Science.gov

Sample records for supernovae x-ray binaries

  1. The youngest known X-ray binary: Circinus X-1 and its natal supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, S.; Sell, P.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Brandt, W. N.; Calvelo-Santos, D. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Nowak, M. A.; Schulz, N. S.; Wijnands, R.; Van der Klis, M.

    2013-12-20

    Because supernova remnants are short-lived, studies of neutron star X-ray binaries within supernova remnants probe the earliest stages in the life of accreting neutron stars. However, such objects are exceedingly rare: none were known to exist in our Galaxy. We report the discovery of the natal supernova remnant of the accreting neutron star Circinus X-1, which places an upper limit of t < 4600 yr on its age, making it the youngest known X-ray binary and a unique tool to study accretion, neutron star evolution, and core-collapse supernovae. This discovery is based on a deep 2009 Chandra X-ray observation and new radio observations of Circinus X-1. Circinus X-1 produces type I X-ray bursts on the surface of the neutron star, indicating that the magnetic field of the neutron star is small. Thus, the young age implies either that neutron stars can be born with low magnetic fields or that they can rapidly become de-magnetized by accretion. Circinus X-1 is a microquasar, creating relativistic jets that were thought to power the arcminute-scale radio nebula surrounding the source. Instead, this nebula can now be attributed to non-thermal synchrotron emission from the forward shock of the supernova remnant. The young age is consistent with the observed rapid orbital evolution and the highly eccentric orbit of the system and offers the chance to test the physics of post-supernova orbital evolution in X-ray binaries in detail for the first time.

  2. DEM L241, A SUPERNOVA REMNANT CONTAINING A HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, F. D.; Charles, P. A.; Foster, D. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Romero, P. S.; Edwards, Z. I.; Perry, M.; Williams, R. M.

    2012-11-10

    A Chandra observation of the Large Magellanic Cloud supernova remnant DEM L241 reveals an interior unresolved source which is probably an accretion-powered binary. The optical counterpart is an O5III(f) star making this a high-mass X-ray binary with an orbital period likely to be of the order of tens of days. Emission from the remnant interior is thermal and spectral information is used to derive density and mass of the hot material. Elongation of the remnant is unusual and possible causes of this are discussed. The precursor star probably had mass >25 M {sub Sun}.

  3. PROBING ELECTRON-CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE: X-RAY BINARIES IN STARBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, T.; Sepinsky, J. F.; Kalogera, V.; Belczynski, K.

    2009-07-10

    We develop population models of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) formed after bursts of star formation and we investigate the effect of electron-capture supernovae (ECS) of massive ONeMg white dwarfs and the hypothesis that ECS events are associated with typically low supernova kicks imparted to the nascent neutron stars. We identify an interesting ECS bump in the time evolution of HMXB numbers; this bump is caused by significantly increased production of wind-fed HMXBs 20-60 Myr post-starburst. The amplitude and age extent of the ECS bump depend on the strength of ECS kicks and the mass range of ECS progenitors. We also find that ECS-HMXBs form through a specific evolutionary channel that is expected to lead to binaries with Be donors in wide orbits. These characteristics, along with their sensitivity to ECS properties, provide us with an intriguing opportunity to probe ECS physics and progenitors through studies of starbursts of different ages. Specifically, the case of the Small Magellanic Cloud, with a significant observed population of Be-HMXBs and starburst activity 30-60 Myr ago, arises as a promising laboratory for understanding the role of ECS in neutron star formation.

  4. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  5. A search for X-ray polarization in cosmic X-ray sources. [binary X-ray sources and supernovae remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J. P.; Long, K. S.; Novick, R.

    1983-01-01

    Fifteen strong X-ray sources were observed by the X-ray polarimeters on board the OSO-8 satellite from 1975 to 1978. The final results of this search for X-ray polarization in cosmic sources are presented in the form of upper limits for the ten sources which are discussed elsewhere. These limits in all cases are consistent with a thermal origin for the X-ray emission.

  6. Discovery of a Be/X-ray pulsar binary and associated supernova remnant in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault-Brunet, V.; Oskinova, L. M.; Guerrero, M. A.; Sun, W.; Chu, Y.-H.; Evans, C. J.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Gruendl, R. A.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a new Be/X-ray pulsar binary located in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The strong pulsed X-ray source was discovered with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. The X-ray pulse period of 1062 s is consistently determined from both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, revealing one of the slowest rotating X-ray pulsars known in the SMC. The optical counterpart of the X-ray source is the emission-line star 2dFS 3831. Its B0-0.5(III)e+ spectral type is determined from VLT-FLAMES and 2dF optical spectroscopy, establishing the system as a Be/X-ray binary (Be-XRB). The hard X-ray spectrum is well fitted by a power law with additional thermal and blackbody components, the latter reminiscent of persistent Be-XRBs. This system is the first evidence of a recent supernova in the low-density surroundings of NGC 602. We detect a shell nebula around 2dFS 3831 in Hα and [O III] images and conclude that it is most likely a supernova remnant. If it is linked to the supernova explosion that created this new X-ray pulsar, its kinematic age of (2-4) × 104 yr provides a constraint on the age of the pulsar.

  7. X-ray reprocessing in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2016-07-01

    We will discuss several aspects of X-ray reprocessing into X-rays or longer wavelength radiation in different kinds of binary systems. In high mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing of hard X-rays into emission lines or lower temperature black body emission is a useful tool to investigate the reprocessing media like the stellar wind, clumpy structures in the wind, accretion disk or accretion stream. In low mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing from the surface of the companion star, the accretion disk, warps and other structures in the accretion disk produce signatures in longer wavelength radiation. X-ray sources with temporal structures like the X-ray pulsars and thermonuclear burst sources are key in such studies. We will discuss results from several new investigations of X-ray reprocessing phenomena in X-ray binaries.

  8. Longterm lightcurves of X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, William

    The X-ray Binaries (XRB) consist of a compact object and a stellar companion, which undergoes large-scale mass-loss to the compact object by virtue of the tight ( P orb usually hours-days) orbit, producing an accretion disk surrounding the compact object. The liberation of gravitational potential energy powers exotic high-energy phenomena, indeed the resulting accretion/ outflow process is among the most efficient energy-conversion machines in the universe. The Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) and RXTE All Sky Monitor (ASM) have provided remarkable X-ray lightcurves above 1.3keV for the entire sky, at near-continuous coverage, for intervals of 9 and 7 years respectively (with ~3 years' overlap). With an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to previous survey instruments, these instruments have provided new insight into the high-energy behaviour of XRBs on timescales of tens to thousands of binary orbits. This thesis describes detailed examination of the long-term X-ray lightcurves of the neutron star XRB X2127+119, SMC X-1, Her X- 1, LMC X-4, Cyg X-2 and the as yet unclassified Circinus X-1, and for Cir X-1, complementary observations in the IR band. Chapters 1 & 2 introduce X-ray Binaries in general and longterm periodicities in particular. Chapter 3 introduces the longterm datasets around which this work is based, and the chosen methods of analysis of these datasets. Chapter 4 examines the burst history of the XRB X2127+119, suggesting three possible interpretations of the apparently contradictory X-ray emission from this system, including a possible confusion of two spatially distinct sources (which was later vindicated by high-resolution imaging). Chapters 5 and 6 describe the characterisation of accretion disk warping, providing observational verification of the prevailing theoretical framework for such disk-warps. Chapters 7 & 8 examine the enigmatic XRB Circinus X-1 with high-resolution IR spectroscopy (chapter 7) and the RXTE

  9. High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sachindra

    2016-07-01

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) are interesting objects that provide a wide range of observational probes to the nature of the two stellar components, accretion process, stellar wind and orbital parameters of the systems. Most of the transient HMXBs are found to Be/X-ray binaries (~67%), consisting of a compact object (neutron star) in orbit around the companion Be star. The orbit of the compact object around the Be star is wide and highly eccentric. Be/X-ray binaries are generally quiescent in X-ray emission. The transient X-ray outbursts seen in these objects are known to be due to interaction between the compact object and the circumstellar disk surrounding the Be star. In the recent years, another class of transient HMXBs have been found which have supergiant companions and show shorter X-ray outbursts. X-ray, infrared and optical observations of these HMXBs provide vital information regarding these systems. The timing and broad-band X-ray spectral properties of a few HMXB pulsars, mainly Be/X-ray binary pulsars during regular X-ray outbursts will be discussed.

  10. X-ray imaging - Supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to imaging observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) obtained during the first year of the Einstein Observatory's operation. Inferences are drawn regarding models for stellar explosions, remnant evolution, neutron star formation and the interstellar medium. Because the X-ray emission traces the expanding shock boundary and dominates the radiative energy losses of an SNR over much of its lifetime, it can provide data on the possible collapsed remnants of the explosion, such as neutron stars and/or black holes. X-ray emission also allows a supernova shock to be used as a probe of interstellar medium structure. The imaging instrument aboard the Einstein satellite has been used to observe over 30 known Galactic remnants, and a similar number of objects in other galaxies, in the 0.15-4.5 keV band.

  11. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  12. X-ray binaries in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray and optical studies of compact binaries and globular clusters are reviewed. Topics covered include, the formation of compact binaries by three-body interactions and by tidal capture, studies of the 11 minute binary in NGC 6624 and the 8.5 hour binary in M 15 (AC211), and an evolutionary model for compact binary formation. Optical searches for X-ray binaries in globular clusters are examined including CCD surveys and studies of NGC 6712. In addition, globular clusters with central cusps in their surface brightness profiles, questions concerning the blue color of binaries, diffuse line emission from CVs, and the possibility that X-ray burst sources in the galactic bulge were formed by tidal capture in globular clusters which have since been disrupted are discussed.

  13. Polarisation modulation in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Adam; Maccarone, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    X-ray polarimetry promises to provide a powerful new lever arm for studying accretion onto black holes with the next generation of X-ray telescopes. I will discuss how polarisation can be used to help constrain the physical origin of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the X-ray light curves of accreting black holes. QPOs may be signatures of the frame dragging effect: in General Relativity, a spinning black hole twists up the surrounding space-time, causing vertical precession of nearby orbits. In the truncated disc / precessing inner flow model, the entire inner accretion flow precesses as a solid body causing a modulation in the X-ray flux through solid angle and Doppler effects. This model also predicts the observed polarisation of the X-ray signal to vary quasi-periodically. I will summarise our work to model the polarisation signal from a precessing accretion flow, starting with simple assumptions about the emission mechanism but taking General Relativity fully into account. We find that it should be possible to measure the predicted modulation in polarisation degree for a reasonable region of parameter space with a polarimeter capable of detecting ~60 counts per second from a bright black hole binary. I will also show that sensitivity can be greatly improved by correlating the signal with a high count rate reference band signal.

  14. Investigating the X-ray Emission from some of the Oldest Known X-ray Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, Vikram; Holmes, Danika

    2016-04-01

    The core-collapse of a massive star results in a supernova (SN) explosion, and a shock wave that expands outwards. The evolution of the shock wave, and the radius and morphology of the resulting remnant, depends on the density structure of the SN ejecta and surrounding medium. As the SN evolves, it sweeps up more material. The shock velocity, and therefore post-shock temperature (proportional to the square of the shock velocity), will consequently decrease. Thus we would expect a gradual evolution in the X-ray properties of the SN. While theoretical models anticipate this, very few SNe have observations over several decades that allow us to probe the time evolution of the X-ray emission and SN shocks.We have compiled a database of most observed X-ray SNe. In this talk we will summarize the X-ray data on some of the oldest detected X-ray SNe. These observations bridge the gap between old SNe and young supernova remnants, and shed light on the transition of a supernova to a remnant. We will show lightcurves for those which have multiple detections, outline the variation in their X-ray luminosity with time, compare their X-ray emission to that of younger supernovae, and discuss the evolution of the shock parameters as the supernova continues on its journey towards becoming a remnant.

  15. Spectral Analysis of X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridriksson, Joel K.

    2011-09-01

    In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), with a particular source, XTE J1701-462, playing a central role. First, I construct and study color-color and hardness-intensity diagrams (CDs and HIDs) for a large sample of NS-LMXBs using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data spanning ~15 years. I study in particular detail three sources whose complicated CDs/HIDs are strongly affected by secular motion -- Cyg X-2, Cir X-1, and GX 13+1 -- and show that Cyg X-2 and Cir X-1 display CD/HID evolution with strong similarities to the transient Z source XTE J1701-462, which was previously shown to have evolved through all subclasses of NS-LMXBs as a result of changes in mass accretion rate. I build on the results for XTE J1701-462, Cyg X-2, and Cir X-1 and rank all the sources in the sample based only on their CD/HID morphology. I speculate that this represents a rough ranking in terms of the relative ranges in mass accretion rate experienced by the sources. Next, I use data from RXTE, Swift, Chandra, and XMM-Newton to study the transition to quiescence and the first ~1200 days of the quiescent phase of XTE J1701-462 following the end of its extraordinarily luminous 19 month outburst in 2006-2007. I find that the crust of the neutron star cooled rapidly during the first ~200 days of quiescence, after having been heated out of thermal equilibrium with the core during the outburst; the source has subsequently shown slower cooling along with sporadic low-level accretion activity. I discuss the implications of the observed cooling behavior and low-level accretion, the former of which yields information on the internal properties of the neutron star. Finally, I use multiple Chandra observations to study the X-ray source populations in the late-type galaxies NGC 6946 and NGC 4485/4490. A particular

  16. The attenuation of X-rays emitted by supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schocken, K.

    1973-01-01

    The attenuation of X-rays in Arnett's C-12 detonation supernova model is computed. The attenuation of X-rays in the filaments of the Crab Nebula is computed using a model for the filaments by Woltjer and a model by Davidson and Tucker. An empirical expression by Gorenstein, Kellogg, and Gursky for the optical thickness of the interstellar medium for three supernova remnants is analyzed.

  17. GSFC Contributions to the NATO X-ray Astronomy Institute, Erice, July 1979. [X-ray spectra of supernova remants, galactic X-ray sources, active galactic nuclei, and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of X-ray astronomical spectroscopy in general is presented and results obtained by HEAO 1 and 2 as well as earlier spacecraft are examined. Particular emphasis is given to the spectra of supernova remnants; galactic binary X-ray sources, cataclysmic variables, bulges, pulsars, and stars; the active nuclei of Seyfert 1 galaxy, BL Lac, and quasars; the diffuse X-ray background; and galactic clusters.

  18. Polarization from Scattering in X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, T.

    2009-01-01

    A paradox of X-ray binaries is that their strong X-ray flux ionizes much nearby low density gas, making it difficult to observe. Polarization can reveal gas which is fully ionized and can provide new insight into X-ray binary environments. In this talk I will present models for the scattering and polarization in X-ray binaries, adopting gas parameters which are chosen according to current ideas about these systems. These include stellar winds from a massive companion, X-ray induced disk winds, and the photospheres of a disk or binary companion.

  19. TYPING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS USING X-RAY LINE EMISSION MORPHOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, L. A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Badenes, C.; Huppenkothen, D.; Jeltema, T. E.

    2009-11-20

    We present a new observational method to type the explosions of young supernova remnants (SNRs). By measuring the morphology of the Chandra X-ray line emission in 17 Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs with a multipole expansion analysis (using power ratios), we find that the core-collapse SNRs are statistically more asymmetric than the Type Ia SNRs. We show that the two classes of supernovae can be separated naturally using this technique because X-ray line morphologies reflect the distinct explosion mechanisms and structure of the circumstellar material. These findings are consistent with recent spectropolarimetry results showing that core-collapse supernovae explosions are intrinsically more asymmetric.

  20. Chandra Observations of New X-ray Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, David

    2012-09-01

    We propose to continue our X-ray studies of all types of supernovae (SNe). The Swift satellite has ushered in a new era of studying SNe in the X-rays, obtaining densely sampled observations for nearby SNe, both core collapse and thermonuclear (although no Type Ia has been conclusively detected in X-rays). However, the Swift XRT spatial resolution is often not good enough to definitively associate X-ray emission in the direction of the SN with the SN itself. We propose short Chandra observations to alleviate this. These observations will assess the X-ray environment of newly discovered X-ray SNe to determine any possible source confusion or contamination of the SN flux. Our strategy makes the best use of the capabilities of each observatory.

  1. Swift X-Ray Telescope Observations of Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kae Batara Olaes, Melanie; Quimby, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe) are a part of an emerging class of exceptionally bright supernovae with peak luminosities 10 times brighter than typical Type Ia supernovae. Similar to supernovae, SLSNe are divided into two subclasses: hydrogen poor SLSN-I and hydrogen rich SLSN-II. However, the luminosity of these events is far too high to be explained by the models for normal supernovae. New models developed to explain SLSNe predict high luminosity X-ray emission at late times. A consistent analysis of incoming SLSNe is essential in order to place constraints on the mechanisms behind these events. Here we present the results of X-ray analysis on SLSNe using a Bayesian method of statistical inference for low count rate events.

  2. EVOLUTION OF SYNCHROTRON X-RAYS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ryoko; Bamba, Aya; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ishida, Manabu; Kohri, Kazunori

    2012-02-20

    A systematic study of the synchrotron X-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) has been conducted. We selected a total of 12 SNRs whose synchrotron X-ray spectral parameters are available in the literature with reasonable accuracy and studied how their luminosities change as a function of radius. It is found that the synchrotron X-ray luminosity tends to drop especially when the SNRs become larger than {approx}5 pc, despite large scatter. This may be explained by the change of spectral shape caused by the decrease of the synchrotron roll-off energy. A simple evolutionary model of the X-ray luminosity is proposed and is found to reproduce the observed data approximately, with reasonable model parameters. According to the model, the total energy of accelerated electrons is estimated to be 10{sup 47-48} erg, which is well below the supernova explosion energy. The maximum energies of accelerated electrons and protons are also discussed.

  3. Collective Properties of Neutron-star X-Ray Binary Populations of Galaxies. II. Pre-low-mass X-Ray Binary Properties, Formation Rates, and Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadkamkar, H.; Ghosh, P.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our exploration of the collective properties of neutron-star X-ray binaries in the stellar fields (i.e., outside globular clusters) of normal galaxies. In Paper I of this series, we considered high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In this paper (Paper II), we consider low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whose evolutionary scenario is very different from that of HMXBs. We consider the evolution of primordial binaries up to the stage where the neutron star just formed in the supernova explosion of the primary is in a binary with its low-mass, unevolved companion, and this binary has circularized tidally, producing what we call a pre-low-mass X-ray binary (pre-LMXB). We study the constraints on the formation of such pre-LMXBs in detail (since these are low-probability events), and calculate their collective properties and formation rates. To this end, we first consider the changes in the binary parameters in the various steps involved, viz., the common-envelope phase, the supernova, and the tidal evolution. This naturally leads to a clarification of the constraints. We then describe our calculation of the evolution of the distributions of primordial binary parameters into those of pre-LMXB parameters, following the standard evolutionary scenario for individual binaries. We display the latter as both bivariate and monovariate distributions, discuss their essential properties, and indicate the influences of some essential factors on these. Finally, we calculate the formation rate of these pre-LMXBs. The results of this paper will be used in a subsequent one to compute the expected X-ray luminosity function of LMXBs.

  4. Be/X-ray Binary Science for Future X-ray Timing Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    For future missions, the Be/X-ray binary community needs to clearly define our science priorities for the future to advocate for their inclusion in future missions. In this talk, I will describe current designs for two potential future missions and Be X-ray binary science enabled by these designs. The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT) is an X-ray timing mission selected in February 2011 for the assessment phase from the 2010 ESA M3 call for proposals. The Advanced X-ray Timing ARray (AXTAR) is a NASA explorer concept X-ray timing mission. This talk is intended to initiate discussions of our science priorities for the future.

  5. The superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars in high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-01

    There exists a special class of X-ray pulsars that exhibit very slow pulsation of P spin > 1000 s in the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). We have studied the temporal and spectral properties of these superslow pulsation neutron star binaries in hard X-ray bands with INTEGRAL observations. Long-term monitoring observations find spin period evolution of two sources: spin-down trend for 4U 2206+54 (P spin ~ 5560 s with Ṗ spin ~ 4.9 × 10-7 s s-1) and long-term spin-up trend for 2S 0114+65 (P spin ~ 9600 s with Ṗ spin ~ -1 × 10-6 s s-1) in the last 20 years. A Be X-ray transient, SXP 1062 (P spin ~ 1062 s), also showed a fast spin-down rate of Ṗ spin ~ 3 × 10-6 s s-1 during an outburst. These superslow pulsation neutron stars cannot be produced in the standard X-ray binary evolution model unless the neutron star has a much stronger surface magnetic field (B > 1014 G). The physical origin of the superslow spin period is still unclear. The possible origin and evolution channels of the superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars are discussed. Superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars could be younger X-ray binary systems, still in the fast evolution phase preceding the final equilibrium state. Alternatively, they could be a new class of neutron star system - accreting magnetars.

  6. Young Supernova explosions in the X-rays and hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margutti, Raffaella

    2016-04-01

    X-ray observations are providing critical insights into Supernova explosions and the nature of their progenitors. In this talk I will highlight some recent results from our dedicated programs at high-energies that allowed us to (1) uncover the weakest engine-driven SNe and understand their link to Gamma-Ray Bursts; (2) monitor the high-energy emission from shock energy deposition into the stellar envelope as early as a few days after the onset of core-collapse; (3) put the most stringent constraints to the progenitors of Type Ia SNe by using the deepest X-ray observations ever obtained. (4) Reveal the ejection of a massive stellar envelope timed with the collapse of a stripped star. These observations represent the first solid detection of a young extragalactic stripped-envelope SN out to high-energy X-rays of ˜40 keV

  7. Correlated X-ray and optical variability in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, K.; Horne, K.

    In X-ray binaries much of the optical/UV emission arises from X-rays reprocessed by material in the accretion disk, stream and the companion star. The resulting optical variability will be delayed in time with respect to the X-ray variability depending on the position of the reprocessing regions in the binary system. By deconvolving the X-ray and optical variability we can determine a range of time-delays present in the system. This time-delay transfer function can be used to echo-map the geometry of the reprocessing regions in the binary system. We present results from our echo-mapping campaign using X-ray lightcurves from RXTE, simultaneous with high time resolution optical and UV observations. In the SXT, GRO J1655-40, using RXTE and HST shortly after the 1996 outburst, we find evidence for reprocessing in the outer regions of a thick accretion disk. In the Z-source Cygnus X-2, using RXTE and Keck II, we find an anti-correlation of the X-ray and optical variability on the timescale of hours, with superimposed correlated X-ray and optical flaring.

  8. Recurring X-ray outbursts in the supernova impostor SN 2010da in NGC 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, B.; Williams, B. F.; Kong, A. K. H.; Gaetz, T. J.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Skillman, E. D.; Dolphin, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present new observations of the `supernova impostor' SN 2010da using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope. During the initial 2010 outburst, the 0.3-10 keV luminosity was observed by Swift to be ˜5 × 1038 erg s-1 and faded by a factor of ˜25 in a four month period. Our two new Chandra observations show a factor of ˜10 increase in the 0.35-8 keV X-ray luminosity, from ˜4 × 1036 to 4 × 1037 erg s-1 in ˜6 months, and the X-ray spectrum is consistent in both observations with a power-law with a photon index of Γ ˜ 0. We find evidence of X-ray spectral state changes: when SN 2010da is in a high-luminosity state, the X-ray spectrum is harder (Γ ˜0) compared to the low-luminosity state (Γ ˜ 1.2 ± 0.8). Using our Hubble observations, we fit the colour-magnitude diagram of the coeval stellar population to estimate a time since formation of the SN 2010da progenitor system of ≲5 Myr. Our observations are consistent with SN 2010da being a high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) composed of a neutron star and a luminous blue variable-like companion, although we cannot rule out the possibility that SN 2010da is an unusually X-ray bright massive star. The ≲5 Myr age is consistent with the theoretically predicted delay time between the formation of a massive binary and the onset of the HMXB phase. It is possible that the initial 2010 outburst marked the beginning of X-ray production in the system, making SN 2010da possibly the first massive progenitor binary ever observed to evolve into an HMXB.

  9. Gamma-Ray Emission from X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R.

    2007-01-01

    We summarize the current observational picture regarding high-energy emission from Galactic X-ray binaries, reviewing the results of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory mission. We speculate on the prospects for the GLAST era.

  10. The X-ray surface brightness of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. L.; Long, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The first X-ray images of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN Ophiuchi 1604) are presented, and consequences for SNR models are discussed. Observations made with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter and High Resolution Imager show the remnant to be circular, with a strong shell brighter in the north than in the south. A flux of 1.2 x 10 to the -10th ergs/sq cm per sec was measured in the 0.15-4.5 keV region, which corresponds to an X-ray luminosity of 1.0 x 10 to the 36th ergs/sec at a distance of 5 kpc and an interstellar medium density of 2.8 x 10 to the 21st/sq cm. The X-ray observations do not allow the determination of whether the SNR is in the adiabatic or free expansion phase, but in either case it is shown that the mean ISM density must be greater than about 0.1/cu cm. In addition, the density of the X-ray emitting gas must be high, and its electron temperature must be fairly low. The high ISM densities derived for Kepler's SNR and other SNRs thus suggest an atypical ISM, possibly influenced by mass lost from the pre-supernova star.

  11. X-ray Evidence Supports Possible New Class Of Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    Evidence for a significant new class of supernova has been found with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton. These results strengthen the case for a population of stars that evolve rapidly and are destroyed by thermonuclear explosions. Such "prompt" supernovas could be valuable tools for probing the early history of the cosmos. A team of astronomers uncovered a puzzling situation when they examined X-ray data from DEM L238 and DEM L249, the remnants of two supernovas in a nearby galaxy. On the one hand, the unusually high concentration of iron atoms implied that the remnants are the products of thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars, a well-known type of supernova known as Type Ia. On the other hand, the hot gas in the remnants was much denser and brighter in X-rays than typical Type Ia remnants. A white dwarf, the dense final stage in the evolution of a sun-like star, is a very stable object and will not explode on its own. However, if a white dwarf has a close companion star it can grow beyond a critical mass by pulling gas off the companion and explode. Chandra X-ray and MCELS Optical Image of DEM L238 and DEM L249 Chandra X-ray and MCELS Optical Image of DEM L238 and DEM L249 Computer simulations of Type Ia supernova remnants showed that the most likely explanation for the X-ray data is that the white dwarfs exploded into very dense environments. This suggests that the stars which evolved into these white dwarfs were more massive than usual, because heavier stars are known to expel more gas into their surroundings. "We know that the more massive a star is, the shorter its lifetime," said Kazimierz Borkowski of North Carolina State University, Raleigh. "If such a star could also begin to pull matter from its companion at an early stage, then this star would have a much shorter fuse and explode in only about 100 million years -- much less than other Type Ia supernovas." Other teams have independently found evidence for

  12. The X-Ray Spectral Evolution of Galactic Black Hole X-Ray Binaries toward Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Richard. M.; Gallo, Elena; Jonker, Peter G.

    2013-08-01

    Most transient black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) spend the bulk of their time in a quiescent state, where they accrete matter from their companion star at highly sub-Eddington luminosities (we define quiescence here as a normalized Eddington ratio lx = L 0.5-10 keV/L Edd < 10-5). Here, we present Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy for three BHXB systems (H 1743-322, MAXI J1659-152, and XTE J1752-223) as they fade into quiescence following an outburst. Multiple X-ray observations were taken within one month of each other, allowing us to track each individual system's X-ray spectral evolution during its decay. We compare these three systems to other BHXB systems. We confirm that quiescent BHXBs have softer X-ray spectra than low-hard-state BHXBs, and that quiescent BHXB spectral properties show no dependence on the binary system's orbital parameters. However, the observed anti-correlation between X-ray photon index (Γ) and lx in the low-hard state does not continue once a BHXB enters quiescence. Instead, Γ plateaus to an average langΓrang = 2.08 ± 0.07 by the time lx reaches ~10-5. lx ~ 10-5 is thus an observationally motivated upper limit for the beginning of the quiescent spectral state. Our results are discussed in the context of different accretion flow models and across the black hole mass scale.

  13. Superluminous X-Rays from a Superluminous Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Read, A. M.; Metzger, B. D.; Wheatley, P. J.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2013-07-01

    The discovery of a population of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), with peak luminosities a factor of ~100 brighter than normal supernovae (SNe; typically SLSNe have MV < -21), has shown an unexpected diversity in core-collapse SN properties. Numerous models have been postulated for the nature of these events, including a strong interaction of the shockwave with a dense circumstellar environment, a re-energizing of the outflow via a central engine, or an origin in the catastrophic destruction of the star following a loss of pressure due to pair production in an extremely massive stellar core (so-called pair instability SNe). Here we consider constraints that can be placed on the explosion mechanism of hydrogen-poor SLSNe (SLSNe-I) via X-ray observations, with XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift, and show that at least one SLSN-I is likely the brightest X-ray SN ever observed, with LX ~ 1045 erg s-1, ~150 days after its initial discovery. This is a luminosity three orders of magnitude higher than seen in other X-ray SNe powered via circumstellar interactions. Such high X-ray luminosities are sufficient to ionize the ejecta and markedly reduce the optical depth, making it possible to see deep into the ejecta and any source of emission that resides there. Alternatively, an engine could have powered a moderately relativistic jet external to the ejecta, similar to those seen in gamma-ray bursts. If the detection of X-rays does require an engine it implies that these SNe do create compact objects, and that the stars are not completely destroyed in a pair instability event. Future observations will determine which, if any, of these mechanisms are at play in SLSNe.

  14. INVERSE COMPTON X-RAY EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVAE WITH COMPACT PROGENITORS: APPLICATION TO SN2011fe

    SciTech Connect

    Margutti, R.; Soderberg, A. M.; Chomiuk, L.; Milisavljevic, D.; Foley, R. J.; Slane, P.; Moe, M.; Chevalier, R.; Hurley, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Fransson, C.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E. [INAF and others

    2012-06-01

    We present a generalized analytic formalism for the inverse Compton X-ray emission from hydrogen-poor supernovae and apply this framework to SN 2011fe using Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT), UVOT, and Chandra observations. We characterize the optical properties of SN 2011fe in the Swift bands and find them to be broadly consistent with a 'normal' SN Ia, however, no X-ray source is detected by either XRT or Chandra. We constrain the progenitor system mass-loss rate M-dot < 2 x 10{sup -9} M{sub Sun }yr{sup -1} (3{sigma} c.l.) for wind velocity v{sub w} = 100 km s{sup -1}. Our result rules out symbiotic binary progenitors for SN 2011fe and argues against Roche lobe overflowing subgiants and main-sequence secondary stars if {approx}> 1% of the transferred mass is lost at the Lagrangian points. Regardless of the density profile, the X-ray non-detections are suggestive of a clean environment (n{sub CSM} < 150 cm{sup -3}) for 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} {approx}< R {approx}< 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm around the progenitor site. This is either consistent with the bulk of material being confined within the binary system or with a significant delay between mass loss and supernova explosion. We furthermore combine X-ray and radio limits from Chomiuk et al. to constrain the post-shock energy density in magnetic fields. Finally, we searched for the shock breakout pulse using gamma-ray observations from the Interplanetary Network and find no compelling evidence for a supernova-associated burst. Based on the compact radius of the progenitor star we estimate that the shock breakout pulse was likely not detectable by current satellites.

  15. X-ray Evidence Supports Possible New Class Of Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    Evidence for a significant new class of supernova has been found with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton. These results strengthen the case for a population of stars that evolve rapidly and are destroyed by thermonuclear explosions. Such "prompt" supernovas could be valuable tools for probing the early history of the cosmos. A team of astronomers uncovered a puzzling situation when they examined X-ray data from DEM L238 and DEM L249, the remnants of two supernovas in a nearby galaxy. On the one hand, the unusually high concentration of iron atoms implied that the remnants are the products of thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars, a well-known type of supernova known as Type Ia. On the other hand, the hot gas in the remnants was much denser and brighter in X-rays than typical Type Ia remnants. A white dwarf, the dense final stage in the evolution of a sun-like star, is a very stable object and will not explode on its own. However, if a white dwarf has a close companion star it can grow beyond a critical mass by pulling gas off the companion and explode. Chandra X-ray and MCELS Optical Image of DEM L238 and DEM L249 Chandra X-ray and MCELS Optical Image of DEM L238 and DEM L249 Computer simulations of Type Ia supernova remnants showed that the most likely explanation for the X-ray data is that the white dwarfs exploded into very dense environments. This suggests that the stars which evolved into these white dwarfs were more massive than usual, because heavier stars are known to expel more gas into their surroundings. "We know that the more massive a star is, the shorter its lifetime," said Kazimierz Borkowski of North Carolina State University, Raleigh. "If such a star could also begin to pull matter from its companion at an early stage, then this star would have a much shorter fuse and explode in only about 100 million years -- much less than other Type Ia supernovas." Other teams have independently found evidence for

  16. Colliding Wind Binary X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Pollock, A. M. T.; Pittard, J. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Henley, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Marchenko, S.

    Very massive stars (≳ 20 M⊙) are rare but important components of galaxies. Products of core nucleosynthesis from these stars are distributed into the circumstellar environment via wind-driven mass loss. Explosive nucleosynthesis after core collapse further enriches the galactic medium. Clusters of such stars can produce galactic chimneys which can pierce the galactic disk and chemically enrich intergalactic space. Such processes are vitally important to the chemical evolution of the early Universe, when the stellar mass function was much more weighted to massive stars.Very massive stars are difficult to study, since they are formed in distant clusters which yield problems of sensitivity and source crowding. A relatively new tool for studying these systems is via high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution observations in the X-ray band. In this note we describe some recent progress in studying mechanisms by which very massive stars produce X-ray emission.

  17. The missing Wolf-Rayet X-ray binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, M.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Hill, G. M.; Richardson, N. D.; Pablo, H.

    We investigate the rarity of the Wolf-Rayet X-ray binaries (WRXRBs) in contrast to their predecessors, the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXRBs). Recent studies suggest that common envelope (CE) mergers during the evolution of a HMXRBs may be responsible (Linden et al. 2012). We conduct a binary population synthesis to generate a population of HMXRBs mimicking the Galactic sample and vary the efficiency parameter during the CE phase to match the current WRXRB to HMXRB ratio. We find that ˜50% of systems must merge to match observational constraints.

  18. Accretion Disk Dynamics in X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Ji, Li; Nowak, M.; Canizares, C. R.; Kallman, T.

    2009-09-01

    The last decade of X-ray observations was an era of true discovery in the study of accretion phenomena in X-ray binaries. With the launch of high resolution X-ray spectrometers on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM Newton we gained novel insights in feedback processes in accretion disks. At the forefront are dynamics in winds and outflows. Recent observations now also not only reveal properties of accretion disk coronal phenomena but point us to highly variable activity in their appearance. Amongst others these include heating along the spectral branches in the Z-source Cyg X-2, short and longterm variations in the photo-ionized emissions in Cir X-1, highly variable and dynamic Ne edges in the ultra-compact binary 4U 0614+091. This presentation summarizes these recent developments and provides an outlook towards more dynamical accretion disk coronal models and perspectives for future missions.

  19. X-ray binaries and black hole candidates: a review of optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Jorge

    This chapter summarizes the optical properties of X-ray binaries, with special emphasis on the class of low mass X-ray binaries and soft X-ray transients. The latter provide the most compelling evidence for the existence of black holes in the Universe, with nine well-established dynamical studies. We review the techniques employed to extract the component masses and discuss the importance of systematic effects. Despite the growing number of black hole cases, the uncertainties involved are still too large to draw statistical conclusions on the mass distribution of collapsed objects. We also present new observational techniques which may help to improve the mass determinations and set constraints on the theory of supernovae and black hole formation.

  20. Observations and Models of X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubus, Guillaume

    1998-06-01

    This PhD thesis presents X-ray observations of the nearby galaxy M33 and an X-ray irradiated accretion disk model. X-ray observations of nearby galaxies allow direct access to the underlying high energy populations, amongst which are X-ray binaries where a compact object (black hole, neutron star) accretes matter from its normal star companion. I present a catalogue and a variability analysis of the sources in M33 detected by the X-ray satellite ROSAT. I discuss X-7 which is shown to be an X-ray binary pulsar. Some 70% of the X-ray flux from M33 comes from the nucleus source X-8. I show that the luminosity from this object is modulated on a 106 day period. Additional observations obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope show a bright stellar-like UV source in the center of the nucleus. These observations significantly constrain models of the bright (Lx~1e39 ergs/s) nucleus source which we believe to be a 10 solar mass black hole X-ray binary. Illumination of the accretion disk surrounding the compact object plays a crucial role in such a system. An accretion disk is thermally and viscously unstable around the hydrogen ionisation temperature. This instability is thought to power the outbursts of dwarf novae and soft X-ray transients. I present a numerical code that can follow the evolution of the instability in a disk with high precision. This model is modified to account for illumination. Contrary to observations of low mass X-ray binaries, illumination by a point source does not modify the properties of a planar disk. However, if the illumination source is not in the disk plane, as is the case for instance if the disk is warped or if the source is above the disk, illumination can stabilise the disk. It is concluded that the physical processes and the geometry of illumination in low mass X-ray binaries is still ill-understood.

  1. Evaporative winds in X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basko, M. M.; Suniaev, R. A.; Hatchett, S.; Mccray, R.

    1977-01-01

    Evaporation of gas from the surface of HZ Her by Her X-1 and its implications regarding the mass transfer process are examined further. The powerful soft X-ray flux results in an evaporation rate greater than previous estimates. The evaporative flow is shown to be subsonic at first, with the result that the capture of evaporated gas by Her X-1 may be efficient, and the self-excited wind mechanism is possible. A criterion for stabilization of mass transfer by stellar wind mass loss is derived. Possible mechanisms for the long-period variability of HZ Her are discussed. Evaporative winds are also estimated for Sco X-1 and Cyg X-2 spectra.

  2. THE X-RAY SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF GALACTIC BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES TOWARD QUIESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Gallo, Elena; Jonker, Peter G.

    2013-08-10

    Most transient black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) spend the bulk of their time in a quiescent state, where they accrete matter from their companion star at highly sub-Eddington luminosities (we define quiescence here as a normalized Eddington ratio l{sub x} = L{sub 0.5-10{sub keV}}/L{sub Edd} < 10{sup -5}). Here, we present Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy for three BHXB systems (H 1743-322, MAXI J1659-152, and XTE J1752-223) as they fade into quiescence following an outburst. Multiple X-ray observations were taken within one month of each other, allowing us to track each individual system's X-ray spectral evolution during its decay. We compare these three systems to other BHXB systems. We confirm that quiescent BHXBs have softer X-ray spectra than low-hard-state BHXBs, and that quiescent BHXB spectral properties show no dependence on the binary system's orbital parameters. However, the observed anti-correlation between X-ray photon index ({Gamma}) and l{sub x} in the low-hard state does not continue once a BHXB enters quiescence. Instead, {Gamma} plateaus to an average ({Gamma}) = 2.08 {+-} 0.07 by the time l{sub x} reaches {approx}10{sup -5}. l{sub x} {approx} 10{sup -5} is thus an observationally motivated upper limit for the beginning of the quiescent spectral state. Our results are discussed in the context of different accretion flow models and across the black hole mass scale.

  3. X-ray spectroscopy of low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juett, Adrienne Marie

    2004-10-01

    I present high-resolution X-ray grating spectroscopy of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) using instruments onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton). The first part of this thesis concentrates on results from the subset of LMXBs with orbital periods less than an hour, known as ultracompact binaries. Previous low- resolution X-ray spectra of four systems (4U 0614+091, 2S 0918-549, 4U 1543-624, and 4U 1850-087) all contain a broad residual near 0.7 keV which had been attributed to unresolved line emission. I show that this residual is due to an incorrect model of the intervening photoelectric absorption and can be accounted for by allowing a non-standard Ne/O abundance ratio in the intervening material. I propose that there is neon-rich material local to each binary and that the mass donor is a low-mass, neon-rich degenerate dwarf in an ultracompact binary. Follow-up spectroscopy of 2S 0918-549 and 4U 1543-624 with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) onboard Chandra and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard XMM confirms the excess neutral neon absorption. Interestingly, the Ne/O ratio of 4U 1543-624 varies by a factor of three between the Chandra and XMM observations, supporting the suggestion that some of the absorption originates local to the binaries. I also present X-ray spectroscopy of another ultracompact binary, the accretion-powered millisecond pulsar XTE J0929-314. No emission or absorption features are found in the high-resolution spectrum of this source, and the neutral absorption edge depths are consistent with the estimated interstellar absorption. The second part of this thesis uses LMXBs as probes of the interstellar medium (ISM). High-resolution X-ray studies of ISM absorption features can provide measurements of the relative abundances and ionization fractions of all the elements from carbon through iron. X-ray studies also probe the ISM on larger scales than is

  4. Echo Tomography of Reprocessing Sites in X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Haswell, Carole

    1998-01-01

    We discovered correlated rapid variability between the optical/UV and X-ray emission for the first time in a soft X-ray transient, GRO J1655-40. Hubble Space Telescope light curves show features similar to those seen by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, but with a mean delay of up to 10 - 20 s. We interpret the correlation as the result of reprocessing of X-rays into optical and UV emission, with a delay owing to finite light travel time; this assumption enables us to perform echo mapping of the system. The time-delay distribution has a mean of 14.6 +/-1.4 s and a dispersion of 10.5+/-1.9 s at binary phase 0.4. This establishes that the reprocessing region is the accretion disk around the compact star, rather than the mass-donating secondary. These results have been published.

  5. Accretion disk dynamics in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peris, Charith Srian

    Accreting X-ray binaries consist of a normal star which orbits a compact object with the former transferring matter onto the later via an accretion disk. These accretion disks emit radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. This thesis exploits two regions of the spectrum, exploring the (1) inner disk regions of an accreting black hole binary, GRS1915+105, using X-ray spectral analysis and (2) the outer accretion disks of a set of neutron star and black hole binaries using Doppler Tomography applied on optical observations. X-ray spectral analysis of black hole binary GRS1915+105: GRS1915+105 stands out as an exceptional black hole primarily due to the wild variability exhibited by about half of its X-ray observations. This study focused on the steady X-ray observations of the source, which were found to exhibit significant curvature in the harder coronal component within the RXTE/PCA band-pass. The roughly constant inner-disk radius seen in a majority of the steady-soft observations is strongly reminiscent of canonical soft state black-hole binaries. Remarkably, the steady-hard observations show the presence of growing truncation in the inner-disk. A majority of the steady observations of GRS1915+105 map to the states observed in canonical black hole binaries which suggests that within the complexity of this source is a simpler underlying basis of states. Optical tomography of X-ray binary systems: Doppler tomography was applied to the strong line features present in the optical spectra of X-ray binaries in order to determine the geometric structure of the systems' emitting regions. The point where the accretion stream hits the disk, also referred to as the "hotspot'', is clearly identified in the neutron star system V691 CrA and the black hole system Nova Muscae 1991. Evidence for stream-disk overflows exist in both systems, consistent with relatively high accretion rates. In contrast, V926 Sco does not show evidence for the presence of a hotspot which

  6. Very faint X-ray binaries with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2016-06-01

    A population of very faint X-ray binaries has been discovered in the last years thanks to the improvement in sensitivity and resolution of the new generations of X-ray missions. These systems show anomalously low luminosities, below 10^{36} ergs/sec, challenging our understanding of accretion physics and binary evolution models, and thereby opening new windows for both observational and theoretical work on accretion onto compact objects. XMM-Newton is playing a crucial role in the study of this dim family of objects thanks to its incomparable spectral capabilities at low luminosities. I will review the state-of-the-art of the field and present our XMM results in both black hole and neutron star objects. Finally, I will discuss the possibilities that the new generation of X-ray telescopes offer for this research line.

  7. Masses and Luminosities of X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas; Frink, Sabine; Tomsick, John

    2004-01-01

    Using SIM, we will perform narrow-angle observations of several X-ray binaries to determine their orbits, and we will observe about 50 X-ray binary systems in wide-angle mode to measure their distances and proper motions. Sources with mass estimates for the compact component of greater than 3 solar masses are generally called black hole candidates since this mass is above the theoretical neutron star limit. Narrow-angle observations of these sources provide a direct test of the dynamical mass estimates on which the black hole evidence is based. Better measurements of the black hole masses will provide constraints on possible evolutionary paths that lead to black hole formation. When combined with X-ray data, mass measurements may provide additional constraints on the black hole spin. Precise mass determinations of neutron star systems can address the question of whether neutron stars can be significantly more massive than 1.4 solar masses, which would eliminate soft models of the neutron star equations of state. The wide-angle observations will probe the Galactic distribution of X-ray binaries through parallaxes and proper motions. They will also eliminate the uncertainties in the luminosities of individual sources, which is currently up to a full order of magnitude. This will enable more detailed comparisons of X-ray observations to physical models such as advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). We intend to carry out the following measurements: 1) Determine the orbits of two black hole candidates to measure the black hole masses; 2) Obtain precise mass measurements for two neutron star systems to constrain neutron star equations of state; 3) Determine the distances and thus luminosities of selected representatives of various classes of X-ray binaries (black hole candidates, neutron stars, jet sources); 4) In the process of distance determination, proper motions will also be measured, from which the age of the population can be estimated.

  8. Progenitor constraints for core-collapse supernovae from Chandra X-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, T.; Tsygankov, S.; Mattila, S.; Eldridge, J. J.; Fraser, M.; Poutanen, J.

    2016-03-01

    The progenitors of hydrogen-poor core-collapse supernovae (SNe) of Types Ib, Ic and IIb are believed to have shed their outer hydrogen envelopes either by extremely strong stellar winds, characteristic of classical Wolf-Rayet stars, or by binary interaction with a close companion star. The exact nature of the progenitors and the relative importance of these processes are still open questions. One relatively unexplored method to constrain the progenitors is to search for high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) at SN locations in pre-explosion X-ray observations. In an HMXB, one star has already exploded as a core-collapse SN, producing a neutron star or a stellar mass black hole. It is likely that the second star in the system will also explode as an SN, which should cause a detectable long-term change in the system's X-ray luminosity. In particular, a pre-explosion detection of an HMXB coincident with an SN could be informative about the progenitor's nature. In this paper, we analyse pre-explosion ACIS observations of 18 nearby Type Ib, Ic and IIb SNe from the Chandra X-ray observatory public archive. Two sources that could potentially be associated with the SN are identified in the sample. Additionally we make similar post-explosion measurements for 46 SNe. Although our modelling indicates that progenitor systems with compact binary companions are probably quite rare, studies of this type can in the future provide more stringent constraints as the number of discovered nearby SNe and suitable pre-explosion X-ray data are both increasing.

  9. GIANT OUTBURSTS IN Be/X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Nixon, Chris; Armitage, Philip J.; Lubow, Stephen H.; Price, Daniel J.

    2014-08-01

    Be/X-ray binary systems exhibit both periodic (Type I) X-ray outbursts and giant (Type II) outbursts, whose origins have remained elusive. We suggest that Type II X-ray outbursts occur when a highly misaligned decretion disk around the Be star becomes eccentric, allowing the compact object companion to capture a large amount of material at periastron. Using three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, we model the long-term evolution of a representative Be/X-ray binary system. We find that periodic (Type I) X-ray outbursts occur when the neutron star is close to periastron for all disk inclinations. Type II outbursts occur for large misalignment angles and are associated with eccentricity growth which occurs on a timescale of about 10 orbital periods. Mass capture from the eccentric decretion disk results in an accretion disk around the neutron star whose estimated viscous time is long enough to explain the extended duration of Type II outbursts. Previous studies suggested that the outbursts are caused by a warped disk but our results suggest that this is not sufficient; the disk must be both highly misaligned and eccentric to initiate a Type II accretion event.

  10. XMM Observations of X-Ray Emission from Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, Stefan; Lewin, Walter

    2003-01-01

    Of the six proposed targets, only one observation was performed. The observation resulted in a 28ks observation of SN 1998S. At the time of writing the proposal, our target list only contained previously unknown X-ray supernovae. Between submission of the proposal and the actual observation, a Chandra DDT observation resulted in the detection of SN 1998S. Since SN 1998S was observed with Chandra five times before the XMM-Newton observation was made, the data did not yield enough new information to warrant a separate SN 1998S publication. The key science results of that observation were presented in a review article (by Immler and Lewin); the results were also presented at two conferences.

  11. X-ray observations of possible binary clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Many studies of superclusters of galaxies have been conducted, taking into account also superclusters representing candidate binary cluster systems. The present investigation is concerned with further studies of potential binary cluster systems, giving attention to a sample of six cluster pairs, in which the redshifts and X-ray luminosities of each member of a pair have been measured. One of the objectives of the investigation was related to a search for X-ray evidence that the clusters interact in these potentially binary systems. A second objective was to provide a measure of the mass of hot gas in the clusters. Two new systems in which the two clusters may have a physical association were found.

  12. The Be X-ray Binary Outburst Zoo II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehnel, M.; Kretschmar, P.; Nespoli, E.; Okazaki, A. T.; Schoenherr, G.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Falkner, S.; Brand, T.; Anders, F.; Schwarm, F.-W.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Mueller, S.; Pottschmidt, K.; Fuerst, F.; Grinberg, V.; Wilms, J.

    2015-03-01

    We have continued our recently started systematic study of Be X-ray binary (BeXRB) outbursts. Specifically, we are developing a catalogue of outbursts including their basic properties based on nearly all available X-ray all-sky-monitors. These properties are derived by fitting asymmetric Gaussians to the outburst lightcurves. This model describes most of the outbursts covered by our preliminary catalogue well; only 13% of all datasets show more complex outburst shapes. Analyzing the basic properties, we reveal a strong correlation between the outburst length and the reached peak flux. As an example, we discuss possible models describing the observed correlation in EXO 2030+375.

  13. X-Ray Line Spectroscopy of Massive X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liedahl, D. A.; Sako, M.; Wojdowski, P. S.; Paerels, F.; Kahn, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    Spectra from ASCA have provided the most, detailed view to date of the X-ray spectral properties of stellar winds in massive X-ray binaries. Using detailed atomic models that account for recombination cascade kinetics, we have reexamined archival data from Vela X-1 and Cen X-3 in the context of simple models of their wind geometries and velocity distributions. Our approach emphasizes apparent differential emission measure (DEM) distributions, and their dependence on orbital phase and wind parameters. A grid of theoretical DEM distributions is used to generate model spectra, which are compared to the data. We obtain good fits, and derive constraints oil the stellar wind parameters. We provide a summary of the method, and show that, even though the companion stars in Vela X-1 and Cen X-3 have comparable mass-loss rates, the winds in these two systems are dramatically different, in character.

  14. High ionisation absorption in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; De, K.; Fender, R.; Merloni, A.

    2016-05-01

    The advent of the new generation of X-ray telescopes yielded a significant step forward in our understanding of ionised absorption generated in the accretion discs of X-ray binaries. It has become evident that these relatively weak and narrow absorption features, sporadically present in the X-ray spectra of some systems, are actually the signature of equatorial outflows, which might carry away more matter than that being accreted. Therefore, they play a major role in the accretion phenomenon. These outflows (or ionised atmospheres) are ubiquitous during the softer states but absent during the power-law dominated, hard states, suggesting a strong link with the state of the inner accretion disc, presence of the radio-jet and the properties of the central source. Here, we discuss the current understanding of this field.

  15. The ASTROSAT mission and study of X-ray binaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Seetha

    2016-07-01

    The ASTROnomy SATellite (ASTROSAT) is the first Indian astronomy mission. The scientific objectives to be addressed using ASTROSAT are To understand high energy processes in binary systems containing neutron stars and black hole sources, estimate magnetic fields of neutron stars, study star birth regions and high energy processes in extragalactic systems, and detect new transient X-ray sources. To achieve this ASTROSAT has a suite of experiments to conduct Multiwavelength studies, covering the energy bands in the UV (NUV and FUV), limited optical, and X-ray regime (0.3 keV to 100keV). This will provide wide spectral coverage to study thermal and non-thermal spectra. High resolution timing capability will also enable study of periodic and aperiodic time variabilities in X-ray sources, including high frequency QPOs. This talk will provide a brief description of the instrument capabilities of ASTROSAT and some initial results.

  16. X-Ray Measured Dynamics of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Hayato, Asami; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We present X-ray proper-motion measurements of the forward shock and reverse-shocked ejecta in Tycho's supernova remnant, based on three sets of archival Chandra data taken in 2000, 2003, and 2007. We find that the proper motion of the edge of the remnant (i.e., the forward shock and protruding ejecta knots) varies from 0.''20 yr-1 (expansion index m = 0.33, where R = tm ) to 0.''40 yr-1 (m = 0.65) with azimuthal angle in 2000-2007 measurements, and 0.''14 yr-1 (m = 0.26) to 0.''40 yr-1 (m = 0.65) in 2003-2007 measurements. The azimuthal variation of the proper motion and the average expansion index of [approx]0.5 are consistent with those derived from radio observations. We also find proper motion and expansion index of the reverse-shocked ejecta to be 0.''21-0.''31 yr-1 and 0.43-0.64, respectively. From a comparison of the measured m-value with Type Ia supernova evolutionary models, we find a pre-shock ambient density around the remnant of [less, similar]0.2 cm-3.

  17. Featured Image: A Supernova Remnant in X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    This is a three-color X-ray image taken by Chandra of the supernova remnant RCW 103. This supernova remnant is an unusual system: its young, but unlike other remnants of its age, metal-rich ejecta hadnt previously been discovered in it. In this paper, Kari Frank (Pennsylvania State University) and collaborators analyze the three deepest Chandra observations of RCW 103 and find the first evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. Their analyses also help to constrain the identity of the mysterious compact stellar object powering the remnant. In this image, red = 0.30.85 keV, green = 0.851.70 keV, and blue = 1.73.0 keV; click on the image for the full view. For more information and the original image, see the paper here:Kari A. Frank et al 2015 ApJ 810 113 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/2/113.

  18. X-RAY EMISSION FROM STRONGLY ASYMMETRIC CIRCUMSTELLAR MATERIAL IN THE REMNANT OF KEPLER'S SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Burkey, Mary T.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.

    2013-02-10

    Kepler's supernova remnant resulted from a thermonuclear explosion, but is interacting with circumstellar material (CSM) lost from the progenitor system. We describe a statistical technique for isolating X-ray emission due to CSM from that due to shocked ejecta. Shocked CSM coincides well in position with 24 {mu}m emission seen by Spitzer. We find most CSM to be distributed along the bright north rim, but substantial concentrations are also found projected against the center of the remnant, roughly along a diameter with position angle {approx}100 Degree-Sign . We interpret this as evidence for a disk distribution of CSM before the supernova, with the line of sight to the observer roughly in the disk plane. We present two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of this scenario in qualitative agreement with the observed CSM morphology. Our observations require Kepler to have originated in a close binary system with an asymptotic giant branch star companion.

  19. Stellar winds in binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, K. B.; Vitello, P. A. J.

    1982-01-01

    It is thought that accretion from a strong stellar wind by a compact object may be responsible for the X-ray emission from binary systems containing a massive early-type primary. To investigate the effect of X-ray heating and ionization on the mass transfer process in systems of this type, an idealized model is constructed for the flow of a radiation-driven wind in the presence of an X-ray source of specified luminosity, L sub x. It is noted that for low values of L sub x, X-ray photoionization gives rise to additional ions having spectral lines with wavelengths situated near the peak of the primary continuum flux distribution. As a consequence, the radiation force acting on the gas increases in relation to its value in the absence of X-rays, and the wind is accelerated to higher velocities. As L sub x is increased, the degree of ionization of the wind increases, and the magnitude of the radiation force is diminished in comparison with the case in which L sub x = 0. This reduction leads at first to a decrease in the wind velocity and ultimately (for L sub x sufficiently large) to the termination of radiatively driven mass loss.

  20. Classifying X-Ray Binaries: A Probabilistic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Giri; Dil Vrtilek, Saeqa; Bornn, Luke

    2015-08-01

    In X-ray binary star systems consisting of a compact object that accretes material from an orbiting secondary star, there is no straightforward means to decide whether the compact object is a black hole or a neutron star. To assist in this process, we develop a Bayesian statistical model that makes use of the fact that X-ray binary systems appear to cluster based on their compact object type when viewed from a three-dimensional coordinate system derived from X-ray spectral data where the first coordinate is the ratio of counts in the mid- to low-energy band (color 1), the second coordinate is the ratio of counts in the high- to low-energy band (color 2), and the third coordinate is the sum of counts in all three bands. We use this model to estimate the probabilities of an X-ray binary system containing a black hole, non-pulsing neutron star, or pulsing neutron star. In particular, we utilize a latent variable model in which the latent variables follow a Gaussian process prior distribution, and hence we are able to induce the spatial correlation which we believe exists between systems of the same type. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by the accurate prediction of system types using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All Sky Monitor data, but it is not flawless. In particular, non-pulsing neutron systems containing “bursters” that are close to the boundary demarcating systems containing black holes tend to be classified as black hole systems. As a byproduct of our analyses, we provide the astronomer with the public R code which can be used to predict the compact object type of XRBs given training data.

  1. Physics of Accretion in X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, Saeqa D.

    2004-01-01

    This project consists of several related investigations directed to the study of mass transfer processes in X-ray binaries. Models developed over several years incorporating highly detailed physics will be tested on a balanced mix of existing data and planned observations with both ground and space-based observatories. The extended time coverage of the observations and the existence of {\\it simultaneous} X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical observations will be particularly beneficial for studying the accretion flows. These investigations, which take as detailed a look at the accretion process in X-ray binaries as is now possible, test current models to their limits, and force us to extend them. We now have the ability to do simultaneous ultraviolet/X-ray/optical spectroscopy with HST, Chandra, XMM, and ground-based observatories. The rich spectroscopy that these Observations give us must be interpreted principally by reference to detailed models, the development of which is already well underway; tests of these essential interpretive tools are an important product of the proposed investigations.

  2. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: A different view of supernova explosions

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research. PMID:20404206

  3. An X-ray look at the first head-trail nebula in an X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleri, Paolo

    2011-09-01

    Head-tail trails are a common feature in active galactic nuclei and pulsar bow-shocks. Heinz et al. (2008) suggested that also X-ray binaries, being jet sources moving with high velocities in dense media, can leave trails of highly ionized plasma that should be detectable at radio frequencies. During bservations of faint-persistent X-ray binaries, we discovered an optical nebula around the X-ray binary SAX J1712.6-3739, consisting of a bow-shock ring-like nebula in front of the binary and two trails originating close to it. This is the first detection of such structure in a X-ray binary and it opens a new sub-field in the study of these objects. Observations with XMM-Newton and Chandra are now needed to investigate the properties of the surrounding nebula.

  4. An X-ray look at the first head-trail nebula in an X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleri, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    Head-tail trails are a common feature in active galactic nuclei and pulsar bow-shocks. Heinz et al. (2008) suggested that also X-ray binaries, being jet sources moving with high velocities in dense media, can leave trails of highly ionized plasma that should be detectable at radio frequencies. During observations of faint-persistent X-ray binaries, we discovered an optical nebula around the X-ray binary SAX J1712.6-3739, consisting of a bow-shock ring-like nebula ``in front'' of the binary and two trails originating close to it. This is the first detection of such structure in a X-ray binary and it opens a new sub-field in the study of these objects. Observations with XMM-Newton and Chandra are now needed to investigate the properties of the surrounding nebula.

  5. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVA 1970G WITH CHANDRA: FILLING THE VOID BETWEEN SUPERNOVAE AND SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, Stefan; Kuntz, K. D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-ray emission from SN 1970G in M101, 35 yr after its outburst, using deep X-ray imaging with the Chundra X-Ray Observatory. The Chandra ACIS spectrum shows that the emission is soft (52 keV) and characteristic of the reverse-shock region. The X-ray luminosity, Lo,,, = (1.1 3 0.2) x lo3# ergs s-1, is likely caused by the interaction of the supernova shock with dense circumstellar matter. If the material was deposited by the stellar wind from the progenitor, a mass-loss rate of M = (2.6 ? 0.4) x M, yr-I (v,/lO km s-I) is inferred. Utilizing the high-resolution Chandra ACIS data of SN 1970G and its environment, we reconstruct the X-ray lightcurve from previous ROSAT HRI, PSPC, and XMM-Newton EPIC observations, and find a best-fit linear rate of decline of L cc t-# with index s = 2.7 t 0.9 over a period of -20-35 yr after the outburst. As the oldest supernova detected in X-rays, SN 1970G allows, for the first time, direct observation of the transition from a supenova to its supernova remnant phase.

  6. GBM Observations of Be X-Ray Binary Outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Finger, M. H.; Jenke, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2008 we have been monitoring accreting pulsars using the Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi. This monitoring program includes daily blind full sky searches for previously unknown or previously quiescent pulsars and source specific analysis to track the frequency evolution of all detected pulsars. To date we have detected outbursts from 23 transient accreting pulsars, including 21 confirmed or likely Be/X-ray binaries. I will describe our techniques and highlight results for selected pulsars.

  7. A high sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Bleach, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    A high sensitivity scan of the galactic plane was performed to search for 2-20 keV X-rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 deg and 31 deg longitude, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants, are reported on. Upper limits are presented for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned in this survey.

  8. A high-sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Bleach, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    A high-sensitivity scan of the galactic plane from 70 to 30 deg was performed to search for 2-20-keV X rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 and 31 deg longitude are presented, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants. Upper limits are given for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned.

  9. AN X-RAY AND OPTICAL LIGHT CURVE MODEL OF THE ECLIPSING SYMBIOTIC BINARY SMC3

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mariko; Hachisu, Izumi; Mikolajewska, Joanna

    2013-01-20

    Some binary evolution scenarios for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) include long-period binaries that evolve to symbiotic supersoft X-ray sources in their late stage of evolution. However, symbiotic stars with steady hydrogen burning on the white dwarf's (WD) surface are very rare, and the X-ray characteristics are not well known. SMC3 is one such rare example and a key object for understanding the evolution of symbiotic stars to SNe Ia. SMC3 is an eclipsing symbiotic binary, consisting of a massive WD and red giant (RG), with an orbital period of 4.5 years in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The long-term V light curve variations are reproduced as orbital variations in the irradiated RG, whose atmosphere fills its Roche lobe, thus supporting the idea that the RG supplies matter to the WD at rates high enough to maintain steady hydrogen burning on the WD. We also present an eclipse model in which an X-ray-emitting region around the WD is almost totally occulted by the RG swelling over the Roche lobe on the trailing side, although it is always partly obscured by a long spiral tail of neutral hydrogen surrounding the binary in the orbital plane.

  10. On the formation of galactic black hole low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-03-01

    Currently, there are 24 black hole (BH) X-ray binary systems that have been dynamically confirmed in the Galaxy. Most of them are low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) comprised of a stellar-mass BH and a low-mass donor star. Although the formation of these systems has been extensively investigated, some crucial issues remain unresolved. The most noticeable one is that, the low-mass companion has difficulties in ejecting the tightly bound envelope of the massive primary during the spiral-in process. While initially intermediate-mass binaries are more likely to survive the common envelope (CE) evolution, the resultant BH LMXBs mismatch the observations. In this paper, we use both stellar evolution and binary population synthesis to study the evolutionary history of BH LMXBs. We test various assumptions and prescriptions for the supernova mechanisms that produce BHs, the binding energy parameter, the CE efficiency and the initial mass distributions of the companion stars. We obtain the birthrate and the distributions of the donor mass, effective temperature and orbital period for the BH LMXBs in each case. By comparing the calculated results with the observations, we put useful constraints on the aforementioned parameters. In particular, we show that it is possible to form BH LMXBs with the standard CE scenario if most BHs are born through failed supernovae.

  11. Formation and Destruction of Jets in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kylafix, N. D.; Contopoulos, I.; Kazanas, D.; Christodoulou, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Neutron-star and black-hole X-ray binaries (XRBs) exhibit radio jets, whose properties depend on the X-ray spectral state e.nd history of the source. In particular, black-hole XRBs emit compact, 8teady radio jets when they are in the so-called hard state. These jets become eruptive as the sources move toward the soft state, disappear in the soft state, and then re-appear when the sources return to the hard state. The jets from neutron-star X-ray binaries are typically weaker radio emitters than the black-hole ones at the same X-ray luminosity and in some cases radio emission is detected in the soft state. Aims. Significant phenomenology has been developed to describe the spectral states of neutron-star and black-hole XRBs, and there is general agreement about the type of the accretion disk around the compact object in the various spectral states. We investigate whether the phenomenology describing the X-ray emission on one hand and the jet appearance and disappearance on the other can be put together in a consistent physical picture. Methods. We consider the so-called Poynting-Robertson cosmic battery (PRCB), which has been shown to explain in a natural way the formation of magnetic fields in the disks of AGNs and the ejection of jets. We investigate whether the PRCB can also explain the [ormation, destruction, and variability or jets in XRBs. Results. We find excellent agreement between the conditions under which the PRCB is efficient (i.e., the type of the accretion disk) and the emission or destruction of the r.adio jet. Conclusions. The disk-jet connection in XRBs can be explained in a natural way using the PRCB.

  12. Effects of variability of X-ray binaries on the X-ray luminosity functions of Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nazma; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-08-01

    The X-ray luminosity functions of galaxies have become a useful tool for population studies of X-ray binaries in them. The availability of long term light-curves of X-ray binaries with the All Sky X-ray Monitors opens up the possibility of constructing X-ray luminosity functions, by also including the intensity variation effects of the galactic X-ray binaries. We have constructed multiple realizations of the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) of Milky Way, using the long term light-curves of sources obtained in the 2-10 keV energy band with the RXTE-ASM. The observed spread seen in the value of slope of both HMXB and LMXB XLFs are due to inclusion of variable luminosities of X-ray binaries in construction of these XLFs as well as finite sample effects. XLFs constructed for galactic HMXBs in the luminosity range 1036-1039 erg/sec is described by a power-law model with a mean power-law index of -0.48 and a spread due to variability of HMXBs as 0.19. XLFs constructed for galactic LMXBs in the luminosity range 1036-1039 erg/sec has a shape of cut-off power-law with mean power-law index of -0.31 and a spread due to variability of LMXBs as 0.07.

  13. X-RAY BINARY EVOLUTION ACROSS COSMIC TIME

    SciTech Connect

    Fragos, T.; Zezas, A.; Lehmer, B.; Tzanavaris, P.; Tremmel, M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; Ptak, A.; Belczynski, K.; Kalogera, V.

    2013-02-10

    High-redshift galaxies permit the study of the formation and evolution of X-ray binary (XRB) populations on cosmological timescales, probing a wide range of metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs). In this paper, we present results from a large-scale population synthesis study that models the XRB populations from the first galaxies of the universe until today. We use as input to our modeling the Millennium II cosmological simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history and metallicity evolution of the universe. Our modeling, which is constrained by the observed X-ray properties of local galaxies, gives predictions about the global scaling of emission from XRB populations with properties such as SFR and stellar mass, and the evolution of these relations with redshift. Our simulations show that the X-ray luminosity density (X-ray luminosity per unit volume) from XRBs in our universe today is dominated by low-mass XRBs, and it is only at z {approx}> 2.5 that high-mass XRBs become dominant. We also find that there is a delay of {approx}1.1 Gyr between the peak of X-ray emissivity from low-mass XRBs (at z {approx} 2.1) and the peak of SFR density (at z {approx} 3.1). The peak of the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs (at z {approx} 3.9) happens {approx}0.8 Gyr before the peak of the SFR density, which is due to the metallicity evolution of the universe.

  14. Supergiant X-Ray Binaries Observed by Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodaghee, A.; Tomsick, J. A.; Rodriquez, J.; Chaty, S.; Pottschmidt, K.; Walter, R.; Romano, P.

    2011-01-01

    Suzaku observations are presented for the high-mass X-ray binaries IGR 116207-5129 and IGR 117391-3021. For IGR 116207-5129, we provide the first X-ray broadband (0.5-60 keV) spectrum from which we confirm a large intrinsic column density (N(sub H) = 1.6 x 10(exp 23)/sq cm), and we constrain the cutoff energy for the first time (E(sub cut) = 19 keV). A prolonged (> 30 ks) attenuation of the X-ray flux was observed which we tentatively attribute to an eclipse of the probable neutron star by its massive companion, in a binary system with an orbital period between 4 and 9 days, and inclination angles> 50 degrees. For IGRJ17391-3021, we witnessed a transition from quiescence to a low-activity phase punctuated by weak flares whose peak luminosities in the 0.5-10keV band are only a factor of 5 times that of the pre-flare emission. These micro flares are accompanied by an increase in NH which suggests the accretion of obscuring clumps of wind. We now recognize that these low-activity epochs constitute the most common emission phase for this system, and perhaps in other supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) as well. We close with an overview of our upcoming program in which Suzaku will provide the first ever observation of an SFXT (IGRJ16479-4514) during a binary orbit enabling us to probe the accretion wind at every phase.

  15. An optical supernova associated with the X-ray flash XRF 060218.

    PubMed

    Pian, E; Mazzali, P A; Masetti, N; Ferrero, P; Klose, S; Palazzi, E; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Woosley, S E; Kouveliotou, C; Deng, J; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Fynbo, J P U; Kann, D A; Li, W; Hjorth, J; Nomoto, K; Patat, F; Sauer, D N; Sollerman, J; Vreeswijk, P M; Guenther, E W; Levan, A; O'Brien, P; Tanvir, N R; Wijers, R A M J; Dumas, C; Hainaut, O; Wong, D S; Baade, D; Wang, L; Amati, L; Cappellaro, E; Castro-Tirado, A J; Ellison, S; Frontera, F; Fruchter, A S; Greiner, J; Kawabata, K; Ledoux, C; Maeda, K; Møller, P; Nicastro, L; Rol, E; Starling, R

    2006-08-31

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are associated with type Ic supernovae that are more luminous than average and that eject material at very high velocities. Less-luminous supernovae were not hitherto known to be associated with GRBs, and therefore GRB-supernovae were thought to be rare events. Whether X-ray flashes--analogues of GRBs, but with lower luminosities and fewer gamma-rays--can also be associated with supernovae, and whether they are intrinsically 'weak' events or typical GRBs viewed off the axis of the burst, is unclear. Here we report the optical discovery and follow-up observations of the type Ic supernova SN 2006aj associated with X-ray flash XRF 060218. Supernova 2006aj is intrinsically less luminous than the GRB-supernovae, but more luminous than many supernovae not accompanied by a GRB. The ejecta velocities derived from our spectra are intermediate between these two groups, which is consistent with the weakness of both the GRB output and the supernova radio flux. Our data, combined with radio and X-ray observations, suggest that XRF 060218 is an intrinsically weak and soft event, rather than a classical GRB observed off-axis. This extends the GRB-supernova connection to X-ray flashes and fainter supernovae, implying a common origin. Events such as XRF 060218 are probably more numerous than GRB-supernovae. PMID:16943831

  16. The slow X-ray pulsar SXP 1062 and associated supernova remnant in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Guerrero, M. A.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Sun, W.; Chu, Y.-H.; Evans, C.; Gallagher, J. S.; Gruendl, R. A.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

    2013-03-01

    SXP 1062 is an exceptional case of a young neutron star in a wind-fed high-mass X-ray binary associated with a supernova remnant. A unique combination of measured spin period, its derivative, luminosity and young age makes this source a key probe for the physics of accretion and neutron star evolution. Theoretical models proposed to explain the properties of SXP 1062 shall be tested with new data.

  17. Accretion and Outflows in X-ray Binaries: What's Really Going on During X-ray Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Rachel K. D.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Buxton, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    X-ray binaries, consisting of a star and a stellar-mass black hole, are wonderful laboratories for studying accretion and outflows. They evolve on timescales quite accessible to us, unlike their supermassive cousins, and allow the possibility of gaining a deeper understanding of these two common astrophysical processes. Different wavelength regimes reveal different aspects of the systems: radio emission is largely generated by outflows and jets, X-ray emission by inner accretion flows, and optical/infrared (OIR) emission by the outer disk and companion star. The search for relationships between these different wavelengths is thus an area of active research, aiming to reveal deeper connections between accretion and outflows.Initial evidence for a strong, tight correlation between radio and X-ray emission has weakened as further observations and newly-discovered sources have been obtained. This has led to discussions of multiple tracks or clusters, or the possibility that no overall relation exists for the currently-known population of X-ray binaries. Our ability to distinguish among these options is hampered by a relative lack of observations at lower luminosities, and especially of truly X-ray quiescent (non-outbursting) systems. Although X-ray binaries spend the bulk of their existence in quiescence, few quiescent sources have been observed and multiple observations of individual sources are largely nonexistent. Here we discuss new observations of the lowest-luminosity quiescent X-ray binary, A0620-00, and the place this object occupies in investigations of the radio/X-ray plane. For the first time, we also incorporate simultaneous OIR data with the radio and X-ray data.In December 2013 we took simultaneous observations of A0620-00 in the X-ray (Chandra), the radio (EVLA), and the OIR (SMARTS 1.3m). These X-ray and radio data allowed us to investigate similarities among quiescent X-ray binaries, and changes over time for this individual object, in the radio/X-ray

  18. On the torque reversal occurred in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Biping

    The effect of torque reversal has been observed in a number of X-ray binaries, such as 4U1627-67, Her X-1, Cen X-3, GX 1+4, OAO 1657-415, and Vela X-1. Here we suggest that it originates in a simply mechanism, residual Doppler shift. In a binary system with periodic signals sending to an observer, the drift of the signal frequency actually changes with the varying orbital velocity, projected to line of sight at different phases of orbit. And it has been taken for granted that the net red-shift and blue-shift of an full orbit circle be cancelled out, so that the effect of Doppler shift to the signal in binary motion cannot be accumulated over the orbital period. However, taking the propagation time at each velocity state into account, the symmetry of the velocity distribution over the orbital phase is broken. Consequently, the net Doppler shift left in an orbit is non-zero. It is this Newtonian second Doppler effect that responsible for the torque reversal occurred in X-ray binaries.

  19. Estimates of black hole natal kick velocities from observations of low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Ilya

    2016-02-01

    The birth kicks of black holes, arising from asymmetric mass ejection or neutrino emission during core-collapse supernovae, are of great interest for both observationally constraining supernova models and population-synthesis studies of binary evolution. Recently, several efforts were undertaken to estimate black hole birth kicks from observations of black hole low-mass X-ray binaries. We follow up on this work, specifically focusing on the highest estimated black hole kick velocities. We find that existing observations do not require black hole birth kicks in excess of approximately 80 km s-1, although higher kicks are not ruled out.

  20. Star formation history and X-ray binary populations: the case of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniou, V.; Zezas, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we investigate the link between high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), our nearest star-forming galaxy. Using optical photometric data, we identify the most likely counterpart of 44 X-ray sources. Among the 40 HMXBs classified in this work, we find 33 Be/X-ray binaries (Be-XRBs), and 4 supergiant XRBs. Using this census and the published spatially resolved star formation history map of the LMC, we find that the HMXBs (and as expected the X-ray pulsars) are present in regions with star formation bursts ∼6-25 Myr ago, in contrast to the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), for which this population peaks at later ages (∼25-60 Myr ago). We also estimate the HMXB production rate to be equal to one system per ∼43.5× 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 or one system per ∼143M⊙ of stars formed during the associated star formation episode. Therefore, the formation efficiency of HMXBs in the LMC is ∼17 times lower than that in the SMC. We attribute this difference primarily in the different ages and metallicity of the HMXB populations in the two galaxies. We also set limits on the kicks imparted on the neutron star during the supernova explosion. We find that the time elapsed since the supernova kick is ∼3 times shorter in the LMC than the SMC. This in combination with the average offsets of the HMXBs from their nearest star clusters results in ∼4 times faster transverse velocities for HMXBs in the LMC than in the SMC.

  1. Different X-ray spectral evolution for black hole X-ray binaries in dual tracks of radio-X-ray correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xiao-Feng; Wu, Qingwen; Dong, Ai-Jun

    2014-06-10

    Recently, an 'outlier' track of radio-X-ray correlation was found, which is much steeper than the former universal correlation, where dual tracks were speculated to be triggered by different accretion processes. In this work, we test this issue by exploring hard X-ray spectral evolution in four black-hole X-ray binaries with multiple, quasi-simultaneous radio and X-ray observations. First, we find that hard X-ray photon indices, Γ, are negatively and positively correlated with X-ray fluxes when the X-ray flux, F{sub 3-9} {sub keV}, is below and above a critical flux, F{sub X,} {sub crit}, which are consistent with predictions of the advection-dominated accretion flow and the disk-corona model, respectively. Second, and most importantly, we find that the radio-X-ray correlations are also clearly different when the X-ray fluxes are higher and lower than the critical flux as defined by X-ray spectral evolution. The data points with F{sub 3-9} {sub keV} ≳ F{sub X,} {sub crit} have a steeper radio-X-ray correlation (F{sub X}∝F{sub R}{sup b} and b ∼ 1.1-1.4), which roughly forms the ''outlier'' track. However, the data points with anti-correlation of Γ – F{sub 3-9} {sub keV} either stay in the universal track with b ∼ 0.61 or stay in the transition track (from the universal to 'outlier' tracks or vice versa). Therefore, our results support that the universal and ''outlier'' tracks of radio-X-ray correlations are regulated by radiatively inefficient and radiatively efficient accretion model, respectively.

  2. The origin of the hard X-ray tail in neutron-star X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Kylafis, N.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Neutron star X-ray binaries emit a compact, optically thick, relativistic radio jet during low-luminosity, usually hard states, as Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries do. When radio emission is bright, a hard power-law tail without evidence for an exponential cutoff is observed in most systems. Aims: We have developed a jet model that explains many spectral and timing properties of black-hole binaries in the states where a jet is present. Our goal is to investigate whether our jet model can reproduce the hard tail, with the correct range of photon index and the absence of a high-energy cutoff, in neutron-star X-ray binaries. Methods: We performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Compton upscattering of soft, accretion-disk or boundary layer photons in the jet and computed the emergent energy spectra, as well as the time lag of hard photons with respect to softer ones as a function of Fourier frequency. We fit the energy spectra with a power law modified by an exponential cutoff at high energy. Results: We demonstrate that our jet model naturally explains the observed power-law distribution with photon index in the range 1.8-3. With an appropriate choice of the parameters, the cutoff expected from Comptonization is shifted to energies above ~300 keV, producing a pure power law without any evidence for a rollover, in agreement with the observations. Conclusions: Our results reinforce the idea that the link between the outflow (jet) and inflow (disk) in X-ray binaries does not depend on the nature of the compact object, but on the process of accretion. Furthermore, we address the differences between jets in black-hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries and predict that the break frequency in the spectral energy distribution of neutron-star X-ray binaries, as a class, will be lower than that of black-hole binaries.

  3. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF X-RAY BINARIES IN CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Mark J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Evans, Daniel A.; Jordan, Andres; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Croston, Judith H.; Brassington, Nicola J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Goodger, Joanna L.; Kainulainen, Jouni; Woodley, Kristin A.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gilfanov, Marat; Sarazin, Craig L.; Voss, Rasmus [Department of Astrophysics and others

    2013-04-01

    We present a spectral investigation of X-ray binaries (XBs) in NGC 5128 (Cen A), using six 100 ks Chandra observations taken over two months in 2007. We divide our sample into thermally and non-thermally dominated states based on the behavior of the fitted absorption column N{sub H}, and present the spectral parameters of sources with L{sub x} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}. The majority of sources are consistent with being neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS LMXBs) and we identify three transient black hole (BH) LMXB candidates coincident with the dust lane, which is the remnant of a small late-type galaxy. Our results also provide tentative support for the apparent 'gap' in the mass distribution of compact objects between {approx}2-5 M{sub Sun }. We propose that BH LMXBs are preferentially found in the dust lane, and suggest this is because of the younger stellar population. The majority ({approx}70%-80%) of potential Roche lobe filling donors in the Cen A halo are {approx}> 12 Gyr old, while BH LMXBs require donors {approx}> 1 M{sub Sun} to produce the observed peak luminosities. This requirement for more massive donors may also explain recent results that claim a steepening of the X-ray luminosity function with age at L{sub x} {>=} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} for the XB population of early-type galaxies; for older stellar populations, there are fewer stars {approx}> 1 M{sub Sun }, which are required to form the more luminous sources.

  4. STATE TRANSITIONS IN LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Charles K.; Frank, Juhan

    2009-10-10

    We investigate the model of disk/coronal accretion into a black hole. We show that the inner regions of an accretion disk in X-ray binaries can transform from a cool standard disk to an advection-dominated flow through the known properties of Coulomb interaction in a two-temperature plasma, viscous heating, radiative processes, and thermal conduction. A hot, diffuse corona covering the disk is powered by accretion, but it exchanges mass with the underlying cold disk. If the accretion rate in the system is low enough, we show that the corona evaporates the disk away, leaving an advective flow to continue toward the hole. In the soft/hard transition commonly seen in X-ray binaries, we show that this advective flow can recondense back onto the underlying disk if the change in the system's accretion rate is slow enough due to thermal conduction. Unabsorbed spectra are produced to test against observations as well as prediction of the location of truncation radii of the accretion disk.

  5. A Study on the Evolution of Compact Star Binaries and Stellar X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. J.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray serves as one of the most important domains of discovery in astronomy. It could be used to study the properties as well as the formation and evolution of X-ray emitting objects. X-ray can also be used to constrain the formation and evolution history of galaxies in the universe. In this thesis, we discuss the properties of the X-ray point sources, especially those with white dwarfs as accretors. We focus on the evolution of these binaries and their progenitors, as well as the relation between these objects and their host environments with the numerical and observational methods. We further put constraints on the final product and the possible connection to the type Ia supernovae. Our main results are as follows: (1) We study the case in which the thermally unstable accretion disks occur in binaries, and apply to the evolution of GRO J1744-28 and type Ia supernovae. Our result shows that GRO J1744-28 could have evolved from a binary composed by a normal star and an ONeMg white dwarf and with the white dwarf as the accretor. During its evolution, the white dwarf experienced accretion from the X-ray irradiated unstable accretion disk, then accumulated mass by burning the accreted matter on its surface before it collapsed to a neutron star. The new formed neutron star then accreted from the companion again, and evolved to its present properties. We also apply the unstable disks to the binaries with C/O white dwarfs as accretors, and calculate the region of the initial companion masses and orbital periods which could lead to successful type Ia supernovae. The results suggest that the companion star of the progenitor system could have the initial mass as low as ≲ 1.5 M_{⊙}. (2) We study the λ parameter in the common envelope evolution. Our results show that the λ parameter varies for the stars with different initial masses. For the same star, λ also varies in different evolutional stages. At the end of their evolution, the stars with the approximate initial

  6. On binary-driven hypernovae and their nested late X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, R.; Muccino, M.; Bianco, C. L.; Enderli, M.; Izzo, L.; Kovacevic, M.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.; Wang, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm addresses the very energetic (1052-1054 erg) long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated to supernovae (SNe). Unlike the traditional "collapsar" model, an evolved FeCO core with a companion neutron star (NS) in a tight binary system is considered as the progenitor. This special class of sources, here named "binary-driven hypernovae" (BdHNe), presents a composite sequence composed of four different episodes with precise spectral and luminosity features. Aims: We first compare and contrast the steep decay, the plateau, and the power-law decay of the X-ray luminosities of three selected BdHNe (GRB 060729, GRB 061121, and GRB 130427A). Second, to explain the different sizes and Lorentz factors of the emitting regions of the four episodes, for definiteness, we use the most complete set of data of GRB 090618. Finally, we show the possible role of r-process, which originates in the binary system of the progenitor. Methods: We compare and contrast the late X-ray luminosity of the above three BdHNe. We examine correlations between the time at the starting point of the constant late power-law decay t*a, the average prompt luminosity ⟨ Liso ⟩, and the luminosity at the end of the plateau La. We analyze a thermal emission (~ 0.97-0.29 keV), observed during the X-ray steep decay phase of GRB 090618. Results: The late X-ray luminosities of the three BdHNe, in the rest-frame energy band 0.3-10 keV, show a precisely constrained "nested" structure. In a space-time diagram, we illustrate the different sizes and Lorentz factors of the emitting regions of the three episodes. For GRB 090618, we infer an initial dimension of the thermal emitter of ~ 7 × 1012 cm, expanding at Γ ≈ 2. We find tighter correlations than the Dainotti-Willingale ones. Conclusions: We confirm a constant slope power-law behavior for the late X-ray luminosity in the source rest frame, which may lead to a new distance indicator for BdHNe. These results

  7. Linking jet emission and X-ray properties in the peculiar neutron star X-ray binary Circinus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleri, Paolo; Tudose, Valeriu; Fender, Rob; van der Klis, Michiel; Jonker, Peter G.

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the peculiar Z-type neutron star X-ray binary Cir X-1, observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer satellite and the Australia Telescope Compact Array in 2000 October and 2002 December. We identify typical Z-source behaviour in the power density spectra as well as characteristic Z patterns drawn in an X-ray hardness-intensity diagram. Power spectra typical of bright atoll sources have also been identified at orbital phases after the periastron passage, while orbital phases before the periastron passage are characterized by power spectra that are typical neither of Z nor of atoll sources. We investigate the coupling between the X-ray and the radio properties, focusing on three orbital phases when an enhancement of the radio flux density has been detected, to test the link between the inflow (X-ray) and the outflow (radio jet) to/from the compact object. In two out of three cases, we associate the presence of the radio jet to a spectral transition in the X-rays, although the transition does not precede the radio flare, as detected in other Z sources. An analogous behaviour has recently been found in the black hole candidate GX 339-4. In the third case, the radio light curve shows a similar shape to the X-ray light curve. We discuss our results in the context of jet models, considering also black hole candidates.

  8. X-Ray, UV, and Optical Observations of Supernova 2006bp with Swift: Detection of Early X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, S.; Brown, P. J.; Milne, P.; Dessart, L.; Mazzali, P. A.; Landsman, W.; Gehrels, N.; Petre, R.; Burrows, D. N.; Nousek, J. A.; Chevalier, R. A.; Williams, C. L.; Koss, M.; Stockdale, C. J.; Kelley, M. T.; Weiler, K. W.; Holland, S. T.; Pian, E.; Roming, P. W. A.; Pooley, D.; Nomoto, K.; Greiner, J.; Campana, S.; Soderberg, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    We present results on the X-ray and optical/UV emission from the Type IIP supernova (SN) 2006bp and the interaction of the SW shock with its environment, obtained with the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on-board the Swift observatory. SN 2006bp is detected in X-rays at a 4.5 sigmalevel of significance in the merged XRT data from days 1 to 12 after the explosion. If the (0.2-10 keV band) X-ray luminosity of L(sub 0.2-10) = (1.8 plus or minus 0.4) x l0(exp 39 ergs s(exp -1) is caused by interaction of the SN shock with circumstellar material (CSM), deposited by a stellar wind from the progenitor's companion star, a mass-loss rate of M is approximately 2x10(exp -6) solar mass yr(exp -1) (v(sub w)/10 km s(exp -l) is inferred. The mass-loss rate is one of the lowest ever recorded for a core-collapse SN and consistent with the non-detection in the radio with the VLA on days 2, 9, and 11 after the explosion. The Swift data further show a fading of the X-ray emission starting around day 12 after the explosion. In combination with a follow-up XMM-Newton observation obtained on day 21 after the explosion, an X-ray rate of decline Lx, varies as t(exp -n) with index n = 1.2 plus or minus 0.6 is inferred. Since no other SN has been detected in X-rays prior to the optical peak and since Type IIP SNe have an extended 'plateau' phase in the optical, we discuss the scenario that the X-rays might be due to inverse Compton scattering of photospheric optical photons off relativistic electrons produced in circumstellar shocks. However, due to the high required value of the Lorentz factor (approximately 10-100), inconsistent with the ejecta velocity inferred from optical line widths, we conclude that Inverse Compton scattering is an unlikely explanation for the observed X-ray emission. The fast evolution of the optical/ultraviolet (1900-5500A) spectral energy distribution and the spectral changes observed with Swift reveal the onset of metal line-blanketing and

  9. A disc corona-jet model for the radio/X-ray correlation in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erlin; Liu, B. F.

    2015-04-01

    The observed tight radio/X-ray correlation in the low spectral state of some black hole X-ray binaries implies the strong coupling of the accretion and jet. The correlation of L_R ∝ L_X^{˜ 0.5-0.7} was well explained by the coupling of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow and a jet. Recently, however, a growing number of sources show more complicated radio/X-ray correlations, e.g. L_R ∝ L_X^{˜ 1.4} for LX/LEdd ≳ 10-3, which is suggested to be explained by the coupling of a radiatively efficient accretion flow and a jet. In this work, we interpret the deviation from the initial radio/X-ray correlation for LX/LEdd ≳ 10-3 with a detailed disc corona-jet model. In this model, the disc and corona are radiatively and dynamically coupled. Assuming a fraction of the matter in the accretion flow, η ≡ dot{M}_jet/dot{M}, is ejected to form the jet, we can calculate the emergent spectrum of the disc corona-jet system. We calculate LR and LX at different dot{M}, adjusting η to fit the observed radio/X-ray correlation of the black hole X-ray transient H1743-322 for LX/LEdd > 10-3. It is found that always the X-ray emission is dominated by the disc corona and the radio emission is dominated by the jet. We noted that the value of η for the deviated radio/X-ray correlation for LX/LEdd > 10-3 is systematically less than that of the case for LX/LEdd < 10-3, which is consistent with the general idea that the jet is often relatively suppressed at the high-luminosity phase in black hole X-ray binaries.

  10. Displacement of X-ray binaries: constraints on the natal kicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Zhao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Context. This work uses the measured luminosity vs. displacement (LX vs. R) distribution of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) to constrain the dispersion of kick velocity σkick, which is an important parameter affecting the system velocity of a binary, and hence its spatial offset from the point of origin. Aims: The aim is to constrain the natal kicks and discriminate between models by comparing the observed LX vs. R distributions with the theoretical simulations. Methods: Using an up-to-date evolutionary population synthesis technique, the spatial offsets of HMXBs are modeled for a range of theoretical models describing the natal kicks, including different choices of the dispersion of kick velocity σkick, as well as different theoretical treatments for black hole (BH) natal kicks. Results: The study shows that the value of σkick for neutron stars (NSs) is constrained to be greater than ~100 km s-1, while σkick on the order of several tens of km s-1 may be excluded, though a low or absent natal kick for electron capture supernovae NSs is permitted. In particular, BH natal kicks are found not indispensable to account for the LX vs. R distributions. It is more interesting that full BH natal kicks (i.e., similar to those that NSs may receive) are likely to be ruled out in this study, which is in contrast with the recent finding to explain the observed distribution of low-mass X-ray binaries hosting BHs.

  11. Orbital period changes in massive X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    Data from long-term pulse-timing observations of Cen X-3 are compiled and analyzed to determine the evolution of the orbital period, and the implications of the results for other massive X-ray binaries are discussed. Third-body effects, tidal effects, and mass-loss/transfer effects are considered as possible causes for the orbital-period decay observed in Cen X-3, and it is concluded that strong tidal coupling between the companion star and the orbital causes the period decay via orbital instability and/or mass loss. Applying these results to the Roche-lobe-overflow models of Savonije (1983), the evolutionary expansion rate of the Cen X-3 companion and the Roche-lobe shrinking rate are estimated as about 2 x 10 to the -7th/yr and about 1 x 10 to the -6th/yr, respectively, implying an X-ray lifetime of about 5000 yr. Estimates of the companion mass-change rate and period decay for Cen X-3 and four other objects are presented in a table.

  12. A Unified Model of Low Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucinska-Church, M.; Church, M.

    2014-07-01

    We present a unified physical model of Low Mass X-ray Binaries explaining the basic Atoll and Z-track types of source. In all LMXB with luminosity above 1-2.10^{37} erg/s, we have a new fundamental result that the temperature of the Comptonizing ADC corona equals that of the neutron star, i.e. there is thermal equilibrium. This equilibrium explains the properties of the basic Banana State of Atoll sources. Below this luminosity, equilibrium breaks down, T_ADC rising towards 100 keV by an unknown heating mechanism, explaining the Island State. Above 5.10^{37} erg/s flaring begins in the GX-Atolls which we show is unstable nuclear burning. Above 1.10^{38} erg/s, LMXB are seen as Z-track sources. Flaring in these and the GX-Atolls occurs when the mass accretion rate to the neutron star falls to the critical value for unstable nuclear burning on the star. Below 2.10^{37} erg/s, a different unstable burning: X-ray bursting, takes over. We show that the Normal Branch of the Z-track consists simply of increasing mass accretion rate, as is the Banana State in Atolls. In the Horizontal Branch, a measured, strongly increasing radiation pressure of the neutron star disrupts the inner disk launching the relativistic jets seen on this branch.

  13. Insights into the High-Mass X-ray Binary Population of the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniou, V.; Zezas, A.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Kalogera, V.

    2013-09-01

    In contrast to the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), our nearest starforming galaxy with metallicity between the Galaxy and the SMC, has received little attention in X-rays so far. With the aim to compare the accreting X-ray binary (XRB) populations in two of our nearest star-forming galaxies, we recently compiled the most complete census of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in the LMC. We found 43 members of which 13 are XRB pulsars, while we also identified their most likely optical counterpart (previously, half of these sources lacked an identification). Using this census, we investigated the link between the young accreting XRBs and their parent stellar populations. It was known that HMXBs can be used as star-formation (SF) rate indicators, but these first studies have been focused only on bright systems (Galaxy: >1038 erg s-1, Magellanic Clouds: >1036 erg s-1) and SF values for the whole galaxy. By including Magellanic Cloud sources with X-ray luminosities at least two order of magnitudes fainter than the above limits and by utilizing the detailed, spatially resolved, SF history maps of these galaxies, we were able to provide observational constraints on ill-understood parameters related to their formation and evolution (such as the kick velocities imparted into the neutron star during the supernova explosion) and to derive their formation efficiency. This work was mainly supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX10AH47G issued through the Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  14. Two component X-ray emission from RS CVn binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J. H.; White, N. E.; Holt, S. S.; Becker, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of results from the solid state spectrometer on the Einstein Observatory for 7 RS CVn binaries is presented. The spectra of all require two emission components, evidenced by line emission characteristic of plasma at 4 to 8 x 10 to the 6th power and bremsstrahlung characteristic of 20 to 100 x 10 to the 6th power K. The data are interpreted in terms of magnetic coronal loops similar to those seen on the Sun, although with different characteristic parameters. The emission regions could be defined by separate magnetic structures. For pressure less than approximately 10 dynes/sq cm the low temperature plasma would be confined within the stellar radii, while the high temperature plasma would, for the synchronous close binaries, fill the binary orbits. However, for loop pressures exceeding 100 dynes/sq cm, the high temperature components would also be confined to within the stellar radii, in loops covering only small fractions of the stellar surfaces. While the radio properties and the occurrence of X-ray flares suggest the larger emission regions, the observations of time variations leave the ambiguity unresolved.

  15. WISE Detection of Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongxiang

    2014-08-01

    I will report on the results from our search for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer detection of the Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries. Among 187 catalogued binaries, we find 13 counterparts and two candidate counterparts. For the 13 counterparts, two (4 0614+091 and G 339-4) have already been confirmed by previous studies to have a jet and one (GR 1915+105) to have a candidate circumbinary disk, from which the detected infrared emission arose. Having collected the broad-band optical and near-infrared data in literature and constructed flux density spectra for the other 10 binaries, we identify that three (A0620-00, XTE J1118+480, and GX 1+4) are candidate circumbinary disk systems, four (Cen X-4, 4U 1700+24, 3A 1954+319, and Cyg X-2) had thermal emission from their companion stars, and three (Sco X-1, Her X-1, and Swift J1753.5-0127) are peculiar systems with the origin of their infrared emission rather uncertain. Discussion of the results and WISE counterparts' brightness distribution will be provided, which suggests that more than half of the LMXBs would have a jet, a circumbinary disk, or the both.

  16. Testing accretion disk instabilities in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagińska, Patrycja; Różańska, Agata; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Czerny, Bożena

    2014-12-01

    We study disk instabilities in black hole binaries in which X-ray novae outbursts were observed. Typically, one outburst occurs in each light curve, with total duration from 30 up to 400 days. The shape of an outburst can be very regular fast rise exponential decay (FRED) characteristic for ionisation instability mechanism that occurs in accretion disks, or irregular suggesting that, beside FRED, additional flickering occurs. We use the model which predicts time dependent evolution of ionisation instability in an accretion disk around black hole, assuming viscosity parameter to be proportional to the total pressure. We test it in detail for two objects: GX 339-4 and XTE J1818-245. The modelled light curves agree with the collected RXTE light curves, indicating that disk instability works in those objects.

  17. The donor star winds in High-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, Lida

    2014-10-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) are essential astrophysical laboratories. These objects represent an advanced stage in the evolution of massive binary systems, after the initially more massive star has already collapsed in a supernova explosion, but its remnant, a neutron star or black hole, remains gravitationally bound. The stellar wind from the OB-type donor is partially accreted onto its compact companion powering its relatively high X-ray luminosity. Since HMXBs accrete from the stellar wind, parameters such as the donor's mass-loss rate, the velocity of the wind, and its clumpiness are of fundamental importance.This proposal takes advantage of the unique capabilities of HST/STIS for UV spectroscopy. We focus on the most populous in the Galaxy class of those HMXBs where the stellar wind of the OB donor is directly accreted onto a neutron star. Recently, a new sub-class of HMXBs - "supergiant fast X-ray transients" - was discovered. It has been proposed that these enigmatic objects can be explained by the specific properties of their donor-star winds. The only way to validate or disprove this hypothesis is by a studying the wind diagnostics lines in the UV spectra of donor stars. The observations proposed here will, for the first time, provide the UV spectra of this important new type of accreting binaries. Our state-of-the art non-LTE expanding stellar atmospheres and 3-D stellar wind simulations allow thorough exploitation of the STIS spectra. As a result we will obtain the wind parameters for a representative sample of six Galactic HMXBs, thus heightening our knowledge thereof considerably.

  18. X-ray emission from the supernova remnant G287.8-0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Pravdo, S. H.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The GSFC Cosmic X-ray spectroscopy experiment on OSO-8 observed a weak galactic X-ray source near theta 2 at 288 deg, b2 at -1 deg. The spectrum for this source between 2-20 keV is well represented by a thermal spectrum of kT = 7.34(+3.6), sub -2.6 keV with an intense iron emission line centered at 6.5 + or - .2 keV. The error box of the Uhuru source 4U1043-59, the only known X-ray source in our field of view, contains the radio supernova remnant G287.8-0.5. The possible association of the X-ray source with this supernova remnant is discussed.

  19. Be/X-Ray Pulsar Binary Science with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Accretion disks are ubiquitous in astronomical sources. Accretion powered pulsars are a good test bed for accretion disk physics, because unlike for other objects, the spin of the neutron star is directly observable allowing us to see the effects of angular momentum transfer onto the pulsar. The combination of a sensitive wide-field monitor and the large area detector on LOFT will enable new detailed studies of accretion powered pulsars which I will review. RXTE observations have shown an unusually high number of Be/X-ray pulsar binaries in the SMC. Unlike binaries in the Milky Way, these systems are all at the same distance, allowing detailed population studies using the sensitive LOFT WFM, potentially providing connections to star formation episodes. For Galactic accreting pulsar systems, LOFT will allow measurement of spectral variations within individual pulses, mapping the accretion column in detail for the first time. LOFT will also provide better constraints on magnetic fields in accreting pulsars, allowing measurements of cyclotron features, observations of transitions into the centrifugal inhibition regime, and monitoring of spin-up rate vs flux correlations. Coordinated multi-wavelength observations are crucial to extracting the best science from LOFT from these and numerous other objects.

  20. X-ray observations of the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. F., Jr.; Clark, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Presented observation data from OSO-7 are shown to confirm the identification of IC 443 as an X-ray source, with a spectrum which is consistent with either thermal bremsstrahlung or a power law. These data lead to an age of 3400 years for IC 443, much younger than previous estimates.

  1. X-ray-binary spectra in the lamp post model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, F. H.; Różańska, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Madej, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The high-energy radiation from black-hole binaries may be due to the reprocessing of a lamp located on the black hole rotation axis and emitting X-rays. The observed spectrum is made of three major components: the direct spectrum traveling from the lamp directly to the observer; the thermal bump at the equilibrium temperature of the accretion disk heated by the lamp; and the reflected spectrum essentially made of the Compton hump and the iron-line complex. Aims: We aim to accurately compute the complete reprocessed spectrum (thermal bump + reflected) of black-hole binaries over the entire X-ray band. We also determine the strength of the direct component. Our choice of parameters is adapted to a source showing an important thermal component. We are particularly interested in investigating the possibility to use the iron-line complex as a probe to constrain the black hole spin. Methods: We computed in full general relativity the illumination of a thin accretion disk by a fixed X-ray lamp along the rotation axis. We used the ATM21 radiative transfer code to compute the local, energy-dependent spectrum emitted along the disk as a function of radius, emission angle and black hole spin. We then ray traced this local spectrum to determine the final reprocessed spectrum as received by a distant observer. We consider two extreme values of the black hole spin (a = 0 and a = 0.98) and discuss the dependence of the local and ray-traced spectra on the emission angle and black hole spin. Results: We show the importance of the angle dependence of the total disk specific intensity spectrum emitted by the illuminated atmosphere when the thermal disk emission is fully taken into account. The disk flux, together with the X-ray flux from the lamp, determines the temperature and ionization structure of the atmosphere. High black hole spin implies high temperature in the inner disk regions, therefore, the emitted thermal disk spectrum fully covers the iron-line complex. As a

  2. DISTRIBUTION OF HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES IN THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Coleiro, Alexis; Chaty, Sylvain E-mail: chaty@cea.fr

    2013-02-20

    Observations of the high-energy sky, particularly with the INTEGRAL satellite, have quadrupled the number of supergiant X-ray binaries observed in the Galaxy and revealed new populations of previously hidden high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), raising new questions about their formation and evolution. The number of detected HMXBs of different types is now high enough to allow us to carry out a statistical analysis of their distribution in the Milky Way. For the first time, we derive the distance and absorption of a sample of HMXBs using a spectral energy distribution fitting procedure, and we examine the correlation with the distribution of star-forming complexes (SFCs) in the Galaxy. We show that HMXBs are clustered with SFCs with a typical cluster size of 0.3 {+-} 0.05 kpc and a characteristic distance between clusters of 1.7 {+-} 0.3 kpc. Furthermore, we present an investigation of the expected offset between the position of spiral arms and HMXBs, allowing us to constrain age and migration distance due to supernova kick for 13 sources. These new methods will allow us to assess the influence of the environment on these high-energy objects with unprecedented reliability.

  3. On the origin of highly ionized X-ray absorbers detected in the galactic X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yang; Fang, Taotao

    2014-01-10

    X-ray observations of the Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) revealed numerous highly ionized metal absorption lines. However, it is unclear whether such lines are produced by the hot interstellar medium (ISM) or the circumstellar medium intrinsic to the binaries. Here we present a Chandra X-ray absorption line study of 28 observations of 12 XRBs, with a focus on the Ne IX and Fe XVII lines. We report the first detections of these lines in a significant amount of observations. We do not find a significant dependence of the line equivalent width on the distance of the XRBs, but we do see a weak dependence on the source X-ray luminosity. We also find 2 out of 12 selected targets show strong temporal variation of the Ne IX absorbers. While the line ratio between the two ion species suggests a temperature consistent with the previous predictions of the ISM, comparing with two theoretical models of the ISM shows the observed column densities are significantly higher than predictions. On the other hand, photoionization by the XRBs provides a reasonably good fit to the data. Our findings suggest that a significant fraction of these X-ray absorbers may originate in the hot gas intrinsic to the XRBs, and that the ISM makes small, if not negligible, contribution. We briefly discuss the implications to the study of the Milky Way hot gas content.

  4. GALACTIC ULTRACOMPACT X-RAY BINARIES: DISK STABILITY AND EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Heinke, C. O.; Ivanova, N.; Engel, M. C.; Pavlovskii, K.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Gladstone, J. C.; Cartwright, T. F.

    2013-05-10

    We study the mass-transfer rates and disk stability conditions of ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs) using empirical time-averaged X-ray luminosities from Paper I and compiled information from the literature. The majority of UCXBs are consistent with evolutionary tracks for white dwarf donors. Three UCXBs with orbital periods longer than 40 minutes have mass-transfer rates above 10{sup -10} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, inconsistent with white dwarf donor tracks. We show that if helium star donors can retain their initial high entropy, they can explain the observed mass-transfer rates of these UCXBs. Several UCXBs show persistent luminosities apparently below the disk instability limit for irradiated He accretion disks. We point out that a predominantly C and/or O disk (as observed in the optical spectra of several) lowers the disk instability limit, explaining this disagreement. The orbital period and low time-averaged mass-transfer rate of 2S 0918-549 provide evidence that the donor star is a low-entropy C/O white dwarf, consistent with optical spectra. We combine existing information to constrain the masses of the donors in 4U 1916-053 (0.064 {+-} 0.010 M{sub Sun }) and 4U 1626-67 (<0.036 M{sub Sun} for a 1.4 M{sub Sun} neutron star). We show that 4U 1626-67 is indeed persistent, and not undergoing a transient outburst, leaving He star models as the best explanation for the donor.

  5. Unsupervised spectral decomposition of X-ray spectra from galactic black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koljonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    Modelling the X-ray spectra of accreting black holes often leads to a problem of degeneracy, i.e. multiple distinct models fit the observed data equally well. Even if an apparently good fit is obtained between the data and the model, it does not necessarily imply a match between theory and physical reality. We separate a multivariate signal -- a set of time series of X-ray spectra -- into subcomponents, using linear unsupervised decomposition methods. This analysis will provide a better estimate of the X-ray continuum models needed to fit the X-ray spectra in these sources by taking into an account also the spectral variability in addition to the fitting of the individual spectra. A comparison with the different analysis methods are studied and suggestions made for the future use of these methods in the context of this study. We apply these analysis methods to an archival set of X-ray spectra from a stellar mass black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4. With a sufficiently long set of observations throughout the hardness-intensity diagram (HID) from GX 339-4, the use of unsupervised decomposition methods reveal how the spectral components change across the HID. We will discuss the ramifications of these results.

  6. Supergiant fast X-ray transients as an under-luminous class of supergiant X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Romano, P.; Ducci, L.; Bernardini, F.; Falanga, M.

    2015-02-01

    The usage of cumulative luminosity distributions, constructed thanks to the long-term observations available through wide field hard X-ray imagers, has been recently exploited to study the averaged high energy emission (>17 keV) from supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) and classical Supergiant High Mass X-ray Binaries (SgXBs). Here, we take advantage of the long term monitorings now available with Swift/XRT to construct for the first time the cumulative luminosity distributions of a number of SFXTs and the classical SgXB IGR J18027-2016 in the soft X-ray domain with a high sensitivity focusing X-ray telescope (0.3-10 keV). By complementing previous results obtained in the hard X-rays, we found that classical SgXBs are characterized by cumulative distributions with a single knee around ∼ 1036-1037 erg s-1, while SFXTs are found to be systematically sub-luminous and their distributions are shifted at significantly lower luminosities (a factor of ∼ 10-100). As the luminosity states in which these sources spend most of their time are typically below the sensitivity limit of large field of view hard X-ray imagers, we conclude that soft X-ray monitorings carried out with high sensitivity telescopes are particularly crucial to reconstruct the complete profile of the SFXT cumulative luminosity distributions. The difference between the cumulative luminosity distributions of classical SgXBs and SFXTs is interpreted in terms of accretion from a structured wind in the former sources and the presence of magnetic/centrifugal gates or a quasi-spherical settling accretion regime in the latter.

  7. Globular Cluster Formation Efficiencies from Black Hole X-Ray Binary Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justham, Stephen; Peng, Eric W.; Schawinski, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    We investigate a scenario in which feedback from black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) sometimes begins inside young star clusters before strong supernova (SN) feedback. Those BHXBs could reduce the gas fraction inside embedded young clusters while maintaining virial equilibrium, which may help globular clusters (GCs) to stay bound when SN-driven gas ejection subsequently occurs. Adopting a simple toy model with parameters guided by BHXB population models, we produce GC formation efficiencies consistent with empirically inferred values. The metallicity dependence of BHXB formation could naturally explain why GC formation efficiency is higher at lower metallicity. For reasonable assumptions about that metallicity dependence, our toy model can produce a GC metallicity bimodality in some galaxies without a bimodality in the field-star metallicity distribution.

  8. On the spin period distribution in Be/X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Z.-Q.; Shao, Y.; Li, X.-D.

    2014-05-10

    There is a remarkable correlation between the spin periods of the accreting neutron stars (NSs) in Be/X-ray binaries (BeXBs) and their orbital periods. Recently, Knigge et al. showed that the distribution of the spin periods contains two distinct subpopulations peaked at ∼10 s and ∼200 s, respectively, and suggested that they may be related to two types of supernovae for the formation of the NSs, i.e., core-collapse and electron-capture supernovae. Here we propose that the bimodal spin period distribution is likely to be ascribed to different accretion modes of the NSs in BeXBs. When the NS tends to capture material from the warped, outer part of the Be star disk and experiences giant outbursts, a radiatively cooling dominated disk is formed around the NS, which spins up the NS and is responsible for the short-period subpopulation. In BeXBs that are dominated by normal outbursts or are persistent, the accretion flow is advection-dominated or quasi-spherical. The spin-up process is accordingly inefficient, leading to longer periods of the neuron stars. The potential relation between the subpopulations and the supernova mechanism is also discussed.

  9. X-Ray Binary Populations in a Cosmological Context, Including NuSTAR Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Ann Hornschemeier

    2011-01-01

    The new ultradeep 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South has afforded the deepest view ever of X-ray binary populations. We report on the latest results on both LMXB and HMXB evolution out to redshifts of approximately four, including comparison with the latest theoretical models, using this deepest-ever view of the X-ray universe with Chandra. The upcoming NuSTAR mission will open up X-ray binary populations in the hard X-ray band, similar to the pioneering work of Fabbiano et al. in the Einstein era. We report on plans to study both Local Group and starburst galaxies as well as the implications those observations may have for X-ray binary populations in galaxies contributing to the Cosmic X-ray Background.

  10. X-ray Observations of the Tycho Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John P.

    2006-06-01

    In this presentation I summarize some key new findings from recent Chandra and XMM-Newton data on the remnant of the supernova (SN) observed by Tycho Brahe in 1572, which is widely believed to have been of Type Ia origin. Studies of the Tycho supernova remnant (SNR) at the current epoch address aspects of SN Ia physics, the evolution of young SNRs, and cosmic ray acceleration at high Mach-number shocks.Research on the Tycho SNR at Rutgers has been supported by Chandra grants GO3-4066X and AR5-6010X.

  11. Luminous Supersoft X-Ray Sources as Progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, R.

    1996-01-01

    In some luminous supersoft X-ray sources, hydrogen accretes onto the surface of a white dwarf at rates more-or-less compatible with steady nuclear burning. The white dwarfs in these systems therefore have a good chance to grow in mass. Here we review what is known about the rate of Type la supernovae that may be associated with SSSS. Observable consequences of the conjecture that SSSs can be progenitors of Type Ia supernovae are also discussed.

  12. SXP 1062, a young Be X-ray binary pulsar with long spin period. Implications for the neutron star birth spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, F.; Sturm, R.; Filipović, M. D.; Pietsch, W.; Crawford, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is ideally suited to investigating the recent star formation history from X-ray source population studies. It harbours a large number of Be/X-ray binaries (Be stars with an accreting neutron star as companion), and the supernova remnants can be easily resolved with imaging X-ray instruments. Aims: We search for new supernova remnants in the SMC and in particular for composite remnants with a central X-ray source. Methods: We study the morphology of newly found candidate supernova remnants using radio, optical and X-ray images and investigate their X-ray spectra. Results: Here we report on the discovery of the new supernova remnant around the recently discovered Be/X-ray binary pulsar CXO J012745.97-733256.5 = SXP 1062 in radio and X-ray images. The Be/X-ray binary system is found near the centre of the supernova remnant, which is located at the outer edge of the eastern wing of the SMC. The remnant is oxygen-rich, indicating that it developed from a type Ib event. From XMM-Newton observations we find that the neutron star with a spin period of 1062 s (the second longest known in the SMC) shows a very high average spin-down rate of 0.26 s per day over the observing period of 18 days. Conclusions: From the currently accepted models, our estimated age of around 10 000-25 000 years for the supernova remnant is not long enough to spin down the neutron star from a few 10 ms to its current value. Assuming an upper limit of 25 000 years for the age of the neutron star and the extreme case that the neutron star was spun down by the accretion torque that we have measured during the XMM-Newton observations since its birth, a lower limit of 0.5 s for the birth spin period is inferred. For more realistic, smaller long-term average accretion torques our results suggest that the neutron star was born with a correspondingly longer spin period. This implies that neutron stars in Be/X-ray binaries with long spin periods can be much younger

  13. Emission lines from X-ray-heated accretion disks in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Kallman, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the structure of accretion disks illuminated by X-rays from a central compact object in a binary system. X-rays can photoionize the upper atmosphere of the disk and form an accretion disk corona (ADC) where emission lines can form. We construct a model to calculate the vertical structure and the emission spectrum of the ADC with parameters appropriate to low-mass X-ray binaries. These models are made by nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of ion and level populations and include a large number of atomic processes for 10 cosmically abundant elements. Transfer of radiation is treated by using the escape probability formalism. The vertical temperature profile of the ADC consists of a Compton-heated region and a mid-T zone where the temperature is approximately 10(exp 6) K. A thermal instability occurs close to the disk photosphere and causes the temperature of the ADC to drop abruptly from 10(exp 6) K to several times 10(exp 4) K. The emission spectrum in the optical, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, and X-ray range is discussed and compared with the observations.

  14. Stellar feedback from high-mass X-ray binaries in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artale, M. C.; Tissera, P. B.; Pellizza, L. J.

    2015-04-01

    We explored the role of X-ray binaries composed by a black hole and a massive stellar companion [black hole X-ray binaries (BHXs)] as sources of kinetic feedback by using hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. Following previous results, our BHX model selects metal-poor stars (Z = [0, 10-4]) as possible progenitors. The model that better reproduces observations assumes that an ˜20 per cent fraction of low-metallicity black holes are in binary systems which produces BHXs. These sources are estimated to deposit ˜1052 erg of kinetic energy per event. With these parameters and in the simulated volume, we find that the energy injected by BHXs represents ˜30 per cent of the total energy released by Type II supernova and BHX events at redshift z ˜ 7 and then decreases rapidly as baryons get chemically enriched. Haloes with virial masses smaller than ˜1010 M⊙ (or Tvir ≲ 105 K) are the most directly affected ones by BHX feedback. These haloes host galaxies with stellar masses in the range 107-108 M⊙. Our results show that BHX feedback is able to keep the interstellar medium warm, without removing a significant gas fraction, in agreement with previous analytical calculations. Consequently, the stellar-to-dark matter mass ratio is better reproduced at high redshift. Our model also predicts a stronger evolution of the number of galaxies as a function of the stellar mass with redshift when BHX feedback is considered. These findings support previous claims that the BHXs could be an effective source of feedback in early stages of galaxy evolution.

  15. CLUSTERING BETWEEN HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES AND OB ASSOCIATIONS IN THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Bodaghee, A.; Tomsick, J. A.; Rodriguez, J.

    2012-01-10

    We present the first direct measurement of the spatial cross-correlation function of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and active OB star-forming complexes in the Milky Way. This result relied on a sample containing 79 hard X-ray-selected HMXBs and 458 OB associations. Clustering between the two populations is detected with a significance above 7{sigma} for distances <1 kpc. Thus, HMXBs closely trace the underlying distribution of the massive star-forming regions that are expected to produce the progenitor stars of HMXBs. The average offset of 0.4 {+-} 0.2 kpc between HMXBs and OB associations is consistent with being due to natal kicks at velocities of the order of 100 {+-} 50 km s{sup -1}. The characteristic scale of the correlation function suggests an average kinematical age (since the supernova phase) of {approx}4 Myr for the HMXB population. Despite being derived from a global view of our Galaxy, these signatures of HMXB evolution are consistent with theoretical expectations as well as observations of individual objects.

  16. X-ray emission from the remnant of a carbon deflagration supernova - SN 1572 (Tycho)

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, H.; Masai, K.; Nomoto, K.

    1988-11-01

    A spherically symmetric hydrodynamic code is used to study the evolution of a young supernova remnant on the basis of a carbon deflagration model for type Ia supernovae. The nonequilibrium X-ray emission has been determined for the elemental composition of the model. The discrepancy between the derived intensity of the Fe D-alpha line blend and the observed value is eliminated by assuming that the stratification of the elemental composition in the supernova ejecta is partially removed by mixing. 59 references.

  17. The Fall and Rise of X-ray Supernova 2005kd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, Vikram; Reddy, Ratuja; Bauer, Franz E.

    2015-01-01

    Supernova (SN) 2005kd belongs to the class of Type IIn SNe, which show narrow lines in their early spectra. It is one of the most luminous X-ray SNe known - in excess of Lx = 1041 ergs/s at peak. The evolution of its X-ray luminosity with time is rather atypical, with a general dimming, as expected, followed by an unexpected re-brightening. We report on a recent 30 ks Chandra observation of SN 2005kd, which extends the X-ray lightcurve of this SN from 2005 to 2013. We use the time evolution of the X-ray flux to explore the expansion of the forward and reverse shock of the SN within the surrounding medium, as well as to study the structure of the surrounding medium.

  18. Studying X-Ray Binaries with High Energy Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Kaaret, P.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to further our understanding of the dynamics of accreting neutron stars and black holes in the hope of using these systems as probes of the physics of strong gravitational fields. The main focus of this work has been a multi-year program of simultaneous millisecond x-ray timing and spectral observations carried out with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) to perform the x-ray timing and one of the satellites Asca, BeppoSAX, or Chandra to perform x-ray spectral measurements. With the advent of Chandra, we have extended our work to include imaging of X-ray jets from binaries and the study of extragalactic X-ray binaries. Significant progress was made over the past year.

  19. Simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of Galactic Centre low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendsen, Stephan G. H.; Fender, Robert; Kuulkers, Erik; Heise, J.; van der Klis, M.

    2000-10-01

    We have performed simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of 13 Galactic Centre low-mass X-ray binaries in 1998 April using the Wide Field Cameras on board BeppoSAX and the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the latter simultaneously at 4.8 and 8.64GHz. We detect two Z sources, GX 17+2 and GX 5-1, and the unusual `hybrid' source GX 13+1. Upper limits, which are significantly deeper than previous non-detections, are placed on the radio emission from two more Z sources and seven atoll sources. Hardness-intensity diagrams constructed from the Wide Field Camera data reveal GX 17+2 and GX 5-1 to have been on the lower part of the horizontal branch and/or the upper part of the normal branch at the time of the observations, and the two non-detected Z sources, GX 340+0 and GX 349+2, to have been on the lower part of the normal branch. This is consistent with the previous empirically determined relation between radio and X-ray emission from Z sources, in which radio emission is strongest on the horizontal branch and weakest on the flaring branch. For the first time we have information on the X-ray state of atoll sources, which are clearly radio-quiet relative to the Z sources, during periods of observed radio upper limits. We place limits on the linear polarization from the three detected sources, and use accurate radio astrometry of GX 17+2 to confirm that it is probably not associated with the optical star NP Ser. Additionally we place strong upper limits on the radio emission from the X-ray binary 2S 0921-630, disagreeing with suggestions that it is a Z-source viewed edge-on.

  20. Chandra Observation of Luminous and Ultraluminous X-ray Binaries in M101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, K.; Pence, W. D.; Snowden, S. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    X-ray binaries in the Milky Way are among the brightest objects on the X-ray sky. With the increasing sensitivity of recent missions, it is now possible to study X-ray binaries in nearby galaxies. We present data on six ultraluminous binaries in the nearby spiral galaxy, M101, obtained with Chandra ACIS-S. Of these, five appear to be similar to ultraluminous sources in other galaxies, while the brightest source, P098, shows some unique characteristics. We present our interpretation of the data in terms of an optically thick outflow, and discuss implications.

  1. Characterizing X-Ray and Radio Emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni during Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vikram; Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane; Tomsick, John A.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Walton, Dominic J.; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William; Fuerst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hailey, Charles; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Zhang, William W.

    2016-04-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broadband (0.3–30 keV) quiescent luminosity of the source is 8.9 × 1032 erg s‑1 for a distance of 2.4 kpc. The source shows clear variability on short timescales (an hour to a couple of hours) in the radio, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray bands in the form of multiple flares. The broadband X-ray spectra obtained from XMM-Newton and NuSTAR can be characterized with a power-law model having a photon index of Γ = 2.12 ± 0.07 (90% confidence errors); however, residuals at high energies indicate spectral curvature significant at a 3σ confidence level with the e-folding energy of the cutoff as {20}-7+20 keV. Such curvature can be explained using synchrotron emission from the base of a jet outflow. Radio observations using the VLA reveal that the spectral index evolves on very fast timescales (as short as 10 minutes), switching between optically thick and thin synchrotron emission, possibly due to instabilities in the compact jet or stochastic instabilities in the accretion rate. We explore different scenarios to explain this very fast variability.

  2. The X-ray emission from Type IIn Supernovae as a Probe of the Stellar Environment and Supernova Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, Vikram

    2016-04-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (SNe) are divided into different subclasses, depending mainly on their optical spectra or light curve. Type IIn supernovae (SNe) form one of the more recent subclasses, having been first identified in 1990. They are characterized by narrow lines on a broad base in the optical spectrum, and comprise 1 to 4% of the total core collapse SN population. There exists a wide diversity in SNe that exhibit IIn features, which has greatly complicated the task of identifying their progenitors.IIns are observed to have the highest X-ray luminosity of all the SN classes, with luminosities generally exceeding 1038 ergs/s after several thousand days. Thus they are observable in X-rays even at late times, hundreds to thousands of days after explosion. They also exhibit the most diversity in their light curves. Many of the lightcurves tend to fall off rather steeply at late times, although one interesting case displayed a rising light curve for several thousand days. These characteristics, along with their high luminosities at other wavelengths, imply initial expansion in a very dense medium, with the densities decreasing rapidly a few years after explosion. Their X-ray spectra generally show distinct lines, suggesting that the emission is thermal in origin. The X-ray spectra can provide insight into the density structure, composition and metallicity of the surrounding medium, and the ionization level, through the spectra themselves as well as the X-ray absorption.In this presentation we will show the lightcurves of almost all IIns that have been observed in the X-ray band, and compare and contrast them to the X-ray lightcurves of other types of SNe. We summarize the known properties of the X-ray emission from Type IIn SNe, and explore the implications for the SN environment, progenitor mass-loss and the identity of the progenitors.

  3. Measuring The Distances, Masses, and Radii of Neutron Stars In X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, F.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.

    2010-03-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries that have independent distance measurements and show thermonuclear X-ray bursts are ideal sources for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. I will introduce our program to systematically measure the distances, masses, and radii of neutron stars in such binaries. We utilize high energy resolution X-ray spectra to measure the ISM column densities to these sources as well as time resolved, high count rate X-ray spectra to study their bursts. I will discuss in detail how the combination of these observations have led to the measurement of the masses and radii of the neutron stars in the low mass X-ray binaries EXO 1745-248, 4U 1608-52, and 4U 1820-30.

  4. The Soft X-ray Spectrum of the High Mass X-Ray Binary V0332+53 in Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshamouty, Khaled G.; Heinke, Craig O.; Chouinard, Rhys

    2016-08-01

    The behaviour of neutron stars in high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) during periods of low mass transfer is of great interest. Indications of spectral softening in systems at low mass transfer rates suggest that some HMXBs are undergoing fundamental changes in their accretion regime, but the nature of the quiescent X-ray emission is not clear. We performed a 39 ks XMM-Newton observation of the transient HMXB V0332+53, finding it at a very low X-ray luminosity (Lx ˜ 4 × 1032 erg s-1). A power-law spectral fit requires an unusually soft spectral index (4.4^{+0.9}_{-0.6}), while a magnetized neutron star atmosphere model, with temperature LogTeff 6.7±0.2 K and inferred emitting radius of ˜0.2 - 0.3 km, gives a good fit. We suggest that the quiescent X-ray emission from V0332+53 is mainly from a hot spot on the surface of the neutron star. No conclusions on the presence of pulsations could be drawn due to the low count rate. Due to the high absorption column, thermal emission from the rest of the neutron star could be only weakly constrained, to LogTeff <6.14^{+0.05}_{-6.14} K, or <3 × 1033 erg s-1.

  5. Recent Radio Results on X-ray Binaries and Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupen, M. P.; Dhawan, V.; Mioduszewski, A. J.

    2003-03-01

    We present recent results from observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) on a number of recent X-ray transients, and a few old friends. In addition to any new X-ray transients discovered between now and the HEAD meeting, we discuss the radio counterpart to XTE J1720-318; the recent resurgence of XTE J1908+094 and GRS 1758-258; the connection between the radio and X-ray emission in the millisecond X-ray pulsars XTE J0929-314 and SAX J1808.4-3658; and VLBA imaging of the 1999 outburst of the microquasar V4641 Sgr, confirming the rapid expansion seen with the VLA. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  6. Recognition of binary x-ray systems utilizing the doppler effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, B. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of recognizing the duality of a single class of X-ray systems utilizing the Doppler effect is studied. The procedure is based on the presence of a period which coincides with the orbital period at the intensity of the radiation in a fixed energy interval of the X-ray component of a binary system.

  7. Constraining the formation of black holes in short-period black hole low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Serena; Nelemans, Gijs

    2015-11-01

    The formation of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) is still very uncertain. Two main uncertainties are the amount of mass ejected in the supernova (SN) event (if any) and the magnitude of the natal kick (NK) the BH receives at birth (if any). Repetto et al., studying the position of Galactic X-ray binaries containing BHs, found evidence for BHs receiving high NKs at birth. In this paper, we extend that study, taking into account the previous binary evolution of the sources as well. The seven short-period BH X-ray binaries that we use are compact binaries consisting of a low-mass star orbiting a BH in a period less than 1 d. We trace their binary evolution backwards in time, from the current observed state of mass transfer, to the moment the BH was formed, and we add the extra information on the kinematics of the binaries. We find that several systems could be explained by no NK, just mass ejection, while for two systems (and possibly more) a high kick is required. So unless the latter have an alternative formation, such as within a globular cluster, we conclude that at least some BHs get high kicks. This challenges the standard picture that BH kicks would be scaled down from neutron star kicks. Furthermore, we find that five systems could have formed with a non-zero NK but zero mass ejected (i.e. no SN) at formation, as predicted by neutrino-driven NKs.

  8. X-Ray Illumination of the Ejecta of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, J.; Fransson, C.; Oestlin, G.; Groeningsson, P.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kozma, C.; Sollerman, J.; Challis, P.; Kirshner, R. P.; Chevalier, R. A.; Heng, K.; McCray, R.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Bouchet, P.; Crotts, A.; Danziger, J.; Dwek, E.; France, K.; Garnavich, P. M.; Lawrence, S. S.; Leibundgut, B.; Lundqvist, P.; Panagia, N.; Pun, C. S. J.; Sonneborn, G.

    2011-01-01

    When a massive star explodes as a supernova, substantial amounts of radioactive elements-primarily Ni-56, Ni-57 and Ti-44 are produced. After the initial from shock heating, the light emitted by the supernova is due to the decay of these elements. However, after decades, the energy powering a supernova remnant comes from the shock interaction between the ejecta and the surrounding medium. The transition to this phase has hitherto not been observed: supernovae occur too infrequently in the Milky Way to provide a young example, and extragalactic supernovae are generally too faint and too small. Here we report observations that show this transition in the supernova SN 1987A in the Large Magellan Cloud. From 1994 to 200l, the ejecta faded owing to radioactive decay of Ti-44 as predicted. Then the flux started to increase, more than doubling by the end of 2009. We show that this increase is the result of heat deposited by X-rays produced as the ejecta interacts with the surrounding material. In time, the X-rays will penetrate farther into the ejects, enabling us to analyse the structure and chemistry of the vanished star.

  9. X-ray illumination of the ejecta of supernova 1987A.

    PubMed

    Larsson, J; Fransson, C; Ostlin, G; Gröningsson, P; Jerkstrand, A; Kozma, C; Sollerman, J; Challis, P; Kirshner, R P; Chevalier, R A; Heng, K; McCray, R; Suntzeff, N B; Bouchet, P; Crotts, A; Danziger, J; Dwek, E; France, K; Garnavich, P M; Lawrence, S S; Leibundgut, B; Lundqvist, P; Panagia, N; Pun, C S J; Smith, N; Sonneborn, G; Wang, L; Wheeler, J C

    2011-06-23

    When a massive star explodes as a supernova, substantial amounts of radioactive elements--primarily (56)Ni, (57)Ni and (44)Ti--are produced. After the initial flash of light from shock heating, the fading light emitted by the supernova is due to the decay of these elements. However, after decades, the energy powering a supernova remnant comes from the shock interaction between the ejecta and the surrounding medium. The transition to this phase has hitherto not been observed: supernovae occur too infrequently in the Milky Way to provide a young example, and extragalactic supernovae are generally too faint and too small. Here we report observations that show this transition in the supernova SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud. From 1994 to 2001, the ejecta faded owing to radioactive decay of (44)Ti as predicted. Then the flux started to increase, more than doubling by the end of 2009. We show that this increase is the result of heat deposited by X-rays produced as the ejecta interacts with the surrounding material. In time, the X-rays will penetrate farther into the ejecta, enabling us to analyse the structure and chemistry of the vanished star. PMID:21654749

  10. A Study of Supernova Remnants with Center-Filled X-Ray Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2001-01-01

    The proposed study entails use of archival data, primarily from past and active X-ray observatories, to study the properties of a class of supernova remnants (SNRs) which display a centrally-bright X-ray morphology. Several models which have been proposed to explain the morphology are being investigated for comparisons with measured characteristics of several remnants: nonthermal emission from a central synchrotron nebula; thermal emission enhanced by slow evaporation of cool clouds in the hot SNR interior; and relic thermal emission from the SNR interior after the remnant has entered the radiative phase of evolution, thus causing the shell emission to cease.

  11. Soft X-ray emission from the Lupus Loop and Sn 1006 supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. F., Jr.; Hearn, D. R.; Richardson, J. A.; Behnken, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    X-ray maps of the Lupus region have been obtained in a raster scan observation from SAS 3. These show the Lupus Loop to be a faint extended source of soft X-rays with a temperature about 2.5 million K. The most prominent feature of the region is the A.D. 1006 supernova remnant, which is unexpectedly bright at 0.2-1.0 keV. One speculative interpretation of the low-energy flux from SN 1006 is as blackbody radiation from a hot neutron star.

  12. The x-ray structure of the supernova remnant W49B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, John R.; Murphy, Rosa; Chu, You-Hua; Garcia, Guillermo; Goscha, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Comparison of x-ray and radio images of W49B and other supernova remnants (SNR) provides detailed information on the mechanisms responsible for the emission and on the evolution of the remnants. There is faint x-ray emission from all parts of W49B but most of it is concentrated near the center of the remnant, unlike the radio emission which arises in a shell near the periphery. This structure indicates that this SNR is in the adolescent phase of its lifetime.

  13. Spatially resolved X-ray line spectroscopy of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelg, Eric V.; Hwang, Una

    1996-01-01

    Narrow band X-ray images of Tycho's supernova remnant, acquired with the solid-state spectrometer onboard the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), are presented. The remnant is mapped in several prominent emission lines and in the 1.4 keV to 1.7 keV and 4 keV to 6 keV continua. A spatial resolution of approximately 0.5 min was obtained. No significant correlation was found for Tycho between the X-ray 4 keV to 6 keV continuum and the radio morphology.

  14. ON NEUTRAL ABSORPTION AND SPECTRAL EVOLUTION IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; Cackett, E. M.; Reis, R. C.

    2009-12-10

    Current X-ray observatories make it possible to follow the evolution of transient and variable X-ray binaries across a broad range in luminosity and source behavior. In such studies, it can be unclear whether evolution in the low-energy portion of the spectrum should be attributed to evolution in the source, or instead to evolution in neutral photoelectric absorption. Dispersive spectrometers make it possible to address this problem. We have analyzed a small but diverse set of X-ray binaries observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer across a range in luminosity and different spectral states. The column density in individual photoelectric absorption edges remains constant with luminosity, both within and across source spectral states. This finding suggests that absorption in the interstellar medium strongly dominates the neutral column density observed in spectra of X-ray binaries. Consequently, evolution in the low-energy spectrum of X-ray binaries should properly be attributed to evolution in the source spectrum. We discuss our results in the context of X-ray binary spectroscopy with current and future X-ray missions.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: X-ray and radio sources in binaries (Malkov+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O. Y.; Tessema, S. B.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2016-05-01

    We have also compiled a general list of 239 radio pulsars in binary systems. The list is supplied with indication of photometric, spectroscopic or X-ray binarity, and with cross-identification data. (4 data files).

  16. Origin and evolution of X-ray binaries in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical model developed by Grindlay (1984 and 1985) and Grindlay and Hertz (1985) to explain the relative numbers of low-luminosity and high-luminosity X-ray sources in Galactic globular clusters is briefly characterized, and the relevant observational evidence is summarized. In the model, high-rate mass transfer onto white dwarfs in about 1 percent of the low-luminosity binary sources produces neutron stars, which then form compact high-luminosity X-ray binaries (by tidal capture in the dense cluster cores); these in turn evolve into hierarchical triple systems. Evidence considered includes observations of the high-luminosity giant-fed X-ray binary in M 15, the results of searches for CVs in globulars, comparisons of X-ray-binary and host-globular evolution, and indications that GX 17 + 2 is a bound triple.

  17. On double-degenerate type Ia supernova progenitors as supersoft X-ray sources. A population synthesis analysis using SeBa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M. T. B.; Nelemans, G.; Voss, R.; Toonen, S.

    2014-03-01

    Context. The nature of the progenitors of type Ia supernova progenitors remains unclear. While it is usually agreed that single-degenerate progenitor systems would be luminous supersoft X-ray sources, it was recently suggested that double-degenerate progenitors might also go through a supersoft X-ray phase. Aims: We aim to examine the possibility of double-degenerate progenitor systems being supersoft X-ray systems, and place stringent upper limits on the maximally possible durations of any supersoft X-ray source phases and expected number of these systems in a galactic population. Methods: We employ the binary population synthesis code SeBa to examine the mass-transfer characteristics of a possible supersoft X-ray phase of double-degenerate type Ia supernova progenitor systems for 1) the standard SeBa assumptions; and 2) an optimistic best-case scenario. The latter case establishes firm upper limits on the possible population of supersoft source double-degenerate type Ia supernova progenitor systems. Results: Our results indicate that unlike what is expected for single-degenerate progenitor systems, the vast majority of the material accreted by either pure wind mass transfer or a combination of wind and RLOF mass transfer is helium rather than hydrogen. Even with extremely optimistic assumptions concerning the mass-transfer and retention efficiencies, the average mass accreted by systems that eventually become double-degenerate type Ia supernovae is small. Consequently, the lengths of time that these systems may be supersoft X-ray sources are short, even under optimal conditions, and the expected number of such systems in a galactic population is negligible. Conclusions: The population of double-degenerate type Ia supernova progenitors that are supersoft X-ray sources is at least an order of magnitude smaller than the population of single-degenerate progenitors expected to be supersoft X-ray sources, and the supersoft X-ray behaviour of double-degenerate systems

  18. Studying Young and Old Supernova Remnants with the Upcoming ASTRO-H X-ray Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar; Hughes, John P.; Long, Knox; Bamba, Aya; Aharonian, Felix; Foster, Adam; Funk, Stefan; Hiraga, Junko; Ishida, Manabu; Katsuda, Satoru; Koyama, Katsuji; Leutenegger, Maurice; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Mori, Koji; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takashi; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Petre, Robert; Sawada, Makoto; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamauchi, Shigeo; ASTRO-H Science Working Group

    2015-01-01

    The upcoming X-ray mission ASTRO-H will open a new discovery window to the high-energy Universe thanks to the unprecedented high-resolution spectroscopy (~7eV) to be achieved with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) combined with its broadband coverage (0.5-600 keV) with the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI), Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) and the Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD). Supernova remnants (SNRs) are a prime science focus for ASTRO-H, particularly with the SXS providing accurate plasma diagnostics of line-rich spectra expected from the youngest, ejecta-dominated, SNRs to the oldest SNRs impacted by their interaction with the Interstellar Medium (ISM). We here highlight the SNR science topics and program that the ASTRO-H team considers of highest priority and impact. For the younger SNRs, the primary science goals are (1) using abundance measurements to unveil SNR progenitors, (2) using spatial and velocity distribution of the ejecta to understand supernova explosion mechanisms, and (3) revealing the link between the thermal plasma state of SNRs and the efficiency of their particle acceleration. For the older SNRs where thermal emission is dominated or heavily impacted by the ISM, the primary goals are (1) constraining metal abundances and physical processes in the mature limb-brightened SNRs, and (2) understanding the puzzling nature of the `mixed-morphology' SNRs and the physics of recombining plasma. For the pulsar-powered nebulae, also known as Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) or plerions with many still lacking thermal X-ray emission from their supernova shells, ASTRO-H will shed light on their progenitors and environment. The hard X-ray coverage on board ASTRO-H will further allow a study of their broadband spectra (for the brightest objects), beyond NuSTAR's range, filling the gap between the soft X-ray regime (with current X-ray missions) and the gamma-ray regime (with Fermi in the GeV and H.E.S.S. in the TeV), allowing the search for spectral breaks in the hard X-ray band.

  19. Supernova Remnants in the Sedov Expansion Phase: Thermal X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Lyerly, William J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2001-02-01

    Improved calculations of X-ray spectra for supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Sedov-Taylor phase are reported, which for the first time include reliable atomic data for Fe L-shell lines. This new set of Sedov models also allows for a partial collisionless heating of electrons at the blast wave and for energy transfer from ions to electrons through Coulomb collisions. X-ray emission calculations are based on the updated Hamilton-Sarazin spectral model. The calculated X-ray spectra are successfully interpreted in terms of three distribution functions: the electron temperature and ionization timescale distributions, and the ionization timescale-averaged electron temperature distribution. The comparison of Sedov models with a frequently used single nonequilibrium ionization (NEI) timescale model reveals that this simple model is generally not an appropriate approximation to X-ray spectra of SNRs. We find instead that plane-parallel shocks provide a useful approximation to X-ray spectra of SNRs, particularly for young SNRs. Sedov X-ray models described here, together with simpler plane shock and single-ionization timescale models, have been implemented as standard models in the widely used XSPEC v11 spectral software package.

  20. Centaurus X-3. [early x-ray binary star spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Cowley, A. P.; Crampton, D.; Van Paradus, J.; White, N. E.

    1979-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of Krzeminski's star at dispersions 25-60 A/mm are described. The primary is an evolved star of type O6-O8(f) with peculiarities, some of which are attributable to X-ray heating. Broad emission lines at 4640A (N III), 4686 A(He II) and H-alpha show self-absorption and do not originate entirely from the region near the X-ray star. The primary is not highly luminous (bolometric magnitude about -9) and does not show signs of an abnormally strong stellar wind. The X-ray source was 'on' at the time of optical observations. Orbital parameters are presented for the primary, which yield masses of 17 + or - 2 and 1.0 + or - 3 solar masses for the stars. The optical star is undermassive for its luminosity, as are other OB-star X-ray primaries. The rotation is probably synchronized with the orbital motion. The distance to Cen X-3 is estimated to be 10 + or - 1 kpc. Basic data for 12 early-type X-ray primaries are discussed briefly

  1. BLACK HOLE SPIN-ORBIT MISALIGNMENT IN GALACTIC X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fragos, T.; Tremmel, M.; Rantsiou, E.; Belczynski, K. E-mail: michaeltremmel2007@u.northwestern.ed E-mail: kbelczyn@nmsu.ed

    2010-08-10

    In black hole (BH) X-ray binaries (XRBs), a misalignment between the spin axis of the BH and the orbital angular momentum can occur during the supernova explosion that forms the compact object. In this Letter, we present population synthesis (PS) models of Galactic BH XRBs and study the probability density function of the misalignment angle and its dependence on our model parameters. In our modeling, we also take into account the evolution of the misalignment angle due to accretion of material onto the BH during the XRB phase. The major factor that sets the misalignment angle for XRBs is the natal kick that the BH may receive at its formation. However, large kicks tend to disrupt binaries, while small kicks allow the formation of XRBs and naturally select systems with small misalignment angles. Our calculations predict that the majority (>67%) of Galactic field BH XRBs have rather small ({approx}<10{sup 0}) misalignment angles, while some systems may reach misalignment angles as high as {approx}90{sup 0} and even higher. These results are robust among all PS models. The assumption of small misalignment angles is extensively used to observationally estimate BH spin magnitudes, and for the first time we are able to confirm this assumption using detailed PS calculations.

  2. The Peculiar Galactic Center Neutron Star X-Ray Binary XMM J174457-2850.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.; Kennea, J.; Gehrels, N.; Haggard, D.; Ponti, G.

    2014-01-01

    The recent discovery of a milli-second radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of 2 hr and a radiated energy output of 5E40 erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of Lx5E32 ergs and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to Lx1E35-1E36 ergs for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at Lx1E33-1E34 ergs. This unusual X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of 1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.

  3. Sigma observations of the low mass X-ray binaries of the galactic bulge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldwurm, A.; Denis, M.; Paul, J.; Faisse, S.; Roques, J. P.; Bouchet, L.; Vedrenne, G.; Mandrou, P.; Sunyaev, R.; Churazov, E.

    1995-01-01

    The soft gamma-ray telescope (35-1300 keV) SIGMA aboard the high energy GRANAT space observatory has been monitoring the Galactic Bulge region for more than 2000 h of effective time since March 1990. In the resulting average 35-75 keV image we detected ten sources at a level of greater than 5 standard deviations, 6 of which can be identified with low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB). Among them, one is the 1993 X-ray nova in Ophiuchus (GRS 1726-249), one is an X-ray pulsar (GX 1+4), two are associated with X-ray bursters (GX 354-0 and A 1742-294) and two with bursting X-ray binaries in the globular clusters Terzan 2 and Terzan 1. Their spectral and long term variability behavior as measured by SIGMMA are presented and discussed.

  4. Accretion disc atmospheres and winds in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Trigo, M.; Boirin, L.

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, X-ray spectroscopy has enabled a wealth of discoveries of photoionised absorbers in X-ray binaries. Studies of such accretion disc atmospheres and winds are of fundamental importance to understand accretion processes and possible feedback mechanisms to the environment. In this work, we review the current observational state and theoretical understanding of accretion disc atmospheres and winds in low-mass X-ray binaries, focusing on the wind launching mechanisms and on the dependence on accretion state. We conclude with issues that deserve particular attention.

  5. A Study of Supernova Remnants with Center-Filled X-Ray Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    1997-01-01

    CTA 1 is a center-filled supernova remnant (SNR) whose morphology and spectrum indicate the presence of a central pulsar, a synchrotron nebula, and a thermal component associated with the expansion of the blast wave into the interstellar medium. The centrally bright emission surrounds the position of a faint point source of x-rays observed with the ROSAT PSPC. Here we report on ASCA observations that confirm the nonthermal nature of the diffuse emission from the central regions of the remnant. We also present evidence for weak thermal emission that appears to increase in strength toward the outer boundary of the SNR. Thus, CTA 1 appears to be an x-ray composite remnant. Both the aftermath of the explosive supernova event and the energetic compact core are observable.

  6. The End of Days -- Chandra Catches X-ray Glow From Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-12-01

    Through a combination of serendipity and skill, scientists have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to capture a rare glimpse of X-radiation from the early phases of a supernova, one of the most violent events in nature. Although more than a thousand supernovas have been observed by optical astronomers, the early X-ray glow from the explosions has been detected in less than a dozen cases. The Chandra observations were made under the direction of a team of scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, led by Walter Lewin and his graduate student, Derek Fox. When combined with simultaneous observations by radio and optical telescopes, the X-ray observations tell about the thickness of the shell that was blown off, its density, its speed, and how much material was shed by the star before it exploded. Chandra observed an X-ray glow from SN1999em with the total power of 50,000 suns. Ten days later it observed the supernova for another nine hours, and found that the X rays had faded to half their previous intensity. The optical luminosity, which had the brightness of 200 million suns, had faded somewhat less. No radio emission was detected at any time. With this information, the MIT group and their colleagues are already piecing together a picture of the catastrophic explosion. Observations by optical astronomers showed that SN1999em was a Type II supernova produced by the collapse of the core of a star ten or more times as massive as the Sun. The intense heat generated in the collapse produces a cataclysmic rebound that sends high speed debris flying outward at speeds in excess of 20 million miles per hour. The debris crashes into matter shed by the former star before the explosion. This awesome collision generates shock waves that heat expanding debris to three million degrees. The X-ray glow from this hot gas was detected by Chandra and gives astrophysicists a better understanding of the dynamics of the explosion, as well as the

  7. The Environment of X-Ray Binaries in the Dwarf Starburst Galaxy NGC 1569

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Raines, Steven N.

    2008-05-01

    We use deep, J and Ks observations of NGC 1569 acquired with FLAMINGOS on the KPNO 4-m to search for star cluster counterparts to X-ray binaries identified in archived Chandra images of this dwarf starburst galaxy. Performing near-IR photometry on the star cluster counterparts, we determine their colors, luminosities and masses. Comparing these results to the properties for all clusters in this galaxy, we search for trends in clusters associated with X-ray sources. Combining this study with FISICA, near-IR spectral observations, we further characterize the surroundings to X-ray binaries in NGC 1569. Contrasting this work with findings from a similar study performed on the Antennae galaxies, a large, merging system, we investigate the differences in X-ray binary environments.

  8. On binary driven hypernovae and their nested late X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccino, Marco; Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Enderli, Maxime; Kovacevic, Milos; Izzo, Luca; Penacchioni, Ana Virginia; Pisani, Giovanni Battista; Rueda, Jorge A.; Wang, Yu

    2015-07-01

    The induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm addresses energetic (1052-1054 erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated to supernovae (SNe) and proposes as their progenitors tight binary systems composed of an evolved FeCO core and a companion neutron star (NS). Their emission is characterized by four specific episodes: Episode 1, corresponding to the on-set of the FeCO SN explosion and the accretion of the ejecta onto the companion NS; Episode 2, related the collapse of the companionNS to a black hole (BH) and to the emission of a long GRB; Episode 3, observed in X-rays and characterized by a steep decay, a plateau phase and a late power-law decay; Episode 4, corresponding to the optical SN emission due to the 56Ni decay. We focus on Episode 3 and we show that, from the thermal component observed during the steep decay of the prototype GRB 090618, the emission region has a typical dimension of ~1013 cm, which is inconsistent with the typical size of the emitting region of GRBs, e.g., ~1016 cm. We propose, therefore, that the X-ray afterglow emission originates from a spherically symmetric SN ejecta expanding at G ˜ 2 or, possibly, from the accretion onto the newly formed black hole, and we name these systems "binary driven hypernovae" (BdHNe). This interpretation is alternative to the traditional afterglow model based on the GRB synchrotron emission from a collimated jet outflow, expanding at ultra-relativistic Lorentz factor of G ~ 102-103 and originating from the collapse of a single object. We show then that the rest-frame energy band 0.3-10 keV X-ray luminosities of three selected BdHNe, GRB 060729, GRB 061121, and GRB 130427A, evidence a precisely constrained "nested" structure and satisfy precise scaling laws between the average prompt luminosity, < Liso>, and the luminosity at the end of the plateau, La, as functions of the time at the end of the plateau. All these features extend the applicability of the "cosmic candle" nature of Episode 3. The

  9. X-Ray Synchrotron-emitting Fe-rich Ejecta in Supernova Remnant RCW 86

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Dyer, Kristy K.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2002-12-01

    Supernova remnants may exhibit both thermal and nonthermal X-ray emission. In a previous study with ASCA data, we found that the middle-aged supernova remnant RCW 86 showed evidence for both processes, and we predicted that observations with much higher spatial resolution would distinguish harder X-rays, which we proposed were primarily synchrotron emission, from softer, thermal X-rays. Here we describe Chandra observations that amply confirm our predictions. Striking differences in the morphology of X-rays below 1 keV and above 2 keV point to a different physical origin. Hard X-ray emission is correlated fairly well with the edges of regions of radio emission, suggesting that these are the locations of shock waves at which both short-lived X-ray-emitting electrons and longer lived radio-emitting electrons are accelerated. Soft X-rays are spatially well correlated with optical emission from nonradiative shocks, which are almost certainly portions of the outer blast wave. These soft X-rays are well fitted with simple thermal plane-shock models. Harder X-rays show Fe Kα emission and are well described with a similar soft thermal component, but a much stronger synchrotron continuum dominating above 2 keV, and a strong Fe Kα line. Quantitative analysis of this line and the surrounding continuum shows that it cannot be produced by thermal emission from a cosmic-abundance plasma; the ionization time is too short, as shown by both the low centroid energy (6.4 keV) and the absence of oxygen lines below 1 keV. Instead, a model of a plane shock in Fe-rich ejecta, with a synchrotron continuum, provides a natural explanation. This requires that reverse shocks in ejecta be accelerating electrons to energies of order 50 TeV. We show that maximum energies of this order can be produced by radiation-limited diffusive shock acceleration at the reverse shocks. In the Appendix, we demonstrate that an explanation of the continuum as being due to nonthermal bremsstrahlung is unlikely.

  10. Relations between X-ray timing features and spectral parameters of Galactic black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiele, H.; Belloni, T. M.; Kalemci, E.; Motta, S.

    2013-03-01

    We present a study of correlations between spectral and timing parameters for a sample of black hole X-ray binary candidates. Data are taken from GX 339-4, H1743-322 and XTE J1650-500, as the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observed complete outbursts of these sources. In our study we investigate outbursts that happened before the end of 2009 to make use of the high-energy coverage of the High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment detector and select observations that show a certain type of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs; type-C). The spectral parameters are derived using the empirical convolution model SIMPL to model the Comptonized component of the emission together with a disc blackbody for the emission of the accretion disc. Additional spectral features, namely a reflection component, a high-energy cut-off and excess emission at 6.4 keV, are taken into account. Our investigations confirm the known positive correlation between photon index and centroid frequency of the QPOs and reveal an anticorrelation between the fraction of up-scattered photons and the QPO frequency. We show that both correlations behave as expected in the `sombrero' geometry. Furthermore, we find that during outburst decay the correlation between photon index and QPO frequency follows a general track, independent of individual outbursts.

  11. An X-ray View of the Zoo of Compact Objects and Associated Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse explosions of massive stars leave behind some of the most exotic compact objects in the Universe. These include: rotation-powered pulsars like the Crab, powering pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) observed across the electromagnetic spectrum; highly magnetized neutron stars ("magnetars") shining or bursting at high-energies; and X-ray emitting “Central Compact Objects” (CCOs) with intrinsic properties and emission mechanism that remain largely unknown. I will highlight this observed diversity of compact stellar remnants from an X-ray perspective, and address the connection between their properties and those of their hosting supernova remnants (SNRs). In particular I will highlight topics related to their formation and evolution, including: 1) which supernovae make magnetars and the shell-less PWNe?, 2) what can we learn from the apparent age discrepancy between SNRs and their associated pulsars? I will conclude with prospects for observations of SNRs with the upcoming ASTRO-H X-ray mission. The unprecedented spectral resolution on board of ASTRO-H’s micro-calorimeter will particularly open a new discovery window for supernova progenitors' science.

  12. A deep census of the X-ray binary populations in the SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zezas, Andreas; Antoniou, Vallia; Hong, JaeSub; Wright, Nick; Drake, Jeremy J.; Haberl, Frank; SMC XVP Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of the deep Chandra survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) (a Chandra X-ray Visionary Program) yielded a wealth of discrete X-ray sources down to a limiting luminosity of a few times 1032 erg/s. The survey is designed to sample stellar populations of ages between ~10 up to ~100Myr, in order to study the evolution of the X-ray binary populations as a function of age. Based on the comparison of the detected X-ray sources with photometric catalogs of the SMC, we identify over 100 High Mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) associated with the SMC, 21 of which exhibit pulsations. We measure the formation rate of HMXBs as a function of the age of their parent stellar populations, and we find that it shows a clear peak at ages of ~30-40Myr. In addition we measure the X-ray luminosity function of HMXBs which shows a clear break at a luminosity of ~5×1034 erg/s, indicative of the onset of the propeller effect. We discuss these results in the context of X-ray binary populations in environments of different ages and metallicities.

  13. Studying X-Ray Binaries with High Energy Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.; West, Donald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to further our understanding of the dynamics of secreting neutron stars and black holes in the hope of using these systems as probes of the physics of strong gravitational fetus. The main focus of this work has been a multi-year program of simultaneous millisecond X-ray timing and spectral observations carried out with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) to perform the X-ray timing and one of the satellites Asca, BeppoSAX, or Chandra to perform X-ray spectral measurements. With the advent of Chandra, we have extended our work to incLude extragalactic X-ray binaries. We conducted a comprehensive study of the X-ray and radio behavior of the Black Hole Candidate (BHC) X-ray transient XTE J1550-564 using RXTE, Chandra, and the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We showed that strong radio emission is associated with major X-ray outbursts involving an X-ray state transition, while a compact radio jet is seen in the low/hard X-ray state found in the outburst decay. Interesting, the total energy required to produce the compact jet may be a substantial fraction of the total accretion energy of the system in that state. We also performed a detailed study of the spectral and timing properties of the decay. In joint RXTE/BeppoSAX observations of the neutron-star X-ray binary Cyg X-2, we discovered a correlation between the timing properties (the frequency of the horizontal branch oscillations) and the properties of a soft, thermal component of the X-ray spectrum. d e showed that more detX- ray from accreting neutron stars. We have completed analysis of RXTE observations of the X-ray transient SAX J1750.8-2900 made after detection of X-ray bursts from the source with the BeppoSAX Wide-Field Camera. We discovered millisecond oscillations in both the persistent emission and in the X-ray bursts.

  14. Discovery of an X-Ray-emitting Contact Binary System 2MASS J11201034‑2201340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Yang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Yi; Liu, L.; Qian, S.-B.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Lin, L. C. C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Li, K. L.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Chen, W. P.; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2016-06-01

    We report the detection of orbital modulation, a model solution, and the X-ray properties of a newly discovered contact binary, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) J11201034‑2201340. We serendipitously found this X-ray point source outside the error ellipse when searching for possible X-ray counterparts of γ-ray millisecond pulsars among the unidentified objects detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The optical counterpart of the X-ray source (unrelated to the γ-ray source) was then identified using archival databases. The long-term Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey detected a precise signal with a period of P=0.28876208(56) days. A follow-up observation made by the Super Light Telescope of Lulin Observatory revealed the binary nature of the object. Utilizing archived photometric data of multi-band surveys, we construct the spectral energy distribution (SED), which is well fit by a K2V spectral template. The fitting result of the orbital profile using the Wilson–Devinney code suggests that 2MASS J11201034-2201340 is a short-period A-type contact binary and the more massive component has a cool spot. The X-ray emission was first noted in observations made by Swift, and then further confirmed and characterized by an XMM-Newton observation. The X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law or thermal Bremsstrahlung. Unfortunately, we could not observe significant X-ray orbital modulation. Finally, according to the SED, this system is estimated to be 690 pc from Earth with a calculated X-ray intensity of (0.7-1.5)× {10}30 erg s‑1, which is in the expected range of an X-ray emitting contact binary.

  15. MAXI/GSC detection of an X-ray flare-like activity probably from the high mass X-ray binary EXO 1722-363

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoro, H.; Nakajima, M.; Serino, M.; Mihara, T.; Nakahira, S.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Ishikawa, M.; Sugawara, Y.; Sugizaki, M.; Iwakiri, W.; Shidatsu, M.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Isobe, N.; Sugita, S.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Ono, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Harita, S.; Muraki, Y.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Kitaoka, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Shomura, R.; Tanaka, K.; Masumitsu, T.; Kawase, T.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Tanimoto, A.; Tsuboi, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Sasaki, R.; Yamauchi, M.; Furuya, K.; Yamaoka, K.; Nakagawa, Y. E.

    2016-08-01

    At 05:06 UT on 2016 August 23, the MAXI/GSC nova-alert system triggered faint X-ray enhancement from the region positionally consistent with the super-giant high mass X-ray binary pulsar EXO 1722-363 (a.k.a., X 1722-36, IGR J17252-3616).

  16. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  17. Binary phase correlated X-ray intensity variations and flaring activity in the RS CVn binary HR 1099

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. C.; Vaidya, J.

    1988-01-01

    The monitor proportional counter and the imaging proportional counter of the Einstein Observatory were used to observe the X-ray variability of the RS CVn binary HR 1099. The X-ray intensity is found to vary with the 2.837-day period of the binary. An intense X-ray flare was noted on February 17, 1980. The present results are explained using a star spot model, and it is suggested that the flare heated plasma cools either mainly by radiation or equally by conduction and radiation.

  18. ON THE APPARENT LACK OF Be X-RAY BINARIES WITH BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Ziolkowski, Janusz E-mail: jz@camk.edu.p

    2009-12-20

    In our Galaxy there are 64 Be X-ray binaries known to date. Out of these, 42 host a neutron star (NS), and for the remainder the nature of the companion is unknown. None, so far, are known to host a black hole (BH). There seems to be no apparent mechanism that would prevent formation or detection of Be stars with BHs. This disparity is referred to as a missing Be-BH X-ray binary problem. We point out that current evolutionary scenarios that lead to the formation of Be X-ray binaries predict that the ratio of binaries with NSs to the ones with BHs is rather high, F{sub NStoBH} approx 10-50, with the more likely formation models providing the values at the high end. The ratio is a natural outcome of (1) the stellar initial mass function that produces more NSs than BHs and (2) common envelope evolution (i.e., a major mechanism involved in the formation of interacting binaries) that naturally selects progenitors of Be X-ray binaries with NSs (binaries with comparable mass components have more likely survival probabilities) over ones with BHs (which are much more likely to be common envelope mergers). A comparison of this ratio (i.e., F{sub NStoBH} approx 30) with the number of confirmed Be-NS X-ray binaries (42) indicates that the expected number of Be-BH X-ray binaries is of the order of only approx0-2. This is entirely consistent with the observed Galactic sample.

  19. Common envelope mechanisms: constraints from the X-ray luminosity function of high-mass X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Zhao-Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn

    2014-12-10

    We use the measured X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in nearby star-forming galaxies to constrain the common envelope (CE) mechanisms, which play a key role in governing the binary evolution. We find that the XLF can be reproduced quite closely under both CE mechanisms usually adopted, i.e., the α{sub CE} formalism and the γ algorithm, with a reasonable range of parameters considered. Provided that the parameter combination is the same, the γ algorithm is likely to produce more HMXBs than the α{sub CE} formalism, by a factor of up to ∼10. In the framework of the α{sub CE} formalism, a high value of α{sub CE} is required to fit the observed XLF, though it does not significantly affect the global number of the HMXB populations. We present the detailed components of the HMXB populations under the γ algorithm and compare them with those in Zuo et al. and observations. We suggest the distinct observational properties, as well as period distributions of HMXBs, may provide further clues to discriminate between these two types of CE mechanisms.

  20. Spectral and timing nature of the symbiotic X-ray binary 4U 1954+319: The slowest rotating neutron star in an X-ray binary system

    SciTech Connect

    Enoto, Teruaki; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-05-10

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its ∼5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (∼7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-Kα line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (∼60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (≳ 10{sup 12} G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10{sup 33}-10{sup 35} erg s{sup –1}), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a ∼10{sup 13} G NS, this scheme can explain the ∼5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (∼10{sup 16} G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (∼50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfvén shell for a ∼10{sup 13} G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  1. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in AN X-Ray Binary System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'Ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its approx. 5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (is approx. 7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-K alpha line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (approx. 60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (approx. greater than 10(exp12) G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10(exp33)-10(exp35) erg s(exp-1)), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a approx. 10(exp13) G NS, this scheme can explain the approx. 5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (approx. 10(exp16) G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (approx. 50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfv´en shell for a approx. 10(exp13) G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  2. Long-term optical variability of high-mass X-ray binaries. II. Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Nersesian, A.; Zezas, A.; Gkouvelis, L.; Coe, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass X-ray binaries are bright X-ray sources. The high-energy emission is caused by the accretion of matter from the massive companion onto a neutron star. The accreting material comes from either the strong stellar wind in binaries with supergiant companions or the cirscumstellar disk in Be/X-ray binaries. In either case, the Hα line stands out as the main source of information about the state of the accreting material. Aims: We present the results of our monitoring program to study the long-term variability of the Hα line in high-mass X-ray binaries. Our aim is to characterise the optical variability timescales and study the interaction between the neutron star and the accreting material. Methods: We fitted the Hα line with Gaussian profiles and obtained the line parameters and equivalent width. The peak separation in split profiles was used to determine the disk velocity law and estimate the disk radius. The relative intensity of the two peaks (V/R ratio) allowed us to investigate the distribution of gas particles in the disk. The equivalent width was used to characterise the degree of variability of the systems. We also studied the variability of the Hα line in correlation with the X-ray activity. Results: Our results can be summarised as follows: i) we find that Be/X-ray binaries with narrow orbits are more variable than systems with long orbital periods; ii) we show that a Keplerian distribution of gas particles provides a good description of the disks in Be/X-ray binaries, as it does in classical Be stars; iii) a decrease in the Hα equivalent width is generally observed after major X-ray outbursts; iv) we confirm that the Hα equivalent width correlates with disk radius; v) while systems with supergiant companions display multi-structured profiles, most of the Be/X-ray binaries show, at some epoch, double-peak asymmetric profiles, which indicates that density inhomogeneities is a common property in the disk of Be/X-ray binaries; vi) the

  3. Evidence For Quasi-Periodic X-ray Dips From An Ultraluminous X-ray Source: Implications for the Binary Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    We report results from long-term (approx.1240 days) X-ray (0.3-8.0 keV) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Here we expand on earlier work by Strohmayer (2009) who used only a part of the present data set. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of sharp, quasi-periodic, energy-independent dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 +/- 4 days, the amplitude of which weakens during the second half of the light curve, and (3) spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data. We interpret the X-ray modulations within the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination accreting X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 +/- 23 days, in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported by Strohmayer (2009). We discuss the overall X-ray modulation within the framework of accretion via Roche-lobe overflow of the donor star. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk, this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination > or approx.70deg. We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.

  4. X-ray emission from interacting wind massive binaries: A review of 15 years of progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauw, Gregor; Nazé, Yaël

    2016-09-01

    Previous generations of X-ray observatories revealed a group of massive binaries that were relatively bright X-ray emitters. This was attributed to emission of shock-heated plasma in the wind-wind interaction zone located between the stars. With the advent of the current generation of X-ray observatories, the phenomenon could be studied in much more detail. In this review, we highlight the progress that has been achieved in our understanding of the phenomenon over the last 15 years, both on theoretical and observational grounds. All these studies have paved the way for future investigations using the next generation of X-ray satellites that will provide crucial information on the X-ray emission formed in the innermost part of the wind-wind interaction.

  5. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Feldmeier, A.; Falanga, M.

    2016-04-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the nonstationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total timescale of several hours), the transitions of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the nonstationary wind. The X-ray luminosity released by the system is computed at each time step by taking into account the relevant physical processes occurring in the different accretion regimes. Synthetic lightcurves are derived and qualitatively compared with those observed from classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. Although a number of simplifications are assumed in these calculations, we show that taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion significantly reduces the average X-ray luminosity expected for any neutron star wind-fed binary. The present model calculations suggest that long spin periods and stronger magnetic fields are favored in order to reproduce the peculiar behavior of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the X-ray domain.

  6. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Feldmeier, A.; Falanga, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the nonstationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total timescale of several hours), the transitions of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the nonstationary wind. The X-ray luminosity released by the system is computed at each time step by taking into account the relevant physical processes occurring in the different accretion regimes. Synthetic lightcurves are derived and qualitatively compared with those observed from classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. Although a number of simplifications are assumed in these calculations, we show that taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion significantly reduces the average X-ray luminosity expected for any neutron star wind-fed binary. The present model calculations suggest that long spin periods and stronger magnetic fields are favored in order to reproduce the peculiar behavior of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the X-ray domain.

  7. SXP523 = Suzaku J0102-7204 = 2XMM J010247.4-720449, a Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, F.; Sturm, R.; Tsujimoto, M.; Wada, Q.; Ebisawa, K.; Miller, E.; Coe, M. J.; Klus, H.; Beardmore, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    After application of an attitude correction to the Suzaku observation of the supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 described in ATel #4628, we derive an improved position for the X-ray pulsar Suzaku J0102-7204 of R.A. = 01:02:46.8, and Dec. = -72:04:56 (J2000, 1 sigma uncertainty of 20 arcsec). The new position is consistent with that of the Be/X-ray binary 2XMM J010247.4-720449 in the Small Magellanic Cloud seen by XMM-Newton, Swift and Chandra (ATel #3761) and most likely all detections are from the same source.

  8. Feedback from winds and supernovae in massive stellar clusters - II. X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, H.; Pittard, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray emission from a simulated massive stellar cluster is investigated. The emission is calculated from a 3D hydrodynamical model which incorporates the mechanical feedback from the stellar winds of three O stars embedded in a giant molecular cloud (GMC) clump containing 3240 M⊙ of molecular material within a 4 pc radius. A simple prescription for the evolution of the stars is used, with the first supernova (SN) explosion at t = 4.4 Myr. We find that the presence of the GMC clump causes short-lived attenuation effects on the X-ray emission of the cluster. However, once most of the material has been ablated away by the winds, the remaining dense clumps do not have a noticeable effect on the attenuation compared with the assumed interstellar medium (ISM) column. We determine the evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity, LX, and spectra, and generate synthetic images. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity drops from nearly 1034 erg s-1 while the winds are `bottled up', to a near-constant value of 1.7 × 1032 erg s-1 between t = 1 and 4 Myr. LX reduces slightly during each star's red supergiant stage due to the depressurization of the hot gas. However, LX increases to ≈1034 erg s-1 during each star's Wolf-Rayet stage. The X-ray luminosity is enhanced by two to three orders of magnitude to ˜1037 erg s-1 for at least 4600 yr after each SN explosion, at which time the blast wave leaves the grid and the X-ray luminosity drops. The X-ray luminosity of our simulation is generally considerably fainter than predicted from spherically symmetric bubble models, due to the leakage of hot gas material through gaps in the outer shell. This process reduces the pressure within our simulation and thus the X-ray emission. However, the X-ray luminosities and temperatures which we obtain are comparable to similarly powerful massive young clusters.

  9. Low-mass X-ray Binaries with RXTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Below are the publications which directly and indirectly evolved from this very successful program: 1) 'Search for millisecond periodicities in type I X-ray bursts of the Rapid Burster'; 2) 'High-Frequency QPOs in the 2000 Outburst of the Galactic Microquasar XTE J1550-564'; 3) 'Chandra and RXTE Spectroscopy of Galactic Microquasar XTE 51550-564 in Outburst'; 4) 'GX 339-4: back to life'; 5) 'Evidence for black hole spin in GX 339-4: XMM-Newton EPIC-PN and RXTE spectroscopy of the very high state'.

  10. GBS-discovered quiescent X-ray binaries: XMM eclipse duration and VLT spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonker, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We propose to use XMM to observe eclipsing probable quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries selected from the Galactic Bulge Survey. The XMM data are crucial to determine the eclipsing duration, one cannot do this as accurately from optical light curves as from X-ray light curves as the X-ray emission region is small compared to the mass donor star. Using the XMM eclipse duration and the VLT spectroscopy we can determine virtually model independent masses of the compact objects. Furthermore, we may select different mass ratio systems favoring low-mass black holes.

  11. Soft X-ray production by photon scattering in pulsating binary neutron star sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.; Meszaros, P.; Alexander, S.

    1985-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed as a source of soft (less than 1 keV) radiation in binary pulsating X-ray sources, in the form of photon scattering which leaves the electron in an excited Landau level. In a plasma with parameters typical of such sources, the low-energy X-ray emissivity of this mechanism far exceeds that of bremsstrahlung. This copious source of soft photons is quite adequate to provide the seed photons needed to explain the power-law hard X-ray spectrum by inverse Comptonization on the hot electrons at the base of the accretion column.

  12. Unveiling optical and X-ray properties of the high mass X-ray binary XMMU J054134.7-682550

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes de Oliveira, R.; Placco, V. M.

    2014-10-01

    XMMU J054134.7-682550 is an X-ray source located in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Based on its X-ray properties, and from optical and near-infrared photometry, it was assumed to be a Be/X-ray binary. In this work we present the characterization of its optical counterpart from optical medium-resolution spectra acquired with the 3.6-m New Technology Telescope and the 4.1-m SOAR Telescope. Photospheric lines along with strong emission lines from the Hα, Hβ and several transitions of iron show that the optical counterpart is a Be star with a dense or large circumstellar disk. Thus, it is now conclusive that the system is indeed a Be/X-ray binary. Additionally, we present an ongoing program which aims to improve the characterization of the system from XMM-Newton, Swift/BAT and ASM/RXTE X-ray observations.

  13. Using Poisson statistics to analyze supernova remnant emission in the low counts X-ray regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Quentin Jeffrey

    We utilize a Poisson likelihood in a maximum likelihood statistical analysis to analyze X-ray spectragraphic data. Specifically, we examine four extragalactic supernova remnants (SNR). IKT 5 (SNR 0047-73.5), IKT 25 (SNR 0104-72.3), and DEM S 128 (SNR 0103-72.4) which are designated as Type Ia in the literature due to their spectra and morphology. This is troublesome because of their asymmetry, a trait not usually associated with young Type Ia remnants. We present Chandra X-ray Observatory data on these three remnants, and perform a maximum likelihood analysis on their spectra. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by interactions with the interstellar medium. In spite of this, we find a significant Fe overabundance in all three remnants. Through examination of radio, optical, and infrared data, we conclude that these three remnants are likely not "classical" Type Ia SNR, but may be examples of so-called "prompt" Type Ia SNR. We detect potential point sources that may be members of the progenitor systems of both DEM S 128 and IKT 5, which could suggest a new subclass of prompt Type Ia SNR, Fe-rich CC remnants. In addition, we examine IKT 18. This remnant is positionally coincident with the X-ray point source HD 5980. Due to an outburst in 1994, in which its brightness changed by 3 magnitudes (corrsponding to an increase in luminosity by a factor of 16) HD 5980 was classified as a luminous blue variable star. We examine this point source and the remnant IKT 18 in the X-ray, and find that its non-thermal photon index has decreased from 2002 to 2013, corresponding to a larger proportion of more energetic X-rays, which is unexpected.

  14. SELF-SHIELDING OF SOFT X-RAYS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Pooley, D.

    2013-01-10

    There are insufficient super-soft ({approx}0.1 keV) X-ray sources in either spiral or elliptical galaxies to account for the rate of explosion of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in either the single-degenerate or the double-degenerate scenarios. We quantify the amount of circumstellar matter that would be required to suppress the soft X-ray flux by yielding a column density in excess of 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. We summarize evidence that appropriate quantities of matter are extant in SNe Ia and in recurrent novae that may be supernova precursors. The obscuring matter is likely to have a large, but not complete, covering factor and to be substantially non-spherically symmetric. Assuming that much of the absorbed X-ray flux is re-radiated as blackbody radiation in the UV, we estimate that {approx}<100 sources might be detectable in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer All-sky Survey.

  15. The population of X-ray supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, P.; Haberl, F.; Kavanagh, P. J.; Sasaki, M.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Filipović, M. D.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Pietsch, W.; Points, S. D.; Chu, Y.-H.; Dickel, J.; Ehle, M.; Williams, R.; Greiner, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We present a comprehensive X-ray study of the population of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Using primarily XMM-Newton observations, we conduct a systematic spectral analysis of LMC SNRs to gain new insight into their evolution and the interplay with their host galaxy. Methods: We combined all the archival XMM-Newton observations of the LMC with those of our Very Large Programme LMC survey. We produced X-ray images and spectra of 51 SNRs, out of a list of 59 objects compiled from the literature and augmented with newly found objects. Using a careful modelling of the background, we consistently analysed all the X-ray spectra and measure temperatures, luminosities, and chemical compositions. The locations of SNRs are compared to the distributions of stars, cold gas, and warm gas in the LMC, and we investigated the connection between the SNRs and their local environment, characterised by various star formation histories. We tentatively typed all LMC SNRs, in order to constrain the ratio of core-collapse to type Ia SN rates in the LMC. We also compared the column densities derived from X-ray spectra to H i maps, thus probing the three-dimensional structure of the LMC. Results: This work provides the first homogeneous catalogue of the X-ray spectral properties of SNRs in the LMC. It offers a complete census of LMC remnants whose X-ray emission exhibits Fe K lines (13% of the sample), or reveals the contribution from hot supernova ejecta (39%), which both give clues to the progenitor types. The abundances of O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe in the hot phase of the LMC interstellar medium are found to be between 0.2 and 0.5 times the solar values with a lower abundance ratio [α/Fe] than in the Milky Way. The current ratio of core-collapse to type Ia SN rates in the LMC is constrained to NCC/NIa=1.35(-0.24+0.11), which is lower than in local SN surveys and galaxy clusters. Our comparison of the X-ray luminosity functions of SNRs in Local Group

  16. Dosimetry of Microdistributed Dose-Enhancing Agents in X-ray Synchrotron Binary Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugtenburg, Richard P.

    2010-07-01

    Monte Carlo based modelling of the dose distribution in the vicinity of concentrates of iodine (I) and gold (Au) binary radiotherapy agents has been performed for monochromatised synchrotron X-rays. While the KERMA approximation, which ignores electron transport, is often acceptable for kilovoltage X-ray dosimetry in X-ray binary therapy, the range of photoelectrons and Auger electrons may be significant when compared to the microdostributed structure of the binary compound in which case corrections to the approximation may be necessary. Dose is calculated using EGSnrc for microdistributions associated with X-ray radiation synovecotomy, where iodine is taken up in the synovial lining. Dose as a function of the volume of aggregation for an Au-based contrast agent such as Au nanoparticles, ranging in diameter from 5 micron to 100 micron, were calculated using EGSnrc and Penelope, showing that the dose varies slowly for 90 keV X-rays, where much of the dose delivered by short range photoelectrons while 80 keV X-rays, just below the K-edge of Au (80.729 keV) increases linearly with diameter. In general the dose varies slowly as a function of volume suggesting that only small corrections will be needed to account for effects due to the failure of electronic equilibrium.

  17. Dosimetry of Microdistributed Dose-Enhancing Agents in X-ray Synchrotron Binary Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hugtenburg, Richard P.

    2010-07-23

    Monte Carlo based modelling of the dose distribution in the vicinity of concentrates of iodine (I) and gold (Au) binary radiotherapy agents has been performed for monochromatised synchrotron X-rays. While the KERMA approximation, which ignores electron transport, is often acceptable for kilovoltage X-ray dosimetry in X-ray binary therapy, the range of photoelectrons and Auger electrons may be significant when compared to the microdostributed structure of the binary compound in which case corrections to the approximation may be necessary. Dose is calculated using EGSnrc for microdistributions associated with X-ray radiation synovecotomy, where iodine is taken up in the synovial lining. Dose as a function of the volume of aggregation for an Au-based contrast agent such as Au nanoparticles, ranging in diameter from 5 micron to 100 micron, were calculated using EGSnrc and Penelope, showing that the dose varies slowly for 90 keV X-rays, where much of the dose delivered by short range photoelectrons while 80 keV X-rays, just below the K-edge of Au (80.729 keV) increases linearly with diameter. In general the dose varies slowly as a function of volume suggesting that only small corrections will be needed to account for effects due to the failure of electronic equilibrium.

  18. Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntaffer, R. L.; Cash, W.

    2008-06-01

    The Cygnus X-Ray Emission Spectroscopic Survey (CyXESS) sounding rocket payload was launched from White Sands Missile Range on 2006 November 20 and obtained a high-resolution spectrum of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant in the soft X-ray. The novel X-ray spectrograph incorporated a wire-grid collimator feeding an array of gratings in the extreme off-plane mount that ultimately dispersed the spectrum onto gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. This instrument recorded 65 s of usable data between 43 and 49.5 Å in two prominent features. The first feature near 45 Å is dominated by the He-like triplet of O VII in second order with contributions from Mg X and Si IX-Si XII in first order, while the second feature near 47.5 Å is first-order S IX and S X. Fits to the spectra give an equilibrium plasma at log (T) = 6.2 (kTe = 0.14 keV) and near cosmic abundances. This is consistent with previous observations, which demonstrated that the soft X-ray emission from the Cygnus Loop is dominated by interactions between the initial blast wave and the walls of a precursor-formed cavity surrounding the Cygnus Loop and that this interaction can be described using equilibrium conditions.

  19. Thermal and Nonthermal X-Ray Emission from the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Una; Decourchelle, Anne; Holt, Stephen S.; Petre, Robert

    2002-12-01

    We present Chandra X-ray images of Tycho's supernova remnant that delineate its outer shock as a thin, smooth rim along the straight northeastern edge and most of the circular western half. The images also show that the Si and S ejecta are highly clumpy and have reached near the forward shock at numerous locations. Most of the X-ray spectra that we examine along the rim show evidence of line emission from Si and S ejecta, while the continuum is well represented by either a thermal or a nonthermal model. If the continuum is assumed to be thermal, the electron temperatures at the rim are all similar at about 2 keV, while the ionization ages are very low because of the overall weakness of the line emission. These electron temperatures are substantially below those expected for equilibration of the electron and ion temperatures, assuming shock velocities inferred from radio and X-ray expansion measurements; the electron-to-mean temperature ratios are <~0.1-0.2, indicating that collisionless heating of the electrons at the shock is modest. The nonthermal contribution to these spectra might be important, but cannot be strongly constrained by these data. It could account for as much as half of the flux in the 4-6 keV energy range, based on an extrapolation of the hard X-ray spectrum above 10 keV.

  20. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DilVrtilek, Saeqa; Mushotsky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. The second of two objects was observed on September of 2002. Data analysis for both observation has been completed: an investigation of the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure. A study of behavior of the emission features as a function of binary orbit shows modulated behavior in one of the systems. A paper on "High-resolution observations of low-mass X-ray binaries" is near completion. The paper includes observations with the Chandra HETG that are not yet completed.

  1. VLBI Observations of the Shortest Orbital Period Black Hole X-Ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paragi, Zsolt; Belloni, Tomaso M.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Miller-Jones, James

    The X-ray transient MAXI J1659-152 was discovered by Swift/BAT and it was initially identified as a GRB. Soon its Galactic origin and binary nature were established. There exists a wealth of multi-wavelength monitoring data for this source, providing a great coverage of the full X-ray transition in this candidate black hole binary system. We obtained two epochs of EVN/e-VLBI and four epochs of VLBA data of MAXI J1659-152 which show evidence for some extended emission in the early phases but -against expectations- no major collimated ejecta during the accretion disk state transition. This might be related to the fact that, with a red dwarf donor star, MAXI J1659-152 is the shortest orbital period black hole X-ray binary system.

  2. X-ray characteristics of the Lupus Loop and SN 1006 supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, A.

    1980-01-01

    The spatial extent of the Lupus Loop and spectra for the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants have been determined with a rocket-borne payload. The Lupus Loop is an extended source of soft X-rays (approx. 300' diam) that shows a correlation between its brightest x-ray and radio-emission regions. Its spectrum is characterized by a temperature of 350 eV. Thus, the Lupus Loop appears similar to Vela X and Cygnus Loop, although much weaker. Emission from SN1006 is spatially unresolved and exhibits a harder spectrum than that of the Lupus Loop. All spectral data (0.2 to 10 keV) from our observation and previous observations are satisfactorily fit with a power law (index = 2.15). This spectral dependence suggests the possibility that a rotating neutron star is the underlying source of the radiated energy although such an interpretation appears inconsistent with the remnant's morphology.

  3. N157B: X-ray evidence for a Crab-like supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, Eric V.; Wang, Q. Daniel

    1996-01-01

    The X-ray observation of the supernova remnant N 157B is described. The Rosat High Resolution Imager (HRI) X-ray emission from the remnant was decomposed into point-like sources. The spectra showed abundance-enhanced neon and magnesium lines, indicating that the remnant originated in a massive progenitor. The flat and featureless data from the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) confirm the Crab-like nature of the remnant. By interpreting both the thermal spectral component and the shell as representing the remnant's outer shock, the age of the remnant was estimated to be 4 x 10(exp 3) yr and the energy release approximately 2 x 10(exp 50) erg.

  4. Swift X-Ray Upper Limits on Type Ia Supernova Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. R.; Immler, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have considered 53 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Swift X-Ray Telescope. None of the SNe Ia are individually detected at any time or in stacked images. Using these data and assuming that the SNe Ia are a homogeneous class of objects, we have calculated upper limits to the X-ray luminosity (0.2-10 keV) and mass-loss rate of L(sub 0.2-10) < 1.7 X 10(exp 38) erg/s and M(dot) < l.l X 10(exp -6) solar M/ yr x (V(sub w))/(10 km/s), respectively. The results exclude massive or evolved stars as the companion objects in SN Ia progenitor systems, but allow the possibility of main sequence or small stars, along with double degenerate systems consisting of two white dwarfs, consistent with results obtained at other wavelengths (e.g., UV, radio) in other studies.

  5. Energy dependence of power-spectral noise in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiele, Holger; Yu, Wenfei

    2014-08-01

    Black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries show variability on time-scales ranging from milliseconds to years. In the last two decades a detailed phenomenological picture of short-term variability in low-mass X-ray binaries has emerged mainly based on RXTE observations that cover energies above 3 keV. This picture comprises periodic or quasi-periodic variability, seen as spikes or humps in power density spectra, that are superposed on broad noise components. The overall shape of the noise components as well as the occurrence of quasi-periodic oscillations is known to vary with the state of the X-ray binary. We are accomplishing a comprehensive study of archival XMM-Newton observations in timing or burst mode of more than ten black hole and more than thirty neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries to investigate the variability properties of these sources at softer energies where the thermal disk component starts to emerge.Here we present some results of the energy dependence of the noise component in power density spectra: a discussion of the energy dependence of the power spectral state that we found in the “plateau” state of GRS 1915+105 and the intermediate state of 4U 1630-47; the dependence of the break-frequency of the band-limited noise component as well as the quasi-periodic oscillations on the studied energy band in several X-ray binaries like GX 339-4 or Swift J1753.5-0127. We will discuss the implications of these findings for the picture of the accretion geometry in black hole X-ray binaries.

  6. The peculiar galactic center neutron star X-ray binary XMM J174457-2850.3

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Kennea, J.; Gehrels, N.; Haggard, D.; Ponti, G.

    2014-09-10

    The recent discovery of a millisecond radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary/radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of ≅2 hr and a radiated energy output of ≅ 5 × 10{sup 40} erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of L {sub X} ≅ 5 × 10{sup 32}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1} and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to L {sub X} ≅ 10{sup 35}-10{sup 36}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1} for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at L {sub X} ≅ 10{sup 33}-10{sup 34}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1}. This peculiar X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of Γ ≅ 1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.

  7. LFN, QPO and fractal dimension of X-ray light curves from black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosvetov, Art; Grebenev, Sergey

    The origin of the low frequency noise (LFN) and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) observed in X-ray flux of Galactic black hole binaries is still not recognized in spite of multiple studies and attempts to model this phenomenon. There are known correlations between the QPO frequency, X-ray power density, X-ray flux and spectral state of the system, but there is no model that can do these dependences understandable. For the low frequency (~1 Hz) QPO we still have no even an idea capable to explain their production and don't know even what part of an accretion disc is responsible for them. Here we attempted to measure the fractal dimension of X-ray light curves of several black hole X-ray binaries and to study its correlation with the frequency of quasi periodic oscillations observed in their X-ray light-curves. The fractal dimension is a measure of the space-filling capacity of the light curves' profile. To measure the fractal dimension we used R/S method, which is fast enough and has good reputation in financial analytic and materials sciences. We found that if no QPO were observed in X-ray flux from the particular source, the fractal dimension is equal to the unique value which is independent on the source, its luminosity or its spectral state. On the other hand if QPO were detected in the flux, the fractal dimension deviated from its usual value. Also, we found a clear correlation between the QPO frequency and the fractal dimension of the emission. The relationship between these two parameters is solid but nonlinear. We believe that the analysis of X-ray light curves of black hole binaries using the fractal dimension has a good scientific potential and may provide an addition information on the geometry of accretion flow and fundamental physical parameters of the system.

  8. A study of low mass x-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    The entire effort under this contract during the period through January 1992 was devoted to a study of the cost and schedule required to put an upgraded Aries payload on the ASTRO-SPAS carrier provided by the German space agency, DARA. The ASTRO-SPAS is flown on the Space Shuttle, deployed by the crew for 5 to 7 days of free-flying observations and then recovered and returned to Earth. The spectrograph was to be provided by a collaboration involving the Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory (LPARL), the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA) at the U. of Colorado and the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) in England. The payload for the ASTRO-SPAS mission included our own spectrograph and an instrument provided by Dr. Joachim Trumper of the Max Planck Institute (MPI) in Garching, Germany. A meeting was held in late July, 1991 with German scientists, DARA representatives and MBB, the ASTRO-SPAS spacecraft contractor. Sufficient information was exchanged to allow us to complete the study and the name LEXSA (Low Energy X-ray Spectrograph on ASTRO-SPAS) was given to our instrument and HERTA (High Energy x-Ray Telescope on ASTR0-SPAS) to the German instrument. The combination was called SPECTRO-SPAS. On October 1, 1991 CASA and LPARL submitted a cost and brief technical proposal to NASA on results of the study. The total cost over 4 fiscal years was 6.16 M dollars including CASA costs. NASA Headquarters was briefed on 3 October on details of the proposal. They found our costs reasonable, but indicated that the NASA FY '92 budget is extremely tight, they could not readily identify where the -S2.3M for LEXSA could be found and it was not clear that FY '93 would improve.

  9. A neutron-star-driven X-ray flash associated with supernova SN 2006aj.

    PubMed

    Mazzali, Paolo A; Deng, Jinsong; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Sauer, Daniel N; Pian, Elena; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tanaka, Masaomi; Maeda, Keiichi; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2006-08-31

    Supernovae connected with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are hyper-energetic explosions resulting from the collapse of very massive stars ( approximately 40 M\\circ, where M\\circ is the mass of the Sun) stripped of their outer hydrogen and helium envelopes. A very massive progenitor, collapsing to a black hole, was thought to be a requirement for the launch of a GRB. Here we report the results of modelling the spectra and light curve of SN 2006aj (ref. 9), which demonstrate that the supernova had a much smaller explosion energy and ejected much less mass than the other GRB-supernovae, suggesting that it was produced by a star whose initial mass was only approximately 20 M\\circ. A star of this mass is expected to form a neutron star rather than a black hole when its core collapses. The smaller explosion energy of SN 2006aj is matched by the weakness and softness of GRB 060218 (an X-ray flash), and the weakness of the radio flux of the supernova. Our results indicate that the supernova-GRB connection extends to a much broader range of stellar masses than previously thought, possibly involving different physical mechanisms: a 'collapsar' (ref. 8) for the more massive stars collapsing to a black hole, and magnetic activity of the nascent neutron star for the less massive stars. PMID:16943833

  10. Effects of radiation pressure on the equipotential surfaces in X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.; Gulden, S. L.

    1976-01-01

    Equipotential surfaces incorporating the effect of radiation pressure were computed for the X-ray binaries Cen X-3, Cyg X-1 = HDE 226868, Vela XR-1 = 3U 0900-40 = HD 77581, and 3U 1700-37 = HD 153919. The topology of the equipotential surfaces is significantly affected by radiation pressure. In particular, the so-called critical Roche (Jacobian) lobes, the traditional figure 8's, do not exist. The effects of these results on modeling X-ray binaries are discussed.

  11. X-ray Emission from Supernovae in Dense Circumstellar Matter Environments: a Search for Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofek, E. O.; Fox, D.; Cenko, Stephen B.; Sullivan, M; Gnat, O.; Frail, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Corsi, A.; Quimby, R. M.; Gehrels, N.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Yaron, O.; Fillippenko, A. V; Kasliwal, M. M.; Bildsten, L.; Bloom, J. S.; Poznanski, D.; Arcavi, I.; Laher, R. R.; Levitan, D.; Sesar, B.; Surace, J..

    2013-01-01

    The optical light curve of some supernovae (SNe) may be powered by the outward diffusion of the energy deposited by the explosion shock (the so-called shock breakout) in optically thick (Tau approx > 30) circumstellar matter (CSM). Recently, it was shown that the radiation-mediated and radiation-dominated shock in an optically thick wind must transform into a collisionless shock and can produce hard X-rays. The X-rays are expected to peak at late times, relative to maximum visible light. Here we report on a search, using Swift/XRT and Chandra, for X-ray emission from 28 SNe that belong to classes whose progenitors are suspected to be embedded in dense CSM. Our sample includes 19 Type IIn SNe, one Type Ibn SN, and eight hydrogen-poor superluminous SNe (SLSN-I such as SN 2005ap). Two SNe (SN 2006jc and SN 2010jl) have X-ray properties that are roughly consistent with the expectation for X-rays from a collisionless shock in optically thick CSM. However, the X-ray emission from SN 2006jc can also be explained as originating in an optically thin region. Thus, we propose that the optical light curve of SN 2010jl is powered by shock breakout in CSM. We suggest that two other events (SN 2010al and SN 2011ht) were too X-ray bright during the SN maximum optical light to be explained by the shock-breakout model.We conclude that the light curves of some, but not all, SNe IIn/Ibn are powered by shock breakout in CSM. For the rest of the SNe in our sample, including all of the SLSN-I events, our X-ray limits are not deep enough and were typically obtained too early (i.e., near the SN maximum light) for definitive conclusions about their nature. Late-time X-ray observations are required in order to further test whether these SNe are indeed embedded in dense CSM. We review the conditions required for a shock breakout in a wind profile. We argue that the timescale, relative to maximum light, for the SN to peak in X-rays is a probe of the column density and the density profile above

  12. Studying X-Ray Binaries with High Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Kaaret, Philip

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to further our understanding of the dynamics of accreting neutron stars and black holes in the hope of using these systems as probes of the physics of strong gravitational fields. The main focus of this work has been a multi-year program of millisecond X-ray timing and spectral observations of accreting compact objects. include imaging of X-ray jets from binaries and the study of extragalactic X-ray binaries. past year. Nine papers were accepted and/or published, as listed below. Seven of these are new since our previous annual report. With the advent of Chandra, we have extended our work to Significant progress was made over the The presentation of several talks and posters at astronomical meetings were supported by this grant. The PI was the lead organizer of "X-Ray Timing 2003: Rossi and Beyond", a major conference held in Cambridge, MA, in November, 2003. A t the conference we reviewed the accomplishments of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and developed the scientific motivation for a future X-ray timing mission. This conference was well attended and generated a significant amount of interest.

  13. Spectral variability in early-type binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, T. R.; Castor, J. I.; Olson, G. L.; Mccray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical models for the ionization of trace elements in a strong stellar wind by a compact binary X-ray source and for the resulting orbital phase dependence of the emergent soft X-ray spectra and the profiles of ultraviolet resonance lines are presented. Model results agree qualitatively with the X-ray and ultraviolet spectra of the system 4U 0900-40/HD 77581 and explain the suppression of the absorption profiles of the Si IV upsilon 1394 and C IV upsilon 1548 lines when the X-ray sources are in front of the star. The model predicts that the absorption profiles of the N V upsilon 1239 and O VI upsilon 1032 lines will be enhanced rather than suppresed during this orbital phase.Phase-dependent linear polarization in the resonance lines profiles is predicted. Future observations of these phase dependent effects in early-type binary X-ray systems may be used to investigate the dynamics of stellar winds and their interactions with the X-ray source.

  14. Spectral variability in early-type binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, R.; Kallman, T. R.; Castor, J. I.; Olson, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical models for the ionization of trace elements in a strong stellar wind by a compact binary X-ray source and for the resulting orbital phase dependence of the emergent soft X-ray spectra and the profiles of ultraviolet resonance lines are presented. Model results agree qualitatively with the X-ray and ultraviolet spectra of the system 4U 0900-40/HD 77581 and explain the suppression of the absorption profiles of the Si IV upsilon 1394 and C IV upsilon 1548 lines when the X-ray sources is in front of the star. The model predicts that the absorption profiles of the N V upsilon 1239 and O VI upsilon 1032 lines will be enhanced rather than suppressed during this orbital phase. We predict phase-dependent linear polarization in the resonance lines profiles. Future observations of these phase dependent effects in early-type binary X-ray systems may be used to investigate the dynamics of stellar winds and their interactions with the X-ray source.

  15. Detection of an X-ray flare in the RS CVn binary Sigma Coronae Borealis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. C.; Rao, A. R.; Riegler, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    The detection of an X-ray flare in the RS CVn binary Sigma Coronae Borealis with the Monitor Proportional Counter on the Einstein Observatory is described. During the 513 min of observation, an X-ray flare of 208 min duration was detected at a significance level of 26 sigma in the 1.19-10.16 keV band. The rise time of the flare is between 25 and 70 min and the decay time is greater than or equal to 34 min. The X-ray luminosity at the flare maximum is found to be 6 x 10 to the 30th erg/s and the total energy radiated in X-rays during the flare is 2 x 10 to the 34th erg. The energy spectrum in the flaring state is found to be harder (temperature T about 2.5 x 10 to the 7th K) compared to the one observed in the quiescent state (T about 6 x 10 to the 6th K). Applying the coronal loop model, the loop parameters are calculated and compared for the X-ray flares observed in the various RS CVn binaries and the sun. The significance of the differences in the observed and derived parameters of the X-ray flares is briefly discussed.

  16. Multi-wavelength study of X-ray binaries in the Magellanic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajoelimanana, A. F.; Charles, P. A.

    We present the long-term temporal properties of X-rays binaries in the Magellanic Clouds using archival optical (from MACHO and OGLE) and X-ray (XMM-Newton) observations. The SMC has known to have an interesting over-abundant population of Be/X-ray binaries (BeX) as compared to our Galaxy. The majority of these SMC BeX display superorbital variations, many of them quasi-periodic on timescales of 200-3000 days, which are believed to be related to the formation and depletion of the Be star equatorial disk. The MACHO colour of these systems follow a clockwise loop-like structure in the colour-magnitude diagram. We also found a quasi-periodic variations in the prototype LMC supersoft source CAL 83. Its light curve shows dramatic brightness changes of ˜1 mag on timescales of ˜450 days. This supersoft source spends typically ˜200 days in the optical low state. Moreover, we have seen an anticorrelation between their X-ray and optical behaviour in which supersoft X-rays are detected during optical minima and very weak or completely off at optical maxima. Simple backbody fits to both high and low-state X-ray spectra reveals a decrease of blackbody temperature and luminosity when the optical counterpart brightens.

  17. Detection of X-ray emission from the PSR 1259-63/SS 2883 binary system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cominsky, Lynn; Roberts, Mallory; Johnston, Simon

    1994-01-01

    Nonpulsed but variable X-ray emission has been detected from the binary system containing the radio pulsar PSR 1259-63 during two pointed ROSAT observations, taken 5 months apart. This 47.7 ms radio pulsar is in a highly eccentric (epsilon approximately 0.85) binary system with the 10-15 solar mass Be star SS 2883. It is the first radio pulsar found to be in a binary system with a massive main-sequence companion; it is also the most highly eccentric binary system known to contain a neutron star. The level of X-ray flux detected in the ROSAT observations has increased with orbital phase by a factor of at least 10 between 1992 February and 1993 February. The X-ray flux is significantly greater than expected from the Be star's corona and seems likely to originate either from low-level stellar wind accretion onto the neutron star or from the shock between the stellar wind and the relativistic pulsar wind. The system may be the progenitor of the more slowly rotating Be X-ray binary pulsar systems.

  18. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN X-RAY BINARIES AND STAR CLUSTERS IN NGC 4449

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, Blagoy; Chandar, Rupali; Prestwich, Andrea H.

    2011-11-10

    We present 23 candidate X-ray binaries with luminosities down to 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}, in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 4449, from observations totaling 105 ks taken with the ACIS-S instrument on the Chandra Space Telescope. We determine count rates, luminosities, and colors for each source, and perform spectral fits for sources with sufficient counts. We also compile a new catalog of 129 compact star clusters in NGC 4449 from high-resolution, multi-band optical images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, doubling the number of clusters known in this galaxy. The UBVI, H{alpha} luminosities of each cluster are compared with predictions from stellar evolution models to estimate their ages and masses. We find strong evidence for a population of very young massive, black hole binaries, which comprise nearly 50% of the detected X-ray binaries in NGC 4449. Approximately a third of these remain within their parent star clusters, which formed {tau} {approx}< 6-8 Myr ago, while others have likely been ejected from their parent clusters. We also find evidence for a population of somewhat older X-ray binaries, including both supergiant and Be-binaries, which appear to be associated with somewhat older {tau} Almost-Equal-To 100-400 Myr star clusters, and one X-ray binary in an ancient ({tau} Almost-Equal-To 10 Gyr) globular cluster. Our results suggest that detailed information on star clusters can significantly improve constraints on X-ray binary populations in star-forming galaxies.

  19. Hydrodynamics of winds from irradiated companion stars in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco; London, Richard

    1993-01-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of evaporative winds driven by X-rays and/or soft gamma-rays irradiating the outer layers of companion stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). We consider several irradiating fluxes and spectra for LMXBs with white dwarf and main-sequence companion stars. The thermal structure of the base of the coronal region, the position of the sonic point, and the value of the mass-loss rate are calculated in the case of spherical geometry. We consider photospheric and coronal heating from both X-ray photoionization and Compton scattering of X-rays and soft gamma-rays with energy about 1 MeV possibly irradiating the companion star in LMXBs. Evaporative winds may play a relevant role for the evolution of a special class of radiation-driven LMXBs, and this study is a step toward a quantitative understanding of the mechanism driving LMXB evolution.

  20. Recurrent X-ray Emission Variations of Eta Carinae and the Binary Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishibashi, K.; Corcoran, M. F.; Davidson, K.; Swank, J. H.; Petre, R.; Drake, S. A.; Damineki, A.; White, S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that, the super-massive star eta Carinae may have a massive stellar companion (Damineli, Conti, and Lopes 1997), although the dense ejecta surrounding the star make this claim hard to test using conventional methods. Settling this question is critical for determining the current evolutionary state and future evolution of the star. We address this problem by an unconventional method: If eta Carinae is a binary, X-ray emission should be produced in shock waves generated by wind-wind collisions in the region between eta Carinae and its companion. Detailed X-ray monitoring of eta Carinae for more that) 2 years shows that the observed emission generally resembles colliding-wind X-ray emission, but with some significant discrepancies. Furthermore, periodic X-ray "flaring" may provide an additional clue to determine the presence of a companion star and for atmospheric pulsation in eta Carinae.

  1. Single order X-ray diffraction with binary sinusoidal transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Leifeng

    2013-10-01

    All existing x-ray dispersive devices including crystals, multilayers and diffraction gratings generate spectra in multiple orders, whereas soft x-ray spectroscopy applications usually require only the first order spectrum. The other diffraction orders can overlap and contaminate the first order spectrum of interest. In this letter we describe how an axis-symmetrically-distributed sinusoidal-shaped aperture with binary transmittance values can be used to disperse x-rays and with a superior diffraction pattern where, along its symmetry axis, all higher-order diffractions can be effectively suppressed. Hence this sophisticated dispersive element generates pure soft x-ray spectra in the first diffraction order, free from interference from higher diffraction orders.

  2. Multiwavelength study of the transient X-ray binary IGR J01583+6713

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Paul, Biswajit; Kumar, Brijesh; Sagar, Ram

    2008-06-01

    We have investigated multiband optical photometric variability and stability of the Hα line profile of the transient X-ray binary IGR J01583+6713. We set an upper limit of 0.05 mag on photometric variations in the V band over a time-scale of three months. The Hα line is found to consist of non-Gaussian profile and quite stable for a duration of two months. We have identified the spectral type of the companion star to be B2 IVe while the distance to the source is estimated to be ~4.0 kpc. Along with the optical observations, we have also carried out analysis of X-ray data from three short observations of the source, two with the Swift-XRT and one with the RXTE-PCA. We have detected a variation in the absorption column density, from a value of 22.0 × 1022 cm-2 immediately after the outburst down to 2.6 × 1022 cm-2 four months afterwards. In the quiescent state, the X-ray absorption is consistent with the optical reddening measurement of E(B - V) = 1.46 mag. From one of the Swift observations, during which the X-ray intensity was higher, we have a possible pulse detection with a period of 469.2 s. For a Be X-ray binary, this indicates an orbital period in the range of 216-561 d for this binary system.

  3. High Time Resolution Studies of Binary X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.

    1996-05-01

    The work for this project was substantially more than anticipated, and involved recreating an analysis system for all the HEAO A-1 scanning data which had been converted to the ELE format. As a result of this work, a complete software analysis package was first created at Sonoma State University using Fortran, that can extract the data for any given X-ray source, and produce light curves from the scanning data. A second complete software analysis package was also created, this time in IDL, which can also display all the data in a timely manner, allowing data screening without the generation of hardcopy plots. The creation of the software systems was not the original goal of the project; rather this was a necessary result when the NRL computers became inoperable due to old age and could not be used to support the project, as originally planned. There were 6 sources originally proposed for analysis: SMC X-1, A0538-66, LMC X-1, LMC X-3, (these 3 sources are all located in the Large Magellanic Cloud region), 4UO115+63 and 4U1626-67. Results on these sources are summarized.

  4. Late-Time X-Ray, UV, and Optical Monitoring of Supernova 1979C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immler, Stefan; Fesen, Robert A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Weiler, Kurt W.; Petre, Robert; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Pooley, David; Pietsch, Wolfgang; Aschenbach, Bernd; Hammell, Molly C.; Rudie, Gwen C.

    2005-10-01

    We present results from observations of supernova (SN) 1979C with the Newton X-Ray Multi-Mirror (XMM-Newton) mission in X-rays and in UV, archival X-ray, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, and follow-up ground-based optical imaging. The XMM-Newton MOS spectrum shows the best-fit two-temperature thermal plasma emission characteristics of both the forward (kThigh=4.1+76-2.4 keV) and reverse shock (kTlow=0.79+0.24-0.17 keV) with no intrinsic absorption. The long-term X-ray light curve, constructed from all X-ray data available, reveals that SN 1979C is still radiating at a flux level similar to that detected by ROSAT in 1995, showing no sign of a decline over the last 6 years, some 16-23 yr after its outburst. The high inferred X-ray luminosity (L0.3-2=8×1038 ergs s-1) is caused by the interaction of the SN shock with dense circumstellar matter, likely deposited by a strong stellar wind from the progenitor with a high mass-loss rate of M˙~1.5×10-4 Msolar yr-1 (vw/10 km s-1). The X-ray data support a strongly decelerated shock and show a mass-loss rate history that is consistent with a constant progenitor mass-loss rate and wind velocity over the past >~16,000 yr in the stellar evolution of the progenitor. We find a best-fit circumstellar medium (CSM) density profile of ρCSM~r-s with index s<~1.7 and high CSM densities (>~104 cm-3) out to large radii from the site of the explosion (r>~4×1017 cm). Using XMM-Newton Optical Monitor data, we further detect a pointlike optical/UV source consistent with the position of SN 1979C, with B-, U-, and UVW1-band luminosities of 5, 7, and 9×1036 ergs s-1, respectively. The young stellar cluster in the vicinity of the SN, as imaged by the HST and follow-up ground-based optical imaging, can only provide a fraction of the total observed flux, so that a significant contribution to the output likely arises from the strong interaction of SN 1979C with dense CSM.

  5. X-Ray Emission from Supernovae in Dense Circumstellar Matter Environments: A Search for Collisionless Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofek, E.O; Fox, D.; Cenko, B.; Sullivan, M.; Gnat, O.; Frail A.; Horesh, A.; Corsi, A; Quimby, R. M.; Gehrels, N.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Yaron, O.; Filippenko, A. V.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Bildsten, L.; Bloom, J. S.; Poznanski, D; Arcavi, L.; Laher, R. R.; Levitan, D.; Sesar, B.; Surace, J.

    2012-01-01

    The optical light curve of some supernovae (SNe) may be powered by the outward diffusion of the energy deposited by the explosion shock (so-called shock breakout) in optically thick (tau approx > 30) circumstellar matter (CSM). Recently, it was shown that the radiation-mediated and -dominated shock in an optically thick wind must transform into 8. collisionless shock and can produce hard X-rays. The X-rays are expected to peak at late times, relative to maximum visible light. Here we report on a search, using Swift-XRT and Chandra, for X-ray emission from 28 SNe that belong to classes whose progenitors are suspected to be embedded in dense CSM. Our sample includes 19 type-IIn SNe, one type-Ibn SN and eiht hydrogen-poor super-luminous SNe (SLSN-I; SN 2005ap like). Two SNe (SN 2006jc and SN 2010jl) have X-ray properties that are roughly consistent with the expectation for X-rays from a collisionless shock in optically thick CSl\\l. Therefore, we suggest that their optical light curves are powered by shock breakout in CSM. We show that two other events (SN 2010al and SN 2011ht) were too X-ray bright during the SN maximum optical light to be explained by the shock breakout model. We conclude that the light curves of some, but not all, type-IIn/Ibn SNe are powered by shock breakout in CSM. For the rest of the SNe in our sample, including all the SLSN-I events, our X-ray limits are not deep enough and were typically obtained at too early times (i.e., near the SN maximum light) to conclude about their nature. Late time X-ray observations are required in order to further test if these SNe are indeed embedded in dense CSM. We review the conditions required for a shock breakOut in a wind profile. We argue that the time scale, relative to maximum light, for the SN to peak in X-rays is a probe of the column density and the density profile above the shock region. The optical light curves of SNe, for which the X-ray emission peaks at late times, are likely powered by the

  6. Double core evolution and X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of a 16-solar mass star and a 1-solar mass neutron star is followed through the common-envelope binary phase. It is found that the encounter of the neutron star with a yellow giant leads to coalescence of the two cores, while encounter with a red giant leads to hydrodynamic expansion and probable ejection of the common envelope. Within the context of the two rotation laws (1) uniform rotation (investigated in the present study), and (2) uniform specific angular momentum (considered in an earlier study), the results are independent of the choice for the angular-momentum distribution in the common envelope. Implications of the results for the binary pulsar phase are discussed.

  7. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. The second of two objects was not observed until September of 2002. Data analysis for the new observation is underway. over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  8. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DilVrtilek, Saeqa; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. observation of one of the two objects has taken place and the data were received in late November. The second object is yet to be observed. Over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  9. Period Derivative of the M15 X-Ray Binary AC211/X2127+119

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, L.; Charles, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    We have combined Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations of X2127+119, the low-mass X-ray binary in the globular cluster M15, with archival X-ray lightcurves to study the stability of the 17.1 hr orbital period. We find that the data cannot be fit by the Ilovaisky ephemeris, and requires either a 7.sigma change to the period or a period derivative P prime/P approximately 9 x 10(exp -7)/yr. Given its remarkably low L(sub X)/L(sub opt) such a P prime lends support to models that require super-Eddington mass transfer in a q approximately 1 binary.

  10. All the X-ray binaries in the Universe: X-ray Emission from Normal and Starburst Galaxies Near and Far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann; Basu-Zych, Antara; Lehmer, Bret

    2015-08-01

    There has recently been quite a bit of excitement on the role of X-ray emission from galaxies in early heating of the IGM, demonstrating that understanding of X-ray emission from normal and starburst galaxies may have significant impact on structure formation in the Universe. The X-ray output from X-ray binaries and hot gas are both important and may rival the ionizing output of AGN at z>5, particularly for Hydrogen reionization. Here we present our research on constraining the X-ray SED of galaxies across cosmic time via several complementary approaches. In the very local universe (d <~ 30 Mpc including the Local Group) we are using NuSTAR to understand the accretion states and total output of black hole and neutron star binaries using the important lever arm of 0.5-30 keV emission. At intermediate distances (10-100 Mpc), we are comparing the X-ray output of galaxies with star formation histories and population synthesis model predictions using both Chandra and XMM data. In the slightly more distant universe (z~0.1-0.2) we can find rare analogs to primordial starbursts via wide-field optical/UV surveys that may be studied with Chandra. We will finish with a discussion of starburst galaxies emitting X-rays at z>4, which thanks to the extremely deep Chandra Deep Field-South 7 Ms survey, are better constrained than ever before. We discuss survey strategy and how the various pieces of the puzzle fit together regarding the X-ray output of galaxies and their X-ray binary populations over cosmic time. We discuss implications for next-generation missions and instruments, including those with wide-field survey capabilities and high throughput, especially the Athena mission.

  11. Observations of the supernova remnant G54.1+0.3: X-ray spectrum and evidence for an X-ray jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, F. J.; Aschenbach, B.; Song, L. M.

    2001-05-01

    We present analyses of the ROSAT PSPC and the ASCA SIS and GIS observations of the Crab-like supernova remnant (SNR) G54.1+0.3. The spectrum is best fitted by a power law model with a photon index of -1.9+0.2-0.2, absorbed energy flux of 6.8 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.7-10 keV band, and a column density of 17.9+2.8-2.5 1021 cm-2. The high absorption column density indicates a distance close to the radius of the galaxy. The 0.7-10.0 keV X-ray luminosity of G54.1+0.3 is 1.4 1035d102 erg s-1, where d10 is the distance in 10 kpc. With an image restoration method, we have deconvolved the X-ray image of the remnant. There is evidence for an X-ray jet pointing to the north-east with a length of about 40arcsec measured from the center of the nebula. Its X-ray luminosity in the 0.1-2.4 keV range is about 2.1 1034d102 erg s-1. The X-ray jet is consistent with the radio extension of G54.1+0.3 to the north-east in both direction and position.

  12. A CHANDRA X-RAY SURVEY OF EJECTA IN THE CASSIOPEIA A SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Una; Laming, J. Martin E-mail: laming@nrl.navy.mil

    2012-02-20

    We present a survey of the X-ray-emitting ejecta in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (SNR) based on an extensive analysis of over 6000 spectral regions extracted on 2.''5-10'' angular scales using the Chandra 1 Ms observation. We interpret these results in the context of hydrodynamical models for the evolution of the remnant. The distributions of fitted temperature and ionization age, and the implied mass coordinates, are highly peaked and suggest that the ejecta were subjected to multiple secondary shocks following reverse shock interaction with ejecta inhomogeneities. Based on the fitted emission measure and element abundances, and an estimate of the emitting volume, we derive masses for the X-ray-emitting ejecta and also show the distribution of the mass of various elements over the remnant. An upper limit to the total shocked Fe mass visible in X-rays appears to be roughly 0.13 M{sub Sun }, which accounts for nearly all of the mass expected in Fe ejecta. We find two populations of Fe ejecta, that associated with normal Si burning and that possibly associated with {alpha}-rich freezeout, with a mass ratio of approximately 2:1. Essentially all of the observed Fe (both components) lies well outside the central regions of the SNR, possibly having been ejected by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion. We discuss this and its implications for the neutron star kick.

  13. Feature-tailored spectroscopic analysis of the supernova remnant Puppis A in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Smith, M. J. S.; Dubner, G.; Giacani, E.; Castelletti, G.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a distinct method for performing spatially resolved spectral analysis of astronomical sources with highly structured X-ray emission. The method measures the surface brightness of neighboring pixels to adaptively size and shape each region, thus the spectra from the bright and faint filamentary structures evident in the broadband images can be extracted. As a test case, we present the spectral analysis of the complete X-ray emitting plasma in the supernova remnant Puppis A observed with XMM-Newton and Chandra. Given the angular size of Puppis A, many pointings with different observational configurations have to be combined, presenting a challenge to any method of spatially resolved spectroscopy. From the fit of a plane-parallel shocked plasma model we find that temperature, absorption column, ionization time scale, emission measure, and elemental abundances of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe, are smoothly distributed in the remnant. Some regions with overabundances of O, Ne, and Mg previously characterized as ejecta material, were automatically selected by our method, proving the excellent response of the technique. This method is an advantageous tool for the exploitation of archival X-ray data.

  14. Thermal and Nonthermal X-ray Emission from the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Decourchelle, Anne; Holt, Stephen S.; Petre, Robert; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present Chandra CCD images of Tycho's supernova remnant that delineate its outer shock, seen as a thin, smooth rim along the straight northeastern edge and most of the circular western half. The images also show that the Si and S ejecta are highly clumpy, and have reached the forward shock at numerous locations. Most of the X-ray spectra that we examine along the rim show line emission from Si and S, which in some cases must come from ejecta; the continuum is well represented by either thermal or nonthermal models. In the case that the continuum is assumed to be thermal, the temperatures at the rim are all similar at about 2 keV, and the ionization ages are very low because of the overall weakness of the line emission. Assuming shock velocities inferred from radio and X-ray expansion measurements, these temperatures are substantially below those expected for equilibration of the electron and ion temperatures; electron to mean temperature ratios of approximately less than 0.1 - 0.2 indicate at most modest collisionless heating of the electrons at the shock. The nonthermal contribution to these spectra may be important, however, and may account for as many as half of the counts in the 4-6 keV energy range, based on an extrapolation of the hard X-ray spectrum above 10 keV.

  15. Kepler's Supernova Remnant: A View from Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Each top panel in the composite above shows the entire remnant. Each color in the composite represents a different region of the electromagnetic spectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. The X-ray and infrared data cannot be seen with the human eye. Astronomers have color-coded those data so they can be seen in these images.

    The bottom panels are close-up views of the remnant. In the bottom, center image, Hubble sees fine details in the brightest, densest areas of gas. The region seen in these images is outlined in the top, center panel.

    The images indicate that the bubble of gas that makes up the supernova remnant appears different in various types of light. Chandra reveals the hottest gas [colored blue and colored green], which radiates in X-rays. The blue color represents the higher-energy gas; the green, the lower-energy gas. Hubble shows the brightest, densest gas [colored yellow], which appears in visible light. Spitzer unveils heated dust [colored red], which radiates in infrared light.

  16. AN X-RAY INVESTIGATION OF THREE SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Klimek, Matthew D.; Points, S. D.; Smith, R. C.; Shelton, R. L.; Williams, R. E-mail: spoints@ctio.noao.ed E-mail: rls@physast.uga.ed

    2010-12-20

    We have investigated three supernova remnants (SNRs) in the LMC using multi-wavelength data. These SNRs are generally fainter than the known sample (see Section 4) and may represent a previously missed population. One of our SNRs is the second LMC remnant analyzed which is larger than any Galactic remnant for which a definite size has been established. The analysis of such a large remnant contributes to the understanding of the population of highly evolved SNRs. We have obtained X-ray images and spectra of three of these recently identified SNRs using the XMM-Newton observatory. These data, in conjunction with pre-existing optical emission-line images and spectra, were used to determine the physical conditions of the optical- and X-ray-emitting gas in the SNRs. We have compared the morphologies of the SNRs in the different wavebands. The physical properties of the warm ionized shell were determined from the H{alpha} surface brightness and the SNR expansion velocity. The X-ray spectra were fit with a thermal plasma model and the physical conditions of the hot gas were derived from the model fits. Finally, we have compared our observations with simulations of SNR evolution.

  17. A1540-53, an eclipsing X-ray binary pulsator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Swank, J. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Pravdo, S. H.; Saba, J. R.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    An eclipsing X-ray binary pulsator consistent with the location of A1540-53 was observed. The source pulse period was 528.93 plus or minus 0.10 seconds. The binary nature is confirmed by a Doppler curve for the pulsation period. The eclipse angle of 30.5 deg plus or minus 3 deg and the 4 h transition to and from eclipse suggest an early type, giant or supergiant, primary star.

  18. Supernova Remnants Interacting with Molecular Clouds: X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick; Bykov, Andrei; Ellison, Donald C.; Dubner, Gloria; Castro, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The giant molecular clouds (MCs) found in the Milky Way and similar galaxies play a crucial role in the evolution of these systems. The supernova explosions that mark the death of massive stars in these regions often lead to interactions between the supernova remnants (SNRs) and the clouds. These interactions have a profound effect on our understanding of SNRs. Shocks in SNRs should be capable of accelerating particles to cosmic ray (CR) energies with efficiencies high enough to power Galactic CRs. X-ray and γ-ray studies have established the presence of relativistic electrons and protons in some SNRs and provided strong evidence for diffusive shock acceleration as the primary acceleration mechanism, including strongly amplified magnetic fields, temperature and ionization effects on the shock-heated plasmas, and modifications to the dynamical evolution of some systems. Because protons dominate the overall energetics of the CRs, it is crucial to understand this hadronic component even though electrons are much more efficient radiators and it can be difficult to identify the hadronic component. However, near MCs the densities are sufficiently high to allow the γ-ray emission to be dominated by protons. Thus, these interaction sites provide some of our best opportunities to constrain the overall energetics of these particle accelerators. Here we summarize some key properties of interactions between SNRs and MCs, with an emphasis on recent X-ray and γ-ray studies that are providing important constraints on our understanding of cosmic rays in our Galaxy.

  19. Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During the five-year period, our study of "Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries" has been focused on the following aspects: observations, data analysis, Monte-Carlo simulations, numerical calculations, and theoretical modeling. Most of the results of our study have been published in refereed journals and conference presentations.

  20. Outburst from low-mass X-ray binary GRS 1747-312 in Terzan 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahramian, A.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Kennea, J. A.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.

    2016-05-01

    GRS 1747-312 is an eclipsing transient low-mass X-ray binary in the core of the globular cluster Terzan 6. This source shows regular outbursts ~ every 6 months and, due to its eclipsing behaviour, has an accurately-constrained orbital period (12.36 hrs, in't Zand et al. 2003, A & A, 406, 233).

  1. High-mass X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, F.; Sturm, R.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: The last comprehensive catalogue of high-mass X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was published about ten years ago. Since then new such systems were discovered, mainly by X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton. For the majority of the proposed HMXBs in the SMC no X-ray pulsations were discovered as yet, and unless other properties of the X-ray source and/or the optical counterpart confirm their HMXB nature, they remain only candidate HMXBs. Methods: From a literature search we collected a catalogue of 148 confirmed and candidate HMXBs in the SMC and investigated their properties to shed light on their real nature. Based on the sample of well-established HMXBs (the pulsars), we investigated which observed properties are most appropriate for a reliable classification. We defined different levels of confidence for a genuine HMXB based on spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray sources and colour-magnitude diagrams from the optical to the infrared of their likely counterparts. We also took the uncertainty in the X-ray position into account. Results: We identify 27 objects that probably are misidentified because they lack an infrared excess of the proposed counterpart. They were mainly X-ray sources with a large positional uncertainty. This is supported by additional information obtained from more recent observations. Our catalogue comprises 121 relatively high-confidence HMXBs (the vast majority with Be companion stars). About half of the objects show X-ray pulsations, while for the rest no pulsations are known as yet. A comparison of the two subsamples suggests that long pulse periods in excess of a few 100 s are expected for the "non-pulsars", which are most likely undetected because of aperiodic variability on similar timescales and insufficiently long X-ray observations. The highest X-ray variability together with the lowest observed minimum fluxes for short-period pulsars indicate that in addition to the eccentricity of the

  2. Chemical abundances of the secondary star in the neutron star X-ray binary Cygnus X-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-Andrés, L.; González Hernández, J. I.; Israelian, G.; Casares, J.; Rebolo, R.

    2015-03-01

    We present Utrecht Echelle Spectrograph@William Herschel Telescope high-resolution spectra of the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Cygnus X-2. We have derived the stellar parameters of the secondary star using χ2 minimization procedure, and taking into account any possible veiling from the accretion disc. We determine a metallicity higher than solar ([Fe/H] = 0.27 ± 0.19), as seen also in the neutron star X-ray binary Centaurus X-4. The high quality of the secondary's spectrum allow us to determine the chemical abundances of O, Mg, Si, Ca, S, Ti, Fe, and Ni. We found that some α-elements (Mg, Si, S, Ti) are enhanced, consistent with a scenario of contamination of the secondary star during the supernova event. Surprisingly oxygen appears to be underabundant, whereas enhanced abundances of Fe and Ni are measured. Assuming that these abundances come from matter that has been processed in the SN and then captured by the secondary star, we explore different SN explosion scenarios with diverse geometries. A non-spherically symmetric SN explosion, with a low mass cut, seems to reproduce better the observed abundance pattern of the secondary star compared to the spherical case.

  3. On the lack of X-ray bright Type IIP supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, V. V.

    2014-05-01

    Type IIP supernovae (SNe) are expected to arise from red supergiant stars (RSGs). These stars have observed mass-loss rates that span more than two orders of magnitude, from less than 10^{-6} M_{⊙} yr-1 to almost 10^{-4} M_{⊙} yr-1. Thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission from at least some IIPs should reflect the larger end of the high mass-loss rates. Strangely, no IIP SNe are seen where the X-ray luminosity is large enough to suggest mass-loss rates greater than about 10^{-5} M_{⊙} yr-1. We investigate if this could be due to absorption of the X-ray emission. After carefully studying all the various aspects, we conclude that absorption would not be large enough to prevent us from having detected X-ray emission from high mass-loss rate IIPs. This leads us to the conclusion that there may be an upper limit of ˜10^{-5} M_{⊙} yr-1 to the mass-loss rate of Type IIP progenitors, and therefore to the luminosity of RSGs that explode to form Type IIPs. This in turn suggests an upper limit of ≲ 19 M_{⊙} for the progenitor mass of a Type IIP SN. This limit is close to that obtained by direct detection of IIP progenitors, as well as that suggested by recent stellar evolution calculations. Although the statistics need to be improved, many current indicators support the notion that RSGs above ˜ 19 M_{⊙} do not explode to form Type IIP SNe.

  4. Infrared Supernova Remnants and their Infrared-to-X-ray Flux Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Lee, Jae-Joon; Jeong, Il-Gyo; Seok, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-04-01

    Recent high-resolution infrared space missions have revealed supernova remnants (SNRs) of diverse morphology in infrared (IR) dust emission that are often very different from their X-ray appearance. The observed range of infrared-to-X-ray (IRX) flux ratios of SNRs is also wide. For a sample of 20 Galactic SNRs, we obtain their IR and X-ray properties and investigate the physical causes for such large differences. We find that the observed IRX flux ratios ({R}{{IRX,obs}}) are related to the IRX morphology, with SNRs with the largest {R}{{IRX,obs}} showing anticorrelated IRX morphology. By analyzing the relation of {R}{{IRX,obs}} to X-ray and IR parameters, we show that the {R}{{IRX,obs}} of some SNRs agrees with theoretical ratios of SNR shocks in which dust grains are heated and destroyed by collisions with plasma particles. For the majority of SNRs, however, {R}{{IRX,obs}} values are either significantly smaller or significantly larger than the theoretical ratios. The latter SNRs have relatively low dust temperatures. We discuss how the natural and/or environmental properties of SNRs could have affected the IRX flux ratios and the IRX morphology of these SNRs. We conclude that the SNRs with largest {R}{{IRX,obs}} are probably located in a dense environment and that their IR emission is from dust heated by shock radiation rather than by collisions. Our result suggests that the IRX flux ratio, together with dust temperature, can be used to infer the nature of unresolved SNRs in external galaxies.

  5. Formation of Black Hole Low-mass X-Ray Binaries in Hierarchical Triple Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoz, Smadar; Fragos, Tassos; Geller, Aaron; Stephan, Alexander P.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of black hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) poses a theoretical challenge, as low-mass companions are not expected to survive the common-envelope scenario with the BH progenitor. Here we propose a formation mechanism that skips the common-envelope scenario and relies on triple-body dynamics. We study the evolution of hierarchical triples following the secular dynamical evolution up to the octupole-level of approximation, including general relativity, tidal effects, and post-main-sequence evolution such as mass loss, changes to stellar radii, and supernovae. During the dynamical evolution of the triple system the “eccentric Kozai-Lidov” mechanism can cause large eccentricity excitations in the LMXB progenitor, resulting in three main BH-LMXB formation channels. Here we define BH-LMXB candidates as systems where the inner BH-companion star crosses its Roche limit. In the “eccentric” channel (∼81% of the LMXBs in our simulations) the donor star crosses its Roche limit during an extreme eccentricity excitation while still on a wide orbit. Second, we find a “giant” LMXB channel (∼11%), where a system undergoes only moderate eccentricity excitations but the donor star fills its Roche-lobe after evolving toward the giant branch. Third, we identify a “classical” channel (∼8%), where tidal forces and magnetic braking shrink and circularize the orbit to short periods, triggering mass-transfer. Finally, for the giant channel we predict an eccentric (∼0.3–0.6) preferably inclined (∼40°, ∼140°) tertiary, typically on a wide enough orbit (∼104 au) to potentially become unbound later in the triple evolution. While this initial study considers only one representative system and neglects BH natal kicks, we expect our scenario to apply across a broad region of parameter space for triple-star systems.

  6. Another thread in the tapestry of stellar feedback: X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justham, Stephen; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-06-01

    We consider X-ray binaries (XBs) as potential sources of stellar feedback. XBs observationally appear able to deposit a high fraction of their power output into their local interstellar medium, which may make them a non-negligible source of energy input. The formation rate of the most luminous XBs rises with decreasing metallicity, which should increase their significance during galaxy formation in the early Universe. We also argue that stochastic effects are important to XB feedback (XBF) and may dominate the systematic changes due to metallicity in many cases. Large stochastic variation in the magnitude of XBF at low absolute star formation rates provides a natural reason for diversity in the evolution of dwarf galaxies which were initially almost identical, with several per cent of such haloes experiencing energy input from XBs roughly two orders of magnitude above the most likely value. These probability distributions suggest that the effect of XBF is most commonly significant for total stellar masses between approximately 107 and 108 M⊙, which might resolve a current problem with modelling populations of such galaxies. We explain how XBs might inject energy before luminous supernovae (SNe) contribute significantly to feedback and how XBs can assist in keeping gas hot long after the last core-collapse SN has exploded. Energy input from XBs produces different behaviour to that from SNe, partly since the peak energy input from a mean XB population continues for ≈100 Myr after the start of a starburst. XBF could be especially important to some dwarf galaxies, potentially heating gas without expelling it; the properties of XBF also match those previously derived as allowing episodic star formation. We also argue that the efficiency of SN feedback (SNF) might be reduced when XBF has had the opportunity to act first. In addition, we note that the effect of SNF is unlikely to be scale-free; galaxies smaller than ≈100 pc might well experience less effective SNF.

  7. X-RAY BINARIES IN THE ULTRAHIGH ENCOUNTER RATE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6388

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, J. Edward; Lugger, Phyllis M.; Cohn, Haldan N.; Heinke, Craig O.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Budac, Sonia A.; Drukier, Gordon A.; Bailyn, Charles D. E-mail: lugger@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: heinke@ualberta.ca

    2012-09-10

    We report the results of a joint Chandra Hubble Space Telescope study of the X-ray binary (XRB) population in the massive, high-density globular cluster NGC 6388. NGC 6388 has one of the highest predicted XRB production rates of any Galactic cluster. We detected a large population of 61 Chandra sources within the half-mass radius with L{sub X} > 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1}. From the X-ray colors, luminosities, (lack of) variability, and spectral fitting, we identify five as likely quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries. Due to the extremely crowded nature of the core of NGC 6388, finding optical identifications to Chandra sources is challenging. We have identified four blue, optically variable counterparts to spectrally hard X-ray sources, evidence that these are bright cataclysmic variables (CVs). One showed variability of 2 mag in V, indicative of a dwarf nova eruption. One other likely CV is identified by its X-ray spectrum (partial covering with high N{sub H}) and strong variability, making five likely CVs identified in this cluster. The relatively bright optical magnitudes of these sources put them in the same class as CV1 in M15 and the brightest CVs in 47 Tuc.

  8. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF THE Be/X-RAY BINARY MXB 0656-072

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Jingzhi; Li Hui; Liu Qingzhong; Zurita Heras, Juan Antonio; Chaty, Sylvain E-mail: hli@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: juan-antonio.zurita-heras@cea.fr

    2012-07-01

    We present and analyze the optical photometric and spectroscopic data of the Be/X-ray binary MXB 0656-072 from 2006 to 2009. A 101.2 day orbital period is found, for the first time, from the present public X-ray data (Swift/BAT and RXTE/ASM). The anti-correlation between the H{alpha} emission and the UBV brightness of MXB 0656-072 during our 2007 observations indicates that a mass ejection event took place in the system. After the mass ejection, a low-density region might develop around the Oe star. With the outward motion of the circumstellar disk, the outer part of the disk interacted with the neutron star around its periastron passage and a series of X-ray outbursts were triggered between MJD 54350 and MJD 54850. The Proportional Counter Array-HEXTE spectra during the 2007-2008 X-ray outbursts could be well fitted by a cutoff power law with low-energy absorption, together with an iron line around 6.4 keV, and a broad cyclotron resonance feature around 30 keV. The same variability of the soft and hard X-ray colors in 2.3-21 keV indicated that there were no overall changes in the spectral shape during the X-ray outbursts, which might only be connected with the changes of the mass accretion rate onto the neutron star.

  9. Probing the neutron star spin evolution in the young Small Magellanic Cloud Be/X-ray binary SXP 1062

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. B.; Turolla, R.

    2012-03-01

    The newly discovered Be/X-ray binary in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 1062, provides the first example of a robust association with a supernova remnant (SNR). The short age estimated for the SNR qualifies SXP 1062 as the youngest known source in its class, ?. As such, it allows us to test current models of magnetorotational evolution of neutron stars in a still unexplored regime. Here we discuss possible evolutionary scenarios for SXP 1062 in an attempt to reconcile its long spin period, ?, and short age. Although several options can be considered, like an anomalously long initial period or the presence of a fossil disc, our results indicate that SXP 1062 may host a neutron star born with a large initial magnetic field, typically in excess of ˜ 1014 G, which then decayed to ˜ 1013 G.

  10. Average spectral properties of galactic X-ray binaries with 3 years of MAXI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nazma; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Paul, B.; Nath, Biman B.

    The energy spectra of X-ray binaries (XRBs) have been investigated during the last few decades with many observatories in different energy bands and with different energy resolutions. However, these studies are carried out in selected states of XRBs like during outbursts, transitions, quiescent states, and are always done in limited time windows of pointed observations. It is now possible to investigate the long term averaged spectra of a large number of X-ray binaries with the all sky monitor MAXI, which also has a broad energy band. Here we present the average spectral behaviour of a few representative XRBs. The long term averaged spectrum of Cyg X-1 is described by a sum of two power-laws having Γ_{1} ˜2.8 and Γ_{2} ˜1.2, along with a multi color disk blackbody having an inner disk temperature of 0.5 keV, GX 301-2 is described by a power-law with a high energy cut-off at E_{c} ˜ 15 keV and a blackbody component at 0.2 keV and that of Aql X-1 is described by a multi color disk blackbody at 2 keV and a power-law of Γ ˜ 2.2. We have also constructed the combined X-ray spectrum of the X-ray binaries in the Milky Way, which can be compared to the XRBs spectra of other galaxies observed with Chandra and XMM-Newton. These measurements are also relevant to investigate the X-ray interaction with the ISM and its contribution to the ionizing X-ray background in the early universe.

  11. Ultra-luminous X-Ray Sources in HARO II and the Role of X-Ray Binaries in Feedback in Lyα Emitting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestwich, A. H.; Jackson, F.; Kaaret, P.; Brorby, M.; Roberts, T. P.; Saar, S. H.; Yukita, M.

    2015-10-01

    Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) are local proxies of high-redshift Lyman Break Galaxies. Spatially resolved studies of nearby starbursts have shown that Lyman continuum and line emission are absorbed by dust and that the Lyα is resonantly scattered by neutral hydrogen. In order to observe Lyα emission from star-forming regions, some source of feedback is required to blow the neutral gas away from the starburst to prevent scattering and allow the Lyα emission to escape. We show that there are two X-ray point sources embedded in the diffuse emission of the LBA galaxy Haro 11. CXOU J003652.4-333316 (abbreviated to Haro 11 X-1) is an extremely luminous (L{}{{X}}˜ {10}41 erg s-1), spatially compact source with a hard-X-ray spectrum. We suggest that the X-ray emission from Haro 11 X-1 is dominated by a single accretion source. This might be an active galactic nucleus or a source similar to the extreme black hole binary (BHB) M82 X-1. The hard X-ray spectrum indicates that Haro 11 X-1 may be a BHB in a low accretion state. In this case, the very high X-ray luminosity suggests an intermediate mass black hole that could be the seed for formation of a supermassive black hole. Source CXOU J003652.7-33331619.5 (abbreviated Haro 11 X-2) has an X-ray luminosity of {L}{{X}}˜ 5× {10}40 erg s-1 and a soft X-ray spectrum (power-law photon index Γ ˜ 2.2). This strongly suggests that Haro 11 X-2 is an X-ray binary in the ultra luminous state (i.e., an Ultra Luminous X-ray source, ULX). Haro 11 X-2 is coincident with the star-forming knot that is the source of the Lyα emission. The association of a ULX with Lyα emission raises the possibility that strong winds from X-ray binaries play an important role in injecting mechanical power into the interstellar medium, thus blowing away neutral material from the starburst region and allowing the Lyα to escape. We suggest that feedback from X-ray binaries may play a significant role in allowing Lyα emission to escape from galaxies in the

  12. Swift/BAT Detection of Hard X-Rays from Tycho's Supernova Remnant: Evidence for Titanium-44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troja, E.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; Hartmann, D.; Baumgartner, W.; Markwardt, C.; Barthelmy, S.; Cusumano, G.; Gehrels, N.

    2014-12-01

    We report Swift/Burst Alert Telescope survey observations of the Tycho's supernova remnant, performed over a period of 104 months since the mission's launch. The remnant is detected with high significance (>10σ) below 50 keV. We detect significant hard X-ray emission in the 60-85 keV band, above the continuum level predicted by a simple synchrotron model. The location of the observed excess is consistent with line emission from radioactive titanium-44, so far reported only for Type II supernova explosions. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the galactic supernova rate, and nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernova.

  13. A Broadband X-Ray Study of Supernova Remnant 3C 397

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, S.; Petre, R.; Arnaud, K. A.; Keohane, J. W.; Borkowski, K. J.; Dyer, K. K.; Reynolds, S. P.; Hughes, J. P.

    2000-12-01

    We present a broadband imaging and spectral study of the radio-bright supernova remnant (SNR) 3C 397 with ROSAT, ASCA, and RXTE. A bright X-ray spot seen in the HRI image hints at the presence of a pulsar-powered component and gives this SNR a composite X-ray morphology. Combined ROSAT and ASCA imaging shows that the remnant is highly asymmetric, with its X-ray emission peaking at the western lobe. The hard-band images obtained with the ASCA Gas Imaging Spectrometer show that much of the hard X-ray emission arises from the western lobe, associated with the SNR shell, with little hard X-ray emission associated with the central hot spot. The spectrum from 3C 397 is heavily absorbed and dominated by thermal emission with emission lines evident from Mg, Si, S, Ar and Fe. Single-component models fail to describe the X-ray spectrum, and at least two components are required: a soft component characterized by a low temperature and a large ionization timescale, and a hard component required to account for the Fe-K emission line and characterized by a much lower ionization timescale. We use a set of nonequilibrium ionization (NEI) models (Borkowski et al., in preparation), and find that the fitted parameters are robust. The temperatures from the soft and hard components are ~0.2 keV and ~1.6 keV respectively. The corresponding ionization timescales n0t (n0 being the preshock hydrogen density) are ~6×1012 cm-3 s and ~6×1010 cm-3 s, respectively. The large n0t of the soft component suggests it is approaching ionization equilibrium; thus it can be fit equally well with a collisional equilibrium ionization model. The spectrum obtained with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) of RXTE is contaminated by emission from the Galactic ridge, with only ~15% of the count rate originating from 3C 397 in the 5-15 keV range. The PCA spectrum allowed us to confirm the thermal nature of the hard X-ray emission. A third component originating from a pulsar-driven component is possible, but

  14. A Search for X-ray Emitting Binary Stars in the Globular Cluster Omega Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveny, Sarah; Gallien, Michael; Rickards Vaught, Ryan; Waters, Miranda; Cool, Adrienne; Bellini, Andrea; Anderson, Jay; Henleywillis, Simon; Haggard, Daryl; Heinke, Craig O.

    2016-06-01

    Omega Centauri is one of the most widely studied globular clusters, and is expected to harbor a significant population of binary stars. Binaries play a crucial role in determining the progression of stellar dynamics within globular clusters, and as such are relevant to questions concerning the possible formation of intermediate black holes at their centers. One effective way to identify certain classes of binary systems is to first locate X-ray sources in the cluster and then to search for their optical counterparts. Using Chandra X-ray Observatory's ACIS-I instrument we have identified 275 X-ray sources in and toward Omega Cen, more than 50 of which lie within the cluster's core radius. Here we present a search for the optical counterparts of these core sources using an extensive database of archival Hubble Space Telescope images. Using WFC3/UVIS data from 11 different filters, we construct color-magnitude diagrams that reveal a diverse array of objects, including (in addition to background and foreground objects) cataclysmic variables, coronally active binaries, and, interestingly, stars that lie on Omega Cen's anomalous giant branch. We discuss the significance of these results in the context of studies of the formation and evolution of binary stars in globular clusters.

  15. Enhanced winds and tidal streams in massive X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Blondin, J.M.; Stevens, I.R.; Kallman, T.R. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1991-04-01

    The tidal effects created by the presence of a compact companion are expected to induce a stream of enhanced wind from the early-type primary star in massive X-ray binary systems. In this paper, two-dimensional gasdynamical simulations of such streams are presented. It is found that the wind enhancement is a sensitive function of the binary separation, and develops into a tidal stream as the primary approaches its critical surface. For typical system parameters, the Coriolis force deflects the stream sufficiently that it does not impact directly on the compact companion but passes behind it. The density in the stream can reach values of 20-30 times the ambient wind density, leading to strong attenuation of the X-ray flux that passes through the tidal stream, providing a possible explanation of the enhanced absorption events seen at later phases in the X-ray observations of massive X-ray binary systems such as Vela X-1. In contrast to the time-variable accretion wake, the tidal stream is relatively stationary, producing absorption features that should remain fixed from orbit to orbit. For systems with a strong tidal stream, the large asymmetry in the accreting wind results in the accretion of angular momentum of constant sign, as opposed to systems without streams, where the sign of the accreted angular momentum can change. 39 refs.

  16. A Global Look at Reflection in Black-Hole X-ray Binaries Using RXTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, James F.; Garcia, Javier; Reis, Ruben C.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.

    2014-08-01

    Spectral reflection is ubiquitous in black-hole X-ray binaries, and is produced by the coronal hard X-ray emission illuminating the cooler accretion disk. The observed interplay between coronal and reflection spectral components provides insight into the geometry of the corona - an attribute which is presently only weakly constrained We present first results from a new campaign analyzing all RXTE PCU-2 spectra of accreting stellar-mass black holes. A simple but self-consistent treatment of disk, coronal, and reflection emission highlights changes evident in the coronal geometry between soft and hard spectral states.

  17. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, δ Orionis Aa. II. X-Ray Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W.; Nazé, Y.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Lauer, J.; Shenar, T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Richardson, N. D.; Pablo, H.; Evans, N. R.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L.; Ignace, R.; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Hole, K. T.; Lomax, J. R.

    2015-08-01

    We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution spectral data set of the δ Ori Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS HETGS, have a total exposure time of ≈ 479 ks and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range of 5-25 Å is confirmed, with a maximum amplitude of about ±15% within a single ≈ 125 ks observation. Periods of 4.76 and 2.04 days are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in the flux level throughout the nine-day observational campaign. Using 40 ks contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate the variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S xv, Si xiii, and Ne ix. For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at ϕ = 0.0 when the secondary δ Ori Aa2 is at the inferior conjunction. Using 3D hydrodynamic modeling of the interacting winds, we relate the emission line width variability to the presence of a wind cavity created by a wind-wind collision, which is effectively void of embedded wind shocks and is carved out of the X-ray-producing primary wind, thus producing phase-locked X-ray variability. Based on data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  18. The coupling of a disk corona and a jet for the radio/X-ray correlation in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erlin

    2015-08-01

    We interpret the radio/X-ray correlation of LR ∝ LX1.4 for LX/LEdd >10-3 in black hole X-ray binaries with a detailed disk corona-jet model, in which the accretion flow and the jet are connected by a parameter, ‘η’, describing the fraction of the matter in the accretion flow ejected outward to form the jet. We calculate LR and LX at different mass accretion rates, adjusting η to fit the observed radio/X-ray correlation of the black hole X-ray transient H1743-322 for LX/LEdd > 10-3. It is found that the value of η for this radio/X-ray correlation for LX/LEdd > 10-3, is systematically less than that of the case for LX/LEdd < 10-3, which is consistent with the general idea that the jet is often relatively suppressed at the high luminosity phase in black hole X-ray binaries.

  19. The X-ray properties of five galactic supernova remnants detected by the Spitzer glimpse survey

    SciTech Connect

    Pannuti, Thomas G.; Moffitt, William P.; Rho, Jeonghee; Heinke, Craig O. E-mail: w.moffitt@moreheadstate.edu E-mail: heinke@ualberta.ca

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the X-ray properties of five Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs)—Kes 17 (G304.6+0.1), G311.5–0.3, G346.6–0.2, CTB 37A (G348.5+0.1), and G348.5–0.0—that were detected in the infrared by Reach et al. in an analysis of data from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) that was conducted by the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present and analyze archival ASCA observations of Kes 17, G311.5–0.3, and G346.6–0.2, archival XMM-Newton observations of Kes 17, CTB 37A, and G348.5–0.0, and an archival Chandra observation of CTB 37A. All of the SNRs are clearly detected in the X-ray except possibly G348.5–0.0. Our study reveals that the four detected SNRs all feature center-filled X-ray morphologies and that the observed emission from these sources is thermal in all cases. We argue that these SNRs should be classified as mixed-morphology SNRs (MM SNRs); our study strengthens the correlation between MM SNRs and SNRs interacting with molecular clouds and suggests that the origin of MM SNRs may be due to the interactions between these SNRs and adjacent clouds. Our ASCA analysis of G311.5–0.3 reveals for the first time X-ray emission from this SNR: the X-ray emission is center-filled within the radio and infrared shells and thermal in nature (kT ∼ 0.98 keV), thus motivating its classification as an MM SNR. We find considerable spectral variations in the properties associated with the plasmas of the other X-ray-detected SNRs, such as a possible overabundance of magnesium in the plasma of Kes 17. Our new results also include the first detailed spatially resolved spectroscopic study of CTB 37A using Chandra as well as a spectroscopic study of the discrete X-ray source CXOU J171428.5–383601, which may be a neutron star associated with CTB 37A. Finally, we also estimate such properties as electron density n{sub e} , radiative age t {sub rad} and swept-up mass M{sub X} for each of the four X-ray-detected SNRs. Each

  20. Quantitative measurement of binary liquid distributions using multiple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    The complex geometry and large index-of-refraction gradients that occur near the point of impingement of binary liquid jets present a challenging environment for optical interrogation. A simultaneous quadruple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and line-of-sight radiography technique is proposed as a means of distinguishing and quantifying individual liquid component distributions prior to, during, and after jet impact. Two different pairs of fluorescence tracers are seeded into each liquid stream to maximize their attenuation ratio for reabsorption correction and differentiation of the two fluids during mixing. This approach for instantaneous correction of x-ray fluorescence reabsorption is compared with a more time-intensive approach of using stereographic reconstruction of x-ray attenuation along multiple lines of sight. The proposed methodology addresses the need for a quantitative measurement technique capable of interrogating optically complex, near-field liquid distributions in many mixing systems of practical interest involving two or more liquid streams.

  1. Energetic Particle Acceleration in X-Ray BINARIES:JOINT X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Observations of CEN X-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    Recent detections of gamma-ray emission from the Cen X-3 system have focussed new attention on x-ray binary systems as possible sites for powerful energetic particle acceleration. Simultaneous x-ray and gamma- ray observations are needed to constrain models for particle acceleration and high-energy photon production within the Cen X-3 system. We propose modest RXTE x-ray monitoring observations as part of an international campaign to measure simultaneously the high-enegy emission from Cen X-3 at x-ray through TeV energies. This broad-band dataset will be a unique resource for modeling high-energy processes in the Cen X-3 system.

  2. Simultaneous X-Ray and Radio Observations of the Unusual Binary LSI + 61 deg 303

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Leahy, Denis A.; Waltman, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    We present simultaneous 0.5 - 10 keV X-ray and two-frequency radio observations at 2.25 and 8.3 GHz of the unusual binary system LSI + 61 deg. 303. This system was observed twice in a single binary orbit by the ASCA satellite, and monitored daily at two radio frequencies during the same orbital cycle with the Greenbank Interferometer. During the first ASCA observation the source was detected with a 1 - 10 keV luminosity 3.6 x 10(exp 33) (d/2.0 kpc)(exp 2) erg 1/s and during the second at a similar level with evidence for a decrease in average flux of 30%. During the first pointing the radio source was at a quiescent 8 GHz flux level of 30 mJy while during the second the radio flux was rising dramatically with an average value of 100 mJy. No variability is seen in the X-ray flux during the first pointing, but during the second the flux is variable by approx. 50% on timescales of approx. 30 minutes. No pulsations are seen in either X-ray observation with an upper limit on pulsed flux of 20%. The low X-ray luminosity and lack of observed pulsations indicate that accretion onto a neutron star surface is not the origin for the high-energy emission. Rather, the X-rays must result either from accreted matter which is stopped at the magnetosphere because the magnetospheric boundry is rotating at super-Keplerian rates or due to a shock formed in the interaction of the dense wind of the Be star companion and a moderately young pulsar. We derive a required pulsar spin down luminosity of approx. 10(exp 37) erg 1/s, and argue that the shock model more easily explains the observed X-ray radio observations.

  3. Rapid spectral and timing variability of Be/X-ray binaries during type ;II outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.

    2008-10-01

    X-ray colour-colour (CD) and colour-intensity (HID) diagrams are powerful tools that allow investigation of spectral variability without assuming any spectral model. These diagrams have been used extensively for low-mass X-ray binaries and black-hole candidates, but very few applications have been found for high-mass X-ray binaries. We investigated the spectral and timing variability of four accreting X-ray pulsars with Be-type companions during major X-ray outbursts. The aim is to define source states based on the properties (noise components) of the aperiodic variability in correlation with the position in the colour-colour diagram. Different spectral states were defined according to the value of the X-ray colours and flux. Transient Be/X-ray binaries exhibit two branches in their colour-colour and colour-intensity diagrams: i) the horizontal branch corresponds to a low-intensity state and shows the highest fractional rms, similar to the the island state in atolls and horizontal branch in Z sources; ii) the diagonal branch corresponds to a high-intensity state, in which the source stays for about 75% of the total duration of the outburst. Despite the complexity of the power spectra due to the peaks of the pulse period and its harmonics, the aperiodic variability of Be/X-ray binaries can be described with a relatively low number of Lorentzian components. Some of these components can be associated with the same type of noise as seen in low-mass X-ray binaries, although the characteristic frequencies are about one order of magnitude lower. The analysis of the CD/HID and power spectra results in two different types of Be/X. While in 4U 0115+63, KS 1947+300 and EXO 2030+375 the hard colour decreases as the count rate decreases, it increases in V0332+53. The pattern traced by V0332+53 then results in a Z-shaped track, similar to the low-mass Z sources, without the flaring branch. In contrast, the horizontal branch in 4U 0115+63, KS 1947+300 and EXO 2030+375 corresponds

  4. ENERGY FEEDBACK FROM X-RAY BINARIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Fragos, T.; Zezas, A.; Lehmer, B. D.; Naoz, S.; Basu-Zych, A.

    2013-10-20

    X-ray photons, because of their long mean-free paths, can easily escape the galactic environments where they are produced, and interact at long distances with the intergalactic medium, potentially having a significant contribution to the heating and reionization of the early universe. The two most important sources of X-ray photons in the universe are active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and X-ray binaries (XRBs). In this Letter we use results from detailed, large scale population synthesis simulations to study the energy feedback of XRBs, from the first galaxies (z ∼ 20) until today. We estimate that X-ray emission from XRBs dominates over AGN at z ∼> 6-8. The shape of the spectral energy distribution of the emission from XRBs shows little change with redshift, in contrast to its normalization which evolves by ∼4 orders of magnitude, primarily due to the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate. However, the metallicity and the mean stellar age of a given XRB population affect significantly its X-ray output. Specifically, the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs per unit of star-formation rate varies an order of magnitude going from solar metallicity to less than 10% solar, and the X-ray luminosity from low-mass XRBs per unit of stellar mass peaks at an age of ∼300 Myr and then decreases gradually at later times, showing little variation for mean stellar ages ∼> 3 Gyr. Finally, we provide analytical and tabulated prescriptions for the energy output of XRBs, that can be directly incorporated in cosmological simulations.

  5. Energy Feedback from X-ray Binaries in the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragos, T.; Lehmer, B..; Naoz, S.; Zezas, A.; Basu-Zych, A.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray photons, because of their long mean-free paths, can easily escape the galactic environments where they are produced, and interact at long distances with the intergalactic medium, potentially having a significant contribution to the heating and reionization of the early universe. The two most important sources of X-ray photons in the universe are active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and X-ray binaries (XRBs). In this Letter we use results from detailed, large scale population synthesis simulations to study the energy feedback of XRBs, from the first galaxies (z (redshift) approximately equal to 20) until today.We estimate that X-ray emission from XRBs dominates over AGN at z (redshift) greater than or approximately equal to 6-8. The shape of the spectral energy distribution of the emission from XRBs shows little change with redshift, in contrast to its normalization which evolves by approximately 4 orders of magnitude, primarily due to the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate. However, the metallicity and the mean stellar age of a given XRB population affect significantly its X-ray output. Specifically, the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs per unit of star-formation rate varies an order of magnitude going from solar metallicity to less than 10% solar, and the X-ray luminosity from low-mass XRBs per unit of stellar mass peaks at an age of approximately 300 Myr (million years) and then decreases gradually at later times, showing little variation for mean stellar ages 3 Gyr (Giga years, or billion years). Finally, we provide analytical and tabulated prescriptions for the energy output of XRBs, that can be directly incorporated in cosmological simulations.

  6. Tracing the Reverberation Lag in the Hard State of Black Hole X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, B.; Ponti, G.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Nandra, K.

    2015-11-01

    We report results obtained from a systematic analysis of X-ray lags in a sample of black hole X-ray binaries, with the aim of assessing the presence of reverberation lags and studying their evolution during outburst. We used XMM-Newton and simultaneous Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations to obtain broadband energy coverage of both the disk and the hard X-ray Comptonization components. In most cases the detection of reverberation lags is hampered by low levels of variability-power signal-to-noise ratio (typically when the source is in a soft state) and/or short exposure times. The most detailed study was possible for GX 339-4 in the hard state, which allowed us to characterize the evolution of X-ray lags as a function of luminosity in a single source. Over all the sampled frequencies (˜0.05-9 Hz), we observe the hard lags intrinsic to the power-law component, already well known from previous RXTE studies. The XMM-Newton soft X-ray response allows us to detail the disk variability. At low frequencies (long timescales) the disk component always leads the power-law component. On the other hand, a soft reverberation lag (ascribable to thermal reprocessing) is always detected at high frequencies (short timescales). The intrinsic amplitude of the reverberation lag decreases as the source luminosity and the disk fraction increase. This suggests that the distance between the X-ray source and the region of the optically thick disk where reprocessing occurs gradually decreases as GX 339-4 rises in luminosity through the hard state, possibly as a consequence of reduced disk truncation.

  7. Energy Feedback from X-Ray Binaries in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragos, T.; Lehmer, B. D.; Naoz, S.; Zezas, A.; Basu-Zych, A.

    2013-10-01

    X-ray photons, because of their long mean-free paths, can easily escape the galactic environments where they are produced, and interact at long distances with the intergalactic medium, potentially having a significant contribution to the heating and reionization of the early universe. The two most important sources of X-ray photons in the universe are active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and X-ray binaries (XRBs). In this Letter we use results from detailed, large scale population synthesis simulations to study the energy feedback of XRBs, from the first galaxies (z ~ 20) until today. We estimate that X-ray emission from XRBs dominates over AGN at z >~ 6-8. The shape of the spectral energy distribution of the emission from XRBs shows little change with redshift, in contrast to its normalization which evolves by ~4 orders of magnitude, primarily due to the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate. However, the metallicity and the mean stellar age of a given XRB population affect significantly its X-ray output. Specifically, the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs per unit of star-formation rate varies an order of magnitude going from solar metallicity to less than 10% solar, and the X-ray luminosity from low-mass XRBs per unit of stellar mass peaks at an age of ~300 Myr and then decreases gradually at later times, showing little variation for mean stellar ages >~ 3 Gyr. Finally, we provide analytical and tabulated prescriptions for the energy output of XRBs, that can be directly incorporated in cosmological simulations.

  8. Optical and X-ray observations of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Brian; Corbet, Robin; Augusteijn, Thomas; Callanan, Paul; Smale, Alan P.

    1993-01-01

    Optical and X-ray observations of EXO-676 in late March 1989 are presented. Our optical observations provide some support for the previously observed correlation between the mean optical brightness and light curve morphology. Unexpectedly, the mean X-ray and optical flux levels during this period do not reflect similar system states. The optical counterpart is found to be in an intermediate to low state, while X-ray data imply a bright (high) state. The changed relationship between optical and X-ray fluxes is evidence showing that EXO 0748-676 has possibly evolved. We fail to find correlated variability in simultaneous X-ray and optical observations. The lack of covariability is attributed to the limited simultaneous coverage of the source and/or significant geometric modulation in the optical light curve.

  9. A High-Resolution X-ray Atlas of Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. M.; Chu, Y.-H.; Dickel, J. R.; Petre, R.; Smith, R. C.; Tavarez, M.

    1998-12-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) presents a unique opportunity to study a large and varied sample of supernova remnants (SNRs), at a common distance ( ~ 50 kpc) and with little interstellar obscuration. These factors allow us to avoid the uncertainties in distances and absorptions that plague the study of Galactic SNRs. Reasonable resolutions can be achieved for LMC SNRs with current instruments in the X-ray, optical, and radio regimes; thus, they can be studied at a level of detail unrivaled by most extragalactic remnants. LMC remnants cover the range of evolutionary stages, from the newly forming SNR of SN 1987A, to the largest remnant yet known (SNR 0450-709, 104x75 pc). They arise from both Type I and Type II progenitors, and expand into environments ranging from a stellar-wind bubble to an HII complex. This extensive sample allows us to examine SNRs both individually and as a group. We can study specific processes such as the collision of two SNRs (DEML316), SNR breakouts (N11L, N86), the expansion of an SNR in a cloudy medium (N63A), Crab-type SNRs (N158A, N157B), and unusual SNR structures (Honeycomb SNR). More importantly, we can identify common features between SNRs and correlate these with their evolutionary states and environments. In this poster we present a high-resolution atlas of the X-ray emission from LMC SNRs, and use the X-ray morphologies to examine SNR conditions and structures. We find five types of SNRs in the LMC. While the Peaked Emission SNRs are dominated by a pulsar-powered nebula, and the Irregular SNRs by the details of their environments, the remaining three categories (Shell, Diffuse Face, and Centrally Peaked) seem to represent an evolutionary trend, as shown by their correlation with remnant sizes. We will discuss the intriguing implications of our findings for SNR development and interactions with the interstellar medium.

  10. IGR J17451-3022: a dipping and eclipsing low mass X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the available X-ray data collected by INTEGRAL, Swift, and XMM-Newton during the first outburst of the INTEGRAL transient IGR J17451-3022, discovered in 2014 August. The emission of the source during the 9 months-long outburst was dominated by a thermal component (kT˜14;1.2 keV), most likely produced by an accretion disk. The XMM-Newton observation carried out during the outburst revealed the presence of multiple absorption features in the soft X-ray emission that could be associated to the presence of an ionized absorber lying above the accretion disk, as observed in many high-inclination low mass X-ray binaries. The XMM-Newton data also revealed the presence of partial and rectangular X-ray eclipses (lasting about 820 s), together with dips. The latter can be associated with increases in the overall absorption column density in the direction of the source. The detection of two consecutive X-ray eclipses in the XMM-Newton data allowed us to estimate the source orbital period at Porb=22620.5(-1.8,+2.0) s (1σ c.l.).

  11. IGR J17451–3022: a dipping and eclipsing low mass X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the available X-ray data collected by INTEGRAL, Swift, and XMM-Newton during the first outburst of the INTEGRAL transient IGR J17451-3022, discovered in 2014 August. The emission of the source during the 9 months-long outburst was dominated by a thermal component (kT˜1.2 keV), most likely produced by an accretion disk. The XMM-Newton observation carried out during the outburst revealed the presence of multiple absorption features in the soft X-ray emission that could be associated to the presence of an ionized absorber lying above the accretion disk, as observed in many high-inclination low mass X-ray binaries. The XMM-Newton data also revealed the presence of partial and rectangular X-ray eclipses (lasting about 820 s), together with dips. The latter can be associated with increases in the overall absorption column density in the direction of the source. The detection of two consecutive X-ray eclipses in the XMM-Newton data allowed us to estimate the source orbital period at Porb=22620.5(‑1.8,+2.0) s (1σ c.l.).

  12. An Archival X-ray Study of the Large Magellanic Cloud Supernova Remnant N132D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, Paul P.; Foster, Adam; Gaetz, Terrance; Jerius, Diab H.; Patnaude, Daniel; Edgar, Richard J.; Smith, Randall K.; Blair, William P.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the archival XMM-Newton EPIC data (203ks for pn and 556/574ks for MOS1/MOS2) and the Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS data (89ks) of the brightest X-ray supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) N132D. N132D has been classified as an ``O-rich'' remnant based on the UV and optical spectra which show emission from C, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. These spectra of the central optical knots do not show any emission from elements with Z higher than Si, yet the nucleosynthesis models predict significant quantities of these higher Z elements. Our spectral analysis of the deep XMM data clearly shows emission lines from S, Ar, Ca, and Fe, with indications of other possible features between Ca and Fe. We use a combination of the high resolution images from Chandra and the sensitive spectra from XMM to disentangle the emission from swept-up interstellar material and a possible hot ejecta component. We interpret these results in the context of a 3,000 year old remnant from a massive progenitor that has exploded into a cavity created by the progenitor.This research was supported by the NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program (ADAP) through grant number NNX11AD17G.

  13. A Chandra X-Ray Survey of Ejecta in the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Laming, J. Martin

    2011-01-01

    We present a survey of the X-ray emitting ejecta in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant based on an extensive analysis of over 6000 spectral regions extracted on 2.5-10" angular scales using the Chandra 1 Ms observation. We interpret these results in the context of hydrodynamical models for the evolution of the remnant. The distributions of fitted temperature and ionization age are highly peaked and suggest that the ejecta were subjected to multiple secondary shocks. Based on the fitted emission measure and element abundances, and an estimate of the emitting volume, we derive masses for the X-ray emitting ejecta as well as showing the distribution of the mass of various elements over the remnant. The total shocked Fe mass appears to be roughly 0.14 Solar Mass, which accounts for nearly all of the mass expected in Fe ejecta. We find two populations of Fe ejecta, that associated with normal Si-burning and that associated with alpha-rich freeze-out, with a mass ratio of approximately 2:1. Surprisingly, essentially all of this Fe (both components) is well outside the central regions of the SNR, presumably having been ejected by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion. We discuss this, and its implications for the neutron star kick.

  14. SOFT X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, Phil; McEntaffer, Randall; Cash, Webster

    2013-03-20

    We present the results of a suborbital rocket flight whose scientific target was the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant. The payload consists of wire grid collimators, off-plane grating arrays, and gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. The system is designed for spectral measurements in the 17-107 A bandpass with a resolution up to {approx}60 ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}). The Extended X-ray Off-plane Spectrometer (EXOS) was launched on a Terrier-Black Brant rocket on 2009 November 13 from White Sands Missile Range and obtained 340 s of useable scientific data. The X-ray emission is dominated by O VII and O VIII, including the He-like O VII triplet at {approx}22 A. Another emission feature at {approx}45 A is composed primarily of Si XI and Si XII. The best-fit model to this spectrum is an equilibrium plasma model at a temperature of log(T) = 6.4 (0.23 keV).

  15. Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, Phil; McEntaffer, Randall; Cash, Webster

    2013-03-01

    We present the results of a suborbital rocket flight whose scientific target was the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant. The payload consists of wire grid collimators, off-plane grating arrays, and gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. The system is designed for spectral measurements in the 17-107 Å bandpass with a resolution up to ~60 (λ/Δλ). The Extended X-ray Off-plane Spectrometer (EXOS) was launched on a Terrier-Black Brant rocket on 2009 November 13 from White Sands Missile Range and obtained 340 s of useable scientific data. The X-ray emission is dominated by O VII and O VIII, including the He-like O VII triplet at ~22 Å. Another emission feature at ~45 Å is composed primarily of Si XI and Si XII. The best-fit model to this spectrum is an equilibrium plasma model at a temperature of log(T) = 6.4 (0.23 keV).

  16. CCD soft X-ray observations of the Puppis a supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthiaume, G. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Garmire, G. P.; Nousek, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first images and spectra of an astronomical object, other than the Sun, acquired with a charge coupled device (CCD) imaging X-ray spectrometer. During a 230 s sounding rocket observation, we have acquired moderate-resolution spectra and moderate-resolution images of a portion of the Pup A supernova remnant (SNR). Based on these data, we conclude that the X-ray spectrum of Pup A is inconsistent with any single-temperature equilibrium or nonequilibrium plasma model. We find evidence for variations in the emitting plasma on scales as small as 5.0 min and as large as 30.0 min. The spatial structure of the spectral variations in the remnant is found to be inconsistent with the standard Sedov model for the evolution of a SRN into a homogeneous interstellar medium (ISM). We suggest that the remnant is expanding into a region of the ISM having a density of approximately 1 cm(exp -3) with inhomogeneities on the order of 50%. We have found evidence for the presence of a knot of plasma enriched in neon, but require more data to be conclusive.

  17. The X-Ray Spectrum of the Supernova Remnant 1E 0102-72.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Behar, Ehud; Kahn, Steven M.; denHerder, Jan Willem; vanderHeyden, Kurt

    1997-01-01

    In this letter we present the soft X-ray (5-35A) spectrum of the supernova remnant (SNR) IE 0102-72.3 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, acquired by the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) aboard ESA's XMM-Newton Observatory. This extended-source X-ray spectrum of unprecedented spectral resolution (lambda/Delta(lambda) approx. 300) permits, for the first time, unabiguous identification and measurement of isolated emission lines and line complexes alike. The diagnostic power of performing spectroscopy using groups of emission lines from single ions is exemplified. In particular, the bright Lyman and helium series lines for light elements (C VI, O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, Ne X and possibly Mg XI & Mg XII) show peculiar ratios, where the values [1s - np] / [1s - (n + l)p] are systematically weaker than expected for electron impact excitation. These measured ratios resemble signatures of recombining or charge exchanging plasmas. We argue that charge exchange, given its large cross section and evidence for inhomogeneous media within the SNR, is a likely mechanism for the observed emission. Also. the well known temperature diagnostics G(T(sub e)) = (i + f)/r of helium- like triplets (O VII & Ne IX) indicate high temperatures, well above the maximum emission temperature T(sub m) for each ion, and consistent with a purely ionizing plasma. The density diagnostics R(n(sub e)) = f / i meanwhile, are consistent with the low density limit, as expected.

  18. An Archival X-ray Study of the Large Magellanic Cloud Supernova Remnant N132D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, Paul P.; Foster, Adam R.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Jerius, Diab; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Edgar, Richard J.; Smith, Randall K.; Blair, William P.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the archival XMM-Newton EPIC data (203ks for pn and 556/574ks for MOS1/MOS2) and the Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS data (89ks) of the brightest X-ray supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) N132D. N132D has been classified as an ``O-rich'' remnant based on the UV and optical spectra which show emission from C, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. These spectra of the central optical knots do not show any emission from elements with Z higher than Si, yet the nucleosynthesis models predict significant quantities of these higher Z elements. Our spectral analysis of the deep XMM data clearly shows emission lines from S, Ar, Ca, and Fe, with indications of other possible features between Ca and Fe. We use a combination of the high resolution images from Chandra and the sensitive spectra from XMM to disentangle the emission from swept-up interstellar material and a possible hot ejecta component. We interpret these results in the context of a 3,000 year old remnant from a massive progenitor that has exploded into a cavity created by the progenitor.This research was supported by the NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program (ADAP) through grant number NNX11AD17G.

  19. ORBITAL PERIOD AND OUTBURST LUMINOSITY OF TRANSIENT LOW MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. X.; Yu, W.; Li, T. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Li, X. D.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relationship between the maximal luminosity of X-ray outburst and the orbital period in transient low mass X-ray binaries (or soft X-ray transients) observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in the past decade. We find that the maximal luminosity (3-200 keV) in Eddington units generally increases with increasing orbital period, which does not show a luminosity saturation but in general agrees with theoretical prediction. The peak luminosities in ultra-compact binaries might be higher than those with an orbital period of 2-4 hr, but more data are needed to make this claim. We also find that there is no significant difference in the 3-200 keV peak outburst luminosity between neutron star (NS) systems and black hole (BH) systems with orbital periods above 4 hr; however, there might be a significant difference at smaller orbital periods where only NS systems are observed and radiatively inefficient accretion flow is expected to work at low luminosities for BH accreters.

  20. Stellar wind in state transitions of high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čechura, J.; Hadrava, P.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: We have developed a new code for the three-dimensional time-dependent raditation hydrodynamic simulation of the stellar wind in interacting binaries to improve models of accretion in high-mass X-ray binaries and to quantitatively clarify the observed variability of these objects. We used the code to test the influence of various parameters on the structure and properties of circumstellar matter. Methods: Our code takes into account acceleration of the wind due to the Roche effective potential, Coriolis force, gas pressure, and (CAK-) radiative pressure in the lines and continuum of the supergiant radiation field that is modulated by its gravity darkening and by the photo-ionization caused by X-ray radiation from the compact companion. The parameters of Cygnus X-1 were used to test the properties of our model. Results: Both two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations show that the Coriolis force substantially influences the mass loss and consequently the accretion rate onto the compact companion. The gravitational field of the compact companion focuses the stellar wind, which leads to the formation of a curved cone-like gaseous tail behind the companion. The changes of X-ray photo-ionization of the wind material during X-ray spectral-state transitions significantly influence the wind structure and offer an explanation of the variability of Cygnus X-1 in optical observations (the Hα emission).

  1. High Mass X-ray Binaries in Nearby Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangelov, Blagoy

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs), in which a compact object, either black hole or neutron star, is accreting material from a young, massive donor star, often dominate the high-energy emission from nearby star-forming galaxies. These high mass pairs are believed to form in star clusters, where most massive star formation takes place, but to become displaced from their parent clusters either because they are dynamically ejected or because their parent cluster has dissolved. We have conducted a systematic study of the formation and evolution of bright HMXBs in eight nearby galaxies, by detecting HMXBs from their X-ray emission in Chandra X-ray Observatory observations, and identifying their parent clusters and donor stars in optical observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. We use the X-ray and optical properties of these systems to determine the ages of the binaries, whether the compact objects are black holes or neutron stars, and to constrain the masses of the donor stars.

  2. X-ray sources in old star clusters: signatures of binary destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen

    2014-11-01

    Chandra observations of globular clusters have revealed hundreds of close binaries. Correlations of their numbers with cluster mass and encounter rate have pointed at a dynamical origin for some binary types and a primoridal origin for others. I will discuss results from our Chandra observations of the oldest open clusters, which have extended these studies to the poorly-studied regime of lower densities not covered by globulars. Active binaries (ABs) and CVs in globulars are underabundant compared to old open clusters, implying that even the closest binaries in globulars are affected by binary destruction. Among open clusters the number of ABs does not scale with cluster mass, and dynamics may shape X-ray source populations at low densities, too.

  3. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, Delta Orionis Aa. II. X-Ray Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W.; Naze, Y.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Lauer, J.; Shenar, T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution spectral data set of the delta Ori Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) HETGS (High Energy Transmission Grating), have a total exposure time approximately equal to 479 kiloseconds and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range of 5-25 angstroms is confirmed, with a maximum amplitude of about plus or minus15 percent within a single approximately equal to125 kiloseconds observation. Periods of 4.76 and 2.04 days are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in the flux level throughout the nine-day observational campaign. Using 40 kiloseconds contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate the variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S (sub XV), Si (sub XIII), and Ne (sub IX). For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at phi = 0.0 when the secondary delta Ori Aa2 is at the inferior conjunction. Using 3D hydrodynamic modeling of the interacting winds, we relate the emission line width variability to the presence of a wind cavity created by a wind-wind collision, which is effectively void of embedded wind shocks and is carved out of the X-ray-producing primary wind, thus producing phase-locked X-ray variability.

  4. The X-Ray Luminosity Functions of Field Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries in Early-Type Galaxies: Evidence for a Stellar Age Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Berkeley, M.; Zezas, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Kalogera, V.; Ptak, A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Tzanavaris, P.; Yukita, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span approximately equal to 3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background AGN/galaxies. We find that the "young" early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (approximately equals 2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L(sub x) approximately greater than (5-10) × 10(exp 37) erg s(exp -1)) per unit K-band luminosity (L(sub K); a proxy for stellar mass) than the "old" early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (approximately equals 8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of 2-3 excess of L(sub X)/L(sub K) for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  5. The X-ray luminosity functions of field low-mass X-ray binaries in early-type galaxies: Evidence for a stellar age dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P.; Yukita, M.; Berkeley, M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Ptak, A.; Zezas, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fragos, T.; Kalogera, V.; Sivakoff, G. R.

    2014-07-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span ≈3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background active galactic nuclei/galaxies. We find that the 'young' early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (≈2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L {sub X} ≳ (5-10) × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}) per unit K-band luminosity (L{sub K} ; a proxy for stellar mass) than the 'old' early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (≈8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of ≈2-3 excess of L {sub X}/L{sub K} for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  6. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearby Massive Binary Sigma Orionis Aa. II; X-Ray Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W.; Naze, Y; Pollock, A. M. T.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Lauer, J.; Shenar, T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Richardson, N. D.; Pablo, H.; Evans, N. R.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L.; Ignace, R.; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Hole, K. T.; Lomax, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution gratings spectral dataset of the Sigma Ori Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS HETGS, have a total exposure time of approximately 479 kiloseconds and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range 5-25 angstroms is confirmed, with maximum amplitude of about plus or minus 15 percent within a single approximately 125 kiloseconds observation. Periods of 4.76 days and 2.04 days are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in flux level throughout the 9-day observational campaign. Using 40 kiloseconds contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S XV, Si XIII, and Ne IX. For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at phi equals 0.0 when the secondary Aa2 is at inferior conjunction. We use the results of an SPH radiative transfer code model, customized for this project, to relate the presence of a low density cavity in the primary stellar wind embedded shock that is associated with the secondary star to the emission line width variability.

  7. Three X-ray flares near primary eclipse of the RS CVn binary XY UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hang; Osten, Rachel; Maccarone, Thomas; Reale, Fabio; Liu, Ji-Feng; Heckert, Paul A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on an archival X-ray observation of the eclipsing RS CVn binary XY UMa (P orb ≈ 0.48 d). In two Chandra ACIS observations spanning 200 ks and almost five orbital periods, three flares occurred. We find no evidence for eclipses in the X-ray flux. The flares took place around times of primary eclipse, with one flare occurring shortly (< 0.125 P orb) after a primary eclipse, and the other two happening shortly (< 0.05 P orb) before a primary eclipse. Two flares occurred within roughly one orbital period (Δα ≈ 1.024 P orb) of each other. We analyze the light curve and spectra of the system, and investigate coronal length scales during both quiescence and flares, as well as the timing of the flares. We explore the possibility that the flares are orbit-induced by introducing a small orbital eccentricity, which is quite challenging for this close binary.

  8. Timing analysis of binary X ray pulsars observed by HEAO 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soong, Y.; Swank, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    Timing analysis of the pointed observations of 5 selected binary X ray pulsars, in two categories of disk-fed and wind-fed sources, by HEAO 1 A-2 is reported. The power spectral analysis was performed on the data in the frequency range from approx. 1 MHz to 6.25 Hz. The coherent signal of the pulsation, the continuum of the power spectrum, varies in time and differs among sources. Quasi-Periodic Oscillation (QPO) is probably related to a fast spinning but weakly magnetized neutron star in the low mass X ray binaries. QPO was searched for in this frequency range to see if scaling laws exist among these two systems which may have possessed different order of magnitude of magnetic field strengths and the inner disk radii. One possible QPO is found centering at 0.062 Hz in 4U0115+63 during a flare.

  9. A Statistical Approach to Identifying Compact Objects in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, Saeqa D.

    2013-04-01

    A standard approach towards statistical inferences in astronomy has been the application of Principal Components Analysis (PCA) to reduce dimensionality. However, for non-linear distributions this is not always an effective approach. A non-linear technique called ``diffusion maps" (Freema \\eta 2009; Richard \\eta 2009; Lee \\& Waterman 2010), a robust eigenmode-based framework, allows retention of the full ``connectivity" of the data points. Through this approach we define the highly non-linear geometry of X-ray binaries in a color-color-intensity diagram in an efficient and statistically sound manner providing a broadly applicable means of distinguishing between black holes and neutron stars in Galactic X-ray binaries.

  10. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, Delta Orionis Aa. I. Overview of the X-Ray Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Nicholas, J. S.; Pablo, H.; Shenar, T.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Waldron, W. L.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Richardson, N. D.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hamaguchi, K.; Leutenegger, M.; Gull, T. R.; Iping, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of four deep phase-constrained Chandra HETGS X-ray observations of Delta Ori A. Delta Ori A is actually a triple system that includes the nearest massive eclipsing spectroscopic binary, Delta Ori Aa, the only such object that can be observed with little phase-smearing with the Chandra gratings. Since the fainter star, Delta Ori Aa2, has a much lower X-ray luminosity than the brighter primary (Delta Ori Aa1), Delta Ori Aa provides a unique system with which to test the spatial distribution of the X-ray emitting gas around Delta Ori Aa1 via occultation by the photosphere of, and wind cavity around, the X-ray dark secondary. Here we discuss the X-ray spectrum and X-ray line profiles for the combined observation, having an exposure time of nearly 500 ks and covering nearly the entire binary orbit. The companion papers discuss the X-ray variability seen in the Chandra spectra, present new space-based photometry and ground-based radial velocities obtained simultaneously with the X-ray data to better constrain the system parameters, and model the effects of X-rays on the optical and UV spectra. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by embedded wind shock emission from star Aa1, with little contribution from the tertiary star Ab or the shocked gas produced by the collision of the wind of Aa1 against the surface of Aa2. We find a similar temperature distribution to previous X-ray spectrum analyses. We also show that the line half-widths are about 0.3-0.5 times the terminal velocity of the wind of star Aa1. We find a strong anti-correlation between line widths and the line excitation energy, which suggests that longer-wavelength, lower-temperature lines form farther out in the wind. Our analysis also indicates that the ratio of the intensities of the strong and weak lines of Fe XVII and Ne X are inconsistent with model predictions, which may be an effect of resonance scattering.

  11. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, δ Orionis Aa. I. Overview of the X-Ray Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Nichols, J. S.; Pablo, H.; Shenar, T.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Waldron, W. L.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Richardson, N. D.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hamaguchi, K.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Oskinova, L.; Hamann, W.-R.; Nazé, Y.; Ignace, R.; Evans, N. R.; Lomax, J. R.; Hoffman, J. L.; Gayley, K.; Owocki, S. P.; Leutenegger, M.; Gull, T. R.; Hole, K. T.; Lauer, J.; Iping, R. C.

    2015-08-01

    We present an overview of four deep phase-constrained Chandra HETGS X-ray observations of δ Ori A. Delta Ori A is actually a triple system that includes the nearest massive eclipsing spectroscopic binary, δ Ori Aa, the only such object that can be observed with little phase-smearing with the Chandra gratings. Since the fainter star, δ Ori Aa2, has a much lower X-ray luminosity than the brighter primary (δ Ori Aa1), δ Ori Aa provides a unique system with which to test the spatial distribution of the X-ray emitting gas around δ Ori Aa1 via occultation by the photosphere of, and wind cavity around, the X-ray dark secondary. Here we discuss the X-ray spectrum and X-ray line profiles for the combined observation, having an exposure time of nearly 500 ks and covering nearly the entire binary orbit. The companion papers discuss the X-ray variability seen in the Chandra spectra, present new space-based photometry and ground-based radial velocities obtained simultaneously with the X-ray data to better constrain the system parameters, and model the effects of X-rays on the optical and UV spectra. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by embedded wind shock emission from star Aa1, with little contribution from the tertiary star Ab or the shocked gas produced by the collision of the wind of Aa1 against the surface of Aa2. We find a similar temperature distribution to previous X-ray spectrum analyses. We also show that the line half-widths are about 0.3-0.5 times the terminal velocity of the wind of star Aa1. We find a strong anti-correlation between line widths and the line excitation energy, which suggests that longer-wavelength, lower-temperature lines form farther out in the wind. Our analysis also indicates that the ratio of the intensities of the strong and weak lines of Fe xvii and Ne x are inconsistent with model predictions, which may be an effect of resonance scattering.

  12. Probing the X-Ray Binary Populations of the Ring Galaxy NGC 1291

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, B.; Fabbiano, G.; Fragos, T.; Kim, D. W.; Belczynski, K.; Brassington, N. J.; Pellegrini, S.; Tzanavaris, P.; Wang, J.; Zezas, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present Chandra studies of the X-ray binary (XRB) populations in the bulge and ring regions of the ring galaxy NGC 1291. We detect 169 X-ray point sources in the galaxy, 75 in the bulge and 71 in the ring, utilizing the four available Chandra observations totaling an effective exposure of 179 ks. We report photometric properties of these sources in a point-source catalog. There are approx. 40% of the bulge sources and approx. 25% of the ring sources showing > 3(sigma) long-term variability in their X-ray count rate. The X-ray colors suggest that a significant fraction of the bulge (approx. 75%) and ring (approx. 65%) sources are likely low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The spectra of the nuclear source indicate that it is a low-luminosity AGN with moderate obscuration; spectral variability is observed between individual observations. We construct 0.3-8.0 keV X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for the bulge and ring XRB populations, taking into account the detection incompleteness and background AGN contamination. We reach 90% completeness limits of approx.1.5 x 10(exp 37) and approx. 2.2 x 10(exp 37) erg/s for the bulge and ring populations, respectively. Both XLFs can be fit with a broken power-law model, and the shapes are consistent with those expected for populations dominated by LMXBs. We perform detailed population synthesis modeling of the XRB populations in NGC 1291 , which suggests that the observed combined XLF is dominated by aD old LMXB population. We compare the bulge and ring XRB populations, and argue that the ring XRBs are associated with a younger stellar population than the bulge sources, based on the relative over-density of X-ray sources in the ring, the generally harder X-ray color of the ring sources, the overabundance of luminous sources in the combined XLF, and the flatter shape of the ring XLF.

  13. Understanding Black Hole X-ray Binaries: The Case of Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottschmidt, Katja

    2008-01-01

    Black Hole X-ray Binaries are known to display distinct emission states that differ in their X-ray spectra, their X-ray timing properties (on times scales less than 1 s) and their radio emission. In recent years monitoring observations, specially with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), have provided us with detailed empirical modeling of the phenomenology of the different states as well as a unification scheme of the long term evolution of black holes, transient and persistent, in terms of these states. Observations of the persistent High Mass X-ray Binary (HMXB) Cygnus X-l have been at the forefront of learning about black hole states since its optical identification through a state transition in 1973. In this talk I will present in depth studies of several different aspects of the accretion process in this system. The main data base for these studies is an ongoing RXTE and Ryle radio telescope bi-weekly monitoring campaign that started in 1997. I will discuss high-resolution timing results, especially power spectra, which first gave rise to the Lorentzian description now widely used for black hole and neutron star binaries, and time lags, which we found to be especially well suited to identify state transitions. The evolution of spectral, timing, and radio parameters over years will be shown, including the rms-flux relation and the observation of a clearly correlated radio/x-ray flare. We also observed Cygnus X-1 with INTEGRAL, which allowed us to extend timing and spectral studies to higher energies, with XMM, which provided strong constraints on the parameters of the 6.4 keV iron fluorescence line, and with Chandra, which provided the most in depth study to date of the stellar wind in this system. Models based on the physical conditions in the accretion region are still mainly concentrated on the one or other of the observational areas but they are expanding: as an example I will review results from a jet model for the quantitative description of the

  14. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of supernova remnants with ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John

    The high spectral resolution and sensitivity of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on the upcoming ASTRO-H mission will open a new window of discovery for the study of supernova remnants. In this presentation, I will offer some illustrative examples of the types of science that the ASTRO-H team hopes to pursue. In young, ejecta-dominated remnants, abundance measurements based on emission line diagnostics will allow for a closer link to the different types of supernova progenitor models. Line widths probe ion temperatures and turbulent gas velocities on small scales, while offsets in observed line centroids characterize the bulk expansion motion of a remnant. For older remnants, much of the line-rich thermal plasma arises from shocks in the ambient, interstellar material. SXS observations will address a number of existing concerns with the intepretation of low resolution CCD spectra, including for example the issue of low inferred abundances at the rims of the Cygnus Loop, Puppis A, and others; and the physical origin of recombination-dominated plasmas.

  15. Studying the High-mass X-ray Binaries Population of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelias, Grigoris; Zezas, Andreas; Antoniou, Vallia; Hatzidimitriou, Despoina; Haberl, Frank

    2013-06-01

    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is a well known laboratory for studies of High-Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs), that are prime targets to investigate the evolution of binaries and massive stars. Although the number of identified Be X-ray Binaries (BeXRBs) has increased dramatically in the last decade, only recently we started to obtain a better picture of their their spectral-type distributions, which in turn can provide us with information and constrains regarding their evolution and nature. We present results from a systematic spectroscopic campaign of HMXBs identified in Chandra and XMM-Newton surveys of the SMC, using the AAOmega/2dF spectrograph at the the Anglo-Australian Telescope. We classified 21 sources, one of which is the well known supergiant B[e] star S18 (or AzV 154). We suggest that it is the optical counterpart of the X-ray source CXOU J005409.57-724143.5, being the second supergiant X-ray binary in the SMC since 1971. The classified sources are within a wide range of five orders of X-ray luminosity, extending our census of BeXRBs to almost quiescent luminosities. A comparison of the populations of HMXBs in the SMC and the Milky Way with respect to their spectral types and orbital parameters (periods and eccentricities) shows no evidence for difference in their populations. In order to expand the sample of HMXBs we performed a systematic survey on selected active regions of the SMC. Since the optical counterparts of the HMXBs display Hα excess they can be identified through Hα imaging. Thus, we observed 16 regions with the Wide Field Imager at MPG/ESO and the MOSAIC II Imager at CTIO Blanco telescopes. The analysis of these data yields approximately 3000 identified Hα emitting stars in the most active regions of the SMC. We discuss the photometric parameters of these sources (Hα EW, broad-band optical and IR colors), and their correlation with the X-ray sources identified in the Chandra and XMM-Newton surveys.

  16. Coordinated X-Ray, Ultraviolet, Optical, and Radio Observations of the PSR J1023+0038 System in a Low-mass X-Ray Binary State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Archibald, Anne M.; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam T.; Halpern, Jules P.; Heald, George; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Janssen, Gemma H.; Lyne, Andrew G.; Moldón, Javier; Paragi, Zsolt; Patruno, Alessandro; Perera, Benetge B. P.; Stappers, Ben W.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; D'Angelo, Caroline R.; Wijnands, Rudy

    2015-06-01

    The PSR J1023+0038 binary system hosts a neutron star and a low-mass, main-sequence-like star. It switches on year timescales between states as an eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar and a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). We present a multi-wavelength observational campaign of PSR J1023+0038 in its most recent LMXB state. Two long XMM-Newton observations reveal that the system spends ˜70% of the time in a ≈3 × 1033 erg s-1 X-ray luminosity mode, which, as shown in Archibald et al., exhibits coherent X-ray pulsations. This emission is interspersed with frequent lower flux mode intervals with ≈ 5× {10}32 erg s-1 and sporadic flares reaching up to ≈1034 erg s-1, with neither mode showing significant X-ray pulsations. The switches between the three flux modes occur on timescales of order 10 s. In the UV and optical, we observe occasional intense flares coincident with those observed in X-rays. Our radio timing observations reveal no pulsations at the pulsar period during any of the three X-ray modes, presumably due to complete quenching of the radio emission mechanism by the accretion flow. Radio imaging detects highly variable, flat-spectrum continuum radiation from PSR J1023+0038, consistent with an origin in a weak jet-like outflow. Our concurrent X-ray and radio continuum data sets do not exhibit any correlated behavior. The observational evidence we present bears qualitative resemblance to the behavior predicted by some existing “propeller” and “trapped” disk accretion models although none can account for key aspects of the rich phenomenology of this system.

  17. The formation efficiency of high-mass X-ray binaries in our two nearest star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of our investigation of the link between high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and star formation in the Magellanic Clouds, our nearest star-forming galaxies. Using the most complete census of HMXBs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the published spatially resolved star-formation history map of this galaxy, we find that the HMXBs (and as expected the X-ray pulsars) are present in regions with star-formation bursts ˜6-25 Myr ago. In contrast, this population peaks at later ages (˜25-60 Myr ago) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Thus, this study (in combination with previous works) reinforces the idea that the HMXBs are associated with young stellar populations of ages ˜10-40 Myr. In addition, we estimate an HMXB production rate of 1 system per ˜(23.0-4.1+4.4)×10-3 M⊙/yr or 1 system per ˜143M⊙ of stars formed during the associated star-formation episode. Therefore, the formation efficiency of HMXBs in the LMC is ˜17 times lower than that in the SMC. We attribute this difference primarily in the different ages and metallicity of the HMXB populations in the two galaxies. We also set limits on the kicks imparted on the neutron star during the supernova explosion. We find that the time elapsed since the supernova kick is ˜3 times shorter in the LMC than the SMC. This in combination with the average offsets of the HMXBs from their nearest star clusters results in ˜4 times faster transverse velocities for HMXBs in the LMC than in the SMC.

  18. Ionization break-out from millisecond pulsar wind nebulae: an X-ray probe of the origin of superluminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Vurm, Indrek; Hascoët, Romain; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic spin-down of a rapidly rotating (millisecond) neutron star has been proposed as the power source of hydrogen-poor `superluminous' supernovae (SLSNe-I). However, producing an unambiguous test that can distinguish this model from alternatives, such as circumstellar interaction, has proven challenging. After the supernova explosion, the pulsar wind inflates a hot cavity behind the expanding stellar ejecta: the nascent millisecond pulsar wind nebula. Electron/positron pairs injected by the wind cool through inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron emission, producing a pair cascade and hard X-ray spectrum inside the nebula. These X-rays ionize the inner exposed side of the ejecta, driving an ionization front that propagates outwards with time. Under some conditions this front can breach the ejecta surface within months after the optical supernova peak, allowing ˜0.1-1 keV photons to escape the nebula unattenuated with a characteristic luminosity LX ˜ 1043-1045 erg s-1. This `ionization break-out' may explain the luminous X-ray emission observed from the transient SCP 06F, providing direct evidence that this SLSN was indeed engine powered. Luminous break-out requires a low ejecta mass and that the spin-down time of the pulsar be comparable to the photon diffusion time-scale at optical maximum, the latter condition being similar to that required for a supernova with a high optical fluence. These relatively special requirements may explain why most SLSNe-I are not accompanied by detectable X-ray emission. Global asymmetry of the supernova ejecta increases the likelihood of an early break-out along the direction of lowest density. Atomic states with lower threshold energies are more readily ionized at earlier times near optical maximum, allowing `UV break-out' across a wider range of pulsar and ejecta properties than X-ray break-out, possibly contributing to the blue/UV colours of SLSNe-I.

  19. X-RAY AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE UNIQUE BINARY SYSTEM HD 49798/RX J0648.0-4418

    SciTech Connect

    Mereghetti, S.; La Palombara, N.; Tiengo, A.; Pizzolato, F.; Esposito, P.; Woudt, P. A.; Israel, G. L.; Stella, L.

    2011-08-20

    We report the results of XMM-Newton observations of HD 49798/RX J0648.0-4418, the only known X-ray binary consisting of a hot sub-dwarf and a white dwarf. The white dwarf rotates very rapidly (P = 13.2 s) and has a dynamically measured mass of 1.28 {+-} 0.05 M{sub sun}. Its X-ray emission consists of a strongly pulsed, soft component, well fit by a blackbody with kT{sub BB} {approx} 40 eV, accounting for most of the luminosity, and a fainter hard power-law component (photon index {approx}1.6). A luminosity of {approx}10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1} is produced by accretion onto the white dwarf of the helium-rich matter from the wind of the companion, which is one of the few hot sub-dwarfs showing evidence of mass loss. A search for optical pulsations at the South African Astronomical Observatory 1.9 m telescope gave negative results. X-rays were also detected during the white dwarf eclipse. This emission, with luminosity 2 x 10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1}, can be attributed to HD 49798 and represents the first detection of a hot sub-dwarf star in the X-ray band. HD 49798/RX J0648.0-4418 is a post-common-envelope binary which most likely originated from a pair of stars with masses {approx}8-10 M{sub sun}. After the current He-burning phase, HD 49798 will expand and reach the Roche lobe, causing a higher accretion rate onto the white dwarf which can reach the Chandrasekhar limit. Considering the fast spin of the white dwarf, this could lead to the formation of a millisecond pulsar. Alternatively, this system could be a Type Ia supernova progenitor with the appealing characteristic of a short time delay, being the descendent of relatively massive stars.

  20. Faint X-ray binaries and their optical counterparts in M31

    SciTech Connect

    Vulic, N.; Gallagher, S. C.; Barmby, P.

    2014-08-01

    X-ray binaries (XRBs) are probes of both star formation and stellar mass, but more importantly remain one of the only direct tracers of the compact object population. To investigate the XRB population in M31, we utilized all 121 publicly available observations of M31 totalling over 1 Ms from Chandra's ACIS instrument. We studied 83 star clusters in the bulge using the year 1 star cluster catalogue from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury Survey. We found 15 unique star clusters that matched to 17 X-ray point sources within 1'' (3.8 pc). This population is composed predominantly of globular cluster low-mass XRBs, with one previously unidentified star cluster X-ray source. Star clusters that were brighter and more compact preferentially hosted an X-ray source. Specifically, logistic regression showed that the F475W magnitude was the most important predictor followed by the effective radius, while color (F475W–F814W) was not statistically significant. We also completed a matching analysis of 1566 H II regions and found 10 unique matches to 9 X-ray point sources within 3'' (11 pc). The H II regions hosting X-ray point sources were on average more compact than unmatched H II regions, but logistic regression concluded that neither the radius nor Hα luminosity was a significant predictor. Four matches have no previous classification and thus are high-mass XRB candidates. A stacking analysis of both star clusters and H II regions resulted in non-detections, giving typical upper limits of ≈10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}, which probes the quiescent XRB regime.

  1. X-ray astrophysics: Constraining thermal conductivity in intracluster gas in clusters of galaxies and placing limits on progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Brock Richard

    X-ray astrophysics provides a great many opportunities to study astronomical structures with large energies or high temperatures. This dissertation will describe two such applications: the use of Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) data to analyze the interaction between a supernova shock and the circumstellar medium, and the use of a straightforward computer simulation to model the dynamics of intracluster gas in clusters of galaxies and constrain the thermal conduction coefficient. Stars emit stellar wind at varying rates throughout their lifetimes. This wind populates the circumstellar medium (CSM) with gas. When the supernova explodes, the shock wave propogates outward through this CSM and heats it to X-ray emitting temperatures. By analyzing X-ray observations of the immediate post-supernova environment, we are able to determine whether any significant CSM is present. By stacking a large number of Swift observations of SNe Ia, we increase the sensitivity. We find no X-rays, with an upper limit of 1.7 x 1038 erg s-1 and a 3 sigma upper limit on the mass loss rate of progenitor systems 1.1 x 10-6 solar masses per year x (vw)/(10 km s -1). This low upper limit precludes a massive progenitor as the binary companion in the supernova progenitor system, unless that star is in Roche lobe overflow. The hot Intracluster Medium (ICM) is composed of tenuous gas which is gravitationally-bound to the cluster of galaxies. This gas is not initially of uniform temperature, and experiences thermal conduction while maintaining hydrostatic equilibrium. However, magnetic field lines present in the ionized gas inhibit the full thermal conduction. In this dissertation, we present the results of a new one-dimensional simulation that models this conduction (and includes cooling while maintaining hydrostatic equilibrium). By comparing the results of this model with the observed gas temperature profiles and recent accurate constraints on the scatter of the gas fraction, we are able to constrain

  2. On the rarity of X-ray binaries with Wolf-Rayet donors

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, T.; Valsecchi, F.; Kalogera, V.

    2012-03-14

    The paucity of High mass X-Ray binaries (HMXB) consisting of a neutron star (NS) accretor and Wolf-Rayet (WR) donor has long been at odds with expectations from population synthesis studies indicating that these systems should survive as the evolved offspring of the observed HMXB population. This tension is particularly troubling in light of recent observations uncovering a preponderance of HMXBs containing loosely bound Be donors which would be expected to naturally evolve into WR-HMXBs. Reconciling the unexpectedly large population of Be-HMXBs with the lack of observed WR-HMXB sources thus serves to isolate the dynamics of CE physics from other binary evolution parameters. We find that binary mergers during CE events must be common in order to resolve tension between these observed populations. Furthermore, future observations which better constrain the background population of loosely bound O/B-NS binaries are likely to place significant constraints on the efficiency of CE removal.

  3. G346.6-0.2: The Mixed-Morphology Supernova Remnant with Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Ng, Stephen C.-Y.; Wong, B. T. T.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) provides us with a unique window into studying particle acceleration at the shock-front. All of the 14 or so SNRs in which non-thermal X-ray synchrotron emission has been detected are shell-like in nature, and show no evidence of interaction with large nearby molecular clouds. Here we present a new X-ray study of the molecular cloud interacting mixed-morphology (MM) SNR G346.6-0.2 using XMM-Newton. We found that the X-ray emission arises from a cool recombining plasma with subsolar abundances, confirming previous Suzaku results. In addition, we identified an additional power-law component in the spectrum, with a photon index of ˜2. We investigated its possible origin and conclude that it most likely arises from synchrotron emission produced by particles accelerated at the shock. This makes G346.6-0.2 an important new object in the class of synchrotron emitting SNRs, as unlike shell type X-ray synchrotron SNRs, MM SNRs are usually thought to have shock velocities that are effectively too slow to accelerate electrons. The dense environment and nature of the remnant, provide conditions unseen in shell type X-ray synchrotron SNRs, providing a unique opportunity to study the effect that these properties have on the production of X-ray synchrotron emission.

  4. X-ray and γ-ray studies of the millisecond pulsar and possible X-ray binary/radio pulsar transition object PSR J1723-2837

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Esposito, Paolo; Crawford III, Fronefield; Possenti, Andrea; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Freire, Paulo

    2014-01-20

    We present X-ray observations of the 'redback' eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) and candidate radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object PSR J1723-2837. The X-ray emission from the system is predominantly non-thermal and exhibits pronounced variability as a function of orbital phase, with a factor of ∼2 reduction in brightness around superior conjunction. Such temporal behavior appears to be a defining characteristic of this variety of peculiar MSP binaries and is likely caused by a partial geometric occultation by the main-sequence-like companion of a shock within the binary. There is no indication of diffuse X-ray emission from a bow shock or pulsar wind nebula associated with the pulsar. We also report on a search for point source emission and γ-ray pulsations in Fermi Large Area Telescope data using a likelihood analysis and photon probability weighting. Although PSR J1723-2837 is consistent with being a γ-ray point source, due to the strong Galactic diffuse emission at its position a definitive association cannot be established. No statistically significant pulsations or modulation at the orbital period are detected. For a presumed detection, the implied γ-ray luminosity is ≲5% of its spin-down power. This indicates that PSR J1723-2837 is either one of the least efficient γ-ray producing MSPs or, if the detection is spurious, the γ-ray emission pattern is not directed toward us.

  5. Suzaku observations of cyclotron resonances in binary X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Y.; Mihara, T.; Nagase, F.; Angelini, L.; Dotani, T.; Enoto, T.; Kitamoto, S.; Kohmura, T.; Kokubun, M.; Kotani, T.; Makishima, K.; Naik, S.; Nakajima, M.; Sugita, S.; Sudoh, K.; Suzuki, M.; Takahashi, H.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, A.

    Since the typical magnetic field strengths of neutron stars reach 10 12 Gauss, the cyclotron resonance produced by a transition between Landau levels appears in the X-ray band. Systematic measurements of cyclotron absorption features in bright sources have been carried out extensively with Ginga, RXTE, BeppoSAX, and INTEGRAL. The cyclotron resonance phenomena can now be studied with a higher sensitivity over a wider hard X-ray band than before, thanks to the Hard X-ray Detector onboard the fifth Japanese X-ray satellite, Suzaku, launched in July, 2005. Suzaku observed Hercules X-1 mainly for calibration purposes, and successfully confirmed its well-known cyclotron absorption feature. Furthermore, the transient pulsar A0535+262 was observed with Suzaku on 14 September, 2005, in the decay phase of its minor outburst (Finger, M.F. Renewed Activity from A0535+26. The Astronomer's Telegram, vol. 595, 2005). The cyclotron resonance of A0535+262 was successfully detected in absorption at about 45 keV (Inoue, H., Kunieda, H., White, N., Kelley, R., Mihara, T., Terada, Y., Takahashi, H., Kokubun, M., Makishima, K. Suzaku detection of cyclotron line near 50 keV for A0535+26. The Astronomer's Telegram vol. 595, 2005; Terada, Y., Mihara, T., Nakajima, M., et al. Cyclotron resonance energies at a low X-ray luminosity: A0535+262 observed with Suzaku. ApJL 648, L139-L142, 2006), even though the object was as dim as 30 mCrab at 20 keV. Compared with previous measurements of the same feature achieved at much brighter phases (e.g., Kretschmar, P., Kreykenbohm, I., Pottschmidt, et al. Integral observes possible cyclotron line at 47 keV for 1A0535+262. The Astronomer's Telegram, vol. 601, 2005; Wilson, C.A., Finger, M.H. RXTE confirms cyclotron line near 50 keV for A0535+26. The Astronomer's Telegram 605, 2005), the Suzaku results give a new constraint to luminosity-related changes in the resonance energy that are observed in other binary pulsars (Nakajima, M., Mihara, T., Makishima

  6. X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY PULSAR CENTAURUS X-3 OVER ITS BINARY ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, Sachindra; Ali, Zulfikar; Paul, Biswajit

    2011-08-20

    We present a comprehensive spectral analysis of the high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) pulsar Centaurus X-3 with the Suzaku observatory covering nearly one orbital period. The light curve shows the presence of extended dips which are rarely seen in HMXBs. These dips are seen up to as high as {approx}40 keV. The pulsar spectra during the eclipse, out-of-eclipse, and dips are found to be well described by a partial covering power-law model with high-energy cutoff and three Gaussian functions for 6.4 keV, 6.7 keV, and 6.97 keV iron emission lines. The dips in the light curve can be explained by the presence of an additional absorption component with high column density and covering fraction, the values of which are not significant during the rest of the orbital phases. The iron line parameters during the dips and eclipse are significantly different compared to those during the rest of the observation. During the dips, the iron line intensities are found to be lesser by a factor of 2-3 with a significant increase in the line equivalent widths. However, the continuum flux at the corresponding orbital phase is estimated to be lesser by more than an order of magnitude. Similarities in the changes in the iron line flux and equivalent widths during the dips and eclipse segments suggest that the dipping activity in Cen X-3 is caused by an obscuration of the neutron star by dense matter, probably structures in the outer region of the accretion disk, as in the case of dipping low-mass X-ray binaries.

  7. Classification of compact binaries: an X-ray analog to the HR diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dil Vrtilek, Saeqa; Raymond, John C.; Gopalan, Giri; Boroson, Bram Seth; Bornn, Luke

    2016-06-01

    X-ray binary systems (XRBs), when examined in an appropriate coordinate system derived from X-ray spectral and intensity information, appear to cluster based on their compact object type. We introduce such a coordinate system, in which two coordinates are hardness ratios and the third is a broadband X-ray intensity. In Gopalan, Vrtilek, & Bornn (2015) we developed a Bayesian statistical model that estimates the probability that an XRB contains a black hole, non-pulsing neutron star, or pulsing neutron star, depending on its location in our coordinate space. In particular, we utilized a latent variable model in which the latent variables follow a Gaussian process prior distribution. Here we expand our work to incorporate systems where the compact object is a white dwarf: cataclysmic variables (CVs). The fact that the CVs also fall into a location spatially distinct from the other XRB types supports the use of X-ray color-color-intensity diagrams as 3-dimensional analogs to the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for normal stars.

  8. A Possible X-Ray Detection of the Binary Millisecond Pulsar J1012+5307

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A possible X-ray detection of the newly discovered binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1012+5307 was obtained from an archival ROSAT observation. The 80 +/- 24 photons detected correspond to a 0.1 - 2.4 keV luminosity of approx. = 2.5 x 10(exp 30) erg/s at the nominal dispersion-measure distance of 520 pc. This luminosity is a factor of 2 less than that of PSR J0437-4715, a near twin of PSR J1012+5307 in its spin parameters and energetics, and the only millisecond pulsar from which pulsed X-rays have definitely been detected. PSR J1012+5307 is also within 6 deg of the "HI hole" in Ursa Major, providing a new estimate of the electron column density through this region which confirms that the ionized column density is also low. The small neutral column density to PSR J1012+5307, N(sub H) less than 7.5 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, will facilitate future soft X-ray study, which will help to discriminate between thermal and nonthermal origins of the X-ray emission in millisecond pulsars.

  9. Isotropic Detectable X-Ray Counterparts to Gravitational Waves from Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Neutron star binary mergers are strong sources of gravitational waves (GWs). Promising electromagnetic counterparts are short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), but the emission is highly collimated. We propose that the scattering of the long-lasting plateau emission in short GRBs by the merger ejecta produces nearly isotropic emission for ∼ {10}4 s with flux {10}-13-{10}-10 erg cm‑2 s‑1 at 100 Mpc in X-ray. This is detectable by Swift/XRT and wide field X-ray detectors such as ISS-Lobster, Einstein Probe, eROSITA, and WF-MAXI, which are desired by the infrared and optical follow-ups to localize and measure the distance to the host galaxy. The scattered X-rays obtain linear polarization, which correlates with the jet direction, X-ray luminosity, and GW polarizations. The activity of the plateau emission is also a natural energy source of a macronova (or kilonova) detected in short GRB 130603B without the r-process radioactivity.

  10. Wind-jet interaction in high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    Jets in high-mass X-ray binaries can strongly interact with the stellar wind from the donor. The interaction leads, in particular, to formation of recollimation shocks. The shocks can then accelerate electrons in the jet and lead to enhanced emission, observable in the radio and gamma-ray bands. DooSoo, Zdziarski & Heinz (2016) have formulated a condition on the maximum jet power (as a function of the jet velocity and wind rate and velocity) at which such shocks form. This criterion can explain the large difference in the radio and gamma-ray loudness between Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3. The orbital modulation of radio emission observed in Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3 allows a measurement of the location of the height along the jet where the bulk of emission at a given frequency occurs. Strong absorption of X-rays in the wind of Cyg X-3 is required to account for properties of the correlation of the radio emission with soft and hard X-rays. That absorption can also account for the unusual spectral and timing X-ray properties of this source.

  11. The Reverberation Lag in the Low-mass X-ray Binary H1743-322

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Barbara; Ponti, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of the inner accretion flow of a black hole X-ray binary during an outburst is still a matter of active research. X-ray reverberation lags are powerful tools for constraining disk–corona geometry. We present a study of X-ray lags in the black hole transient H1743-322. We compared the results obtained from analysis of all the publicly available XMM-Newton observations. These observations were carried out during two different outbursts that occurred in 2008 and 2014. During all the observations the source was caught in the hard state and at similar luminosities ({L}3-10{keV}/{L}{Edd}˜ 0.004). We detected a soft X-ray lag of ˜60 ms, most likely due to thermal reverberation. We did not detect any significant change of the lag amplitude among the different observations, indicating a similar disk–corona geometry at the same luminosity in the hard state. On the other hand, we observe significant differences between the reverberation lag detected in H1743-322 and in GX 339-4 (at similar luminosities in the hard state), which might indicate variations of the geometry from source to source.

  12. Isotropic Detectable X-Ray Counterparts to Gravitational Waves from Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Neutron star binary mergers are strong sources of gravitational waves (GWs). Promising electromagnetic counterparts are short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), but the emission is highly collimated. We propose that the scattering of the long-lasting plateau emission in short GRBs by the merger ejecta produces nearly isotropic emission for ˜ {10}4 s with flux {10}-13-{10}-10 erg cm-2 s-1 at 100 Mpc in X-ray. This is detectable by Swift/XRT and wide field X-ray detectors such as ISS-Lobster, Einstein Probe, eROSITA, and WF-MAXI, which are desired by the infrared and optical follow-ups to localize and measure the distance to the host galaxy. The scattered X-rays obtain linear polarization, which correlates with the jet direction, X-ray luminosity, and GW polarizations. The activity of the plateau emission is also a natural energy source of a macronova (or kilonova) detected in short GRB 130603B without the r-process radioactivity.

  13. Using 3D dynamic models to reproduce X-ray properties of colliding wind binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher Michael Post

    Colliding wind binaries (CWBs) are unique laboratories for X-ray astrophysics. The two massive stars contained in these systems have powerful radiatively driven stellar winds, and the conversion of their kinetic energy to heat (up to 108 K) at the wind-wind collision region generates hard thermal X-rays (up to 10 keV). Rich data sets exist of several multi-year-period systems, as well as key observations of shorter period systems, and detailed models are required to disentangle the phase-locked emission and absorption processes in these systems. To interpret these X-ray light curves and spectra, this dissertation models the wind-wind interaction of CWBs using 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), and solves the 3D formal solution of radiative transfer to synthesize the model X-ray properties, allowing direct comparison with the colliding-wind X-ray spectra observed by, e.g., RXTE and XMM. The multi-year-period, highly eccentric CWBs we examine are eta Carinae and WR140. For the commonly inferred primary mass loss rate of ˜10 -3 Msun/yr, eta Carinae's 3D model reproduces quite well the 2-10 keV RXTE light curve, hardness ratio, and dynamic spectra in absolute units. This agreement includes the ˜3 month X-ray minimum associated with the 1998.0 and 2003.5 periastron passages, which we find to occur as the primary wind encroaches into the secondary wind's acceleration region. This modeling provides further evidence that the observer is mainly viewing the system through the secondary's shock cone, and suggests that periastron occurs ~1 month after the onset of the X-ray minimum. The model RXTE observables of WR140 match the data well in absolute units, although the decrease in model X-rays around periastron is less than observed. There is very good agreement between the observed XMM spectrum taken on the rise before periastron and the model. We also model two short-period CWBs, HD150136, which has a wind-star collision, and delta Orionis A, the closest eclipsing

  14. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE BINARY CENTRAL STARS OF THE PLANETARY NEBULAE HFG 1, DS 1, AND LOTR 5

    SciTech Connect

    Montez, Rodolfo; Kastner, Joel H.; De Marco, Orsola; Chu, You-Hua

    2010-10-01

    Close binary systems undergoing mass transfer or common envelope interactions can account for the morphological properties of some planetary nebulae. The search for close binary companions in planetary nebulae is hindered by the difficulty of detecting cool, late-type, main-sequence companions in binary systems with hot pre-white-dwarf primaries. However, models of binary planetary nebula progenitor systems predict that mass accretion or tidal interactions can induce rapid rotation in the companion, leading to X-ray-emitting coronae. To test such models, we have searched for, and detected, X-ray emission from three binary central stars within planetary nebulae: the post-common envelope close binaries in HFG 1 and DS 1 consisting of O-type subdwarfs with late-type, main-sequence companions and the binary system in LoTr 5 consisting of O-type subdwarf and rapidly rotating, late-type giant companion. The X-ray emission in each case is best characterized by spectral models consisting of two optically thin thermal plasma components with characteristic temperatures of {approx}10 MK and 15-40 MK and total X-ray luminosities {approx}10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1}. We consider the possible origin of the X-ray emission from these binary systems and conclude that the most likely origin is, in each case, a corona around the late-type companion, as predicted by models of interacting binaries.

  15. The Orbit and Properties of the BD+60 73 + IGRJ00370+612 Supergiant X-Ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, C. T.; Grunhut, J. H.

    2007-08-01

    Spectrograms of the blue and H alpha regions of BD+60 73 obtained with the Cassegrain spectrograph on the David Dunlap Observatory 1.88 m telescope have been measured for radial velocities. These measures confirm that BD+60 73 is a single-line spectroscopic binary with the same period, 15.665 d, as the x-ray flux variations of IGRJ00370+612. The x-ray maxima occur at or just after the time of periastron passage, even though the eccentricity e=0.37 does not seem large enough to produce a large increase in the mass flux at the position of the compact object at the time of periastron passage. The mass function combined with a plausible range of possible masses for a neutron star companion yields primary masses within the range expected for the spectral type of BD+60 73. The compact companion cannot be a black hole unless the supergiant has an exceptionally high mass for its B1Ib spectral type or the inclination of the orbit is very low. The H alpha line shows weak, variable emission, but we have insufficient data to test whether these variations are correlated with orbital phase. We note, as have other authors, that BD+60_73 is projected on the sky within the bounds of Cas OB5. It also lies close to the "adolescent" supernova remnant CTB1. However, the binary system has a radial velocity of approximately -40 km/s with respect to Cas OB5.

  16. Unification of Low Luminosity AGN and Hard State X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present X-ray spectral variability of four low accretion rate and low luminosity AGN (LLAGN)- M81, NGC 1097, NGC 1052 and NGC 3998 - as observed by Swift and RXTE. All four objects were selected due to having spectra which hardened with increasing count rate, converse to the 'softer when brighter' behaviour normally observed in AGN with higher accretion rates. The spectra were summed in flux bins and fitted with a variety of models. A simple absorbed power law model was found to fit the spectra of M81, NGC 1097 and NGC 3998 well, whilst NGC 1052 required a partially covered power law model. In all four cases, the most likely cause of spectral variability is found to be hardening of the photon index of the power law component with increasing luminosity. Such a correlation has been seen previously within samples of low accretion rate AGN but in only one case has it been seen within observations of a single AGN. Here we show that such behaviour may be very common in LLAGN. A similar anticorrelation is found in X-ray binary systems in the 'hard state', at low accretion rates similar to those of the LLAGN discussed here. Our observations thus imply that LLAGN are the active galaxy equivalent of hard state X-ray binaries.

  17. Correlated Temporal and Spectral Variability in Neutron Star and Black Hole X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J.

    2006-01-01

    The variability of neutron star and black hole X-ray sources has several dimensions, because of the roles played by different important time-scales. The variations on time scales of hours, weeks, and months, ranging from 50% to orders of magnitude, arise out of changes in the flow in the disk. The most important driving forces for those changes are probably various possible instabilities in the disk, though there may be effects with other dominant causes. The changes in the rate of flow appear to be associated with changes in the flow's configuration, as the accreting material approaches the compact object, for there are generally correlated changes in both the X-ray spectra and the character of the faster temporal variability. There has been a lot of progress in tracking these correlations, both for Z and Atoll neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, and for black hole binaries. I will discuss these correlations and what they tell us about the physical states of the systems.

  18. Chandra High Resolution Spectroscopy of the Be X-Ray binary A0535+262

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Mark

    2008-09-01

    We propose to observe the Be X-ray pulsar binary 1A 0535+262 with Chandra HETGS for 20 ks. This observations will allow us to investigate: 1) High M_dot accretion onto a NS: These observations will allow us to probe accretion at a high fraction of the Eddington luminosity onto a neutron star with an accurately constrained B-field (4e12 -- Cyclotron lines) and spin period (X-ray pulsations). 2) Disk winds from accreting compact objects: Miller et al. (2008) have previously obtained HETGS spectra of the black hole transient GRO J1655-40; while Ueda et al. (2004) have obtained HETGS spectra of the Z-source GX13+1. In both cases numerous wind absorption lines are observed. 3) Relativistic accretion disk emission lines: Cackett et al. (2009) have observed relativistic Fe emission from a sample of accreting neutron star LMXBs (Z, Atoll, MSP) providing constraints on the radius of the neutron star. This will be the definitive Chandra observation of a Be X-ray binary.

  19. Potential Gamma-Ray Emissions from Low-mass X-Ray Binary Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Tong; Xue, Li; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2015-06-01

    By proposing a pure leptonic radiation model, we study the potential gamma-ray emissions from the jets of low-mass X-ray binaries. In this model, the relativistic electrons that are accelerated in the jets are responsible for radiative outputs. Nevertheless, jet dynamics are dominated by magnetic and proton-matter kinetic energies. The model involves all kinds of related radiative processes and considers the evolution of relativistic electrons along the jet by numerically solving the kinetic equation. Numerical results show that the spectral energy distributions can extend up to TeV bands, in which synchrotron radiation and synchrotron self-Compton scattering are dominant components. As an example, we apply the model to the low-mass X-ray binary GX 339-4. The results not only can reproduce the currently available observations from GX 339-4, but also predict detectable radiation at GeV and TeV bands by the Fermi and CTA telescopes. Future observations with Fermi and CTA can be used to test our model, which could be employed to distinguish the origin of X-ray emissions.

  20. Confirmation of IGR J01363 plus 6610 as a Be X-Ray Binary with Very Low Quiescent X-Ray Luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsick, John A.; Heinke, Craig; Halpern, Jules; Kaaret, Philip; Chaty, Sylvain; Rodriguez, Jerome; Bodaghee, Arash

    2011-01-01

    The field containing the candidate High Mass X-ray Binary IGR J01 363+6610 was observed by XMM-Newton on 2009 July 31 for 28 ks. A Be star was previously suggested as the possible counterpart of the INTEGRAL source, and although Chandra, during a 2007 observation, did not detect an X-ray source at the position of the Be star, we find a variable source (XMMU 101 3549.5+661243) with an average X-ray flux of 2 x 10(exp -13)ergs/sq cm/s (0.2-12 keV, unabsorbed) at this position with XMM-Newton. The spectrum of this source is consistent with a hard power law with a photon index of r = 1.4+/-0.3 and a column density of N(sub H) = (15(+0.7/-0.5)) x 10(exp 22)/sq cm (90% confidence errors). These results, along with our optical investigation of other X-ray sources in the field, make the association with the Be star very likely, and the 2 kpc distance estimate for the Be star indicates an X-ray luminosity of 9.1 x 10(exp 31) ergs/s. This is lower than typical for a Be X-ray binary, and the upper limit on the luminosity was even lower ( < 1.4 x 10(exp 3)ergs/s assuming the same spectral model) during the Chandra observation. We discuss possible implications of the very low quiescent luminosity for the physical properties of IGR 101363+6610.

  1. Assessing luminosity correlations via cluster analysis: evidence for dual tracks in the radio/X-ray domain of black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Elena; Miller, Brendan P.; Fender, Rob

    2012-06-01

    The radio/X-ray correlation for hard and quiescent state black hole X-ray binaries is critically investigated in this paper. New observations of known sources, along with newly discovered ones (since 2003), have resulted in an increasingly large number of outliers lying well outside the scatter about the quoted best-fitting relation. Most of these outliers tend to cluster below the best-fitting line, possibly indicative of two distinct tracks which might reflect different accretion regimes within the hard state. Here, we employ and compare state of the art data clustering techniques in order to identify and characterize different data groupings within the radio/X-ray luminosity plane for 18 hard and quiescent state black hole X-ray binaries with nearly simultaneous multiwavelength coverage. Linear regression is then carried out on the clustered data to infer the parameters of a relationship of the form ℓr=α+βℓx through a Bayesian approach (where ℓ denotes logarithmic luminosities). We conclude that the two-cluster model, with independent linear fits, is a significant improvement over fitting all points as a single cluster. While the upper track slope (0.63 ± 0.03) is consistent, within the errors, with the fitted slope for the 2003 relation (0.7 ± 0.1), the lower track slope (0.98 ± 0.08) is not consistent with the upper track or with the widely adopted value of ≃1.4 for the neutron stars. The two luminosity tracks do not reflect systematic differences in black hole spins as estimated either from reflection- or continuum-fitting method. Additionally, there is evidence for at least two sources (H1743-322 and GRO J1655-500) jumping from the lower to the upper track as they fade towards quiescence, further indicating that black hole spin does not play any major role in defining the radio loudness of compact jets from hard black hole X-ray binaries. The results of the clustering and regression analysis are fairly insensitive to the selection of subsamples

  2. THE QUIESCENT X-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE ACCRETING MILLISECOND X-RAY PULSAR AND ECLIPSING BINARY SWIFT J1749.4-2807

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Patruno, A.; Wijnands, R.

    2012-09-10

    Swift J1749.4-2807 is a transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary that contains an accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar spinning at 518 Hz. It is the first of its kind that displays X-ray eclipses, which holds significant promise to precisely constrain the mass of the neutron star. We report on a {approx_equal} 105 ks long XMM-Newton observation performed when Swift J1749.4-2807 was in quiescence. We detect the source at a 0.5-10 keV luminosity of {approx_equal}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33}(D/6.7 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1}. The X-ray light curve displays three eclipses that are consistent in orbital phase and duration with the ephemeris derived during outburst. Unlike most quiescent neutron stars, the X-ray spectrum can be adequately described with a simple power law, while a pure-hydrogen atmosphere model does not fit the data. We place an upper limit on the 0.01-100 keV thermal luminosity of the cooling neutron star of {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} and constrain its temperature to be {approx}< 0.1 keV (for an observer at infinity). Timing analysis does not reveal evidence for X-ray pulsations near the known spin frequency of the neutron star or its first overtone with a fractional rms of {approx}< 34% and {approx}< 28%, respectively. We discuss the implications of our findings for dynamical mass measurements, the thermal state of the neutron star, and the origin of the quiescent X-ray emission.

  3. X-ray, optical and UV observations of the young supernova remnant in the irregular galaxy NGC 4449

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, W. P.; Raymond, J. C.; Kirshner, R. P.; Winkler, P. F.; Fesen, R. A.; Gull, T. R.

    1983-01-01

    A powerful young supernova remnant (SNR) similar to Cas A has recently been discovered in the irregular galaxy NGC 4449. X-ray, optical and ultraviolet data have been obtained which allow possible models for this object to be investigated and its age to be estimated. Several lines of argument indicate a massive star of order 25 solar masses as the precursor to this remnant. If the X-ray emision is attributed to a reverse shock in the ejecta, the remnant should be about 120 years old.

  4. Observational results from cooling neutron stars in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    The composition and structure of the ~1 km thick, solid crust of neutron stars is responsible for many of their observable properties, and plays a fundamental role in the emission of gravitational waves and the evolution of their magnetic field. When residing in an X-ray binary, a neutron star accretes gas from a companion star. As matter accumulates on the neutron star surface, the underlying crust is compressed and heated due to nuclear reactions induced by this compression. Once accretion switches off, sensitive X-ray satellites can be employed to observe how the heated crust cools. Comparing these observations with theoretical simulations provides very valuable insight into the structure and composition of the crusts of neutron stars. I will present the latest observational results and challenges in this research field.

  5. Rapidly evolving light curves of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhli, P.; Hakala, P. J.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Hannikainen, D. C.; Schultz, J.

    2004-07-01

    A few Galactic Low Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMXBs) have shown drastically evolving X-ray and/or optical orbital light curves. In two short-period LMXBs, MS 1603+2600 (= UW CrB, P[orb] = 111 min) and 4U 1916-053 (see e.g. Homer et al. 2001), the variations in the light curve morphology seem to be repeating in a periodic manner. We present first results of a photometric monitoring campaign of MS 1603+2600, showing evidence of a 5-day superorbital period in this yet unclassified source. The observations also unraveled optical flares, reminiscent of type I bursts, suggesting a neutron star primary.

  6. X-ray emission mechanism for the gamma-ray binary LS 5039

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masaki

    2012-07-01

    We address an unsolved issue in the model of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039, which consists of an O star and a compact object not yet identified. In previous studies, the X-ray emission observed with Suzaku has been assumed to be due to the synchrotron emission from high energy electrons, and the inverse Compton (IC) emission from low energy electrons has been neglected. However, this IC emission can affect the X-ray emission. In this study, we calculate the IC emission from low energy electrons (γ < 10^4) accelerated near the compact object, including those created by the radiative cooling. We find that the IC emission of the low energy electrons can be responsible for the Suzaku band if the minimum Lorentz factor of injected electrons γ_{min} is around 10^3. In addition, we show that the Suzaku light curve is well reproduced if γ_{min} varies in proportion to the Fermi flux.

  7. V404 Cyg - an Interacting Black-Hole Low-Mass X-ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Ori; Mauerhan, Jon; Graham, Melissa

    2015-07-01

    This DDT proposal is prompted by the June 15, 2015 outburst of V404 Cyg, a black-hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). This outburst stands out since it is the first black hole system with a measured parallax, lying at a distance of only 2.39+/-0.14 kpc. An extensive and loosely organized multi-wavelength campaign is already underway by the astronomical community. One of the missing pieces of the puzzle is the mid-infrared (IR). Combined with radio, optical, and X-ray data, the mid-IR will help to discriminate discriminate between an accretion disk, jet emission, or circumstellar dust scenarios. Spitzer offers a unique opportunity to observe at these wavelengths. Here we propose 4 very short (5-minutes at 3.6 and 4.5 micron) observations of IRAC hotometry to search for the presence of warm dust and, if present, constrain the heating mechanism.

  8. ROSAT x ray survey observations of active chromospheric binary systems and other selected sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    The connection between processes that produce optical chromospheric activity indicators and those that produce x-rays in RS CVn binary systems by taking advantage of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) results and our unique ground-based data set was investigated. In RS CVn systems, excess emission in the Ca 2 resonance (K & H) and infrared triplet (IRT) lines and in the Balmer lines of hydrogen is generally cited as evidence for chromospheric activity, which is usually modeled as scaled up solar-type activity. X-ray emission in RS CVn systems is believed to arise from coronal loop structures. Results from spectra data obtained from RASS observations are discussed and presented.

  9. Faint and soft X-ray binaries in three dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina

    2007-10-01

    We propose to observe three nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) companions of the Milky Way. These galaxies host old populations with little or no contamination of recent star formation, and appear to have a huge dark matter content. They are the ideal Rosetta stones to probe theories of X-ray binary formation, type Ia progenitors evolution, and dark matter halos.Recent observations of four other dSph with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revealed a large number of X-ray sources in the fields, effected by small column density of neutral hydrogen N(H).Using deep optical and UV images, archival HST and GALEX exposures, and later spectroscopic follow-up, we will be able to determine the nature of the sources and whether they belong to the galactic populations.

  10. Monitoring the latest stages of a transient neutron star X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, Sergio

    2012-10-01

    Neutron star transient low mass X-ray binaries (TLMXB) are among the brightest sources in the X-ray sky. Their outbursts are well known and studied. Despite this, their return to quiescence has been studied only in a handful of cases. This return is quite fast making even more difficult. Recently we monitor in high detail the return to quiescence of the archetypal TLMXB Aql X-1 thanks to XMM-Newton observations. We probed for the first time the cooling of the neutron star after a (short) outburst, finding a very short cooling time ( 3d). Thanks to an approved Swift XRT program for monitoring every day for 5 ks (for 30 d) the latest stages of a TLMXB, we are aiming assessing the spectral properties of a transient LMXB close to the quiescent level.

  11. Discovery of a 3.6-hr Eclipsing Luminous X-Ray Binary in the Galaxy NGC 4214

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Rappaport, Saul; Tennant, Allyn F.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Pooley, David; Madhusudhan, N.

    2006-01-01

    We report the discovery of an eclipsing X-ray binary with a 3.62-hr period within 24 arcsec of the center of the dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 4214. The orbital period places interesting constraints on the nature of the binary, and allows for a few very different interpretations. The most likely possibility is that the source lies within NGC 4214 and has an X-ray luminosity of up to 7e38. In this case the binary may well be comprised of a naked He-burning donor star with a neutron-star accretor, though a stellar-mass black-hole accretor cannot be completely excluded. There is no obvious evidence for a strong stellar wind in the X-ray orbital light curve that would be expected from a massive He star; thus, the mass of the He star should be <3-4 solar masses. If correct, this would represent a new class of very luminous X-ray binary----perhaps related to Cyg X-3. Other less likely possibilities include a conventional low-mass X-ray binary that somehow manages to produce such a high X-ray luminosity and is apparently persistent over an interval of years; or a foreground AM Her binary of much lower luminosity that fortuitously lies in the direction of NGC 4214. Any model for this system must accommodate the lack of an optical counterpart down to a limiting magnitude of 22.6 in the visible.

  12. The coupling of a disk corona and a jet for the radio/X-ray correlation in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erlin

    2016-02-01

    We interpret the radio/X-ray correlation of L R ~ L X ~1.4 for L X/L Edd >~ 10-3 with a detailed disk corona-jet model, in which the accretion flow and the jet are connected by a parameter, η, describing the fraction of the matter in the accretion flow ejected outward to form the jet. We calculate L R and L X at different Ṁ, adjusting η to fit the observed radio/X-ray correlation of the black hole X-ray transient H1743-322 for L X/L Edd > 10-3. It is found that the value of η for this radio/X-ray correlation for L X/L Edd > 10-3, is systematically less than that of the case for L X/L Edd < 10-3, which is consistent with the general idea that the jet is often relatively suppressed at the high luminosity phase in black hole X-ray binaries.

  13. ECLIPSE TIMINGS OF THE TRANSIENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY EXO 0748-676. IV. THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER ECLIPSES

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Michael T.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Hertz, Paul L. E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: Paul.Hertz@nasa.gov

    2009-07-01

    We report our complete database of X-ray eclipse timings of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676 observed by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite. As of this writing we have accumulated 443 full X-ray eclipses, 392 of which have been observed with the Proportional Counter Array on RXTE. These include both observations where an eclipse was specifically targeted and those eclipses found in the RXTE data archive. Eclipse cycle count has been maintained since the discovery of the EXO 0748-676 system in 1985 February. We describe our observing and analysis techniques for each eclipse and describe improvements we have made since the last compilation by Wolff et al. The principal result of this paper is the database containing the timing results from a seven-parameter fit to the X-ray light curve for each observed eclipse along with the associated errors in the fitted parameters. Based on the standard O - C analysis, EXO 0748-676 has undergone four distinct orbital period epochs since its discovery. In addition, EXO 0748-676 shows small-scale events in the O - C curve that are likely due to short-lived changes in the secondary star.

  14. The atmospheric structures of the companion stars of eclipsing binary x ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, George W.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at determining structural features of the atmospheres of the massive early-type companion stars of eclipse x-ray pulsars by measurement of the attenuation of the x-ray spectrum during eclipse transitions and in deep eclipse. Several extended visits were made to ISAS in Japan by G. Clark and his graduate student, Jonathan Woo to coordinate the Ginga observations and preliminary data reduction, and to work with the Japanese host scientist, Fumiaki Nagase, in the interpretation of the data. At MIT extensive developments were made in software systems for data interpretation. In particular, a Monte Carlo code was developed for a 3-D simulation of the propagation of x-rays from the neutron star through the ionized atmosphere of the companion. With this code it was possible to determine the spectrum of Compton-scattered x-rays in deep eclipse and to subtract that component from the observed spectra, thereby isolating the software component that is attributable in large measure to x-rays that have been scattered by interstellar grains. This research has culminated in the submission of paper to the Astrophysical Journal on the determination of properties of the atmosphere of QV Nor, the BOI companion of 4U 1538-52, and the properties of interstellar dust grains along the line of sight from the source. The latter results were an unanticipated byproduct of the investigation. Data from Ginga observations of the Magellanic binaries SMC X-1 and LMC X-4 are currently under investigation as the PhD thesis project of Jonathan Woo who anticipated completion in the spring of 1993.

  15. A transient supergiant X-ray binary in IC 10: An extragalactic SFXT?

    SciTech Connect

    Laycock, Silas; Cappallo, Rigel; Oram, Kathleen; Balchunas, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    We report the discovery of a large amplitude (factor of ∼100) X-ray transient (IC 10 X-2, CXOU J002020.99+591758.6) in the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy IC 10 during our Chandra monitoring project. Based on the X-ray timing and spectral properties, and an optical counterpart observed with Gemini, the system is a high-mass X-ray binary consisting of a luminous blue supergiant and a neutron star. The highest measured luminosity of the source was 1.8 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}during an outburst in 2003. Observations before, during, and after a second outburst in 2010 constrain the outburst duration to be less than 3 months (with no lower limit). The X-ray spectrum is a hard power law (Γ = 0.3) with fitted column density (N{sub H} = 6.3 × 10{sup 21} atom cm{sup –2}), consistent with the established absorption to sources in IC 10. The optical spectrum shows hydrogen Balmer lines strongly in emission at the correct blueshift (-340 km s{sup –1}) for IC 10. The N III triplet emission feature is seen, accompanied by He II [4686] weakly in emission. Together these features classify the star as a luminous blue supergiant of the OBN subclass, characterized by enhanced nitrogen abundance. Emission lines of He I are seen, at similar strength to Hβ. A complex of Fe II permitted and forbidden emission lines are seen, as in B[e] stars. The system closely resembles galactic supergiant fast X-ray transients, in terms of its hard spectrum, variability amplitude, and blue supergiant primary.

  16. The nuclear X-ray source in NGC 3628: A strange active galactic nucleus or the most luminous high-mass X-ray binary known?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlem, Michael; Heckman, Timothy M.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    1995-01-01

    After 12 years, during which its unabsorbed soft X-ray flux in the 0.1-2.0 keV band was almost constant at about f(sub x) approximately 10(exp -12) ergs/s/sq cm, the compact nuclear source in NGC 3628 was not detected in one of our ROSAT observations, with a limiting sensitivity of f(sub x) approximately 5 x 10(exp -14) ergs/s/sq cm. Our data can be explained in two ways. The source is either the most massive X-ray binary known so far, with a greater than and approximately equal to 75 solar mass black hole, or an unusual low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The X-ray spectrum is typical of a high-mass X-ray binary, while the luminosity of the source of L(sub x) is approximately equal to 10(exp 40) ergs/s is more similar to those of low-luminosity AGNs. If it is an AGN, variable obscuration might explain the observed light curve.

  17. WATCHDOG: A Comprehensive All-sky Database of Galactic Black Hole X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, B. E.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Heinke, C. O.; Gladstone, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    With the advent of more sensitive all-sky instruments, the transient universe is being probed in greater depth than ever before. Taking advantage of available resources, we have established a comprehensive database of black hole (and black hole candidate) X-ray binary (BHXB) activity between 1996 and 2015 as revealed by all-sky instruments, scanning surveys, and select narrow-field X-ray instruments on board the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, Monitor of All-Sky X-ray Image, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and Swift telescopes; the Whole-sky Alberta Time-resolved Comprehensive black-Hole Database Of the Galaxy or WATCHDOG. Over the past two decades, we have detected 132 transient outbursts, tracked and classified behavior occurring in 47 transient and 10 persistently accreting BHs, and performed a statistical study on a number of outburst properties across the Galactic population. We find that outbursts undergone by BHXBs that do not reach the thermally dominant accretion state make up a substantial fraction (∼40%) of the Galactic transient BHXB outburst sample over the past ∼20 years. Our findings suggest that this “hard-only” behavior, observed in transient and persistently accreting BHXBs, is neither a rare nor recent phenomenon and may be indicative of an underlying physical process, relatively common among binary BHs, involving the mass-transfer rate onto the BH remaining at a low level rather than increasing as the outburst evolves. We discuss how the larger number of these “hard-only” outbursts and detected outbursts in general have significant implications for both the luminosity function and mass-transfer history of the Galactic BHXB population.

  18. Si K Edge Structure and Variability in Galactic X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Corrales, Lia; Canizares, Claude R.

    2016-08-01

    We survey the Si K edge structure in various absorbed Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) to study states of silicon in the inter- and circum-stellar medium. The bulk of these LMXBs lie toward the Galactic bulge region and all have column densities above 1022 cm‑2. The observations were performed using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. The Si K edge in all sources appears at an energy value of 1844 ± 0.001 eV. The edge exhibits significant substructure that can be described by a near edge absorption feature at 1849 ± 0.002 eV and a far edge absorption feature at 1865 ± 0.002 eV. Both of these absorption features appear variable with equivalent widths up to several mÅ. We can describe the edge structure using several components: multiple edge functions, near edge absorption excesses from silicates in dust form, signatures from X-ray scattering optical depths, and a variable warm absorber from ionized atomic silicon. The measured optical depths of the edges indicate much higher values than expected from atomic silicon cross sections and interstellar medium abundances, and they appear consistent with predictions from silicate X-ray absorption and scattering. A comparison with models also indicates a preference for larger dust grain sizes. In many cases, we identify Si xiii resonance absorption and determine ionization parameters between log ξ = 1.8 and 2.8 and turbulent velocities between 300 and 1000 km s‑1. This places the warm absorber in close vicinity of the X-ray binaries. In some data, we observe a weak edge at 1.840 keV, potentially from a lesser contribution of neutral atomic silicon.

  19. The Mysterious sdO X-ray Binary BD+37°442

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.; Geier, S.; Irrgang, A.; Schneider, D.; Barbu-Barna, I.; Mereghetti, S.; La Palombara, N.

    2014-04-01

    Pulsed X-ray emission in the luminous, helium-rich sdO BD +37°442 has recently been discovered (La Palombara et al. 2012). It was suggested that the sdO star has a neutron star or white dwarf companion with a spin period of 19.2 s. After HD 49798, which has a massive white dwarf companion spinning at 13.2 s in an 1.55 day orbit, this is only the second O-type subdwarf from which X-ray emission has been detected. We report preliminary results of our ongoing campaign to obtain time-resolved high-resolution spectroscopy using the CAFE instrument at Calar Alto observatory and SARG at the Telescopio Nationale Galileo. Atmospheric parameters were derived via a quantitative NLTE spectral analysis. The line fits hint at an unusually large projected rotation velocity. Therefore it seemed likely that BD +37°442 is a binary similar to HD 49798 and that the orbital period is also similar. The level of X-ray emission from BD +37°442 could be explained by accretion from the sdO wind by a neutron star orbiting at a period of less than ten days. Hence, we embarked on radial velocity monitoring in order to derive the binary parameters of the BD+37°442 system and obtained 41 spectra spread out over several month in 2012. Unlike for HD 49798, no radial velocity variations were found and, hence, there is no dynamical evidence for the existence of a compact companion yet. The origin of the pulsed X-ray emission remains as a mystery.

  20. X-ray Observations of Binary and Single Wolf-Rayet Stars with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen; Gudel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner; Zhekov, Svetozar

    2006-01-01

    We present an overview of recent X-ray observations of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars with XMM-Newton and Chandra. These observations are aimed at determining the differences in X-ray properties between massive WR + OB binary systems and putatively single WR stars. A new XMM spectrum of the nearby WN8 + OB binary WR 147 shows hard absorbed X-ray emission (including the Fe Ka line complex), characteristic of colliding wind shock sources. In contrast, sensitive observations of four of the closest known single WC (carbon-rich) WR stars have yielded only nondetections. These results tentatively suggest that single WC stars are X-ray quiet. The presence of a companion may thus be an essential factor in elevating the X-ray emission of WC + OB stars to detectable levels.

  1. UV and X-ray emission in the interacting binary U Cephei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimenez, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Gonzalez-Riestra, R.

    1993-01-01

    The active close binary U Cep has been monitored in the ultraviolet, using IUE, during 1.25 orbital cycles. The emission spectrum at the bottom of the primary total eclipse confirms earlier suggestions of an unexpected absence of the Hell 1640 A line. Stronger than expected emission in some other lines like NV, CII, CIV or AlIII, indicative of hot plasma, points out that some important differences still remain between the active components of RS CVn-type binaries and the mass-losing components of semidetached Algols. Simultaneous X-ray measurements, carried out with GINGA, indicated a low upper limit flux in the observed energy range (1 to 10 keV). A comparison with other binary systems or isolated stars is discussed in order to understand the obtained results.

  2. Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of Accretion in High-mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymer, Eric John

    Wind accretion in high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) often results in highly variable X-ray behavior, the nature of which is not well understood. Most models of wind accretion are based on the analytical predictions of Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion (HLA), which assumes a steady axisymmetric flow. Surprisingly little is known about the structure, stability, and time-evolution of HLA in three dimensions, particularly in the presence of non-uniform winds. This work describes hydrodynamic simulations of idealized HLA in three-dimensions, then applies these simulations to two HMXB subclasses that exhibit unexplained X-ray behavior. Our idealized HLA models show that the accretion flow remains steady and stable in two-dimensional axisymmetric and three dimensional grid geometries, assuming a uniform upstream flow. We test the stability of the model with linear upstream density gradients and find that they are able to induce rotational flow around the accretor that reduces the mass accretion rate by up to an order of magnitude. We apply our 3D model to accretion in the context of Be/X-ray binaries, in which the accreting neutron star is immersed in the dense decretion disk of the Be donor star. These systems have traditionally been described with 2D models that exhibit the flip-flop instability. This instability results in the formation and destruction of transient accretion disks with accompanying bursts of mass accretion. Our 3D models show no sign of the flip-flop instability, but instead display rotation about the neutron star directed primarily out of the plane of the decretion disk. This rotation generates large-scale asymmetries in the bow shock and suppresses mass accretion by up to two orders of magnitude. The accretion of a clumped stellar wind is one of the primary mechanisms proposed to explain the high-luminosity X-ray flares of supergiant fast X-ray transients. We model clump accretion in 3D to determine whether the impact of a clump can produce flares with a

  3. X-ray study of the supernova remnant G337.2-0.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Akihiro; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Tanaka, Takaaki; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on the Suzaku result of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G337.2-0.7. The X-ray spectrum is well explained by three components in ionizing phase. One is a plasma with a low temperature kT = 0.70_{-0.03}^{+0.02}keV, solar abundances, and an ionization parameter n_et = 5.7^{+0.7}_{-0.4}× 10^{11}s cm-3. The second is a middle-temperature plasma with kT = 1.54^{+0.13}_{-0.02}keV and high metal abundances in a highly ionized state of n_et = 3.6^{+0.2}_{-0.5}× 10^{11}s cm-3, and the third is a high-temperature plasma with kT = 3.1^{+0.2}_{-0.1}keV and high metal abundances in a low-ionized state of n_et=2.1^{+0.4}_{-0.2}× 10^{10}s cm-3. The high metal-abundance plasmas are likely to be of an ejecta origin, while the solar abundance plasma would be of an interstellar-gas origin. The abundance pattern and mass of the ejecta confirm that G337.2-0.7 is a remnant of a Type Ia supernova (SN). The derived Fe mass of ejecta MFe = 0.025-0.039 M⊙ is far smaller than that expected from any Type Ia model, suggesting that most Fe has not yet been heated by the reverse shock. The ejecta has enhanced distribution in the northeastern region compared to the central region, and therefore the SN explosion or SNR evolution would be asymmetric.

  4. Hydrodynamic model of Kepler's supernova remnant constrained by EINSTEIN and EXOSAT X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenflug, R.; Magne, B.; Chieze, J. P.; Ballet, J.

    1994-11-01

    We have used the EXOSAT spectrum of Kepler's supernova remnant (including the Fe K line and the high-energy continuum) to further constrain its models. On the basis of the large abundances of Si, S and Fe required by a Sedov model, we have focused on models of young supernova remnants in which the reverse shock (propagating into the stellar ejecta) is still active. We have built a relatively simple hydrodynamic code (assuming adiabatic expansion and ion-electron equilibrium) and coupled it to the ionization equations. The assumption of an SN II remnant with 5 solar mass ejecta dominated by hydrogen was tested. The simplest density structure (uniform ejecta and uniform ambient medium) fits the X-ray data fairly well when the ambient density and explosion energy are adjusted at 0.74/cu.cm and 1051 ergs, respectively. Small overabundances (2 to 3 times solar) of Si, S and Ar in the ejecta are enough to account for the observed line intensities. However the temperature is too low in the shocked ejecta to produce the Fe K line without exceeding the observed Fe L intensity. The shocked ambient medium is hot enough but a large overabundance of iron (4.6 times solar) is necessary. As such an overabundance is hard to justify, we conclude that the model will have to be refined in order to get over this last stumbling block. Other models were also tested: with Mej = 5 solar mass and ejecta of pure helium, Mej = 10 solar mass, and with Coulomb heated electrons. None is able to produce the Fe K line in the ejecta.

  5. Near-infrared survey of high mass X-ray binary candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrejón, J. M.; Negueruela, I.; Smith, D. M.; Harrison, T. E.

    2010-02-01

    Context. The INTEGRAL satellite is detecting a large population of new X-ray sources that were missed by previous missions because of high obscuration and, in some cases, very short duty cycles. The nature of these sources must be addressed by characterizing their optical and/or infrared counterparts. Aims: We investigate the nature of the optical counterparts to five of these newly discovered X-ray sources. Methods: We combine infrared spectra in the I, J,H, and K bands with JHK photometry to characterize the spectral type, luminosity class, and distance to the infrared counterparts to these systems. For IGR J19140+0951, we present spectroscopy from the red to the K band and new red and infrared photometry. For SAX J18186-1703 and IGR J18483-0311, we present the first intermediate-resolution spectroscopy to be published. Finally, for IGR J18027-2016, we present new I and K band spectra. Results: We find that four systems harbour early-type B supergiants. All of them are heavily obscured, with E(B-V) ranging between 3 and 5, implying visual extinctions of ~ 9 to 15 mag. We refine the published classifications of IGR J18027-2016 and IGR J19140+0951 by constraining their luminosity class. In the first case, we confirm the supergiant nature but exclude a class III. In the second case, we propose a slightly higher luminosity class (Ia instead of Iab) and provide an improved value of the distance based on new optical photometry. Two other systems, SAX J18186-1703 and IGR J18483-0311 are classified as supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs). XTE J1901+014, on the other hand, contains no bright infrared source in its error circle. Conclusions: Owing to their infrared and X-ray characteristics, IGR J18027-2016 and IGR J19140+0951, emerge as supergiant X-ray binaries with X-ray luminosities of the order of L_X˜ [1-2]× 1036 erg s-1, while SAX J1818.6-1703 and IGR J18483-0311, are found to be SFXTs at 2 and 3 kpc, respectively. Finally, XTE J1901+014 emerges as a puzzling

  6. THE COMPLETE SPECTRUM OF THE NEUTRON STAR X-RAY BINARY 4U 0614+091

    SciTech Connect

    Migliari, S.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Heinz, S.; Hynes, R. I.; Fender, R. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Gallo, E.; Jonker, P. G.

    2010-02-10

    We observed the neutron star (NS) ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 0614+091 quasi-simultaneously in the radio band (Very Large Array), mid-infrared (IR)/IR (Spitzer/Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer and Infrared Array Camera), near-IR/optical (Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System), optical-UV (Swift/UV-Optical Telescope), soft and hard X-rays (Swift/X-ray Telescope and Rossi-X-ray Timing Explorer). The source was steadily in its 'hard state'. We detected the source in the whole range, for the first time in the radio band at 4.86 and 8.46 GHz and in the mid-IR at 24 {mu}m, up to 100 keV. The optically thick synchrotron spectrum of the jet is consistent with being flat from the radio to the mid-IR band. The flat jet spectrum breaks in the range {approx}(1-4) x 10{sup 13} Hz to an optically thin power-law synchrotron spectrum with spectral index {approx}-0.5. These observations allow us to estimate a lower limit on the jet radiative power of {approx}3 x 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1} and a total jet power L{sub J} {approx} 10{sup 34}mu{sup -1}{sub 0.05} E {sup 0.53}{sub c} erg s{sup -1} (where E{sub c} is the high-energy cutoff of the synchrotron spectrum in eV and mu{sub 0.05} is the radiative efficiency in units of 0.05). The contemporaneous detection of the optically thin part of the compact jet and the X-ray tail above 30 keV allows us to assess the contribution of the jet to the hard X-ray tail by synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) processes. We conclude that, for realistic jet size, boosting, viewing angle, and energy partition, the SSC emission alone, from the post-shock, accelerated, non-thermal population in the jet, is not a viable mechanism to explain the observed hard X-ray tail of the NS 4U 0614+091.

  7. Compact Objects In Binary Systems: Formation and Evolution of X-ray Binaries and Tides in Double White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsecchi, Francesca

    Binary star systems hosting black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs are unique laboratories for investigating both extreme physical conditions, and stellar and binary evolution. Black holes and neutron stars are observed in X-ray binaries, where mass accretion from a stellar companion renders them X-ray bright. Although instruments like Chandra have revolutionized the field of X-ray binaries, our theoretical understanding of their origin and formation lags behind. Progress can be made by unravelling the evolutionary history of observed systems. As part of my thesis work, I have developed an analysis method that uses detailed stellar models and all the observational constraints of a system to reconstruct its evolutionary path. This analysis models the orbital evolution from compact-object formation to the present time, the binary orbital dynamics due to explosive mass loss and a possible kick at core collapse, and the evolution from the progenitor's Zero Age Main Sequence to compact-object formation. This method led to a theoretical model for M33 X-7, one of the most massive X-ray binaries known and originally marked as an evolutionary challenge. Compact objects are also expected gravitational wave (GW) sources. In particular, double white dwarfs are both guaranteed GW sources and observed electromagnetically. Although known systems show evidence of tidal deformation and a successful GW astronomy requires realistic models of the sources, detached double white dwarfs are generally approximated to point masses. For the first time, I used realistic models to study tidally-driven periastron precession in eccentric binaries. I demonstrated that its imprint on the GW signal yields constrains on the components' masses and that the source would be misclassified if tides are neglected. Beyond this adiabatic precession, tidal dissipation creates a sink of orbital angular momentum. Its efficiency is strongest when tides are dynamic and excite the components' free

  8. X-ray brightening of the super-Eddington black hole X-ray binary P13 in NGC 7793

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Roberto; Motch, Christian; Pakull, Manfred; Grise', Fabien

    2016-05-01

    The ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) P13 in the nearby galaxy NGC 7793 (d = 3.7 Mpc) has recently brightened up to its highest historical flux. Our Swift/XRT observations from 2016 May 10 and May 15 show a count rate of about 0.1 ct/s, twice as high as the previously recorded peak.

  9. Infrared and X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Kes 75 Supernova Shell Characterizing the Dust and Gas Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Slane, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of approx 1.5 keV, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keY. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked SN ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from supernova (SN) ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and IR emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of approx 140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma, that also gives rise to the hot X-ray emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-ray emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 x 10(exp -2) Solar Mass, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide quantitative

  10. Infrared and X-Ray Spectroscopy of the KES 75 Supernova Remnant Shell: Characterizing the Dust and Gas Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Slane, Patrick; Arendt, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of 1.5 keV, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keV. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked SN ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from supernova (SN) ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and ill emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of 140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma, that also gives rise to the hot X-ray emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-ray emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 x 10(exp -2) solar mass, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide quantitative estimates of

  11. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy and Imaging of Supernova Remnant N132D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Ehud; Rasmussen, Andrew; Griffiths, R. Gareth; Dennerl, Konrad; Audard, Marc; Aschenbach, Bernd

    2000-01-01

    The observation of the supernova remnant N132D by the scientific instruments on board the XMM-Newton satellite is presented. The X-rays from N132D are dispersed into a detailed line-rich spectrum using the Reflection Grating Spectrometers. Spectral lines of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe are identified. Images of the remnant, in narrow wavelength bands, produced by the European Photon Imaging Cameras reveal a complex spatial structure of the ionic distribution. While K - shell Fe seems to originate near the centre, all of the other ions are observed along the shell. An emission excess of O(6+) over O(7+) is detected on the northeastern edge of the remnant. This can be a sign of hot ionising conditions, or it can reflect a relatively cool region. Spectral fitting of the CCD spectrum suggests high temperatures in this region, but a detailed analysis of the atomic processes involved in producing the O(6+) spectral lines leads to the conclusion that the intensities of these lines alone cannot provide a conclusive distinction between the two scenarios.

  12. Hard X-ray emission and {sup 44}Ti line features of the Tycho supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhuo E-mail: zhuo.li@pku.edu.cn

    2014-07-10

    A deep hard X-ray survey of the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) satellite has detected for the first time non-thermal emission up to 90 keV in the Tycho supernova (SN) remnant. Its 3-100 keV spectrum is fitted with a thermal bremsstrahlung of kT ∼ 0.81 ± 0.45 keV plus a power-law model of Γ ∼ 3.01 ± 0.16. Based on diffusive shock acceleration theory, this non-thermal emission, together with radio measurements, implies that the Tycho remnant may not accelerate protons up to >PeV but to hundreds TeV. Only heavier nuclei may be accelerated to the cosmic ray spectral 'knee'. In addition, using INTEGRAL, we search for soft gamma-ray lines at 67.9 and 78.4 keV that come from the decay of radioactive {sup 44}Ti in the Tycho remnant. A bump feature in the 60-90 keV energy band, potentially associated with the {sup 44}Ti line emission, is found with a marginal significance level of ∼2.6σ. The corresponding 3σ upper limit on the {sup 44}Ti line flux amounts to 1.5 × 10{sup –5} photon cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}. Implications on the progenitor of the Tycho SN, considered to be a Type Ia SN prototype, are discussed.

  13. X-ray Follow-ups of XSS J12270-4859: A Low-mass X-ray Binary with Gamma-ray Fermi-LAT Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deMartino, D.; Belloni, T.; Falanga, M.; Papitto, A.; Motta, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Masetti, N.; Mouchet, M.; Mukai, K.; Possenti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Context. XSS J1227.0-4859 is a peculiar, hard X-ray source recently positionally associated to the Fermi-LAT source 1FGL J1227.9- 4852/2FGL J1227.7-4853. Multi-wavelength observations have added information on this source, indicating a low-luminosity lowmass X-ray binary (LMXB), but its nature is still unclear. Aims. To progress in our understanding, we present new X-ray data from a monitoring campaign performed in 2011 with the XMM-Newton, RXTE, and Swift satellites and combine them with new gamma-ray data from the Fermi and AGILE satellites. We complement the study with simultaneous near-UV photometry from XMM-Newton and with previous UV/optical and near-IR data. Methods. We analysed the temporal characteristics in the X-rays, near-UV, and gamma rays and studied the broad-band spectral energy distribution from radio to gamma rays. Results. The X-ray history of XSS J1227 over 7 yr shows a persistent and rather stable low-luminosity (6 × 1033 d2 1 kpcerg s-1) source, with flares and dips being peculiar and permanent characteristics. The associated Fermi-LAT source 2FGL J1227.7-4853 is also stable over an overlapping period of 4.7 yr. Searches for X-ray fast pulsations down to msec give upper limits to pulse fractional amplitudes of 15-25% that do not rule out a fast spinning pulsar. The combined UV/optical/near-IR spectrum reveals a hot component at approximately 13 kK and a cool one at approximately 4.6 kK. The latter would suggest a late-type K2-K5 companion star, a distance range of 1.4-3.6 kpc, and an orbital period of 7-9 h. A near-UV variability (6 h) also suggests a longer orbital period than previously estimated. Conclusions. The analysis shows that the X-ray and UV/optical/near-IR emissions are more compatible with an accretion-powered compact object than with a rotational powered pulsar. The X-ray to UV bolometric luminosity ratio could be consistent with a binary hosting a neutron star, but the uncertainties in the radio data may also allow an LMXB

  14. Searches for millisecond pulsations in low-mass X-ray binaries, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, B. A.; Van Der Klis, M.; Wood, K. S.; Norris, J. P.; Hertz, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Paradijs, J. Van; Lewin, W. H. G.; Mitsuda, K.; Penninx, W.

    1994-01-01

    Coherent millisecond X-ray pulsations are expected from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), but remain undetected. Using the single-parameter Quadratic Coherence Recovery Technique (QCRT) to correct for unknown binary orbit motion, we have performed Fourier transform searches for coherent oscillations in all long, continuous segments of data obtained at 1 ms time resolution during Ginga observations of LMXB. We have searched the six known Z sources (GX 5-1, Cyg X-2, Sco X-1, GX 17+2, GX 340+0, and GX 349+2), seven of the 14 known atoll sources (GX 3+1. GX 9+1, GX 9+9, 1728-33. 1820-30, 1636-53 and 1608-52), the 'peculiar' source Cir X-1, and the high-mass binary Cyg X-3. We find no evidence for coherent pulsations in any of these sources, with 99% confidence limits on the pulsed fraction between 0.3% and 5.0% at frequencies below the Nyquist frequency of 512 Hz. A key assumption made in determining upper limits in previous searches is shown to be incorrect. We provide a recipe for correctly setting upper limits and detection thresholds. Finally we discuss and apply two strategies to improve sensitivity by utilizing multiple, independent, continuous segments of data with comparable count rates.

  15. A NEW METHOD TO CONSTRAIN SUPERNOVA FRACTIONS USING X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bulbul, Esra; Smith, Randall K.; Loewenstein, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Supernova (SN) explosions enrich the intracluster medium (ICM) both by creating and dispersing metals. We introduce a method to measure the number of SNe and relative contribution of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and core-collapse supernovae (SNe cc) by directly fitting X-ray spectral observations. The method has been implemented as an XSPEC model called snapec. snapec utilizes a single-temperature thermal plasma code (apec) to model the spectral emission based on metal abundances calculated using the latest SN yields from SN Ia and SN cc explosion models. This approach provides a self-consistent single set of uncertainties on the total number of SN explosions and relative fraction of SN types in the ICM over the cluster lifetime by directly allowing these parameters to be determined by SN yields provided by simulations. We apply our approach to XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC), Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS), and 200 ks simulated Astro-H observations of a cooling flow cluster, A3112. We find that various sets of SN yields present in the literature produce an acceptable fit to the EPIC and RGS spectra of A3112. We infer that 30.3% {+-} 5.4% to 37.1% {+-} 7.1% of the total SN explosions are SNe Ia, and the total number of SN explosions required to create the observed metals is in the range of (1.06 {+-} 0.34) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} to (1.28 {+-} 0.43) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9}, from snapec fits to RGS spectra. These values may be compared to the enrichment expected based on well-established empirically measured SN rates per star formed. The proportions of SNe Ia and SNe cc inferred to have enriched the ICM in the inner 52 kpc of A3112 is consistent with these specific rates, if one applies a correction for the metals locked up in stars. At the same time, the inferred level of SN enrichment corresponds to a star-to-gas mass ratio that is several times greater than the 10% estimated globally for clusters in the A3112 mass range.

  16. A New Method to Constrain Supernova Fractions Using X-ray Observations of Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulbul, Esra; Smith, Randall K.; Loewenstein, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Supernova (SN) explosions enrich the intracluster medium (ICM) both by creating and dispersing metals. We introduce a method to measure the number of SNe and relative contribution of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and core-collapse supernovae (SNe cc) by directly fitting X-ray spectral observations. The method has been implemented as an XSPEC model called snapec. snapec utilizes a single-temperature thermal plasma code (apec) to model the spectral emission based on metal abundances calculated using the latest SN yields from SN Ia and SN cc explosion models. This approach provides a self-consistent single set of uncertainties on the total number of SN explosions and relative fraction of SN types in the ICM over the cluster lifetime by directly allowing these parameters to be determined by SN yields provided by simulations. We apply our approach to XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC), Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS), and 200 ks simulated Astro-H observations of a cooling flow cluster, A3112.We find that various sets of SN yields present in the literature produce an acceptable fit to the EPIC and RGS spectra of A3112. We infer that 30.3% plus or minus 5.4% to 37.1% plus or minus 7.1% of the total SN explosions are SNe Ia, and the total number of SN explosions required to create the observed metals is in the range of (1.06 plus or minus 0.34) x 10(exp 9), to (1.28 plus or minus 0.43) x 10(exp 9), fromsnapec fits to RGS spectra. These values may be compared to the enrichment expected based on well-established empirically measured SN rates per star formed. The proportions of SNe Ia and SNe cc inferred to have enriched the ICM in the inner 52 kiloparsecs of A3112 is consistent with these specific rates, if one applies a correction for the metals locked up in stars. At the same time, the inferred level of SN enrichment corresponds to a star-to-gas mass ratio that is several times greater than the 10% estimated globally for clusters in the A3112 mass range.

  17. The search for low-luminosity high-mass X-ray binaries and the study of X-ray populations in the Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasini, Francesca; Tomsick, John; Bodaghee, Arash; Rahoui, Farid; Krivonos, Roman; Corral-Santana, Jesus; An, Hongjun; Bauer, Franz E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Stern, Daniel; NuSTAR Galactic Plane Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which consist of a neutron star (NS) or black hole (BH) accreting material from a massive stellar companion, provide valuable insights into the evolution of massive stars and the merger rates of NS/NS, NS/BH, and BH/BH binaries whose gravitational wave signatures will soon be detectable by facilities such as Advanced-LIGO. INTEGRAL discoveries of new classes of lower-luminosity HMXBs, some highly obscured and some showing extreme transient activity, as well as the recent discovery of the very quiescent and only known Be-BH binary, have considerably changed our understanding of clumping in massive stellar winds and the relative importance of different binary evolutionary channels. In order to better characterize the low-luminosity HMXB population, we have performed a survey of a square degree region in the direction of the Norma spiral arm with Chandra and NuSTAR. These surveys, combined with optical and infrared spectroscopic follow-up of the counterparts of hard X-ray sources, have yielded three HMXB candidates to date. Future radial-velocity follow-up of these candidates, as well as other Be HMXB candidates from the NuSTAR serendipitous survey, will help determine whether these sources truly are HMXBs and, if so, constrain the mass of the compact object in these systems. If confirmed, these HMXB candidates could extend our measurement of the HMXB luminosity function by about two orders of magnitude and provide important constraints on massive binary evolutionary models. In addition, the colliding wind binaries and pulsar wind nebulae discovered in the Norma X-ray survey will help shed light on other aspects of massive stellar evolution and massive stellar remnants. Finally, these surveys provide the opportunity to compare the hard X-ray populations in the Galactic disk and the Galactic Center. While the dominant hard X-ray populations in both of these Galactic regions appear to be cataclysmic variables (CVs), those in the Norma

  18. SWIFT/BAT DETECTION OF HARD X-RAYS FROM TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT: EVIDENCE FOR TITANIUM-44

    SciTech Connect

    Troja, E.; Baumgartner, W.; Markwardt, C.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; Hartmann, D.

    2014-12-10

    We report Swift/Burst Alert Telescope survey observations of the Tycho's supernova remnant, performed over a period of 104 months since the mission's launch. The remnant is detected with high significance (>10σ) below 50 keV. We detect significant hard X-ray emission in the 60-85 keV band, above the continuum level predicted by a simple synchrotron model. The location of the observed excess is consistent with line emission from radioactive titanium-44, so far reported only for Type II supernova explosions. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the galactic supernova rate, and nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernova.

  19. Phase shifts and nonellipsoidal light curves: Challenges from mass determinations in x-ray binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, Andrew Glenn

    We consider two types of anomalous observations which have arisen from efforts to measure dynamical masses of X-ray binary stars: (1) Radial velocity curves which seemingly show the primary and the secondary out of antiphase in most systems, and (2) The observation of double-waved light curves which deviate significantly from the ellipsoidal modulations expected for a Roche lobe filling star. We consider both problems with the joint goals of understanding the physical origins of the anomalous observations, and using this understanding to allow robust dynamical determinations of mass in X-ray binary systems. In our analysis of phase-shifted radial velocity curves, we discuss a comprehensive sample of X-ray binaries with published phase-shifted radial velocity curves. We show that the most commonly adopted explanation for phase shifts is contradicted by many observations, and consider instead a generalized form of a model proposed by Smak in 1970. We show that this model is well supported by a range of observations, including some systems which had previously been considered anomalous. We lay the groundwork for the derivation of mass ratios based on our explanation for phase shifts, and we discuss the work necessary to produce more detailed physical models of the phase shift. In our analysis of non-ellipsoidal light curves, we focus on the very well-studied system A0620-00. We present new VIH SMARTS photometry spanning 1999-2007, and supplement this with a comprehensive collection of archival data obtained since 1981. We show that A0620-00 undergoes optical state changes within X-ray quiescence and argue that not all quiescent data should be used for determinations of the inclination. We identify twelve light curves which may reliably be used for determining the inclination. We show that the accretion disk contributes significantly to all twelve curves and is the dominant source of nonellipsoidal variations. We derive the disk fraction for each of the twelve curves

  20. Bifurcation timescales in power spectra of black hole binaries and ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taishan; Li, Tipei

    2010-01-01

    For black hole binaries (BHBs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs), bifurcation timescales (BTs) Δ t b exist, below which time-domain power is significantly higher than the corresponding Fourier power. Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are removed from the Fourier spectra of BHBs. A relationship between BT, black hole mass and bolometric luminosity is derived. Strong anti-correlation between BT and luminosity of Cyg X-1 is found. After removing the QPOs, BTs are also obtained for two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), M82 X-1 and NGC5408 X-1. The results support that they harbor intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs).

  1. Determination of the Thermal and Non-Thermal Emissions in the X-Ray Spectrum of Kepler's Supernova Remnant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decourchelle, Anne

    The XTE/PCA instrument, with its large efficiency and wide energy range, offers an unique opportunity to observe the high energy X-ray emission of Kepler's supernova remnant. Previous observations in the 0.1-10 keV range (EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, GINGA, ROSAT and ASCA) have favored non-equilibrium ionization reverse shock models. A very high temperature (24 keV) is predicted in the shocked interstellar medium by these models. Observation of this high energy component will put strong constraints on the SN type and SNR evolution. The other major objective is to seek for an X-ray synchrotron emission in addition to the thermally produced X-rays. The observational goal for XTE PCA is thus to determine both these thermal and non-thermal contributions in the Kepler's high energy spectrum.

  2. Theoretical studies of X-ray emission from supernova remnants and other non-equilibrium astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the accuracy of thermal X-ray emission spectrum predictions, new computations of electron excitation rates, dielectric recombination rates, and updated codes were applied to existing data on supernova remnants and O star winds. Because of its general predominance along with low ionization and recombination rates, Fe(XVII) was analyzed with the inclusion of resonances to the excitation rate data. Corrections to the existing dielectric recombination rates based on detailed Fe (XVII) calculations and the more approximate Quantum Defect Method were accomplished. by using Distorted Wave ionization rates and reliable excitation rates, models for X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical emission line intensities of non-radiative shock wave can be constructed that supply data on shock velocity, preshock ionization states, and elemental abundances. The radiative driving force that drives the shock wave is calculated through line opacities of the shocked gas. X-ray emission spectra are also calculated for O star winds.

  3. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A with the XMM-Newton RGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Petre, Robert; Yamada, Shinya; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Konami, Saori; Tamagawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray spectra of cloud-shock interaction regions in the eastern and northern rims of the Galactic supernova remnant Puppis A, using the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard the XMM-Newton satellite. A number of emission lines including K(alpha) triplets of He-like N, O , and Ne are clearly resolved for the first time. Intensity ratios of forbidden to resonance lines in the triplets are found to be higher than predictions by thermal emission models having plausible plasma parameters. The anomalous line ratios cannot be reproduced by effects of resonance scattering, recombination, or inner-shell ionization processes, but could be explained by charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. Our observations thus provide observational support for charge-exchange X-ray emission in supernova remnants.

  4. The soft and hard X-rays thermal emission from star cluster winds with a supernova explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos-Ramírez, A.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Esquivel, A.; Toledo-Roy, J. C.; Olivares, J.; Velázquez, P. F.

    2015-07-01

    Massive young star clusters contain dozens or hundreds of massive stars that inject mechanical energy in the form of winds and supernova explosions, producing an outflow which expands into their surrounding medium, shocking it and forming structures called superbubbles. The regions of shocked material can have temperatures in excess of 106 K, and emit mainly in thermal X-rays (soft and hard). This X-ray emission is strongly affected by the action of thermal conduction, as well as by the metallicity of the material injected by the massive stars. We present three-dimensional numerical simulations exploring these two effects, metallicity of the stellar winds and supernova explosions, as well as thermal conduction.

  5. Metallicity dependence of high-mass X-ray binary populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douna, V. M.; Pellizza, L. J.; Mirabel, I. F.; Pedrosa, S. E.

    2015-07-01

    Context. High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) might have contributed a non-negligible fraction of the energy feedback to the interstellar and intergalactic media at high redshift, becoming important sources for the heating and ionization history of the Universe. However, the importance of this contribution depends on the hypothesized increase in the number of HMXBs formed in low-metallicity galaxies and in their luminosities. Aims: In this work we test the aforementioned hypothesis, and quantify the metallicity dependence of HMXB population properties. Methods: We compile from the literature a large set of data on the sizes and X-ray luminosities of HMXB populations in nearby galaxies with known metallicities and star formation rates. We use Bayesian inference to fit simple Monte Carlo models that describe the metallicity dependence of the size and luminosity of the HMXB populations. Results: We find that HMXBs are typically ten times more numerous per unit star formation rate in low-metallicity galaxies (12 + log (O / H) < 8, namely <20% solar) than in solar-metallicity galaxies. The metallicity dependence of the luminosity of HMXBs is small compared to that of the population size. Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that HMXBs are more numerous in low-metallicity galaxies, implying the need to investigate the feedback in the form of X-rays and energetic mass outflows of these high-energy sources during cosmic dawn.

  6. X-RAY EMISSION FROM TRANSIENT JET MODEL IN BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Pe'er, Asaf; Markoff, Sera

    2012-07-10

    While the non-thermal radio through at least near-infrared emission in the hard state in X-ray binaries (XRBs) is known to originate in jets, the source of the non-thermal X-ray component is still uncertain. We introduce a new model for this emission, which takes into account the transient nature of outflows, and show that it can explain the observed properties of the X-ray spectrum. Rapid radiative cooling of the electrons naturally accounts for the break often seen below around 10 keV, and for the canonical spectral slope F{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -1/2} observed below the break. We derive the constraints set by the data for both synchrotron- and Compton-dominated models. We show that for the synchrotron-dominated case, the jet should be launched at radii comparable to the inner radius of the disk ({approx}few 100 r{sub s} for the 2000 outburst of XTE J1118+480), with typical magnetic field B {approx}> 10{sup 6} G. We discuss the consequences of our results for the possible connection between the inflow and outflow in the hard state of XRBs.

  7. Geometry of X-ray sources in accreting black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    The structure of the X-ray sources in the hard spectral state of accreting black-hole binaries has been a subject of intense debate. The paradigm dominant for many years postulated that the accretion disc in the hard state is truncated at some radius >> the innermost stable orbit (ISCO) whereas the disc reaches the ISCO in the soft state. This paradigm explains a large body of observed phenomena, including the spectral and variability differences between the states and outbursts of transient sources, proceeding from quiescence (where no disc is present) through the hard state to the peak flux in the soft state. On the other hand, there have been numerous claims in recent years that the disc extends to the ISCO in the hard state. Also, the primary X-ray source has been postulated to consist of a compact source on-axis of the rotating black hole (a lamppost). Those claims are based on observations of broad Fe K lines and of soft X-ray components interpreted as blackbody-emitting accretion discs. I will discuss arguments for and against the disc truncation and the lamppost geometry based on current spectral and timing results.

  8. Probing the clumpy winds of giant stars with high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Victoria; Hell, Natalie; Hirsch, Maria; Garcia, Javier; Huenemoerder, David; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Nowak, Michael; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schulz, Norbert S.; Sundqvists, Jon O.; Townsend, Richard D.; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    Line-driven winds from early type stars are structured, with small, overdense clumps embedded in tenuous hot gas. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), systems where a neutron star or a black hole accretes from the line-driven stellar wind of an O/B-type companion, are ideal for studying such winds: the wind drives the accretion onto the compact object and thus the X-ray production. The radiation from close to the compact object is quasi-pointlike and effectively X-rays the wind.We used RXTE and Chandra-HETG observations of two of the brightest HMXBs, Cyg X-1 and Vela X-1, to decipher their wind structure. In Cyg X-1, we show that the orbital variability of absorption can be only explained by a clumpy wind model and constrain the porosity of the wind as well as the onion-like structure of the clumps. In Vela X-1 we show, using the newest reference energies for low ionization Si-lines obtained with LLNL’s EBIT-I, that the ionized phase of the circumstellar medium and the cold clumps have different velocities.

  9. Multi-frequency observation of high mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-3 during flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sabyasachi; Patra, Dusmanta; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Rao, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    We studied the multi-frequency properties of the Galactic high mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-3 during various flaring activities using The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) etc. The flare of 2006 May-June was one of the largest flare in the history of the source which is thoroughly discussed. We also observed few large flares of this source between 2007 and 2009. We commented on correlation and lag between X-ray and radio emissions during flares. We construct the radio spectrum of the source in the rising and fading phase of flares using GMRT, JVLA and published results using RATAN. We clearly see that the turn-over frequency is shifting towards lower frequencies as the flares evolve gradually. The two point spectral index between 614 MHz and 235 MHz varies from positive (optically thick) and negative (optically thin) values which is consistent with the synchrotron self absorption model. We calculated some physical parameters of the source such as the size of emitting region using the synchrotron self absorption model. The size of the emitting region expands with the flare. We estimate the velocity of the expansion of the blob in the non-relativistic range from the expansion of the size of emitting region.

  10. A distance determination for the supernova remnant G27.4+0.0 and its central X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanbonmatsu, K. Y.; Helfand, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    We have determined the distance to the supernova remnant G27.4+0.0, one of the handful of remnants with a bright central X-ray source. H I absorption data obtained with the VLA toward the remnant and adjacent H II regions allow us to constrain the distance to G27.4+0.0 to lie between 6 and 7.5 kpc. We briefly discuss the implications of this result for the nature of the central source.

  11. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM AND DISTANCE TO THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G84.2-0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, Denis A.; Green, Kaylie S. E-mail: ksgreen@ucalgary.ca

    2012-11-20

    We analyze X-ray and radio observations of the supernova remnant G84.2-0.8. 1420 MHz atomic hydrogen (H I) line and radio continuum data yield H I absorption spectra and a new H I absorption distance of 5.8-6.2 kpc. Archival X-ray observations from ROSAT and Chandra which cover the area including G84.2-0.8 are analyzed to show extended X-ray emission from G84.2-0.8. Fits to X-ray spectra from Chandra, with the new H I distance of 5.8-6.2 kpc, are used to determine the Sedov parameters of the supernova remnant. G84.2-0.8 is large (16-18 pc radius), middle aged ({approx}9000 yr), expanding in low-density interstellar medium (0.02 cm{sup -3}), and consistent with a low explosion energy (0.8-6.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 50} erg).

  12. Dynamics of a Type Ia Supernova Remnant: X-ray and Radio Proper Motions in Tycho's SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Blondin, John M.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Chomiuk, Laura; Ghavamian, Parviz; Hewitt, John W.; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    We present results from new Chandra X-ray and JVLA radio observations of Tycho's supernova remnant, the remains of the supernova of 1572 A.D. The high spatial resolution of these instruments allows for accurate measurements of the proper motion of the forward shock in Tycho, with baselines now at 15 years for the X-ray data and 30 years for the radio. Type Ia SNe are of fundamental importance in astrophysics, yet the nature of their environments and progenitor systems is poorly understood. In a recent work, we have shown that theISM surrounding Tycho varies systematically in density by a factor of 5, with larger excursions in some locations. A substantial density variation is consistent with limited previous proper motion studies that have been done in radio and X-rays. Our expanded baseline measurements allow us to further explore the variations in the dynamics of the shock wave, which can also be used to localize the explosion site. Previous proper motion measurements, made over much shorter time baselines, have shown some discrepancies in the shockvelocity as measured in radio and X-rays. With our new, much improved data, we can compare proper motions in these two energy bands with much greater accuracy.

  13. INTEGRAL measures the hard X-ray spectrum of the Be/X-ray binary XTE J1859+083

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, D.; Gotz, C. Ferrigno D.

    2015-04-01

    During the INTEGRAL observations performed from 2015 April 17, 19:47 to April 19, 20:01 UTC, the IBIS/ISGRI instrument detected a highly significant signal from a transient source, positionally coincident with the Be/X-ray pulsar XTE J1859+083 (ra, dec) = (284.78 ; 8.25) , which is reported to be in outburst since 2015-02-08 (ATeL #7034).

  14. X-rays and gamma-rays from accretion flows onto black holes in Seyferts and X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Johnson, W. Neil; Poutanen, Juri; Magdziarz, Pawel; Gierlinski, Marek

    1997-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of X-ray/gamma ray spectra of radio quiet Seyfert galaxies and Galactic black hole candidates are reviewed. The spectra from these objects share the following characteristics: an underlying power law with a high energy cutoff above 200 keV; a Compton reflection component with a Fe K alpha line, and a low energy absorption by intervening cold matter. The X-ray energy spectral index, alpha, is typically in the range between 0.8 and 1 in Seyfert spectra, and that of the hard state spectra of the black hole candidates Cygnus X-1 and GX 339-4 is typically between 0.6 and 0.8. The Compton reflection component corresponds with cold matter covering a solid angle of between 0.8pi and 2pi as seen from the X-ray source. The broadband spectra of both classes of sources are well fitted by Compton upscattering of soft photons in thermal plasma. The fits yield a thermal plasma temperature of 100 keV and the Thomson optical depth of 1. All the spectra presented are cut off before the electron rest energy 511 keV, indicating that electron/positron pair production is an important process.

  15. Early Radio and X-Ray Observations of the Youngest Nearby Type Ia Supernova PTF 11kly (SN 2011fe)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, S. R.; Fox, Derek B.; Carpenter, John; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Quimby, Robert; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cenko, S. Bradley; deBruyn, A. G.; Kamble, Atish; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; vanderHorst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter E.; Gehrels, Neil; Law, Nicolas M.; Poznanski, Dovi; Shara, Michael

    2012-01-01

    On August 24 (UT) the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) discovered PTF11kly (SN 2011fe), the youngest and most nearby type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. We followed this event up in the radio (centimeter and millimeter bands) and X-ray bands, starting about a day after the estimated explosion time. We present our analysis of the radio and X-ray observations, yielding the tightest constraints yet placed on the pre-explosion mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of this supernova. We find a robust limit of M(raised dot) less than or equal to 10(exp -8) (w /100 kilometers per second ) solar mass yr(exp -1) from sensitive X-ray non-detections, as well as a similar limit from radio data, which depends, however, on assumptions about microphysical parameters. We discuss our results in the context of single-degenerate models for SNe Ia and find that our observations modestly disfavor symbiotic progenitor models involving a red giant donor, but cannot constrain systems accreting from main sequence or sub-giant stars, including the popular supersoft channel. In view of the proximity of PTF11kly and the sensitivity of our prompt observations we would have to wait for a long time (decade or longer) in order to more meaningfully probe the circumstellar matter of Ia supernovae.

  16. Modeling X-Ray Binary Evolution in Normal Galaxies: Insights from SINGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Fragos, T.; Tremmel, M.; Jenkins, L.; Zezas, A.; Lehmer, B. D.; Hornschemeier, A.; Kalogera, V.; Ptak, A; Basu-Zych, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present the largest-scale comparison to date between observed extragalactic X-ray binary (XRB) populations and theoretical models of their production. We construct observational X-ray luminosity functions (oXLFs) using Chandra observations of 12 late-type galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey (SINGS). For each galaxy, we obtain theoretical XLFs (tXLFs) by combining XRB synthetic models, constructed with the population synthesis code StarTrack, with observational star formation histories (SFHs). We identify highest-likelihood models both for individual galaxies and globally, averaged over the full galaxy sample. Individual tXLFs successfully reproduce about half of oXLFs, but for some galaxies we are unable to find underlying source populations, indicating that galaxy SFHs and metallicities are not well matched and/or XRB modeling requires calibration on larger observational samples. Given these limitations, we find that best models are consistent with a product of common envelope ejection efficiency and central donor concentration approx.. = 0.1, and a 50% uniform - 50% "twins" initial mass-ratio distribution. We present and discuss constituent subpopulations of tXLFs according to donor, accretor and stellar population characteristics. The galaxy-wide X-ray luminosity due to low-mass and high-mass XRBs, estimated via our best global model tXLF, follows the general trend expected from the L(sub X) - star formation rate and L(sub X) - stellar mass relations of Lehmer et al. Our best models are also in agreement with modeling of the evolution both of XRBs over cosmic time and of the galaxy X-ray luminosity with redshift.

  17. MODELING X-RAY BINARY EVOLUTION IN NORMAL GALAXIES: INSIGHTS FROM SINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanavaris, P.; Jenkins, L.; Lehmer, B. D.; Hornschemeier, A.; Ptak, A.; Basu-Zych, A. R.; Tremmel, M.; Kalogera, V.

    2013-09-10

    We present the largest-scale comparison to date between observed extragalactic X-ray binary (XRB) populations and theoretical models of their production. We construct observational X-ray luminosity functions (oXLFs) using Chandra observations of 12 late-type galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey. For each galaxy, we obtain theoretical XLFs (tXLFs) by combining XRB synthetic models, constructed with the population synthesis code StarTrack, with observational star formation histories (SFHs). We identify highest-likelihood models both for individual galaxies and globally, averaged over the full galaxy sample. Individual tXLFs successfully reproduce about half of the oXLFs, but for some galaxies we are unable to find underlying source populations, indicating that galaxy SFHs and metallicities are not well matched and/or that XRB modeling requires calibration on larger observational samples. Given these limitations, we find that the best models are consistent with a product of common envelope ejection efficiency and central donor concentration {approx_equal} 0.1, and a 50% uniform-50% ''twins'' initial mass-ratio distribution. We present and discuss constituent subpopulations of tXLFs according to donor, accretor, and stellar population characteristics. The galaxy-wide X-ray luminosity due to low-mass and high-mass XRBs, estimated via our best global model tXLF, follows the general trend expected from the L{sub X} -star formation rate and L{sub X} -stellar mass relations of Lehmer et al. Our best models are also in agreement with modeling of the evolution of both XRBs over cosmic time and of the galaxy X-ray luminosity with redshift.

  18. A CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATION OF THE BINARY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J1023+0038

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Archibald, Anne M.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Lorimer, Duncan; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Ransom, Scott M.; Stairs, Ingrid H.

    2011-12-01

    We present a Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S variability, spectroscopy, and imaging study of the peculiar binary containing the millisecond pulsar J1023+0038. The X-ray emission from the system exhibits highly significant (12.5{sigma}) large-amplitude (factor of two to three) orbital variability over the five consecutive orbits covered by the observation, with a pronounced decline in the flux at all energies at superior conjunction. This can be naturally explained by a partial geometric occultation by the secondary star of an X-ray-emitting intrabinary shock, produced by the interaction of outflows from the two stars. The depth and duration of the eclipse imply that the intrabinary shock is localized near or at the surface of the companion star and close to the inner Lagrangian point. The energetics of the shock favor a magnetically dominated pulsar wind that is focused into the orbital plane, requiring close alignment of the pulsar spin and orbital angular momentum axes. The X-ray spectrum consists of a dominant non-thermal component and at least one thermal component, likely originating from the heated pulsar polar caps, although a portion of this emission may be from an optically thin 'corona'. We find no evidence for extended emission due to a pulsar wind nebula or bow shock down to a limiting luminosity of L{sub X} {approx}< 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg s{sup -1} (0.3-8 keV), {approx}< 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} of the pulsar spin-down luminosity, for a distance of 1.3 kpc and an assumed power-law spectrum with photon index {Gamma} = 1.5.

  19. Probing X-ray burst - accretion disk interaction in low mass X-ray binaries through kilohertz quasiperiodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peille, P.; Olive, J.-F.; Barret, D.

    2014-07-01

    The intense radiation flux of Type I X-ray bursts is expected to interact with the accretion flow around neutron stars. High frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (kHz QPOs), observed at frequencies matching orbital frequencies at tens of gravitational radii, offer a unique probe of the innermost disk regions. In this paper, we follow the lower kHz QPOs, in response to Type I X-ray bursts, in two prototypical QPO sources, namely 4U 1636-536 and 4U 1608-522, as observed by the Proportional Counter Array of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We have selected a sample of 15 bursts for which the kHz QPO frequency can be tracked on timescales commensurable with the burst durations (tens of seconds). We find evidence that the QPOs are affected for over ~200 s during one exceptionally long burst and ~100 s during two others (although at a less significant level), while the burst emission has already decayed to a level that would enable the pre-burst QPO to be detected. On the other hand, for most of our burst-kHz QPO sample, we show that the QPO is detected as soon as the statistics allow and in the best cases, we are able to set an upper limit of ~20 s on the recovery time of the QPO. This diversity of behavior cannot be related to differences in burst peak luminosity. We discuss these results in the framework of recent findings that accretion onto the neutron star may be enhanced during Type I X-ray bursts. The subsequent disk depletion could explain the disappearance of the QPO for ~100 s, as possibly observed in two events. However, alternative scenarios would have to be invoked for explaining the short recovery timescales inferred from most bursts. Heating of the innermost disk regions would be a possibility, although we cannot exclude that the burst does not affect the QPO emission at all. Clearly the combination of fast timing and spectral information of Type I X-ray bursts holds great potential in the study of the dynamics of the inner accretion flow around neutron

  20. The Origin of Warped, Precessing Accretion Disks in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1997-01-01

    The radiation-driven warping instability discovered by Pringle holds considerable promise as the mechanism responsible for producing warped, precessing accretion disks in X-ray binaries. This instability is an inherently global mode of the disk, thereby avoiding the difficulties with earlier models for the precession. Here we follow up on earlier work to study the linear behavior of the instability in the specific context of a binary system. We treat the influence of the companion as an orbit-averaged quadrupole torque on the disk. The presence of this external torque allows the existence of solutions in which the direction of precession of the warp is retrograde with respect to disk rotation, in addition to the prograde solutions that exist in the absence of external torques.

  1. Modelling the `outliers' track of the radio-X-ray correlation in X-ray binaries based on a disc-corona model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chang-Yin; Wu, Qingwen; Wang, Ding-Xiong

    2014-05-01

    A universal radio-X-ray correlation (F_R∝ F_Xb, b ˜ 0.5-0.7) has been found for a sample of black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) in their low/hard states. This can roughly be explained by a coupled model of a jet and radiatively inefficient advection-dominated accretion flow. However, more and more `outliers' have been found in the last few years, which evidently deviate from the universal radio-X-ray correlation and usually show a much steeper correlation with an index of ˜1.4. Based on simple physical assumptions, it is speculated that radiatively efficient accretion flows occur in these outliers. In this work, we test this hypothesis by modelling the outliers track based on the radiatively efficient disc-corona model and the hybrid jet model. We find that our model predicts a steeper radio-X-ray correlation, with slopes ≳ 1.2 for typical viscosity values of α ˜ 0.05-0.2. In particular, the slope is ˜1.4 for the case α ˜ 0.1, which is consistent with observational results for H1743-322. Our results suggest that the outliers track might be regulated by the disc-corona model.

  2. High-resolution x-ray imaging of a globular cluster core: compact binaries in 47Tuc.

    PubMed

    Grindlay, J E; Heinke, C; Edmonds, P D; Murray, S S

    2001-06-22

    We have obtained high-resolution (approximately 1") deep x-ray images of the globular cluster 47Tucanae (NGC 104) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study the population of compact binaries in the high stellar density core. A 70-kilosecond exposure of the cluster reveals a centrally concentrated population of faint (Lx approximately 10(30-33) ergs per second) x-ray sources, with at least 108 located within the central 2' x 2.5' and greater, similar half with Lx approximately 10(30.5) ergs per second. All 15 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) recently located precisely by radio observations are identified, though 2 are unresolved by Chandra. The x-ray spectral and temporal characteristics, as well as initial optical identifications with the Hubble Space Telescope, suggest that greater, similar50 percent are MSPs, about 30 percent are accreting white dwarfs, about 15 percent are main-sequence binaries in flare outbursts, and only two to three are quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries containing neutron stars, the conventional progenitors of MSPs. An upper limit of about 470 times the mass of the sun is derived for the mass of an accreting central black hole in the cluster. These observations provide the first x-ray "color-magnitude" diagram for a globular cluster and census of its compact object and binary population. PMID:11358997

  3. MAXI/GSC detection of a possible X-ray flare from an dMe binary system YY Gem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Kanetou, S.; Tsuboi, Y.; Sasaki, R.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Nakahira, S.; Kimura, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Serino, M.; Shidatsu, M.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Arimoto, M.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Ono, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Ohtsuki, H.; Tsunemi, H.; Imatani, R.; Negoro, H.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, K.; Masumitsu, T.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Yamauchi, M.; Itoh, D.; Yamaoka, K.; Morii, M.

    2015-09-01

    MAXI/GSC observed a possible X-ray flare from a dMe binary system YY Gem. The MAXI/GSC nova alert system triggered on the flare-like event from the position consistent with the active binary system YY Gem during a scan transit at 01:29:00 UT on September 24th 2015.

  4. A High-Precision, Optical Polarimeter to Measure Inclinations of High Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Matthews, K.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2007-12-01

    While most astrophysical objects require many parameters in order to be fully described, black holes are unique in that only three parameters are required: mass, spin, and charge. Of these, mass and spin are enough to describe the black hole's gravitational field and event horizon location. Therefore, theory and observation may jointly pursue one or two quantities to uncover the progenitor star's history. Constraints on black hole mass exist for high mass X-ray binaries, such as Cygnus X-1, which is thought to consist of a 40 ± 10 solar mass O9.7Iab star and a 13.5-29 solar mass black hole (Ziolkowski 2005). While the constraints on the mass of the compact object are tight enough to declare that it is a black hole, they are sufficiently loose as to prohibit precise modeling of the progenitor star's mass. We have built an optical polarimeter for the Hale 5-m telescope at Mt. Palomar to provide an independent method for determining black hole mass. Degree of polarization will vary for an edge-on system, while position angle of net polarization will vary for a face-on system. Therefore, by monitoring the linear polarimetric variability of the binary, inclination can be estimated. Coupled with the known mass function of the binary from radial velocity work (Gies et al. 2003), inclination estimates constrain the mass of the black hole. Our polarimeter, POLISH (POLarimeter for Inclination Studies of High mass x-ray binaries), has achieved linear polarimetric precision of less than 10 parts per million on bright, unpolarized standard stars. We will also present results for polarized standard stars and Cygnus X-1 itself. This instrument has been funded by an endowment from the Moore Foundation.

  5. Attempt to explain black hole spin in X-ray binaries by new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2015-01-01

    It is widely believed that the spin of black holes in X-ray binaries is mainly natal. A significant spin-up from accretion is not possible. If the secondary has a low mass, the black hole spin cannot change too much even if the black hole swallows the whole stellar companion. If the secondary has a high mass, its lifetime is too short to transfer the necessary amount of matter and spin the black hole up. However, while black holes formed from the collapse of a massive star with solar metallicity are expected to have low birth spin, current spin measurements show that some black holes in X-ray binaries are rotating very rapidly. Here we show that, if these objects are not the Kerr black holes of general relativity, the accretion of a small amount of matter (2 ) can make them look like very fast-rotating Kerr black holes. Such a possibility is not in contradiction with any observation and it can explain current spin measurements in a very simple way.

  6. Timing the Beast: A Spectro-Timing Approach to Understanding X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Victoria; Pottschmidt, Katja; Böck, Moritz; Schmid, Christian; Uttley, Phil; Tomsick, John; Rodriguez, Jerome; Hell, Natalie; Markowitz, Alex; Bodaghee, Arash; Cadolle Bel, Marion; Rothschild, Richard E.; Wilms, Joern

    2014-08-01

    Neither spectral nor timing studies alone allow us to disentangle the complex interplay of accretion and ejection processes. In this talk, I will show how combining both methods allows for an (almost) model-independent description of X-ray binary behavior across different accretion and ejection regimes and gives clues as to the contributions of accretion disk, disk winds, jets and Comptonization corona to the X-ray spectrum. A better grasp of the long-term evolution is also crucial for the interpretation of individual high resolution observations, e.g., by Chandra.As an example, we use over 12 years of RXTE monitoring of the black hole Cygnus X-1 to build up a template of spectro-timing behavior which enables an easy comparison among accreting sources acting on different mass and time scales. In particular, we can avoid misidentification of power spectral components in other black hole binaries that are less well sampled and therefore do not allow tracking of power spectral components across spectral states. Important is also the comparison with AGN, where many of the relevant variability time scales that shape the interaction of the supermassive black hole with its surroundings are not accessible during an astronomer's lifetime.

  7. AN ULTRACOMPACT X-RAY BINARY IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 1851

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, D. R.; Knigge, C.; Maccarone, T. J.; Dieball, A.; Long, K. S.

    2009-07-10

    We present far-ultraviolet photometry obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0513-40 in the globular cluster NGC 1851. Our observations reveal a clear, roughly sinusoidal periodic signal with P {approx_equal} 17 minutes and amplitude 3%-10%. The signal appears fully coherent and can be modeled as a simple reprocessing effect associated with the changing projected area presented by the irradiated face of a white dwarf donor star in the system. All of these properties suggest that the signal we have detected is orbital in nature, thus confirming 4U 0513-40 as an ultracompact X-ray binary (UCXB). All four confirmed UCXBs in globular clusters have orbital periods below 30 minutes, whereas almost all UCXBs in the Galactic field have orbital periods longer than this. This suggests that dynamical formation processes dominate UCXB production in clusters, producing a different orbital period distribution than observed among field UCXBs. Based on the likely system parameters, we show that 4U 0513-40 should be a strong gravitational wave source and may be detectable by Laser Interferometer Space Antenna over the course of a multiyear mission.

  8. Unsupervised spectral decomposition of X-ray binaries with application to GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koljonen, K. I. I.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we explore unsupervised spectral decomposition methods for distinguishing the effect of different spectral components for a set of consecutive spectra from an X-ray binary. We use well-established linear methods for the decomposition, namely principal component analysis, independent component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Applying these methods to a simulated data set consisting of a variable multicolour disc blackbody and a cutoff power law, we find that NMF outperforms the other two methods in distinguishing the spectral components. In addition, due the non-negative nature of NMF, the resulting components may be fitted separately, revealing the evolution of individual parameters. To test the NMF method on a real source, we analyse data from the low-mass X-ray binary GX 339-4 and found the results to match those of previous studies. In addition, we found the inner radius of the accretion disc to be located at the innermost stable circular orbit in the intermediate state right after the outburst peak. This study shows that using unsupervised spectral decomposition methods results in detecting the separate component fluxes down to low flux levels. Also, these methods provide an alternative way of detecting the spectral components without performing actual spectral fitting, which may prove to be practical when dealing with large data sets.

  9. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF 20 Be/X-RAY BINARIES IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniou, V.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Zezas, A.; Reig, P.

    2009-12-20

    We present a large sample (20 in total) of optical spectra of Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) High-Mass X-ray Binaries obtained with the 2dF spectrograph at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. All of these sources are found to be Be/X-ray binaries (Be-XRBs), while for five sources we present original classifications. Several statistical tests on this expanded sample support previous findings for similar spectral-type distributions of Be-XRBs and Be field stars in the SMC, and of Be-XRBs in the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Milky Way, although this could be the result of small samples. On the other hand, we find that Be-XRBs follow a different distribution than Be stars in the Galaxy, also in agreement with previous studies. In addition, we find similar Be spectral-type distributions between the Magellanic Clouds samples. These results reinforce the relation between the orbital period and the equivalent width of the Halpha line that holds for Be-XRBs. SMC Be stars have larger Halpha equivalent widths when compared to Be-XRBs, supporting the notion of circumstellar disk truncation by the compact object.

  10. Hot accretion flow with radiative cooling: state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mao-Chun; Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Gan, Zhaoming

    2016-06-01

    We investigate state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries through different parameters by using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulation method. For radiative cooling in hot accretion flow, we take into account the bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and synchrotron self-Comptonization self-consistently in the dynamics. Our main result is that the state transitions occur when the accretion rate reaches a critical value dot{M} ˜ 3α dot{M}_Edd, above which cold and dense clumpy/filamentary structures are formed, embedded within the hot gas. We argued this mode likely corresponds to the proposed two-phase accretion model, which may be responsible for the intermediate state of black hole X-ray binaries. When the accretion rate becomes sufficiently high, the clumpy/filamentary structures gradually merge and settle down on to the mid-plane. Eventually the accretion geometry transforms to a disc-corona configuration. In summary, our results are consistent with the truncated accretion scenario for the state transition.

  11. A search for thermal X-ray signatures in gamma-ray bursts - I. Swift bursts with optical supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starling, R. L. C.; Page, K. L.; Pe'Er, A.; Beardmore, A. P.; Osborne, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The X-ray spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can generally be described by an absorbed power law. The landmark discovery of thermal X-ray emission in addition to the power law in the unusual GRB 060218, followed by a similar discovery in GRB 100316D, showed that during the first thousand seconds after trigger the soft X-ray spectra can be complex. Both the origin and prevalence of such spectral components still evade understanding, particularly after the discovery of thermal X-ray emission in the classical GRB 090618. Possibly most importantly, these three objects are all associated with optical supernovae (SNe), begging the question of whether the thermal X-ray components could be a result of the GRB-SN connection, possibly in the shock breakout. We therefore performed a search for blackbody components in the early Swift X-ray spectra of 11 GRBs that have or may have associated optical SNe, accurately recovering the thermal components reported in the literature for GRBs 060218, 090618 and 100316D. We present the discovery of a cooling blackbody in GRB 101219B/SN2010ma, and in four further GRB-SNe we find an improvement in the fit with a blackbody which we deem possible blackbody candidates due to case-specific caveats. All the possible new blackbody components we report lie at the high end of the luminosity and radius distribution. GRB 101219B appears to bridge the gap between the low-luminosity and the classical GRB-SNe with thermal emission, and following the blackbody evolution we derive an expansion velocity for this source of the order of 0.4c. We discuss potential origins for the thermal X-ray emission in our sample, including a cocoon model which we find can accommodate the more extreme physical parameters implied by many of our model fits.

  12. Discovery of X-Ray Emission from the Galactic Supernova Remnant G32.8-0.1 with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, Aya; Terada, Yukikatsu; Hewitt, John; Petre, Robert; Angelini, Lorella; Safi-Harb, Samar; Zhou, Ping; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Sawada, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    We present the first dedicated X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) G32.8-0.1 (Kes 78) with Suzaku. X-ray emission from the whole SNR shell has been detected for the first time. The X-ray morphology is well correlated with the emission from the radio shell, while anti-correlated with the molecular cloud found in the SNR field. The X-ray spectrum shows not only conventional low-temperature (kT ˜ 0.6 keV) thermal emission in a non-equilibrium ionization state, but also a very high-temperature (kT ˜ 3.4 keV) component with a very low ionization timescale (˜2.7 × 109 cm-3 s), or a hard nonthermal component with a photon index Γ ˜ 2.3. The average density of the low-temperature plasma is rather low, of the order of 10-3-10-2 cm-3, implying that this SNR is expanding into a low-density cavity. We discuss the X-ray emission of the SNR, also detected in TeV with H.E.S.S., together with multi-wavelength studies of the remnant and other gamma-ray emitting SNRs, such as W28 and RCW 86. Analysis of a time-variable source, 2XMM J185114.3-000004, found in the northern part of the SNR, is also reported for the first time. Rapid time variability and a heavily absorbed hard-X-ray spectrum suggest that this source could be a new supergiant fast X-ray transient.

  13. X Persei: The X-Ray Halo and Spectrum of a High-Latitude X-Ray Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Smith, Randall

    2004-01-01

    The observations were completed on February 25,2003. Although the source was in the FOV for 31.4 ksec, only 18.2 ksec of data were usable due to a strong flare in the first part of the observations. We have extracted the X-ray halo from the good portion of the data, and were then faced with the problem of calibrating the far-off-axis point spread function, which is needed only for X-ray halo analysis; the same problem affected Chandra halo observations. We used data from 3C273, MCG 6-30-15, LMC X-1, and Her X-1 to measure the PSF, and found that it is reasonably well fit with a power law of the form PSF(theta) = A theta^-G, where A = 0.0034 arcmin^-2, and G = 3.05 for energies between 1-4 keV. This suggests there are fewer large dust grains along the When fitting the spectrum of X Persei, we found NH = 3e21 cm^-2, as expected. However, the X-ray halo (using a Mathis, Rumpl, Nordsieck 1977 dust model) required at most a column density of 1.4+/-0.1 e21 cm^-2; other models required sightline to X Per than would have been expected. In addition, a smoothly distributed dust model fit the observations better than a single cloud model, also against our expectations. We are in the process of writing a paper to be submitted to ApJ with these results, and will also present them at the 2004 HEAD meeting in New Orleans.

  14. Current and Prospective Constraints on Cosmic Acceleration using X-ray Galaxy Clusters and Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapetti, David A.; Allen, S. W.; Amin, M. A.; Blandford, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    We employ both a standard dynamical approach and a new kinematical approach to constrain cosmic acceleration using the three best available sets of redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements. The standard `dynamical' analysis employs the Friedmann equations and models dark energy as a fluid with an equation of state parameter, w. From a purely kinematical point of view, however, we can also construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q_0 and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). A convenient feature of this parameterization is that all LambdaCDM models have j(t)=1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the LambdaCDM paradigm. We obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk j(t)=j, we measure q_0=-0.81+-0.14 and j=2.16+0.81-0.75. For a dynamical model with constant w we measure Omega_m=0.306+0.042-0.040 and w=-1.15+0.14-0.18. Both kinematical and dynamical results are consistent with LambdaCDM at the 1sigma level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. We argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible. Finally, we discuss the potential for future experiments including Constellation-X, which will constrain dark energy with comparable accuracy and in a beautifully complementary manner to the best other techniques available circa 2018.

  15. MS 1603.6 + 2600, an unusual X-ray selected binary system at high Galactic latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Simon L.; Liebert, James; Stocke, John T.; Gioia, Isabella M.; Schild, Rudy E.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of an eclipsing binary system at Galactic latitude 47 deg, found as a serendipitous X-ray source in the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey, is described. The object has X-ray flux 1.1 x 10 to the -12th ergs/sq cm s (0.3-3.5 keV) and mean magnitude R = 19.4. An orbital period of 111 minutes is found. The problem discussed is whether the system has a white dwarf or neutron star primary, in the end preferring the neutron star primary model. If the system has either optical or X-ray luminosities typical of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB), it must be at a very large distance (30-80 kpc). Blueshifted He I absorption is seen, indicating cool outflowing material, similar to that seen in the LMXB AC 211 in the globular cluster M15.

  16. The Chandra ACIS Survey of M33: X-ray, Optical, and Radio Properties of the Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Becker, Robert H.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Helfand, David J.; Hughes, John P.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Kuntz, Kip D.; McNeil, Emily K.; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Saul, Destry; Tüllmann, Ralph; Williams, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    M33 contains a large number of emission nebulae identified as supernova remnants (SNRs) based on the high [S II]:Hα ratios characteristic of shocked gas. Using Chandra data from the ChASeM33 survey with a 0.35-2 keV sensitivity of ~2 × 1034 erg s-1, we have detected 82 of 137 SNR candidates, yielding confirmation of (or at least strongly support for) their SNR identifications. This provides the largest sample of remnants detected at optical and X-ray wavelengths in any galaxy, including the Milky Way. A spectral analysis of the seven X-ray brightest SNRs reveals that two, G98-31 and G98-35, have spectra that appear to indicate enrichment by ejecta from core-collapse supernova explosions. In general, the X-ray-detected SNRs have soft X-ray spectra compared to the vast majority of sources detected along the line of sight to M33. It is unlikely that there are any other undiscovered thermally dominated X-ray SNRs with luminosities in excess of ~4 × 1035 erg s-1 in the portions of M33 covered by the ChASeM33 survey. We have used a combination of new and archival optical and radio observations to attempt to better understand why some objects are detected as X-ray sources and others are not. We have also developed a morphological classification scheme for the optically identified SNRs and discussed the efficacy of this scheme as a predictor of X-ray detectability. Finally, we have compared the SNRs found in M33 to those that have been observed in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. There are no close analogs of Cas A, Kepler's SNR, Tycho's SNR, or the Crab Nebula in the regions of M33 surveyed, but we have found an X-ray source with a power-law spectrum coincident with a small-diameter radio source that may be the first pulsar-wind nebula recognized in M33.

  17. Infrared and X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Kes 75 Supernova Remnant Shell: Characterizing the Dust and Gas Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli

    2011-01-01

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of approximately 1.5 keY, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keY. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked supernova (SN) ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from SN ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and IR emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of approximately 140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma that also gives rise to the hot X-my emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-my emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 x 10(exp -2) x solar mass, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide

  18. Tidal capture formation of low-mass X-ray binaries from wide binaries in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaely, Erez; Perets, Hagai B.

    2016-06-01

    We present a dynamical formation scenario for low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in the field, focusing on black hole (BH) LMXBs. In this formation channel, LMXBs are formed from wide binaries (>1000 au) with a BH component and a stellar companion. The wide binary is perturbed by fly-bys of field stars, its orbit random walks, until driven into a sufficiently eccentric orbit such that the binary components tidally interact and the binary evolves to become a short period binary, which eventually evolves into an LMXB. We consider several models for the formation and survival of such wide binaries, and calculate the LMXB formation rates for each model. We find that models where BHs form through direct collapse with no/little natal kicks can give rise to high formation rates comparable with those inferred from observations. This formation scenario had several observational signatures: (1) the number density of LMXBs generally follows the background stellar density, beside the densest regions, where the dependence is stronger, (2) the mass function of the BH stellar companion should be comparable to the mass function of the background stellar population, likely peaking at 0.4-0.6 M⊙, and (3) the LMXBs orbit should not correlate with the spin of the BH. These aspects generally differ from the expectations from previously suggested LMXB formation models following common envelope binary stellar evolution. We note that neutron star LMXBs can similarly form from wide binaries, but their formation rate through this channel is likely significantly smaller due to their much higher natal kicks.

  19. X-ray decay lines from heavy nuclei in supernova remnants as a probe of the r-process origin and the birth periods of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, Justin L.; Metzger, Brian D.; Arcones, Almudena; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    The origin of rapid neutron capture (r-process) nuclei remains one of the longest standing mysteries in nuclear astrophysics. Core collapse supernovae (SNe) and neutron star binary mergers are likely r-process sites, but little evidence yet exists for their in situ formation in such environments. Motivated by the advent of sensitive new or planned X-ray telescopes such as the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), we revisit the prospects for the detection of X-ray decay lines from r-process nuclei in young or nearby supernova remnants. For all remnants planned to be observed by NuSTAR (and several others), we conclude that r-process nuclei are detectable only if the remnant possesses a large overabundance O ≳ 10^3 relative to the average yield per SN. Prospects are better for the next Galactic SN (assumed age of 3 yr and distance of 10 kpc), for which an average r-process yield is detectable via the 10.7 (9.2) keV line complexes of 194Os by LOFT at 6σ (5σ) confidence; the 27.3 keV line complex of 125Sb is detectable by NuSTAR at 2σ for O ≳ 2. We also consider X-rays lines from the remnants of Galactic magnetars, motivated by the much higher r-process yields of the magnetorotationally driven SNe predicted to birth magnetars. The ˜3.6-3.9 keV lines of 126Sn are potentially detectable in the remnants of the magnetars 1E1547.0-5408 and 1E2259+586 by LOFT for an assumed r-process yield predicted by recent simulations. The (non-)detection of these lines can thus probe whether magnetars are indeed born with millisecond periods. Finally, we consider a blind survey of the Galactic plane with LOFT for r-process lines from the most recent binary neutron star merger remnant, concluding that a detection is unlikely without additional information on the merger location.

  20. M33 X-7: ChASeM33 Reveals the First Eclipsing Black Hole X-Ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, W.; Haberl, F.; Sasaki, M.; Gaetz, T. J.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Ghavamian, P.; Long, K. S.; Pannuti, T. G.

    2006-07-01

    The first observations conducted as part of the Chandra ACIS survey of M33 (ChASeM33) sampled the eclipsing X-ray binary M33 X-7 over a large part of the 3.45 day orbital period and have resolved eclipse ingress and egress for the first time. The occurrence of the X-ray eclipse allows us to determine an improved ephemeris of mid-eclipse and binary period as HJD (2,453,639.119+/-0.005)+/-N(3.453014+/-0.000020) and constrain the eclipse half-angle to 26.5d+/-1.1d. There are indications for a shortening of the orbital period. The X-ray spectrum is best described by a disk blackbody spectrum typical for black hole X-ray binaries in the Galaxy. We find a flat power density spectrum, and no significant regular pulsations were found in the frequency range of 10-4 to 0.15 Hz. HST WFPC2 images resolve the optical counterpart, which can be identified as an O6 III star with the help of extinction and color corrections derived from the X-ray absorption. Based on the optical light curve, the mass of the compact object in the system most likely exceeds 9 Msolar. This mass, the shape of the X-ray spectrum, and the short-term X-ray time variability identify M33 X-7 as the first eclipsing black hole high-mass X-ray binary.

  1. Reverse and forward shock X-ray emission in an evolutionary model of supernova remnants undergoing efficient diffusive shock acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Slane, Patrick O.; Ellison, Donald C.; Nagataki, Shigehiro E-mail: shiu-hang.lee@riken.jp E-mail: slane@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: don_ellison@ncsu.edu

    2014-08-20

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) that include the efficient production of cosmic rays (CR) via nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization, hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles that the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line emission from young SNRs is a powerful tool for determining specific SN elemental contributions and for providing critical information that helps to understand the type and energetics of the explosion, the composition of the ambient medium in which the SN exploded, and the ionization and dynamics of the hot plasma in the shocked SN ejecta and interstellar medium. With the approaching launch of the next-generation X-ray satellite Astro-H, observations of spectral lines with unprecedented high resolution will become a reality. Our self-consistent calculations of the X-ray spectra from various progenitors will help interpret future observations of SNRs.

  2. X-Ray Spectra of the High-mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1700-37 Using BeppoSAX, Suzaku, and RXTE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    We present an X-ray spectral analysis of the high-mass binary 4U 1700-37 during its hard-soft state evolution. We use BeppoSAX, Suzaku, and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations for this investigation. We argue that the X-ray broadband spectra during all of the spectral states can be adequately reproduced by a model consisting of a low-temperature blackbody component, two Comptonized components which are both due to the presence of a Compton cloud (CC) that up-scatters seed photons of Ts1 ≲ 1.4 keV and Ts2 < 1 keV, and an iron-line component. Using this model, we find that the photon power-law index is almost constant, Γ1 ∼ 2 for all spectral states. However, Γ2 shows behavior that is dependent on the spectral state. Namely, Γ2 is quasi-constant at the level of Γ2 ∼ 2 while the CC plasma temperature {{kT}}e(2) is less than 40 keV; on the other hand, Γ2 is in the range of 1.3 < Γ2 < 2 when {{kT}}e(2) is greater than 40 keV. We explain this quasi-stability of Γ during most of the hard-soft transitions of 4U 1700-37 in the framework of a model in which the resulting spectrum is described by two Comptonized components. We find that these Comptonized spectral components of the high-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1700-37 are similar to those previously found in neutron star (NS) sources. This index dependence versus both the mass accretion rate and kTe revealed in 4U 1700-37 is universal observational evidence for the presence of an NS in 4U 1700-37.

  3. A model of the spectra and high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-07-01

    High-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) in black hole X-ray binaries have frequencies comparable to the orbital frequency at the innermost stable circular orbit, and therefore may encode information about strong field general relativity. However, the origin of the oscillations and the associated X-ray spectra remain uncertain. I will discuss a new model for these spectra, which also acts to filter coherent QPOs from local accretion disk oscillations. This model explains many puzzling aspects of HFQPOs, makes predictions which are testable with archival and future X-ray data, and can in principle be used as a new method to measure black hole spin.

  4. Inner Accretion Disk Regions of Black Hole X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg

    2015-01-01

    The innermost regions of accretion disks in black hole X-ray binaries dominate the observed X-ray emission, which is the main diagnostic that one uses to gain insights into the physics of black holes and accretion. The standard spectrum predicted from a geometrically thin, optically thick disk experiences non-trivial modification due to conspiring physical effects operating within the vertical disk structure such as Comptonization, free-free emission/absorption, bound-free opacities, and energy dissipation by magnetic processes. The complicated interplay of these effects cause the seed accretion disk spectrum to become hardened and it is this hardened emergent spectrum that we observe. To zeroth order, this hardening can be described by a phenomenological parameter called the spectral hardening factor.In practice, the adopted degree of spectral hardening is confined to lie within a rather restrictive range. I will discuss the following consequences of relaxing this criterion, while still requiring the spectral hardening factor to take on physically plausible values. Examining multiple state transitions of the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4 with archival data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, I will show that appealing to a spectral hardening factor that varies during state transitions provides a viable alternative to a truncated disk model for the evolution of the inner accretion disk. Having demonstrated that moderate degrees of accretion disk spectral hardening cannot be ruled out by observations, I will explore this possibility from a theoretical standpoint. Extending previous work on radiative transfer modeling coupled to the vertical disk structure, I present the impacts on the emergent accretion disk spectrum caused by disk inclination and by allowing accretion power to be dissipated in the corona. Using magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a localized patch of the accretion disk (i.e., shearing box) performed with the Athena code, I will present the

  5. Measuring the Spins of Stellar-Mass Holes in X-ray Binaries, Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, Jeffrey

    Relativity theory firmly predicts that an astronomical black hole is the result of the complete gravitational collapse of tens, millions or billions of solar masses of matter to a point, a conclusion that is beyond comprehension. In our Milky Way, there are an estimated 100 million ``stellar" black holes, the collapsed remnants of giant burned-out stars. The masses of 23 of these black holes, with typical masses of 10 suns, have been measured, most of them by our team during the past 25 years. These black holes are closely orbited by a normal star that trickles gas into an X-ray-hot disk of matter that encircles the black hole. During these past five years, we have succeeded in measuring the spins (or rate of rotation) of six of these same black holes. This is of fundamental importance for two reasons. First, a black hole is *totally* described by just the two numbers that specify its mass and its spin. Second, this complete description allows one to build full models of relativistic jets, supernovae, gamma-ray burst sources, etc. Our method for measuring spin is based on Einstein's prediction that their exists a smallest radius for a particle orbiting a black hole, inside of which the particle suddenly plunges into the hole. As a consequence, the inner edge of the disk of gas that encircles the black hole is truncated at this minimum radius, which depends only on the spin and the known mass of the black hole. We determine the inner radius of this disk and thereby the spin by fitting the continuous X-ray spectrum recorded by an X-ray detector to a model of the black-hole's disk that includes all relativistic effects. We propose to double our sample of black holes with measured spins from six to twelve while continuing to improve the quality of all of our spin estimates. The bulk of the requested funding will provide continued support for a postdoctoral student who leads our X-ray data analysis effort. Our work represents a new and vital use of NASA's vast HEASARC

  6. Non-thermal X-rays and interstellar gas toward the γ-ray supernova remnant RX J1713.7–3946: evidence for X-ray enhancement around CO and H I clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, H.; Torii, K.; Fukuda, T.; Yoshiike, S.; Sato, J.; Horachi, H.; Kuwahara, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Inutsuka, S.; Kawamura, A.; Tachihara, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Inoue, T.; Yamazaki, R.; Mizuno, A.; and others

    2013-11-20

    RX J1713.7–3946 is the most remarkable very high energy γ-ray supernova remnant that emits synchrotron X-rays without thermal features. We made a comparative study of CO, H I, and X-rays in order to better understand the relationship between the X-rays, and the molecular and atomic gas. The results indicate that the X-rays are enhanced around the CO and H I clumps on a pc scale, but are decreased inside the clumps on a 0.1 pc scale. Magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of the shock interaction with molecular and atomic gas indicate that the interaction between the shock waves and the clumps excite turbulence, which amplifies the magnetic field around the clumps. We suggest that the amplified magnetic field around the CO and H I clumps enhances the synchrotron X-rays and possibly the acceleration of cosmic-ray electrons.

  7. Cosmic Evolution of X-ray Binary Populations: Probes of Changing Chemistry and Aging Stellar Populations in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, Bret; Basu-Zych, Antara; Mineo, Stefano; Brandt, W. Niel; Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Fragos, Tassos; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Luo, Bin; Xue, Yongquan; Bauer, Franz E.; Gilfanov, Marat; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Ranalli, Piero; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad; Tozzi, Paolo; Trump, Jonathan; Vignali, Cristian; Wang, JunXian; Yukita, Mihoko; Zezas, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The 2-10 keV emission from normal galaxies is dominated by X-ray binary (XRB) populations. The formation of XRBs is sensitive to galaxy properties like stellar age and metallicity---properties that have evolved significantly in the broader galaxy population throughout cosmic history. The 6 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) allows us to study how XRB emission has evolved over a significant fraction of cosmic history (since z ~ 4), without significant contamination from AGN. Using constraints from the CDF-S, I will show that the X-ray emission from normal galaxies from z = 0-7 depends not only on star-formation rate (SFR), but also on stellar mass (M) and redshift. Our analysis shows the that low-mass X-ray binary emission scales with stellar mass and evolves as LX(LMXB)/M ~ (1+z)^3, and high-mass X-ray binaries scale with SFR and evolve as LX(HMXB)/SFR ~ (1+z), consistent with predictions from population synthesis models, which attribute the increase in LMXB and HMXB scaling relations with redshift as being due to declining host galaxy stellar ages and metallicities, respectively. These findings have important implications for the X-ray emission from young, low-metallicity galaxies at high redshift, which are likely to be more X-ray luminous per SFR and play a significant role in the heating of the intergalactic medium.

  8. The Discovery of a Second Luminous Low Mass X-Ray Binary System in the Globular Cluster M15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Angelini, Lorella

    2001-01-01

    Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory we have discovered a second bright X-ray source in the globular cluster M15 that is 2.7" to the west of AC211, the previously known low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) in this system. Prior to the 0.5" imaging capability of Chandra this second source could not have been resolved from AC211. The luminosity and spectrum of this new source, which we call M15-X2, are consistent with it also being a LMXB system. This is the first time that two LMXBs have been seen to be simultaneously active in a globular cluster. The new source, M15-X2, is coincident with a 18th U magnitude very blue star. The discovery of a second LMXB in M15 clears up a long standing puzzle where the X-ray and optical properties of AC211 appear consistent with the central source being hidden behind an accretion disk corona, and yet also showed a luminous X-ray burst suggesting the neutron star is directly visible. This discovery suggests instead that the X-ray burst did not come from AC211, but rather from the newly discovered X-ray source. We discuss the implications of this discovery for X-ray observations of globular clusters in nearby galaxies.

  9. Physical Identification of Binary System of Gliclazide-Hydrophilic Polymers Using X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmawati, H.; Yatinasari, Faizatun, Syarie, S. A.

    2008-03-01

    The formation of binary system in pharmaceutical solid state is aimed to improve the physicochemical characteristics of active compound, such as its solubility. To identify the physical change of the binary system including crystallinity or particle morphology, there are many methods can be applied. In present report, we study the physical interaction of the binary system of gliclazide and hydrophilic polymers. In this binary system, gliclazide was either dispersed or mixed with polyvinyl pirrolidone (PVP K30) or polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000). The dispersion system of gliclazide in the polymeric carriers was prepared by solvation-evaporation method, using dichloromethane/methylene chloride as an organic solvent. The physical characterization of both dispersed and mixed of gliclazide was studied using X-ray diffraction at interval 6-50 °/2θ. As a comparison, the same procedure was performed for pure gliclazide. To confirm the diffractogram of this binary system, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was carried out as well. Both diffarctogram and FT-IR spectra revealed that there was no new compound formed in the solid dispersion system of gliclazide:PEG 6000 and gliclazide:PVP K30. In contrast, the solubility as well as the dissolution rate of gliclazide in the presence of both hydrophilic polymers was increased as compared to pure gliclazide. We conclude therefore that solvatation followed by evaporation of gliclazide in the presence of either PEG 6000 or PVP K30 did not alter its crystalline characteristic. The improved of gliclazide solubility in the binary system might due to other mechanism such as increased in the wettability and the hydrophylicity effect of the polymers.

  10. Hard-X-ray emission lines from the decay of 44Ti in the remnant of supernova 1987A.

    PubMed

    Grebenev, S A; Lutovinov, A A; Tsygankov, S S; Winkler, C

    2012-10-18

    It is assumed that the radioactive decay of (44)Ti powers the infrared, optical and ultraviolet emission of supernova remnants after the complete decay of (56)Co and (57)Co (the isotopes that dominated the energy balance during the first three to four years after the explosion) until the beginning of active interaction of the ejecta with the surrounding matter. Simulations show that the initial mass of (44)Ti synthesized in core-collapse supernovae is (0.02-2.5) × 10(-4) solar masses (M circled dot). Hard X-rays and γ-rays from the decay of this (44)Ti have been unambiguously observed from Cassiopeia A only, leading to the suggestion that values of the initial mass of (44)Ti near the upper bound of the predictions occur only in exceptional cases. For the remnant of supernova 1987A, an upper limit to the initial mass of (44)Ti of <10(-3) M circled dot has been obtained from direct X-ray observations, and an estimate of (1-2) × 10(-4) M circled dot has been made from infrared light curves and ultraviolet spectra by complex and model-dependent computations. Here we report observations of hard X-rays from the remnant of supernova 1987A in the narrow band containing two direct-escape lines of (44)Ti at 67.9 and 78.4 keV. The measured line fluxes imply that this decay provided sufficient energy to power the remnant at late times. We estimate that the initial mass of (44)Ti was (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10(-4), which is near the upper bound of theoretical predictions. PMID:23075986

  11. X-ray Properties of Supernova Remnants in Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Kuntz, K. D.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2016-04-01

    More extragalactic SNRs have been detected in X-rays in nearby galaxies than in the Milky Way. Most of the X-ray detected SNRs were first identified optically, and then detected as soft X-ray sources in deep imaging observations with Chandra and in some cases XMM. Here, we discuss the large X-ray samples of SNRs in M33, M51, M83, and M101, with the goal of understanding which SNRs are detected in X-rays and which are not. Not surprisingly perhaps, most of the SNRs in these galaxies are middle-aged ones very few analogs of Cas A, the Crab or other young objects have been found. Trends of X-ray luminosity with diameter are absent, probably because the total amount of swept up material is the dominant factor in determining the X-ray luminosity of a SNR at a particular time. SNRs expanding into high density media evolve rapidly and have X-ray luminosities that peak at small diameters, whereas those expanding into lower density media evolve more slowly and have luminosities that peak later.

  12. Population synthesis of classical low-mass X-ray binaries in the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haaften, L. M.; Nelemans, G.; Voss, R.; van der Sluys, M. V.; Toonen, S.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We model the present-day population of classical low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with neutron star accretors, which have hydrogen-rich donor stars. Their population is compared with that of hydrogen-deficient LMXBs, known as ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs). We model the observable LMXB population and compare it to observations. We model the Galactic Bulge because it contains a well-observed population and it is the target of the Galactic Bulge Survey. Methods: We combine the binary population synthesis code SeBa with detailed LMXB evolutionary tracks to model the size and properties of the present-day LMXB population in the Galactic Bulge. Whether sources are persistent or transient, and what their instantaneous X-ray luminosities are, is predicted using the thermal-viscous disk instability model. Results: We find a population of ~2.1 × 103 LMXBs with neutron star accretors. Of these about 15-40 are expected to be persistent (depending on model assumptions), with luminosities higher than 1035 erg s-1. About 7-20 transient sources are expected to be in outburst at any given time. Within a factor of two these numbers are consistent with the observed population of bright LMXBs in the Bulge. This gives credence to our prediction of the existence of a population of ~1.6 × 103 LMXBs with low donor masses that have gone through the period minimum, and have present-day mass transfer rates below 10-11 M⊙ yr-1. Conclusions: Even though the observed population of hydrogen-rich LMXBs in the Bulge is larger than the observed population of (hydrogen-deficient) UCXBs, the latter have a higher formation rate. While UCXBs may dominate the total LMXB population at the present time, the majority would be very faint or may have become detached and produced millisecond radio pulsars. In that case UCXBs would contribute significantly more to the formation of millisecond radio pulsars than hydrogen-rich LMXBs.

  13. X-Ray Observations of Type Ia Supernovae with Swift: Evidence of Circumstellar Interaction for SN 2005ke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immler, S.; Brown, P. J.; Milne, P.; The, L.-S.; Petre, R.; Gehrels, N.; Burrows, D. N.; Nousek, J. A.; Williams, C. L.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P. A.; Nomoto, K.; Chevalier, R. A.; Mangano, V.; Holland, S. T.; Roming, P. W. A.; Greiner, J.; Pooley, D.

    2006-09-01

    We present a study of the early (days to weeks) X-ray and UV properties of eight Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that have been extensively observed with the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board Swift, ranging from 5 to 132 days after the outburst. SN 2005ke is tentatively detected (at a 3-3.6 σ level of significance) in X-rays based on deep monitoring with the XRT ranging from 8 to 120 days after the outburst. The inferred X-ray luminosity [L0.3-2=(2+/-1)×1038 ergs s-1 0.3-2 keV band] is likely caused by interaction of the SN shock with circumstellar material (CSM) deposited by a stellar wind from the progenitor's companion star with a mass-loss rate of M˙~3×10-6 Msolar yr-1 (vw/10 km s-1). Evidence of CSM interaction in X-rays is independently confirmed by an excess of UV emission, as observed with the UVOT on board Swift, starting around 35 days after the explosion. The nondetection of SN 2005ke with Chandra 105 days after the outburst implies a rate of decline steeper than LX~t-0.75, consistent with the decline expected from the interaction of the SN shock with a spherically symmetric CSM (t-1). None of the other seven SNe Ia is detected in X-rays or shows a UV excess, which allows us to put tight constraints on the mass-loss rates of the progenitor systems.

  14. Discovery of a 105-ms X-ray Pulsar in Kesteven-79: On the Nature of Compact Central Objects in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Seward, F. D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of 105-ms X-ray pulsations from the compact central object (CCO) in the supernova remnant \\snr\\ using data acquired with the {\\it Newton X-Ray Multi-Mirror Mission). Using two observations of the pulsar taken 6-days apart we derive an upper limit on its spin-down rate of $\\dot P < 9 \\times 10"{-14}$-s-${-l)$,a nd find no evidence for binary orbital motion. The implied energy loss rate is $\\dot E < 3 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-s$A{-1)$, polar magnetic field strength is $B-{\\rm p) < 3 \\times 10A{12)$-G, and spin-down age is $\\tau > 18.5$-kyr. The latter exceeds the remnant's estimated age, suggesting that the pulsar was born spinning near its current period. The X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ is best characterized as a blackbody of temperature $kT {BB) =, 0.43\\pm0.02$ keV, radius $R-{BB) \\approx 1.3$-km, and $I{\\rm bol) = 5.2 \\times 10A{33)$ ergs-sSA{-1)$ at $d = 7.1$-kpc. The sinusoidal light curve is modulated with a pulsed fraction of $>45\\%$, suggestive of a small hot spot on the surface of the rotating neutron star. The lack of a discernible pulsar wind nebula is consistent with an interpretation of \\psr\\ as a rotation-powered pulsar whose spin-down luminosity falls below the empirical threshold for generating bright wind nebulae, $\\dot E-{\\rm c) = 4 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-sSA{-I)$. The age discrepancy suggests that its $\\dot E$ has always been below $\\dot E c$, perhaps a distinguishing property of the CCOs. Alternatively, the X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ suggests a low-luminosity AXP, but the weak inferred $B-{\\rm p)$ field is incompatible with a magnetar theory of its X-ray luminosity. The ordinary spin parameters discovered from \\psr\\ highlight the inability of existing theories to explain the high luminosities and temperatures of CCO thermal X-ray spectra.

  15. EARLY RADIO AND X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNGEST NEARBY TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PTF 11kly (SN 2011fe)

    SciTech Connect

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, S. R.; Carpenter, John; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Fox, Derek B.; Quimby, Robert; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cenko, S. Bradley; De Bruyn, A. G.; Kamble, Atish; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter E.; Gehrels, Neil; and others

    2012-02-10

    On 2011 August 24 (UT) the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) discovered PTF11kly (SN 2011fe), the youngest and most nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. We followed this event up in the radio (centimeter and millimeter bands) and X-ray bands, starting about a day after the estimated explosion time. We present our analysis of the radio and X-ray observations, yielding the tightest constraints yet placed on the pre-explosion mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of this supernova. We find a robust limit of M-dot {approx}<10{sup -8}(w/100 km s{sup -1}) M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} from sensitive X-ray non-detections, as well as a similar limit from radio data, which depends, however, on assumptions about microphysical parameters. We discuss our results in the context of single-degenerate models for SNe Ia and find that our observations modestly disfavor symbiotic progenitor models involving a red giant donor, but cannot constrain systems accreting from main-sequence or sub-giant stars, including the popular supersoft channel. In view of the proximity of PTF11kly and the sensitivity of our prompt observations, we would have to wait for a long time (a decade or longer) in order to more meaningfully probe the circumstellar matter of SNe Ia.

  16. Early Radio and X-Ray Observations of the Youngest nearby Type Ia Supernova PTF 11kly (SN 2011fe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, S. R.; Fox, Derek B.; Carpenter, John; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Quimby, Robert; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cenko, S. Bradley; de Bruyn, A. G.; Kamble, Atish; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter E.; Gehrels, Neil; Law, Nicholas M.; Poznanski, Dovi; Shara, Michael

    2012-02-01

    On 2011 August 24 (UT) the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) discovered PTF11kly (SN 2011fe), the youngest and most nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. We followed this event up in the radio (centimeter and millimeter bands) and X-ray bands, starting about a day after the estimated explosion time. We present our analysis of the radio and X-ray observations, yielding the tightest constraints yet placed on the pre-explosion mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of this supernova. We find a robust limit of \\dot{M}\\lesssim 10^{-8}(w/100\\,km\\,s^{-1})\\,M_{\\odot }\\,yr^{-1} from sensitive X-ray non-detections, as well as a similar limit from radio data, which depends, however, on assumptions about microphysical parameters. We discuss our results in the context of single-degenerate models for SNe Ia and find that our observations modestly disfavor symbiotic progenitor models involving a red giant donor, but cannot constrain systems accreting from main-sequence or sub-giant stars, including the popular supersoft channel. In view of the proximity of PTF11kly and the sensitivity of our prompt observations, we would have to wait for a long time (a decade or longer) in order to more meaningfully probe the circumstellar matter of SNe Ia.

  17. A study of coronal X-ray emission from short-period Algol binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, K. P.; Drake, S. A.; White, N. E.

    1995-01-01

    A study of X-ray emission from five short-period Algol-type binaries based on observations with Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) and ROSAT is presented. We have observed RZ Cas with both satellites, and beta Per, U Cep, delta Lib, and TW Dra with ROSAT. Significant intensity variations are seen in the X-ray emission from RZ Cas, U Cep, TW Dra, and delta Lib. These variations seem unrelated to the eclipsing behavior of these systems and are probably due to either rotational modulation of compact active regions on the surfaces of the chromospherically active secondary components or to flaring activity in the systems. The spectra of all but one of the systems require the presence of at least two discrete plasma components with different temperatures (0.6 - 0.7 keV, and approximately 2 keV) and the abundances of the medium-Z elements 20% - 50% of the solar photospheric values. The high resolving power and signal-to-noise ratio of the ASCA spectra allow us to individually constrain the coronal abundances of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe in RZ Cas. We demonstrate that, if we use the elemental abundances and temperatures obtained from the analysis of their ASCA spectra as (fixed) inputs, to fit the ROSAT PSPC spectra well requires the presence of a third component (kT approximately 0.2 - 0.3 keV) in RZ Cas and beta Per. A continuous emission measure model of the power-law type (EM(T) variesas (T/T(sub max)(sup alpha)) generally gives a poor fit to the ASCA and ROSAT data on most sources. Circumstellar or circumbinary absorbing matter seems to be present in some of these systems, as indicated by the variable total column density needed to fit their X-ray spectra.

  18. RXJ0440.9+4431: a Persistent Be-x-ray Binary in Outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrigno, C.; Farinelli, R.; Bozzo, E.; Pottschmidt, K.; Klochkov, D.; Kretschmar, P.

    2013-01-01

    The persistent Be/X-ray binary RXJ0440.9+4431 flared in 2010 and 2011 and has been followed by various X-ray facilities (Swift, RXTE, XMM-Newton, and INTEGRAL).We studied the source timing and spectral properties as a function of its X-ray luminosity to investigate the transition from normal to flaring activity and the dynamical properties of the system. We have determined the orbital period from the long-term Swift/BAT light curve, but our determinations of the spin-period are not precise enough to constrain any orbital solution. The source spectrum can always be described by a bulk-motion Comptonization model of black body seed photons attenuated by a moderate photoelectric absorption. At the highest luminosity, we measured a curvature of the spectrum, which we attribute to a significant contribution of the radiation pressure in the accretion process. This allows us to estimate that the transition from a bulk-motion-dominated flow to a radiatively dominated one happens at a luminosity of approx 2 × 10(exp 36) erg/ s. The luminosity dependency of the size of the black body emission region is found to be r(sub BB) varies as L(sub x) (exp 0.39 +/- 0.02). This suggests that either matter accreting onto the neutron star hosted in RXJ0440.9+4431 penetrates through closed magnetic field lines at the border of the compact object magnetosphere or that the structure of the Neutron star magnetic field is more complicated than a simple dipole close to the surface.

  19. Formation, disruption and energy output of Population III X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Taeho; Tanaka, Takamitsu L.; Perna, Rosalba

    2016-02-01

    The first astrophysical objects shaped the cosmic environment by reionizing and heating the intergalactic medium (IGM). Particularly, X-rays are very efficient at heating the IGM before reionization is complete. High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in early stellar populations are prime candidates for driving the thermal evolution of the IGM at redshifts z ≳ 20; however, their formation efficiency is not well understood. Using N-body simulations, we estimate the HMXB formation rate via mutual gravitational interactions of nascent, small groups of the Population III stars. We run two sets of calculations: (i) stars formed in small groups of five in nearly Keplerian initial orbits and (ii) collision of two such groups (an expected outcome of mergers of host protogalaxies). We find that HMXBs form at a rate of one per ≳ 104 M⊙ in newly born stars, and that they emit with a power of ˜1041 erg s-1 in the 2-10 keV band per star formation rate. This value is a factor of ˜102 larger than what is observed in star-forming galaxies at lower redshifts; the X-ray production from early HMXBs would have been even more copious, if they also formed in situ or via migration in protostellar discs. Combining our results with earlier studies suggests that early HMXBs were highly effective at heating the IGM and leaving a strong 21-cm signature. We discuss broader implications of our results, such as the rate of long gamma-ray bursts from Population III stars and the direct collapse channel for massive black hole formation.

  20. INTEGRAL Observations of the Be/X-ray binary EX0 2030+375 During Outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arranz, A. Camero; Wilson, C. A.; Connell, P.; Nunez, S. Martinez; Blay, P.; Beckmann, V.; Reglero, V.

    2005-01-01

    We present a type-I outburst of the high-mass X-ray binary EX0 2030+375, detected during INTEGRAL'S Performance and Verification phase in December 2002 (on-source time about 10(exp 6) seconds). In addition, six more outbursts have been observed during INTEGRAL'S Galactic Plane Scans. X-ray pulsations have been detected with a pulse period of 41.691798 plus or minus 0.000016 s. The X-ray luminosity in the 5-300 keV energy range was 9.7 x 10 (exp 36) erg per second, for a distance of 7.1 kpc. Two unusual features were found in the light curve, with an initial peak before the main outburst and another possible spike after the maximum. RXTE observations confirm only the existence of the initial spike. Although the initial peak appears to be a recurrent feature, the physical mechanisms producing it and the possible second spike are unknown. Moreover, a four-day delay between periastron passage and the peak of the outburst is observed. We present for the first time a 5-300 keV broad-band spectrum of this source. It can be modelled by the sum of a disk black body (kT(sub BB) approximately 8 keV) and either with a power law model with Gamma=2.04 plus or minus 0.11 keV or a Comptonized component (spherical geometry, kT(sub e).=30 keV, tau = 2.64, kT(sub w)=1.5 keV).

  1. Low-mass X-ray binary MAXI J1421-613 observed by MAXI GSC and Swift XRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serino, Motoko; Shidatsu, Megumi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Masaru; Negoro, Hitoshi; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Kennea, Jamie A.; Fukushima, Kosuke; Nagayama, Takahiro

    2015-04-01

    Monitor of All sky X-ray Image (MAXI) discovered a new outburst of an X-ray transient source named MAXI J1421-613. Because of the detection of three X-ray bursts from the source, it was identified as a neutron star low-mass X-ray binary. The results of data analyses of the MAXI GSC (Gas Slit Camera) and the Swift XRT (X-Ray Telescope) follow-up observations suggest that the spectral hardness remained unchanged during the first two weeks of the outburst. All the XRT spectra in the 0.5-10 keV band can be well explained by thermal Comptonization of multi-color disk blackbody emission. The photon index of the Comptonized component is ≈ 2, which is typical of low-mass X-ray binaries in the low/hard state. Since X-ray bursts have a maximum peak luminosity, it is possible to estimate the (maximum) distance from its observed peak flux. The peak flux of the second X-ray burst, which was observed by the GSC, is about 5 photons cm-2 s-1. By assuming a blackbody spectrum of 2.5 keV, the maximum distance to the source is estimated as 7 kpc. The position of this source is contained by the large error regions of two bright X-ray sources detected with Orbiting Solar Observatory-7 (OSO-7) in the 1970s. Besides this, no past activities at the XRT position are reported in the literature. If MAXI J1421-613 is the same source as (one of) these, the outburst observed with MAXI may have occurred after a quiescence of 30-40 years.

  2. Discovery of SXP 265, a Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, R.; Haberl, F.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Bartlett, E. S.; Maggi, P.; Rau, A.; Greiner, J.; Udalski, A.

    2014-11-01

    We identify a new candidate for a Be/X-ray binary in the XMM-Newton slew survey and archival Swift observations that is located in the transition region of the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud and the Magellanic Bridge. We investigated and classified this source with follow-up XMM-Newton and optical observations. We model the X-ray spectra and search for periodicities and variability in the X-ray observations and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment I-band light curve. The optical counterpart has been classified spectroscopically, with data obtained at the South African Astronomical Observatory 1.9 m telescope, and photometrically, with data obtained using the Gamma-ray Burst Optical Near-ir Detector at the MPG 2.2 m telescope. The X-ray spectrum is typical of a high-mass X-ray binary with an accreting neutron star. We detect X-ray pulsations, which reveal a neutron-star spin period of Ps = (264.516 ± 0.014) s. The source likely shows a persistent X-ray luminosity of a few 1035 erg s-1 and in addition type-I outbursts that indicate an orbital period of ˜146 d. A periodicity of 0.867 d, found in the optical light curve, can be explained by non-radial pulsations of the Be star. We identify the optical counterpart and classify it as a B1-2II-IVe star. This confirms SXP 265 as a new Be/X-ray binary pulsar originating in the tidal structure between the Magellanic Clouds.

  3. THE AGES OF HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES IN NGC 2403 AND NGC 300

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Binder, Breanna A.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Eracleous, Michael; Dolphin, Andrew E-mail: bbinder@astro.washington.edu E-mail: mce@astro.psu.edu

    2013-07-20

    We have examined resolved stellar photometry from HST imaging surrounding 18 high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) candidates in NGC 300 and NGC 2403 as determined from combined Chandra/HST analysis. We have fit the color-magnitude distribution of the surrounding stars with stellar evolution models. All but one region in NGC 300 and two in NGC 2403 contain a population with an age between 20 and 70 Myr. One of the candidates is the ultraluminous X-ray source in NGC 2403, which we associate with a 60 {+-} 5 Myr old population. These age distributions provide additional evidence that 16 of these 18 candidates are HMXBs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the most common HMXB age in these galaxies is 40-55 Myr. This preferred age is similar to observations of HMXBs in the Small Magellanic Cloud, providing new evidence of this formation timescale, but in higher metallicity populations. We suggest that this preferred HMXB age is the result of the fortuitous combination of two physical effects. First, this is the age of a population when the greatest rate of core-collapse events should be occurring, maximizing neutron star production. Second, this is the age when B stars are most likely to be actively losing mass. We also discuss our results in the context of HMXB feedback in galaxies, confirming HMXBs as a potentially important source of energy for the interstellar medium in low-mass galaxies.

  4. THE EFFECT OF STARBURST METALLICITY ON BRIGHT X-RAY BINARY FORMATION PATHWAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, T.; Kalogera, V.; Sepinsky, J. F.; Prestwich, A.; Zezas, A.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2010-12-20

    We investigate the characteristics of young (<20 Myr) and bright (L{sub X} > 1 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and find the population to be strongly metallicity dependent. We separate the model populations among two distinct formation pathways: (1) systems undergoing active Roche lobe overflow (RLO) and (2) wind accretion systems with donors in the (super)giant stage, which we find to dominate the HMXB population. We find metallicity to primarily affect the number of systems which move through each formation pathway, rather than the observable parameters of systems which move through each individual pathway. We discuss the most important model parameters affecting the HMXB population at both low and high metallicities. Using these results, we show that (1) the population of ultra-luminous X-ray sources can be consistently described by very bright HMXBs which undergo stable RLO with mild super-Eddington accretion and (2) the HMXB population of the bright starburst galaxy NGC 1569 is likely dominated by one extremely metal-poor starburst cluster.

  5. The nature of very faint X-ray binaries: hints from light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinke, C. O.; Bahramian, A.; Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.

    2015-03-01

    Very faint X-ray binaries (VFXBs), defined as having peak luminosities LX of 1034-1036 erg s-1, have been uncovered in significant numbers, but remain poorly understood. We analyse three published outburst light curves of two transient VFXBs using the exponential and linear decay formalism of King & Ritter. The decay time-scales and brink luminosities suggest orbital periods of order 1 h. We review various estimates of VFXB properties, and compare these with suggested explanations of the nature of VFXBs. We suggest that: (1) VFXB outbursts showing linear decays might be explained as partial drainings of the disc of `normal' X-ray transients, and many VFXB outbursts may belong to this category; (2) VFXB outbursts showing exponential decays are best explained by old, short-period systems involving mass transfer from a low-mass white dwarf or brown dwarf; (3) persistent (or quasi-persistent) VFXBs, which maintain an LX of 1034-1035 erg s-1 for years, may be explained by magnetospheric choking of the accretion flow in a propeller effect, permitting a small portion of the flow to accrete on to the neutron star's surface. We thus predict that (quasi-) persistent VFXBs may also be transitional millisecond pulsars, turning on as millisecond radio pulsars when their LX drops below 1032 erg s-1.

  6. Quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlione, A.; Aguilera, D. N.; Pons, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. We monitored the quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries after active periods of intense activity in X-rays (outbursts). Aims: The theoretical modeling of the thermal relaxation of the neutron star crust may be used to establish constraints on the crust composition and transport properties, depending on the astrophysical scenarios assumed. Methods: We numerically simulated the thermal evolution of the neutron star crust and compared them with inferred surface temperatures for five sources: MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260, XTE J1701-462, EXO 0748-676 and IGR J17480-2446. Results: We find that the evolution of MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260 and EXO 0748-676 can be well described within a deep crustal cooling scenario. Conversely, we find that the other two sources can only be explained with models beyond crustal cooling. For the peculiar emission of XTE J1701-462 we propose alternative scenarios such as residual accretion during quiescence, additional heat sources in the outer crust, and/or thermal isolation of the inner crust due to a buried magnetic field. We also explain the very recent reported temperature of IGR J17480-2446 with an additional heat deposition in the outer crust from shallow sources.

  7. OBSERVATIONS OF THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY A 0535+26 IN QUIESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Rothschild, Richard; Markowitz, Alex; Hemphill, Paul; Caballero, Isabel; Kuehnel, Matthias; Wilms, Joern; Fuerst, Felix; Doroshenko, Victor; Camero-Arranz, Ascension

    2013-06-10

    We have analyzed three observations of the high-mass X-ray binary A 0535+26 performed by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) three, five, and six months after the last outburst in 2011 February. We detect pulsations only in the second observation. The 3-20 keV spectra can be fit equally well with either an absorbed power law or absorbed thermal bremsstrahlung model. Reanalysis of two earlier RXTE observations made 4 yr after the 1994 outburst, original BeppoSAX observations 2 yr later, reanalysis of four EXOSAT observations made 2 yr after the last 1984 outburst, and a recent XMM-Newton observation in 2012 reveal a stacked, quiescent flux level decreasing from {approx}2 to <1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} over 6.5 yr after outburst. The detection of pulsations during half of the quiescent observations would imply that accretion onto the magnetic poles of the neutron star continues despite the fact that the circumstellar disk may no longer be present. The accretion could come from material built up at the corotation radius or from an isotropic stellar wind.

  8. Discovery of the third transient X-ray binary in the galactic globular cluster Terzan 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gladstone, Jeanette C.; Altamirano, Diego; Wijnands, Rudy; Homan, Jeroen; Linares, Manuel; Degenaar, Nathalie

    2014-01-10

    We report and study the outburst of a new transient X-ray binary (XRB) in Terzan 5, the third detected in this globular cluster, Swift J174805.3-244637 or Terzan 5 X-3. We find clear spectral hardening in Swift/XRT data during the outburst rise to the hard state, thanks to our early coverage (starting at L{sub X} ∼ 4 × 10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1}) of the outburst. This hardening appears to be due to the decline in relative strength of a soft thermal component from the surface of the neutron star (NS) during the rise. We identify a Type I X-ray burst in Swift/XRT data with a long (16 s) decay time, indicative of hydrogen burning on the surface of the NS. We use Swift/BAT, MAXI/GSC, Chandra/ACIS, and Swift/XRT data to study the spectral changes during the outburst, identifying a clear hard-to-soft state transition. We use a Chandra/ACIS observation during outburst to identify the transient's position. Seven archival Chandra/ACIS observations show evidence for variations in Terzan 5 X-3's nonthermal component but not the thermal component during quiescence. The inferred long-term time-averaged mass accretion rate, from the quiescent thermal luminosity, suggests that if this outburst is typical and only slow cooling processes are active in the NS core, such outbursts should recur every ∼10 yr.

  9. Inhomogeneous accretion discs and the soft states of black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-10-01

    Observations of black hole binaries (BHBs) have established a rich phenomenology of X-ray states. The soft states range from the low variability, accretion disc dominated thermal (TD) state to the higher variability, non-thermal steep power law (SPL) state. The disc component in all states is typically modelled with standard thin disc accretion theory. However, this theory is inconsistent with optical/UV spectral, variability and gravitational microlensing observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the supermassive analogues of BHBs. An inhomogeneous disc (ID) model with large (≃0.4 dex) temperature fluctuations in each radial annulus can qualitatively explain all of these AGN observations. The inhomogeneity may be a consequence of instabilities in radiation-dominated discs, and therefore may be present in BHBs as well. We show that ID models can explain many features of the TD and SPL states of BHBs. The observed relationships between spectral hardness, disc fraction and rms variability amplitude in BHBs are reproduced with temperature fluctuations similar to those inferred in AGNs, suggesting a unified picture of luminous accretion discs across orders of magnitude in black hole mass. This picture can be tested with spectral fitting of ID models, X-ray polarization observations and radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations. If BHB accretion discs are indeed inhomogeneous, only the most disc-dominated states (disc fraction ≳0.95) can be used to robustly infer black hole spin using current continuum fitting methods.

  10. Radiation-hydrodynamic Model of High-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čechura, J.; Hadrava, P.

    2014-10-01

    The topic of circumstellar matter in the X-ray binaries and its spectroscopic diagnostics is addressed by method of generating synthetic Dopplerograms for direct comparison with observations. The presented results were obtained using our improved three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic model of the stellar wind in HMXBs. We use the model to simulate dynamics, anisotropy and other characteristics of the wind, e.g. the density distribution and ionization structure. We adopt parameters of Cygnus X-1 in our simulations and use the Doppler tomography to probe the structure of radiation-emitting material in the system. We introduce a data interpretation method of observed Doppler tomograms via direct comparison with synthetic Dopplerograms obtained from our model. We test the reliability of the model as well as set constrains on various physical parameters and processes, e.g. the accretion rate. We take into account the Coriolis force, the ionization structure of the medium, the gravity darkening, and we investigate the effects these phenomena have on the accretion process. E.g. the Coriolis force substantially influences the mass-loss of the donor and by that the accretion rate of the compact companion. Additionally, focusing of the stellar wind by the gravitational field of the compact companion leads to the formation of an unstable gaseous tail behind the companion. This tail shows signs of quasi-periodic oscillations and its existence presents us with other means to explain the switching mechanism among the various X-ray states.

  11. WISE detection of the galactic low-mass X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2014-06-20

    We report on the results from our search for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) detection of the Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Among 187 binaries cataloged in Liu et al., we find 13 counterparts and 2 candidate counterparts. For the 13 counterparts, 2 (4U 0614+091 and GX 339–4) have already been confirmed by previous studies to have a jet and 1 (GRS 1915+105) to have a candidate circumbinary disk, from which the detected infrared emission arose. Having collected the broadband optical and near-infrared data in the literature and constructed flux density spectra for the other 10 binaries, we identify that 3 (A0620–00, XTE J1118+480, and GX 1+4) are candidate circumbinary disk systems, 4 (Cen X-4, 4U 1700+24, 3A 1954+319, and Cyg X-2) had thermal emission from their companion stars, and 3 (Sco X-1, Her X-1, and Swift J1753.5–0127) are peculiar systems with the origin of their infrared emission rather uncertain. We discuss the results and WISE counterparts' brightness distribution among the known LMXBs, and suggest that more than half of the LMXBs would have a jet, a circumbinary disk, or both.

  12. ON THE RARITY OF X-RAY BINARIES WITH NAKED HELIUM DONORS

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, T.; Valsecchi, F.; Kalogera, V.

    2012-04-01

    The paucity of known high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) with naked He donor stars (hereafter He star) in the Galaxy has been noted over the years as a surprising fact, given the significant number of Galactic HMXBs containing H-rich donors, which are expected to be their progenitors. This contrast has further sharpened in light of recent observations uncovering a preponderance of HMXBs hosting loosely bound Be donors orbiting neutron stars (NSs), which would be expected to naturally evolve into He-HMXBs through dynamical mass transfer onto the NS and a common-envelope (CE) phase. Hence, reconciling the large population of Be-HMXBs with the observation of only one He-HMXB can help constrain the dynamics of CE physics. Here, we use detailed stellar structure and evolution models and show that binary mergers of HMXBs during CE events must be common in order to resolve the tension between these observed populations. We find that, quantitatively, this scenario remains consistent with the typically adopted energy parameterization of CE evolution, yielding expected populations which are not at odds with current observations. However, future observations which better constrain the underlying population of loosely bound O/B-NS binaries are likely to place significant constraints on the efficiency of CE ejection.

  13. WISE Detection of the Galactic Low-mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2014-06-01

    We report on the results from our search for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) detection of the Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Among 187 binaries cataloged in Liu et al., we find 13 counterparts and 2 candidate counterparts. For the 13 counterparts, 2 (4U 0614+091 and GX 339-4) have already been confirmed by previous studies to have a jet and 1 (GRS 1915+105) to have a candidate circumbinary disk, from which the detected infrared emission arose. Having collected the broadband optical and near-infrared data in the literature and constructed flux density spectra for the other 10 binaries, we identify that 3 (A0620-00, XTE J1118+480, and GX 1+4) are candidate circumbinary disk systems, 4 (Cen X-4, 4U 1700+24, 3A 1954+319, and Cyg X-2) had thermal emission from their companion stars, and 3 (Sco X-1, Her X-1, and Swift J1753.5-0127) are peculiar systems with the origin of their infrared emission rather uncertain. We discuss the results and WISE counterparts' brightness distribution among the known LMXBs, and suggest that more than half of the LMXBs would have a jet, a circumbinary disk, or both.

  14. RXTE Observations of the Neutron Star Low-Mass X-Ray Binary GX 17+2: Correlated X-Ray Spectral and Timing Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Jeroen; van der Klis, Michiel; Jonker, Peter G.; Wijnands, Rudy; Kuulkers, Erik; Méndez, Mariano; Lewin, Walter H. G.

    2002-04-01

    We have analyzed ~600 ks of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and Z source GX 17+2. A study was performed of the properties of the noise components and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) as a function of the broadband spectral properties, with the main goal to study the relation between the frequencies of the horizontal branch (HBO) and upper kHz QPOs. It was found that when the upper kHz QPO frequency is below 1030 Hz these frequencies correlate, whereas above 1030 Hz they anticorrelate. GX 17+2 is the first source in which this is observed. We also found that the frequency difference of the high-frequency QPOs was not constant and that the quality factors (Q-values) of the HBO, its second harmonic, and the kHz QPOs are similar and vary almost hand in hand by a factor of more than 3. Observations of the normal branch oscillations during two type I X-ray bursts showed that their absolute amplitude decreased as the flux from the neutron star became stronger. We discuss these and other findings in terms of models that have been proposed for these phenomena. We also compare the behavior of GX 17+2 and other Z sources with that of black hole sources and consider the possibility that the mass accretion rate might not be the driving force behind all spectral and variability changes.

  15. THE X-RAY QUIESCENCE OF SWIFT J195509.6+261406 (GRB 070610): AN OPTICAL BURSTING X-RAY BINARY?

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, N.; Jonker, P. G.; Nelemans, G.; Pons, J. A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Wijnands, R.

    2011-03-10

    We report on an {approx}63 ks Chandra observation of the X-ray transient Swift J195509.6+261406 discovered as the afterglow of what was first believed to be a long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB 070610). The outburst of this source was characterized by unique optical flares on timescales of second or less, morphologically similar to the short X-ray bursts usually observed from magnetars. Our Chandra observation was performed {approx}2 years after the discovery of the optical and X-ray flaring activity of this source, catching it in its quiescent state. We derive stringent upper limits on the quiescent emission of Swift J195509.6+261406, which argues against the possibility of this object being a typical magnetar. Our limits show that the most viable interpretation on the nature of this peculiar bursting source is a binary system hosting a black hole or a neutron star with a low-mass companion star (<0.12 M{sub sun}) and with an orbital period smaller than a few hours.

  16. Formation and Evolution of Galactic Intermediate/Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the formation and evolutionary sequences of Galactic intermediate- and low-mass X-ray binaries (I/LMXBs) by combining binary population synthesis (BPS) and detailed stellar evolutionary calculations. Using an updated BPS code we compute the evolution of massive binaries that leads to the formation of incipient I/LMXBs and present their distribution in the initial donor mass versus initial orbital period diagram. We then follow the evolution of the I/LMXBs until the formation of binary millisecond pulsars (BMSPs). We find that the birthrate of the I/LMXB population is in the range of 9 × 10-6-3.4 × 10-5 yr-1, compatible with that of BMSPs that are thought to descend from I/LMXBs. We show that during the evolution of I/LMXBs they are likely to be observed as relatively compact binaries with orbital periods ≲1 day and donor masses ≲0.3M⊙. The resultant BMSPs have orbital periods ranging from less than 1 day to a few hundred days. These features are consistent with observations of LMXBs and BMSPs. We also confirm the discrepancies between theoretical predictions and observations mentioned in the literature, that is, the theoretical average mass transfer rates (˜10-10 M⊙ yr-1) of LMXBs are considerably lower than observed, and the number of BMSPs with orbital periods ˜0.1-10 days is severely underestimated. These discrepancies imply that something is missing in the modeling of LMXBs, which is likely to be related to the mechanisms of the orbital angular momentum loss.

  17. THE ORIGIN OF BLACK HOLE SPIN IN GALACTIC LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fragos, T.; McClintock, J. E.

    2015-02-10

    Galactic field black hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) are believed to form in situ via the evolution of isolated binaries. In the standard formation channel, these systems survived a common envelope phase, after which the remaining helium core of the primary star and the subsequently formed BH are not expected to be highly spinning. However, the measured spins of BHs in LMXBs cover the whole range of spin parameters. We propose here that the BH spin in LMXBs is acquired through accretion onto the BH after its formation. In order to test this hypothesis, we calculated extensive grids of detailed binary mass-transfer sequences. For each sequence, we examined whether, at any point in time, the calculated binary properties are in agreement with their observationally inferred counterparts of 16 Galactic LMXBs. The ''successful'' sequences give estimates of the mass that the BH has accreted since the onset of Roche-Lobe overflow. We find that in all Galactic LMXBs with measured BH spin, the origin of the spin can be accounted for by the accreted matter, and we make predictions about the maximum BH spin in LMXBs where no measurement is yet available. Furthermore, we derive limits on the maximum spin that any BH can have depending on current properties of the binary it resides in. Finally we discuss the implication that our findings have on the BH birth-mass distribution, which is shifted by ∼1.5 M {sub ☉} toward lower masses, compared to the currently observed one.

  18. The evolution of cataclysmic and low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J.

    1984-01-01

    The observational data for the 124 cataclysmic and low-mass X-ray binaries of known orbital period are compiled. It is found that the eruption properties are very well correlated with the orbital periods, in a manner that suggests that the mass transfer is the all-important determinant of evolution and of the eruptive behavior. Transfer rates of 10 to the -11th to 10 to the -7th solar mass/year are found, which are well correlated with orbital period. It is concluded that the mechanism which drives these systems is the magnetic braking of the secondary's rotation by its own stellar wind, coupled with the enforcement of synchronous rotation by tidal friction. This permits CVs to lose sufficient angular momentum to begin mass transfer in a reasonable time and drives the mass transfer at a high rate once it begins. An account of the long-lived phases of CV evolution is given.

  19. Testing propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations model PROPFLUC on black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapisarda, S.; Ingram, A.; van der Klis, M.

    2016-05-01

    Over the past 20 years, a consistent phenomenology has been established to describe the variability properties of black hole X-ray binaries. However, the physics behind the observational data is still poorly understood. The recently proposed model PROPFLUC assumes a truncated disc/hot inner flow geometry, with mass accretion rate fluctuations propagating through a precessing inner flow. These two processes give rise respectively to broad band variability and a quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) on the precession frequency. We recently applied systematically for the first time PROPFLUC on a black hole candidate (MAXI J1543-564) in order to compare the results of phenomenological and physical modeling of the source power spectrum and to give a physical interpretation of the rising phase of the source outburst. Here we resume the results of our study on MAXI J1543-564 and we discuss future PROPFLUC implementations.

  20. Potential Optical Counterparts to High Mass X-Ray and γ-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl; McSwain, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    We seek to identify optical counterparts to several previously discovered high mass X-ray binaries and γ-ray sources from the Liu et al. and Fermi first year catalogues. Observations were taken with the CTIO 0.9-meter telescope, operated by the SMARTS Consortium. Photometric data were taken in the Strömgren b and y filters, as well as a narrow-band Hα filter. We present color-color diagrams of y-Hα vs. b-y for each field, and candidates for optical counterparts were selected based on their excesses of Hα emission. We also present spectral energy distributions for select candidates. This work is supported by the NSF REU site grant PHY-0849416, NASA DPR No. NNX09AT67G, and Lehigh University. We also thank the SMARTS Consortium, Rachael Roettenbacher, Tina Aragona, and Amber Marsh.

  1. Jets in black-hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylafis, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    Jets have been observed from both neutron-star and black-hole X-ray binaries. There are many similarities between the two and a few differences. I will offer a physical explanation of the formation and destruction of jets from compact objects and I will discuss the similarities and differences in the two types. The basic concept in the physical explanation is the Cosmic Battery, the mechanism that creates the required magnetic field for the jet ejection. The Cosmic Battery operates efficiently in accretion flows consisting of an inner hot flow and an outer thin accretion disk, independently of the nature of the compact object. It is therefore natural to always expect a jet in the right part of a spectral hardness - luminosity diagram and to never expect a jet in the left part. As a consequence, most of the phenomenology of an outburst can be explained with only one parameter, the mass accretion rate.

  2. Ultraluminous X-rays from the historical supernova 1986L: Testing stellar mass black hole scenario for the ULX origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kwan Lok

    2014-09-01

    The Type II-L SN 1986L was first discovered in X-ray through serendipitous Swift observations taken in 2005 and 2007 with a luminosity of 1.6*10^40 erg/s which is reminiscent of ULX that could either be an IMBH or a stellar mass black hole at (super-)Eddington accretion. While Type II-L SNe are suggested to explode in binary, we suspect that a stellar mass black hole remnant created by fallback forming an X-ray binary with the progenitor's companion to produce the ULX. As the positional accuracy of Swift prevents a solid identification, a deep Chandra observation is required to confirm the SN-ULX association. If confirmed, SN 1986L will be the first ULX detected in a young SNR, which favors the stellar mass black hole scenario.

  3. Testing theories for longterm accretion variability in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambier, Hal J.

    Many X-ray sources are now understood to be "black hole X-ray binaries'' in which a stellar remnant black hole either tidally "squeezes'' gas off a companion star, or pulls in some fraction the companion's wind. This gas can drain inward through a dense, thin disk characterized by thermalized radiation, or a sparse and radiatively-inefficient flow, or some combination of the two. Observations at other energies often provide crucial information, but our primary tools to study accretion, especially closest to the black hole, are X-ray spectra and their time evolution. This evolution includes numerous behaviors spanning orders of magnitude in timescale and luminosity, and also hints at spatial structure since draining is generally faster at smaller radii. This includes variability at time-scales of weeks to months which remains difficult to explain despite an abundance of possible variability mechanisms since direct simulations covering the full spatial and temporal range remain impractical. After reviewing general aspects of accretion, I present both more and less familiar forms of longterm variability. Based on these, I argue the problem involves finding a physical process (or combination) that can generate repeatable yet adjustable cycles in luminosity and evolution of low and high energy spectral components, while letting the ionization instability dominate conventional outbursts. Specific models examined include: disks embedded in, and interacting with, hot, sparse flows, and another instability that quenches viscous-draining of the disk at more fundamental level. Testing these theories, alone and in combination, motivates building a very general and simplified numerical model presented here. I find that two-phase flow models still predict excessive recondensation in LMC X-3 among other problems, while the viscosity-quenching instability may account for rapid drops and slow recoveries in disk accretion rate but also likely requires diffusivity orders of magnitude

  4. X-ray follow-ups of XSS J12270-4859: a low-mass X-ray binary with gamma-ray Fermi-LAT association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Martino, D.; Belloni, T.; Falanga, M.; Papitto, A.; Motta, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Masetti, N.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Mouchet, M.; Mukai, K.; Possenti, A.

    2013-02-01

    Context. XSS J1227.0-4859 is a peculiar, hard X-ray source recently positionally associated to the Fermi-LAT source 1FGL J1227.9-4852/2FGL J1227.7-4853. Multi-wavelength observations have added information on this source, indicating a low-luminosity low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB), but its nature is still unclear. Aims: To progress in our understanding, we present new X-ray data from a monitoring campaign performed in 2011 with the XMM-Newton, RXTE, and Swift satellites and combine them with new gamma-ray data from the Fermi and AGILE satellites. We complement the study with simultaneous near-UV photometry from XMM-Newton and with previous UV/optical and near-IR data. Methods: We analysed the temporal characteristics in the X-rays, near-UV, and gamma rays and studied the broad-band spectral energy distribution from radio to gamma rays. Results: The X-ray history of XSS J1227 over 7 yr shows a persistent and rather stable low-luminosity (6 × 1033 d1 kpc2 erg s-1) source, with flares and dips being peculiar and permanent characteristics. The associated Fermi-LAT source 2FGL J1227.7-4853 is also stable over an overlapping period of 4.7 yr. Searches for X-ray fast pulsations down to msec give upper limits to pulse fractional amplitudes of 15-25% that do not rule out a fast spinning pulsar. The combined UV/optical/near-IR spectrum reveals a hot component at ~13 kK and a cool one at ~4.6 kK. The latter would suggest a late-type K2-K5 companion star, a distance range of 1.4-3.6 kpc, and an orbital period of 7-9 h. A near-UV variability (≳6 h) also suggests a longer orbital period than previously estimated. Conclusions: The analysis shows that the X-ray and UV/optical/near-IR emissions are more compatible with an accretion-powered compact object than with a rotational powered pulsar. The X-ray to UV bolometric luminosity ratio could be consistent with a binary hosting a neutron star, but the uncertainties in the radio data may also allow an LMXB black hole with a compact

  5. Detection of a new extended soft X-ray source H1538-32 - A possible old supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riegler, G. R.; Agrawal, P. C.; Gull, S. F.

    1980-01-01

    The discovery in the Lupus region of a new, extended soft X-ray source, H1538-32, is reported, having a distance of approximately 340 pc, and a luminosity of 1 to 2 x 10 to the 34th ergs/sec. The observed energy spectrum of the source is well fitted either by a thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum with Gaunt factor but without line emission, or by a coronal plasma model which includes the X-ray emission lines of various elements and the continuum as outlined by Raymond and Smith (1977). On the basis of the extended nature of the source and its thermal spectrum, it is suggested that H1538-32 may be an old supernova remnant.

  6. A NEW X-RAY VIEW OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G272.2-3.2 AND ITS ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    McEntaffer, R. L.; Grieves, N.; DeRoo, C.; Brantseg, T.

    2013-09-10

    We present an analysis of Chandra X-Ray Observatory data detailing a Galactic supernova remnant, G272.2-3.2. A clear shell of emission is resolved as a series of filaments and knots around the entire rim of the remnant. Spectral analysis of these features show that they are consistent with shock heating of interstellar material in a clumpy medium. We contrast these X-ray images with 22 {mu}m Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to verify this interaction. Spatially separated from the shell we see a central diffuse region dominated by harder, hotter emission. Spatial spectroscopy shows a clear enhancement of metals consistent with a Type Ia explosion, namely S, Si, and Fe. We find no clear evidence for a compact object or pulsar wind nebula and argue for a Type Ia origin. Consideration of the ionization timescales suggest an age of 11,000 yr for G272.2-3.2.

  7. The soft X-ray background as a supernova blast wave viewed from inside - Solar abundance models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    A model of the soft X-ray background is presented in which the sun is assumed to be inside an active supernova blast wave. The blast wave evolves in a preexisting cavity. The broad band surface brightnesses is explained by such a blast wave with an explosion energy of E sub approximately 5 x 10 to the 50th power ergs and radius 80 to 100 pc, using solar abundances. An approach to treating the problem of large anisotropies in the ambient medium is also explored, accommodating the observed anticorrelation between the soft X-ray surface brightness and the 21 cm column density. It is found that only for post shock temperatures below 10 to the 6 power K a shock propagating into a density enhancement will be dimmer than a similar shock in a lower density region.

  8. The soft X-ray background as a supernova blast wave viewed from inside: Solar abundance models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the soft X-ray background is presented in which the Sun is assumed to be inside an active supernova blast wave. The blast wave evolves in a preexisting cavity. The broad band surface brightnesses is explained by such a blast wave with an explosion energy of E sub approx. 5 x 10 to the 50th power ergs and radius 80 to 100 pc, using solar abundances. An approach to treating the problem of large anisotropies in the ambient medium is also explored, accommodating the observed anticorrelation between the soft X-ray surface brightness and the 21 cm column density. It is found that only for post shock temperatures below 10 6 K a shock propagating into a density enhancement will be dimmer than a similar shock in a lower density region.

  9. Possible contributions of supernova remnants to the soft X-ray diffuse background (0.1 - 1keV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Burrows, D. N.; Mccammon, D.; Kraushaar, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Almost all of the B band (0.10-0.19 keV) and C band (0.15-0.28 keV) X-rays probably originate in a hot region surrounding the Sun, which Cox and Anderson modeled as a supernova remnant. This same region may account for a significant fraction of the M band (0.5-1 keV) X-rays if the nonequilibrium models of Cox and Anderson are applicable. A population of distant SNR similar to the local region, with center-to-center spacing of about 300 pc, could provide enough galactic M band emission to fill in the dip in the count rate in the galactic plane that would otherwise be present due to absorption of both the extra galactic power law flux and any large-scale-height stellar (or galactic halo) emission.

  10. A new deep, hard X-ray survey of M31: Identifying Black Holes and Neutron Stars in the X-ray Binary Population of our Nearest Neighbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Lehmer, Bret; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel; Venters, Tonia M.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Eracleous, Michael; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pooley, David A.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray binaries (XRBs) trace old and new stellar populations in galaxies, and thus star formation history and star formation rate. X-ray emission from XRBs may be responsible for significant amounts of heating of the early Intergalactic Medium (IGM) at Cosmic Dawn and may also play a significant role in reionization. Until recently, the hard emission from these populations could only be studied for XRBs in our own galaxy, where it is often difficult to measure accurate distances and thus luminosities. The launch of NuSTAR, the first focusing hard X-ray observatory, has allowed us to resolve the brightest XRBs (down to LX ~ few times 10^38 erg/s) in galaxies like NGC 253, M83, and M82 up to 4 Mpc away. To reach much lower X-ray luminosities that are more typical of XRBs in the Milky Way (Lx <~ 10^37 erg/s), we have observed M31 in 4 NuSTAR fields for more than 1 Ms total exposure, covering younger stellar population in a swath of the disk (within the footprint of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) Survey) and the older populations of the bulge. We detect 120 sources in the 4-25 keV band and over 40 hard band (12-25 keV) accreting black holes and neutron stars, distinguished by their spectral shape in this band. The luminosity function (LF) of the hard band detected sources are compared to Swift/BAT-derived LFs of the Milky Way population, which reveals an excess of luminous sources in M31 when correcting for star formation rate and stellar mass. We also discuss implications for this updated understanding of XRB populations on early-Universe measurements in, e.g., the 7 Ms Chandra Deep Field survey.

  11. Spectral and Temporal Behavior of Low Mass X-ray Binaries Observed by the Einstein SSS and MPC, and the Broad Band X-ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, D. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1992-12-01

    An extensive survey of 50 low mass X-ray binaries was carried out using the HEAO-2 Einstein Solid State Spectrometer data (0.5-4.5 keV) with the Monitor Proportional Counter data (1.2-20.0 keV) and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT) (0.5-12 keV). Spectra were selected on the basis of intensity and fit with a set of simple and complex spectral models. For all the subclasses, including Eddington-limited bulge sources, bursters, dippers, the soft spectrum black hole candidates, and a few transients in decline, the spectra could be fit acceptably with combinations of thermal bremsstrahlung and blackbody spectra or a Comptonized spectrum and a blackbody. The results rule out optically thick disk models for the bright Z sources and power law models for bursters. There is a progression of spectra as a function of X-ray luminosity for the bursters, Atoll and Z sources. Interpretation is discussed in terms of separate emission regions, one due to radial accretion onto a neutron star and the optically thick component that appears for higher luminosity due to a boundary layer or to high optical depth to scattering in the flow. A lower temperature blackbody required in some cases could be an expected contribution from the accretion disk. The soft spectrum sources are dominated by blackbody spectra, but for two, low effective area is a problem for the black hole interpretation. The strongest of previously reported low energy X-ray lines due to OVIII or Fe L transitions are confirmed. Similar line emission is seen for several other sources, in particular X0614+091. The photoionized gas in the inner part of an accretion disk corona can give Fe K lines from Fe XXV. BBXRT obtained upper limits for X0614+091 and M15 which are consistent with the coronal model.

  12. Suzaku view of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 during Type I X-ray outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra; Epili, Prahlad

    2016-04-01

    We report the timing and spectral properties of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 using two Suzaku observations during its 2010 August and 2012 January X-ray outbursts. Pulsations at ˜275 s were clearly detected in the light curves from both observations. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly energy-dependent. During the 2010 observation, the prominent dips seen in soft X-ray (≤10 keV) pulse profiles were found to be absent at higher energies. However, during the 2012 observation, the pulse profiles were complex as a result of the presence of several dips. Significant changes in the shape of the pulse profiles were detected at high energies (>35 keV). A phase shift of ˜0.3 was detected while comparing the phase of the main dip in the pulse profiles below and above ˜35 keV. The broad-band energy spectrum of the pulsar was well described by a partially absorbed negative and positive power law with exponential cut-off (NPEX) model with 6.4-keV iron line and a cyclotron absorption feature. The energy of the cyclotron absorption line was found to be ˜53 and 50 keV for the 2010 and 2012 observations, respectively, indicating a marginal positive dependence on source luminosity. Based on the results obtained from phase-resolved spectroscopy, the absorption dips in the pulse profiles can be interpreted as due to the presence of additional matter at same phases. Observed positive correlation between the cyclotron line energy and luminosity, and the significant pulse-phase variation of cyclotron parameters are discussed from the perspective of theoretical models on the cyclotron absorption line in X-ray pulsars.

  13. Contrasting Behaviour from Two Be/X-ray Binary Pulsars: Insights into Differing Neutron Star Accretion Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. J.; Drave, S. P.; Hill, A. B.; Coe, M. J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Bird, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the identification of two periodic X-ray signals coming from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). On detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the 175.4 s and 85.4 s pulsations were considered to originate from new Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) pulsars with unknown locations. Using rapid follow-up INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations, we show the first pulsar (designated SXP175) to be coincident with a candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) in the northern bar region of the SMC undergoing a small Type II outburst. The orbital period (87d) and spectral class (B0-B0.5IIIe) of this system are determined and presented here for the first time. The second pulsar is shown not to be new at all, but is consistent with being SXP91.1 - a pulsar discovered at the very beginning of the 13 year long RXTE key monitoring programme of the SMC. Whilst it is theoretically possible for accreting neutron stars to change spin period so dramatically over such a short time, the X-ray and optical data available for this source suggest this spin-up is continuous during long phases of X-ray quiescence, where accretion driven spin-up of the neutron star should be minimal.

  14. Infrared and X-Ray Evidence for Circumstellar Grain Destruction by the Blast Wave of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu; Arendt, Richard G.; Bouchet, Patrice; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Danziger, John; DeBuizer James M.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Kirshner, Robert P.; McCray, Richard; Park, Sangwok; Polomski, Elisha; Woodward, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A show that its morphology and luminosity are rapidly changing at X-ray, optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths as the blast wave from the explosion expands into the circumstellar equatorial ring, produced by mass loss from the progenitor star. The observed infrared (IR) radiation arises from the interaction of dust grains that formed in mass outflow with the soft X-ray emitting plasma component of the shocked gas. Spitzer IRS spectra at 5 - 30 microns taken on day 6190 since the explosion show that the emission arises from approx. 1.1 x 10(exp -6) solar mass of silicate grains radiating at a temperature of approx. 180+/-(15-20) K. Subsequent observations on day 7137 show that the IR flux had increased by a factor of 2 while maintaining an almost identical spectral shape. The observed IR-to-X-ray flux ratio (IRX) is consistent with that of a dusty plasma with standard LMC dust abundances. This flux ratio has decreased by a factor of approx. 2 between days 6190 and 7137, providing the first direct observation of the ongoing destruction of dust in an expanding SN blast wave on dynamic time scales. Detailed models consistent with the observed dust temperature, the ionization fluence of the soft X-ray emission component, and the evolution of IRX suggest that the radiating si1icate grains are immersed in a 3.5 x 10(exp 6) K plasma with a density of (0.3 - 1) x 10(exp 4)/cu cm, and have a size distribution that is confined to a narrow range of radii between 0.02 and 0.2 microns. Smaller grains may have been evaporated by the initial UV flash from the supernova.

  15. Timing and Spectral Studies of the Peculiar X-ray Binary Circinus X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, Pablo M.

    2003-08-26

    Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) is an X-ray binary displaying an array of phenomena which makes it unique in our Galaxy. Despite several decades of observation, controversy surrounds even the most basic facts about this system. It is generally classified as a Neutron Star (NS) Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB),though this classification is based primarily on the observation of Type I X-ray Bursts by EXOSAT in 1985. It is believed to be in a very eccentric {approx} 16.5 day orbit, displaying periodic outbursts in the radio and other frequency bands (including optical and IR) which reinforce the notion that this is in fact the orbital period. Cir X-1 lies in the plane of the Galaxy, where optical identification of the companion is made difficult due to dust obscuration. The companion is thought to be a low mass star, though a high mass companion has not currently been ruled out. In this work, the author analyzes recent observations of Cir X-1 made with the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) experiment, as well as archival observations of Cir X-1 made by a variety of instruments, from as early as 1969. The fast (< 1 s) timing properties of Cir X-1 are studied by performing FFT analyses of the USA data. Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in the 1-50 Hz range are found and discussed in the context of recent correlations which question the leading models invoked for their generation. The energy dependence of the QPOs (rms increasing with energy) argues against them being generated in the disk and favors models in which the QPOs are related to a higher energy Comptonizing component. The power spectrum of Cir X-1 in its soft state is compared to that of Cygnus X-1 (Cyg X-1), the prototypical black hole candidate. Using scaling arguments the author argues that the mass of Cir X-1 could exceed significantly the canonical 1.4 M{circle_dot} mass of a neutron star, possibly partly explaining why this object appears so different to other neutron stars. The spectral evolution of Cir X-1 is

  16. X-ray Studies of the Black Hole Binary Cygnus X-1 with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shin'ya

    2011-03-01

    In order to study X-ray properties of black hole binaries in so-called Low/Hard state, we analyzed 0.5--300 keV data of Cyg X-1, taken with the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer and the Hard X-ray Detector onboard the X-ray satellite Suzaku. The data were acquired on 25 occasions from 2005 to 2009, with a total exposure of ~450 ks. The source was in the Low/Hard state throughout, and the 0.5-300 keV luminosity changed by a factor of 4, corresponding to 2-10% of the Eddington limit for a 10 Mo black hole. Among the 25 data sets, the first one was already analyzed by Makishima et al. (2008), who successfully reproduced the wide-band spectrum by a linear combination of an emission from a standard accretion disk, soft and hard Comptonization continua, and reprocessed features. Given this, we analyzed the 25 data sets for intensity-related spectral changes, on three different time scales using different analysis methods. One is the source behavior on time scales of days to months, studied via direct comparison among the 25 spectra which are averaged over individual observations. Another is spectral changes on time scales of 1-2 seconds, revealed through ``intensity-sorted spectroscopy''. The other is spectral changes on time scales down to ~0.1 seconds, conducted using ``shot analysis" technique which was originally developed by Negoro et al. (1997) with Ginga. These studies partially incorporated spectral fitting in terms of a thermal Comptonization model. We payed great attention to instrumental problems caused by the source brightness, and occasional ``dipping" episodes which affects the Cyg X-1 spectrum at low energies. The shot analysis incorporated a small fraction of XIS data that were taken in the P-sum mode with a time resolution of 7.8 msec. Through these consistent analyses of all the 25 data sets, we found that a significant soft X-ray excess develops as the source gets brighter. Comparing results from the different time scales, the soft excess was further

  17. Radiative Signatures of Reconnection in X-ray Binary Spectral States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri

    Accreting black holes (BHs) in Galactic X-ray Binary (XRB) systems represent some of the main targets of space-based high-energy observatories such as NASA s RXTE, Chandra, and NuSTAR, as well as the international observatories XMM Newton, INTEGRAL, Suzaku (Astro-E), and Astro-H. The overall radiative energy output (mostly X-rays) is ultimately powered by the conversion of the gravitational potential energy of the matter falling onto a black hole and forming an accretion disk or a hot accretion flow around it. Observationally, these systems are found to cycle between a few discrete spectral states, characterized by different overall X-ray power and spectral hardness: (1) the bright thermal high-soft state, dominated by a soft (1 keV) thermal component attributed to a thin dense accretion disk with a relatively weak corona producing a power-law tail emission to at least 1 MeV; (2) the low-hard state, showing no signs of a thin accretion disk and dominated by a single hard (with index ~ -1.7) power law truncating at about 100 keV; and (3) the bright Steep Power Law state with both a standard thin disk and a powerful coronal power-law (with index about -2.5) emission extending to at least 1 MeV. Explaining the key features of these nonthermal spectra, i.e., their power law indices and high-energy cutoffs, is one of the outstanding problems in high-energy astrophysics. The hard (10keV 1MeV) X-ray emission in these states is believed to be produced by inverse-Compton scattering in relativistically-hot gas, presumably heated by magnetic reconnection processes, and forming either an accretion disk corona or the hot accretion flow itself. Since the radiative cooling time of the energetic electrons in the intense radiation fields found in these systems is very short, the observed non-thermal hard X-ray spectra should directly reflect the instantaneous energy spectra of the electrons accelerated in reconnection events. Recent advances in kinetic simulations of reconnection

  18. X-ray emission from the historical supernovae in the spiral galaxy NGC 6946: SN 1980K and SN 1968D recovered ?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Eric M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observation of the spiral galaxy NGC 6946 to search for x-ray emission from the six historical supernovae that have occurred in that galaxy. At the age of these supernovae, all could be emitting x rays due to circumstellar interactions. Supernova (SN) 1980K may be present based upon the hardness ratio and the coincidence of an x-ray source with the optical position. Its luminosity agrees with a recent prediction by Chevalier & Fransson. The situation for SN 1968D, apparently recovered in Very Large Array (VLA) data, is less clear due to source confusion, but suggests SN 1968D has not been recovered. Only upper limits are available for the remaining four supernovae that have occurred in this galaxy.

  19. An X-ray investigation of the unusual supernova remnant CTB 80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z. R.; Seward, F. D.

    1984-01-01

    The X-ray properties of SNR CTB 80 (G68.8 + 2.8) are discussed based on both low- and high-resolution images from the Einstein satellite. The X-ray maps show a point source coinciding with the region of maximum radio emission. Diffuse X-ray emission is evident mainly along the radio lobe extending about 8 arcmin east of the point source and aligned with the projected magnetic field lines. The observed X-ray luminosity is 3.2 x 10 to the 34th ergs/s with 1.0 x 10 to the 3th ergs/s from the point source (assuming a distance of 3 kpc). There is also faint, diffuse, X-ray emission south of the point source, where radio emission is absent. The unusual radio and X-ray morphologies are interpreted as a result of relativistic jets energized by the central object, and the possible association of CTB 80 with SN 1408 as recorded by Chinese observers is discussed.

  20. CXOGBS J173620.2-293338: A candidate symbiotic X-ray binary associated with a bulge carbon star

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, C. T.; Johnson, C. B.; Torres, M. A. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Heinke, C. O.; Maccarone, T. J.; Mikles, V. J.; Knigge, C.; Greiss, S.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a wide but shallow X-ray survey of regions above and below the Plane in the Galactic Bulge. It was performed using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's ACIS camera. The survey is primarily designed to find and classify low luminosity X-ray binaries. The combination of the X-ray depth of the survey and the accessibility of optical and infrared counterparts makes this survey ideally suited to identification of new symbiotic X-ray binaries (SyXBs) in the Bulge. We consider the specific case of the X-ray source CXOGBS J173620.2-293338. It is coincident to within 1 arcsec with a very red star, showing a carbon star spectrum and irregular variability in the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment data. We classify the star as a late C-R type carbon star based on its spectral features, photometric properties, and variability characteristics, although a low-luminosity C-N type cannot be ruled out. The brightness of the star implies it is located in the Bulge, and its photometric properties are overall consistent with the Bulge carbon star population. Given the rarity of carbon stars in the Bulge, we estimate the probability of such a close chance alignment of any GBS source with a carbon star to be ≲ 10{sup –3}, suggesting that this is likely to be a real match. If the X-ray source is indeed associated with the carbon star, then the X-ray luminosity is around 9 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}. Its characteristics are consistent with a low luminosity SyXB, or possibly a low accretion rate white dwarf symbiotic.

  1. Detection of the first infra-red quasi periodic oscillation in a black hole X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkar, M.; Casella, P.; Uttley, P.; O'Brien, K.; Russell, D.; Maccarone, T.; van der Klis, M.; Vincentelli, F.

    2016-05-01

    We present analysis of fast variability of Very Large Telescope/ISAAC (infra-red), XMM-Newton/OM (optical) and EPIC-pn (X-ray), and RXTE/PCA (X-ray) observations of the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4 in a rising hard state of its outburst in 2010. We report the first detection of a Quasi Periodic Oscillation (QPO) in the infra-red band (IR) of a black hole X-ray binary. The QPO is detected at 0.08 Hz in the IR as well as two optical bands (U and V). Interestingly, these QPOs are at half the X-ray QPO frequency at 0.16 Hz, which is classified as the type-C QPO; a weak sub-harmonic close to the IR and optical QPO frequency is also detected in X-rays. The band-limited sub-second time scale variability is strongly correlated in IR/X-ray bands, with X-rays leading the IR by over 120 ms. This short time delay, shape of the cross correlation function and spectral energy distribution strongly indicate that this band-limited variable IR emission is the synchrotron emission from the jet. A jet origin for the IR QPO is strongly favoured, but cannot be definitively established with the current data. The spectral energy distribution indicates a thermal disc origin for the bulk of the optical emission, but the origin of the optical QPO is unclear. We discuss our findings in the context of the existing models proposed to explain the origin of variability.

  2. CXOGBS J173620.2-293338: A Candidate Symbiotic X-Ray Binary Associated with a Bulge Carbon Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Torres, M. A. P.; Heinke, C. O.; Maccarone, T. J.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Knigge, C.; Greiss, S.; Jonker, P. G.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; Johnson, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a wide but shallow X-ray survey of regions above and below the Plane in the Galactic Bulge. It was performed using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's ACIS camera. The survey is primarily designed to find and classify low luminosity X-ray binaries. The combination of the X-ray depth of the survey and the accessibility of optical and infrared counterparts makes this survey ideally suited to identification of new symbiotic X-ray binaries (SyXBs) in the Bulge. We consider the specific case of the X-ray source CXOGBS J173620.2-293338. It is coincident to within 1 arcsec with a very red star, showing a carbon star spectrum and irregular variability in the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment data. We classify the star as a late C-R type carbon star based on its spectral features, photometric properties, and variability characteristics, although a low-luminosity C-N type cannot be ruled out. The brightness of the star implies it is located in the Bulge, and its photometric properties are overall consistent with the Bulge carbon star population. Given the rarity of carbon stars in the Bulge, we estimate the probability of such a close chance alignment of any GBS source with a carbon star to be <~ 10-3, suggesting that this is likely to be a real match. If the X-ray source is indeed associated with the carbon star, then the X-ray luminosity is around 9 × 1032 erg s-1. Its characteristics are consistent with a low luminosity SyXB, or possibly a low accretion rate white dwarf symbiotic.

  3. Detection of the first infra-red quasi-periodic oscillation in a black hole X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkar, M.; Casella, P.; Uttley, P.; O'Brien, K.; Russell, D.; Maccarone, T.; van der Klis, M.; Vincentelli, F.

    2016-08-01

    We present analysis of fast variability of Very Large Telescope/ISAAC (infra-red), \\textit{XMM-Newton}/OM (optical) and EPIC-pn (X-ray), and RXTE/PCA (X-ray) observations of the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4 in a rising hard state of its outburst in 2010. We report the first detection of a Quasi Periodic Oscillation (QPO) in the infra-red band (IR) of a black hole X-ray binary. The QPO is detected at 0.08 Hz in the IR as well as two optical bands (U and V). Interestingly, these QPOs are at half the X-ray QPO frequency at 0.16 Hz, which is classified as the type-C QPO; a weak sub-harmonic close to the IR and optical QPO frequency is also detected in X-rays. The broad band sub-second time scale variability is strongly correlated in IR/X-ray bands, with X-rays leading the IR by over 100 ms. This short time delay, shape of the cross correlation function and spectral energy distribution strongly indicate that this broad band variable IR emission is the synchrotron emission from the jet. A jet origin for the IR QPO is strongly favoured, but cannot be definitively established with the current data. The spectral energy distribution indicates a thermal disc origin for the bulk of the optical emission, but the origin of the optical QPO is unclear. We discuss our findings in the context of the existing models proposed to explain the origin of variability.

  4. Detection of the first infra-red quasi-periodic oscillation in a black hole X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkar, M.; Casella, P.; Uttley, P.; O'Brien, K.; Russell, D.; Maccarone, T.; van der Klis, M.; Vincentelli, F.

    2016-08-01

    We present the analysis of fast variability of Very Large Telescope/ISAAC (Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera) (infra-red), XMM-Newton/OM (optical) and EPIC-pn (X-ray), and RXTE/PCA (X-ray) observations of the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4 in a rising hard state of its outburst in 2010. We report the first detection of a quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the infra-red band (IR) of a black hole X-ray binary. The QPO is detected at 0.08 Hz in the IR as well as two optical bands (U and V). Interestingly, these QPOs are at half the X-ray QPO frequency at 0.16 Hz, which is classified as the type-C QPO; a weak sub-harmonic close to the IR and optical QPO frequency is also detected in X-rays. The band-limited sub-second time-scale variability is strongly correlated in IR/X-ray bands, with X-rays leading the IR by over 120 ms. This short time delay, shape of the cross-correlation function and spectral energy distribution strongly indicate that this band-limited variable IR emission is the synchrotron emission from the jet. A jet origin for the IR QPO is strongly favoured, but cannot be definitively established with the current data. The spectral energy distribution indicates a thermal disc origin for the bulk of the optical emission, but the origin of the optical QPO is unclear. We discuss our findings in the context of the existing models proposed to explain the origin of variability.

  5. Spectral and temporal behavior of low mass X ray binaries observed with the Einstein SSS and MPC, and the Broad Band X Ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Damian Joseph

    An extensive survey of 50 low mass X-ray binaries was carried out using the HEAO-2 Einstein Solid State Spectrometer data (0.5-4.5 keV) with the Monitor Proportional Counter data (1.2-20.0 keV). The SSS provided 160 eV resolution below 4.5 keV with about 200 sq cm of area, 100 times that of grating instruments on Einstein and EXOSAT. Additional observations were obtained with the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (0.5-12 keV). Although LMXRB are some of the most luminous X-ray sources and include one of the first X-ray sources discovered, the nature of their emission regions has remained uncertain. Spectra were selected on the basis of intensity and fit with a set of simple and complex spectral models. For all the subclasses, including Eddington-limited bulge sources, bursters, dippers, the soft spectrum black hole candidates, and a few transients in decline, the spectra could be fit acceptably with combinations of thermal bremsstrahlung and blackbody spectra or a Comptonized spectrum and a blackbody. The results rule out optically thick disk models for the bright Z sources and power law models for bursters. The results suggest a progression of spectra as a function of X-ray luminosity for the bursters, Atoll, and Z sources, in which there are separate emission regions, one optically thin to scattering. The optically thick component that appears for higher luminosity may be due to a boundary layer or to high optical depth to scattering in the flow. A lower temperature blackbody indicated in some cases could be an expected contribution from the accretion disk. The soft spectrum sources are dominated by blackbody spectra, but for two, low effective area of emission is a problem for the black hole interpretation. There did not appear to be any clear selection between models for the sources with high binary orbit inclinations. Column densities for absorption by cold gas were determined simultaneously with the fits. They give distance estimates for the galactic bulge sources

  6. Finding a 24 Day Orbital Period for the X-Ray Binary 1A 1118-616

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staubert, R.; Pottschmidt, K.; Doroshenko, V.; Wilms, J.; Suchy, S.; Rothschild, R.; Santangelo, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report the first determination of the binary period and the orbital ephemeris of the Be X-ray binary containing the pulsar IA 1118-616 (35 years after the discovery of the source). The orbital period is found to be P(sub orb) = 24.0+/-0.4 days. The source was observed by RXTE during its last big X-ray outburst in January 2009, peaking at MJD 54845.4. This outburst was sampled by taking short observations every few days, covering an elapsed time comparable to the orbital period. Using the phase connection technique, pulse arrival time delays could be measured and an orbital solution determined. The data are consistent with a circular orbit, the time of 90 degrees longitude was found to be T,/2 = MJD 54845.37(10), coincident with the peak X-ray flux.

  7. Polarization in massive X-ray binaries. I - A low-inclination model for Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, D. B.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that variable linear polarization in massive X-ray binaries is produced by electron scattering in an asymmetric stellar wind is investigated. The stellar wind is asymmetric because of the gravitational field of the secondary (X-ray source). The degree of asymmetry and the magnitude of the linear polarization are controlled by the degree to which the primary star fills its Roche lobe. For the well-observed X-ray binary Cyg X-1, the present model can produce the correct magnitude for the polarization. Provided that the inclination of the system is less than about 20 deg, the present model should also predict the correct phase dependence of the polarization. Modifications to the model are described which would enable it to apply to systems with higher inclination.

  8. The binary nature of the Galactic centre X-ray source CXOGC J174536.1-285638

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. S.; Crowther, P. A.; Mikles, V. J.

    2009-12-01

    Context: The combination of X-ray and near-IR surveys of the central 2°×0.8° of the Galactic centre have revealed a population of X-ray bright massive stars. However, the nature of the X-ray emission, originating in wind collision zones or via accretion onto compact objects, is uncertain. Aims: In order to address this we investigated the nature of one of the most luminous X-ray sources - CXOGC J174536.1-285638. Methods: This was accomplished by an analysis of the near-IR spectrum with a non-LTE model atmosphere code to determine the physical parameters of the primary. Results: This was found to be an highly luminous WN9h star, which is remarkably similar to the most massive stars found in the Arches cluster, for which comparison to evolutionary tracks suggest an age of 2-2.5 Myr and an initial mass of ~110 M⊙. The X-ray properties of CXOGC J174536.1-285638 also resemble those of 3 of the 4 X-ray detected WN9h stars within the Arches and in turn other very massive WNLh colliding wind binaries, of which WR25 forms an almost identical “twin”. Simple analytical arguments demonstrate consistency between the X-ray emission and a putative WN9h+mid O V-III binary, causing us to favour such a scenario over an accreting binary. However, we may not exclude a high mass X-ray binary interpretation, which, if correct, would provide a unique insight into the (post-SN) evolution of extremely massive stars. Irrespective of the nature of the secondary, CXOGC J174536.1-285638 adds to the growing list of known and candidate WNLh binaries. Of the subset of WNLh stars subject to a radial velocity survey, we find a lower limit to the binary fraction of ~45%; of interest for studies of massive stellar formation, given that they currently possess the highest dynamically determined masses of any type of star.

  9. Heating the intergalactic medium by X-rays from population III binaries in high-redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Ahn, Kyungjin; Wise, John H.; O'Shea, Brian W. E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu E-mail: jwise@gatech.edu

    2014-08-20

    Due to their long mean free path, X-rays are expected to have an important impact on cosmic reionization by heating and ionizing the intergalactic medium (IGM) on large scales, especially after simulations have suggested that Population III (Pop III) stars may form in pairs at redshifts as high as 20-30. We use the Pop III distribution and evolution from a self-consistent cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of the first galaxies and a simple Pop III X-ray binary model to estimate their X-ray output in a high-density region larger than 100 comoving (Mpc){sup 3}. We then combine three different methods—ray tracing, a one-zone model, and X-ray background modeling—to investigate the X-ray propagation, intensity distribution, and long-term effects on the IGM thermal and ionization state. The efficiency and morphology of photoheating and photoionization are dependent on the photon energies. The sub-kiloelectronvolt X-rays only impact the IGM near the sources, while the kiloelectronvolt photons contribute significantly to the X-ray background and heat and ionize the IGM smoothly. The X-rays just below 1 keV are most efficient in heating and ionizing the IGM. We find that the IGM might be heated to over 100 K by z = 10 and the high-density source region might reach 10{sup 4} K, limited by atomic hydrogen cooling. This may be important for predicting the 21 cm neutral hydrogen signals. On the other hand, the free electrons from X-ray ionizations are not enough to contribute significantly to the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background to the Thomson scattering.

  10. High energy neutrino absorption and its effects on stars in close X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stecker, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    The physics and astrophysics of high energy neutrino production and interactions in close X-ray binary systems are studied. These studies were stimulated by recent observations of ultrahigh energy gamma-rays and possibly other ultrahigh energy particles coming from the directions of Cygnus X-3 and other binary systems and possessing the periodicity characteristics of these systems. Systems in which a compact object, such as a neutron star, is a strong source of high energy particles which, in turn, produce photons, neutronos and other secondary particles by interactions in the atmosphere of the companion star were considered. The highest energy neutrinos are absorbed deep in the companion and the associated energy deposition may be large enough to effect its structure or lead to its ultimate disruption. This neutrino heating was evaluated, starting with a detailed numerical calculation of the hadronic cascade induced in the atmosphere of the companion star. For some theoretical models, the resulting energy deposition from neutrino absorption may be so great as to disrupt the companion star over an astronomically small timescale of the order of 10,000 years. Even if the energy deposition is smaller, it may still be high enough to alter the system substantially, perhaps leading to quenching of high energy signals from the source. Given the cosmic ray luminosities required to produce the observed gamma rays from cygnus X-3 and LMX X-4, such a situation may occur in these sources.

  11. The Galactic supersoft X-ray binary RXJ0925.7-4758 (MR Vel)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, M.; Prodhani, N.

    2016-06-01

    Close binary supersoft X-ray sources (CBSS) are believed to be an accreting white dwarf (WD) in a close binary with near-main-sequence companion, which can provide large mass accretion rates (~1×10^-7 - 6×10^-7Msol yr-1). During such high accretion rates, hydrogen shell burning consumes hydrogen at the same rate as the WD accretes. Using most recent proton capturing reaction rates and beta-decay rates the cyclic reactions have been studied. In the present work, effort has been made to explain the observed characteristics of the source RXJ0925.7-4758 considering the above mentioned model. The calculated values of Luminosity (8.56×10^37erg/sec) and Effective temperature (94.19 eV) tally well with the observed ones. The Color temperature of RXJ0925.7-4758 near the photosphere has been determined as 106 eV. Photo ionisation code CLOUDY has been used to explain the observed absorption edges in the spectrum of RXJ0925.7-4758.

  12. High Energy Observations of X-Ray Binaries and Gamma-Ray Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The report discusses the CGRO observation of X-ray binary systems and studies of gamma-ray blasars. Numerous authors have suggested mechanisms for particle acceleration within X-Ray Binary (XRB) systems. Among the acceleration mechanisms that have been applied are pulsar acceleration, shock acceleration at an accretion shock front, shock acceleration at a pulsar wind termination shock, plasma turbulence excited by the accretion flow, and a number of electrodynamic mechanisms. There are therefore many mechanisms which are capable of generating very energetic particles in the XRB environment. If the reports of TeV/PeV gamma-ray generation in XRBs are correct, then one can show that the accelerated particles must be hadrons and that the most likely gamma-ray production mechanism is the decay of collisionally-produced (or photoproduced) neutral pions. At these ultra-high energies, the emission is so strongly beamed that the target conditions are constrained by the requirement that the column depth be large enough to efficiently generate gamma-rays, but not so large that the gamma-rays are absorbed. These constraints naturally lead to models that explain the periodic, narrow duty-cycle pulses observed at TeV/PeV energies as arising from interactions with, either, the atmosphere of the binary companion, an accretion column, or an accretion disk. The production of these TeV/PeV gamma-rays by the decay of pions from "leading isobars" must also be accompanied by a more isotropic emission component in the EGRET energy band from the decay of slower pions (i.e. the "pionization" component). Since the attenuation of 35 MeV-1 GeV photons by photon-photon pair production is not likely to be significant in most XRBs, the TeV/PeV reports therefore strongly suggest sporadic emission in the EGRET energy band. One of the key unresolved issues for understanding AGN is the relationship between XBLs and RBLs.To test the "reunification" hypothesis, authors conducted a multiwavelength

  13. A CHANDRA X-RAY STUDY OF THE INTERACTING BINARIES IN THE OLD OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6791

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Berg, Maureen; Verbunt, Frank

    2013-06-20

    We present the first X-ray study of NGC 6791, one of the oldest open clusters known (8 Gyr). Our Chandra observation is aimed at uncovering the population of close interacting binaries down to L{sub X} Almost-Equal-To 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1} (0.3-7 keV). We detect 86 sources within 8' of the cluster center, including 59 inside the half-mass radius. We identify 20 sources with proper-motion cluster members, which are a mix of cataclysmic variables (CVs), active binaries (ABs), and binaries containing sub-subgiants. With follow-up optical spectroscopy, we confirm the nature of one CV. We discover one new, X-ray variable candidate CV with Balmer and He II emission lines in its optical spectrum; this is the first X-ray-selected CV in an open cluster. The number of CVs per unit mass is consistent with the field, suggesting that the 3-4 CVs observed in NGC 6791 are primordial. We compare the X-ray properties of NGC 6791 with those of a few old open (NGC 6819, M 67) and globular clusters (47 Tuc, NGC 6397). It is puzzling that the number of ABs brighter than 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1} normalized by cluster mass is lower in NGC 6791 than in M 67 by a factor {approx}3-7. CVs, ABs, and sub-subgiants brighter than 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1} are under-represented per unit mass in the globular clusters compared to the oldest open clusters, and this accounts for the lower total X-ray luminosity per unit mass of the former. This indicates that the net effect of dynamical encounters may be the destruction of even some of the hardest (i.e., X-ray-emitting) binaries.

  14. A Chandra X-Ray Study of the Interacting Binaries in the Old Open Cluster NGC 6791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen; Verbunt, Frank; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Belloni, Tomaso; Bedin, Luigi R.; Platais, Imants

    2013-06-01

    We present the first X-ray study of NGC 6791, one of the oldest open clusters known (8 Gyr). Our Chandra observation is aimed at uncovering the population of close interacting binaries down to L X ≈ 1 × 1030 erg s-1 (0.3-7 keV). We detect 86 sources within 8' of the cluster center, including 59 inside the half-mass radius. We identify 20 sources with proper-motion cluster members, which are a mix of cataclysmic variables (CVs), active binaries (ABs), and binaries containing sub-subgiants. With follow-up optical spectroscopy, we confirm the nature of one CV. We discover one new, X-ray variable candidate CV with Balmer and He II emission lines in its optical spectrum; this is the first X-ray-selected CV in an open cluster. The number of CVs per unit mass is consistent with the field, suggesting that the 3-4 CVs observed in NGC 6791 are primordial. We compare the X-ray properties of NGC 6791 with those of a few old open (NGC 6819, M 67) and globular clusters (47 Tuc, NGC 6397). It is puzzling that the number of ABs brighter than 1 × 1030 erg s-1 normalized by cluster mass is lower in NGC 6791 than in M 67 by a factor ~3-7. CVs, ABs, and sub-subgiants brighter than 1 × 1030 erg s-1 are under-represented per unit mass in the globular clusters compared to the oldest open clusters, and this accounts for the lower total X-ray luminosity per unit mass of the former. This indicates that the net effect of dynamical encounters may be the destruction of even some of the hardest (i.e., X-ray-emitting) binaries.

  15. Evidence for Thermal X-Ray Line Emission from the Synchrotron-dominated Supernova Remnant RX J1713.7-3946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Acero, Fabio; Tominaga, Nozomu; Fukui, Yasuo; Hiraga, Junko S.; Koyama, Katsuji; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mori, Koji; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ohira, Yutaka; Petre, Robert; Sano, Hidetoshi; Takeuchi, Yoko; Tamagawa, Toru; Tsuji, Naomi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Yasunobu

    2015-11-01

    We report the first detection of thermal X-ray line emission from the supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946, the prototype of the small class of synchrotron-dominated SNRs. A softness-ratio map generated using XMM-Newton data shows that faint interior regions are softer than bright shell regions. Using Suzaku and deep XMM-Newton observations, we have extracted X-ray spectra from the softest area, finding clear line features at {E}{{ph}}˜ 1 and ˜1.35 keV. These lines can be best explained as Ne Lyα and Mg Heα from a thermal emission component. Since the abundance ratios of metals to Fe are much higher than solar values in the thermal component, we attribute the thermal emission to reverse-shocked SN ejecta. The measured Mg/Ne, Si/Ne, and Fe/Ne ratios of 2.0-2.6, 1.5-2.0, and <0.05 solar suggest that the progenitor star of RX J1713.7-3946 was a relatively low-mass star (≲20 M⊙), consistent with a previous inference based on the effect of stellar winds of the progenitor star on the surrounding medium. Since the mean blastwave speed of ˜6000 km s-1 (the radius of 9.6 pc divided by the age of 1600 years) is relatively fast compared with other core-collapse SNRs, we propose that RX J1713.7-3946 is a result of an SN Ib/c whose progenitor was a member of an interacting binary. While our analysis provides strong evidence for X-ray line emission, our interpretation of its nature as thermal emission from SN ejecta requires further confirmation especially through future precision spectroscopic measurements using ASTRO-H.

  16. Results of ongoing Swift/XRT monitoring of the low mass X-ray binary IGR J17091-3624

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhausen, Ralf; Grinberg, Victoria; Wilms, Joern; Fuerst, Felix; Eikmann, Wiebke; Bozzo, Enrico; Cadolle Bel, Marion; Egron, Elise; Favre, Thierry; Ferrigno, Carlo; Krauss, Felicia; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Nowak, Michael A.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Rodriguez, Jerome; Bachetti, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    The low mass X-ray binary IGR J17091-3624 has been reported to be in outburst by Miller et al. (ATel #8742) on 2016 February 26. Subsequent observations by Swift/XRT and INTEGRAL revealed the transient to be in the hard/low state (Grinberg et al., ATel #8761).

  17. USING THE X-RAY MORPHOLOGY OF YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS TO CONSTRAIN EXPLOSION TYPE, EJECTA DISTRIBUTION, AND CHEMICAL MIXING

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Laura A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Badenes, Carles; Pooley, David A.

    2011-05-10

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are a complex class of sources, and their heterogeneous nature has hindered the characterization of their general observational properties. To overcome this challenge, in this paper, we use statistical tools to analyze the Chandra X-ray images of Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs. We apply two techniques, a power-ratio method (a multipole expansion) and wavelet-transform analysis, to measure the global and local morphological properties of the X-ray line and thermal emission in 24 SNRs. We find that Type Ia SNRs have statistically more spherical and mirror-symmetric thermal X-ray emission than core-collapse (CC) SNRs. The ability to type SNRs based on thermal emission morphology alone enables, for the first time, the typing of SNRs with weak X-ray lines and those with low-resolution spectra. Based on our analyses, we identify one source (SNR G344.7-0.1) as originating from a CC explosion that was of unknown origin previously; we also confirm the tentative Type Ia classifications of G337.2-0.7 and G272.2-3.2. Although the global morphology is indicative of the explosion type, the relative morphology of the X-ray line emission within SNRs is not: all sources in our sample have well-mixed ejecta, irrespective of stellar origin. In particular, we find that 90% of the bright metal-line-emitting substructures are spatially coincident and have similar scales, even if the metals arise from different burning processes. Moreover, the overall X-ray line morphologies within each SNR are the same, with <6% differences. These findings reinforce observationally that hydrodynamical instabilities can efficiently mix ejecta in Type Ia and CC SNRs. The only exception is W49B, which can be attributed to its jet-driven/bipolar explosive origin. Based on comparative analyses across our sample, we describe several observational constraints that can be used to test hydrodynamical models of SNR evolution; notably, the filling factor of X-ray emission

  18. A MODEL FOR THE CORRELATION OF HARD X-RAY INDEX WITH EDDINGTON RATIO IN BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Erlin; Liu, B. F.

    2013-02-10

    Observations show that there is a positive correlation between the Eddington ratio {lambda} and hard X-ray index {Gamma} for {lambda} {approx}> 0.01, and there is an anti-correlation between {lambda} and {Gamma} for {lambda} {approx}< 0.01 in black hole X-ray binaries (with {lambda} = L {sub bol}/L {sub Edd}). In this work, we theoretically investigate the correlation between {Gamma} and {lambda} within the framework of a disk-corona model. We improve the model by taking into account all cooling processes, including synchrotron and self-Compton radiations in the corona, Comptonization of the soft photons from the underlying accretion disk, and the bremsstrahlung radiations. Presuming that the coronal flow above the disk can reach up to the 0.1 Eddington rate at the outer region, we calculate the structure of the two-phase accretion flows and the emergent spectra for accretion rates from 0.003 to 0.1. We find that at accretion rates larger than bsim0.01 Eddington rate, a fraction of coronal gas condenses into the disk and an inner disk can be sustained by condensation. In this case, the X-ray emission is dominated by the scattering of the soft photon from the underlying disk in the corona. The emission from the inner disk and corona can produce the positive correlation between {lambda} and {Gamma}. While at accretion rates lower than bsim0.01 Eddington accretion rate, the inner disk vanishes completely by evaporation, and the accretion is dominated by advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs), in which the X-ray emission is produced by the Comptonization of the synchrotron and bremsstrahlung photons of ADAF itself. The emission from ADAFs can produce the anti-correlation between {lambda} and {Gamma}. We show that our model can roughly explain the observed evolution of {Gamma}{sub 3-25keV} with L {sub 0.5-25keV}/L {sub Edd} for the black hole X-ray transient H1743-322 in the decay of 2003 from the thermal-dominated state to low/hard state.

  19. A local recent supernova - Evidence from X-rays, Al-26 radioactivity and cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Cox, Donald P.; Michel, Curtis F.

    1986-01-01

    Possible ways in which cosmic rays could have been contaminated by a local recent supernova are discussed, and ways in which this contamination may be affecting interpretation of Al-26 gamma radiation and locally observed cosmic rays as samples of the average Galactic distribution are considered. Mass spectra of cosmic rays are examined to see whether there is enrichment by a population arising from supernova preacceleration. The reinterpretation of the anomalous component in terms of a local supernova model is addressed.

  20. A detailed X-ray and radio comparison of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Y.; Long, K. S.; Dickel, J. R.; Greisen, E. W.

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution radio images of Kepler's SNR (SNR (SN 1604) at 6 and 21 cm have been obtained using the VLA. The orientation of linear polarization in the SNR implies a substantial nonrandom radial component for the magnetic field of the remnant. Based on a new X-ray picture of the SNR, obtained using the Einstein Observatory, a detailed comparison of the X-ray and radio morphology is carried out. There is a good correlation between rotation measure, obtained from the radio maps, and emission measure, an X-ray-derived quantity in the SNR shell. From the mean electron density value infered from an analysis of X-ray fluxes, a mean radial magnetic field of 14 micro G and a total magnetic field of 70 microG are estimated. The energy density of relativistic electrons in Kepler's SNR in the shell comparable to the energy density in the magnetic field; the relativistic electron-pressure is 2 percent of the thermal gas pressure. The strong correlation between radio emissivity and X-ray emissivity found over the SNR in somewhat large scale can be ascribed to acceleration of thermal electrons at the shock wave and insignificant diffusion of resultant relativistic electrons.

  1. Supernova remnants in dense clouds. I - Blast-wave dynamics and X-ray irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draine, B. T.; Woods, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    Simplified models of cooling SNRs in uniform media together with an idealized emission spectrum are used to investigate the X-ray irradiation of the surrounding gas. The radiative transfer of the emitted X-rays through both the dense cooling shell and the unshocked cloud is calculated, with a simplified treatment to allow for an ionized zone surrounding the SNR. Numerical results are presented for SN energy of 10 exp 51 ergs and ambient densities ranging from 100 to 1,000,000 cu cm. It is found that an appreciable fraction of the X-ray energy is absorbed in regions where the X-ray energy deposited per H nucleon is between 1 and 30 eV; if the gas is initially molecular, the X-ray irradiation will result in warm molecular gas in which endothermic chemical reactions may proceed, and from which there may be strong emission in rotation-vibration transitions of H2 and other molecular species.

  2. Coronae and Winds from Irradiated Disks in X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbottom, Nick; Proga, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    X-ray and UV line emission in X-ray binaries (XRBs) can be accounted for by a hot corona. Such a corona forms through irradiation of the outer disk by radiation produced in the inner accretion flow. The same irradiation can produce a strong outflow from the disk at sufficiently large radii. Outflowing gas has been recently detected in several XRBs via blueshifted absorption lines. However, the causal connection between winds produced by irradiation and the blueshifted absorption lines is problematic, particularly in the case of GRO J1655-40. Observations of this source imply wind densities about two orders of magnitude higher than theoretically predicted. This discrepancy does not mean that these “thermal disk winds” cannot explain blueshifted absorption in other systems, nor that they are unimportant as a sink of matter. Motivated by the inevitability of thermal disk winds and wealth of data taken with current observatories such as Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku, as well as the future AstroH mission, we decided to investigate the requirements to produce very dense winds. Using physical arguments, hydrodynamical simulations, and absorption-line calculations, we found that modification of the heating and cooling rates by a factor of a few results in an increase of the wind density of up to an order of magnitude and the wind velocity by a factor of about two. Therefore, the mass-loss rate from the disk can be one, if not even two, orders of magnitude higher than the accretion rate onto the central object. Such a high mass-loss rate is expected to destabilize the disk and perhaps provides a mechanism for state change.

  3. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Bright Galactic X-Ray Binaries in Crowded Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Margon, Bruce; Wachter, Stefanie; Anderson, Scott F.

    1996-01-01

    We report high spatial resolution HST imagery and photometry of three well-studied, intense Galactic X-ray binaries, X2129+470, CAL 87, and GX 17+2. All three sources exhibit important anomalies that are not readily interpreted by conventional models. Each source also lies in a severely crowded field, and in all cases the anomalies would be removed if much of the light observed from the ground in fact came from a nearby, thus far unresolved superposed companion. For V1727 Cyg (X2129+470), we find no such companion. We also present an HST FOS spectrum and broadband photometry which is consistent with a single, normal star. The supersoft LMC X-ray source CAL 87 was already known from ground-based work to have a companion separated by O.9 minutes from the optical counterpart; our HST images clearly resolve these objects and yield the discovery of an even closer, somewhat fainter additional companion. Our photometry indicates that contamination is not severe outside eclipse, where the companions only contribute 20% of the light in V, but during eclipse more than half of the V light comes from the companions. The previously determined spectral type of the CAL 87 secondary may need to be reevaluated due to this significant contamination, with consequences on inferences of the mass of the components. We find no companions to NP Ser (= X1813-14, = GX 17+2). However, for this object we point out a small but possibly significant astrometric discrepancy between the position of the optical object and that of the radio source which is the basis for the identification. This discrepancy needs to be clarified.

  4. Dip Spectroscopy of the Low Mass X-Ray Binary XB 1254-690

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smale, Alan P.; Church, M. J.; BalucinskaChurch, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We observed the low mass X-ray binary XB 1254-690 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in 2001 May and December. During the first observation strong dipping on the 3.9-hr orbital period and a high degree of variability were observed, along with "shoulders" approx. 15% deep during extended intervals on each side of the main dips. The first observation also included pronounced flaring activity. The non-dip spectrum obtained using the PCA instrument was well-described by a two-component model consisting of a blackbody with kT = 1.30 +/- 0.10 keV plus a cut-off power law representation of Comptonized emission with power law photon index 1.10 +/- 0.46 and a cut-off energy of 5.9(sup +3.0, sub -1.4) keV. The intensity decrease in the shoulders of dipping is energy-independent, consistent with electron scattering in the outer ionized regions of the absorber. In deep dipping the depth of dipping reached 100%, in the energy band below 5 keV, indicating that all emitting regions were covered by absorber. Intensity-selected dip spectra were well-fit by a model in which the point-like blackbody is rapidly covered, while the extended Comptonized emission is progressively overlapped by the absorber, with the, covering fraction rising to 95% in the deepest portion of the dip. The intensity of this component in the dip spectra could be modeled by a combination of electron scattering and photoelectric absorption. Dipping did not occur during the 2001 December observation, but remarkably, both bursting and flaring were observed contemporaneously.

  5. Timing and spectral studies of the peculiar x-ray binary Circinus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Pablo Miguel Saz

    Cir X-1 is a unique Galactic X-ray binary which was initially classified as a black hole candidate but later reclassified as a neutron star due primarily to the observation of Type I X-ray Bursts by EXOSAT in 1985. In this work, I examine the timing and spectral properties of Cir X-1. FFT analyses are used to study the short (<1 s) timescales while Lomb-Scargle and Phase Dispersion Minimization periodograms are computed to study longer timing properties. I analyze Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPO) in the 1-50 Hz range and divide them into lower frequency (˜3--20 Hz) and higher frequency ones (˜15--50 Hz). The high frequency QPOs decrease in strength (% rms) with increasing frequency, while the lower frequency ones stay constant. The energy dependence of the QPOs implies the frequency is not representative of different locations in the disk. The power spectrum of Cir X-1 in its softest state is compared to Cyg X-1. Both show breaks. By using scaling arguments, I hypothesize that Cir X-1 has a mass of ˜3 M⊙ , greater than the canonical 1.4 M⊙ mass of a neutron star. I study the energy spectrum evolution of Cir X-1 by constructing both instrument-independent and model-independent color-color diagrams. Spectral fits were performed on USA data, from which physical parameters were derived. The spectral parameters indicate that a two-component model is valid for describing the Cir X-1 spectrum: a multicolor blackbody emission from an accretion disk and a Comptonized emission from a hot plasma (boundary layer or corona). The temperature of the disk remains constant, while there is an indication that the Comptonizing component increases in temperature with orbital phase. From the relative contribution of the disk I infer the neutron star is spinning very rapidly (>1 kHz). The long-term variability of Cir X-1 is studied using data from instruments going back over thirty years. I derive an X-ray ephemeris based showing that the period of Cir X-1 decreases rapidly (P

  6. Circinus X-1: a Laboratory for Studying the Accretion Phenomenon in Compact Binary X-Ray Sources. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson-Saba, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the binary X-ray source Circinus X-1 provide samples of a range of spectral and temporal behavior whose variety is thought to reflect a broad continuum of accretion conditions in an eccentric binary system. The data support an identification of three or more X-ray spectral components, probably associated with distinct emission regions.

  7. X-Ray Heating of the Ejecta of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Larsson, Josefin; Fransson, Claes; Kirshner, Robert; Challis, Peter; McCray, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of Hubble Space Telescope Band R band images from 1994 to 2009 show that the optical luminosity of SN 1987A has transitioned from being powered by radioactive decay of Ti-44 to energy deposited by X-rays produced as the ejecta interacts with the surrounding material (Larsson et al. 2011, Nature, 474, 484). The B and R band flux from the densest, central parts of the ejecta followed the expected exponential decline until 2001 (about day 5000) when the flux in these bands started increasing, more than doubling by the end of 2009. This increase is the result of heat deposited by X-rays from the shock interaction of the fast-moving outer ejecta with the inner circumstellar ring. In time, the X-rays will penetrate farther into the ejecta, enabling us to analyze the structure and chemistry of the vanished star.

  8. Probing X-Ray Absorption and Optical Extinction in the Interstellar Medium Using Chandra Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foight, Dillon R.; Güver, Tolga; Özel, Feryal; Slane, Patrick O.

    2016-07-01

    We present a comprehensive study of interstellar X-ray extinction using the extensive Chandra supernova remnant (SNR) archive and use our results to refine the empirical relation between the hydrogen column density and optical extinction. In our analysis, we make use of the large, uniform data sample to assess various systematic uncertainties in the measurement of the interstellar X-ray absorption. Specifically, we address systematic uncertainties that originate from (i) the emission models used to fit SNR spectra; (ii) the spatial variations within individual remnants; (iii) the physical conditions of the remnant such as composition, temperature, and non-equilibrium regions; and (iv) the model used for the absorption of X-rays in the interstellar medium. Using a Bayesian framework to quantify these systematic uncertainties, and combining the resulting hydrogen column density measurements with the measurements of optical extinction toward the same remnants, we find the empirical relation N H = (2.87 ± 0.12) × 1021 A V cm‑2, which is significantly higher than the previous measurements.

  9. A `high-hard' outburst of the black hole X-ray binary GS 1354-64

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koljonen, K. I. I.; Russell, D. M.; Corral-Santana, J. M.; Armas Padilla, M.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Lewis, F.; Coriat, M.; Bauer, F. E.

    2016-07-01

    We study in detail the evolution of the 2015 outburst of GS 1354-64 (BW Cir) at optical, UV and X-ray wavelengths using Faulkes Telescope South/Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Small & Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System and Swift. The outburst was found to stay in the hard X-ray state, albeit being anomalously luminous with a peak luminosity of LX > 0.15 LEdd, which could be the most luminous hard state observed in a black hole X-ray binary. We found that the optical/UV emission is tightly correlated with the X-ray emission, consistent with accretion disc irradiation and/or a jet producing the optical emission. The X-ray spectra can be fitted well with a Comptonization model, and show softening towards the end of the outburst. In addition, we detect a QPO in the X-ray light curves with increasing centroid frequency during the peak and decay periods of the outburst. The long-term optical light curves during quiescence show a statistically significant, slow rise of the source brightness over the 7 years prior to the 2015 outburst. This behaviour as well as the outburst evolution at all wavelengths studied can be explained by the disc instability model with irradiation and disc evaporation/condensation.

  10. A "high-hard" outburst of the black hole X-ray binary GS 1354-64

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koljonen, K. I. I.; Russell, D. M.; Corral-Santana, J. M.; Armas Padilla, M.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Lewis, F.; Coriat, M.; Bauer, F. E.

    2016-04-01

    We study in detail the evolution of the 2015 outburst of GS 1354-64 (BW Cir) at optical, UV and X-ray wavelengths using Faulkes Telescope South/LCOGT, SMARTS and Swift. The outburst was found to stay in the hard X-ray state, albeit being anomalously luminous with a peak luminosity of LX > 0.15 LEdd, which could be the most luminous hard state observed in a black hole X-ray binary. We found that the optical/UV emission is tightly correlated with the X-ray emission, consistent with accretion disc irradiation and/or a jet producing the optical emission. The X-ray spectra can be fitted well with a Comptonisation model, and show softening towards the end of the outburst. In addition, we detect a QPO in the X-ray lightcurves with increasing centroid frequency during the peak and decay periods of the outburst. The long-term optical lightcurves during quiescence show a statistically significant, slow rise of the source brightness over the 7 years prior to the 2015 outburst. This behaviour as well as the outburst evolution at all wavelengths studied can be explained by the disc instability model with irradiation and disc evaporation/condensation.

  11. First Detection of the Hatchett-McCray Effect in the High-Mass X-ray Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Kaper, L.; Hammerschiag-Hensberge, G.; Hutchings, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    The orbital modulation of stellar wind UV resonance line profiles as a result of ionization of the wind by the X-ray source has been observed in the high-mass X-ray binary 4U1700-37/HD 153919 for the first time. Far-UV observations (905-1180 Angstrom, resolution 0.05 Angstroms) were made at the four quadrature points of the binary orbit with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) in 2003 April and August. The O6.5 laf primary eclipses the X-ray source (neutron star or black hole) with a 3.41-day period. Orbital modulation of the UV resonance lines, resulting from X-ray photoionization of the dense stellar wind, the so-called Hatchett-McCray (HM) effect, was predicted for 4U1700-37/HD153919 (Hatchett 8 McCray 1977, ApJ, 211, 522) but was not seen in N V 1240, Si IV 1400, or C IV 1550 in IUE and HST spectra. The FUSE spectra show that the P V 1118-1128 and S IV 1063-1073 P-Cygni lines appear to vary as expected for the HM effect, weakest at phase 0.5 (X-ray source conjunction) and strongest at phase 0.0 (X-ray source eclipse). The phase modulation of the O VI 1032-1037 lines, however, is opposite to P V and S IV, implying that O VI may be a byproduct of the wind's ionization by the X-ray source. Such variations were not observed in N V, Si IV, and C IV because of their high optical depth. Due to their lower cosmic abundance, the P V and S IV wind lines are unsaturated, making them excellent tracers of the ionization conditions in the O star's wind.

  12. Disc-jet coupling in the Terzan 5 neutron star X-ray binary EXO 1745-248

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, A. J.; Bahramian, A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Tremou, E.; Linares, M.; Tudor, V.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Heinke, C. O.; Chomiuk, L.; Strader, J.; Altamirano, D.; Degenaar, N.; Maccarone, T.; Patruno, A.; Sanna, A.; Wijnands, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of Very Large Array, Australia Telescope Compact Array, and Swift X-ray Telescope observations of the 2015 outburst of the transient neutron star X-ray binary (NSXB), EXO 1745-248, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. Combining (near-) simultaneous radio and X-ray measurements, we measure a correlation between the radio and X-ray luminosities of L_R∝ L_X^β with β =1.68^{+0.10}_{-0.09}, linking the accretion flow (probed by X-ray luminosity) and the compact jet (probed by radio luminosity). While such a relationship has been studied in multiple black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs), this work marks only the third NSXB with such a measurement. Constraints on this relationship in NSXBs are strongly needed, as comparing this correlation between different classes of XB systems is key in understanding the properties that affect the jet production process in accreting objects. Our best-fitting disc-jet coupling index for EXO 1745-248 is consistent with the measured correlation in NSXB 4U 1728-34 (β = 1.5 ± 0.2) but inconsistent with the correlation we fit using the most recent measurements from the literature of NSXB Aql X-1 (β =0.76^{+0.14}_{-0.15}). While a similar disc-jet coupling index appears to hold across multiple BHXBs in the hard accretion state, this does not appear to be the case with the three NSXBs measured so far. Additionally, the normalization of the EXO 1745-248 correlation is lower than the other two NSXBs, making it one of the most radio faint XBs ever detected in the hard state. We also report the detection of a type-I X-ray burst during this outburst, where the decay time-scale is consistent with hydrogen burning.

  13. Relation between the X-ray and optical luminosities in binary systems with accreting nonmagnetic white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revnivtsev, M. G.; Filippova, E. V.; Suleimanov, V. F.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the relation between the optical ( g-band) and X-ray (0.5-10 keV) luminosities of accreting nonmagnetic white dwarfs. According to the present-day counts of the populations of star systems in our Galaxy, these systems have the highest space density among the close binary systems with white dwarfs. We show that the dependence of the optical luminosity of accreting white dwarfs on their X-ray luminosity forms a fairly narrow one-parameter curve. The typical half-width of this curve does not exceed 0.2-0.3 dex in optical and X-ray luminosities, which is essentially consistent with the amplitude of the aperiodic flux variability for these objects. At X-ray luminosities L x ˜ 1032 erg s-1 or lower, the optical g-band luminosity of the accretion flow is shown to be related to its X-ray luminosity by a factor ˜2-3. At even lower X-ray luminosities ( L x ≲ 1030 erg s-1), the contribution from the photosphere of the white dwarf begins to dominate in the optical spectrum of the binary system and its optical brightness does not drop below M g ˜ 13-14. Using the latter fact, we show that in current and planned X-ray sky surveys, the family of accreting nonmagnetic white dwarfs can be completely identified to the distance determined by the sensitivity of an optical sky survey in this region. For the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with a limiting sensitivity m g ˜ 22.5, this distance is ˜400-600 pc.

  14. THE TeV BINARY HESS J0632+057 IN THE LOW AND HIGH X-RAY STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, Nanda; Torres, Diego F.

    2011-08-10

    We report on a 40 ks Chandra observation of the TeV emitting high-mass X-ray binary HESS J0632+057 performed in 2011 February during a high state of X-ray and TeV activity. We have used the ACIS-S camera in continuous clocking mode to search for a possible X-ray pulsar in this system. Furthermore, we compare the emission of the source during this high state, with its X-ray properties during a low state of emission, caught by a 47 ks XMM-Newton observation on 2007 September. We did not find any periodic or quasi-periodic signal in any of the two observations. We derived an average pulsed fraction 3{sigma} upper limit for the presence of a periodic signal of {approx}<35% and 25% during the low and high emission states, respectively (although this limit is strongly dependent on the frequency and the energy band). Using the best X-ray spectra derived to date for HESS J0632+057, we found evidence for a significant spectral change between the low and high X-ray emission states, with the absorption value and the photon index varying between N{sub H} {approx_equal} (2.1-4.3) x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} and {Gamma} {approx_equal} 1.18-1.61. In contrast to what has been observed in other TeV binaries, it seems that in this source the higher the flux, the softer the X-ray spectrum.

  15. How Massive are the Heaviest Black Holes in X-ray Binaries? Exploring IC 10 X-1 and its Kind.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas; Maccarone, Tom; Steiner, James F.; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Yang, Jun; Binder, Breanna A.; Cappallo, Rigel

    2016-01-01

    Black hole X-ray binaries represent a unique probe of stellar evolution and the most extreme physical conditions found in nature. The X-ray binary IC 10 X-1 occupies an important niche as a link between BH-XRBs and Ultra Luminous X-ray Sources (ULX) due to its intermediate luminosity (10^38 erg/s), and role as a central exemplar of the association of between low metallicity galaxies and maximum BH mass.The most secure and direct dynamical evidence for any BH mass comes from the radial velocity (RV) curve coupled with eclipse timing measurements. We phase-connected X-ray timing data accumulated over a decade with Chandra/XMM, with the optical RV curve, revealing a surprizing simultenaity of mid X-ray eclipse and the maximum blueshift velocity of He II emission lines. Our interpretation is that the optical emission lines originate in a shadowed sector of the WR star's stellar wind which escapes X-ray ionization by the compact object. The RV shifts are therefore a projection effect of the stellar wind, and unrelated to the system's mass function which becomes completely unknown. Chandra, XMM and NuStar datasets present a complex picture of radiative transfer through a photo-ionized wind. A search for the orbital period derivative (P-dot) by X-ray timing offers additonal insights, and we present a simulation for the feasibility of constraining P-dot via optical means.This is a substantial change to our understanding of IC 10 X-1, and with similar results reported for its "near twin" NGC 300 X-1, adds new a dimension to the facinating question of the maximum mass for stellar BHs.

  16. Interpreting the radio/X-ray correlation of black hole X-ray binaries based on the accretion-jet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Two types of correlations between the radio and X-ray luminosities (LR and LX) have been found in black hole X-ray binaries. For some sources, they follow the `original' type of correlation which is described by a single power law. Later it was found that some other sources follow a different correlation consisting of three power-law branches, with each branch having different power-law indexes. In this work, we explain these two types of correlation under the coupled accretion-jet model. We attribute the difference between these two types of sources to the different value of viscosity parameter α. One possible reason for different α is the different configuration of magnetic field in the accretion material coming from the companion stars. For the `single power-law' sources, their α is high; so their accretion is always in the mode of advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) for the whole range of X-ray luminosity. For those `hybrid power-law' sources, the value of α is small so their accretion mode changes from an ADAF to a luminous hot accretion flow, and eventually to two-phase accretion as the accretion rate increases. Because the dependence of radiative efficiency on the mass accretion rate is different for these three accretion modes, different power-law indexes in the LR-LX correlation are expected. Constraints on the ratio of the mass-loss rate into the jet and the mass accretion rate in the accretion flow are obtained, which can be tested in future by radiative magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of jet formation.

  17. X-Ray Outbursts of ESO 243-49 HLX-1: Comparison with Galactic Low-mass X-Ray Binary Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhen; Zhang, Wenda; Soria, Roberto; Altamirano, Diego; Yu, Wenfei

    2015-09-01

    We studied the outburst properties of the hyper-luminous X-ray source ESO 243-49 HLX-1, using the full set of Swift monitoring observations. We quantified the increase in the waiting time, recurrence time, and e-folding rise timescale along the outburst sequence, and the corresponding decrease in outburst duration, total radiated energy, and e-folding decay timescale, which confirms previous findings. HLX-1 spends less and less time in outburst and more and more time in quiescence, but its peak luminosity remains approximately constant. We compared the HLX-1 outburst properties with those of bright Galactic low-mass X-ray binary transients (LMXBTs). Our spectral analysis strengthens the similarity between state transitions in HLX-1 and those in Galactic LMXBTs. We also found that HLX-1 follows the nearly linear correlations between the hard-to-soft state transition luminosity and the peak luminosity, and between the rate of change of X-ray luminosity during the rise phase and the peak luminosity, which indicates that the occurrence of the hard-to-soft state transition of HLX-1 is similar to those of Galactic LMXBTs during outbursts. We found that HLX-1 does not follow the correlations between total radiated energy and peak luminosity, and between total radiated energy and e-folding rise/decay timescales we had previously identified in Galactic LMXBTs. HLX-1 would follow those correlations if the distance were several hundreds of kiloparsecs. However, invoking a much closer distance for HLX-1 is not a viable solution to this problem, as it introduces other, more serious inconsistencies with the observations.

  18. The contribution of young core-collapse supernova remnants to the X-ray emission near quiescent supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimoldi, A.; Rossi, E. M.; Costantini, E.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2016-03-01

    Appreciable star formation, and, therefore, numerous massive stars, are frequently found near supermassive black holes (SMBHs). As a result, core-collapse supernovae in these regions should also be expected. In this paper, we consider the observational consequences of predicting the fate of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the sphere of influence of quiescent SMBHs. We present these results in the context of `autarkic' nuclei, a model that describes quiescent nuclei as steady-state and self-sufficient environments where the SMBH accretes stellar winds with no appreciable inflow of material from beyond the sphere of influence. These regions have properties such as gas density that scale with the mass of the SMBH. Using predictions of the X-ray lifetimes of SNRs originating in the sphere of influence, we make estimates of the number of core collapse SNRs present at a given time. With the knowledge of lifetimes of SNRs and their association with young stars, we predict a number of core-collapse SNRs that grows from ˜1 around Milky Way-like (4.3 × 106 M⊙) SMBHs to ˜100 around the highest mass (1010 M⊙) SMBHs. The presence of young SNRs will amplify the X-ray emission near quiescent SMBHs, and we show that the total core-collapse SNR emission has the potential to influence soft X-ray searches for very low-luminosity SMBHs. Our SNR lifetime estimates also allow us to predict star formation rates in these regions. Assuming a steady-state replenishment of massive stars, we estimate a star formation rate density of 2 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 pc-2 around the Milky Way SMBH, and a similar value around other SMBHs due to a weak dependence on SMBH mass. This value is consistent with currently available observations.

  19. Progenitors of Type IIB Supernovae in the Light of Radio and X-Rays from SN 2013DF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Atish; Margutti, Raffaella; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chakraborti, Sayan; Fransson, Claes; Chevalier, Roger; Powell, Diana; Milisavljevic, Dan; Parrent, Jerod; Bietenholz, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We present radio and X-ray observations of the nearby SN IIb 2013df in NGC 4414 from 10 to 250 days after the explosion. The radio emission showed a peculiar steep-to-shallow spectral evolution. We present a model in which inverse Compton cooling of synchrotron emitting electrons can account for the observed spectral and light curve evolution. A significant mass-loss rate, \\dot{M}≈ 8× {10}-5 {M}⊙ yr-1 for a wind velocity of 10 km s-1, is estimated from the detailed modeling of radio and X-ray emission, which are primarily due to synchrotron and bremsstrahlung, respectively. We show that SN 2013df is similar to SN 1993J in various ways. The shock wave speed of SN 2013df was found to be average among the radio supernovae; {v}{sh}/c˜ 0.07. We did not find any significant deviation from smooth decline in the light curve of SN 2013df. One of the main results of our self-consistent multiband modeling is the significant deviation from energy equipartition between magnetic fields and relativistic electrons behind the shock. We estimate {ɛ }e=200{ɛ }B. In general for SNe IIb, we find that the presence of bright optical cooling envelope emission is linked with free-free radio absorption and bright thermal X-ray emission. This finding suggests that more extended progenitors, similar to that of SN 2013df, suffer from substantial mass loss in the years before the supernova.

  20. M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTER STRUCTURES AND THE PRESENCE OF X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Agar, J. R. R.; Barmby, P.

    2013-11-01

    The Andromeda galaxy, M31, has several times the number of globular clusters found in the Milky Way. It contains a correspondingly larger number of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) associated with globular clusters, and as such can be used to investigate the cluster properties that lead to X-ray binary formation. The best tracer of the spatial structure of M31 globulars is the high-resolution imaging available from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and we have used HST data to derive structural parameters for 29 LMXB-hosting M31 globular clusters. These measurements are combined with structural parameters from the literature for a total of 41 (of 50 known) LMXB clusters and a comparison sample of 65 non-LMXB clusters. Structural parameters measured in blue bandpasses are found to be slightly different (smaller core radii and higher concentrations) than those measured in red bandpasses; this difference is enhanced in LMXB clusters and could be related to stellar population differences. Clusters with LMXBs show higher collision rates for their mass compared to clusters without LMXBs, and collision rates estimated at the core radius show larger offsets than rates estimated at the half-light radius. These results are consistent with the dynamical formation scenario for LMXBs. A logistic regression analysis finds that, as expected, the probability of a cluster hosting an LMXB increases with increasing collision rate and proximity to the galaxy center. The same analysis finds that probability of a cluster hosting an LMXB decreases with increasing cluster mass at a fixed collision rate, although we caution that this could be due to sample selection effects. Metallicity is found to be a less important predictor of LMXB probability than collision rate, mass, or distance, even though LMXB clusters have a higher metallicity on average. This may be due to the interaction of location and metallicity: a sample of M31 LMXBs with a greater range in galactocentric distance would

  1. Relativistic 3D precessing jet simulations for the X-ray binary SS433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monceau-Baroux, Rémi; Porth, Oliver; Meliani, Zakaria; Keppens, Rony

    2014-01-01

    Context. Modern high-resolution radio observations allow us a closer look into the objects that power relativistic jets. This is especially the case for SS433, an X-ray binary that emits a precessing jet that is observed down to the subparsec scale. Aims: We aim to study full 3D dynamics of relativistic jets associated with active galactic nuclei or X-ray binaries (XRB). In particular, we incorporate the precessing motion of a jet into a model for the jet associated with the XRB SS433. Our study of the jet dynamics in this system focuses on the subparsec scales. We investigate the impact of jet precession and the variation of the Lorentz factor of the injected matter on the general 3D jet dynamics and its energy transfer to the surrounding medium. After visualizing and quantifying jet dynamics, we aim to realize synthetic radio mapping of the data, to compare our results with observations. Methods: For our study we used a block-tree adaptive mesh refinement scheme and an inner time-dependent boundary prescription to inject precessing bipolar supersonic jets. Parameters extracted from observations were used. Different 3D jet realizations that match the kinetic flux of the SS433 jet were intercompared, which vary in density contrast and jet beam velocity. We tracked the energy content deposited in different regions of the domain affected by the jet. Our code allows us to follow the adiabatic cooling of a population of relativistic particles injected by the jet. This evolving energy spectrum of accelerated electrons, using a pressure-based proxy for the magnetic field, allowed us to obtain the radio emission from our simulation. Results: We find a higher energy transfer for a precessing jet than for standing jets with otherwise identical parameters as a result of the effectively increased interaction area. We obtain synthetic radio maps for all jets, from which one can see that dynamical flow features are clearly linked with enhanced emission sites. Conclusions: The

  2. Tests of General Relativity in the Strong-gravity Regime Based on X-Ray Spectropolarimetric Observations of Black Holes in X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, Henric

    2012-08-01

    Although general relativity (GR) has been tested extensively in the weak-gravity regime, similar tests in the strong-gravity regime are still missing. In this paper, we explore the possibility to use X-ray spectropolarimetric observations of black holes in X-ray binaries to distinguish between the Kerr metric and the phenomenological metrics introduced by Johannsen & Psaltis (which are not vacuum solutions of Einstein's equation) and thus to test the no-hair theorem of GR. To this end, we have developed a numerical code that calculates the radial brightness profiles of accretion disks and parallel transports the wave vector and polarization vector of photons through the Kerr and non-GR spacetimes. We used the code to predict the observational appearance of GR and non-GR accreting black hole systems. We find that the predicted energy spectra and energy-dependent polarization degree and polarization direction do depend strongly on the underlying spacetime. However, for large regions of the parameter space, the GR and non-GR metrics lead to very similar observational signatures, making it difficult to observationally distinguish between the two types of models.

  3. TESTS OF GENERAL RELATIVITY IN THE STRONG-GRAVITY REGIME BASED ON X-RAY SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF BLACK HOLES IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczynski, Henric

    2012-08-01

    Although general relativity (GR) has been tested extensively in the weak-gravity regime, similar tests in the strong-gravity regime are still missing. In this paper, we explore the possibility to use X-ray spectropolarimetric observations of black holes in X-ray binaries to distinguish between the Kerr metric and the phenomenological metrics introduced by Johannsen and Psaltis (which are not vacuum solutions of Einstein's equation) and thus to test the no-hair theorem of GR. To this end, we have developed a numerical code that calculates the radial brightness profiles of accretion disks and parallel transports the wave vector and polarization vector of photons through the Kerr and non-GR spacetimes. We used the code to predict the observational appearance of GR and non-GR accreting black hole systems. We find that the predicted energy spectra and energy-dependent polarization degree and polarization direction do depend strongly on the underlying spacetime. However, for large regions of the parameter space, the GR and non-GR metrics lead to very similar observational signatures, making it difficult to observationally distinguish between the two types of models.

  4. Combining Fits of The Optical Photometry and X-ray Spectra of the Low Mass X-ray Binary V1408 Aquilae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Sebastian; Mason, Paul A.; Robinson, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    V1408 Aquilae is a binary system with a black hole primary accreting matter from a low mass secondary. We observed the system at the McDonald Observatory and collected 126 hours of high speed optical photometry on the source. We modeled the optical light curve using the XRbinary light curve synthesis software. The best fits to the optical light curve seem to suggest that the primary is a low mass black hole, however we cannot exclude some high mass solutions. Our models slightly favor a 3 solar mass primary at an inclination of about 13 degrees. In order to