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Sample records for suppressing advanced glycation

  1. Advanced glycation end products suppress osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Yamaguchi, Toru; Kaji, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Ippei; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2013-08-30

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are involved in bone quality deterioration in diabetes mellitus. We previously showed that AGE2 or AGE3 inhibited osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization of mouse stromal ST2 cells, and also induced apoptosis and decreased cell growth. Although quality management for synthesized proteins in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for the maturation of osteoblasts, the effects of AGEs on ER stress in osteoblast lineage are unknown. We thus examined roles of ER stress in AGE2- or AGE3-induced suppression of osteoblastogenesis of ST2 cells. An ER stress inducer, thapsigargin (TG), induced osteoblastic differentiation of ST2 cells by increasing the levels of Osterix, type 1 collagen (Col1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN) mRNA. AGE2 or AGE3 suppressed the levels of ER stress sensors such as IRE1α, ATF6 and OASIS, while they increased the levels of PERK and its downstream molecules, ATF4. A reduction in PERK level by siRNA did not affect the AGEs-induced suppression of the levels of Osterix, Col1 and OCN mRNA. In conclusion, AGEs inhibited the osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells by suppressing ER stress sensors and accumulating abnormal proteins in the cells. This process might accelerate AGEs-induced suppression of bone formation found in diabetes mellitus. PMID:23933252

  2. Advanced glycation end products

    PubMed Central

    Gkogkolou, Paraskevi; Böhm, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the progressive accumulation of damage to an organism over time leading to disease and death. Aging research has been very intensive in the last years aiming at characterizing the pathophysiology of aging and finding possibilities to fight age-related diseases. Various theories of aging have been proposed. In the last years advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have received particular attention in this context. AGEs are formed in high amounts in diabetes but also in the physiological organism during aging. They have been etiologically implicated in numerous diabetes- and age-related diseases. Strategies inhibiting AGE accumulation and signaling seem to possess a therapeutic potential in these pathologies. However, still little is known on the precise role of AGEs during skin aging. In this review the existing literature on AGEs and skin aging will be reviewed. In addition, existing and potential anti-AGE strategies that may be beneficial on skin aging will be discussed. PMID:23467327

  3. Receptor for advanced glycation end products inhibits proliferation in osteoblast through suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guofeng; Xu, Jingren; Li, Zengchun

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression suppresses cell proliferation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases ERK and PI3K signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes PI3K signaling restored by RAGE blockade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes ERK signaling restored by RAGE blockade. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a crucial role in bone metabolism. However, the role of RAGE in the control of osteoblast proliferation is not yet evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrate that RAGE overexpression inhibits osteoblast proliferation in vitro. The negative regulation of RAGE on cell proliferation results from suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, and is restored by RAGE neutralizing antibody. Prevention of Wnt signaling using Sfrp1 or DKK1 rescues RAGE-decreased PI3K and ERK signaling and cell proliferation, indicating that the altered cell growth in RAGE overexpressing cells is in part secondary to alterations in Wnt signaling. Consistently, RAGE overexpression inhibits the expression of Wnt targets cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is partially reversed by RAGE blockade. Overall, these results suggest that RAGE inhibits osteoblast proliferation via suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, which provides novel mechanisms by which RAGE regulates osteoblast growth.

  4. Kaempferol modulates pro-inflammatory NF-κB activation by suppressing advanced glycation endproducts-induced NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Min; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Dae Hyun; Yu, Byung Pal

    2010-01-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) are oxidative products formed from the reaction between carbohydrates and a free amino group of proteins that are provoked by reactive species (RS). It is also known that AGE enhance the generation of RS and that the binding of AGE to a specific AGE receptor (RAGE) induces the activation of the redox-sensitive, pro-inflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB). In this current study, we investigated the anti-oxidative effects of short-term kaempferol supplementation on the age-related formation of AGE and the binding activity of RAGE in aged rat kidney. We further investigated the suppressive action of kaempferol against AGE's ability to stimulate activation of pro-inflammatory NF-ĸB and its molecular mechanisms. For this study, we utilized young (6 months old), old (24 months old), and kaempferol-fed (2 and 4 mg/kg/day for 10 days) old rats. In addition, for the molecular work, the rat endothelial cell line, YPEN-1 was used. The results show that AGE and RAGE were increased during aging and that these increases were blunted by kaempferol. In addition, dietary kaempferol reduced age-related increases in NF-κB activity and NF-ĸB-dependant pro-inflammatory gene activity. The most significant new finding from this study is that kaempferol supplementation prevented age-related NF-κB activation by suppressing AGE-induced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase). Taken together, our results demonstrated that dietary kaempferol exerts its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory actions by modulating the age-related NF-κB signaling cascade and its pro-inflammatory genes by suppressing AGE-induced NADPH oxidase activation. Based on these data, dietary kaempferol is proposed as a possible anti-AGE agent that may have the potential for use in anti-inflammation therapies. PMID:20431987

  5. Scopoletin protects against methylglyoxal-induced hyperglycemia and insulin resistance mediated by suppression of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) generation and anti-glycation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Chang; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Xu, Kun-Di; Liao, Bo-Chieh; Wu, Jia-Feng; Cheng, An-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Recently, several types of foods and drinks, including coffee, cream, and cake, have been found to result in high methylglyoxal (MG) levels in the plasma, thus causing both nutritional and health concerns. MG can be metabolized by phase-II enzymes in liver through the positive regulation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). In this study, we investigated the ability of scopoletin (SP) to protect against MG-induced hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Recently, SP was shown to be a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activator to elevate insulin sensitivity. We investigated the effects of oral administration of SP on the metabolic, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities characteristic of type 2 diabetes in MG-treated Wistar rats to understand the potential mechanism of scopoletin for diabetes protection. Our results suggested that SP activated Nrf2 by Ser40 phosphorylation, resulting in the metabolism of MG into d-lactic acid and the inhibition of AGEs generation, which reduced the accumulation of AGEs in the livers of MG-induced rats. In this manner, SP improved the results of the oral glucose tolerance test and dyslipidemia. Moreover, SP also increased the plasma translocation of glucose transporter-2 and promoted Akt phosphorylation caused by insulin treatment in MG-treated FL83B hepatocytes. In contrast, SP effectively suppressed protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) expression, thereby alleviating insulin resistance. These findings suggest that SP acts as an anti-glycation and anti-diabetic agent, and thus has therapeutic potential for the prevention of diabetes. PMID:25671364

  6. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products (AGEs) improves glycemic control and decreases adipocyte size in fructose-fed rats by suppressing AGE-RAGE axis.

    PubMed

    Ojima, A; Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Higashimoto, Y; Ueda, S; Fukami, K; Okuda, S; Yamagishi, S

    2015-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) decrease adiponectin expression and suppress insulin signaling in cultured adipocytes through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) via oxidative stress generation. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. This study examined the effects of AGE-aptamer on adipocyte remodeling, AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis, and adiponectin expression in fructose-fed rats. Although AGE-aptamer treatment by an osmotic mini pump for 8 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels, it significantly decreased average fasting blood glucose and had a tendency to inhibit body weight gain in fructose-fed rats. Furthermore, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the increase in adipocyte size and prevented the elevation in AGEs, RAGE, and an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), levels in adipose tissues of fructose-fed rats at 14-week-old, while it restored the decrease in adiponectin mRNA levels. Our present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could improve glycemic control and prevent adipocyte remodeling in fructose-fed rats partly by suppressing the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for fructose-induced metabolic derangements. PMID:25105541

  7. Telmisartan inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-elicited endothelial cell injury by suppressing AGE receptor (RAGE) expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gammaactivation.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Matsui, Takanori; Nakamura, Kazuo; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Inoue, Hiroyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-their receptor (RAGE) axis plays a central role in the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy. Since the pathophysiological crosstalk between the AGEs-RAGE system and angiotensin II has also been associated with diabetic microangiopathy, we examined here whether and how telmisartan, a unique angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB) with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma)-modulating activity, could inhibit the AGEs-elicited endothelial cell injury by suppressing RAGE expression in vitro. Telmisartan suppressed RAGE expression at both mRNA and protein levels in human cultured microvascular endothelial cells (ECs), which were prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of PPAR-gamma. Further, telmisartan was found to inhibit up-regulation of mRNA levels for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor in AGEs-exposed ECs. These results suggest that telmisartan inhibits the AGEs-elicited EC injury by down-regulating RAGE expression via PPAR-gamma activation. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of telmisartan. Specifically, it could work as an anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs via PPAR-gamma activation and may play a protective role against diabetic microangiopathy. PMID:18855759

  8. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) inhibits proximal tubular cell injury in early diabetic nephropathy by suppressing advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-receptor (RAGE) axis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sayaka; Matsui, Takanori; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yoshida, Yumiko; Yamakawa, Ryoji; Fukami, Kei; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2011-03-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a multifunctional glycoprotein with anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory properties, and it could block the development and progression of experimental diabetic retinopathy. However, a role for PEDF in early experimental diabetic nephropathy is not fully understood. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) axis stimulates oxidative stress generation and subsequently evokes inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions in renal tubular cells, thereby playing a role in diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, this study investigated whether PEDF could prevent AGE-elicited tubular cell injury in early diabetic nephropathy. Human proximal tubular cells were incubated with or without AGE-bovine serum albumin in the presence or absence of PEDF. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated with or without intravenous injection of PEDF for 4 weeks. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured with dihydroethidium staining. PEDF or antibodies raised against RAGE inhibited the AGE-induced RAGE gene expression and subsequently reduced ROS generation, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), fibronectin and type IV collagen mRNA levels in proximal tubular cells. RAGE gene expression, ROS generation and MCP-1 and TGF-β mRNA levels were significantly increased in diabetic kidney, which were suppressed by administration of PEDF. Our present data suggest that PEDF could play a protective role against tubular injury in diabetic nephropathy by attenuating the deleterious effects of AGEs via down-regulation of RAGE expression. Administration of PEDF may offer a promising strategy for halting the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21115116

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 21 protects mouse brain against D-galactose induced aging via suppression of oxidative stress response and advanced glycation end products formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinhang; Bai, Fuliang; Wang, Wenfei; Liu, Yaonan; Yuan, Qingyan; Qu, Susu; Zhang, Tong; Tian, Guiyou; Li, Siming; Li, Deshan; Ren, Guiping

    2015-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a hormone secreted predominantly in the liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. Recently, it has been reported that FGF21-Transgenic mice can extend their lifespan compared with wild type counterparts. Thus, we hypothesize that FGF21 may play some roles in aging of organisms. In this study d-galactose (d-gal)-induced aging mice were used to study the mechanism that FGF21 protects mice from aging. The three-month-old Kunming mice were subcutaneously injected with d-gal (180mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) for 8weeks and administered simultaneously with FGF21 (1, 2 or 5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)). Our results showed that administration of FGF21 significantly improved behavioral performance of d-gal-treated mice in water maze task and step-down test, reduced brain cell damage in the hippocampus, and attenuated the d-gal-induced production of MDA, ROS and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). At the same time, FGF21 also markedly renewed the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and total anti-oxidation capability (T-AOC), and decreased the enhanced total cholinesterase (TChE) activity in the brain of d-gal-treated mice. The expression of aldose reductase (AR), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and member-anchored receptor for AGEs (RAGE) declined significantly after FGF21 treatment. Furthermore, FGF21 suppressed inflamm-aging by inhibiting IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. The expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, decreased significantly. In conclusion, these results suggest that FGF21 protects the aging mice brain from d-gal-induced injury by attenuating oxidative stress damage and decreasing AGE formation. PMID:25871519

  10. Beta-D-glucoside protects against advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-mediated diabetic responses by suppressing ERK and inducing PPAR gamma DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Mahali, Sidhartha K; Manna, Sunil K

    2012-12-15

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), due to excessive amounts of 3- or 4-carbon sugars derived from glucose; cause multiple consequences in diabetic patients and older persons. The transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), is down regulated in the diabetic condition. Drugs targeting PPARγ were developed for diabetes therapy. We found that AGE inhibited PPARγ activity in different cell types induced by PPARγ activators, like troglitazone, rosiglitazone, oleamide, and anandamide. AGE induced translocation of PPARγ from nucleus to cytoplasm, increased on activation of ERK in cells. Antioxidants that inhibit AGE-induced NF-κB activation by preventing ROI generation were unable to protect AGE-mediated decrease in PPARγ activity. Only mangiferin, a β-D-glucoside, prevented AGE-mediated decrease in PPARγ activity and inhibited phosphorylation of ERK and cytoplasmic translocation of PPARγ. Mangiferin interacts with PPARγ and enhanced its DNA binding activity as predicted by in silico and shown by in vitro DNA-binding activity. Overall, the data suggest that (i) mangiferin inhibited AGE-induced ERK activation thereby inhibited PPARγ phosphorylation and cytoplasmic translocation; (ii) mangiferin interacts with PPARγ and enhances its DNA-binding ability. With these dual effects, mangiferin can be a likely candidate for developing therapeutic drug against diabetes. PMID:23058985

  11. Sulforaphane inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced pericyte damage by reducing expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sayaka; Matsui, Takanori; Ojima, Ayako; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) not only inhibit DNA synthesis but also play a role in diabetic retinopathy by evoking apoptosis and inflammation in retinal pericytes via interaction with a receptor for AGE (RAGE). Similarly, sulforaphane, which is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate that is found in widely consumed cruciferous vegetables, protects against oxidative stress-induced tissue damage. Therefore, we hypothesized that sulforaphane could inhibit AGE-induced pericytes injury through its antioxidative properties. Advanced glycation end product stimulated superoxide generation as well as RAGE gene and protein expression in bovine-cultured retinal pericytes, and these effects were prevented by the treatment with sulforaphane. Antibodies directed against RAGE also blocked AGE-evoked reactive oxygen species generation in pericytes. Sulforaphane and antibodies directed against RAGE significantly inhibited the AGE-induced decrease in DNA synthesis, apoptotic cell death, and up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 messenger RNA levels in pericytes. For the first time, the present study demonstrates that sulforaphane could inhibit DNA synthesis, apoptotic cell death, and inflammatory reactions in AGE-exposed pericytes, partly by suppressing RAGE expression via its antioxidative properties. Blockade of the AGE-RAGE axis in pericytes by sulforaphane might be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25241332

  12. Advanced glycation end product 3 (AGE3) suppresses the mineralization of mouse stromal ST2 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells by increasing TGF-β expression and secretion.

    PubMed

    Notsu, Masakazu; Yamaguchi, Toru; Okazaki, Kyoko; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Ogawa, Noriko; Kanazawa, Ippei; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2014-07-01

    In diabetic patients, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) cause bone fragility because of deterioration of bone quality. We previously showed that AGEs suppressed the mineralization of mouse stromal ST2 cells. TGF-β is abundant in bone, and enhancement of its signal causes bone quality deterioration. However, whether TGF-β signaling is involved in the AGE-induced suppression of mineralization during the osteoblast lineage remains unknown. We therefore examined the roles of TGF-β in the AGE-induced suppression of mineralization of ST2 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells. AGE3 significantly (P < .001) inhibited mineralization in both cell types, whereas transfection with small interfering RNA for the receptor for AGEs (RAGEs) significantly (P < .05) recovered this process in ST2 cells. AGE3 increased (P < .001) the expression of TGF-β mRNA and protein, which was partially antagonized by transfection with RAGE small interfering RNA. Treatment with a TGF-β type I receptor kinase inhibitor, SD208, recovered AGE3-induced decreases in osterix (P < .001) and osteocalcin (P < .05) and antagonized the AGE3-induced increase in Runx2 mRNA expression in ST2 cells (P < .001). Moreover, SD208 completely and dose dependently rescued AGE3-induced suppression of mineralization in both cell types. In contrast, SD208 intensified AGE3-induced suppression of cell proliferation as well as AGE3-induced apoptosis in proliferating ST2 cells. These findings indicate that, after cells become confluent, AGE3 partially inhibits the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblastic cells by binding to RAGE and increasing TGF-β expression and secretion. They also suggest that TGF-β adversely affects bone quality not only in primary osteoporosis but also in diabetes-related bone disorder. PMID:24758301

  13. Autofluorescence characterization of advanced glycation end products of hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneshwaran, Nadanathangam; Bijukumar, Gopalakrishnapillai; Karmakar, Nivedita; Anand, Sneh; Misra, Anoop

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the analysis of autofluorescence of advanced glycation end products of hemoglobin (Hb-AGE). Formed as a result of slow, spontaneous and non-enzymatic glycation reactions, Hb-AGE possesses a characteristic autofluorescence at 308/345 nm ( λex/ λem). Even in the presence of heme as a quenching molecule, the surface presence of the glycated adduct gave rise to autofluorescence with the quantum yield of 0.19. The specificity of monoclonal antibody developed against common AGE structure with Hb-AGE was demonstrated using reduction in fluorescence polarization value due to increased molecular volume while binding. The formation of fluorescent adduct in hemoglobin in the advanced stage of glycation and the non-fluorescent HbA 1c will be of major use in distinguishing and to know the past status of diabetes mellitus. While autofluorescence correlated highly with HbA 1c value under in vivo condition ( r=0.85), it was moderate in the clinical samples ( r=0.55). The results suggest a non-linear relation between glycemia and glycation, indicating the application of Hb-AGE as a measure of susceptibility to glycation rather than glycation itself.

  14. The road to advanced glycation end products: a mechanistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Cho, S-J; Roman, G; Yeboah, F; Konishi, Y

    2007-01-01

    Protein glycation is a slow natural process involving the chemical modification of the reactive amino and guanidine functions in amino acids by sugars and carbohydrates-derived reactive carbonyls. Its deleterious consequences are obvious in the case of long-lived proteins in aged people and are exacerbated by the high blood concentration of sugars in diabetic patients. The non-enzymatic glycation of proteins occurs through a wide range of concurrent processes comprising condensation, rearrangement, fragmentation, and oxidation reactions. Using a few well established intermediates such as Schiff base, Amadori product and reactive a-dicarbonyls as milestones and the results of in vitro glycation investigations, an overall detailed mechanistic analysis of protein glycation is presented for the first time. The pathways leading to several advanced glycation end products (AGEs) such as (carboxymethyl)lysine, pentosidine, and glucosepane are outlined, whereas other AGEs useful as potential biomarkers of glycation are only briefly mentioned. The current stage of the development of glycation inhibitors has been reviewed with an emphasis on their mechanism of action. PMID:17584071

  15. Advancing the Development of Glycated Protein Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kameya, Miho; Sakaguchi-Mikami, Akane; Ferri, Stefano; Tsugawa, Wakako; Sode, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Research advances in biochemical molecules have led to the development of convenient and reproducible biosensing molecules for glycated proteins, such as those based on the enzymes fructosyl amino acid oxidase (FAOX) or fructosyl peptide oxidase (FPOX). Recently, more attractive biosensing molecules with potential applications in next-generation biosensing of glycated proteins have been aggressively reported. We review 2 such molecules, fructosamine 6-kinase (FN6K) and fructosyl amino acid-binding protein, as well as their recent applications in the development of glycated protein biosensing systems. Research on FN6K and fructosyl amino acid-binding protein has been opening up new possibilities for the development of highly sensitive and proteolytic-digestion-free biosensing systems for glycated proteins. PMID:25627465

  16. Nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, inhibits advanced glycation end product (AGE)-elicited mesangial cell damage by suppressing AGE receptor (RAGE) expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya

    2009-07-24

    The interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptor RAGE mediates the progressive alteration in renal architecture and loss of renal function in diabetic nephropathy. Oxidative stress generation and inflammation also play a central role in diabetic nephropathy. This study investigated whether and how nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), blocked the AGE-elicited mesangial cell damage in vitro. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, down-regulated RAGE mRNA levels and subsequently reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGE-exposed mesangial cells. AGE increased mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production in mesangial cells, both of which were prevented by the treatment with nifedipine, but not amlodipine. The beneficial effects of nifedipine on AGE-exposed mesangial cells were blocked by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}). Although nifedipine did not affect expression levels of PPAR-{gamma}, it increased the PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in mesangial cells. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-inflammatory agent against AGE by suppressing RAGE expression in cultured mesangial cells via PPAR-{gamma} activation.

  17. Targeting advanced glycation with pharmaceutical agents: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Borg, Danielle J; Forbes, Josephine M

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are the final products of the Maillard reaction, a complex process that has been studied by food chemists for a century. Over the past 30 years, the biological significance of advanced glycation has also been discovered. There is mounting evidence that advanced glycation plays a homeostatic role within the body and that food-related Maillard products, intermediates such as reactive α-dicarbonyl compounds and AGEs, may influence this process. It remains to be understood, at what point AGEs and their intermediates become pathogenic and contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic diseases that inflict current society. Diabetes and its complications have been a major focus of AGE biology due to the abundance of excess sugar and α-dicarbonyls in this family of diseases. While further temporal information is required, a number of pharmacological agents that inhibit components of the advanced glycation pathway have already showed promising results in preclinical models. These therapies appear to have a wide range of mechanistic actions to reduce AGE load. Some of these agents including Alagebrium, have translated successfully to clinical trials, while others such as aminoguanidine, have had undesirable side-effect profiles. This review will discuss different pharmacological agents that have been used to reduce AGE burden in preclinical models of disease with a focus on diabetes and its complications, compare outcomes of those therapies that have reached clinical trials, and provide further rationale for the use of inhibitors of the glycation pathway in chronic diseases. PMID:27392438

  18. Epicatechin breaks preformed glycated serum albumin and reverses the retinal accumulation of advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Moon, Min Kyong; Kim, Jin Sook

    2015-02-01

    The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is associated with many of the complications of diabetes mellitus, including diabetic retinopathy. AGE-breakers, such as N-phenacylthiazolium and alagebrium, have been proposed as therapeutic agents for reversing the increase in protein crosslinking in diabetes. (-)-Epicatechin is a major dietary flavonoid with a wide range of health-promoting biological activities. The aim of this study was to determine the potential effect of (-)-epicatechin in reducing the burden of AGEs in vitro and in vivo and to evaluate whether the reduced AGE burden could translate into improvement in retinal vascular function in exogenously AGE-injected rats. Glycated human serum albumin was purified from patients with diabetes. The breakdown of the already formed AGEs was studied by treating glycated human serum albumin with (-)-epicatechin. To study the effect of (-)-epicatechin on retinal vascular function, exogenously AGE-injected rats were treated with (-)-epicatechin (50 and 100 mg/kg i.p.) for two weeks. Apoptosis of retinal vascular cells was quantified using TUNEL staining. The AGE load in the retinas was determined via immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis. (-)-Epicatechin was able to break preformed glycated human serum albumin in vitro as well as reduce AGE accumulation in retinas in vivo in a dose dependent manner. In exogenously AGE-injected rats, treatment with (-)-epicatechin was evidenced by an improved retinal vascular apoptosis. AGE burden in retinas was also reduced upon treatment. This study suggests that (-)-epicatechin could represent a valuable drug for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy by reducing the AGE burden. PMID:25530268

  19. Engineered glycated amino dendritic polymers as specific nonviral gene delivery vectors targeting the receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Giron-Gonzalez, M Dolores; Morales-Portillo, Arturo; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Lopez-Jaramillo, F Javier; Hernandez-Mateo, Fernando; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Salto-Gonzalez, Rafael

    2014-06-18

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is involved in diabetes or angiogenesis in tumors. Under pathological conditions, RAGE is overexpressed and upon ligand binding and internalization stimulates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation. In this work, amino dendritic polymers PEI 25 kDa and alkylated derivatives of PAMAM-G2 were engineered by the nonenzymatic Maillard glycation reaction to generate novel AGE-containing gene delivery vectors targeting the RAGE. The glycated dendritic polymers were easily prepared and retained the capability to bind and protect DNA from endonucleases. Furthermore, while glycation decreased the transfection efficiency of the dendriplexes in CHO-k1 cells which do not express RAGE, glycated dendriplexes acted as efficient transfection reagents in CHO-k1 cells which stably express recombinant RAGE. In addition, preincubation with BSA-AGEs, a natural ligand of the RAGE, or dansyl cadaverine, an inhibitor of the RAGE internalization, blocked transfection, confirming their specificity toward RAGE. The results were confirmed in NRK and RAW264.7 cell lines, which naturally express the receptor. The glycated compounds retain their transfection efficiency in the presence of serum and promote in vivo transfection in a mouse model. Accordingly, RAGE is a suitable molecular target for the development of site-directed engineered glycated nonviral gene vectors. PMID:24852962

  20. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), but not high glucose, inhibit the osteoblastic differentiation of mouse stromal ST2 cells through the suppression of osterix expression, and inhibit cell growth and increasing cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Kyoko; Yamaguchi, Toru; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Notsu, Masakazu; Ogawa, Noriko; Yano, Shozo; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2012-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to be associated with osteoporotic fractures through a decrease in osteoblastic bone formation rather than an increase in osteoclastic bone resorption. However, its precise mechanism is unknown, and we examined whether or not high glucose or advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which play key roles in the pathogenesis and complications of diabetes, would affect the osteoblastic differentiation, growth, and apoptosis of mouse stromal ST2 cells. Ten to 200 μg/mL AGE2 or AGE3 alone dose-dependently inhibited the mineralization. AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly inhibited alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities as well as the mineralization of the cells (p < 0.01). In contrast, 22 mM glucose alone or in combination with 200 μg/mL AGE2 or AGE3 did not affect these cellular phenotypes. Real-time PCR showed that AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly decreased mRNA expressions of osteocalcin as well as osterix on day 14 (p < 0.01). Western blot analysis showed that AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) also decreased the levels of Runx2 and osterix protein expressions on days 7 and 14. AGE2 or AGE3 significantly suppressed cell growth and increased apoptotic cell death in time- and dose-dependent manners (p < 0.01). Moreover, AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly increased mRNA expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) on days 2 and 3 (p < 0.01). These results suggest that AGE2 and AGE3, but not high glucose, may inhibit the osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells by decreasing osterix expression and partly by increasing RAGE expression, as well as inhibiting cell growth and increasing cell apoptosis. PMID:22903508

  1. Role of advanced glycation end products in cellular signaling☆

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Christiane; Jacobs, Kathleen; Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete Santos, Anne; Grune, Tilman; Simm, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Improvements in health care and lifestyle have led to an elevated lifespan and increased focus on age-associated diseases, such as neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease, frailty and arteriosclerosis. In all these chronic diseases protein, lipid or nucleic acid modifications are involved, including cross-linked and non-degradable aggregates, such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Formation of endogenous or uptake of dietary AGEs can lead to further protein modifications and activation of several inflammatory signaling pathways. This review will give an overview of the most prominent AGE-mediated signaling cascades, AGE receptor interactions, prevention of AGE formation and the impact of AGEs during pathophysiological processes. PMID:24624331

  2. Vascular Effects of Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Stirban, Alin; Tschöpe, Diethelm

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated lately demonstrating that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important role in the development of diabetic and cardiovascular complications as well as the development of other chronic diseases. AGEs originating from diet have a significant contribution to the AGEs body pool and therefore dietary interventions aiming at reducing AGEs load are believed to exert health promoting effects. This review summarizes the evidence from clinical studies regarding effects of dietary AGEs on the vascular system, highlighting also the different aspects of vascular tests. It also advocates an extension of dietary recommendations towards the promotion of cooking methods that reduce dietary AGEs in consumed foods. PMID:26089897

  3. Advanced Glycation End-Product Accumulation Reduces Vitreous Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, On-Tat; Good, Samuel D.; Lamy, Ricardo; Kudisch, Max; Stewart, Jay M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of nonenzymatic cross-linking (glycation) upon the permeability of the vitreous to small- and large-solute diffusion. Methods. Vitreous from freshly excised porcine eyes was treated for 30 minutes with control or 0.01%, 0.1%, or 1% methylglyoxal (MG) solution. The efficacy of the glycation regimen was verified by measuring nonenzymatic cross-link density by fluorescence in the vitreous samples. Resistance to collagenase digestion as well as Nε-(carboxyethyl) lysine (CEL) content were also measured. The permeability coefficient for fluorescein and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-IgG diffusion through 3 mL of the vitreous samples was determined by using a custom permeability tester. Results. Vitreous cross-linking with MG treatment was confirmed by increased fluorescence, increased CEL concentration, and increased resistance to collagenase digestion. Vitreous glycation resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the permeability coefficient for fluorescein diffusion when either 0.1% or 1% MG solution was used (5.36 ± 5.24 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.04; and 4.03 ± 2.1 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.001; respectively, compared with control, 9.77 ± 5.45 × 10−5 cm s−1). The permeability coefficient for diffusion of FITC-IgG between control (9.9 ± 6.37 × 10−5 cm s−1) and treatment groups was statistically significant at all MG concentrations (0.01% MG: 3.95 ± 3.44 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.003; 0.1% MG: 4.27 ± 1.32 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.004; and 0.1% MG: 3.72 ± 2.49 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.001). Conclusions. Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) accumulation reduces vitreous permeability when glycation is performed in ex vivo porcine vitreous. The permeability change was more pronounced for the larger solute, suggesting a lower threshold for AGE-induced permeability changes to impact the movement of proteins through the vitreous when compared with smaller molecules. PMID:26024075

  4. Glycation of H1 Histone by 3-Deoxyglucosone: Effects on Protein Structure and Generation of Different Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin Mohammad; Rabbani, Gulam; Ahmad, Saheem; Hasan, Qambar; Khan, Rizwan Hasan; Alam, Khursheed; Choi, Inho

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) culminate from the non-enzymatic reaction between a free carbonyl group of a reducing sugar and free amino group of proteins. 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG) is one of the dicarbonyl species that rapidly forms several protein-AGE complexes that are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases, particularly diabetic complications. In this study, the generation of AGEs (Nε-carboxymethyl lysine and pentosidine) by 3-DG in H1 histone protein was characterized by evaluating extent of side chain modification (lysine and arginine) and formation of Amadori products as well as carbonyl contents using several physicochemical techniques. Results strongly suggested that 3-DG is a potent glycating agent that forms various intermediates and AGEs during glycation reactions and affects the secondary structure of the H1 protein. Structural changes and AGE formation may influence the function of H1 histone and compromise chromatin structures in cases of secondary diabetic complications. PMID:26121680

  5. Mass spectrometric determination of early and advanced glycation in biology.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Naila; Ashour, Amal; Thornalley, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Protein glycation in biological systems occurs predominantly on lysine, arginine and N-terminal residues of proteins. Major quantitative glycation adducts are found at mean extents of modification of 1-5 mol percent of proteins. These are glucose-derived fructosamine on lysine and N-terminal residues of proteins, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone on arginine residues and N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine residues mainly formed by the oxidative degradation of fructosamine. Total glycation adducts of different types are quantified by stable isotopic dilution analysis liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Metabolism of glycated proteins is followed by LC-MS/MS of glycation free adducts as minor components of the amino acid metabolome. Glycated proteins and sites of modification within them - amino acid residues modified by the glycating agent moiety - are identified and quantified by label-free and stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) high resolution mass spectrometry. Sites of glycation by glucose and methylglyoxal in selected proteins are listed. Key issues in applying proteomics techniques to analysis of glycated proteins are: (i) avoiding compromise of analysis by formation, loss and relocation of glycation adducts in pre-analytic processing; (ii) specificity of immunoaffinity enrichment procedures, (iii) maximizing protein sequence coverage in mass spectrometric analysis for detection of glycation sites, and (iv) development of bioinformatics tools for prediction of protein glycation sites. Protein glycation studies have important applications in biology, ageing and translational medicine - particularly on studies of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, renal failure, neurological disorders and cancer. Mass spectrometric analysis of glycated proteins has yet to find widespread use clinically. Future use in health screening, disease diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring, and

  6. The Mechanisms of Inhibition of Advanced Glycation End Products Formation through Polyphenols in Hyperglycemic Condition.

    PubMed

    Khangholi, Shahpour; Majid, Fadzilah Adibah Abdul; Berwary, Najat Jabbar Ahmed; Ahmad, Farediah; Aziz, Ramlan Bin Abd

    2016-01-01

    Glycation, the non-enzymatic binding of glucose to free amino groups of an amino acid, yields irreversible heterogeneous compounds known as advanced glycation end products. Those products play a significant role in diabetic complications. In the present article we briefly discuss the contribution of advanced glycation end products to the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, such as atherosclerosis, diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and wound healing. Then we mention the various mechanisms by which polyphenols inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products. Finally, recent supporting documents are presented to clarify the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on the formation of advanced glycation end products. Phytochemicals apply several antiglycation mechanisms, including glucose metabolism, amelioration of oxidative stress, scavenging of dicarbonyl species, and up/down-regulation of gene expression. To utilize polyphenols in order to remedy diabetic complications, we must explore, examine and clarify the action mechanisms of the components of polyphenols. PMID:26550791

  7. Determination of advanced glycation endproducts in cooked meat products.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gengjun; Smith, J Scott

    2015-02-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), a pathogenic factor implicated in diabetes and other chronic diseases, are produced in cooked meat products. The objective of this study was to determine the AGE content, as measured by Nε-carboxymethyllysine (CML) levels, in cooked chicken, pork, beef and fish (salmon and tilapia) prepared by three common cooking methods used by U.S. consumers: frying, baking, and broiling. The CML was detected in all the cooked samples, but the levels were dependent on types of meat, cooking conditions, and the final internal temperature. Broiling and frying at higher cooking temperature produced higher levels of CML, and broiled beef contained the highest CML content (21.8μg/g). Baked salmon (8.6μg/g) and baked tilapia (9.7μg/g) contained less CML as compared to the other muscle food samples. PMID:25172699

  8. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and diabetic vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2005-02-01

    Diabetic vascular complication is a leading cause of acquired blindness, end-stage renal failure, a variety of neuropathies and accelerated atherosclerosis, which could account for disabilities and high mortality rates in patients with diabetes. Chronic hyperglycemia is essentially involved in the development and progression of diabetic micro- and macroangiopathy. Among various metabolic derangements implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complication, advanced glycation end product (AGE) hypothesis is most compatible with the theory of 'hyperglycemic memory'. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of diabetic vascular complication, specially focusing on AGEs and their receptor (RAGE) system. Several types of AGE inhibitors and their therapeutic implications in this devastating disorder are also discussed here. PMID:18220586

  9. Targeting advanced glycation endproducts and mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ward, Micheal S; Fortheringham, Amelia K; Cooper, Mark E; Forbes, Josephine M

    2013-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of mortality in the Western World. The development and onset of disease can be attributed to many risk factors including genetic susceptibility, diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis. Numerous studies highlight the production of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and interaction with their receptor (RAGE) as playing a key pathogenic role. The AGEs-RAGE axis is thought to contribute to a proinflammatory environment inducing cellular dysfunction which cascades towards pathology. Mitochondrial dysfunction concurrently plays a role in these proinflammatory responses presenting excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production under pathological conditions. This ROS release can exacerbate the production of AGEs fuelling the fire somewhat. However, the AGEs-RAGE axis may influence mitochondrial function independently of inflammation. Therefore instigation of the AGEs-RAGE axis may facilitate spiralling towards pathology on many fronts including CVD development. PMID:23871446

  10. Mangiferin suppressed advanced glycation end products (AGEs) through NF-κB deactivation and displayed anti-inflammatory effects in streptozotocin and high fat diet-diabetic cardiomyopathy rats.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jun; Zheng, Dezhi; Fung, Gabriel; Deng, Haoyu; Chen, Lin; Liang, Jiali; Jiang, Yan; Hu, Yonghe

    2016-03-01

    Given the importance of the aggregation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and cardiac inflammation in the onset and progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), our objective in this study was to demonstrate the cardioprotective effect of mangiferin, an antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory agent, on diabetic rat model. The DCM model was established by a high-fat diet and a low dose of streptozotocin. DCM rats were treated orally with mangiferin (20 mg/kg) for 16 weeks. Serum and left ventricular myocardium were collected for determination of inflammatory cytokines. AGEs mRNA and protein expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and receptor for AGEs (RAGE) in myocardium were assayed by real-time PCR and Western blot. ROS levels were measured by dihydroethidium fluorescence staining. NF-κB binding activity was assayed by TransAM NF-κB p65 ELISA kit. Chronic treatment with mangiferin decreased the levels of myocardial enzymes (CK-MB, LDH) and inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β). Meanwhile, NF-κB is inhibited by the reduction of nuclear translocation of p65 subunit, and mangiferin reduced AGE production and decreased the mRNA and protein expression of RAGE in DCM rats. Our data indicated that mangiferin could significantly ameliorate DCM by preventing the release of inflammatory cytokines, and inhibiting ROS accumulation, AGE/RAGE production, and NF-κB nuclear translocation, suggesting that mangiferin treatment might be beneficial in DCM. PMID:26751764

  11. Study of an Unusual Advanced Glycation End-Product (AGE) Derived from Glyoxal Using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Clavijo, Andrea F.; Duque-Daza, Carlos A.; Romero Canelon, Isolda; Barrow, Mark P.; Kilgour, David; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2014-04-01

    Glycation is a post-translational modification (PTM) that affects the physiological properties of peptides and proteins. In particular, during hyperglycaemia, glycation by α-dicarbonyl compounds generate α-dicarbonyl-derived glycation products also called α-dicarbonyl-derived advanced glycation end products. Glycation by the α-dicarbonyl compound known as glyoxal was studied in model peptides by MS/MS using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. An unusual type of glyoxal-derived AGE with a mass addition of 21.98436 Da is reported in peptides containing combinations of two arginine-two lysine, and one arginine-three lysine amino acid residues. Electron capture dissociation and collisionally activated dissociation results supported that the unusual glyoxal-derived AGE is formed at the guanidino group of arginine, and a possible structure is proposed to illustrate the 21.9843 Da mass addition.

  12. Advanced glycation end-products: modifiable environmental factors profoundly mediate insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ottum, Mona S.; Mistry, Anahita M.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products are toxic by-products of metabolism and are also acquired from high-temperature processed foods. They promote oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and nucleotides. Aging and chronic diseases are strongly associated with markers for oxidative stress, especially advanced glycation end-products, and resistance to peripheral insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Modifiable environmental factors including high levels of refined and simple carbohydrate diets, hypercaloric diets and sedentary lifestyles drive endogenous formation of advanced glycation end-products via accumulation of highly reactive glycolysis intermediates and activation of the polyol/aldose reductase pathway producing high intracellular fructose. High advanced glycation end-products overwhelm innate defenses of enzymes and receptor-mediated endocytosis and promote cell damage via the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Oxidative stress disturbs cell signal transduction, especially insulin-mediated metabolic responses. Here we review emerging evidence that restriction of dietary advanced glycation end-products significantly reduces total systemic load and insulin resistance in animals and humans in diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome, healthy populations and dementia. Of clinical importance, this insulin sensitizing effect is independent of physical activity, caloric intake and adiposity level. PMID:26236094

  13. Advanced glycation endproducts in food and their effects on health.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Malene W; Hedegaard, Rikke V; Andersen, Jeanette M; de Courten, Barbora; Bügel, Susanne; Nielsen, John; Skibsted, Leif H; Dragsted, Lars O

    2013-10-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) form by Maillard-reactions after initial binding of aldehydes with amines or amides in heated foods or in living organisms. The mechanisms of formation may include ionic as well as oxidative and radical pathways. The reactions may proceed within proteins to form high-molecular weight (HMW) AGEs or among small molecules to form low-molecular weight (LMW) AGEs. All free amino acids form AGEs, but lysine or arginine side chains dominate AGE formation within proteins. The analysis of AGEs in foods and body fluids is most often performed by ELISA or LC-MS; however, none of the methodologies cover all HMW and LMW AGEs. Most research is, therefore, carried out using 'representative' AGE compounds, most often N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML). Only LMW AGEs, including peptide-bound forms, and carbonyls may be absorbed from the gut and contribute to the body burden of AGEs. Some AGEs interact with specific pro- or anti-inflammatory receptors. Most studies on the biological effects of AGEs have been carried out by administering heated foods. The pro-inflammatory and deteriorating biological effects of AGEs in these studies, therefore, need further confirmation. The current review points out several research needs in order to address important questions on AGEs in foods and health. PMID:23867544

  14. Key structural and functional differences between early and advanced glycation products.

    PubMed

    Paradela-Dobarro, Beatriz; Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Alonso, Jana; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; González-Peteiro, Mercedes; González-Juanatey, José R; Álvarez, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    Most of the studies on advanced glycation end products (AGE) have been carried out with uncharacterized mixtures of AGE, so the observed effects cannot be linked to defined structures. Therefore, we analysed the structural differences between glycated human serum albumin (gHSA), a low glycated protein, and AGE-human serum albumin (AGE-HSA), a high glycated protein, and we compared their effects on endothelial functionality. Specifically, we characterized glycation and composition on both early and advanced stage glycation products of gHSA and AGE-HSA by using the MALDI-TOF-mass spectrometry assay. Furthermore, we studied the effects of both types of glycation products on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and in the expression of vascular and intercellular cell adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and ICAM-1) on human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). We also measured the adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to HUVEC. Low concentrations of gHSA enhanced long-lasting ROS production in HUVEC, whereas lower concentrations of AGE-HSA caused the anticipation of the induced extracellular ROS production. Both gHSA and AGE-HSA up-regulated the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 at mRNA levels. Nevertheless, only AGE-HSA increased protein levels and enhanced the adhesion of PBMC to HUVEC monolayers. Functional differences were observed between gHSA and AGE-HSA, causing the latter an anticipation of the pro-oxidant effects in comparison to gHSA. Moreover, although both molecules induced genetic up-regulation of adhesion molecules in HUVEC, only the high glycated protein functionally increased mononuclear cell adhesion to endothelial monolayers. These observations could have important clinical consequences in the development of diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26581238

  15. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products mitigates vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Manli; Zhang, Le; Cao, Qingxin; Song, Ying; Liu, Yuxiu; Gong, Jianbin

    2016-08-01

    Vascular dysfunction including vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction in hypertension often results in poor clinical outcomes and increased risk of vascular accidents. We investigate the effect of treatment with soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) on vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Firstly, the aortic AGE/RAGE pathway was investigated in SHR. Secondly, SHR received intraperitoneal injections of sRAGE daily for 4 weeks. Effect of sRAGE against vascular dysfunction in SHR and underlying mechanism was investigated. SHR aortas exhibited enhanced activity of aldose reductase, reduced activity of glyoxalase 1, accumulation of methylglyoxal and AGE, and upregulated expression of RAGE. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE had no significant effect on blood pressure, but alleviated aortic hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction. In vitro, treatment with sRAGE reversed the effect of incubation with AGE on proliferation of smooth muscle cells and endothelial function. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE abated oxidative stress, suppressed inflammation and NF-κB activation, improved the balance between Ang II and Ang-(1-7) through reducing angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and enhancing ACE2 expression, and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) expression in aortas. In conclusion, treatment with sRAGE alleviated vascular adverse remodeling in SHR, possibly via suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation, improvement in RAS balance, and activation of PPAR-γ pathway. PMID:27426491

  16. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Regulates Adipocyte Hypertrophy and Insulin Sensitivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Masayo; Koyama, Hidenori; Otsuka, Yoshiko; Morioka, Tomoaki; Mori, Katsuhito; Shoji, Takuhito; Mima, Yohei; Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya; Shioi, Atsushi; Emoto, Masanori; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Nishizawa, Yoshiki; Kurajoh, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Inaba, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been shown to be involved in adiposity as well as atherosclerosis even in nondiabetic conditions. In this study, we examined mechanisms underlying how RAGE regulates adiposity and insulin sensitivity. RAGE overexpression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes using adenoviral gene transfer accelerated adipocyte hypertrophy, whereas inhibitions of RAGE by small interfering RNA significantly decrease adipocyte hypertrophy. Furthermore, double knockdown of high mobility group box-1 and S100b, both of which are RAGE ligands endogenously expressed in 3T3-L1 cells, also canceled RAGE-medicated adipocyte hypertrophy, implicating a fundamental role of ligands–RAGE ligation. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by RAGE overexpression is associated with suppression of glucose transporter type 4 and adiponectin mRNA expression, attenuated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, and insulin-stimulated signaling. Toll-like receptor (Tlr)2 mRNA, but not Tlr4 mRNA, is rapidly upregulated by RAGE overexpression, and inhibition of Tlr2 almost completely abrogates RAGE-mediated adipocyte hypertrophy. Finally, RAGE−/− mice exhibited significantly less body weight, epididymal fat weight, epididymal adipocyte size, higher serum adiponectin levels, and higher insulin sensitivity than wild-type mice. RAGE deficiency is associated with early suppression of Tlr2 mRNA expression in adipose tissues. Thus, RAGE appears to be involved in mouse adipocyte hypertrophy and insulin sensitivity, whereas Tlr2 regulation may partly play a role. PMID:23011593

  17. Glycative stress from advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and dicarbonyls: An emerging biological factor in cancer onset and progression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jer-An; Wu, Chi-Hao; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Hsia, Shih-Min; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, glycative stress from exogenous or endogenous advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and highly reactive dicarbonyls has gained great attention for its putative effects on cancer development. AGEs are a group of compounds formed from the complex chemical reaction of reducing sugars with compounds containing an amino group. AGEs bind to and activate the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), which is a predominant modulator of inflammation-associated cancer, and AGEs induce reactive oxygen species that are an important regulator of the hallmarks of cancer. Dicarbonyls, which are formed during glycolysis, lipid oxidation, or protein degradation, include glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone and are regarded as major precursors of AGEs. These dicarbonyls not only fuel the AGE pool in living organisms but also evoke carbonyl stress, which may contribute to the carbonylative damage of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, or DNA. Carbonylative damage then leads to many lesions, some of which are implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. In this review, studies regarding the effects of AGEs and dicarbonyls on cancer onset or progression are systematically discussed, and the utilization of AGE inhibitors and dicarbonyl scavengers in cancer therapy are noted. PMID:26774083

  18. Inhibitory effect of GSPE on RAGE expression induced by advanced glycation end products in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng-Lei; Gao, Hai-Qing; Shen, Lin

    2007-10-01

    Advanced glycation end products' (AGEs) engagement of a cell-surface receptor for AGEs (RAGE) has been causally implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications via induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent alteration of many gene expressions, including RAGE itself. Grapeseed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE), which is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound, has been reported to possess potent radical-scavenging and antioxidant properties and to display significant cardiovascular protective action. In this study, we investigated whether GSPE could inhibit AGE-induced RAGE expression through interference with ROS generation in human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) was prepared by incubating BSA with high-concentration glucose. Stimulation of cultured HUVECs with 200 microg/mL of AGE-BSA significantly enhanced intracellular ROS formation and subsequently upregulated the protein and mRNA expression of RAGE; unmodified BSA and GSPE alone had no effect. However, GSPE preincubation markedly downregulated AGE-induced surface expression of RAGE in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In AGE-stimulated HUVECs, GSPE also dose-dependently decreased RAGE mRNA levels and inhibited AGE-induced ROS generation at defined time periods. These results demonstrate that GSPE can inhibit enhanced RAGE expression in AGE-exposed endothelial cells by suppressing ROS generation, thereby limiting the AGE-RAGE interaction. Hence, GSPE may have therapeutic potential in the prevention and treatment of vascular complications in diabetic patients. PMID:18049312

  19. Update on Mechanisms of Renal Tubule Injury Caused by Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Yuan, Yang; Sun, Zilin

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) caused by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may be associated with lipid accumulation in the kidneys. This study was designed to investigate whether Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML, a member of the AGEs family) increases lipid accumulation in a human renal tubular epithelial cell line (HK-2) via increasing cholesterol synthesis and uptake and reducing cholesterol efflux through endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). Our results showed that CML disrupts cholesterol metabolism in HK-2 cells by activating sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) and liver X receptor (LXR), followed by an increase in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) mediated cholesterol synthesis and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) mediated cholesterol uptake and a reduction in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediated cholesterol efflux, ultimately causing lipid accumulation in HK-2 cells. All of these responses could be suppressed by an ERS inhibitor, which suggests that CML causes lipid accumulation in renal tubule cells through ERS and that the inhibition of ERS is a potential novel approach to treating CML-induced renal tubular foam cell formation. PMID:27034941

  20. Effect of diet-derived advanced glycation end products on inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kellow, Nicole J; Coughlan, Melinda T

    2015-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formed via the Maillard reaction during the thermal processing of food contributes to the flavor, color, and aroma of food. A proportion of food-derived AGEs and their precursors is intestinally absorbed and accumulates within cells and tissues. AGEs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes-related complications and several chronic diseases via interaction with the receptor for AGEs, which promotes the transcription of genes that control inflammation. The dicarbonyls, highly reactive intermediates of AGE formation, are also generated during food processing and may incite inflammatory responses through 1) the suppression of protective pathways, 2) the incretin axis, 3) the modulation of immune-mediated signaling, and 4) changes in gut microbiota profile and metabolite sensors. In animal models, restriction of dietary AGEs attenuates chronic low-grade inflammation, but current evidence from human studies is less clear. Here, the emerging relationship between excess dietary AGE consumption and inflammation is explored, the utility of dietary AGE restriction as a therapeutic strategy for the attenuation of chronic diseases is discussed, and possible avenues for future investigation are suggested. PMID:26377870

  1. Longistatin in tick saliva blocks advanced glycation end-product receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Anisuzzaman; Hatta, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Takeharu; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Islam, M. Khyrul; Alim, M. Abdul; Anas, M. Abu; Hasan, M. Mehedi; Matsumoto, Yasunobu; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Fujisaki, Kozo; Tsuji, Naotoshi

    2014-01-01

    Ticks are notorious hematophagous ectoparasites and vectors of many deadly pathogens. As an effective vector, ticks must break the strong barrier provided by the skin of their host during feeding, and their saliva contains a complex mixture of bioactive molecules that paralyze host defenses. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mediates immune cell activation at inflammatory sites and is constitutively and highly expressed in skin. Here, we demonstrate that longistatin secreted with saliva of the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis binds RAGE and modulates the host immune response. Similar to other RAGE ligands, longistatin specifically bound the RAGE V domain, and stimulated cultured HUVECs adhered to a longistatin-coated surface; this binding was dramatically inhibited by soluble RAGE or RAGE siRNA. Treatment of HUVECs with longistatin prior to stimulation substantially attenuated cellular oxidative stress and prevented NF-κB translocation, thereby reducing adhesion molecule and cytokine production. Recombinant longistatin inhibited RAGE-mediated migration of mouse peritoneal resident cells (mPRCs) and ameliorated inflammation in mouse footpad edema and pneumonia models. Importantly, tick bite upregulated RAGE ligands in skin, and endogenous longistatin attenuated RAGE-mediated inflammation during tick feeding. Our results suggest that longistatin is a RAGE antagonist that suppresses tick bite–associated inflammation, allowing successful blood-meal acquisition from hosts. PMID:25401185

  2. Inhibitory Effect of Metformin and Pyridoxamine in the Formation of Early, Intermediate and Advanced Glycation End-Products

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saheem; Shahab, Uzma; Baig, Mohd. Hassan; Khan, Mohd. Sajid; Khan, M. Salman; Srivastava, A. K.; Saeed, Mohd; Moinuddin

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-enzymatic glycation is the addition of free carbonyl group of reducing sugar to the free amino groups of proteins, resulting in the formation of a Schiff base and an Amadori product. Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) is one of the carbonyl species which reacts rapidly with the free amino groups of proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The highly reactive dihydroxyacetone phosphate is a derivative of dihydroxyacetone (DHA), and a product of glycolysis, having potential glycating effects to form AGEs. The formation of AGEs results in the generation of free radicals which play an important role in the pathophysiology of aging and diabetic complications. While the formation of DHA-AGEs has been demonstrated previously, no extensive studies have been performed to assess the inhibition of AGE inhibitors at all the three stages of glycation (early, intermediate and late) using metformin (MF) and pyridoxamine (PM) as a novel inhibitor. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we report glycation of human serum albumin (HSA) & its characterization by various spectroscopic techniques. Furthermore, inhibition of glycation products at all the stages of glycation was also studied. Spectroscopic analysis suggests structural perturbations in the HSA as a result of modification which might be due to generation of free radicals and formation of AGEs. Conclusion The inhibition in the formation of glycation reaction reveals that Pyridoxamine is a better antiglycating agent than Metformin at all stages of the glycation (early, intermediate and late stages). PMID:24023728

  3. A cross talk between class A scavenger receptor and receptor for advanced glycation end-products contributes to diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Xu, Yiming; Wang, Chenchen; Li, Nan; Li, Kexue; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiaoyu; Yang, Qing; Zhang, Hanwen; Zhu, Xudong; Bai, Hui; Ben, Jingjing; Ding, Qingqing; Li, Keran; Jiang, Qin; Xu, Yong; Chen, Qi

    2014-12-15

    In response to hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes, many signaling pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, including diabetic retinopathy (DR). Excessive production of inflammatory mediators plays an important role in this process. Amadori-glycated albumin, one of the major forms of advanced glycated end-products, has been implicated in DR by inducing inflammatory responses in microglia/macrophages. Our goal was to delineate the potential cross talk between class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) and the receptor for advanced glycated end-product (RAGE) in the context of DR. We show here that SR-A ablation caused an exacerbated form of DR in streptozotocin-injected C57BL/6J mice as evidenced by fundus imaging and electroretinography. Immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR assay indicated that there was augmented activation of proinflammatory macrophages with upregulated synthesis of proinflammatory mediators in the retina in Sr-a(-/-) mice. Overexpression of SR-A suppressed RAGE-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, whereas RAGE activation in macrophages favored a proinflammatory (M1) phenotype in the absence of SR-A. Mechanistic analysis on bone marrow-derived macrophages and HEK293 cell line revealed that SR-A interacted with and inhibited the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 7, the major kinase in the RAGE-MAPK-NF-κB signaling, thereby leading to diminished secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest that the antagonism between SR-A and RAGE contributes to the pathogenesis of DR by nurturing a disease-prone macrophage phenotype. Therefore, specific agonist that boosts SR-A signaling could potentially provide benefits in the prevention and/or intervention of DR. PMID:25352436

  4. Advanced glycation end products induce differential structural modifications and fibrillation of albumin.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-06-15

    Glycation induced amyloid fibrillation is fundamental to the development of many neurodegenerative and cardiovascular complications. Excessive non-enzymatic glycation in conditions such as hyperglycaemia results in the increased accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are highly reactive pro-oxidants, which can lead to the activation of inflammatory pathways and development of oxidative stress. Recently, the effect of non-enzymatic glycation on protein structure has been the major research area, but the role of specific AGEs in such structural alteration and induction of fibrillation remains undefined. In this study, we determined the specific AGEs mediated structural modifications in albumin mainly considering carboxymethyllysine (CML), carboxyethyllysine (CEL), and argpyrimidine (Arg-P) which are the major AGEs formed in the body. We studied the secondary structural changes based on circular dichroism (CD) and spectroscopic analysis. The AGEs induced fibrillation was determined by Congo red binding and examination of scanning and transmission electron micrographs. The amyloidogenic regions in the sequence of BSA were determined using FoldAmyloid. It was observed that CEL modification of BSA leads to the development of fibrillar structures, which was evident from both secondary structure changes and TEM analysis. PMID:27037764

  5. Advanced glycation end products induce differential structural modifications and fibrillation of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Saraswathi, N. T.

    2016-06-01

    Glycation induced amyloid fibrillation is fundamental to the development of many neurodegenerative and cardiovascular complications. Excessive non-enzymatic glycation in conditions such as hyperglycaemia results in the increased accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are highly reactive pro-oxidants, which can lead to the activation of inflammatory pathways and development of oxidative stress. Recently, the effect of non-enzymatic glycation on protein structure has been the major research area, but the role of specific AGEs in such structural alteration and induction of fibrillation remains undefined. In this study, we determined the specific AGEs mediated structural modifications in albumin mainly considering carboxymethyllysine (CML), carboxyethyllysine (CEL), and argpyrimidine (Arg-P) which are the major AGEs formed in the body. We studied the secondary structural changes based on circular dichroism (CD) and spectroscopic analysis. The AGEs induced fibrillation was determined by Congo red binding and examination of scanning and transmission electron micrographs. The amyloidogenic regions in the sequence of BSA were determined using FoldAmyloid. It was observed that CEL modification of BSA leads to the development of fibrillar structures, which was evident from both secondary structure changes and TEM analysis.

  6. Unexpected Crosslinking and Diglycation as Advanced Glycation End-Products from Glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Clavijo, Andrea F.; Duque-Daza, Carlos A.; Soulby, Andrew; Canelon, Isolda Romero; Barrow, Mark; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2014-12-01

    Glyoxal-derived advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are formed in physiological systems affecting protein/peptide function and structure. These AGEs are generated during aging and chronic diseases such as diabetes and are considered arginine glycating agents. Thus, the study of glyoxal-derived AGEs in lysine residues and amino acid competition is addressed here using acetylated and non-acetylated undecapeptides, with one arginine and one lysine residue available for glycation. Tandem mass spectrometry results from a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer showed glycated species at both the arginine and lysine residues. One species with the mass addition of 116.01096 Da is formed at the arginine residue. A possible structure is proposed to explain this finding (Nδ-[2-(dihydroxymethyl)-2H,3aH,4H,6aH-[1, 3]dioxolo[5,6-d]imidazolin-5-yl]-L-ornithine-derived AGE). The second species corresponded to intramolecular crosslink involving the lysine residue and its presence is checked with ion-mobility mass spectrometry.

  7. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) in Type 1 Diabetes Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sherman S; Forbes, Josephine M; Borg, Danielle J

    2016-10-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a novel protein increasingly studied in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). RAGE is expressed by several immune cell types, including T cells, antigen-presenting cells, endothelial cells, and the endocrine cells of the pancreatic islets. RAGE binds various ligands including advanced glycation end products (AGEs), high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), S100 proteins, β-amyloid, β-sheet fibrils, and lipopolysaccharide. AGEs are a particularly interesting ligand because their exogenous introduction into the body can be accelerated by the consumption of AGE-rich processed foods. This review will detail RAGE isoforms and its ligands and discuss how RAGE binding on the aforementioned cells could be linked to T1D pathogenesis. PMID:27612847

  8. Advanced glycation end-products induce heparanase expression in endothelial cells by the receptor for advanced glycation end products and through activation of the FOXO4 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    An, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Lei; Jiang, Peng-Jun; Yan, Ming; Huang, Yu-Jun; Zhang, Su-Na; Niu, Yun-Fei; Ten, Shi-Chao; Yu, Jiang-Yi

    2011-08-01

    As an endo-β (1-4)-D: -glucuronidase, heparanase can specifically cleave carbohydrate chains of heparan sulfate (HS) and has been implicated in development of endothelial cells dsyfunction. The advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play a pivotal role in the pathology of diabetic complications. In the present study, we investigated the effect of AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) on heparanase expression in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The results indicated that in vitro direct exposure of HMVECs to AGE-BSA (300, 1000, and 3000 μg/ml) could increase heparanase mRNA and protein expression in a dose and time-dependent manner. The effect of 1000 μg/ml AGE-BSA could be abolished by neutralization with antibody of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Moreover, pretreatment with inhibitors of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) or PI3-kinase did not affect heparanase expression induced by AGE-BSA. Nevertheless, small interference RNA (siRNA) for transcriptional factor FOXO4 could reduce the increase of heparanase expression in HMVECs induced by 1000 μg/ml AGE-BSA. These results suggest that AGEs could induce heparanase expression in HMVECs by RAGE and predominantly through activation of the FOXO4 transcription factor. PMID:21461610

  9. Beneficial effects of metformin and irbesartan on advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-RAGE-induced proximal tubular cell injury.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-03-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) axis contributes to diabetic nephropathy. An oral hypoglycemic agent, metformin may have a potential effect on the inhibition of glycation reactions. Further, since a pathophysiological crosstalk between renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and AGEs-RAGE axis is involved in diabetic nephropathy, it is conceivable that metformin and irbesartan additively could protect against the AGEs-RAGE-induced tubular cell injury. In this study, we addressed the issues. Metformin dose-dependently inhibited the formation of AGEs modification of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Compared with AGEs-modified BSA prepared without metformin (AGEs-MF0), those prepared in the presence of 30 mM or 100 mM metformin (AGEs-MF30 or AGEs-MF100) significantly reduced RAGE mRNA level, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, apoptosis, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β mRNA level in tubular cells. Irbesartan further inhibited the harmful effects of AGEs-MF0 or AGEs-MF30 on tubular cells. Our present study suggests that combination therapy with metformin and irbesartan may have therapeutic potential in diabetic nephropathy; it could play a protective role against tubular injury in diabetes not only by inhibiting AGEs formation, but also by attenuating the deleterious effects of AGEs via down-regulating RAGE expression and subsequently suppressing ROS generation. PMID:22100460

  10. Inhibition of NA(+)/H(+) Exchanger 1 Attenuates Renal Dysfunction Induced by Advanced Glycation End Products in Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Chen, Geng-Rong; Wang, Fu; Xu, Ping; Liu, Li-Ying; Yin, Ya-Ling; Wang, Shuang-Xi

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that sodium hydrogen exchanger 1 (NHE1) is involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. The role of NHE1 in kidney dysfunction induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) remains unknown. Renal damage was induced by AGEs via tail vein injections in rats. Function and morphology of kidney were determined. Compared to vehicle- or BSA-treated rats, AGEs caused abnormalities of kidney structures and functions in rats, accompanied with higher MDA level and lower GSH content. Gene expressions of NHE1 gene and TGF-β1 in the renal cortex and urine were also increased in AGEs-injected rats. Importantly, all these detrimental effects induced by AGEs were reversed by inhibition of NHE1 or suppression of oxidative stress. These pieces of data demonstrated that AGEs may activate NHE1 to induce renal damage, which is related to TGF-β1. PMID:26697498

  11. Advanced glycation end products biphasically modulate bone resorption in osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziqing; Li, Chaohong; Zhou, Yuhuan; Chen, Weishen; Luo, Guotian; Zhang, Ziji; Wang, Haixing; Zhang, Yangchun; Xu, Dongliang; Sheng, Puyi

    2016-03-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) disturb bone remodeling during aging, and this process is accelerated in diabetes. However, their role in modulation of osteoclast-induced bone resorption is controversial, with some studies indicating that AGEs enhance bone resorption and others showing the opposite effect. We determined whether AGEs present at different stages of osteoclast differentiation affect bone resorption differently. Based on increased levels of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K (CTSK), we identified day 4 of induction as the dividing time of cell fusion stage and mature stage in RAW264.7 cell-derived osteoclast-like cells (OCLs). AGE-modified BSA (50-400 μg/ml) or control BSA (100 μg/ml) was then added at the beginning of each stage. Results showed that the presence of AGEs at the cell fusion stage reduced pit numbers, resorption area, and CTSK expression. Moreover, expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) as well as the number of TRAP-positive cells, nuclei per OCL, actin rings, and podosomes also decreased. However, the presence of AGEs at the mature stage enlarged the resorption area markedly and increased pit numbers slightly. Intriguingly, only the number of nuclei per OCL and podosomes increased. These data indicate that AGEs biphasically modulate bone resorption activity of OCLs in a differentiation stage-dependent manner. AGEs at the cell fusion stage reduce bone resorption dramatically, mainly via suppression of RANK expression in osteoclast precursors, whereas AGEs at the mature stage enhance bone resorption slightly, most likely by increasing the number of podosomes in mature OCLs. PMID:26670486

  12. Biological Effects Induced by Specific Advanced Glycation End Products in the Reconstructed Skin Model of Aging.

    PubMed

    Pageon, Hervé; Zucchi, Hélène; Dai, Zhenyu; Sell, David R; Strauch, Christopher M; Monnier, Vincent M; Asselineau, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate in the aging skin. To understand the biological effects of individual AGEs, skin reconstructed with collagen selectively enriched with N(ɛ)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine (CML), N(ɛ)-(carboxyethyl)-lysine (CEL), methylglyoxal hydroimidazolone (MG-H1), or pentosidine was studied. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased expression of α6 integrin at the dermal epidermal junction by CEL and CML (p<0.01). Laminin 5 was diminished by CEL and MG-H1 (p<0.05). Both CML and CEL induced a robust increase (p<0.01) in procollagen I. In the culture medium, IL-6, VEGF, and MMP1 secretion were significantly decreased (p<0.05) by MG-H1. While both CEL and CML decreased MMP3, only CEL decreased IL-6 and TIMP1, while CML stimulated TIMP1 synthesis significantly (p<0.05). mRNA expression studies using qPCR in the epidermis layer showed that CEL increased type 7 collagen (COL7A1), β1, and α6 integrin, while CML increased only COL7A1 (p<0.05). MG-H1-modified collagen had no effect. Importantly, in the dermis layer, MMP3 mRNA expression was increased by both CML and MG-H1. CML also significantly increased the mRNAs of MMP1, TIMP1, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1) (p<0.05). Mixed effects were present in CEL-rich matrix. Minimally glycoxidized pentosidine-rich collagen suppressed most mRNAs of the genes studied (p<0.05) and decreased VEGF and increased MCP1 protein expression. Taken together, this model of the aging skin suggests that a combination of AGEs tends to counterbalance and thus minimizes the detrimental biological effects of individual AGEs. PMID:26309782

  13. Advanced Glycation End Products, Inflammation, and Chronic Metabolic Diseases: Links in a Chain?

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathleen E; Prasad, Chandan; Vijayagopal, Parakat; Juma, Shanil; Imrhan, Victorine

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a diverse group of compounds produced when reducing sugars react with proteins or other compounds to form glycosylated molecules. AGEs may form endogenously, and glycation of molecules may negatively affect their function. AGEs may also be consumed in food form with dietary AGEs reported to be particularly high in foods treated with high heat: baked, broiled, grilled, and fried foods. Whether dietary AGEs are absorbed in significant quantities and whether they are harmful if absorbed is a question under current debate. The American Diabetes Association makes no recommendation regarding avoidance of these foods, but many researchers are concerned that they may be pro-inflammatory and way worsen cardiac function, kidney function, diabetes and its complications and may even contribute to obesity. PMID:25259686

  14. Advanced glycation end products overload might explain intracellular cobalamin deficiency in renal dysfunction, diabetes and aging.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rima; Shannan, Batool; Herrmann, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to aging. Cobalamin (Cbl) is required for cell growth and functions, and its deficiency causes serious complications. Diabetics and renal patients show high concentrations of Cbl, but metabolic evidence of Cbl deficiency that is reversible after Cbl treatment. Cbl might be sequestered in blood and cannot be delivered to the cell. Megalin mediates the uptake of transcobalamin-Cbl complex into the proximal tubule cells. Megalin is involved in the uptake and degradation of AGEs. In aging, diabetes or renal dysfunction, AGEs might overload megalin thus lowering Cbl uptake. Transcobalamin-Cbl might retain in blood. Shedding of megalin and transcobalamin receptor under glycation conditions is also a possible mechanism of this phenomenon. PMID:21880434

  15. Pathologic role of dietary advanced glycation end products in cardiometabolic disorders, and therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Matsui, Takanori

    2016-02-01

    Reactive derivatives from nonenzymatic glucose-protein condensation reactions, as well as lipids and nucleic acids exposed to reducing sugars, form a heterogeneous group of irreversible adducts called AGEs (advanced glycation end products). The glycation process begins with the conversion of reversible Schiff base adducts to more stable, covalently bound Amadori rearrangement products. Over the course of days to weeks, these Amadori products undergo further rearrangement and condensation reactions to form irreversibly cross-linked macroprotein derivatives known as AGEs. The formation and accumulation of AGEs have been known to progress in a physiological aging process and at an accelerated rate under hyperglycemic and oxidative stress conditions. There is growing evidence that AGEs play a pathologic role in numerous disorders. Indeed, glycation and/or cross-linking modification of circulating or organic matrix proteins by AGEs the senescence of moieties and deteriorate their physiological function and structural integrity in multiple organ systems. Moreover, AGEs elicit oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions through the interaction with the receptor for advanced glycation products in a variety of cells, thereby contributing to the development and progression of various aging- or diabetes-related disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, insulin resistance, and Alzheimer's disease. Recently, diet has been recognized as a major environmental source of AGEs that could cause proinflammatory reactions and organ damage in vivo. Therefore, this review summarizes the pathophysiological role of dietary AGEs in health and disease, especially focusing on cardiometabolic disorders. We also discuss the potential utility in targeting exogenously derived AGEs for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26602289

  16. Tea Flavanols Block Advanced Glycation of Lens Crystallins Induced by Dehydroascorbic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingdong; Zhao, Yantao; Wang, Pei; Ahmedna, Mohamed; Ho, Chi-Tang; Sang, Shengmin

    2015-01-20

    Growing evidence has shown that ascorbic acid (ASA) can contribute to protein glycation and the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), especially in the lens. The mechanism by which ascorbic acid can cause protein glycation probably originates from its oxidized form, dehydroascorbic acid (DASA), which is a reactive dicarbonyl species. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time that four tea flavanols, (-)-epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EGCG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin 3-O-gallate (ECG), and (-)-epicatechin (EC), could significantly trap DASA and consequently form 6C- or 8C-ascorbyl conjugates. Among these four flavanols, EGCG exerted the strongest trapping efficacy by capturing approximate 80% of DASA within 60 min. We successfully purified and identified seven 6C- or 8C-ascorbyl conjugates of flavanols from the chemical reaction between tea flavanols and DASA under slightly basic conditions. Of which, five ascorbyl conjugates, EGCGDASA-2, EGCDASA-2, ECGDASA-1, ECGDASA-2 and ECDASA-1, were recognized as novel compounds. The NMR data showed that positions 6 and 8 of the ring A of flavanols were the major active sites for trapping DASA. We further demonstrated that tea flavanols could effectively inhibit the formation of DASA-induced AGEs via trapping DASA in the bovine lens crystallin-DASA assay. In this assay, 8C-ascorbyl conjugates of flavanols were detected as the major adducts using LC-MS. This study suggests that daily consumption of beverages containing tea flavanols may prevent protein glycation in the lens induced by ascorbic acid and its oxidized products. PMID:25437149

  17. Advanced glycation end products induce lipogenesis: regulation by natural xanthone through inhibition of ERK and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Mahali, Sidhartha K; Verma, Neeharika; Manna, Sunil K

    2014-12-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) accumulate in diabetic patients and aged persons due to high amounts of 3- or 4-carbon derivatives of glucose. Understanding the mechanism of AGE-mediated signaling leading to these consequences, like oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, etc. and its regulation would be a viable strategy to control diabetic complication and age-related diseases. We have detected the probable mechanism by which AGE increases lipogenesis, the cause of fatty liver in diabetic patients. AGE increased lipid accumulation in different cells as shown by Oil Red O staining. AGE-mediated regulation of several transcription factors was determined by gel shift assay. Antioxidants like NAC, PDTC, and vitamin C, except mangiferin, were unable to protect AGE-induced activation of SREBP and subsequent lipid accumulation. AGE increased the phosphorylation of ERK, and IKK and also DNA binding ability of SREBP, thereby its dependent gene transcription. AGE induces NF-κB which might suppress PPARγ activity, in turn reducing lipid breakdown and mobilization. Mangiferin not only inhibits AGE-mediated ROI generation that requires NF-κB activation, but also inhibits ERK and IKK activity, thereby suppression of SREBP activity and lipogenesis. Mangiferin has shown a double-edged sword effect to suppress AGE-mediated ailments by reducing ROI-mediated responses as antioxidant and inhibiting SREBP activation thereby lipogenesis, suggesting its potential efficacy against diabetes and obesity-related diseases. PMID:24733604

  18. Arguing for the motion: yes, RAGE is a receptor for advanced glycation endproducts.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Yan, Shi Fang; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2007-09-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are an heterogenous class of compounds formed by diverse stimuli, including hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, renal failure, and innate aging. Recent evidence suggests that dietary sources of AGE may contribute to pathology. AGEs impart diverse effects in cells; evidence strongly suggests that crosslinking of proteins by AGEs may irrevocably alter basement membrane integrity and function. In addition, the ability of AGEs to bind to cells and activate signal transduction, thereby affecting broad properties in the cellular milieu, indicates that AGEs are not innocent bystanders in the diseases of AGEing. Here, we present evidence that receptor for AGE (RAGE) is a receptor for AGEs. PMID:17854009

  19. Inhibition and breaking of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) with bis-2-aminoimidazole derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Mike A.; Furlani, Robert E.; Podell, Brendan K.; Ackart, David F.; Haugen, Jessica D.; Melander, Roberta J.; Melander, Christian; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), unregulated modifications to host macromolecules that occur as a result of metabolic dysregulation, play a role in many diabetes related complications, inflammation and aging, and may lead to increased cardiovascular risk. Small molecules that have the ability to inhibit AGE formation, and even break preformed AGEs have enormous therapeutic potential in the treatment of these disease states. We report the screening of a series of 2-aminoimidazloles for anti-AGE activity, and the identification of a bis-2-aminoimidazole lead compound that possesses superior AGE inhibition and breaking activity compared to the known AGE inhibitor aminoguanidine. PMID:26146419

  20. Pyrazole-5-carboxamides, novel inhibitors of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE).

    PubMed

    Han, Young Taek; Kim, Kyeojin; Choi, Gyeong-In; An, Hongchan; Son, Dohyun; Kim, Hee; Ha, Hee-Jin; Son, Jun-Hyeng; Chung, Suk-Jae; Park, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jeewoo; Suh, Young-Ger

    2014-05-22

    In an effort to develop novel inhibitors of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, a series of pyrazole-5-carboxamides were designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated. Analyses of the extensive structure-activity relationship (SAR) led us to identify a 4-fluorophenoxy analog (40) that exhibited improved in vitro RAGE inhibitory activity and more favorable aqueous solubility than the parent 2-aminopyrimidine, 1. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and molecular docking study strongly supported the RAGE inhibitory activity of pyrazole-5-carboxamides. The brain Aβ-lowering effect of 40 is also described. PMID:24727489

  1. Role of Moesin in Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Angiogenesis of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Fan, Aihui; Yuan, Yongjun; Chen, Lixian; Guo, Xiaohua; Huang, Xuliang; Huang, Qiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of angiogenesis are related to microangiopathies during the development of diabetic vascular complications, but the effect of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on angiogenesis and the mechanism has not been completely unveiled. We previous demonstrated that moesin belonging to the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) protein family protein played a critical role in AGE-induced hyper-permeability in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Here, we investigated the impact of moesin on AGE-induced HUVEC proliferation, migration, and tubulogenesis. Silencing of moesin decreased cell motility and tube formation but not cell proliferation. It also attenuated cellular F-actin reassembly. Further, phosphorylation of threonine at the 558 amino acid residue (Thr 558) in moesin suppressed AGE-induced HUVEC proliferation, migration, and tube formation, while the activating mutation of moesin at Thr 558 enhanced HUVEC angiogenesis. Further, the inhibition of either RhoA activity by adenovirus or ROCK activation with inhibitor Y27632 decreased AGE-induced moesin phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed HUVEC angiogenesis. These results indicate that the Thr 558 phosphorylation in moesin mediates endothelial angiogenesis. AGEs promoted HUVEC angiogenesis by inducing moesin phosphorylation via RhoA/ROCK pathway. PMID:26956714

  2. Dietary advanced glycation end products and their role in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Uribarri, Jaime; del Castillo, María Dolores; de la Maza, María Pía; Filip, Rosana; Gugliucci, Alejandro; Luevano-Contreras, Claudia; Macías-Cervantes, Maciste H; Markowicz Bastos, Deborah H; Medrano, Alejandra; Menini, Teresita; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Rojas, Armando; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Garay-Sevilla, Ma Eugenia

    2015-07-01

    Over the past 2 decades there has been increasing evidence supporting an important contribution from food-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to the body pool of AGEs and therefore increased oxidative stress and inflammation, processes that play a major role in the causation of chronic diseases. A 3-d symposium (1st Latin American Symposium of AGEs) to discuss this subject took place in Guanajuato, Mexico, on 1-3 October 2014 with the participation of researchers from several countries. This review is a summary of the different presentations and subjects discussed, and it is divided into 4 sections. The first section deals with current general knowledge about AGEs. The second section dwells on mechanisms of action of AGEs, with special emphasis on the receptor for advanced glycation end products and the potential role of AGEs in neurodegenerative diseases. The third section discusses different approaches to decrease the AGE burden. The last section discusses current methodologic problems with measurement of AGEs in different samples. The subject under discussion is complex and extensive and cannot be completely covered in a short review. Therefore, some areas of interest have been left out because of space. However, we hope this review illustrates currently known facts about dietary AGEs as well as pointing out areas that require further research. PMID:26178030

  3. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Their Role in Health and Disease12

    PubMed Central

    Uribarri, Jaime; del Castillo, María Dolores; de la Maza, María Pía; Filip, Rosana; Gugliucci, Alejandro; Luevano-Contreras, Claudia; Macías-Cervantes, Maciste H; Markowicz Bastos, Deborah H; Medrano, Alejandra; Menini, Teresita; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Rojas, Armando; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Garay-Sevilla, Ma Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades there has been increasing evidence supporting an important contribution from food-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to the body pool of AGEs and therefore increased oxidative stress and inflammation, processes that play a major role in the causation of chronic diseases. A 3-d symposium (1st Latin American Symposium of AGEs) to discuss this subject took place in Guanajuato, Mexico, on 1–3 October 2014 with the participation of researchers from several countries. This review is a summary of the different presentations and subjects discussed, and it is divided into 4 sections. The first section deals with current general knowledge about AGEs. The second section dwells on mechanisms of action of AGEs, with special emphasis on the receptor for advanced glycation end products and the potential role of AGEs in neurodegenerative diseases. The third section discusses different approaches to decrease the AGE burden. The last section discusses current methodologic problems with measurement of AGEs in different samples. The subject under discussion is complex and extensive and cannot be completely covered in a short review. Therefore, some areas of interest have been left out because of space. However, we hope this review illustrates currently known facts about dietary AGEs as well as pointing out areas that require further research. PMID:26178030

  4. Advanced Glycation End Products in Foods and a Practical Guide to Their Reduction in the Diet

    PubMed Central

    URIBARRI, JAIME; WOODRUFF, SANDRA; GOODMAN, SUSAN; CAI, WEIJING; CHEN, XUE; PYZIK, RENATA; YONG, ANGIE; STRIKER, GARY E.; VLASSARA, HELEN

    2013-01-01

    Modern diets are largely heat-processed and as a result contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Dietary advanced glycation end products (dAGEs) are known to contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which are linked to the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This report significantly expands the available dAGE database, validates the dAGE testing methodology, compares cooking procedures and inhibitory agents on new dAGE formation, and introduces practical approaches for reducing dAGE consumption in daily life. Based on the findings, dry heat promotes new dAGE formation by >10- to 100-fold above the uncooked state across food categories. Animal-derived foods that are high in fat and protein are generally AGE-rich and prone to new AGE formation during cooking. In contrast, carbohydrate-rich foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and milk contain relatively few AGEs, even after cooking. The formation of new dAGEs during cooking was prevented by the AGE inhibitory compound aminoguanidine and significantly reduced by cooking with moist heat, using shorter cooking times, cooking at lower temperatures, and by use of acidic ingredients such as lemon juice or vinegar. The new dAGE database provides a valuable instrument for estimating dAGE intake and for guiding food choices to reduce dAGE intake. PMID:20497781

  5. Differential effects between amphoterin and advanced glycation end products on colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kuniyasu, Hiroki; Chihara, Yoshitomo; Kondo, Hideaki

    2003-05-10

    Amphoterin is 1 ligand of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). We studied expression of amphoterin and RAGE mRNA and proteins in colorectal carcinoma cells and investigated their associations with the invasive activities of cells exposed to advanced glycation end products (AGE). Expression of RAGE and amphoterin was examined in 4 colorectal carcinoma cell lines. All cell lines expressed both RAGE and amphoterin. The effects of RAGE and amphoterin on cell growth (MTT assay), migration (wound healing assay) and invasion (in vitro invasion assay) were tested by treatment of cells with RAGE and amphoterin antisense S-oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Cell growth, migration and invasion were inhibited significantly in Colo320 and WiDr carcinoma cells treated with RAGE and amphoterin antisense S-ODNs compared with sense-treated cells. Differences in ligand activity between amphoterin and AGE were examined with AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA). AGE-BSA decreased cell growth, migration and invasion of amphoterin antisense S-ODN-treated Colo320 and WiDr cells compared with those of cells treated with Colo320 conditioned medium. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2, Rac1 and AKT and production of matrix metalloproteinase 9 were increased to a greater degree by amphoterin than by AGE-BSA. In contrast, production of inducible nitric oxide synthase and nuclear factor-kappaBp65 were increased to a greater degree by AGE-BSA than by amphoterin. PMID:12640679

  6. Advanced glycation end products in foods and a practical guide to their reduction in the diet.

    PubMed

    Uribarri, Jaime; Woodruff, Sandra; Goodman, Susan; Cai, Weijing; Chen, Xue; Pyzik, Renata; Yong, Angie; Striker, Gary E; Vlassara, Helen

    2010-06-01

    Modern diets are largely heat-processed and as a result contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Dietary advanced glycation end products (dAGEs) are known to contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which are linked to the recent epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This report significantly expands the available dAGE database, validates the dAGE testing methodology, compares cooking procedures and inhibitory agents on new dAGE formation, and introduces practical approaches for reducing dAGE consumption in daily life. Based on the findings, dry heat promotes new dAGE formation by >10- to 100-fold above the uncooked state across food categories. Animal-derived foods that are high in fat and protein are generally AGE-rich and prone to new AGE formation during cooking. In contrast, carbohydrate-rich foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and milk contain relatively few AGEs, even after cooking. The formation of new dAGEs during cooking was prevented by the AGE inhibitory compound aminoguanidine and significantly reduced by cooking with moist heat, using shorter cooking times, cooking at lower temperatures, and by use of acidic ingredients such as lemon juice or vinegar. The new dAGE database provides a valuable instrument for estimating dAGE intake and for guiding food choices to reduce dAGE intake. PMID:20497781

  7. Relationship of Advanced Glycation End Products With Cardiovascular Disease in Menopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Pertynska-Marczewska, Magdalena; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the most significant cause of death in postmenopausal women. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed by nonenzymatic modification of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids by glucose. This review focuses on the contribution of AGEs and their receptors to the development of CVD in menopause. Advanced glycation end products circulate and activate the proinflammatory endothelial cell surface receptor called RAGE, bind to the extracellular matrix of the cardiovascular system, or bind to the circulating anti-inflammatory soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE). Data emerging from human and animal studies suggest that AGEs and both receptors (RAGE and sRAGE) are implicated in the pathophysiology of CVD. Particular emphasis has been given to the role of AGE-RAGE axis in oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial cell toxicity, and progression of atherosclerosis in menopause. Data accruing from human and animal studies suggest that RAGE expression level and circulating sRAGE level are associated with estradiol and are correlated with CVD risk factors, such as adiposity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. By recognizing the impact of AGEs on atherosclerosis, pharmacological strategies targeting the AGE-RAGE pathway hold therapeutic potential for CVD in menopausal women. PMID:25228634

  8. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and its Inflammatory Ligands are Upregulated in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Juranek, Judyta K.; Daffu, Gurdip K.; Wojtkiewicz, Joanna; Lacomis, David; Kofler, Julia; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disorder of largely unknown pathogenesis. Recent studies suggest that enhanced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation contribute to the progression of the disease. Mounting evidence implicates the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) as a significant contributor to the pathogenesis of certain neurodegenerative diseases and chronic conditions. It is hypothesized that detrimental actions of RAGE are triggered upon binding to its ligands, such as AGEs (advanced glycation end products), S100/calgranulin family members, and High Mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) proteins. Here, we examined the expression of RAGE and its ligands in human ALS spinal cord. Tissue samples from age-matched human control and ALS spinal cords were tested for the expression of RAGE, carboxymethyllysine (CML) AGE, S100B, and HMGB1, and intensity of the immunofluorescent and immunoblotting signals was assessed. We found that the expression of both RAGE and its ligands was significantly increased in the spinal cords of ALS patients versus age-matched control subjects. Our study is the first report describing co-expression of both RAGE and its ligands in human ALS spinal cords. These findings suggest that further probing of RAGE as a mechanism of neurodegeneration in human ALS is rational. PMID:26733811

  9. Development of Nonalcoholic Hepatopathy: Contributions of Oxidative Stress and Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana Célia de F.; Valentim, Iara B.; de Araújo, Orlando R. P.; Ataide, Terezinha da R.; Goulart, Marília O. F.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are generated spontaneously in cells; however, under conditions of hyperglycemia and lipid peroxidation, their levels are higher than usual, which contribute to the development of diseases such as the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is associated with oxidative stress (OS), which is linked to the transition of steatosis to steatohepatitis due to lipid peroxidation. The AGE-receptor interaction in hepatic stellate cells leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species and enhances the proliferation and activation of these cells, worsening liver fibrosis and disease progression. In this vicious cycle, there is production of (carboxymethyl)lysine, a biomarker for products of advanced glycation and lipid peroxidation, being a shared component between the two pathways. In this review, we aim to compile evidence to support the basic molecular mechanisms of AGEs and OS generation and their influence, independently or combined, on the evolution of NAFLD. The deeper understanding of the interrelations of AGEs + OS may help to elucidate the pathogenic pathways of NAFLD and to devise rational therapeutic interventions for this disease, with an expected positive impact on quality of life of patients. PMID:24084729

  10. Olive leaf extracts are a natural source of advanced glycation end product inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Margianni, Evangelia; Lamari, Fotini N; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P; Tzakos, Andreas G

    2013-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are readily formed and accumulated with sustained hyperglycemia, contribute to the development of diabetic complications. As a consequence, inhibition of AGE formation constitutes an attractive therapeutic/preventive target. In the current study, we explored the phytochemical composition and the in vitro effect of two different olive leaf extracts (an aqueous and a methanolic) on AGE formation. The methanolic olive leaf extract inhibited fluorescent AGE formation in a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-ribose system, whereas the aqueous extract had no effect in both BSA-fructose and BSA-ribose systems. The phytochemical profile was investigated with liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) diode array coupled to electrospray ionization multistage mass spectrometry (LC/DAD/ESI-MS(n)). Quantification of the major phenolic compounds was performed with high performance liquid chromatography with UV-Vis diode array detection and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Among the major phenolic components (luteolin, hydroxytyrosol, luteolin-4'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and oleuropein), luteolin and luteolin-4'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside were assigned as potent inhibitors of AGE formation. The extraction procedure greatly affects the composition and therefore the anti-glycation potential of olive leaves. PMID:24044491

  11. Olive Leaf Extracts Are a Natural Source of Advanced Glycation End Product Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Charisiadis, Pantelis; Margianni, Evangelia; Lamari, Fotini N.; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are readily formed and accumulated with sustained hyperglycemia, contribute to the development of diabetic complications. As a consequence, inhibition of AGE formation constitutes an attractive therapeutic/preventive target. In the current study, we explored the phytochemical composition and the in vitro effect of two different olive leaf extracts (an aqueous and a methanolic) on AGE formation. The methanolic olive leaf extract inhibited fluorescent AGE formation in a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-ribose system, whereas the aqueous extract had no effect in both BSA-fructose and BSA-ribose systems. The phytochemical profile was investigated with liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) diode array coupled to electrospray ionization multistage mass spectrometry (LC/DAD/ESI-MSn). Quantification of the major phenolic compounds was performed with high performance liquid chromatography with UV-Vis diode array detection and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Among the major phenolic components (luteolin, hydroxytyrosol, luteolin-4′-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and oleuropein), luteolin and luteolin-4′-O-β-D-glucopyranoside were assigned as potent inhibitors of AGE formation. The extraction procedure greatly affects the composition and therefore the anti-glycation potential of olive leaves. PMID:24044491

  12. Advanced glycation end-products and insulin signaling in granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Papageorgiou, Efstathia; Koundouras, Dimitrios; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) may interfere with insulin intracellular signaling and glucose transport in human granulosa cells, potentially affecting ovarian function, follicular growth, linked with diminished fertility. The potential interaction of AGEs with insulin signaling pathways and glucose transport was investigated in human granulosa KGN cells. KGN cells were cultured with variable concentrations of human glycated albumin (HGA, 50-200 µg/mL) or insulin (100 ng/mL). Combined treatments of KGN cells with insulin (100 ng/mL) and HGA (200 µg/mL) were also performed. p-AKT levels and glucose transporter type 4 (Glut-4) translocation analysis were performed by Western blot. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-specific signaling was checked by using the PI3K-inhibitor, LY294002. p-AKT levels were significantly increased following insulin treatment compared to basal levels or HGA exposure. This insulin-mediated AKT-phosphorylation was PI3K-specific and it was inhibited after combined treatment of insulin and HGA. Furthermore, Glut-4 translocation from the cytoplasm to the membrane compartments of KGN cells was remarkably reduced after the combined treatment of insulin and HGA. The present findings support that AGEs interfere with insulin signaling in granulosa cells and prevent Glut-4 membrane translocation suggesting that intra ovarian AGEs accumulation, from endogenous or exogenous sources, may contribute to the pathophysiology of states characterized with anovulation and insulin resistance such as polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:25956684

  13. Survey of the distribution of a newly characterized receptor for advanced glycation end products in tissues.

    PubMed

    Brett, J; Schmidt, A M; Yan, S D; Zou, Y S; Weidman, E; Pinsky, D; Nowygrod, R; Neeper, M; Przysiecki, C; Shaw, A

    1993-12-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the final products of nonenzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins, are found in the plasma and accumulate in the tissues during aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. A novel integral membrane protein, termed receptor for AGE (RAGE), forms a central part of the cell surface binding site for AGEs. Using monospecific, polyclonal antibody raised to human recombinant and bovine RAGE, immunostaining of bovine tissues showed RAGE in the vasculature, endothelium, and smooth muscle cells and in mononuclear cells in the tissues. Consistent with these data, RAGE antigen and mRNA were identified in cultured bovine endothelium, vascular smooth muscle, and monocyte-derived macrophages. RAGE antigen was also visualized in bovine cardiac myocytes as well as in cultures of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes and in neural tissue where motor neurons, peripheral nerves, and a population of cortical neurons were positive. In situ hybridization confirmed the presence of RAGE mRNA in the tissues, and studies with rat PC12 pheochromocytes indicated that they provide a neuronal-related cell culture model for examining RAGE expression. Pathological studies of human atherosclerotic plaques showed infiltration of RAGE-expressing cells in the expanded intima. These results indicate that RAGE is present in multiple tissues and suggest the potential relevance of AGE-RAGE interactions for modulating properties of the vasculature as well as neural and cardiac function, prominent areas of involvement in diabetes and in the normal aging process. PMID:8256857

  14. Effect of advanced glycation end products on lens epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hong, S B; Lee, K W; Handa, J T; Joo, C K

    2000-08-18

    The extended exposure of proteins to reducing sugars leads to nonenzymatic glycation with the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Long-lived proteins, such as collagen and crystallins, are subjected to this modification, and are implicated as causal factors in several diseases including diabetic complications, cataracts, and arteriosclerosis. One means through which AGEs modulate cellular interactions is via binding to specific receptors. In the current study, the existence of AGEs in human anterior polar lens capsules of cataracts was confirmed using a combination of dot-immunoblot and fluorescent detection. Human lens epithelial cells (LECs) attached to anterior lens capsules expressed mRNA for the receptor for AGEs (RAGE). The interaction of LECs with AGEs using bovine lens epithelial explants demonstrated that AGEs induced mRNAs and proteins of fibronectin, collagen type I, aberrant extracellular matrix proteins, and alpha-SMA, a specific marker for myofibroblastic cells. These findings suggest that AGEs may alter cellular functions which induce mRNAs and proteins associated with fibrosis in LECs. PMID:10944440

  15. Ameliorating Effect of Akebia quinata Fruit Extracts on Skin Aging Induced by Advanced Glycation End Products.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seoungwoo; Son, Dahee; Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Seungjun; Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Ryu, Dehun; Lee, Jongsung; Jung, Eunsun; Park, Deokhoon

    2015-11-01

    The accumulation of free radicals and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the skin plays a very important role in skin aging. Both are known to interact with each other. Therefore, natural compounds or extracts that possess both antioxidant and antiglycation activities might have great antiageing potential. Akebia quinata fruit extract (AQFE) has been used to treat urinary tract inflammatory disease in traditional Korean and Chinese medicines. In the present study, AQFE was demonstrated to possess antioxidant and antiglycation activity. AQFE protects human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) from oxidative stress and inhibits cellular senescence induced by oxidative stress. We also found that AQFE inhibits glycation reaction between BSA and glucose. The antiglycation activity of AQFE was dose-dependent. In addition, the antiglycation activity of AQFE was confirmed in a human skin explant model. AQFE reduced CML expression and stimulated fibrillin-1 expression in comparison to the methyglyoxal treatment. In addition, the possibility of the extract as an anti-skin aging agent has also been clinically validated. Our analysis of the crow's feet wrinkle showed that there was a decrease in the depth of deep furrows in RI treated with AQFE cream over an eight-week period. The overall results suggest that AQFE may work as an anti-skin aging agent by preventing oxidative stress and other complications associated with AGEs formation. PMID:26569300

  16. Ameliorating Effect of Akebia quinata Fruit Extracts on Skin Aging Induced by Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seoungwoo; Son, Dahee; Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Seungjun; Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Ryu, Dehun; Lee, Jongsung; Jung, Eunsun; Park, Deokhoon

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of free radicals and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the skin plays a very important role in skin aging. Both are known to interact with each other. Therefore, natural compounds or extracts that possess both antioxidant and antiglycation activities might have great antiageing potential. Akebia quinata fruit extract (AQFE) has been used to treat urinary tract inflammatory disease in traditional Korean and Chinese medicines. In the present study, AQFE was demonstrated to possess antioxidant and antiglycation activity. AQFE protects human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) from oxidative stress and inhibits cellular senescence induced by oxidative stress. We also found that AQFE inhibits glycation reaction between BSA and glucose. The antiglycation activity of AQFE was dose-dependent. In addition, the antiglycation activity of AQFE was confirmed in a human skin explant model. AQFE reduced CML expression and stimulated fibrillin-1 expression in comparison to the methyglyoxal treatment. In addition, the possibility of the extract as an anti-skin aging agent has also been clinically validated. Our analysis of the crow’s feet wrinkle showed that there was a decrease in the depth of deep furrows in RI treated with AQFE cream over an eight-week period. The overall results suggest that AQFE may work as an anti-skin aging agent by preventing oxidative stress and other complications associated with AGEs formation. PMID:26569300

  17. Singlet oxygen induced advanced glycation end-product photobleaching of in vivo human fingertip autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bin; Simental, Anabel; Lutz, Patrick; Shaheen, George; Chaiken, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation and oxidation of ubiquitous proteins in vivo leads to irreversible formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Due to their relatively long half life and low clearance rate AGEs tend to accumulate within static tissues and the circulatory system. Spectra obtained using 830 nm near-infrared (NIR) excitation suggest that the so-called "autofluorescence" from all tissues has a finite number of sources but the fact that senior and diabetic subjects produce more than other members of the general population suggests that a significant portion of the total autofluorescence from all sources originates from AGEs. Using pentosidine generated in a reaction mixture as described by Monnier as representative, an in vitro study unveiled very similar fluorescence and photobleaching pattern as observed for autofluorescence in vivo. A series of oxygen, air and argon purging experiments on the pentosidine-generating reaction mixture suggests that pentosidine is a singlet oxygen sensitizer and secondary reactions between the pentosidine itself and/or other fluorophores and the photosensitized singlet oxygen explain the observed photobleaching. Ab initio Gaussian calculations on pentosidine reveal the existence of low-lying triplet excited states required for the sensitization of ground state oxygen. A commercially available product known as singlet oxygen sensor green (SOSG) that specifically serves as a singlet oxygen detection reagent confirms the generation of singlet oxygen from NIR irradiated pentosidine trimixture. This study provides one definite chemical mechanism for understanding in vivo human skin autofluorescence and photobleaching.

  18. Hyperglycemia attenuates acute permeability response to advanced glycation end products in retinal microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Warboys, C M; Fraser, P A

    2010-07-01

    Increased microvascular permeability contributes to the development of diabetic retinopathy and is associated with hyperglycemia and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The isolated perfused retina preparation was used to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia (HG) on the permeability response to AGEs. Retinae were dissected from rats, and the vasculature perfused with sulforhodamine B fluorescent dye and permeability of venular capillaries was determined from the rate of decrease of fluorescence gradient across a vessel during stasis. The resting permeability was very high in streptozotocin treated and some obese Zucker fatty diabetic rats, but low in others. The permeability response to glycated albumin (which is free radical-dependent) in these animals was reduced for a range of concentrations compared to the lean controls. The effects of 15 min 25 mM glucose (HG) superfusion on the retinal microvascular permeability response to 5 microM AGE-BSA was studied in non-diabetic Wistar rats. HG itself had no effect on permeability, but reduced the response to AGE-BSA from 1.02+/-0.08x10(-6) cm s(-1) to 0.31+/-0.07x10(-6) cm s(-1). The response to bradykinin (also free radical-dependent) was not affected by HG. This suggests that chronic exposure to HG down-regulates the signalling pathways activated in response to RAGE stimulation. PMID:20302881

  19. Advanced Glycation End Products: A Molecular Target for Vascular Complications in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Suematsu, Mika; Kaseda, Kuniyoshi; Matsui, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    A nonenzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids contributes to the aging of macromolecules and subsequently alters their structural integrity and function. This process has been known to progress at an accelerated rate under hyperglycemic and/or oxidative stress conditions. Over a course of days to weeks, early glycation products undergo further reactions such as rearrangements and dehydration to become irreversibly cross-linked, fluorescent and senescent macroprotein derivatives termed advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There is a growing body of evidence indicating that interaction of AGEs with their receptor (RAGE) elicits oxidative stress generation and as a result evokes proliferative, inflammatory, thrombotic and fibrotic reactions in a variety of cells. This evidence supports AGEs’ involvement in diabetes- and aging-associated disorders such as diabetic vascular complications, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and osteoporosis. Therefore, inhibition of AGE formation could be a novel molecular target for organ protection in diabetes. This report summarizes the pathophysiological role of AGEs in vascular complications in diabetes and discusses the potential clinical utility of measurement of serum levels of AGEs for evaluating organ damage in diabetes. PMID:26605646

  20. Advanced Glycation-Modified Human Serum Albumin Evokes Alterations in Membrane and Eryptosis in Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Gayathiri, S K; Ramya, R; Duraichelvan, R; Dhason, A; Saraswathi, N T

    2015-11-01

    Increased burden of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in case of hyperglycemic conditions leads to the development of retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. AGEs are considered as pro-oxidants, and their accumulation increases the oxidative stress. The prolonged exposure to these AGEs is the fundamental cause of chronic oxidative stress. Abnormal morphology of red blood cells (RBCs) and excessive eryptosis has been observed in diabetes, glomerulonephritis, dyslipidemia, and obesity, but yet the contribution of extracellular AGEs remains undefined. In this study, we investigated the effect of AGEs on erythrocytes to determine their impact on the occurrence of different pathological forms of these blood cells. Specifically, carboxymethyllysine (CML), carboxyethyllysine (CEL), and Arg-pyrimidine (Arg-P) which have been reported to be the most pre-dominant AGEs formed under in vivo conditions were used in this study. Results suggested the eryptotic properties of CML, CEL, and Arg-P for RBCs, which were evident from the highly damaged cell membrane and occurrence of abnormal morphologies. Methylglyoxal-modified albumin showed more severe effects, which can be attributed to the high reactivity and pro-oxidant nature of glycation end products. These findings suggest the possible role of AGE-modified albumin towards the morphological changes in erythrocyte's membrane associated with diabetic conditions. PMID:26276445

  1. Effect of taurine on advanced glycation end products-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-S. Chuang, L.-Y.; Guh, J.-Y.; Yang, Y.-L.; Hsu, M.-S.

    2008-12-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that advanced glycation end products (AGE) play a major role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Taurine is a well documented antioxidant agent. To explore whether taurine was linked to altered AGE-mediated renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in DN, we examined the molecular mechanisms of taurine responsible for inhibition of AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells. We found that AGE (but not non-glycated BSA) caused inhibition of cellular mitogenesis rather than cell death by either necrosis or apoptosis. There were no changes in caspase 3 activity, bcl-2 protein expression, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release in BSA, AGE, or the antioxidant taurine treatments in these cells. AGE-induced the Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was markedly blocked by taurine. Furthermore, taurine, the Raf-1 kinase inhibitor GW5074, and the ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059 may have the ability to induce cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression from AGE-treated cells. The ability of taurine, GW5074, or PD98059 to inhibit AGE-induced hypertrophy was verified by the observation that it significantly decreased cell size, cellular hypertrophy index, and protein levels of RAGE, p27{sup Kip1}, collagen IV, and fibronectin. The results obtained in this study suggest that taurine may serve as the potential anti-fibrotic activity in DN through mechanism dependent of its Raf-1/ERK inactivation in AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells.

  2. Does Accumulation of Advanced Glycation End Products Contribute to the Aging Phenotype?

    PubMed Central

    Nicklett, Emily J.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Background. Aging is a complex multifactorial process characterized by accumulation of deleterious changes in cells and tissues, progressive deterioration of structural integrity and physiological function across multiple organ systems, and increased risk of death. Methods. We conducted a review of the scientific literature on the relationship of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with aging. AGEs are a heterogeneous group of bioactive molecules that are formed by the nonenzymatic glycation of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Results. Humans are exposed to AGEs produced in the body, especially in individuals with abnormal glucose metabolism, and AGEs ingested in foods. AGEs cause widespread damage to tissues through upregulation of inflammation and cross-linking of collagen and other proteins. AGEs have been shown to adversely affect virtually all cells, tissues, and organ systems. Recent epidemiological studies demonstrate that elevated circulating AGEs are associated with increased risk of developing many chronic diseases that disproportionally affect older individuals. Conclusions. Based on these data, we propose that accumulation of AGEs accelerate the multisystem functional decline that occurs with aging, and therefore contribute to the aging phenotype. Exposure to AGEs can be reduced by restriction of dietary intake of AGEs and drug treatment with AGE inhibitors and AGE breakers. Modification of intake and circulating levels of AGEs may be a possible strategy to promote health in old age, especially because most Western foods are processed at high temperature and are rich in AGEs. PMID:20478906

  3. Collagen advanced glycation inhibits its Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2)-mediated induction of lysyl oxidase in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Roozbeh; Sodek, Katharine L; Faibish, Michael; Trackman, Philip C

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of bone fracture. Organic and inorganic bone extracellular matrix components determine bone strength. Previous studies indicate that in diabetes, glycation of collagen causes abnormal arrangements of collagen molecules and fragile bones. Diabetic bone fragility is additionally attributed to reduced levels of lysyl oxidase enzyme-dependent collagen cross-links. The mechanism underlying the presence of lower enzymatic collagen cross-links in diabetic bone has not been directly investigated. Here we determine in primary osteoblast cultures the regulation of lysyl oxidase protein by type I collagen and collagen modified by carboxymethylation (CML-collagen), a form of advanced glycation endproducts. Data indicate that non-glycated collagen up-regulates lysyl oxidase levels both in primary non-differentiated and in differentiating mouse and rat osteoblast cultures, while CML-collagen fails to regulate lysyl oxidase in these cells. Collagen binding to Discoidin Domain Receptor-2 (DDR2) mediates lysyl oxidase increases, determined in DDR2 shRNA knockdown studies. DDR2 binding and activation were disrupted by collagen glycation, pointing to a mechanism for the diminished levels of lysyl oxidase and consequently low lysyl oxidase-derived cross-links in diabetic bone. Our studies indicate that collagen-integrin interactions may not play a major role in up-regulating lysyl oxidase. Furthermore, non-collagenous ligands for the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) failed to alter lysyl oxidase levels. Taken together with published studies a new understanding emerges in which diabetes- and age-dependent inhibition of normal collagen-stimulated DDR2- and integrin-signaling, and independent advanced glycation-stimulated RAGE-signaling, each contributes to different aspects of diabetic osteopenia. PMID:24120383

  4. Collagen Advanced Glycation Inhibits Its Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2)-Mediated Induction of Lysyl Oxidase in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Roozbeh; Sodek, Katharine L.; Faibish, Michael; Trackman, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of bone fracture. Organic and inorganic bone extracellular matrix components determine bone strength. Previous studies indicate that in diabetes, glycation of collagen causes abnormal arrangements of collagen molecules and fragile bones. Diabetic bone fragility is additionally attributed to reduced levels of lysyl oxidase enzyme-dependent collagen cross-links. The mechanism underlying the presence of lower enzymatic collagen cross-links in diabetic bone has not been directly investigated. Here we determine in primary osteoblast cultures the regulation of lysyl oxidase protein by type I collagen and collagen modified by carboxymethylation (CML-collagen), a form of advanced glycation endproducts. Data indicate that non-glycated collagen up-regulates lysyl oxidase levels both in primary non-differentiated and in differentiating mouse and rat osteoblast cultures, while CML-collagen fails to regulate lysyl oxidase in these cells. Collagen binding to Discoidin Domain Receptor-2 (DDR2) mediates lysyl oxidase increases, determined in DDR2 shRNA knockdown studies. DDR2 binding and activation were disrupted by collagen glycation, pointing to a mechanism for the diminished levels of lysyl oxidase and consequent low lysyl oxidase-derived cross-links in diabetic bone. Our studies indicate that collagen-integrin interactions may not play a major role in up-regulating lysyl oxidase. Furthermore, non-collagenous ligands for the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) failed to alter lysyl oxidase levels. Taken together with published studies a new understanding emerges in which diabetes- and age-dependent inhibition of normal collagen-stimulated DDR2- and integrin-signaling, and independent advanced glycation-stimulated RAGE-signaling, each contributes to different aspects of diabetic osteopenia. PMID:24120383

  5. [Expression and function of receptors for advanced glycation end products in bovine corneal endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Kaji, Yuichi

    2005-11-01

    Corneal endothelial cell loss is a change that occurs with age, but its mechanism is still unclear. We postulated that interaction between advanced glycation end product(AGE) and its receptors is implicated in the corneal endothelial cell loss with age. We investigated the expression of AGE receptors: receptors for AGE(RAGE) and galectin-3 in bovine corneal endothelial cells by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. In addition, we investigated the effect of AGE on the cultured corneal endothelial cells. Expression of RAGE and galectin-3 was detected in bovine corneal endothelial cells. Galectin-3 was important in the internalization of AGE. In contrast, RAGE was important in the generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis. Based on these data, the interaction of AGE in aqueous humor and AGE receptors expressed on the corneal endothelial cells was speculated to have a role in the corneal endothelial cell loss with age. PMID:16363662

  6. Do advanced glycation end-products play a role in malaria susceptibility?

    PubMed Central

    Traoré, Karim; Arama, Charles; Médebielle, Maurice; Doumbo, Ogobara; Picot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    There are growing data supporting the differences in susceptibility to malaria described between sympatric populations with different lifestyles. Evidence has also been growing for some time that nutritional status and the host’s metabolism are part of the complex mechanisms underlying these differences. The role of dietary advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in the modulation of immune responses (innate and adaptive responses) and chronic oxidative stress has been established. But less is known about AGE implication in naturally acquired immunity and susceptibility to malaria. Since inflammatory immune responses and oxidative events have been demonstrated as the hallmark of malaria infection, it seems crucial to investigate the role of AGE in susceptibility or resistance to malaria. This review provides new insight into the relationship between nutrition, metabolic disorders, and infections, and how this may influence the mechanisms of susceptibility or resistance to malaria in endemic areas. PMID:27012162

  7. Role of advanced glycation endproducts and potential therapeutic interventions in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Mallipattu, Sandeep K; He, John C; Uribarri, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    It has been nearly 100 years since the first published report of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by the French chemist Maillard. Since then, our understanding of AGEs in diseased states has dramatically changed. Especially in the last 25 years, AGEs have been implicated in complications related to aging, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. Although AGE formation has been well characterized by both in vitro and in vivo studies, few prospective human studies exist demonstrating the role of AGEs in patients on chronic renal replacement therapy. As the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States rises, it is essential to identify therapeutic strategies that either delay progression to ESRD or improve morbidity and mortality in this population. This article reviews the role of AGEs, especially those of dietary origin, in ESRD patients as well as potential therapeutic anti-AGE strategies in this population. PMID:22548330

  8. Litsea japonica extract inhibits neuronal apoptosis and the accumulation of advanced glycation end products in the diabetic mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    KIM, JUNGHYUN; KIM, CHAN-SIK; LEE, YUN MI; SOHN, EUNJIN; JO, KYUHYUNG; KIM, JIN SOOK

    2015-01-01

    The retinal accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is a condition, which is found in diabetic retinopathy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of Litsea japonica extract (LJE) and to elucidate its underlying protective mechanism in model diabetic db/db mice. Male, 7 -week-old db/db mice were treated with LJE (100 or 250 mg/kg body weight) once a day orally for 12 weeks. The expression levels of AGEs and their receptor (RAGE) were subsequently assessed by immunohistochemistry. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and southwestern histochemistry were used to detect activated nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). The immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that LJE significantly reduced the expression levels of the AGEs and RAGE in the neural retinas of the db/db mice. LJE markedly inhibited the apop-tosis of retinal ganglion cells. In addition, LJE suppressed the activation of NF-κB. These results suggested that LJE may be beneficial for the treatment of diabetes-induced retinal neurodegeneration, and the ability of LJE to attenuate retinal ganglion cell loss may be mediated by inhibition of the accumulation of AGEs. PMID:25815519

  9. Advanced glycation endproducts in neurofilament conglomeration of motoneurons in familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, S. M.; Wang, H. S.; Taniguchi, A.; Bucala, R.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Massive neurofilament conglomeration in motor neurons has been described to occur in the early stages of both familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previously, neurofilament conglomerates were immunolabeled for both superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and nitrotyrosine, suggesting the potential for oxidative nitration damage to neurofilament protein by peroxynitrite. Long-lived neurofilaments may also undergo modification by advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) with concomitant generation of free radicals, including superoxide. This radical species may then react with nitric oxide to form the potent oxidant, peroxynitrite, which in turn can nitrate neurofilament protein. Such a glycated and nitrated neurofilament protein may become resistant to proteolytic systems, forming high-molecular-weight protein complexes and cytotoxic, neuronal inclusions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Paraffin sections containing both neurofilament conglomerates and neuronal inclusions were obtained from patients with sporadic (n = 5) and familial (n = 2) ALS and were probed with specific antibodies directed against the AGEs cypentodine/piperidine-enolone, arginine-lysine imidazole, pentosidine, and pyrraline. RESULTS: Neurofilament conglomerates, but not neuronal inclusions, were intensely immunolabeled with each of the anti-AGE antibodies tested. The immunoreactivity was selective for neurofilament conglomerates and suggested that AGEs may form inter- or intramolecular cross-links in neurofilament proteins. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the hypothesis that AGE formation affects neurofilament proteins in vivo and is associated with the concomitant induction of SODI and protein nitration in neurofilament conglomerates. AGE formation in neurofilament protein may not only cause covalent cross-linking but also generate superoxide and block nitric oxide-mediated responses, thereby perpetuating neuronal toxicity in patients with ALS. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:9642682

  10. Survey of the Distribution of a Newly Characterized Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Jerold; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Yan, Shi Du; Zou, Yu Shan; Weidman, Elliott; Pinsky, David; Nowygrod, Roman; Neeper, Michael; Przysiecki, Craig; Shaw, Alan; Migheli, Antonio; Stern, David

    1993-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the final products of nonenzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins, are found in the plasma and accumulate in the tissues during aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. A novel integral membrane protein, termed receptor for AGE (RAGE), forms a central part of the cell surface binding site for AGEs. Using monospecific, polyclonal antibody raised to human recombinant and bovine RAGE, immunostaining of bovine tissues showed RAGE in the vasculature, endothelium, and smooth muscle cells and in mononuclear cells in the tissues. Consistent with these data, RAGE antigen and mRNA were identified in cultured bovine endothelium, vascular smooth muscle, and monocyte-derived macrophages. RAGE antigen was also visualized in bovine cardiac myocytes as well as in cultures of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes and in neural tissue where motor neurons, peripheral nerves, and a population of cortical neurons were positive. In situ hybridization confirmed the presence of RAGE mRNA in the tissues, and studies with rat PC12 pheochromocytes indicated that they provide a neuronal-related cell culture model for examining RAGE expression. Pathological studies of human atherosclerotic plaques showed infiltration of RAGE-expressing cells in the expanded intima. These results indicate that RAGE is present in multiple tissues and suggest the potential relevance of AGE-RAGE interactions for modulating properties of the vasculature as well as neural and cardiac function, prominent areas of involvement in diabetes and in the normal aging process. ImagesFigure 9Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 10 PMID:8256857

  11. Detection of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on human skin by in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. A.; Pereira, L.; Ali, S. M.; Pizzol, C. D.; Tellez, C. A.; Favero, P. P.; Santos, L.; da Silva, V. V.; Praes, C. E. O.

    2016-03-01

    The aging process involves the reduction in the production of the major components of skin tissue. During intrinsic aging and photoaging processes, in dermis of human skin, fibroblasts become senescent and have decreased activity, which produce low levels of collagen. Moreover, there is accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs have incidence in the progression of age-related diseases, principally in diabetes mellitus and in Alzheimer's diseases. AGEs causes intracellular damage and/or apoptosis leading to an increase of the free radicals, generating a crosslink with skin proteins and oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to detect AGEs markers on human skin by in vivo Confocal Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were obtained by using a Rivers Diagnostic System, 785 nm laser excitation and a CCD detector from the skin surface down to 120 μm depth. We analyzed the confocal Raman spectra of the skin dermis of 30 women volunteers divided into 3 groups: 10 volunteers with diabetes mellitus type II, 65-80 years old (DEW); 10 young healthy women, 20-33 years old (HYW); and 10 elderly healthy women, 65-80 years old (HEW). Pentosidine and glucosepane were the principally identified AGEs in the hydroxyproline and proline Raman spectral region (1000-800 cm-1), in the 1.260-1.320 cm-1 region assignable to alpha-helical amide III modes, and in the Amide I region. Pentosidine and glucosepane calculated vibrational spectra were performed through Density Functional Theory using the B3LYP functional with 3-21G basis set. Difference between the Raman spectra of diabetic elderly women and healthy young women, and between healthy elderly women and healthy young women were also obtained with the purpose of identifying AGEs Raman bands markers. AGEs peaks and collagen changes have been identified and used to quantify the glycation process in human skin.

  12. Effect of advanced glycation endproducts on gene expression profiles of human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Molinari, J; Ruszova, E; Velebny, V; Robert, L

    2008-06-01

    The Maillard reaction and its end products, AGE-s (Advanced Glycation End products) are rightly considered as one of the important mechanisms of post-translational tissue modifications with aging. We studied the effect of two AGE-products prepared by the glycation of lysozyme and of BSA, on the expression profile of a large number of genes potentially involved in the above mentioned effects of AGE-s. The two AGE-products were added to human skin fibroblasts and gene expression profiles investigated using microarrays. Among the large number of genes monitored the expression of 16 genes was modified by each AGE-preparations, half of them only by both of them. Out of these 16 genes, 12 were more strongly affected, again not all the same for both preparations. Both of them upregulated MMP and serpin-expression and downregulated some of the collagen-chain coding genes, as well as the cadherin- and fibronectin genes. The BSA-AGE preparation downregulated 10 of the 12 genes strongly affected, only the serpin-1 and MMP-9 genes were upregulated. The lysozyme-AGE preparation upregulated selectively the genes coding for acid phosphatase (ACP), integrin chain alpha5 (ITGA5) and thrombospondin (THBS) which were unaffected by the BSA-AGE preparation. It was shown previously that the lysozyme-AGE strongly increased the rate of proliferation and also cell death, much more than the BSA-AGE preparation. These differences between these two AGE-preparations tested suggest the possibility of different receptor-mediated transmission pathways activated by these two preparations. Most of the gene-expression modifications are in agreement with biological effects of Maillard products, especially interference with normal tissue structure and increased tissue destruction. PMID:18297408

  13. Effect of advanced glycation end-products on cell proliferation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Peterszegi, G; Molinari, J; Ravelojaona, V; Robert, L

    2006-09-01

    The effect of advanced glycation end products (AGE-s) was studied on the proliferation and cell death of human skin fibroblasts in culture. Several AGE-products were prepared from proteins, a peptide and amino acids, using Glucose or Fructose, with or without Fe2+. The AGE preparations increased cell death at the 7th day, after only 72 hours of incubation. Some of these glycation products modified also proliferation. This effect of AGE-s was even maintained without these products in fresh medium for a second period of incubation up to 10 days from the start of the experiment. In order to explore the role of AGE-receptors, especially of AGE-receptor and of growth factor receptors (fibroblast and epidermal growth factors receptors), antibodies to these receptors were added to cell cultures and their effect on both cell death and proliferation were determined as for the AGE-s. These anti-receptor antibodies imitated to some extent the results obtained with AGE-s, producing increase of cell death and proliferation, followed above a certain concentration of antibodies by a decrease and a new increase or plateau. This might correspond to the internalization of the receptors followed by a re-expression on the cell membrane. The role of receptor-mediated Reactive Oxygen Species-production was also explored using scavengers: N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), L-Carnosine, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Catalase. Several of these scavengers decreased cell death, suggesting that Reactive Oxygen Species-production is partially involved in the observed phenomena. PMID:16919894

  14. Sildenafil Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in HT-22 Hippocampal Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Soon Ki; Woo, Jae Suk; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) and mitochondrial glycation is importantly implicated in the pathological changes of the brain associated with diabetic complications, Alzheimer disease, and aging. The present study was undertaken to determine whether sildenafil, a type 5 phosphodiesterase type (PDE-5) inhibitor, has beneficial effect on neuronal cells challenged with AGE-induced oxidative stress to preserve their mitochondrial functional integrity. Methods HT-22 hippocampal neuronal cells were exposed to AGE and changes in the mitochondrial functional parameters were determined. Pretreatment of cells with sildenafil effectively ameliorated these AGE-induced deterioration of mitochondrial functional integrity. Results AGE-treated cells lost their mitochondrial functional integrity which was estimated by their MTT reduction ability and intracellular ATP concentration. These cells exhibited stimulated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, induction of mitochondrial permeability transition, and release of the cytochrome C, activation of the caspase-3 accompanied by apoptosis. Western blot analyses and qRT-PCR demonstrated that sildenafil increased the expression level of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). CoPP and bilirubin, an inducer of HO-1 and a metabolic product of HO-1, respectively, provided a similar protective effects. On the contrary, the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP IX blocked the effect of sildenafil. Transfection with HO-1 siRNA significantly reduced the protective effect of sildenafil on the loss of MTT reduction ability and MPT induction in AGE-treated cells. Conclusion Taken together, our results suggested that sildenafil provides beneficial effect to protect the HT-22 hippocampal neuronal cells against AGE-induced deterioration of mitochondrial integrity, and upregulation of HO-1 is involved in the underlying mechanism. PMID:27226858

  15. Identification of C1q as a Binding Protein for Advanced Glycation End Products.

    PubMed

    Chikazawa, Miho; Shibata, Takahiro; Hatasa, Yukinori; Hirose, Sayumi; Otaki, Natsuki; Nakashima, Fumie; Ito, Mika; Machida, Sachiko; Maruyama, Shoichi; Uchida, Koji

    2016-01-26

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) make up a heterogeneous group of molecules formed from the nonenzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with the free amino groups of proteins. The abundance of AGEs in a variety of age-related diseases, including diabetic complications and atherosclerosis, and their pathophysiological effects suggest the existence of innate defense mechanisms. Here we examined the presence of serum proteins that are capable of binding glycated bovine serum albumin (AGEs-BSA), prepared upon incubation of BSA with dehydroascorbate, and identified complement component C1q subcomponent subunit A as a novel AGE-binding protein in human serum. A molecular interaction analysis showed the specific binding of C1q to the AGEs-BSA. In addition, we identified DNA-binding regions of C1q, including a collagen-like domain, as the AGE-binding site and established that the amount of positive charge on the binding site was the determining factor. C1q indeed recognized several other modified proteins, including acylated proteins, suggesting that the binding specificity of C1q might be ascribed, at least in part, to the electronegative potential of the ligand proteins. We also observed that C1q was involved in the AGEs-BSA-activated deposition of complement proteins, C3b and C4b. In addition, the AGEs-BSA mediated the proteolytic cleavage of complement protein 5 to release C5a. These findings provide the first evidence of AGEs as a new ligand recognized by C1q, stimulating the C1q-dependent classical complement pathway. PMID:26731343

  16. Chronic diabetes increases advanced glycation end products on cardiac ryanodine receptors/calcium-release channels.

    PubMed

    Bidasee, Keshore R; Nallani, Karuna; Yu, Yongqi; Cocklin, Ross R; Zhang, Yinong; Wang, Mu; Dincer, U Deniz; Besch, Henry R

    2003-07-01

    Decrease in cardiac contractility is a hallmark of chronic diabetes. Previously we showed that this defect results, at least in part, from a dysfunction of the type 2 ryanodine receptor calcium-release channel (RyR2). The mechanism(s) underlying RyR2 dysfunction is not fully understood. The present study was designed to determine whether non-cross-linking advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on RyR2 increase with chronic diabetes and if formation of these post-translational complexes could be attenuated with insulin treatment. Overnight digestion of RyR2 from 8-week control animals (8C) with trypsin afforded 298 peptides with monoisotopic mass (M+H(+)) >or=500. Digestion of RyR2 from 8-week streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals (8D) afforded 21% fewer peptides, whereas RyR2 from 6-week diabetic/2-week insulin-treated animals generated 304 peptides. Using an in-house PERLscript algorithm, search of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass data files identified several M+H(+) peaks corresponding to theoretical RyR2 peptides with single N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine, imidazolone A, imidazone B, pyrraline, or 1-alkyl-2-formyl-3,4-glycosyl pyrrole modification that were present in 8D but not 8C. Insulin treatment minimized production of some of these nonenzymatic glycation products. These data show for the first time that AGEs are formed on intracellular RyR2 during diabetes. Because AGE complexes are known to compromise protein activity, these data suggest a potential mechanism for diabetes-induced RyR2 dysfunction. PMID:12829653

  17. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Hegele, Jörg; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry

    2008-06-01

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N(epsilon)-fructoselysine (FL), N(epsilon)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34+/-3.81 nmol CML per micromol of free Lys (Lys(free)) and 81.5+/-87.8 nmol Pyr micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1) vs. 3.72+/-1.29 nmol FL micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1). In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47+/-0.08 nmol FL micromol(-1) of protein-bound Lys (Lys(p-b)), 0.04+/-0.03 nmol CML micromol(-1) Lys(p-b)(-1) and 0.06+/-0.02 nmol Pyr micromol(-1)Lys(p-b)(-1). It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products. PMID:18486644

  18. Potential Dual Role of Eugenol in Inhibiting Advanced Glycation End Products in Diabetes: Proteomic and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Priyanka; Jayaramaiah, Ramesha H.; Agawane, Sachin B.; Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; Korwar, Arvind M.; Anand, Atul; Dhaygude, Vitthal S.; Shaikh, Mahemud L.; Joshi, Rakesh S.; Boppana, Ramanamurthy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J.; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V.; Giri, Ashok P.

    2016-01-01

    Medicinally important genus Ocimum harbors a vast pool of chemically diverse metabolites. Current study aims at identifying anti-diabetic candidate compounds from Ocimum species. Major metabolites in O. kilimandscharicum, O. tenuiflorum, O. gratissimum were purified, characterized and evaluated for anti-glycation activity. In vitro inhibition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by eugenol was found to be highest. Preliminary biophysical analysis and blind docking studies to understand eugenol-albumin interaction indicated eugenol to possess strong binding affinity for surface exposed lysines. However, binding of eugenol to bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not result in significant change in secondary structure of protein. In vivo diabetic mice model studies with eugenol showed reduction in blood glucose levels by 38% likely due to inhibition of α-glucosidase while insulin and glycated hemoglobin levels remain unchanged. Western blotting using anti-AGE antibody and mass spectrometry detected notably fewer AGE modified peptides upon eugenol treatment both in vivo and in vitro. Histopathological examination revealed comparatively lesser lesions in eugenol-treated mice. Thus, we propose eugenol has dual mode of action in combating diabetes; it lowers blood glucose by inhibiting α-glucosidase and prevents AGE formation by binding to ε-amine group on lysine, protecting it from glycation, offering potential use in diabetic management. PMID:26739611

  19. Potential Dual Role of Eugenol in Inhibiting Advanced Glycation End Products in Diabetes: Proteomic and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Jayaramaiah, Ramesha H; Agawane, Sachin B; Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; Korwar, Arvind M; Anand, Atul; Dhaygude, Vitthal S; Shaikh, Mahemud L; Joshi, Rakesh S; Boppana, Ramanamurthy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V; Giri, Ashok P

    2016-01-01

    Medicinally important genus Ocimum harbors a vast pool of chemically diverse metabolites. Current study aims at identifying anti-diabetic candidate compounds from Ocimum species. Major metabolites in O. kilimandscharicum, O. tenuiflorum, O. gratissimum were purified, characterized and evaluated for anti-glycation activity. In vitro inhibition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by eugenol was found to be highest. Preliminary biophysical analysis and blind docking studies to understand eugenol-albumin interaction indicated eugenol to possess strong binding affinity for surface exposed lysines. However, binding of eugenol to bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not result in significant change in secondary structure of protein. In vivo diabetic mice model studies with eugenol showed reduction in blood glucose levels by 38% likely due to inhibition of α-glucosidase while insulin and glycated hemoglobin levels remain unchanged. Western blotting using anti-AGE antibody and mass spectrometry detected notably fewer AGE modified peptides upon eugenol treatment both in vivo and in vitro. Histopathological examination revealed comparatively lesser lesions in eugenol-treated mice. Thus, we propose eugenol has dual mode of action in combating diabetes; it lowers blood glucose by inhibiting α-glucosidase and prevents AGE formation by binding to ε-amine group on lysine, protecting it from glycation, offering potential use in diabetic management. PMID:26739611

  20. Ability of resveratrol to inhibit advanced glycation end product formation and carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme activity, and to conjugate methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yixiao; Xu, Zhimin; Sheng, Zhanwu

    2017-02-01

    Glycation can generate advanced glycation end products (AGE) and its intermediates methylglyoxal (MGO) and glyoxal in foods, which increase the risk of developing diabetes diseases. In this study, the effect of resveratrol against AGE formation, carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme activity and trapping MGO capability were evaluated. Resveratrol showed a significant inhibition capability against AGE formation in bovine serum albumin (BSA)-fructose, BSA-MGO and arginine-MGO models with inhibition percentages of 57.94, 85.95 and 99.35%, respectively. Furthermore, resveratrol acted as a competitive inhibitor for α-amylase with IC50 3.62μg/ml, while it behaved in an uncompetitive manner for α-glucosidase with an IC50 of 17.54μg/l. A prevention of BSA protein glycation was observed in the BSA-fructose model with addition of resveratrol. Three types of resveratrol-MGO adducts were identified in the model consisting of MGO and resveratrol. The results demonstrated that resveratrol has potential in reducing glycation in foods and retarding carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme activities. PMID:27596404

  1. Advanced glycation end products promote differentiation of CD4(+) T helper cells toward pro-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-qun; Gong, Zuo-jiong; Xu, San-qing; Li, Xun; Wang, Li-kun; Wu, Shi-min; Wu, Jian-hong; Yang, Hua-fen

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells and the role of the receptor of AGEs (RAGE) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) activity in the process in order to gain insight into the mechanism of immunological disorders in diabetes. AGEs were prepared by the reaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with glucose. Human naïve CD4(+) T cells, enriched from blood of healthy adult volunteers with negative selection assay, were cultured in vitro and treated with various agents including AGEs, BSA, high glucose, PGJ2 and PD68235 for indicated time. In short hairpin (sh) RNA knock-down experiment, naïve CD4(+) T cells were transduced with media containing shRNA-lentivirus generated from lentiviral packaging cell line, Lent-X(TM) 293 T cells. Surface and intracellular cytokine stainings were used for examination of CD4(+) T cell phenotypes, and real-time PCR and Western blotting for detection of transcription factor mRNA and protein expression, respectively. The suppressive function of regulatory T (Treg) cells was determined by a [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation assay. The results showed that AGEs induced higher pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 cells differentiated from naïve CD4(+) T cells than the controls, whereas did not affect anti-inflammatory Treg cells. However, AGEs eliminated suppressive function of Treg cells. In addition, AGEs increased RAGE mRNA expression in naïve CD4(+) T cells, and RAGE knock-down by shRNA eliminated the effect of AGEs on the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells and the reduction of suppressive function of Treg cells. Furthermore, AGEs inhibited the mRNA expression of PPARγ, not PPARα PPARγ agonist, PGJ2, inhibited the effect of AGEs on naïve CD4(+) T cell differentiation and reversed the AGE-reduced suppressive function of Treg cells; on the other hand, PPARγ antagonist, PD68235, attenuated the blocking effect of RAGE shRNA on the role of AGEs. It

  2. Advanced glycation end-products: a common pathway in diabetes and age-related erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Neves, D

    2013-08-01

    Reactive derivatives of non-enzymatic glucose-protein condensation reactions integrate a heterogeneous group of irreversible adducts called advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Numerous studies have investigated the role of the AGEs in cardiovascular system; however, its contribution to erectile dysfunction (ED) that is an early manifestation of cardiovascular disease has been less intensively investigated. This review summarizes the most recent advances concerning AGEs effects in the cavernous tissue of the penis and in ED onset, particularly on diabetes and aging, conditions that not only favor AGEs formation, but also increase risk of developing ED. The specific contribution of AGE on intra- and extracellular deposition of insoluble complexes, interference in activity of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase, NO bioavailability, endothelial-dependent vasodilatation, as well as molecular pathways activated by receptor of AGEs are presented. Finally, the interventional actions that prevent AGEs formation, accumulation or activity in the cavernous tissue and that include nutritional pattern modulation, nutraceuticals, exercise, therapeutic strategies (statins, anti-diabetics, inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-5, anti-hypertensive drugs) and inhibitors of AGEs formation and crosslink breakers, are discussed. From this review, we conclude that despite the experiments conducted in animal models pointing to the AGE/RAGE axis as a potential interventional target with respect to ED associated with diabetes and aging, the clinical data have been very disappointing and, until now, did not provide evidence of benefits of treatments directed to AGE inactivation. PMID:23822116

  3. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products: from disease marker to potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Geroldi, Diego; Falcone, Colomba; Emanuele, Enzo

    2006-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a cell-bound receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily which may be activated by a variety of proinflammatory ligands including advanced glycoxidation end products, S100/calgranulins, high mobility group box 1, and amyloid beta-peptide. RAGE has a secretory splice isoform, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), that lacks the transmembrane domain and therefore circulates in plasma. By competing with cell-surface RAGE for ligand binding, sRAGE may contribute to the removal/neutralization of circulating ligands thus functioning as a decoy. Clinical studies have recently shown that higher plasma levels of sRAGE are associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease, hypertension, the metabolic syndrome, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease. Increasing the production of plasma sRAGE is therefore considered to be a promising therapeutic target that has the potential to prevent vascular damage and neurodegeneration. This review presents the state of the art in the use of sRAGE as a disease marker and discusses the therapeutic potential of targeting sRAGE for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:16842191

  4. Pathological Significance of Mitochondrial Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Murphy, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Glycation, the nonenzymatic glycosylation of biomolecules, is commonly observed in diabetes and ageing. Reactive dicarbonyl species such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal are thought to be major physiological precursors of glycation. Because these dicarbonyls tend to be formed intracellularly, the levels of advanced glycation end products on cellular proteins are higher than on extracellular ones. The formation of glycation adducts within cells can have severe functional consequences such as inhibition of protein activity and promotion of DNA mutations. Although several lines of evidence suggest that there are specific mitochondrial targets of glycation, and mitochondrial dysfunction itself has been implicated in disease and ageing, it is unclear if glycation of biomolecules specifically within mitochondria induces dysfunction and contributes to disease pathology. We discuss here the possibility that mitochondrial glycation contributes to disease, focussing on diabetes, ageing, cancer, and neurodegeneration, and highlight the current limitations in our understanding of the pathological significance of mitochondrial glycation. PMID:22778743

  5. Advanced glycation end products induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ down-regulation-related inflammatory signals in human chondrocytes via Toll-like receptor-4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying Ju; Sheu, Meei Ling; Tsai, Keh Sung; Yang, Rong Sen; Liu, Shing Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in joints is important in the development of cartilage destruction and damage in age-related osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), and receptor for AGEs (RAGE) in AGEs-induced inflammatory signalings in human OA chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were isolated and cultured. The productions of metalloproteinase-13 and interleukin-6 were quantified using the specific ELISA kits. The expressions of related signaling proteins were determined by Western blotting. Our results showed that AGEs enhanced the productions of interleukin-6 and metalloproteinase-13 and the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 and high-mobility group protein B1 and resulted in the reduction of collagen II expression in human OA chondrocytes. AGEs could also activate nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. Stimulation of human OA chondrocytes with AGEs significantly induced the up-regulation of TLR4 and RAGE expressions and the down-regulation of PPARγ expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Neutralizing antibodies of TLR4 and RAGE effectively reversed the AGEs-induced inflammatory signalings and PPARγ down-regulation. PPARγ agonist pioglitazone could also reverse the AGEs-increased inflammatory signalings. Specific inhibitors for p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and NF-κB suppressed AGEs-induced PPARγ down-regulation and reduction of collagen II expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that AGEs induce PPARγ down-regulation-mediated inflammatory signalings and reduction of collagen II expression in human OA chondrocytes via TLR4 and RAGE, which may play a crucial role in the development of osteoarthritis pathogenesis induced by AGEs accumulation. PMID:23776688

  6. Increased concentration of two different advanced glycation end-products detected by enzyme immunoassays with new monoclonal antibodies in sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Levels of pentosidine (representative of advanced glycation end-products) in sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis are increased when compared with sera of other diagnoses or healthy controls. These levels have been reported to correlate with clinical indices of rheumatoid arthritis activity and with laboratory markers of inflammation. The purpose of this study was to find out if these findings pertain to other advanced glycation end-products. Methods We have developed two immunoassays based on new monoclonal antibodies to advanced glycation end-products. Antibody 103-E3 reacts with an unidentified antigen, formed in the reaction of proteins with ribose, while antibody 8-C1 responds to Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine. We have used these monoclonal antibodies to measure levels of advanced glycation end-products in sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, osteoarthritis, and healthy controls. We calculated the correlations between advanced glycation end-product levels in rheumatoid arthritis sera and the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28), age, disease duration, CRP, anti-CCP, rheumatoid factor and treatment with corticosteroids, respectively. Results Levels of both glycation products were significantly higher in sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis when compared with sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, osteoarthritis, or the healthy controls. Neither the level of Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine nor the level of the 103-E3 antigen in rheumatoid arthritis sera correlated with the DAS28-scored rheumatoid arthritis activity. The levels of both antigens in rheumatoid arthritis sera did not correlate with age, gender, corticosteroid treatment, or levels of CRP, anti-CCP antibodies, and rheumatoid factor in sera. Conclusions We report highly specific increases in the levels of two advanced glycation end-products in sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This increase could be explained neither by rheumatoid

  7. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Activates the AIM2 Inflammasome in Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Rui; Chen, Ruochan; Xie, Min; Cao, Lizhi; Lotze, Michael T; Tang, Daolin; Zeh, Herbert J

    2016-05-15

    Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is responsible for significant human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, no specific treatments for AP exist, primarily due to the lack of a mechanistic understanding of sterile inflammation and the resultant multisystem organ dysfunction, the pathologic response of AP linked to early death. In this study, we demonstrate that the class III major histocompatibility region III receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) contributes to AP by modulating inflammasome activation in macrophages. RAGE mediated nucleosome-induced absent in melanoma 2 (but not NLRP3) inflammasome activation by modulating dsRNA-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation in macrophages. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of the RAGE-dsRNA-dependent protein kinase pathway attenuated the release of inflammasome-dependent exosomal leaderless cytokines (e.g., IL-1β and high-mobility group box 1) in vitro. RAGE or absent in melanoma 2 depletion in mice limited tissue injury, reduced systemic inflammation, and protected against AP induced by l-arginine or cerulein in experimental animal models. These findings define a novel role for RAGE in the propagation of the innate immune response with activation of the nucleosome-mediated inflammasome and will help guide future development of therapeutic strategies to treat AP. PMID:27045109

  8. The receptor for advanced glycation end products is a central mediator of asthma pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Milutinovic, Pavle S; Alcorn, John F; Englert, Judson M; Crum, Lauren T; Oury, Tim D

    2012-10-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor that has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes, atherosclerosis, and neurodegeneration. However, its role in asthma and allergic airway disease is largely unknown. These studies use a house dust mite (HDM) mouse model of asthma/allergic airway disease. Respiratory mechanics were assessed and compared between wild-type and RAGE knockout mice. Bronchovascular architecture was assessed with quantitative scoring, and expression of RAGE, immunoglobulins, and relevant cytokines was assessed by standard protein detection methods and/or quantitative RT-PCR. The absence of RAGE abolishes most assessed measures of pathology, including airway hypersensitivity (resistance, tissue damping, and elastance), eosinophilic inflammation, and airway remodeling. IL-4 secretion, isotype class switching, and antigen recognition are intact in the absence of RAGE. In contrast, normal increases in IL-5, IL-13, eotaxin, and eotaxin-2 production are abrogated in the RAGE knockouts. IL-17 indicates complex regulation, with elevated baseline expression in RAGE knockouts, but no induction in response to allergen. Treatment of WT mice with an inhibitor of RAGE markedly reduces inflammation in the HDM model, suggesting that RAGE inhibition may serve as a promising therapeutic strategy. Finally, the results in the HDM model are recapitulated in an ovalbumin model of asthma, suggesting that RAGE plays a role in asthma irrespective of the identity of the allergens involved. PMID:22889845

  9. A role for the receptor for advanced glycation end products in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Englert, Judson M; Hanford, Lana E; Kaminski, Naftali; Tobolewski, Jacob M; Tan, Roderick J; Fattman, Cheryl L; Ramsgaard, Lasse; Richards, Thomas J; Loutaev, Inna; Nawroth, Peter P; Kasper, Michael; Bierhaus, Angelika; Oury, Tim D

    2008-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a severely debilitating disease associated with a dismal prognosis. There are currently no effective therapies for IPF, thus the identification of novel therapeutic targets is greatly needed. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface receptors whose activation has been linked to various pathologies. In healthy adult animals, RAGE is expressed at the highest levels in the lung compared to other tissues. To investigate the hypothesis that RAGE is involved in IPF pathogenesis, we have examined its expression in two mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis and in human tissue from IPF patients. In each instance we observed a depletion of membrane RAGE and its soluble (decoy) isoform, sRAGE, in fibrotic lungs. In contrast to other diseases in which RAGE signaling promotes pathology, immunohistochemical and hydroxyproline quantification studies on aged RAGE-null mice indicate that these mice spontaneously develop pulmonary fibrosis-like alterations. Furthermore, when subjected to a model of pulmonary fibrosis, RAGE-null mice developed more severe fibrosis, as measured by hydroxyproline assay and histological scoring, than wild-type controls. Combined with data from other studies on mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis and human IPF tissues indicate that loss of RAGE contributes to IPF pathogenesis. PMID:18245812

  10. Advanced glycation end products delay corneal epithelial wound healing through reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Long; Chen, Hongmei; Yu, Xiaoming; Wu, Xinyi

    2013-11-01

    Delayed healing of corneal epithelial wounds is a serious complication in diabetes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are intimately associated with the diabetic complications and are deleterious to the wound healing process. However, the effect of AGEs on corneal epithelial wound healing has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) on corneal epithelial wound healing and its underlying mechanisms. Our data showed that AGE-BSA significantly increased the generation of intracellular ROS in telomerase-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells. However, the generation of intracellular ROS was completely inhibited by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), anti-receptor of AGEs (RAGE) antibodies, or the inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. Moreover, AGE-BSA increased NADPH oxidase activity and protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, p22phox and Nox4, but anti-RAGE antibodies eliminated these effects. Furthermore, prevention of intracellular ROS generation using NAC or anti-RAGE antibodies rescued AGE-BSA-delayed epithelial wound healing in porcine corneal organ culture. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that AGE-BSA impaired corneal epithelial wound healing ex vivo. AGE-BSA increased intracellular ROS generation through NADPH oxidase activation, which accounted for the delayed corneal epithelial wound healing. These results may provide better insights for understanding the mechanism of delayed healing of corneal epithelial wounds in diabetes. PMID:23955437

  11. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Li, D.X.; Deng, T.Z.; Lv, J.; Ke, J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction. PMID:25387669

  12. Advanced glycation endproducts regulate smooth muscle cells calcification in cultured HSMCs

    PubMed Central

    He, Hu-Qiang; Liu, Yong; Zeng, Hong; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Lin; Liao, Wen-Jun; Zhou, Xiang-Yu; He, Yan-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) promoting the calcification of smooth muscle cells. Methods: The successfully cultured smooth muscle cells were divided into three groups: normal culture group (group A), calcified culture group (group B), calcification + AGEs group (group C); the concentration of intracellular calcium ion was detected in each group; the promotion of AGEs on the calcification of HSMCs was confirmed by VON KOSSA staining; and the expressions of β-catenin, RAGE, β-catenin, OPG and E-cadherin protein were detected by immunofluorescence and western blot. Results: The morphology of the cells in each group showed that the amount of calcified plaques in calcification + AGES group were significantly higher than the calcification group. VON KOSSA staining showed that with increasing concentrations of AGE-BSA, the amount of its calcification gradually increased. Calcium concentration in Calcification + 20 mg/L AGEs group was significantly higher, followed by 40 mg/L AGEs group. The expression of β-catenin increased with the increasing concentrations of AGEs. Conclusion: AGEs can promote the calcification of human femoral artery smooth muscle cells, with a concentration gradient effect. With increasing concentrations of AGEs, the expression of RAGE increased, indicating that AGEs-induced HSMCs proliferation was correlated with RAGE expression. PMID:26722411

  13. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, D X; Deng, T Z; Lv, J; Ke, J

    2014-12-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80 ± 5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31 ± 1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction. PMID:25387669

  14. Quercetin inhibits advanced glycation end product formation by trapping methylglyoxal and glyoxal.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Zheng, Tiesong; Sang, Shengmin; Lv, Lishuang

    2014-12-17

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) and glyoxal (GO) not only are endogenous metabolites but also exist in exogenous resources, such as foods, beverages, urban atmosphere, and cigarette smoke. They have been identified as reactive dicarbonyl precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which have been associated with diabetes-related long-term complications. In this study, quercetin, a natural flavonol found in fruits, vegetables, leaves, and grains, could effectively inhibit the formation of AGEs in a dose-dependent manner via trapping reactive dicarbonyl compounds. More than 50.5% of GO and 80.1% of MGO were trapped at the same time by quercetin within 1 h under physiological conditions. Quercetin and MGO (or GO) were combined at different ratios, and the products generated from this reaction were analyzed with LC-MS. Both mono-MGO and di-MGO adducts of quercetin were detected in this assay using LC-MS, but only tiny amounts of mono-GO adducts of quercetin were found. Additionally, di-MGO adducts were observed as the dominant product with prolonged incubation time. In the bovine serum albumin (BSA)-MGO/GO system, quercetin traps MGO and GO directly and then significantly inhibits the formation of AGEs. PMID:25412188

  15. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, D X; Deng, T Z; Lv, J; Ke, J

    2014-09-19

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction. PMID:25250588

  16. Advanced glycation end-products: a biological consequence of lifestyle contributing to cancer disparity.

    PubMed

    Turner, David P

    2015-05-15

    Low income, poor diet, obesity, and a lack of exercise are interrelated lifestyle factors that can profoundly alter our biologic make up to increase cancer risk, growth, and development. We recently reported a potential mechanistic link between carbohydrate-derived metabolites and cancer, which may provide a biologic consequence of lifestyle that can directly affect tumor biology. Advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are reactive metabolites produced as a by-product of sugar metabolism. Failure to remove these highly reactive metabolites can lead to protein damage, aberrant cell signaling, increased stress responses, and decreased genetic fidelity. Critically, AGE accumulation is also directly affected by our lifestyle choices and shows a race-specific, tumor-dependent pattern of accumulation in cancer patients. This review will discuss the contribution of AGEs to the cancer phenotype, with a particular emphasis on their biologic links with the socioeconomic and environmental risk factors that drive cancer disparity. Given the potential benefits of lifestyle changes and the potential biologic role of AGEs in promoting cancer, opportunities exist for collaborations affecting basic, translational, epidemiologic, and cancer prevention initiatives. PMID:25920350

  17. Advanced glycation endproduct changes to Bruch's membrane promotes lipoprotein retention by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Cano, Marisol; Fijalkowski, Natalia; Kondo, Naoshi; Dike, Sonny; Handa, James

    2011-08-01

    Lipoprotein particles accumulate in Bruch's membrane before the development of basal deposits and drusen, two histopathologic lesions that define age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We therefore, sought to determine which molecules could participate in lipoprotein retention. Wild-type or lipoprotein lipase-deficient mice were injected with low-dose D-galactose or PBS subcutaneously for 8 weeks to induce advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) formation. Some mice were also injected with the AGE breaker phenacylphiazolium bromide and D-galactose. Rhodamine-labeled low-density lipoproteins were injected into mice, and the fluorescence was measured up to 72 hours later. AGEs, proteoglycans, and other lipid-retaining molecules were evaluated by IHC. Lipoprotein lipase distribution was assessed in AMD samples by IHC. D-galactose-treated mice retained lipoproteins in the retinal pigment epithelial and Bruch's membrane to a greater extent than either PBS- or phenacylphiazolium bromide/D-galactose-treated mice at 24 and 72 hours after injection (P ≤ 0.04). Immunolabeling for carboxymethyllysine, biglycan, and lipoprotein lipase was found in D-galactose-treated mice only. Mice deficient for lipoprotein lipase treated with D-galactose did not retain lipoproteins to any measureable extent. Human AMD samples had lipoprotein lipase labeling within drusen, basal deposits, and the choroid. Mice treated with D-galactose to induce AGE formation in Bruch's membrane retain intravenously injected lipoproteins. Our results suggest that lipoprotein retention in Bruch's membrane is mediated by lipoprotein lipase. PMID:21801873

  18. Eucommia ulmoides extracts prevent the formation of advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Sugawa, Hikari; Ohno, Rei-Ichi; Shirakawa, Jun-Ichi; Nakajima, Akari; Kanagawa, Amane; Hirata, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Moroishi, Narumi; Nagai, Mime; Nagai, Ryoji

    2016-06-15

    Proteins non-enzymatically react with reducing sugars to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), resulting in the induction of protein denaturation. Because the levels of AGE increase with age and are elevated in age-related diseases, such as diabetes and atherosclerosis, the intake of compound(s) that inhibit the formation of AGEs by daily meal may represent a potential strategy for preventing age-related diseases. In this study, we measured the inhibitory effects of several Eucommia ulmoides extracts on the formation of AGEs, N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and N(ω)-(carboxymethyl)arginine (CMA). Although a crude extract obtained from E. ulmoides bark is widely used as herbal medicine, E. ulmoides leaf extract (ELE) inhibited CML and CMA formation more effectively during the incubation of gelatin with ribose. Therefore, the inhibitory effects of compounds present in ELE on CML and CMA formation were studied. As a result, isoquercetin showed the strongest inhibitory effect of all the tested ELE components. These results indicate that the oral intake of ELE may inhibit the formation of AGEs, thereby ameliorating age-related diseases. PMID:27080730

  19. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yijun . E-mail: zhou-yijun@hotmail.com; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-06-02

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-{kappa}B, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-{kappa}B, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease.

  20. Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Malene W; Andersen, Jeanette M; Hedegaard, Rikke V; Madsen, Andreas N; Krath, Britta N; Monošík, Rastislav; Bak, Monika J; Nielsen, John; Holst, Birgitte; Skibsted, Leif H; Larsen, Lesli H; Dragsted, Lars O

    2016-02-28

    Dietary advanced glycation end products (AGE) formed during heating of food have gained interest as potential nutritional toxins with adverse effects on inflammation and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we investigated the short-term effects of high and low molecular weight (HMW and LMW) dietary AGE on insulin sensitivity, expression of the receptor for AGE (RAGE), the AGE receptor 1 (AGER1) and TNF-α, F2-isoprostaglandins, body composition and food intake. For 2 weeks, thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a diet containing 20% milk powder with different proportions of this being given as heated milk powder (0, 40 or 100%), either native (HMW) or hydrolysed (LMW). Gene expression of RAGE and AGER1 in whole blood increased in the group receiving a high AGE LMW diet, which also had the highest urinary excretion of the AGE, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1). Urinary excretion of N ε-carboxymethyl-lysine increased with increasing proportion of heat-treated milk powder in the HMW and LMW diets but was unrelated to gene expression. There was no difference in insulin sensitivity, F2-isoprostaglandins, food intake, water intake, body weight or body composition between the groups. In conclusion, RAGE and AGER1 expression can be influenced by a high AGE diet after only 2 weeks in proportion to MG-H1 excretion. No other short-term effects were observed. PMID:26824730

  1. Advanced glycation end products facilitate bacterial adherence in urinary tract infection in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Ahmet; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Izgi, Kenan; Bicer, Fuat; Hultgren, Scott J.; Liu, Guiming; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic individuals have increased susceptibility to urinary tract infection (UTI), a common, painful condition. During diabetes mellitus, non-enzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and protein amine groups result in excessive production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that accumulate in tissues. Since bacteria adhere to cell surfaces by binding to carbohydrates, we hypothesized that adherence of bacteria to the bladder in diabetics may be enhanced by accumulation of AGEs on urothelial surface proteins. Using a murine model of UTI, we observed increased adherence of type 1 fimbriated uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the bladder in streptozotocin-induced diabetic female mice compared with age-matched controls, along with increased concentrations of two common AGEs in superficial urothelial cells from diabetic bladders. Several lectins with different specificities exhibited increased binding to urothelial homogenates from diabetic mice compared with controls, and two of those lectins also bound to AGEs. Furthermore, mannose-binding type 1 fimbriae isolated from UPEC bound to different AGEs, and UPEC adherence to the bladder in diabetic mice, were inhibited by pretreatment of mice with the AGE inhibitor pyridoxamine. These results strongly suggest a role for urothelial AGE accumulation in increased bacterial adherence during UTI in diabetes. PMID:25986378

  2. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) knockout reduces fetal dysmorphogenesis in murine diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ejdesjö, Andreas; Brings, Sebastian; Fleming, Thomas; Fred, Rikard G; Nawroth, Peter P; Eriksson, Ulf J

    2016-07-01

    The receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, but its importance in diabetic embryopathy is unclear. We therefore investigated the role of RAGE in diabetic embryopathy using streptozotocin induced diabetes in female wild type (WT) C57Bl/6N and RAGE knockout C57Bl/6N (RAGE(-/-)) mice, mated with control males of the same genotype. Maternal diabetes induced more fetal resorption and malformation (facial skeleton, neural tube) in the WT than in the RAGE(-/-) fetuses. Maternal plasma glucose and methylgyoxal concentrations, as well as embryonic N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) levels were increased to the same extent in diabetic WT and RAGE(-/-) pregnancy. However, maternal diabetes induced increased fetal hepatic isoprostane 8-iso-PGF2α levels (oxidative stress marker) and embryonic activation of NFκB in WT only (not in RAGE(-/-) embryos). The association between RAGE knockout and diminished embryonic dysmorphogenesis in diabetic pregnancy suggests that embryonic RAGE activation is involved in diabetic embryopathy. PMID:27109771

  3. Advanced Glycation End Products: Link between Diet and Ovulatory Dysfunction in PCOS?

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Deepika; Merhi, Zaher

    2015-01-01

    PCOS is the most common cause of anovulation in reproductive-aged women with 70% experiencing ovulatory problems. Advanced glycation end products are highly reactive molecules that are formed by non-enzymatic reactions of sugars with proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. AGEs are also present in a variety of diet where substantial increase in AGEs can result due to thermal processing and modifications of food. Elevation in bodily AGEs, produced endogenously or absorbed exogenously from high-AGE diets, is further exaggerated in women with PCOS and is associated with ovulatory dysfunction. Additionally, increased expression of AGEs as pro-inflammatory receptors in the ovarian tissue has been observed in women with PCOS. In this review, we summarize the role of dietary AGEs as mediators of metabolic and reproductive alterations in PCOS. Once a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between AGEs and anovulation is established, there is a promise that such knowledge will contribute to the subsequent development of targeted pharmacological therapies that will treat anovulation and improve ovarian health in women with PCOS. PMID:26690206

  4. Statins stimulate the production of a soluble form of the receptor for advanced glycation end products

    PubMed Central

    Quade-Lyssy, Patricia; Kanarek, Anna Maria; Baiersdörfer, Markus; Postina, Rolf; Kojro, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effects of statin therapy in the reduction of cardiovascular pathogenesis, atherosclerosis, and diabetic complications are well known. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays an important role in the progression of these diseases. In contrast, soluble forms of RAGE act as decoys for RAGE ligands and may prevent the development of RAGE-mediated disorders. Soluble forms of RAGE are either produced by alternative splicing [endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE)] or by proteolytic shedding mediated by metalloproteinases [shed RAGE (sRAGE)]. Therefore we analyzed whether statins influence the production of soluble RAGE. Lovastatin treatment of either mouse alveolar epithelial cells endogenously expressing RAGE or HEK cells overexpressing RAGE caused induction of RAGE shedding, but did not influence secretion of esRAGE from HEK cells overexpressing esRAGE. Lovastatin-induced secretion of sRAGE was also evident after restoration of the isoprenylation pathway, demonstrating a correlation of sterol biosynthesis and activation of RAGE shedding. Lovastatin-stimulated induction of RAGE shedding was completely abolished by a metalloproteinase ADAM10 inhibitor. We also demonstrate that statins stimulate RAGE shedding at low physiologically relevant concentrations. Our results show that statins, due to their cholesterol-lowering effects, increase the soluble RAGE level by inducing RAGE shedding, and by doing this, might prevent the development of RAGE-mediated pathogenesis. PMID:23966666

  5. Clearance Kinetics and Matrix Binding Partners of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Pavle S.; Englert, Judson M.; Crum, Lauren T.; Mason, Neale S.; Ramsgaard, Lasse; Enghild, Jan J.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Lotze, Michael T.; Oury, Tim D.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating the sites and mechanisms of sRAGE action in the healthy state is vital to better understand the biological importance of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Previous studies in animal models of disease have demonstrated that exogenous sRAGE has an anti-inflammatory effect, which has been reasoned to arise from sequestration of pro-inflammatory ligands away from membrane-bound RAGE isoforms. We show here that sRAGE exhibits in vitro binding with high affinity and reversibly to extracellular matrix components collagen I, collagen IV, and laminin. Soluble RAGE administered intratracheally, intravenously, or intraperitoneally, does not distribute in a specific fashion to any healthy mouse tissue, suggesting against the existence of accessible sRAGE sinks and receptors in the healthy mouse. Intratracheal administration is the only effective means of delivering exogenous sRAGE to the lung, the organ in which RAGE is most highly expressed; clearance of sRAGE from lung does not differ appreciably from that of albumin. PMID:24642901

  6. Receptor for advanced glycation end products is detrimental during influenza A virus pneumonia☆

    PubMed Central

    van Zoelen, Marieke A.D; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F.; Achouiti, Ahmed; Florquin, Sandrine; Braun-Pater, Jennie M.; Yang, Huan; Nawroth, Peter P.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by influenza A virus (IAV) can have devastating effects, resulting in respiratory failure and death. The idea that a new influenza pandemic might occur in the near future has triggered renewed interests in IAV infection. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory processes. We here investigated the role of RAGE in the host response to IAV pneumonia using wild-type (wt) and RAGE deficient (−/−) mice. Whereas strong RAGE was constitutively expressed in the lungs of uninfected wt mice, in particular on endothelium, IAV pneumonia was associated with enhanced expression on endothelium and de novo expression on bronchial epithelium. Additionally, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box 1 was upregulated during IAV pneumonia. RAGE−/− mice were relatively protected from IAV induced mortality and showed an improved viral clearance and enhanced cellular T cell response and activation of neutrophils. These data suggest that RAGE is detrimental during IAV pneumonia. PMID:19592063

  7. The receptor for advanced glycation end products mediates lung endothelial activation by RBCs

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jessica L.; Wang, Liang-Chuan; Stolz, Donna; Muthukumaran, Geetha; Siegel, Don L.; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Lee, Janet S.; Albelda, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand pattern recognition receptor implicated in multiple disease states. Although RAGE is expressed on systemic vascular endothelium, the expression and function of RAGE on lung endothelium has not been studied. Utilizing in vitro (human) and in vivo (mouse) models, we established the presence of RAGE on lung endothelium. Because RAGE ligands can induce the expression of RAGE and stored red blood cells express the RAGE ligand Nε-carboxymethyl lysine, we investigated whether red blood cell (RBC) transfusion would augment RAGE expression on endothelium utilizing a syngeneic model of RBC transfusion. RBC transfusion not only increased lung endothelial RAGE expression but enhanced lung inflammation and endothelial activation, since lung high mobility group box 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression was elevated following transfusion. These effects were mediated by RAGE, since endothelial activation was absent in RBC-transfused RAGE knockout mice. Thus, RAGE is inducibly expressed on lung endothelium, and one functional consequence of RBC transfusion is increased RAGE expression and endothelial activation. PMID:23275625

  8. Advanced glycation endproducts in 35 types of seafood products consumed in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Zhenxing; Pavase, Ramesh Tushar; Lin, Hong; Zou, Long; Wen, Jie; Lv, Liangtao

    2016-05-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) have been recognized as hazards in processed foods that can induce chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we investigated the AGEs contents of 35 types of industrial seafood products that are consumed frequently in eastern China. Total fluorescent AGEs level and Nɛ-carboxymethyl- lysine (CML) content were evaluated by fluorescence spectrophotometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. The level of total fluorescent AGEs in seafood samples ranged from 39.37 to 1178.3 AU, and was higher in canned and packaged instant aquatic products that were processed at high temperatures. The CML content in seafood samples ranged from 44.8 to 439.1 mg per kg dried sample, and was higher in roasted seafood samples. The total fluorescent AGEs and CML content increased when seafood underwent high-temperature processing, but did not show an obvious correlation. The present study suggested that commonly consumed seafood contains different levels of AGEs, and the seafood processed at high temperatures always displays a high level of either AGEs or CML.

  9. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) promote melanogenesis through receptor for AGEs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Young; Oh, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is linked with development or aggravation of many degenerative processes or disorders, including aging and atherosclerosis. AGEs production in skin cells is known to promote stiffness and loss of elasticity through their buildup in connective tissue. However, the impact of AGEs has yet to be fully explored in melanocytes. In this study, we confirmed the existence of receptor for AGE (RAGE) in melanocytes in western blot and immunofluorescence along with increased melanin production in ex vivo skin organ culture and in vitro melanocyte culture following AGEs treatment. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 are considered as key regulatory proteins in AGEs-induced melanogenesis. In addition, blockage experiment using anti-RAGE blocking antibody has indicated that RAGE plays a pivotal role in AGE-mediated melanogenesis. Therefore, it is apparent that AGEs, known markers of aging, promote melanogenesis via RAGE. In addition, AGEs could be implicated in pigmentation associated with photoaging according to the results of increased secretion of AGEs from keratinocytes following UV irradiation. AGE-mediated melanogenesis may thus hold promise as a novel mean of altering skin pigmentation. PMID:27293210

  10. Advanced Glycation End-Products Enhance Lung Cancer Cell Invasion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yin, Mei-Chin; Mong, Mei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine, two advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), upon invasion and migration in A549 and Calu-6 cells, two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. CML or pentosidine at 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 μmol/L were added into cells. Proliferation, invasion and migration were measured. CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L promoted invasion and migration in both cell lines, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-β1. CML or pentosidine at 2–16 μmol/L up-regulated the protein expression of AGE receptor, p47phox, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and fibronectin in test NSCLC cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 protein expression in A549 and Calu-6 cells was increased by CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L. These two AGEs at 2–16 μmol/L enhanced nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κ B) p65 protein expression and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells. However, CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L up-regulated NF-κB p65 and p-p38 protein expression in Calu-6 cells. These findings suggest that CML and pentosidine, by promoting the invasion, migration and production of associated factors, benefit NSCLC metastasis. PMID:27517907

  11. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) promote melanogenesis through receptor for AGEs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Young; Oh, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is linked with development or aggravation of many degenerative processes or disorders, including aging and atherosclerosis. AGEs production in skin cells is known to promote stiffness and loss of elasticity through their buildup in connective tissue. However, the impact of AGEs has yet to be fully explored in melanocytes. In this study, we confirmed the existence of receptor for AGE (RAGE) in melanocytes in western blot and immunofluorescence along with increased melanin production in ex vivo skin organ culture and in vitro melanocyte culture following AGEs treatment. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 are considered as key regulatory proteins in AGEs-induced melanogenesis. In addition, blockage experiment using anti-RAGE blocking antibody has indicated that RAGE plays a pivotal role in AGE-mediated melanogenesis. Therefore, it is apparent that AGEs, known markers of aging, promote melanogenesis via RAGE. In addition, AGEs could be implicated in pigmentation associated with photoaging according to the results of increased secretion of AGEs from keratinocytes following UV irradiation. AGE-mediated melanogenesis may thus hold promise as a novel mean of altering skin pigmentation. PMID:27293210

  12. Antibody-based detection of advanced glycation end-products: promises vs. limitations.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Ryoji; Shirakawa, Jun-Ichi; Ohno, Rei-Ichi; Hatano, Kota; Sugawa, Hikari; Arakawa, Shoutaro; Ichimaru, Kenta; Kinoshita, Shoh; Sakata, Noriyuki; Nagai, Mime

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) of the Maillard reaction were originally measured according to their fluorescent and browning properties. A subsequent study with instrumental analyses such as high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography mass spectrometry more clearly demonstrated the involvement of each AGE structure in pathological conditions. Furthermore, immunochemical methods have also been developed to clarify the localization of AGEs in tissues and measurement of AGEs in multiple clinical samples. Although the involvement of AGEs in age-related diseases has progressed due to immunochemical techniques, the relationship between AGE structure and diseases has not been clear because little was known about the epitope structure of each anti-AGE antibody. However, the development of epitope-identified antibodies against AGEs has made it possible to clarify AGE structures involved in diseases. This review discusses not only the usability of anti-AGE antibodies to evaluate AGEs and disease pathology and screen AGE inhibitors, but also describes their usage. PMID:27421861

  13. The Role of Advanced Glycation Endproducts and Glyoxalase I in Diabetic Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jack, M.M.; Wright, D.E.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes mellitus with over half of all patients developing altered sensation as a result of damage to peripheral sensory neurons. Hyperglycemia results in altered nerve conduction velocities, loss of epidermal innervation, and the development of painful or painless signs and symptoms in the feet and hands. Current research has been unable to determine if a patient will develop insensate or painful neuropathy or be protected from peripheral nerve damage all together. One of the mechanisms that has been recognized to have a role in the pathogenesis of sensory neuron damage is the process of reactive dicarbonyls forming advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) as a direct result of hyperglycemia. The glyoxalase system, composed of the enzymes glyoxalase I (GLO1) and glyoxalase II, is the main detoxification pathway involved in breaking down toxic reactive dicarbonyls before producing carbonyl stress and forming AGEs on proteins, lipids, or nucleic acids. This review discusses AGEs, GLO1, their role in diabetic neuropathy, and potential therapeutic targets of the AGE pathway. PMID:22500508

  14. Increased Levels of Circulating Advanced Glycation End-Products in Menopausal Women with Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Deng-Ho; Chiang, Tsay-I; Chang, I-Chang; Lin, Fu-Huang; Wei, Cheng-Chung; Cheng, Ya-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) can accumulate in organs and tissues during ageing and diabetes. Increased levels of AGEs are found in the bone tissue of patients with osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate circulating AGEs in patients with osteoporosis. Methods: We evaluated plasma AGEs, osteoporosis-related biomarkers, and bone mass in 82 menopausal women with osteoporosis or osteopenia, 16 young women with osteopenia, and 43 healthy women without osteoporosis or osteopenia. Results: Higher levels of serum AGEs were found in the osteoporosis or osteopenia group compared to healthy women (P < 0.0001). A negative correlation was observed between serum AGEs and lumbar spine bone density (BMD of lumbar spine, r = -0.249, P = 0.028; T-score of lumbar spine, r = -0.261, P = 0.021). Women with a increased level of serum AGEs (> 8.12 U/mL) had a 5.34-fold risk of osteopenia regarding lumbar spine T-score and a 3.31-fold risk of osteopenia regarding the hip T-score. Conclusion: Serum AGEs could be used to monitor the severity and progression of osteoporosis. An increased serum level of AGEs was associated with impaired bone formation and was a risk factor for the development of osteoporosis. Targeting AGEs may represent a novel therapeutic approach for primary or secondary osteoporosis. PMID:24688308

  15. Protection Effect of Endomorphins on Advanced Glycation End Products Induced Injury in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Yan, Liping; Niu, Ruilan; Tian, Limin; Zhang, Qi; Quan, Jinxing; Liu, Hua; Wei, Suhong; Guo, Qian

    2013-01-01

    Endomorphins (EMs) have a very important bridge-function in cardiovascular, endocrinological, and neurological systems. This study is to investigate the effects of EMs on the synthesis and secretion of vasoactive substances induced by advanced glycation end products in primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Firstly, HUVECs were stimulated with AGEs-bovine serum albumin (AGEs-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA), or both AGEs-BSA and EMs together, respectively. Then, HUVEC survival rate was calculated by MTT assay, the levels of NO, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were detected by colorimetric analysis, and the contents of endothelin-1 (ET-1) were detected by ELISA. The mRNA levels of eNOS and ET-1 were measured by RT-PCR. The expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) was detected by immunofluorescence assay. The results showed that the mRNA expression and secretion of eNOS were significantly enhanced after incubation with EMs compared to those with AGEs-BSA, while the secretion of NO and iNOS, mRNA expression, and secretion of ET-1 had opposite changes. The fluorescence intensity of p38MAPK in nuclear was decreased after pretreatment with EMs compared to incubation with AGEs-BSA. Conclusion. The present study suggests that EMs have certain protection effect on AGEs-BSA-induced injury in HUVEC. PMID:23671848

  16. Advanced Glycation End-Products Enhance Lung Cancer Cell Invasion and Migration.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yin, Mei-Chin; Mong, Mei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine, two advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), upon invasion and migration in A549 and Calu-6 cells, two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. CML or pentosidine at 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 μmol/L were added into cells. Proliferation, invasion and migration were measured. CML or pentosidine at 4-16 μmol/L promoted invasion and migration in both cell lines, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-β1. CML or pentosidine at 2-16 μmol/L up-regulated the protein expression of AGE receptor, p47(phox), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and fibronectin in test NSCLC cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 protein expression in A549 and Calu-6 cells was increased by CML or pentosidine at 4-16 μmol/L. These two AGEs at 2-16 μmol/L enhanced nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κ B) p65 protein expression and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells. However, CML or pentosidine at 4-16 μmol/L up-regulated NF-κB p65 and p-p38 protein expression in Calu-6 cells. These findings suggest that CML and pentosidine, by promoting the invasion, migration and production of associated factors, benefit NSCLC metastasis. PMID:27517907

  17. Clearance kinetics and matrix binding partners of the receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Milutinovic, Pavle S; Englert, Judson M; Crum, Lauren T; Mason, Neale S; Ramsgaard, Lasse; Enghild, Jan J; Sparvero, Louis J; Lotze, Michael T; Oury, Tim D

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating the sites and mechanisms of sRAGE action in the healthy state is vital to better understand the biological importance of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Previous studies in animal models of disease have demonstrated that exogenous sRAGE has an anti-inflammatory effect, which has been reasoned to arise from sequestration of pro-inflammatory ligands away from membrane-bound RAGE isoforms. We show here that sRAGE exhibits in vitro binding with high affinity and reversibly to extracellular matrix components collagen I, collagen IV, and laminin. Soluble RAGE administered intratracheally, intravenously, or intraperitoneally, does not distribute in a specific fashion to any healthy mouse tissue, suggesting against the existence of accessible sRAGE sinks and receptors in the healthy mouse. Intratracheal administration is the only effective means of delivering exogenous sRAGE to the lung, the organ in which RAGE is most highly expressed; clearance of sRAGE from lung does not differ appreciably from that of albumin. PMID:24642901

  18. RAGE (Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts), RAGE ligands, and their role in cancer and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sparvero, Louis J; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin; Amin, Neilay; Im, Jaehyun; Rutledge, Ronnye; Lin, Brenda; Amoscato, Andrew A; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T

    2009-01-01

    The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts [RAGE] is an evolutionarily recent member of the immunoglobulin super-family, encoded in the Class III region of the major histocompatability complex. RAGE is highly expressed only in the lung at readily measurable levels but increases quickly at sites of inflammation, largely on inflammatory and epithelial cells. It is found either as a membrane-bound or soluble protein that is markedly upregulated by stress in epithelial cells, thereby regulating their metabolism and enhancing their central barrier functionality. Activation and upregulation of RAGE by its ligands leads to enhanced survival. Perpetual signaling through RAGE-induced survival pathways in the setting of limited nutrients or oxygenation results in enhanced autophagy, diminished apoptosis, and (with ATP depletion) necrosis. This results in chronic inflammation and in many instances is the setting in which epithelial malignancies arise. RAGE and its isoforms sit in a pivotal role, regulating metabolism, inflammation, and epithelial survival in the setting of stress. Understanding the molecular structure and function of it and its ligands in the setting of inflammation is critically important in understanding the role of this receptor in tumor biology. PMID:19292913

  19. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and Its Involvement in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Talib, Herni; Tie, Tung Hing; Nordin, Norshariza

    2013-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a transmembrane receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, capable of binding a broad repertoire of ligands. RAGE-ligands interaction induces a series of signal transduction cascades and lead to the activation of transcription factor NF-κB as well as increased expression of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. These effects endow RAGE with the role in the signal transduction from pathogen substrates to cell activation during the onset and perpetuation of inflammation. RAGE signaling and downstream pathways have been implicated in a wide spectrum of inflammatory-related pathologic conditions such as arteriosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, acute respiratory failure, and sepsis. Despite the significant progress in other RAGE studies, the functional importance of the receptor in clinical situations and inflammatory diseases still remains to be fully realized. In this review, we will summarize current understandings and lines of evidence on the molecular mechanisms through which RAGE signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of the aforementioned inflammation-associated conditions. PMID:24102034

  20. RAGE (Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts), RAGE Ligands, and their role in Cancer and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sparvero, Louis J; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin; Amin, Neilay; Im, Jaehyun; Rutledge, Ronnye; Lin, Brenda; Amoscato, Andrew A; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T

    2009-01-01

    The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts [RAGE] is an evolutionarily recent member of the immunoglobulin super-family, encoded in the Class III region of the major histocompatability complex. RAGE is highly expressed only in the lung at readily measurable levels but increases quickly at sites of inflammation, largely on inflammatory and epithelial cells. It is found either as a membrane-bound or soluble protein that is markedly upregulated by stress in epithelial cells, thereby regulating their metabolism and enhancing their central barrier functionality. Activation and upregulation of RAGE by its ligands leads to enhanced survival. Perpetual signaling through RAGE-induced survival pathways in the setting of limited nutrients or oxygenation results in enhanced autophagy, diminished apoptosis, and (with ATP depletion) necrosis. This results in chronic inflammation and in many instances is the setting in which epithelial malignancies arise. RAGE and its isoforms sit in a pivotal role, regulating metabolism, inflammation, and epithelial survival in the setting of stress. Understanding the molecular structure and function of it and its ligands in the setting of inflammation is critically important in understanding the role of this receptor in tumor biology. PMID:19292913

  1. Advanced glycation endproducts in 35 types of seafood products consumed in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Zhenxing; Pavase, Ramesh Tushar; Lin, Hong; Zou, Long; Wen, Jie; Lv, Liangtao

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) have been recognized as hazards in processed foods that can induce chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we investigated the AGEs contents of 35 types of industrial seafood products that are consumed frequently in eastern China. Total fluorescent AGEs level and Nɛ-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) content were evaluated by fluorescence spectrophotometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. The level of total fluorescent AGEs in seafood samples ranged from 39.37 to 1178.3 AU, and was higher in canned and packaged instant aquatic products that were processed at high temperatures. The CML content in seafood samples ranged from 44.8 to 439.1 mg per kg dried sample, and was higher in roasted seafood samples. The total fluorescent AGEs and CML content increased when seafood underwent high-temperature processing, but did not show an obvious correlation. The present study suggested that commonly consumed seafood contains different levels of AGEs, and the seafood processed at high temperatures always displays a high level of either AGEs or CML.

  2. Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria Is Characterized by Lower Serum Advanced Glycation End-Products

    PubMed Central

    Grzanka, Alicja; Damasiewicz-Bodzek, Aleksandra; Machura, Edyta; Szumska, Magdalena; Tyrpień-Golder, Krystyna; Mazur, Bogdan; Kasperska-Zajac, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is associated with activation of acute phase response. On the other hand, it is known that systemic inflammation may lead to increased formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), associated with pathogenesis of various diseases. Aim. We aim to test whether chronic inflammation manifested by activated acute phase response may provide a mechanism for increased serum AGEs concentration in CSU. Methods. Concentrations of AGEs were measured spectrofluorimetrically in serum of CSU patients and the healthy subjects. Results. Serum AGEs and albumin concentrations in CSU patients were significantly lower as compared with the healthy subjects. Serum CRP concentration was significantly higher in patients with CSU than in the controls. Significant positive correlation was observed between AGEs and albumin concentrations in the subjects. Conclusions. CSU is not associated with increased circulating AGEs concentrations, despite the enhanced systemic inflammatory response. Paradoxical decrease of serum AGEs concentrations is probably a reflection of lower concentration of “negative acute phase proteins” such as albumin. PMID:25180195

  3. Importance of advanced glycation end products in diabetes-associated cardiovascular and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Mark E

    2004-12-01

    Although the features of diabetic cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis, and nephropathy have been clinically characterized, the pathogenesis and the mechanisms underlying the abnormalities in the diabetic heart and kidney are not fully understood. During the past several years, in an attempt to discover interventions for diabetes-related complications, researchers have refocused their attention from the hemodynamic aspects of the disease to the biochemical interactions of glucose and proteins. Diabetes is a disorder of chronic hyperglycemia, and glucose participates in diabetic complications such as atherosclerosis, cardiac dysfunction, and nephropathy. Chronic hyperglycemia accelerates the reaction between glucose and proteins and leads to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), which form irreversible cross-links with many macromolecules such as collagen. In diabetes, these AGE accumulate in tissues at an accelerated rate. The development of the novel compound dimethyl-3-phenacylthiazolium chloride (alagebrium chloride), which chemically breaks AGE cross-links, led to several preclinical animal studies that showed an attenuation or reversal of disease processes of the heart and kidney. In diabetes, AGE not only structurally stiffen structural collagen backbones but also act as agonists to AGE receptors (RAGE) on various cell types, which stimulate the release of profibrotic growth factors, promote collagen deposition, increase inflammation, and ultimately lead to tissue fibrosis. In the heart, large vessels, and kidney, these reactions produce diastolic dysfunction, atherosclerosis, and renal fibrosis. Administration of the cross-link breaker alagebrium chloride in these diabetic animals attenuates these pathologic phenomena, restoring functionality to the heart, vasculature, and kidney. PMID:15607433

  4. The inhibition of advanced glycation end-products-induced retinal vascular permeability by silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sheikpranbabu, Sardarpasha; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Eom, Soo Hyun; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2010-03-01

    The increased permeability of the blood-retinal barrier is known to occur in patients with diabetes, and this defect contributes to retinal edema. This study aimed to determine the effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) on advanced glycation end-products (AGEs)-induced endothelial cell permeability. Cultured porcine retinal endothelial cells (PRECs) were exposed to AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) and the endothelial cell permeability was detected by measuring the flux of RITC-dextran across the PREC monolayers. We found that AGE-BSA increased the dextran flux across a PREC monolayer and Ag-NPs blocked the solute flux induced by AGE-BSA. In order to understand the underlying signaling mechanism of Ag-NPs on the inhibitory effect of AGE-BSA-induced permeability, we demonstrated that Ag-NPs could inhibit the AGE-BSA-induced permeability via Src kinase pathway. AGE-BSA also increased the PREC permeability by stimulating the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and decreased the expression of occludin and ZO-1. Further, Ag-NPs inhibited the AGE-BSA-induced permeability by increased expression of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1, co-incident with an increase in barrier properties of endothelial monolayer. Together, our results indicate that Ag-NPs could possibly act as potent anti-permeability molecule by targeting the Src signaling pathway and tight junction proteins and it offers potential targets to inhibit the ocular related diseases. PMID:19963272

  5. Glucosepane: a poorly understood advanced glycation end product of growing importance for diabetes and its complications.

    PubMed

    Monnier, Vincent M; Sun, Wanjie; Sell, David R; Fan, Xingjun; Nemet, Ina; Genuth, Saul

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) represent a family of protein, peptide, amino acid, nucleic acid and lipid adducts formed by the reaction of carbonyl compounds derived directly or indirectly from glucose, ascorbic acid and other metabolites such as methylglyoxal. AGE formation in diabetes is of growing importance for their role as markers and potential culprits of diabetic complications, in particular retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Development of sensitive and specific assays utilizing liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with isotope dilution method has made it possible to detect and quantitate non-UV active AGEs such as carboxymethyl-lysine and glucosepane, the most prevalent AGE and protein crosslink of the extracellular matrix. Below we review studies on AGE formation in two skin biopsies obtained near the closeout of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), one of which was processed in 2011 for assay of novel AGEs. The results of these analyses show that while several AGEs are associated and predict complication progression, the glucose/fructose-lysine/glucosepane AGE axis is one of the most robust markers for microvascular disease, especially retinopathy, in spite of adjustment for past or future average glycemia. Yet overall little biological and clinical information is available on glucosepane, making this review a call for data in a field of growing importance for diabetes and chronic metabolic diseases of aging. PMID:23787467

  6. Implication of advanced glycation end products (Ages) and their receptor (Rage) on myocardial contractile and mitochondrial functions.

    PubMed

    Neviere, Remi; Yu, Yichi; Wang, Lei; Tessier, Frederic; Boulanger, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important role for the development and/or progression of cardiovascular diseases, mainly through induction of oxidative stress and inflammation. AGEs are a heterogeneous group of molecules formed by non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with amino acids of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. AGEs are mainly formed endogenously, while recent studies suggest that diet constitutes an important exogenous source of AGEs. The presence and accumulation of AGEs in various cardiac cell types affect extracellular and intracellular structure and function. AGEs contribute to a variety of microvascular and macrovascular complications through the formation of cross-links between molecules in the basement membrane of the extracellular matrix and by engaging the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Activation of RAGE by AGEs causes up regulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB and its target genes. of the RAGE engagement stimulates oxidative stress, evokes inflammatory and fibrotic reactions, which all contribute to the development and progression of devastating cardiovascular disorders. This review discusses potential targets of glycation in cardiac cells, and underlying mechanisms that lead to heart failure with special interest on AGE-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the myocardium. PMID:27277623

  7. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of vinyl and l-ascorbyl phenolates and their inhibitory effects on advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-01-01

    This study successfully established the feasibility of a two-step chemo-enzymatic synthesis of l-ascorbyl phenolates. Intermediate vinyl phenolates were first chemically produced and then underwent trans-esterification with l-ascorbic acid in the presence of Novozyme 435® (Candida Antarctica lipase B) as a catalyst. Twenty vinyl phenolates and 11 ascorbyl phenolates were subjected to in vitro bioassays to investigate their inhibitory activity against advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Among them, vinyl 4-hydroxycinnamate (17VP), vinyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamate (18VP), vinyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxycinnamate (20VP), ascorbyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamate (18AP) and ascorbyl 3,4-dimethoxycinnamate (19AP) showed 2-10 times stronger inhibitory activities than positive control (aminoguanidine and its precursors). These results indicated that chemo-enzymatically synthesized compounds have AGE inhibitory effect and thus are effective in either preventing or retarding glycation protein formation. PMID:27507531

  8. Advanced glycation end-products and skin autofluorescence in end-stage renal disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Stefan; Graaff, Reindert; van Oeveren, Wim; Stegmayr, Bernd; Sikole, Aleksandar; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Smit, Andries J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially in its end stage, is marked by extremely high cardiovascular rates of morbidity and mortality; hemodialysis patients have a five-fold shorter life expectancy than healthy subjects of the same age. In CKD the metabolic products that accumulate in the body are so-called uremic toxins. These include advanced glycation end-products (AGE). AGE levels are markedly increased in CKD patients not only because of impaired excretion but also because of increased production. AGE formation has initially been described as a non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and glucose in the so-called Maillard reaction, but they are also more rapidly formed during oxidative stress and subsequent formation of reactive carbonyl compounds like (methyl)glyoxal. AGE accumulate in tissue where they cross-link with proteins, e.g., collagen, inducing tissue stiffening of blood vessels and skin. They may also interact with receptor of AGE (RAGE) and other receptors, which lead to activation of intracellular transduction mechanisms resulting in cytokine release and further tissue damage in CKD. The accumulation of AGE in the skin can be measured non-invasively using autofluorescence. The skin autofluorescence is a strong marker of cardiovascular mortality in CKD. The focus of this review is on the role of tissue and plasma AGE, and of skin autofluorescence as a proxy of tissue AGE accumulation, in the increase in cardiovascular disease in end stage renal disease (ESRD). This review will also present the possibility of reducing the AGE accumulation in ESRD patients using the following five methods: 1) use of low AGE peritoneal dialysis solutions; 2) use of advanced hemodialysis techniques; 3) use of AGE reducing drugs; 4) optimizing the nutrition of hemodialysis patients; and 5) renal transplantation. PMID:23612551

  9. Chronic Running Exercise Alleviates Early Progression of Nephropathy with Upregulation of Nitric Oxide Synthases and Suppression of Glycation in Zucker Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Cao, Pengyu; Kakihana, Takaaki; Sato, Emiko; Suda, Chihiro; Muroya, Yoshikazu; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Hu, Gaizun; Ishii, Tadashi; Ito, Osamu; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training is known to exert multiple beneficial effects including renal protection in type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. However, the mechanisms regulating these actions remain unclear. The present study evaluated the effects of chronic running exercise on the early stage of diabetic nephropathy, focusing on nitric oxide synthase (NOS), oxidative stress and glycation in the kidneys of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Male ZDF rats (6 weeks old) underwent forced treadmill exercise for 8 weeks (Ex-ZDF). Sedentary ZDF (Sed-ZDF) and Zucker lean (Sed-ZL) rats served as controls. Exercise attenuated hyperglycemia (plasma glucose; 242 ± 43 mg/dL in Sed-ZDF and 115 ± 5 mg/dL in Ex-ZDF) with increased insulin secretion (plasma insulin; 2.3 ± 0.7 and 5.3 ± 0.9 ng/mL), reduced albumin excretion (urine albumin; 492 ± 70 and 176 ± 11 mg/g creatinine) and normalized creatinine clearance (9.7 ± 1.4 and 4.5 ± 0.8 mL/min per body weight) in ZDF rats. Endothelial (e) and neuronal (n) NOS expression in kidneys of Sed-ZDF rats were lower compared with Sed-ZL rats (p<0.01), while both eNOS and nNOS expression were upregulated by exercise (p<0.01). Furthermore, exercise decreased NADPH oxidase activity, p47phox expression (p<0.01) and α-oxoaldehydes (the precursors for advanced glycation end products) (p<0.01) in the kidneys of ZDF rats. Additionally, morphometric evidence indicated renal damage was reduced in response to exercise. These data suggest that upregulation of NOS expression, suppression of NADPH oxidase and α-oxoaldehydes in the kidneys may, at least in part, contribute to the renal protective effects of exercise in the early progression of diabetic nephropathy in ZDF rats. Moreover, this study supports the theory that chronic aerobic exercise could be recommended as an effective non-pharmacological therapy for renoprotection in the early stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. PMID:26379244

  10. Phlorotannins from brown algae (Fucus vesiculosus) inhibited the formation of advanced glycation endproducts by scavenging reactive carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Gu, Liwei

    2012-02-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in vivo is associated with aging, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, renal failure, etc. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of brown algae Fucus vesiculosus phlorotannins on the formation of AGEs. F. vesiculosus phlorotannins were extracted using 70% acetone. The resultant extract was fractionated into dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, butanol, and water fractions. The ethyl acetate fraction was further fractionated into four subfractions (Ethyl-F1 to -F4) using a Sephadex LH-20 column. F. vesiculosus acetone extract or fractions significantly inhibited the formation of AGEs mediated by glucose and methylglyoxal in a concentration-dependent manner. The concentrations of F. vesiculosus extracts required to inhibit 50% of albumin glycation (EC(50)) in the bovine serum albumin (BSA)-methylglyoxal assay were lower than those of aminoguanidine (a drug candidate for diabetic complication), except for F. vesiculosus acetone extract and dichloromethane fraction. In the BSA-glucose assay, F. vesiculosus extracts inhibited BSA glycation more than or as effectively as aminoguanidine, except for Ethyl-F3 and -F4. The ethyl acetate fraction and its four subfractions scavenged more than 50% of methylglyoxal in two hours. The hypothesis whether F. vesiculosus phlorotannins scavenged reactive carbonyls by forming adducts was tested. Phloroglucinol, the constituent unit of phlorotannins, reacted with glyoxal and methylglyoxal. Five phloroglucinol-carbonyl adducts were detected and tentatively identified using HPLC-ESI-MS(n). PMID:22248148

  11. Age- and diabetes-related nonenzymatic crosslinks in collagen fibrils: candidate amino acids involved in Advanced Glycation End-products.

    PubMed

    Gautieri, Alfonso; Redaelli, Alberto; Buehler, Markus J; Vesentini, Simone

    2014-02-01

    Ageing and diabetes share a common deleterious phenomenon, the formation of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs), which accumulate predominantly in collagen due to its low turnover. Though the general picture of glycation has been identified, the detailed knowledge of which collagen amino acids are involved in AGEs is still missing. In this work we use an atomistic model of a collagen fibril to pinpoint, for the first time, the precise location of amino acids involved in the most relevant AGE, glucosepane. The results show that there are 14 specific lysine-arginine pairs that, due to their relative position and configuration, are likely to form glucosepane. We find that several residues involved in AGE crosslinks are within key collagen domains, such as binding sites for integrins, proteoglycans and collagenase, hence providing molecular-level explanations of previous experimental results showing decreased collagen affinity for key molecules. Altogether, these findings reveal the molecular mechanism by which glycation affects the biological properties of collagen tissues, which in turn contribute to age- and diabetes-related pathological states. PMID:24060753

  12. Aspartic acid functions as carbonyl trapper to inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products by chemical chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Govindarajan; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-05-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were implicated in pathology of numerous diseases. In this study, we present the bioactivity of aspartic acid (Asp) to inhibit the AGEs. Hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated with glucose, fructose, and ribose in the presence and absence of Asp (100-200 μM). HbA1c inhibition was investigated using human blood and characterized by micro-column ion exchange chromatography. The effect of methyl glyoxal (MG) on hemoglobin and BSA was evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. The effect of MG on red blood cells morphology was characterized by scanning electron micrographs. Molecular docking was performed on BSA with Asp. Asp is capable of inhibiting the formation of fluorescent AGEs by reacting with the reducing sugars. The presence of Asp as supplement in whole blood reduced the HbA1c% from 8.8 to 6.1. The presence of MG showed an increase in fluorescence and the presence of Asp inhibited the glycation thereby the fluorescence was quenched. MG also affected the electrophoretic mobility of hemoglobin and BSA by forming high molecular weight aggregates. Normal RBCs showed typical biconcave shape. MG modified RBCs showed twisted and elongated shape whereas the presence of ASP tends to protect RBC from twisting. Asp interacted with arginine residues of bovine serum albumin particularly ARG 194, ARG 198, and ARG 217 thereby stabilized the protein complex. We conclude that Asp has dual functions as a chemical chaperone to stabilize protein and as a dicarbonyl trapper, and thereby it can prevent the complications caused by glycation. PMID:26325019

  13. Recombinant advanced glycation end product receptor pharmacokinetics in normal and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Renard, C; Chappey, O; Wautier, M P; Nagashima, M; Lundh, E; Morser, J; Zhao, L; Schmidt, A M; Scherrmann, J M; Wautier, J L

    1997-07-01

    Vascular dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus is related to advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation. We previously showed that AGEs produce an increase in vascular permeability and generated an oxidant stress after binding to the receptor (RAGE) present on endothelium. RAGE, a 35-kDa protein that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily, has been cloned from a rat lung cDNA library, and recombinant rat soluble RAGE (rR-RAGE) has been produced in insect cells. The sequence of RAGE is highly conserved between human and rat. We studied the biological effect of rR-RAGE and pharmacokinetics of 125I-rR-RAGE after intravenous or intraperitoneal administration in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. rR-RAGE prevented albumin or inulin transfer through a bovine aortic endothelial cell monolayer, restored the hyperpermeability observed in diabetic rats or induced in normal rats by diabetic rat red blood cells, and corrected the reactive oxygen intermediate production after intravenous or intraperitoneal administration. After intravenous injection of 125I-rR-RAGE, the distribution half-life was longer (p < or = 0.01) in diabetic (0.15 and 4.01 hr) than in normal (0.02 and 0.21 hr) rats, as was the case for the elimination half-lives (diabetic, 57.17 hr; normal, 26.02 hr; p < or = 0.01). Distribution volume was higher in diabetic than in normal rats (6.94 and 3.24 liter/kg, respectively; p = 0.049). Our study showed that rR-RAGE was biologically active in vivo and slowly cleared, which suggests it could be considered as a potential therapy. PMID:9224812

  14. N -Glycans on the receptor for advanced glycation end products influence amphoterin binding and neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Srikrishna, Geetha; Huttunen, Henri J; Johansson, Lena; Weigle, Bernd; Yamaguchi, Yu; Rauvala, Heikki; Freeze, Hudson H

    2002-03-01

    In this study we show that embryonic neurite growth-promoting protein amphoterin binds to carboxylated N -glycans previously identified on mammalian endothelial cells. Since amphoterin is a ligand for the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), and the ligand-binding V-domain of the receptor contains two potential N -glycosylation sites, we hypothesized that N -glycans on RAGE may mediate its interactions with amphoterin. In support of this, anti-carboxylate antibody mAbGB3.1 immunoprecipitates bovine RAGE, and PNGase F treatment reduces its molecular mass by 4.5 kDa, suggesting that the native receptor is a glycoprotein. The binding potential of amphoterin to RAGE decreases significantly in presence of soluble carboxylated glycans or when the receptor is deglycosylated. Oligosaccharide analysis shows that RAGE contains complex type anionic N -glycans with non-sialic acid carboxylate groups, but not the HNK-1 (3-sulfoglucuronyl beta1-3 galactoside) epitope. Consistent with the functional localization of RAGE and amphoterin at the leading edges of developing neurons, mAbGB3.1 stains axons and growth cones of mouse embryonic cortical neurons, and inhibits neurite outgrowth on amphoterin matrix. The carboxylated glycans themselves promote neurite outgrowth in embryonic neurons and RAGE-transfected neuroblastoma cells. This outgrowth requires full-length, signalling-competent RAGE, as cells expressing cytoplasmic domain-deleted RAGE are unresponsive. These results indicate that carboxylated N -glycans on RAGE play an important functional role in amphoterin-RAGE-mediated signalling. PMID:11953450

  15. Garlic decreases liver and kidney receptor for advanced glycation end products expression in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Khaled K; Mansour, Mohamed H; Thomson, Martha; Ali, Muslim

    2016-06-01

    The up-regulation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been implicated as a major mediator in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy and hepatic fibrogenesis. The present study was designed to investigate the potential of garlic (Allium sativum L.) to modulate the level of expression of RAGE in renal and hepatic tissues of diabetic rats. Three groups of rats were studied after 8 weeks following diabetes induction: normal, streptozotocin-induced diabetic (control diabetic), and garlic-treated diabetic rats. A polyclonal antibody of proven specificity to RAGE indicated in immunohistochemical assays that RAGE labeling was significantly increased in renal and hepatic tissues of control diabetic rats compared to the normal group. The increased RAGE labeling involved mesangial cells in glomeruli exhibiting signs of mesangial expansion, mesangial nodule formation and glomerulosclerosis. In the liver, a significant up-regulation of RAGE was observed in hepatocytes and bile ducts and vessels in portal tracts. In 2-dimensional Western blots, RAGE expression in both tissues was dominated by heterogeneous charge variants, represented by 46-50kDa isoforms with more basic pIs compared to their counterparts in normal rats. Compared to control diabetic rats, RAGE labeling in the garlic-treated diabetic group was significantly reduced throughout renal and hepatic regions and was marked by the expression of 43-50kDa acidic charge variants comparable to those observed in normal rats. The capacity of garlic to modulate diabetes-induced up-regulation of selective RAGE polymorphic variants may be implicated in attenuating the detrimental consequences of excessive RAGE signaling manifested by diabetes-associated disorders. PMID:26968224

  16. A receptor-based bioadsorbent to target advanced glycation end products in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangrong; Lapidos, Karen A; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2014-06-01

    The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) has been reported to be a major contributor to chronic systemic inflammation. AGEs are not efficiently removed by hemodialysis or the kidney of a chronic kidney disease (CKD) patient. The goal of this study was to develop a receptor for AGEs (RAGE)-based bioadsorbent device that was capable of removing endogenous AGEs from human blood. The extracellular domain of RAGE was immobilized onto agarose beads to generate the bioadsorbent. The efficacy of AGE removal from saline, serum, and whole blood; biological effects of AGE reduction; and hemocompatibility and stability of the bioadsorbent were investigated. The bioadsorbent bound AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) with a binding capacity of 0.73 ± 0.07 mg AGE-BSA/mL bioadsorbent. The bioadsorbent significantly reduced the concentration of total AGEs in serum isolated from end-stage kidney disease patients by 57%. AGE removal resulted in a significant reduction of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human endothelial cells and abolishment of osteoclast formation in osteoclast progenitor cells. A hollow fiber device loaded with bioadsorbent-reduced endogenous AGEs from recirculated blood to 36% of baseline levels with no significant changes in total protein or albumin concentration. The bioadsorbent maintained AGE-specific binding capacity after freeze-drying and storage for 1 year. This approach provides the foundation for further development of soluble RAGE-based extracorporeal therapies to selectively deplete serum AGEs from human blood and decrease inflammation in patients with diabetes and/or CKD. PMID:24206165

  17. Dysfunctional protection against advanced glycation due to thiamine metabolism abnormalities in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bartáková, Vendula; Pleskačová, Anna; Kuricová, Katarína; Pácal, Lukáš; Dvořáková, Veronika; Bělobrádková, Jana; Tomandlová, Marie; Tomandl, Josef; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2016-08-01

    While the pathogenic role of dicarbonyl stress and accelerated formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to glucose intolerance and to the development of diabetic complications is well established, little is known about these processes in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a condition pathogenically quite similar to type 2 diabetes. The aims of the present study were (i) to determine plasma thiamine and erythrocyte thiamine diphosphate (TDP) and transketolase (TKT) activity in pregnant women with and without GDM, (ii) to assess relationships between thiamine metabolism parameters and selected clinical, biochemical and anthropometric characteristics and, finally, (iii) to analyse relationship between variability in the genes involved in the regulation of transmembrane thiamine transport (i.e. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3) and relevant parameters of thiamine metabolism. We found significantly lower plasma BMI adjusted thiamine in women with GDM (P = 0.002, Mann-Whitney) while levels of erythrocyte TDP (an active TKT cofactor) in mid-trimester were significantly higher in GDM compared to controls (P = 0.04, Mann-Whitney). However, mid-gestational TKT activity - reflecting pentose phosphate pathway activity - did not differ between the two groups (P > 0.05, Mann-Whitney). Furthermore, we ascertained significant associations of postpartum TKT activity with SNPs SLC19A2 rs6656822 and SLC19A3 rs7567984 (P = 0.03 and P = 0.007, resp., Kruskal-Wallis). Our findings of increased thiamine delivery to the cells without concomitant increase of TKT activity in women with GDM therefore indicate possible pathogenic role of thiamine mishandling in GDM. Further studies are needed to determine its contribution to maternal and/or neonatal morbidity. PMID:27287225

  18. Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts is upregulated in temporal lobe epilepsy and contributes to experimental seizures.

    PubMed

    Iori, Valentina; Maroso, Mattia; Rizzi, Massimo; Iyer, Anand M; Vertemara, Roberta; Carli, Mirjana; Agresti, Alessandra; Antonelli, Antonella; Bianchi, Marco E; Aronica, Eleonora; Ravizza, Teresa; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2013-10-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in neuron and astrocytes by High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) protein is a key mechanism of seizure generation. HMGB1 also activates the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE), but it was unknown whether RAGE activation contributes to seizures or to HMGB1 proictogenic effects. We found that acute EEG seizures induced by 7ng intrahippocampal kainic acid (KA) were significantly reduced in Rage-/- mice relative to wild type (Wt) mice. The proictogenic effect of HMGB1 was decreased in Rage-/- mice, but less so, than in Tlr4-/- mice. In a mouse mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) model, status epilepticus induced by 200ng intrahippocampal KA and the onset of the spontaneous epileptic activity were similar in Rage-/-, Tlr4-/- and Wt mice. However, the number of hippocampal paroxysmal episodes and their duration were both decreased in epileptic Rage-/- and Tlr4-/- mice vs Wt mice. All strains of epileptic mice displayed similar cognitive deficits in the novel object recognition test vs the corresponding control mice. CA1 neuronal cell loss was increased in epileptic Rage-/- vs epileptic Wt mice, while granule cell dispersion and doublecortin (DCX)-positive neurons were similarly affected. Notably, DCX neurons were preserved in epileptic Tlr4-/- mice. We did not find compensatory changes in HMGB1-related inflammatory signaling nor in glutamate receptor subunits in Rage-/- and Tlr4-/- naïve mice, except for ~20% NR2B subunit reduction in Rage-/- mice. RAGE was induced in neurons, astrocytes and microvessels in human and experimental mTLE hippocampi. We conclude that RAGE contributes to hyperexcitability underlying acute and chronic seizures, as well as to the proictogenic effects of HMGB1. RAGE and TLR4 play different roles in the neuropathologic sequelae developing after status epilepticus. These findings reveal new molecular mechanisms underlying seizures, cell loss and neurogenesis which involve inflammatory pathways

  19. Molten Globule of Hemoglobin Proceeds into Aggregates and Advanced Glycated End Products

    PubMed Central

    Iram, Afshin; Alam, Tauqeer; Khan, Javed M.; Khan, Taqi A.; Khan, Rizwan H.; Naeem, Aabgeena

    2013-01-01

    Conformational alterations of bovine hemoglobin (Hb) upon sequential addition of glyoxal over a range of 0–90% v/v were investigated. At 20% v/v glyoxal, molten globule (MG) state of Hb was observed by altered tryptophan fluorescence, high ANS binding, existence of intact heme, native-like secondary structure as depicted by far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and ATR-FTIR spectra as well as loss in tertiary structure as confirmed by near-UV CD spectra. In addition, size exclusion chromatography analysis depicted that MG state at 20% v/v glyoxal corresponded to expanded pre-dissociated dimers. Aggregates of Hb were detected at 70% v/v glyoxal. These aggregates of Hb had altered tryptophan environment, low ANS binding, exposed heme, increased β-sheet secondary structure, loss in tertiary structure, enhanced thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and red shifted Congo Red (CR) absorbance. On incubating Hb with 30% v/v glyoxal for 0–20 days, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were detected on day 20. These AGEs were characterised by enhanced tryptophan fluorescence at 450 nm, exposure of heme, increase in intermolecular β-sheets, enhanced ThT fluorescence and red shift in CR absorbance. Comet assay revealed aggregates and AGEs to be genotoxic in nature. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the amorphous structure of aggregates and branched fibrils of AGEs. The transformation of α-helix to β-sheet usually alters the normal protein to amyloidogenic resulting in a variety of protein conformational disorders such as diabetes, prion and Huntington's. PMID:23991043

  20. Advanced Glycation Endproducts and Bone Material Properties in Type 1 Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mishaela R; Paschalis, Eleftherios P; Poundarik, Atharva; Sroga, Gyna E; McMahon, Donald J; Gamsjaeger, Sonja; Klaushofer, Klaus; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Fractures, particularly at the lower extremities and hip, are a complication of diabetes. In both type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), fracture risk is disproportionately worse than that predicted from the measurement of bone mineral density. Although an explanation for this discrepancy is the presence of organic matrix abnormalities, it has not been fully elucidated how advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) relate to bone deterioration at both the macroscopic and microscopic levels. We hypothesized that there would be a relationship between skeletal AGE levels (determined by Raman microspectroscopy at specific anatomical locations) and bone macroscopic and microscopic properties, as demonstrated by the biomechanical measures of crack growth and microindentation respectively. We found that in OVE26 mice, a transgenic model of severe early onset T1D, AGEs were increased by Raman (carboxymethyl-lysine [CML] wildtype (WT): 0.0143 ±0.0005 vs T1D: 0.0175 ±0.0002, p = 0.003) at the periosteal surface. These differences were associated with less tough bone in T1D by fracture mechanics (propagation toughness WT: 4.73 ± 0.32 vs T1D: 3.39 ± 0.24 NM/m1/2, p = 0.010) and by reference point indentation (indentation distance increase WT: 6.85 ± 0.44 vs T1D: 9.04 ± 0.77 μm; p = 0.043). Within T1D, higher AGEs by Raman correlated inversely with macroscopic bone toughness. These data add to the existing body of knowledge regarding AGEs and the relationship between skeletal AGEs with biomechanical indices. PMID:27140650

  1. Role of advanced glycation end products in hypertension and atherosclerosis: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Vasdev, Sudesh; Gill, Vicki; Singal, Pawan

    2007-01-01

    The vascular diseases, hypertension and atherosclerosis, affect millions of individuals worldwide, and account for a large number of deaths globally. A better understanding of the mechanism of these conditions will lead to more specific and effective therapies. Hypertension and atherosclerosis are both characterized by insulin resistance, and we suggest that this plays a major role in their etiology. The cause of insulin resistance is not known, but may be a result of a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors. In insulin resistance, alterations in glucose and lipid metabolism lead to the production of excess aldehydes including glyoxal and methylglyoxal. These aldehydes react non-enzymatically with free amino and sulfhydryl groups of amino acids of proteins to form stable conjugates called advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs act directly, as well as via receptors to alter the function of many intra- and extracellular proteins including antioxidant and metabolic enzymes, calcium channels, lipoproteins, and transcriptional and structural proteins. This results in endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and oxidative stress. All these changes are characteristic of hypertension and atherosclerosis. Human and animal studies have demonstrated that increased AGEs are also associated with these conditions. A pathological role for AGEs is substantiated by studies showing that therapies that attenuate insulin resistance and/or lower AGEs, are effective in decreasing oxidative stress, lowering blood pressure, and attenuating atherosclerotic vascular changes. These interventions include lipoic acid and other antioxidants, AGE breakers or soluble receptors of AGEs, and aldehyde-binding agents like cysteine. Such therapies may offer alternative specific means to treat hypertension and atherosclerosis. An adjunct therapy may be to implement lifestyle changes such as weight reduction, regular exercise, smoking cessation, and increasing dietary intake of fruits and

  2. Calcitriol blunts the deleterious impact of advanced glycation end products on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Talmor, Yeela; Golan, Eliezer; Benchetrit, Sydney; Bernheim, Jacques; Klein, Osnat; Green, Janice; Rashid, Gloria

    2008-05-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are elevated in diabetic and uremic patients, may induce vascular dysfunctions, and calcitriol may improve the cardiovascular complications. Therefore, we examined whether calcitriol may modify the endothelial response to AGEs stimulation. Knowing the importance of nuclear factor-kappaB in endothelial inflammatory responses, the effect of AGEs and calcitriol on this pathway was also studied. Calcitriol was added to endothelial cells previously incubated with AGE-human serum albumin (HSA). AGE-HSA induced a decrease in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA expression and enzyme activity. Addition of calcitriol to AGE-HSA-treated endothelial cells improved the decreased action of AGEs on the eNOS system. AGE-HSA increased the AGEs receptor mRNA and protein, which were both blunted by calcitriol. The parallel elevation of interleukin-6 mRNA in the presence of AGE-HSA was also blunted by calcitriol. The NF-kappaB-p65 DNA binding activity was enhanced and associated with a decrease in inhibitor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) and an increase in phosphorylated (p)-IkappaBalpha levels. Addition of calcitriol blunted the AGEs-induced elevation of NF-kappaB-p65 DNA binding activity, a phenomenon related to an increased expression of IkappaBalpha. This increase was correlated to declined p-IkappaBalpha levels. The present results support the concept that calcitriol may act as a vascular protective agent counteracting the probable deleterious actions of AGEs on endothelial cell activities. PMID:18353875

  3. Advanced glycation end products as environmental risk factors for the development of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yap, Felicia Y T; Kantharidis, Phillip; Coughlan, Melinda T; Slattery, Robyn; Forbes, Josephine M

    2012-04-01

    The globally rising incidence of Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is no longer restricted to individuals with higher risk genotypes, but is now significantly increasing in a population with lower risk genotypes, likely as the result of environmental factors. In this review, we discuss the potential of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) as environmental contributors to the development of T1D. AGEs are nonenzymatically formed protein modifications found in the body, as well as, consumed in our daily diets. To date, many studies have provided evidence of AGE involvement in β cell dysfunction, whether by AGE modification itself or via interaction with AGE receptors. The receptor for AGE (RAGE) and AGE-receptor-1 (AGE-R1) are of particular interest, given that studies have demonstrated the deleterious effects of RAGE modulation and the protection afforded by AGE-R1 in the context of diabetes. More interestingly, we have recently found that two RAGE polymorphism are predictive of T1D in humans while the third is protective. Moreover, soluble RAGE (sRAGE) levels (a circulating competitive inhibitor of RAGE) were greatly reduced at seroconversion to autoantibodies in both children on high risk of T1D background and in an animal model of autoiummune diabetes. Taken together with the fact that AGEs have also shown to be involved in immunomodulation, it is tempting to postulate that dietary AGEs, RAGE and even AGE-R1 could be working synergistically or independently to breach the tightly regulated immune system, providing a missing link in the development of T1D. PMID:22250649

  4. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and increased aortic stiffness in the general population.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Otto; Seidlerová, Jitka; Filipovský, Jan; Vágovičová, Petra; Wohlfahrt, Peter; Cífková, Renata; Windrichová, Jindra; Topolčan, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is involved in several pathophysiological processes in the vessel wall. We hypothesized that low levels of the soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE) might be associated with increased arterial stiffness, a manifestation of vascular ageing in the general population. Using a cross-sectional design, we analyzed 1077 subjects from the Czech post-MONICA study. The aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) was measured using a Sphygmocor device. sRAGE concentrations were assessed in frozen samples using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods (R&D Systems). aPWV significantly (P<0.0001) increased across the sRAGE quartiles. An aPWV of 1 m s(-1) was associated with a 37% increase in the risk of low sRAGE (<918 pg ml(-1), bottom quartile; P-value=0.018). In a categorized manner, subjects in the bottom sRAGE quartile had an odds ratio of an increased aPWV (⩾9.3 m s(-1)), adjusted for all potential confounders of 2.05 (95% confidence interval: 1.26-3.32; P=0.004), but this was only the case for non-diabetic hypertensive patients. In contrast, a low sRAGE was rejected as an independent predictor of an increased aPWV in normotensive or diabetic subjects using similar regression models. In conclusion, low circulating sRAGE was independently associated with increased arterial stiffness in a general population-based sample, but this was only observed in hypertensive non-diabetic patients. PMID:26631850

  5. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W; Nawroth, Peter P; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A D

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated-if any-cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS. PMID:26824892

  6. Paradoxical function for the receptor for advanced glycation end products in mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Judson M; Kliment, Corrine R; Ramsgaard, Lasse; Milutinovic, Pavle S; Crum, Lauren; Tobolewski, Jacob M; Oury, Tim D

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disease with poor survival. The identification of therapeutic targets is essential to improving outcomes. Previous studies found that expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in the lung is significantly decreased in human IPF lungs and in two animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, RAGE-null mice spontaneously develop pulmonary fibrosis with age and more severe fibrosis when challenged with asbestos. In contrast to the findings that the lack of RAGE enhanced pulmonary fibrosis, He et al. found that RAGE null mice were protected from bleomycin-induced fibrosis and suggested the effect was due to a lack of HMGB1 induced RAGE signaling. The current study further tests this hypothesis by blocking RAGE signaling via administration of soluble RAGE, a decoy receptor, to determine if this will also protect against pulmonary fibrosis. Wild-type, RAGE+/-, and RAGE-/- mice were treated with bleomycin and assessed for fibrosis. Wild-type mice were also treated with exogenous soluble RAGE or vehicle control. In addition, in vitro studies with primary alveolar epithelial cells from wild-type and RAGE null mice were used to investigate the effect of RAGE on cell viability and migration in response to injury. A lack of RAGE was found to be protective against bleomycin injury in both in vivo and in vitro studies. However, soluble RAGE administration was unable to ameliorate fibrosis. This study confirms paradoxical responses to two different models of pulmonary fibrosis and suggests a further role for RAGE in cellular migration. PMID:21487520

  7. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-04-23

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic {beta}-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  8. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products and progression of airway disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is highly expressed in the lung, where it is believed to have a homeostatic role. Reduced plasma levels of soluble RAGE (sRAGE) have been reported in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of plasma sRAGE levels with a longitudinal decline of lung function. We have also measured plasma levels of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a RAGE ligand which has been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases including COPD. Methods Baseline plasma concentrations of sRAGE and HMGB1 were measured in non-smokers (n = 32), smokers without COPD (n = 212), and smokers with COPD (n = 51), and the associations of the plasma sRAGE and HMGB1 levels with longitudinal declines of lung function during a 4-year follow-up period were analysed. Results The plasma levels of sRAGE were significantly lower in smokers without COPD and in smokers with COPD, as compared to those of non-smokers. Plasma sRAGE levels positively correlated with FVC and FEV1 and inversely correlated with BMI and pack-years. Lower sRAGE levels were associated with greater declines of FEV1/FVC over 4 years in all participants. Moreover, multivariate regression analysis indicated that the baseline plasma sRAGE concentration was an independent predictor of FEV1/FVC decline in all groups. A subgroup analysis showed that decreased sRAGE levels are significantly associated with a more rapid decline of FEV1/FVC in smokers with COPD. There was no significant correlation between plasma HMGB1 levels and longitudinal decline of lung function. Conclusions Lower plasma concentrations of sRAGE were associated with greater progression of airflow limitations over time, especially in smokers with COPD, suggesting that RAGE might have a protective role in the lung. PMID:24758342

  9. Bone-targeting endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products rescues rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tatsuo; Katsuta, Sayaka; Tamura, Yusuke; Nagase, Nozomi; Suzuki, Keita; Nomura, Masaaki; Tomatsu, Shunji; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi; Kobayashi, Shinjiro

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory synovitis that leads to the destruction of bone and cartilage. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand membrane-bound receptor for high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) associated with development of RA by inducing production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. We developed a bone-targeting therapeutic agent by tagging acidic oligopeptide to a nonmembrane-bound form of RAGE (endogenous secretory RAGE [esRAGE]) functioning as a decoy receptor. We assessed its tissue distribution and therapeutic effectiveness in a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Acidic oligopeptide-tagged esRAGE (D6-esRAGE) was localized to mineralized region in bone, resulting in the prolonged retention of more than 1 wk. Weekly administration of D6-esRAGE with a dose of 1 mg/kg to RA model mice significantly ameliorated inflammatory arthritis, synovial hyperplasia, cartilage destruction and bone destruction, while untagged esRAGE showed little effectiveness. Moreover, D6-esRAGE reduced plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6, while esRAGE reduced the levels of IL-1 and IL-6 to a lesser extent, suggesting that production of IL-1 and IL-6 reduced along the blockade of HMGB1 receptor downstream signals by D6-esRAGE could be attributed to remission of CIA. These findings indicate that D6-esRAGE enhances drug delivery to bone, leading to rescue of clinical and pathological lesions in murine CIA. PMID:23821362

  10. Imaging receptor for advanced glycation end product expression in mouse model of hind limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to image the effect of diabetes on expression of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in limb ischemia in live animals. Methods Male wild-type C57BL/6 mice were either made diabetic or left as control. Two months later, diabetic and non-diabetic mice underwent left femoral artery ligation. The right leg served as lesion control. Five days later, mice were injected with 15.1 ± 4.4 MBq 99mTc-anti-RAGE F(ab’)2 and 4 to 5 h later (blood pool clearance) underwent SPECT/CT imaging. At the completion of imaging, mice were euthanized, hind limbs counted and sectioned, and scans reconstructed. Regions of interest were drawn on serial transverse sections comprising the hind limbs and activity in millicuries summed and divided by the injected dose (ID). Quantitative histology was performed for RAGE staining and angiogenesis. Results Uptake of 99mTc-anti-RAGE F(ab')2 as %ID × 10−3 was higher in the left (ischemic) limbs for the diabetic mice (n = 8) compared to non-diabetic mice (n = 8) (1.20 ± 0.44% vs. 0.49 ± 0.40%; P = 0.0007) and corresponded to less angiogenesis in the diabetic mice. Uptake was also higher in the right limbs of diabetic compared to non-diabetic animals (0.82 ± 0.33% vs. 0.40 ± 0.14%; P = 0.0004). Conclusions These data show the feasibility of imaging and quantifying the effect of diabetes on RAGE expression in limb ischemia. PMID:23663412

  11. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated—if any—cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS. PMID:26824892

  12. Association between Advanced Glycation End Products and Impaired Fasting Glucose: Results from the SALIA Study

    PubMed Central

    Teichert, Tom; Hellwig, Anne; Peßler, Annette; Hellwig, Michael; Vossoughi, Mohammad; Sugiri, Dorothea; Vierkötter, Andrea; Schulte, Thomas; Freund, Juliane; Roden, Michael; Hoffmann, Barbara; Schikowski, Tamara; Luckhaus, Christian; Krämer, Ursula; Henle, Thomas; Herder, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and related complications, whereas their role in the early deterioration of glycaemia is unknown. While previous studies used antibody-based methods to quantify AGEs, data from tandem mass spectrometry coupled liquid chromatography (LC-MS/MS)-based measurements are limited to patients with known diabetes. Here, we used the LC-MS/MS method to test the hypothesis that plasma AGE levels are higher in individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) than in those with normal fasting glucose (NFG). Secondary aims were to assess correlations of plasma AGEs with quantitative markers of glucose metabolism and biomarkers of subclinical inflammation. This study included on 60 women with NFG or IFG (n = 30 each, mean age 74 years) from the German SALIA cohort. Plasma levels of free metabolites (3-deoxyfructose, 3-deoxypentosone, 3-deoxypentulose), two hydroimidazolones, oxidised adducts (carboxymethyllysine, carboxyethyllysine, methionine sulfoxide) and Nε-fructosyllysine were measured using LC-MS/MS. Plasma concentrations of all tested AGEs did not differ between the NFG and IFG groups (all p>0.05). Associations between plasma levels of AGEs and fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR as a measure of insulin resistance were weak (r between -0.2 and 0.2, all p>0.05). The association between 3-deoxyglucosone-derived hydroimidazolone with several proinflammatory biomarkers disappeared upon adjustment for multiple testing. In conclusion, plasma AGEs assessed by LC-MS/MS were neither increased in IFG nor associated with parameters of glucose metabolism and subclinical inflammation in our study. Thus, these data argue against strong effects of AGEs in the early stages of deterioration of glucose metabolism. PMID:26018950

  13. Advanced Glycation Endproducts and Bone Material Properties in Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Mishaela R.; Paschalis, Eleftherios P.; Poundarik, Atharva; Sroga, Gyna E.; McMahon, Donald J.; Gamsjaeger, Sonja; Klaushofer, Klaus; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Fractures, particularly at the lower extremities and hip, are a complication of diabetes. In both type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), fracture risk is disproportionately worse than that predicted from the measurement of bone mineral density. Although an explanation for this discrepancy is the presence of organic matrix abnormalities, it has not been fully elucidated how advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) relate to bone deterioration at both the macroscopic and microscopic levels. We hypothesized that there would be a relationship between skeletal AGE levels (determined by Raman microspectroscopy at specific anatomical locations) and bone macroscopic and microscopic properties, as demonstrated by the biomechanical measures of crack growth and microindentation respectively. We found that in OVE26 mice, a transgenic model of severe early onset T1D, AGEs were increased by Raman (carboxymethyl-lysine [CML] wildtype (WT): 0.0143 ±0.0005 vs T1D: 0.0175 ±0.0002, p = 0.003) at the periosteal surface. These differences were associated with less tough bone in T1D by fracture mechanics (propagation toughness WT: 4.73 ± 0.32 vs T1D: 3.39 ± 0.24 NM/m1/2, p = 0.010) and by reference point indentation (indentation distance increase WT: 6.85 ± 0.44 vs T1D: 9.04 ± 0.77 μm; p = 0.043). Within T1D, higher AGEs by Raman correlated inversely with macroscopic bone toughness. These data add to the existing body of knowledge regarding AGEs and the relationship between skeletal AGEs with biomechanical indices. PMID:27140650

  14. Expression of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Oligodendrocytes in Response to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jingdong; Goswami, Rajendra; Dawson, Sylvia; Dawson, Glyn

    2008-01-01

    Demyelination is a common result of oxidative stress in the nervous system, and we report here that the response of oligodendrocytes to oxidative stress involves the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). RAGE has not previously been reported in neonatal rat oligodendrocytes (NRO), but, by using primers specific for rat RAGE, we were able to show expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for RAGE in NRO, and a 55-kDa protein was detected by Western blotting with antibodies to RAGE. Neonatal rat oligodendrocytes stained strongly for RAGE, suggesting membrane localization of RAGE. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (100 μM) initiated 55-kDa RAGE shedding from the cell membrane and the appearance of “soluble” 45-kDa RAGE in the culture medium, followed by restoration of RAGE expression to normal levels. Increasing hydrogen peroxide concentration (>200 μM) resulted in no restoration of RAGE, and the cells underwent apoptosis and necrosis. We further confirmed the observation in a human oligodendroglioma-derived (HOG) cell line. Both the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine and the broad-spectrum metalloproteases inhibitor TAPI0 were able partially to inhibit shedding of RAGE, suggesting involvement of metalloproteases in cleavage to produce soluble RAGE. The level of 55-kDa RAGE in autopsy brain of patients undergoing neurodegeneration with accompanying inflammation [multiple sclerosis and neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (Batten's disease)] was much lower than that in age-matched controls, suggesting that shedding of RAGE might occur as reactive oxygen species accumulate in brain cells and be part of the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:18438937

  15. Contribution of dietary advanced glycation end products (AGE) to circulating AGE: role of dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathleen E; Prasad, Chandan; Vijayagopal, Parakat; Juma, Shanil; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Imrhan, Victorine

    2015-12-14

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether macronutrient content (low-fat v. high-fat diet) influences an indicator of advanced glycation end products (AGE), N(ε) carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), in the context of a 1-d, high-AGE diet. The effect of the diets on inflammatory markers was also assessed. A total of nineteen overweight and obese adults (nine men and ten women) without known disease were recruited to participate in a crossover challenge of a high-fat, high-AGE (HFHA) and low-fat, high-AGE (LFHA) diet. In each phase patients had fasting blood drawn, followed by consumption of a high-fat or low-fat breakfast test meal, then three postprandial blood draws at 1, 2 and 3 h after consuming the test meal. After consuming high-AGE meals for the remainder of the day, participants returned the next day for a follow-up analysis. A different pattern in the 3-h post-meal CML and soluble receptor for AGE response to the two diets was observed (P=0·01 and 0·05, respectively). No change in serum CML was observed following consumption of a LFHA breakfast (535 (25th-75th percentile 451-790) to 495 (25th-75th percentile 391-682) ng/ml; P=0·36), whereas a rise in CML occurred after the HFHA breakfast (463 (25th-75th percentile 428-664) to 578 (25th-75th percentile 474-865) ng/ml; P=0·05). High sensitivity C-reactive protein and high molecular weight adiponectin were not affected by either diet. These findings suggest that dietary CML may not be as important in influencing serum CML as other dietary factors. In addition, acute exposure to dietary CML may not influence inflammation in adults without diabetes or kidney disease. This is contrary to previous findings. PMID:26392152

  16. Targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression induces apoptosis and inhibits prostate tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, Indira; Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Chen, Aoshuang; Zheng, Guoxing; Bosland, Maarten C.; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting RAGE by RNAi induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing RAGE expression abrogates rHMGB1 mediated cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of RAGE by RNAi inhibits PSA secretion of prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock down of RAGE abrogates prostate tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of RAGE expression in prostate tumor activates death receptors. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the progression of prostate cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of targeting RAGE expression in prostate cancer is not yet evaluated. Therefore in this study, we have investigated the effects of silencing the expression of RAGE by RNAi approach both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study showed that down regulation of RAGE expression by RNAi inhibited the cell proliferation of androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (DU-145) prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, targeting RAGE expression resulted in apoptotic elimination of these prostate cancer cells by activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 death signaling. Of note, the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) were also reduced in LNCaP cells transfected with RAGE RNAi constructs. Importantly, the RAGE RNAi constructs when administered in nude mice bearing prostate tumors, inhibited the tumor growth by targeting the expression of RAGE, and its physiological ligand, HMGB1 and by up regulating death receptors DR4 and DR5 expression. Collectively, the results of this study for the first time show that targeting RAGE by RNAi may be a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for treating prostate cancer.

  17. A receptor-based bioadsorbent to target advanced glycation end products in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yangrong; Lapidos, Karen A.; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M.; Ameer, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) has been reported to be a major contributor to chronic systemic inflammation. AGEs are not efficiently removed by hemodialysis or the kidney of a chronic kidney disease (CKD) patient. The goal of this study was to develop a receptor for AGEs (RAGE)-based bioadsorbent device that was capable of removing endogenous AGEs from human blood. The extracellular domain of RAGE was immobilized onto agarose beads to generate the bioadsorbent. The efficacy of AGE removal from saline, serum, and whole blood; biological effects of AGE reduction; and hemocompatibility and stability of the bioadsorbent were investigated. The bioadsorbent bound AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) with a binding capacity of 0.73 ± 0.07 mg AGE-BSA/ml bioadsorbent. The bioadsorbent significantly reduced the concentration of total AGEs in serum isolated from end stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients by 57%. AGE removal resulted in a significant reduction of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in human endothelial cells and abolishment of osteoclast formation in osteoclast progenitor cells. A hollow fiber device loaded with bioadsorbent reduced endogenous AGEs from recirculated blood to 36% of baseline levels with no significant changes in total protein and albumin concentration. The bioadsorbent maintained AGE-specific binding capacity after freeze-drying and storage for 1 year. This approach provides the foundation for further development of sRAGE-based extracorporeal therapies to selectively deplete serum AGEs from human blood and decrease inflammation in patients with diabetes and/or CKD. PMID:24206165

  18. Advanced Glycation End Products and Oxidative Stress in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nowotny, Kerstin; Jung, Tobias; Höhn, Annika; Weber, Daniela; Grune, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a very complex and multifactorial metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance and β cell failure leading to elevated blood glucose levels. Hyperglycemia is suggested to be the main cause of diabetic complications, which not only decrease life quality and expectancy, but are also becoming a problem regarding the financial burden for health care systems. Therefore, and to counteract the continually increasing prevalence of diabetes, understanding the pathogenesis, the main risk factors, and the underlying molecular mechanisms may establish a basis for prevention and therapy. In this regard, research was performed revealing further evidence that oxidative stress has an important role in hyperglycemia-induced tissue injury as well as in early events relevant for the development of T2DM. The formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), a group of modified proteins and/or lipids with damaging potential, is one contributing factor. On the one hand it has been reported that AGEs increase reactive oxygen species formation and impair antioxidant systems, on the other hand the formation of some AGEs is induced per se under oxidative conditions. Thus, AGEs contribute at least partly to chronic stress conditions in diabetes. As AGEs are not only formed endogenously, but also derive from exogenous sources, i.e., food, they have been assumed as risk factors for T2DM. However, the role of AGEs in the pathogenesis of T2DM and diabetic complications—if they are causal or simply an effect—is only partly understood. This review will highlight the involvement of AGEs in the development and progression of T2DM and their role in diabetic complications. PMID:25786107

  19. Genetic analysis of advanced glycation end products in the DHS MIND study.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jeremy N; Raffield, Laura M; Martelle, Susan E; Freedman, Barry I; Langefeld, Carl D; Carr, J Jeffrey; Cox, Amanda J; Bowden, Donald W

    2016-06-15

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are a diverse group of molecules produced by the non-enzymatic addition of glucose to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. AGE levels have been associated with hyperglycemia and diabetic complications, especially in animal models, but less clearly in human studies. We measured total serum AGEs using an enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) in 506 subjects from 246 families in the Diabetes Heart Study (DHS)/DHS MIND Study (n=399 type 2 diabetes (T2D)-affected). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in several candidate genes, including known AGE receptors, were tested for their influence on circulating AGE levels. The genetic analysis was expanded to include an exploratory genome-wide association study (GWAS) and exome chip analysis of AGEs (≈440,000 SNPs). AGEs were found to be highly heritable (h(2)=0.628, p=8.96 × 10(-10)). While no SNPs from candidate genes were significantly associated after Bonferroni correction, rs1035798 in the gene AGER was the most significantly associated (p=0.007). Additionally, rs7198427, in MT1A, showed a nominally significant p-value (p=0.0099). No SNPs from the GWAS or exome studies were identified after correction for multiple comparisons; however, rs17054480 in the PALLD2 gene on chromosome 4 showed the strongest association (p=7.77 × 10(-7)). Five SNPs at two loci (ISCA2/NPC2 and FBXO33) had p-values of less than 2.0 × 10(-5) and three additional SNPs (rs716326 in MACROD2, and rs6795197 and rs6765857 in ZBTB38) showed a nominal association with p-values of less than 1.0 × 10(-5).These findings provide a foundation for further investigation into the genetic component of circulating AGEs. PMID:26915486

  20. Oral advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) promote insulin resistance and diabetes by depleting the antioxidant defenses AGE receptor-1 and sirtuin 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weijing; Ramdas, Maya; Zhu, Li; Chen, Xue; Striker, Gary E; Vlassara, Helen

    2012-09-25

    The epidemics of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) affect the first world as well as less-developed countries, and now affect children as well. Persistently elevated oxidative stress and inflammation (OS/Infl) precede these polygenic conditions. A hallmark of contemporary lifestyle is a preference for thermally processed nutrients, replete with pro-OS/Infl advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), which enhance appetite and cause overnutrition. We propose that chronic ingestion of oral AGEs promotes IR and T2D. The mechanism(s) involved in these findings were assessed in four generations of C57BL6 mice fed isocaloric diets with or without AGEs [synthetic methyl-glyoxal-derivatives (MG(+))]. F3/MG(+) mice manifested increased adiposity and premature IR, marked by severe deficiency of anti-AGE advanced glycation receptor 1 (AGER1) and of survival factor sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in white adipose tissue (WAT), skeletal muscle, and liver. Impaired 2-deoxy-glucose uptake was associated with marked changes in insulin receptor (InsR), IRS-1, IRS-2, Akt activation, and a macrophage and adipocyte shift to a pro-OS/inflammatory (M1) phenotype. These features were absent in F3/MG(-) mice. MG stimulation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes led to suppressed AGER1 and SIRT1, and altered InsR, IRS-1, IRS-2 phosphorylation, and nuclear factor kappa-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (Nf-κB) p65 acetylation. Gene modulation revealed these effects to be coregulated by AGER1 and SIRT1. Thus, prolonged oral exposure to MG-AGEs can deplete host-defenses AGER1 and SIRT1, raise basal OS/Infl, and increase susceptibility to dysmetabolic IR. Because exposure to AGEs can be decreased, these insights provide an important framework for alleviating a major lifestyle-linked disease epidemic. PMID:22908267

  1. Advanced glycation end products and their receptors co-localise in rat organs susceptible to diabetic microvascular injury.

    PubMed

    Soulis, T; Thallas, V; Youssef, S; Gilbert, R E; McWilliam, B G; Murray-McIntosh, R P; Cooper, M E

    1997-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to play an important role in the development of diabetic complications. AGEs are increased in experimental diabetes and treatment with the inhibitor of advanced glycation end products, aminoguanidine, has been shown to attenuate the level of these products in tissues undergoing complications. Recently, an AGE-binding protein has been isolated from bovine lung endothelial cells and termed the receptor for advanced glycated end products (RAGE). The present study sought to determine the distribution of AGE and RAGE in tissues susceptible to the long-term complications of diabetes including the kidney, eye, nerve, arteries as well as in a tissue resistant to such complications, the lung. Using polyclonal antisera both AGE and RAGE were found to co-localize in the renal glomerulus. AGE staining was clearly increased with age and was further increased by diabetes. Aminoguanidine treatment reduced AGE accumulation in the kidney. Co-localisation of AGE and RAGE was demonstrated in the inner plexiform layer and the inner limiting membrane of the retina and in nerve bundles from mesenteric arteries. In the aorta, both AGE and RAGE were found in the intima, media and adventitia. Medial staining was increased in diabetes and was reduced by aminoguanidine treatment. A similar pattern was observed for RAGE in the aorta. In the lung, RAGE was found widely distributed throughout the lung whereas the distribution of AGE staining was more limited, primarily localising to macrophages. The co-localisation of AGEs and RAGE in sites of diabetic microvascular injury suggests that this ligand-receptor interaction may represent an important mechanism in the genesis of diabetic complications. PMID:9222639

  2. Advanced Glycation End Products Evolution after Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation: Plasmatic and Cutaneous Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, José C.; Vizcaíno, José Ramón; Gouveia, Carlos; Silva, Donzília; Henriques, António C.; Noronha, Irene L.; Rodrigues, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus leads to increased Advanced Glycation End Products (AGE) production, which has been associated with secondary diabetic complications. Type 1 diabetic patients undergoing pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT) can restore normoglycemia and renal function, eventually decreasing AGE accumulation. We aimed to prospectively study AGE evolution after SPKT. Circulating AGE were assessed in 20 patients, at time 0 (T0), 3 months (T3), 6 months (T6), and 12 months (T12) after successful SPKT. Global AGE and carboxymethyllysine (CML) were analyzed, as well as advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP). Skin biopsies were obtained at T0 and T12. Immunohistochemistry with anti-AGE antibody evaluated skin AGE deposition. AGE mean values were 16.8 ± 6.4 μg/mL at T0; 17.1 ± 3.8 μg/mL at T3; 17.5 ± 5.6 μg/mL at T6; and 16.0 ± 5.2 μg/mL at T12. CML mean values were 0.94 ± 0.36 ng/mL at T0; 1.11 ± 0.48 ng/mL at T3; 0.99 ± 0.42 ng/mL at T6; and 0.78 ± 0.38 ng/mL at T12. AOPP mean values were 130.1 ± 76.8 μMol/L at T0; 137.3 ± 110.6 μMol/L at T3; 116.4 ± 51.2 μMol/L at T6; and 106.4 ± 57.9 μMol/L at T12. CML variation was significant (P = 0.022); AOPP variation was nearly significant (P = 0.076). Skin biopsies evolved mostly from a cytoplasmic diffuse to a peripheral interkeratinocytic immunoreaction pattern; in 7 cases, a reduction in AGE immunoreaction intensity was evident at T12. In conclusion, glycoxidation markers decrease, plasmatic and on tissues, may start early after SPKT. Studies with prolonged follow-up may confirm these data. PMID:26881017

  3. HCD Fragmentation of Glycated Peptides.

    PubMed

    Keilhauer, Eva C; Geyer, Philipp E; Mann, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Protein glycation is a concentration-dependent nonenzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with amine groups of proteins to form early as well as advanced glycation (end-) products (AGEs). Glycation is a highly disease-relevant modification but is typically only studied on a few blood proteins. To complement our blood proteomics studies in diabetics, we here investigate protein glycation by higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation on Orbitrap mass spectrometers. We established parameters to most efficiently fragment and identify early glycation products on in vitro glycated model proteins. Retaining standard collision energies does not degrade performance if the most dominant neutral loss of H6O3 is included into the database search strategy. Glycation analysis of the entire HeLa proteome revealed an unexpected intracellular preponderance for arginine over lysine modification in early and advanced glycation (end-) products. Single-run analysis from 1 μL of undepleted and unenriched blood plasma identified 101 early glycation sites as well as numerous AGE sites on diverse plasma proteins. We conclude that HCD fragmentation is well-suited for analyzing glycated peptides and that the diabetic status of patients can be directly diagnosed from single-run plasma proteomics measurements. PMID:27425404

  4. Effects of advanced glycation end products on ezrin-dependent functions in LLC-PK1 proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Bach, Leon A; Gallicchio, Marisa A; McRobert, E Anne; Tikoo, Anjali; Cooper, Mark E

    2005-06-01

    We have recently shown that advanced glycation products (AGEs) bind to the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family of proteins. ERM proteins act as cross-linkers between cell membrane proteins and the actin cytoskeleton. They are also involved in signal transduction pathways. They therefore have a critical role in normal cell processes, including modulation of cell shape, adhesion, and motility. We postulate that AGEs may contribute to diabetic complications by disrupting ERM function. In support of this hypothesis, AGEs inhibit ezrin-dependent tubulogenesis of proximal tubule cells. Phosphorylation is an important activating mechanism for ERM proteins, and AGEs inhibit ezrin phosphorylation mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor. PMID:16037284

  5. Advanced glycation end products inhibit testosterone secretion by rat Leydig cells by inducing oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-Tao; Qi, Ya-Wei; Hu, Chuan-Yin; Chen, Shao-Hong; Liu, You

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes severely impairs male reproduction. The present study assessed the effects and mechanisms of action of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which play an important role in the development of diabetes complications, on testosterone secretion by rat Leydig cells. Primary rat Leydig cells were cultured and treated with AGEs (25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml). Testosterone production induced by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was determined by ELISA. The mRNA and protein expression levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), which are involved in testosterone biosynthesis, were measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and western blot analyssi, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Leydig cells was measured using the dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) probe. The expression levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress-related proteins [C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78)] in the Leydig cells were measured by western blot analysis. We found that the AGEs markedly suppressed testosterone production by rat Leydig cells which was induced by hCG in a concentration-dependent manner compared with the control (P<0.01). The mRNA and protein expression levels of StAR, 3β-HSD and P450scc were downregulated by the AGEs in a dose-dependent manner compared with the control (P<0.01). The antioxidant agent, N-acetyl‑L‑cysteine (NAC), and the endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), reversed the inhibitory effects of AGEs. In addition, the content of ROS in Leydig cells treated with AGEs increased significantly. The expression levels of CHOP and GRP78 were markedly upregulated by the AGEs in the Leydig cells. From these findings, it can be concluded that AGEs inhibit testosterone production by rat Leydig cells by inducing oxidative stress and

  6. Advanced Glycation End Products Acutely Impair Ca2+ Signaling in Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Nadim; Januszewski, Andrzej S.; Brown, Bronwyn E.; Jenkins, Alicia J.; Hill, Michael A.; Murphy, Timothy V.

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins in diabetes, including formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to contribute to vascular dysfunction and disease. Impaired function of the endothelium is an early indicator of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and as many endothelial cell processes are dependent upon intracellular [Ca2+] and Ca2+ signaling, the aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of AGEs on Ca2+ signaling in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Ca2+ signaling was studied using the fluorescent indicator dye Fura-2-AM. AGEs were generated by incubating bovine serum albumin with 0–250 mM glucose or glucose-6-phosphate for 0–120 days at 37°C. Under all conditions, the main AGE species generated was carboxymethyl lysine (CML) as assayed using both gas-liquid chromatograph-mass spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography. In Ca2+-replete solution, exposure of BAEC to AGEs for 5 min caused an elevation in basal [Ca2+] and attenuated the increase in intracellular [Ca2+] caused by ATP (100 μM). In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, exposure of BAEC to AGEs for 5 min caused an elevation in basal [Ca2+] and attenuated subsequent intracellular Ca2+ release caused by ATP, thapsigargin (0.1 μM), and ionomycin (3 μM), but AGEs did not affect extracellular Ca2+ entry induced by the re-addition of Ca2+ to the bathing solution in the presence of any of these agents. The anti-oxidant α-lipoic acid (2 μM) and NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors apocynin (500 μM) and diphenyleneiodonium (1 μM) abolished these effects of AGEs on BAECs, as did the IP3 receptor antagonist xestospongin C (1 μM). In summary, AGEs caused an acute depletion of Ca2+ from the intracellular store in BAECs, such that the Ca2+ signal stimulated by the subsequent application other agents acting upon this store is reduced. The mechanism may involve generation of reactive oxygen species from NAD(P)H oxidase and possible

  7. Imaging of Receptors for Advanced Glycation End Products in Experimental Myocardial Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tekabe, Yared; Luma, Joane; Li, Qing; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Johnson, Lynne L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to image expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in a mouse model of myocardial reperfusion injury. BACKGROUND RAGE and its ligands are implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion injury and infarction. We hypothesized that RAGE-directed quantitative imaging of myocardial uptake of technetium-99m (99mTc)-anti-RAGE F(ab′)2 in a mouse model of myocardial ischemic injury can detect RAGE expression and show quantitative differences between early (18 to 20 h) and later times (48 h) after reperfusion. METHODS Twenty-five wild-type (WT) mice underwent left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion for 30 min. Mice were injected with 19.98 ± 1.78 MBq of 99mTc anti-RAGE F(ab′)2 at 2 time points after reperfusion (at 18 to 20 h [n = 8] and at 48 h [n = 12]) and 5 h later with 6.14 ± 2.0 MBq of thallium-201 (201Tl). Five WT mice were injected with nonspecific F(ab′)2 and 201Tl 18 to 20 h after reperfusion. Six WT mice underwent sham operation without coronary intervention. After injection with 201Tl, all mice immediately underwent dual isotope single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography. At completion of imaging, hearts were counted and sectioned. RESULTS The uptake of 99mTc-anti-RAGE F(ab′)2 in the ischemic zone from the scans as mean percentage injected dose was significantly greater at 18 to 20 h (5.7 ± 2.1 × 10−3%) as compared with at 48 h (1.4 ± 1.1 × 10−3%; p < 0.001) after reperfusion. Disease and antibody controls showed no focal uptake in the infarct. Gamma well counting of the myocardium supported the quantitative scan data. By immunohistochemical staining there was greater caspase-3 and RAGE staining at 18 to 20 h versus at 48 h (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively). On dual immunofluorescence, RAGE colocalized mainly with injured cardiomyocytes undergoing apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS RAGE expression in myocardial ischemic injury can be imaged in vivo using

  8. Glycated Serum Albumin and AGE Receptors.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Stefan W

    2015-01-01

    In vivo modification of proteins by molecules with reactive carbonyl groups leads to intermediate and advanced glycation end products (AGE). Glucose is a significant glycation reagent due to its high physiological concentration and poorly controlled diabetics show increased albumin glycation. Increased levels of glycated and AGE-modified albumin have been linked to diabetic complications, neurodegeneration, and vascular disease. This review discusses glycated albumin formation, structural consequences of albumin glycation on drug binding, removal of circulating AGE by several scavenger receptors, as well as AGE-induced proinflammatory signaling through activation of the receptor for AGE. Analytical methods for quantitative detection of protein glycation and AGE formation are compared. Finally, the use of glycated albumin as a novel clinical marker to monitor glycemic control is discussed and compared to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as long-term indicator of glycemic status. PMID:26471084

  9. Advanced Glycation End Products (AGE) Potently Induce Autophagy through Activation of RAF Protein Kinase and Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB).

    PubMed

    Verma, Neeharika; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-01-15

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) accumulate in diabetic patients and aging people because of high amounts of three- or four-carbon sugars derived from glucose, thereby causing multiple consequences, including inflammation, apoptosis, obesity, and age-related disorders. It is important to understand the mechanism of AGE-mediated signaling leading to the activation of autophagy (self-eating) that might result in obesity. We detected AGE as one of the potent inducers of autophagy compared with doxorubicin and TNF. AGE-mediated autophagy is inhibited by suppression of PI3K and potentiated by the autophagosome maturation blocker bafilomycin. It increases autophagy in different cell types, and that correlates with the expression of its receptor, receptor for AGE. LC3B, the marker for autophagosomes, is shown to increase upon AGE stimulation. AGE-mediated autophagy is partially suppressed by inhibitor of NF-κB, PKC, or ERK alone and significantly in combination. AGE increases sterol regulatory element binding protein activity, which leads to an increase in lipogenesis. Although AGE-mediated lipogenesis is affected by autophagy inhibitors, AGE-mediated autophagy is not influenced by lipogenesis inhibitors, suggesting that the turnover of lipid droplets overcomes the autophagic clearance. For the first time, we provide data showing that AGE induces several cell signaling cascades, like NF-κB, PKC, ERK, and MAPK, that are involved in autophagy and simultaneously help with the accumulation of lipid droplets that are not cleared effectively by autophagy, therefore causing obesity. PMID:26586913

  10. Advanced glycation end products induce oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Yu, Song; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wang, Yue; Liu, Hai-Xing; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Li-De

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the direct effects of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on the mitochondrial structure and function of SH-SY5Y cells and the possible molecular mechanism(s) underlying mitochondria dysfunction by AGEs. SH-SY5Y cells were cultured in 400 μg/ml of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) for 24 h, and changes in the mitochondrial function of SH-SY5Y cells were analysed as follows. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate molecular probes. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was determined by flow cytometry using fluorescent probes. The expression of cytochrome c (Cyt c) protein level was assessed by Western blotting. Mitochondrial structures were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that AGE-BSA induced an increase in ROS levels, a decrease in mitochondrial ΔΨm, and the release of Cyt c from mitochondria in SH-SY5Y cells. The mitochondria of SH-SY5Y cells showed remarkable swelling and vacuolisation, but these changes were recovered after pretreatment with neutralising anti-receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) antibody. Our results suggested that AGE-BSA induced mitochondrial dysfunction in SH-SY5Y cells through RAGE pathways. Thus, AGEs are potential mechanistic links between diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25381033

  11. Phlorotannins from Brown Algae: inhibition of advanced glycation end products formation in high glucose induced Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Shakambari, Ganeshan; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem; Varalakshmi, Perumal

    2015-06-01

    Advanced Glycation End products (AGE) generated in a non enzymatic protein glycation process are frequently associated with diabetes, aging and other chronic diseases. Here, we explored the protective effect of phlorotannins from brown algae Padina pavonica, Sargassum polycystum and Turbinaria ornata against AGEs formation. Phlorotannins were extracted from brown algae with methanol and its purity was analyzed by TLC and RP-HPLC-DAD. Twenty five grams of P. pavonica, S. polycystum, T. ornata yielded 27.6 ± 0.8 μg/ml, 37.7 μg/ml and 37.1 ± 0.74 μg/ml of phloroglucinol equivalent of phlorotannins, respectively. Antioxidant potentials were examined through DPPH assay and their IC50 values were P. pavonica (30.12 ± 0.99 μg), S. polycystum (40.9 ± 1.2 μg) and T. ornata (22.9 ± 1.3 μg), which was comparatively lesser than the control ascorbic acid (46 ± 0.2 μg). Further, anti-AGE activity was examined in vitro by BSA-glucose assay with the extracted phlorotannins of brown algae (P. pavonica, 15.16 ± 0.26 μg/ml; S. polycystum, 35.245 ± 2.3 μg/ml; T. ornata, 22.7 ± 0.3 μg/ml), which revealed the required concentration to inhibit 50% of albumin glycation (IC50) were lower for extracts than controls (phloroglucinol, 222.33 ± 4.9 μg/ml; thiamine, 263 μg/ml). Furthermore, brown algal extracts containing phlorotannins (100 μl) exhibited protective effects against AGE formation in vivo in C. elegans with induced hyperglycemia. PMID:26155677

  12. Regulation of human mononuclear phagocyte migration by cell surface-binding proteins for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A M; Yan, S D; Brett, J; Mora, R; Nowygrod, R; Stern, D

    1993-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of proteins occurs at an accelerated rate in diabetes and can lead to the formation of advanced glycation end products of proteins (AGEs), which bind to mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) and induce chemotaxis. We have isolated two cell surface-associated binding proteins that mediate the interaction of AGEs with bovine endothelial cells. One of these proteins is a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of receptors (termed receptor for AGEs or RAGE); and the second is a lactoferrin-like polypeptide (LF-L). Using monospecific antibodies to these two AGE-binding proteins, we detected immunoreactive material on Western blots of detergent extracts from human MPs. Radioligand-binding studies demonstrated that antibody to the binding proteins blocked 125I-AGE-albumin binding and endocytosis by MPs. Chemotaxis of human MPs induced by soluble AGE-albumin was prevented in a dose-dependent manner by intact antibodies raised to the AGE-binding proteins, F(ab')2 fragments of these antibodies and by soluble RAGE. When MP migration in response to N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe was studied in a chemotaxis chamber with AGE-albumin adsorbed to the upper surface of the chamber membrane, movement of MPs to the lower compartment was decreased because of interaction of the glycated proteins with RAGE and LF-L on the cell surface. The capacity of AGEs to attract and retain MPs was shown by implanting polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mesh impregnated with AGE-albumin into rats: within 4 d a florid mononuclear cell infiltrate was evident in contrast to the lack of a significant cellular response to PTFE with adsorbed native albumin. These data indicate that RAGE and LF-L have a central role in the interaction of AGEs with human mononuclear cells and that AGEs can serve as a nidus to attract MPs in vivo. Images PMID:8387541

  13. Glucitol-core containing gallotannins inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end-products mediated by their antioxidant potential.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hang; Liu, Weixi; Frost, Leslie; Kirschenbaum, Louis J; Dain, Joel A; Seeram, Navindra P

    2016-05-18

    Glucitol-core containing gallotannins (GCGs) are polyphenols containing galloyl groups attached to a 1,5-anhydro-d-glucitol core, which is uncommon among naturally occurring plant gallotannins. GCGs have only been isolated from maple (Acer) species, including the red maple (Acer rubrum), a medicinal plant which along with the sugar maple (Acer saccharum), are the major sources of the natural sweetener, maple syrup. GCGs are reported to show antioxidant, α-glucosidase inhibitory, and antidiabetic effects, but their antiglycating potential is unknown. Herein, the inhibitory effects of five GCGs (containing 1-4 galloyls) on the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) were evaluated by MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy, and BSA-fructose, and G.K. peptide-ribose assays. The GCGs showed superior activities compared to the synthetic antiglycating agent, aminoguanidine (IC50 15.8-151.3 vs. >300 μM) at the early, middle, and late stages of glycation. Circular dichroism data revealed that the GCGs were able to protect the secondary structure of BSA protein from glycation. The GCGs did not inhibit AGE formation by the trapping of reactive carbonyl species, namely, methylglyoxal, but showed free radical scavenging activities in the DPPH assay. The free radical quenching properties of the GCGs were further confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using ginnalin A (contains 2 galloyls) as a representative GCG. In addition, this GCG chelated ferrous iron, an oxidative catalyst of AGE formation, supported a potential antioxidant mechanism of antiglycating activity for these polyphenols. Therefore, GCGs should be further investigated for their antidiabetic potential given their antioxidant, α-glucosidase inhibitory, and antiglycating properties. PMID:27101975

  14. Immunohistochemical distribution of the receptor for advanced glycation end products in neurons and astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, N; Toki, S; Chowei, H; Saito, T; Nakano, N; Hayashi, Y; Takeuchi, M; Makita, Z

    2001-01-12

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) and the receptor for AGE (RAGE) have been implicated in the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), and have been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we established a polyclonal anti-RAGE antibody, and examined the immunohistochemical localization of amyloid beta protein (Abeta), AGE, and RAGE in neurons and astrocytes from patients with AD and DM. Our anti-RAGE antibody recognized full-length RAGE (50 kd) and N-terminal RAGE (35 kd) in human brain tissue. Abeta-, AGE-, and RAGE-positive granules were identified in the perikaryon of hippocampal neurons (especially from CA3 and CA4) in all subjects. The distribution and staining pattern of these immunopositive granules showed good concordance with each antibody. In AD, most astrocytes contained both AGE-and RAGE-positive granules and their distribution was almost the same. Abeta-positive granules were less common, but Abeta-, AGE-, and RAGE-positive granules were colocalized in one part of a single astrocyte. In DM patients and control cases, AGE-and RAGE-positive astrocytes were very rare. These finding support the hypothesis that glycated Abeta is taken up via RAGE and is degraded through the lysosomal pathway in astrocytes. In addition to the presence of AGE, the process of AGE degradation and receptor-mediated reactions may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and promote the progression of AD. PMID:11150482

  15. Diet-derived advanced glycation end products or lipofuscin disrupts proteostasis and reduces life span in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tsakiri, Eleni N; Iliaki, Kalliopi K; Höhn, Annika; Grimm, Stefanie; Papassideri, Issidora S; Grune, Tilman; Trougakos, Ioannis P

    2013-12-01

    Advanced glycation end product (AGE)-modified proteins are formed by the nonenzymatic glycation of free amino groups of proteins and, along with lipofuscin (a highly oxidized aggregate of covalently cross-linked proteins, sugars, and lipids), have been found to accumulate during aging and in several age-related diseases. As the in vivo effects of diet-derived AGEs or lipofuscin remain elusive, we sought to study the impact of oral administration of glucose-, fructose-, or ribose-modified albumin or of artificial lipofuscin in a genetically tractable model organism. We report herein that continuous feeding of young Drosophila flies with culture medium enriched in AGEs or in lipofuscin resulted in reduced locomotor performance and in accelerated rates of AGE-modified proteins and carbonylated proteins accumulation in the somatic tissues and hemolymph of flies, as well as in a significant reduction of flies health span and life span. These phenotypic effects were accompanied by reduced proteasome peptidase activities in both the hemolymph and the somatic tissues of flies and higher levels of oxidative stress; furthermore, oral administration of AGEs or lipofuscin in flies triggered an upregulation of the lysosomal cathepsin B, L activities. Finally, RNAi-mediated cathepsin D knockdown reduced flies longevity and significantly augmented the deleterious effects of AGEs and lipofuscin, indicating that lysosomal cathepsins reduce the toxicity of diet-derived AGEs or lipofuscin. Our in vivo studies demonstrate that chronic ingestion of AGEs or lipofuscin disrupts proteostasis and accelerates the functional decline that occurs with normal aging. PMID:23999505

  16. Dietary intake of advanced glycation end products did not affect endothelial function and inflammation in healthy adults in a randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When food is heated to high temperatures, the characteristic “browning” generates advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that result from the reaction of reducing sugars with proteins. AGEs have been implicated in an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other adverse aging-relate...

  17. Hyperoside Downregulates the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) and Promotes Proliferation in ECV304 Cells via the c-Jun N-Terminal Kinases (JNK) Pathway Following Stimulation by Advanced Glycation End-Products In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengyu; Sethiel, Mosha Silas; Shen, Weizhi; Liao, Sentai; Zou, Yuxiao

    2013-01-01

    Hyperoside is a major active constituent in many medicinal plants which are traditionally used in Chinese medicines for their neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects. The molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. In this study, quiescent ECV304 cells were treated in vitro with advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the presence or absence of hyperoside. The results demonstrated that AGEs induced c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) activation and apoptosis in ECV304 cells. Hyperoside inhibited these effects and promoted ECV304 cell proliferation. Furthermore, hyperoside significantly inhibited RAGE expression in AGE-stimulated ECV304 cells, whereas knockdown of RAGE inhibited AGE-induced JNK activation. These results suggested that AGEs may promote JNK activation, leading to viability inhibition of ECV304 cells via the RAGE signaling pathway. These effects could be inhibited by hyperoside. Our findings suggest a novel role for hyperoside in the treatment and prevention of diabetes. PMID:24252909

  18. Age-related accumulation of advanced glycation end-products-albumin, S100β, and the expressions of advanced glycation end product receptor differ in visceral and subcutaneous fat.

    PubMed

    Son, Kuk Hui; Son, Myeongjoo; Ahn, Hyosang; Oh, Seyeon; Yum, Yoonji; Choi, Chang Hu; Park, Kook Yang; Byun, Kyunghee

    2016-08-19

    Visceral fat induces more inflammation by activating macrophages than subcutaneous fat, and inflammation is an underlying feature of the pathogeneses of various diseases, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), S100β, and their receptors, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), lead to macrophage activation. However, little information is available regarding the differential accumulations of AGE-albumin (serum albumin modified by AGEs), S100β, or expressions of RAGE in different adipocyte types in fat tissues. In this study, the authors investigated whether age-related AGE-albumin accumulations S100β level, and RAGE expressions differ in subcutaneous and visceral fat tissues. Subcutaneous and visceral fat were harvested from 3- and 28-week-old rats. Macrophage activation was confirmed by Iba1 staining, and AGE-albumin accumulations and RAGE expressions were assessed by confocal microscopy. S100β were analyzed by immunoblotting. It was found that activated macrophage infiltration, AGE-albumin accumulation, and S100β in visceral fat was significantly greater in 28-week-old rats than in 3-week-old rats, but similar in subcutaneous fat. The expression of RAGE in visceral fat was much greater in 28-week-old rats, but its expression in subcutaneous fat was similar in 3- and 28-week-old rats. Furthermore, inflammatory signal pathways (NFκB, TNF-α) and proliferation pathways (FAK) in visceral fat were more activated in 28-week-old rats. These results imply that age-related AGE-albumin accumulation, S100β, and RAGE expression are more prominent in visceral than in subcutaneous fat, suggesting that visceral fat is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation-induced diseases in the elderly. PMID:27301641

  19. Current perspectives on the health risks associated with the consumption of advanced glycation end products: recommendations for dietary management

    PubMed Central

    Palimeri, Sotiria; Palioura, Eleni; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) constitute a complex group of compounds produced endogenously during the aging process and under conditions of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress. AGEs also have an emerging exogenous origin. Cigarette smoke and diet are the two main exogenous sources of AGEs (glycotoxins). Modern Western diets are rich in AGEs which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several metabolic and degenerative disorders. Accumulating evidence underlies the beneficial effect of the dietary restriction of AGEs not only in animal studies but also in patients with diabetic complications and metabolic diseases. This article reviews the evidence linking dietary glycotoxins to several disorders from diabetic complications and renal failure to liver dysfunction, female reproduction, eye and cognitive disorders as well as cancer. Furthermore, strategies for AGE reduction are discussed with a focus on dietary modification. PMID:26366100

  20. The receptor for advanced glycation end products promotes bacterial growth at distant body sites in Staphylococcus aureus skin infection.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; Van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-09-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) has been implicated in the regulation of skin inflammation. We here sought to study the role of RAGE in host defense during skin infection caused by Staphylococcus (S.) aureus, the most common pathogen in this condition. Wild-type (Wt) and RAGE deficient (rage(-/-)) mice were infected subcutaneously with S. aureus and bacterial loads and local inflammation were quantified at regular intervals up to 8 days after infection. While bacterial burdens were similar in both mouse strains at the primary site of infection, rage(-/-) mice had lower bacterial counts in lungs and liver. Skin cytokine and chemokine levels did not differ between groups. In accordance with the skin model, direct intravenous infection with S. aureus was associated with lower bacterial loads in lungs and liver of rage(-/-) mice. Together these data suggest that RAGE does not impact local host defense during S. aureus skin infection, but facilitates bacterial growth at distant body sites. PMID:26086798

  1. A portable system for noninvasive assessment of advanced glycation end-products using skin fluorescence and reflectance spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. K.; Zhu, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, G.; Liu, Y.; Wang, A.

    2012-07-01

    An optical system has been developed for noninvasive assessment of skin advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). The system comprises mainly a high-power ultraviolet light emitting diode (LED) as an excitation source, an LED array for the reflectance measurement, a trifurcated fiber-optic probe for light transmitting and receiving, and a compact spectrometer for light detecting. Both skin fluorescence of a subject and the reflectance spectrum of the same site can be obtained in a single measurement with the system. Demonstrative measurements with the system have been conducted. Results indicate that the measured reflectance spectrum can be used to compensate for the distortion of AGEs fluorescence, which is caused by skin absorption and scattering. The system is noninvasive, portable, easy to operate, and has potential applications for clinical diagnosis of AGE-related diseases, especially diabetes mellitus.

  2. The renin-angiotensin system and advanced glycation end-products in diabetic retinopathy: impacts and synergies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Antonia G; Zhu, Tong; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of vision impairment and blindness and represents a significant health burden throughout the world. There is considerable interest in developing new treatments that retard the progression of diabetic retinopathy from its early to proliferative stages. It could be argued that the absence of an ideal therapy for diabetic retinopathy comes from an incomplete understanding about the biochemical mechanisms that underlie this disease, and their precise impact on specific retinal cell populations. Findings from pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that both the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) influence various aspects of diabetic retinopathy. Of interest is growing evidence of cross-talk between the RAS and AGEs pathways. This review will discuss the role of both the RAS and AGEs in diabetic retinopathy, and how the identification of interactions between the two pathways may have implications for the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:23173957

  3. Advanced glycation end-products as markers of aging and longevity in the long-lived Ansell's mole-rat (Fukomys anselli).

    PubMed

    Dammann, Philip; Sell, David R; Begall, Sabine; Strauch, Christopher; Monnier, Vincent M

    2012-06-01

    Mole-rat of the genus Fukomys are mammals whose life span is strongly influenced by reproductive status with breeders far outliving nonbreeders. This raises the important question of whether increased longevity of the breeders is reflected in atypical expression of biochemical markers of aging. Here, we measured markers of glycation and advanced glycation end-products formed in insoluble skin collagen of Ansell's mole-rat Fukomys anselli as a function of age and breeding status. Glucosepane, pentosidine, and total advanced glycation end-product content significantly increased with age after correction for breeder status and sex. Unexpectedly, total advanced glycation end-products, glucosepane, and carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) were significantly higher in breeders versus nonbreeders suggesting that breeders have evolved powerful defenses against combined oxidant and carbonyl stress compared with nonbreeders. Most interestingly, when compared with other mammals, pentosidine formation rate was lower in mole-rat compared with other short-lived rodents confirming previous observations of an inverse relationship between longevity and pentosidine formation rates in skin collagen. PMID:22156473

  4. Advanced Glycation End-Products as Markers of Aging and Longevity in the Long-Lived Ansell’s Mole-Rat (Fukomys anselli)

    PubMed Central

    Dammann, Philip; Begall, Sabine; Strauch, Christopher; Monnier, Vincent M.

    2012-01-01

    Mole-rat of the genus Fukomys are mammals whose life span is strongly influenced by reproductive status with breeders far outliving nonbreeders. This raises the important question of whether increased longevity of the breeders is reflected in atypical expression of biochemical markers of aging. Here, we measured markers of glycation and advanced glycation end-products formed in insoluble skin collagen of Ansell’s mole-rat Fukomys anselli as a function of age and breeding status. Glucosepane, pentosidine, and total advanced glycation end-product content significantly increased with age after correction for breeder status and sex. Unexpectedly, total advanced glycation end-products, glucosepane, and carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) were significantly higher in breeders versus nonbreeders suggesting that breeders have evolved powerful defenses against combined oxidant and carbonyl stress compared with nonbreeders. Most interestingly, when compared with other mammals, pentosidine formation rate was lower in mole-rat compared with other short-lived rodents confirming previous observations of an inverse relationship between longevity and pentosidine formation rates in skin collagen. PMID:22156473

  5. Comprehensive Identification of Glycated Peptides and Their Glycation Motifs in Plasma and Erythrocytes of Control and Diabetic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qibin; Monroe, Matthew E.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Meng, Da; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins sets the stage for formation of advanced glycation end-products and development of chronic complications of diabetes. In this report, we extended our previous methods on proteomics analysis of glycated proteins to comprehensively identify glycated proteins in control and diabetic human plasma and erythrocytes. Using immunodepletion, enrichment, and fractionation strategies, we identified 7749 unique glycated peptides, corresponding to 3742 unique glycated proteins. Semi-quantitative comparisons showed that glycation levels of a number of proteins were significantly increased in diabetes and that erythrocyte proteins were more extensively glycated than plasma proteins. A glycation motif analysis revealed that some amino acids were favored more than others in the protein primary structures in the vicinity of the glycation sites in both sample types. The glycated peptides and corresponding proteins reported here provide a foundation for potential identification of novel markers for diabetes, hyperglycemia, and diabetic complications in future studies. PMID:21612289

  6. Advanced Glycation End Products Modulate Structure and Drug Binding Properties of Albumin.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Murugan, N Arul; Saraswathi, N T

    2015-09-01

    The extraordinary ligand binding properties of albumin makes it a key player in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many vital drugs. Albumin is highly susceptible for nonenzymatic glycation mediated structural modifications, and there is a need to determine structural and functional impact of specific AGEs modifications. The present study was aimed toward determining the AGE mediated structure and function changes, primarily looking into the effect on binding affinity of drugs in the two major drug binding sites of albumin. The impact of the two most predominant AGEs modifications, i.e., carboxyethyllysine (CEL) and argpyrimidine (Arg-P), was studied on the basis of the combination of in vitro and in silico experiments. In vitro studies were carried out by AGEs modification of bovine serum albumin (BSA) for the formation of Arg-P and CEL followed by drug interaction studies. In silico studies involved molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and docking studies for native and AGEs modified BSAs. In particular the side chain modification was specifically carried out for the residues in the drug binding sites, i.e., Arg-194, Arg-196, Arg-198, and Arg-217, and Lys-204 (site I) and Arg-409 and Lys-413 (site II). The equilibrated structures of native BSA (n-BSA) and glycated BSA (G-BSA) as obtained from MD were used for drug binding studies using molecular docking approach. It was evident from the results of both in vitro and in silico drug interaction studies that AGEs modification results in the reduced drug binding affinity for tolbutamide (TLB) and ibuprofen (IBP) in sites I and II. Moreover, the AGEs modification mediated conformational changes resulted in the shallow binding pockets with reduced accessibility for drugs. PMID:26281017

  7. The hydrolyzable gallotannin, penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside, inhibits the formation of advanced glycation endproducts by protecting protein structure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hang; Liu, Weixi; Frost, Leslie; Wang, Ling; Kong, Liwen; Dain, Joel A; Seeram, Navindra P

    2015-05-01

    Glycation is a spontaneous process initiated by a condensation reaction between reducing sugars and proteins that leads to the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). The in vivo accumulation of AGEs is associated with several chronic human diseases and, thus, the search for AGE inhibitors is of great research interest. Hydrolyzable tannins (gallotannins and ellagitannins) are bioactive plant polyphenols which show promise as natural inhibitors of glycation and AGE formation. Notably, the gallotannin, 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (PGG), is a key intermediate involved in the biosynthesis of hydrolyzable tannins in plants. Herein, we investigated the effects of PGG on the individual stages of protein glycation and on protein structure (using bovine serum albumin; BSA). MALDI-TOF data demonstrated that PGG inhibited early glycation by 75% while the synthetic AGE inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG), was not active (both at 50 μM). In addition, PGG reduced the formation of middle and late stage AGEs by 90.1 and 60.5%, respectively, which was superior to the positive control, AG. While glycation induced conformational changes in BSA from α-helix to β-sheets (from circular dichroism and congo red binding studies), PGG (at 50 μM) reduced this transition by 50%. Moreover, BSA treated with PGG was more stable in its structure and retained its biophysical properties (based on zeta potential and electrophoretic mobility measurements). The interaction between PGG and BSA was further supported by molecular docking studies. Overall, the current study adds to the growing body of data supporting the anti-AGE effects of hydrolyzable tannins, a ubiquitous class of bioactive plant polyphenols. PMID:25789915

  8. Enhanced cellular oxidant stress by the interaction of advanced glycation end products with their receptors/binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Yan, S D; Schmidt, A M; Anderson, G M; Zhang, J; Brett, J; Zou, Y S; Pinsky, D; Stern, D

    1994-04-01

    Attack by reactive oxygen intermediates, common to many kinds of cell/tissue injury, has been implicated in the development of diabetic and other vascular diseases. Such oxygen-free radicals can be generated by advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are nonenzymatically glycated and oxidized proteins. Since cellular interactions of AGEs are mediated by specific cellular binding proteins, receptor for AGE (RAGE) and the lactoferrin-like polypeptide (LF-L), we tested the hypothesis that AGE ligands tethered to the complex of RAGE and LF-L could induce oxidant stress. AGE albumin or AGEs immunoisolated from diabetic plasma resulted in induction of endothelial cell (EC) oxidant stress, including the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and resulted in the activation of NF-kappa B, each of which was blocked by antibodies to AGE receptor polypeptides and by antioxidants. Infusion of AGE albumin into normal animals led to the appearance of malondialdehyde determinants in the vessel wall and increased TBARS in the tissues, activation of NF-kappa B, and induction of heme oxygenase mRNA. AGE-induced oxidant stress was inhibited by pretreatment of animals with either antibodies to the AGE receptor/binding proteins or antioxidants. These data indicate that interaction of AGEs with cellular targets, such as ECs, leads to oxidant stress resulting in changes in gene expression and other cellular properties, potentially contributing to the development of vascular lesions. Further studies will be required to dissect whether oxidant stress occurs on the cell surface or at an intracellular locus. PMID:8144582

  9. Correlation between advanced glycation end-products and the expression of fatty inflammatory factors in type II diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhengdong; Huang, Donghui; Tang, Xiange; Han, Jingjing; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is one of the most severe complications of diabetes without a clear pathogenesis. This study investigated the adiponectin (APN) and leptin levels in type II DCM, as well as their correlation with advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). From 2011–2013, 78 type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) cases (40–65 years old) in the Taian region were randomly selected. Based on the results of colour Doppler ultrasonography and coronary angiography, the cases were divided into a simple T2DM group (40 cases) and a DCM group (38 cases). Forty healthy subjects were used as normal control (NC). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to determine the levels of fatty inflammatory factors such as APN, leptin and AGEs, and a correlation analysis was conducted. In the T2DM group, the APN levels were decreased but the leptin and AGE levels were significantly increased compared to the NC group. In the DCM group, the APN levels were decreased but the leptin and AGE levels were significantly increased (P<0.01) compared to the T2DM group. The AGE levels were positively correlated with disease progression and with fasting plasma glucose levels, glycated haemoglobin, insulin resistance and leptin, but were negatively correlated with APN levels. Additionally, the APN and leptin levels were independently related to the AGE levels. Fatty inflammatory factors play a significant role in the progression of both simple T2DM and DCM. The results of this study revealed the pathogenesis of DCM and indicated the potential significance of AGEs in DCM prevention and treatment. PMID:26614846

  10. Differential expression of receptors for advanced glycation end-products in peritoneal mesothelial cells exposed to glucose degradation products

    PubMed Central

    LAI, K N; LEUNG, J C K; CHAN, L Y Y; LI, F F K; TANG, S C W; LAM, M F; TSE, K C; YIP, T P; CHAN, T M; WIESLANDER, A; VLASSARA, H

    2004-01-01

    Autoclaving peritoneal dialysate fluid (PDF) degrades glucose into glucose degradation products (GDPs) that impair peritoneal mesothelial cell functions. While glycation processes leading to formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) were viewed commonly as being mediated by glucose present in the PDF, recent evidence indicates that certain GDPs are even more powerful inducers of AGE formation than glucose per se. In the present study, we examined the expression and modulation of AGE receptors on human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) cultured with GDPs, conventional PDF or PDF with low GDP content. HPMC cultured with GDPs differentially modulated AGE receptors (including RAGE, AGE–R1, AGE–R2 and AGE–R3) expression in a dose-dependent manner. At subtoxic concentrations, GDPs increased RAGE mRNA expression in HPMC. 2-furaldehyde (FurA), methylglyoxal (M-Glx) and 3,4-dideoxy-glucosone-3-Ene (3,4-DGE) increased the expression of AGE–R1 and RAGE, the receptors that are associated with toxic effects. These three GDPs up-regulated the AGE synthesis by cultured HPMC. In parallel, these GDPs also increased the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in HPMC. PDF with lower GDP content exerted less cytotoxic effect than traditional heat-sterilized PDF. Both PDF preparations up-regulated the protein expression of RAGE and VEGF. However, the up-regulation of VEGF in HPMC following 24-h culture with conventional PDF was higher than values from HPMC cultured with PDF containing low GDP. We have demonstrated, for the first time, that in addition to RAGE, other AGE receptors including AGE–R1, AGE–R2 and AGE–R3 are expressed on HPMC. Different GDPs exert differential regulation on the expression of these receptors on HPMC. The interactions between GDPs and AGE receptors may bear biological relevance to the intraperitoneal homeostasis and membrane integrity. PMID:15544624

  11. Optoacoustic detection of tissue glycation.

    PubMed

    Ghazaryan, Ara; Omar, Murad; Tserevelakis, George J; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative-based diseases including diabetes, chronic renal failure, cardiovascular diseases and neurological disorders are accompanied by accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE). Therefore, AGE-associated changes in tissue optical properties could yield a viable pathological indicator for disease diagnostics and monitoring. We investigated whether skin glycation could be detected based on absorption changes associated with AGE accumulation using spectral optoacoustic measurements and interrogated the optimal spectral band for skin glycation determination. Glycated and non-glycated skin was optoacoustically measured at multiple wavelengths in the visible region. The detected signals were spectrally processed and compared to measurements of skin auto-fluorescence and to second harmonic generation multiphoton microscopy images. Optoacoustic measurements are shown to be capable of detecting skin glycolysis based on AGE detection. A linear dependence was observed between optoacoustic intensity and the progression of skin glycation. The findings where corroborated by autofluorescence observations. Detection sensitivity is enhanced by observing normalised tissue spectra. This result points to a ratiometric method for skin glycation detection, specifically at 540 nm and 620 nm. We demonstrate that optoacoustic spectroscopy could be employed to detect AGE accumulation, and possibly can be employed as a non-invasive quick method for monitoring tissue glycation. PMID:26417487

  12. Angiogenesis impairment in diabetes: role of methylglyoxal-induced receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, autophagy and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongtao; Yu, Shujie; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes impairs physiological angiogenesis by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. Methylglyoxal (MGO), a metabolite of glycolysis, is increased in patients with diabetes. This study defined the role of MGO in angiogenesis impairment and tested the mechanism in diabetic animals. Endothelial cells and mouse aortas were subjected to Western blot analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) protein levels and angiogenesis evaluation by endothelial cell tube formation/migration and aortic ring assays. Incubation with MGO reduced VEGFR2 protein, but not mRNA, levels in a time and dose dependent manner. Genetic knockdown of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) attenuated the reduction of VEGFR2. Overexpression of Glyoxalase 1, the enzyme that detoxifies MGO, reduced the MGO-protein adducts and prevented VEGFR2 reduction. The VEGFR2 reduction was associated with impaired angiogenesis. Suppression of autophagy either by inhibitors or siRNA, but not of the proteasome and caspase, normalized both the VEGFR2 protein levels and angiogenesis. Conversely, induction of autophagy either by rapamycin or overexpression of LC3 and Beclin-1 reduced VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. MGO increased endothelial LC3B and Beclin-1, markers of autophagy, which were accompanied by an increase of both autophagic flux (LC3 punctae) and co-immunoprecipitation of VEGFR2 with LC3. Pharmacological or genetic suppression of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) generation not only blocked the autophagy but also reversed the reduction of VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. Like MGO-treated aortas from normglycemic C57BL/6J mice, aortas from diabetic db/db and Akita mice presented reductions of angiogenesis or VEGFR2. Administration of either autophagy inhibitor ex vivo or superoxide scavenger in vivo abolished the reductions. Taken together, MGO reduces endothelial angiogenesis through RAGE-mediated, ONOO(-)dependent and autophagy-induced VEGFR2 degradation, which may represent

  13. Angiogenesis Impairment in Diabetes: Role of Methylglyoxal-Induced Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts, Autophagy and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongtao; Yu, Shujie; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes impairs physiological angiogenesis by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. Methylglyoxal (MGO), a metabolite of glycolysis, is increased in patients with diabetes. This study defined the role of MGO in angiogenesis impairment and tested the mechanism in diabetic animals. Endothelial cells and mouse aortas were subjected to Western blot analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) protein levels and angiogenesis evaluation by endothelial cell tube formation/migration and aortic ring assays. Incubation with MGO reduced VEGFR2 protein, but not mRNA, levels in a time and dose dependent manner. Genetic knockdown of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) attenuated the reduction of VEGFR2. Overexpression of Glyoxalase 1, the enzyme that detoxifies MGO, reduced the MGO-protein adducts and prevented VEGFR2 reduction. The VEGFR2 reduction was associated with impaired angiogenesis. Suppression of autophagy either by inhibitors or siRNA, but not of the proteasome and caspase, normalized both the VEGFR2 protein levels and angiogenesis. Conversely, induction of autophagy either by rapamycin or overexpression of LC3 and Beclin-1 reduced VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. MGO increased endothelial LC3B and Beclin-1, markers of autophagy, which were accompanied by an increase of both autophagic flux (LC3 punctae) and co-immunoprecipitation of VEGFR2 with LC3. Pharmacological or genetic suppression of peroxynitrite (ONOO−) generation not only blocked the autophagy but also reversed the reduction of VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. Like MGO-treated aortas from normglycemic C57BL/6J mice, aortas from diabetic db/db and Akita mice presented reductions of angiogenesis or VEGFR2. Administration of either autophagy inhibitor ex vivo or superoxide scavenger in vivo abolished the reductions. Taken together, MGO reduces endothelial angiogenesis through RAGE-mediated, ONOO–dependent and autophagy-induced VEGFR2 degradation, which may represent

  14. Inhibitory effect of quercetin in the formation of advance glycation end products of human serum albumin: An in vitro and molecular interaction study.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Maroof; Ahmad, Irshad; Naseem, Imrana

    2015-08-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation entails the reaction between the carbonyl group of a sugar with the amino group of a protein giving rise to Schiff base and Amadori products. The formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) leads to the generation of free radicals, which play an important role in the pathophysiology of ageing and diabetes. Bioavailable dietary antioxidants like quercetin (QC) are thought to inhibit AGEs formation. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of quercetin on AGE formation and features the glycation of human serum albumin (HSA) and its characterization by various spectroscopic techniques. The effect of quercetin, against the formation of AGEs was studied using a glycated human serum albumin product, haemoglobin-δ-gluconolactone, and aminoguanidine. The results were then corroborated with estimation of protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and comet assay. On the basis of the experimental data, computational docking studies were then performed to understand the location of the site of quercetin binding and its best bound conformation with respect to human serum albumin. Through this study we have demonstrated the mechanism of formation of AGE and its inhibition by quercetin. We have also suggested that the supplementation with dietary antioxidants like quercetin might protect against free radical toxicity. PMID:25982953

  15. Diabetic kidney disease: a role for advanced glycation end-product receptor 1 (AGE-R1)?

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Aowen; Forbes, Josephine M

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic patients are postulated to be in a perpetual state of oxidative stress and inflammation at sites where chronic complications occur. The accumulation of AGEs derived from both endogenous and exogenous sources (such as the diet) have been implicated in the development and progression of diabetic complications, particularly nephropathy. There has been some interest in investigating the potential for reducing the AGE burden in chronic disease, through the action of AGE "clearance" receptors, such as the advanced glycation end-product receptor 1 (AGE-R1). Reducing the burden of AGEs has been linked to attenuation of inflammation, slower progression of diabetic complications (in particular vascular and renal complications) and has been shown to extend lifespan. To date, however, there have been no direct investigations into whether AGE-R1 has any role in modulating normal kidney function, or specifically during the development and progression of diabetes. This mini-review will focus on the recent advances in knowledge around the mechanistic function of AGE-R1 and the implications of this for the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:27270766

  16. Regulation of striatal astrocytic receptor for advanced glycation end-products variants in an early stage of experimental Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Viana, Sofia D; Valero, Jorge; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Couceiro, Patrícia; Silva, Andréa M; Carvalho, Félix; Ali, Syed F; Fontes-Ribeiro, Carlos A; Pereira, Frederico C

    2016-08-01

    Convincing evidence indicates that advanced glycation end-products and danger-associated protein S100B play a role in Parkinson's disease (PD). These agents operate through the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), which displays distinct isoforms playing protective/deleterious effects. However, the nature of RAGE variants has been overlooked in PD studies. Hence, we attempted to characterize RAGE regulation in early stages of PD striatal pathology. A neurotoxin-based rodent model of PD was used in this study, through administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to C57BL/6 mice. Animals were killed 6 h post-MPTP to assess S100B/RAGE contents (RT-qPCR, ELISA) and RAGE isoform density (WB) and cellular distribution (immunohistochemistry). Dopaminergic and gliotic status were also mapped (HPLC-ED, WB, immunohistochemistry). At this preliminary stage of MPTP-induced PD in mice, RAGE inhibitory isoforms were increased whereas full-length RAGE was not affected. This putative cytoprotective RAGE phenotype paired an inflammatory and pro-oxidant setting fueling DAergic denervation. Increased RAGE inhibitory variants occur in astrocytes showing higher S100B density but no overt signs of hypertrophy or NF-κB activation, a canonical effector of RAGE. These findings expand our understanding of the toxic effect of MPTP on striatum and offer first in vivo evidence of RAGE being a responder in early stages of astrogliosis dynamics, supporting a protective rather tissue-destructive phenotype of RAGE in the initial phase of PD degeneration. These data lay the groundwork for future studies on the relevance of astrocytic RAGE in DAergic neuroprotection strategies. We report increased antagonistic RAGE variants paralleling S100B up-regulation in early stages of MPTP-induced astrogliosis dynamics . We propose that selective RAGE regulation reflects a self-protective mechanism to maintain low levels of RAGE ligands , preventing long

  17. Metformin reduces endothelial cell expression of both the receptor for advanced glycation end products and lectin-like oxidized receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Ouslimani, Nadjat; Mahrouf, Meriem; Peynet, Jacqueline; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Cosson, Claudine; Legrand, Alain; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    Beyond its antihyperglycemic action, the antidiabetic oral drug metformin possesses antioxidant properties that may contribute to improve the cardiovascular deleterious effects of the diabetic disease. We explored whether metformin could modulate the redox-sensible expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and lectin-like oxidized receptor 1 (LOX-1), 2 endothelial membrane receptors involved in the arterial endothelial dysfunction observed in diabetes. Bovine aortic endothelial cells, either unstimulated or activated by high levels of glucose (30 mmol/L) or advanced glycation end products, were incubated for 72 hours with metformin at therapeutically relevant concentrations (10(-5) to 5 x 10(-4) mol/L). The expressions of RAGE and LOX-1 were evaluated on cell extracts by Western blot analysis. Metformin was shown to reduce, in dose-dependent manner, such expression of the 2 receptors, both in stimulated (by either glucose or advanced glycation end products) and in unstimulated cells. The effect of metformin was associated with a decrease in intracellular reactive oxygen species as assessed using the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate fluoroprobe. Taken together, our results suggest that the intracellular antioxidant properties of metformin may result in the inhibition of cell expression of both RAGE and LOX-1, possibly through a modulation of redox-sensible nuclear factors such as nuclear factor kappaB, that were shown to be involved in such receptor cell expression. PMID:17292717

  18. A new perspective on therapeutic inhibition of advanced glycation in diabetic microvascular complications: common downstream endpoints achieved through disparate therapeutic approaches?

    PubMed

    Sourris, Karly C; Harcourt, Brooke E; Forbes, Josephine M

    2009-01-01

    A commonality among the chemically disparate compounds that inhibit the formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) or their signalling pathways is their end organ protection in experimental models of diabetes complications. Although this group of therapeutics are structurally and functionally distinct with numerous mechanisms of action, the most important factor governing their therapeutic capability is clearly their ability to alleviate the tissue burden of advanced glycation, rather than the biochemical mechanism by which this is achieved. However, it remains to be determined if it is the reduction in tissue AGE levels per se or inhibition of downstream signal pathways which is ultimately required for end organ protection. For example, a number of these agents stimulate antioxidant defences, modify lipid profiles and inhibit low-grade inflammation. These novel actions emphasise the importance of further examination of the advanced glycation pathway and in particular the diverse action of these agents in ameliorating the development of diabetic complications such as nephropathy. PMID:19556753

  19. Differential effects of α-tocopherol and N-acetyl-cysteine on advanced glycation end product-induced oxidative damage and neurite degeneration in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Pazdro, Robert; Burgess, John R

    2012-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) result from non-enzymatic glycation of proteins and cause cellular oxidative stress in a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-dependent manner. Due to these effects, AGEs are implicated as a causal factor in diabetic complications. Several antioxidants, including vitamin E, improve cell viability and diminish markers of oxidative damage in cells exposed to AGEs. However, vitamin E has been studied in cell culture systems with primary focus on apoptosis and lipid peroxidation, while its influences on AGE-induced protein and DNA oxidation, intracellular antioxidant status and cell morphology remain largely unknown. Here, we verify the suppression of AGE-induced cell death and lipid peroxidation by 200μM α-tocopherol in SH-SY5Y cells. We report the partial inhibition of DNA oxidation and a decrease in protein carbonyl formation by α-tocopherol with no effects on intracellular GSH concentrations. We observed that 2mM N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) also had a suppressive effect on DNA and protein oxidation, but unlike α-tocopherol, it caused a marked increase in intracellular GSH. Finally, we compared the ability of both antioxidants to maintain neurites in SH-SY5Y cells and found that α-tocopherol had no effect on neurite loss due to AGEs, while NAC fully maintained cell morphology. Thus, while α-tocopherol suppressed AGE-induced macromolecule damage, it was ineffective against neurite degeneration. These results may implicate thiol oxidation and maintenance as a major regulator of neurite degeneration in this model. PMID:22261284

  20. Inhibiting receptor for advanced glycation end product (AGE) and oxidative stress involved in the protective effect mediated by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor on AGE induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Yin, Lei; Xu, Zheng; An, Feng-Mao; Liu, Ai-Ran; Wang, Ying; Yao, Wen-Bing; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-26

    Our previous study has demonstrated that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist could protect neurons from advanced glycation end products (AGEs) toxicity in vitro. However, further studies are still needed to clarify the molecular mechanism of this GLP-1 receptor -dependent action. The present study mainly focused on the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists against the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) signal pathway and the mechanism underlying this effect of GLP-1. Firstly the data based on the SH-GLP-1R(+) and SH-SY5Y cells confirmed our previous finding that GLP-1 receptor could mediate the protective effect against AGEs. The assays of the protein activity and of the mRNA level revealed that apoptosis-related proteins such as caspase-3, caspase-9, Bax and Bcl-2 were involved. Additionally, we found that both GLP-1 and exendin-4 could reduce AGEs-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation by suppressing the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase. Interestingly, we also found that GLP-1 receptor activation could attenuate the abnormal expression of the RAGE in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the protein expression and translocation level of transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and the use of GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) and NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, we found that the effect mediated by GLP-1 receptor could alleviate the over expression of RAGE induced by ligand via the suppression of NF-κB. In summary, the results indicated that inhibiting RAGE/oxidative stress was involved in the protective effect of GLP-1 on neuron cells against AGEs induced apoptosis. PMID:26679229

  1. Modeling the interaction between quinolinate and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE): relevance for early neuropathological processes.

    PubMed

    Serratos, Iris N; Castellanos, Pilar; Pastor, Nina; Millán-Pacheco, César; Rembao, Daniel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Cabrera, Nallely; Reyes-Espinosa, Francisco; Díaz-Garrido, Paulina; López-Macay, Ambar; Martínez-Flores, Karina; López-Reyes, Alberto; Sánchez-García, Aurora; Cuevas, Elvis; Santamaria, Abel

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor involved in neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. RAGE induces cellular signaling upon binding to a variety of ligands. Evidence suggests that RAGE up-regulation is involved in quinolinate (QUIN)-induced toxicity. We investigated the QUIN-induced toxic events associated with early noxious responses, which might be linked to signaling cascades leading to cell death. The extent of early cellular damage caused by this receptor in the rat striatum was characterized by image processing methods. To document the direct interaction between QUIN and RAGE, we determined the binding constant (Kb) of RAGE (VC1 domain) with QUIN through a fluorescence assay. We modeled possible binding sites of QUIN to the VC1 domain for both rat and human RAGE. QUIN was found to bind at multiple sites to the VC1 dimer, each leading to particular mechanistic scenarios for the signaling evoked by QUIN binding, some of which directly alter RAGE oligomerization. This work contributes to the understanding of the phenomenon of RAGE-QUIN recognition, leading to the modulation of RAGE function. PMID:25757085

  2. Site-specific analysis of advanced glycation end products in plasma proteins of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Greifenhagen, Uta; Frolov, Andrej; Blüher, Matthias; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are posttranslational modifications formed non-enzymatically from the reaction of carbohydrates and their degradation products with proteins. Accumulation of AGEs is associated with the progression of severe diabetic complications, for example, and elevated tissue levels of AGEs might even predict these pathologies. As AGE formation is often site-specific, mapping of these modification sites may reveal more sensitive and specific markers than the global tissue level. Here, 42 AGE modifications were identified in a bottom-up proteomic approach by tandem mass spectrometry, which corresponded to 36 sites in 22 high to medium abundant proteins in individual plasma samples obtained from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with long disease duration (>10 years). Major modifications were glarg (11 modification sites) and carboxymethylation (5) of arginine and formylation (8), acetylation (7), and carboxymethylation (7) of lysine residues. Relative quantification of these sites in plasma samples obtained from normoglycemic individuals (n = 47) and patients with T2DM being newly diagnosed (n = 47) or of medium (2-5 years, n = 20) and long disease duration (>10 years, n = 20) did not reveal any significant differences. PMID:27236317

  3. Levels of Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid in Patients with Various Inflammatory Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kamo, Tetsuro; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Tokuda, Yuriko; Suzuki, Shoji; Asakura, Takanori; Yagi, Kazuma; Namkoong, Ho; Ishii, Makoto; Hasegawa, Naoki; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor of S100/calgranulins, high-mobility group box 1, and others, and it is associated with the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and circulatory diseases. The soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE) is a decoy receptor and competitively inhibits membrane-bound RAGE activation. In this study, we measured sRAGE levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of 78 patients, including 41 with interstitial pneumonia, 11 with sarcoidosis, 9 with respiratory infection, 7 with ARDS, 5 with lung cancer, and 5 with vasculitis. Among them, sRAGE was detectable in BALF of 73 patients (94%). In patients with ARDS and vasculitis, the sRAGE levels were significantly higher than in the control subjects and those with interstitial pneumonia. The sRAGE levels were positively correlated with total cell counts in BALF and serum levels of surfactant protein-D, lactate dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein. There was an inverse correlation between PaO2/FIO2 ratio and sRAGE levels. These results indicate that sRAGE in BALF might be considered as a biomarker of lung inflammatory disorders, especially ARDS and vasculitis. PMID:27147899

  4. Contribution of the toxic advanced glycation end-products-receptor axis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takino, Jun-ichi; Nagamine, Kentaro; Hori, Takamitsu; Sakasai-Sakai, Akiko; Takeuchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. The main etiologies of HCC are hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus (HCV), and non-hepatitis B/non-hepatitis C HCC (NBNC-HCC) has also been identified as an etiological factor. Although the incidence of HCV-related HCC in Japan has decreased slightly in recent years, that of NBNC-HCC has increased. The onset mechanism of NBNC-HCC, which has various etiologies, remains unclear; however, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, is known to be an important risk factor for NBNC-HCC. Among the different advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) formed by the Maillard reaction, glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs, the predominant components of toxic AGEs (TAGE), have been associated with NASH and NBNC-HCC, including NASH-related HCC. Furthermore, the expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) has been correlated with the malignant progression of HCC. Therefore, TAGE induce oxidative stress by binding with RAGE may, in turn, lead to adverse effects, such as fibrosis and malignant transformation, in hepatic stellate cells and tumor cells during NASH or NASH-related HCC progression. The aim of this review was to examine the contribution of the TAGE-RAGE axis in NASH-related HCC. PMID:26483867

  5. Regulation of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Ectodomain Shedding and Its Role in Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Braley, Alex; Kwak, Taekyoung; Jules, Joel; Harja, Evis; Landgraf, Ralf; Hudson, Barry I

    2016-06-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand transmembrane receptor that can undergo proteolysis at the cell surface to release a soluble ectodomain. Here we observed that ectodomain shedding of RAGE is critical for its role in regulating signaling and cellular function. Ectodomain shedding of both human and mouse RAGE was dependent on ADAM10 activity and induced with chemical activators of shedding (ionomycin, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate) and endogenous stimuli (serum and RAGE ligands). Ectopic expression of the splice variant of RAGE (RAGE splice variant 4), which is resistant to ectodomain shedding, inhibited RAGE ligand dependent cell signaling, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, cell spreading, and cell migration. We found that blockade of RAGE ligand signaling with soluble RAGE or inhibitors of MAPK or PI3K blocked RAGE-dependent cell migration but did not affect RAGE splice variant 4 cell migration. We finally demonstrated that RAGE function is dependent on secretase activity as ADAM10 and γ-secretase inhibitors blocked RAGE ligand-mediated cell migration. Together, our data suggest that proteolysis of RAGE is critical to mediate signaling and cell function and may therefore emerge as a novel therapeutic target for RAGE-dependent disease states. PMID:27022018

  6. Phytochemicals from Camellia nitidissima Chi inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end-products by scavenging methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixin; Liu, Haiyan; Wang, Zhennan; Qi, Jing; Yuan, Shengtao; Zhang, Weijie; Chen, Hongjuan; Finley, John W; Gu, Liwei; Jia, Ai-Qun

    2016-08-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of Camellia nitidissima Chi (CNC) on the advanced glycation end-product (AGE) formation. CNC was extracted with ethanol and further separated into dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water soluble fractions. Ethyl acetate fraction had the highest total phenolic and quercetin content compared with other fractions. Sixteen phenolic compounds were identified using HPLC Triple TOF MS/MS. Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-glucose assay showed that dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fraction inhibited AGE formation by 88.1% and 87.5% at 2.5mg/mL. BSA-methylglyoxal assay showed that ethyl acetate fraction inhibited 54.1% AGE formation while dichloromethane fraction inhibited 28.1%. Over 96.0% of methylglyoxal was scavenged by different fractions within 12h. Both mono- and di-methylglyoxal quercetin adducts were identified after incubating quercetin with methylglyoxal using HPLC-ESI-MS(n). The results in this study suggest that CNC extracts inhibited AGEs formation in part through scavenging methylglyoxal by phenolic compounds. PMID:27006232

  7. Cardiomyocyte mitochondrial respiration is reduced by receptor for advanced glycation end-product signaling in a ceramide-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael B; Swensen, Adam C; Winden, Duane R; Bodine, Jared S; Bikman, Benjamin T; Reynolds, Paul R

    2015-07-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications. The role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is already well established in numerous comorbidities, including cardiomyopathy. Given the role of AGEs and their receptor, RAGE, in activating inflammatory pathways, we sought to determine whether ceramides could be a mediator of RAGE-induced altered heart mitochondrial function. Using an in vitro model, we treated H9C2 cardiomyocytes with the AGE carboxy-methyllysine before mitochondrial respiration assessment. We discovered that mitochondrial respiration was significantly impaired in AGE-treated cells, but not when cotreated with myriocin, an inhibitor of de novo ceramide biosynthesis. Moreover, we exposed wild-type and RAGE knockout mice to secondhand cigarette smoke and found reduced mitochondrial respiration in the left ventricular myocardium from wild-type mice, but RAGE knockout mice were protected from this effect. Finally, conditional overexpression of RAGE in the lungs of transgenic mice elicited a robust increase in left ventricular ceramides in the absence of smoke exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest a RAGE-ceramide axis as an important contributor to AGE-mediated disrupted cardiomyocyte mitochondrial function. PMID:25957215

  8. Genotoxicity of Advanced Glycation End Products: Involvement of Oxidative Stress and of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schupp, Nicole; Schinzel, Reinhard; Heidland, August; Stopper, Helga

    2005-06-01

    In patients with chronic renal failure, cancer incidence is increased. This may be related to an elevated level of genomic damage, which has been demonstrated by micronuclei formation as well as by comet assay analysis. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are markedly elevated in renal failure. In the comet assay, the model AGEs methylglyoxal- and carboxy(methyl)lysine-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) induced significant DNA damage in colon, kidney, and liver cells. The addition of antioxidants prevented AGE-induced DNA damage, suggesting enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The coincubation with dimethylfumarate (DMF), an inhibitor of NF-κB translocation, reduced the genotoxic effect, thereby underscoring the key role of NF-κB in this process. One of the genes induced by NF-κB is angiotensinogen. The ensuing proteolytic activity yields angiotensin II, which evokes oxidative stress as well as proinflammatory responses. A modulator of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), the angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor 1 antagonist, candesartan, yielded a reduction of the AGE-induced DNA damage, connecting the two signal pathways, RAS and AGE signaling. We were able to identify important participants in AGE-induced DNA damage: ROS, NF-κB, and Ang II, as well as modulators to prevent this DNA damage: antioxidants, DMF, and AT1 antagonists.

  9. Comprehensive analyses of how tubule occlusion and advanced glycation end-products diminish strength of aged dentin

    PubMed Central

    Shinno, Yuko; Ishimoto, Takuya; Saito, Mitsuru; Uemura, Reo; Arino, Masumi; Marumo, Keishi; Nakano, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    In clinical dentistry, since fracture is a major cause of tooth loss, better understanding of mechanical properties of teeth structures is important. Dentin, the major hard tissue of teeth, has similar composition to bone. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of human dentin not only in terms of mineral density but also using structural and quality parameters as recently accepted in evaluating bone strength. Aged crown and root dentin (age ≥ 40) exhibited significantly lower flexural strength and toughness than young dentin (age < 40). Aged dentin, in which the dentinal tubules were occluded with calcified material, recorded the highest mineral density; but showed significantly lower flexural strength than young dentin. Dentin with strong alignment of the c-axis in hydroxyapatite exhibited high fracture strength, possibly because the aligned apatite along the collagen fibrils may reinforce the intertubular dentin. Aged dentin, showing a high advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) level in its collagen, recorded low flexural strength. We first comprehensively identified significant factors, which affected the inferior mechanical properties of aged dentin. The low mechanical strength of aged dentin is caused by the high mineral density resulting from occlusion of dentinal tubules and accumulation of AGEs in dentin collagen. PMID:26797297

  10. Advanced glycation end products are mitogenic signals and trigger cell cycle reentry of neurons in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, Angela; Ludwig, Sophie C; Kuhla, Björn; Münch, Gerald; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2015-02-01

    Neurons that reenter the cell cycle die rather than divide, a phenomenon that is associated with neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Reexpression of cell-cycle related genes in differentiated neurons in AD might be rooted in aberrant mitogenic signaling. Because microglia and astroglia proliferate in the vicinity of amyloid plaques, it is likely that plaque components or factors secreted from plaque-activated glia induce neuronal mitogenic signaling. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), protein-bound oxidation products of sugar, might be one of those mitogenic compounds. Cyclin D1 positive neurons are colocalized with AGEs or directly surrounded by extracellular AGE deposits in AD brain. However, a direct proof of DNA replication in these cells has been missing. Here, we report by using fluorescent in situ hybridization that consistent with the expression of cell cycle proteins, hyperploid neuronal cells are in colocalization with AGE staining in AD brains but not in nondemented controls. To complement human data, we used apolipoprotein E-deficient mice as model of neurodegeneration and showed that increased oxidative stress caused an intensified neuronal deposition of AGEs, being accompanied by an activation of the MAPK cascade via RAGE. This cascade, in turn, induced the expression of cyclin D1 and DNA replication. In addition, reduction of oxidative stress by application of α-lipoic acid decreased AGE accumulations, and this decrease was accompanied by a reduction in cell cycle reentry and a more euploid neuronal genome. PMID:25448604

  11. Overexpression of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Human Dental Pulp Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tancharoen, Salunya; Tengrungsun, Tassanee; Suddhasthira, Theeralaksna; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Vechvongvan, Nuttavun; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nonhistone DNA-binding protein, is released into the extracellular space and promotes inflammation. HMGB1 binds to related cell signaling transduction receptors, including receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which actively participate in vascular and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the pathogenesis of pulpitis and investigate the effect of Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on RAGE and HMGB1 expression in odontoblast-like cells (OLC-1). RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in clinically inflamed dental pulp were higher than those in healthy dental pulp. Upregulated expression of RAGE was observed in odontoblasts, stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells, and endothelial-like cell lining human pulpitis tissue. Strong cytoplasmic HMGB1 immunoreactivity was noted in odontoblasts, whereas nuclear HMGB1 immunoreactivity was seen in stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells in human pulpitis tissue. LPS stimulated OLC-1 cells produced HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner through RAGE. HMGB1 translocation towards the cytoplasm and secretion from OLC-1 in response to LPS was inhibited by TPCA-1, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that RAGE and HMGB1 play an important role in the pulpal immune response to oral bacterial infection. PMID:25114379

  12. Modeling the Interaction between Quinolinate and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE): Relevance for Early Neuropathological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Serratos, Iris N.; Castellanos, Pilar; Pastor, Nina; Millán-Pacheco, César; Rembao, Daniel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Cabrera, Nallely; Reyes-Espinosa, Francisco; Díaz-Garrido, Paulina; López-Macay, Ambar; Martínez-Flores, Karina; López-Reyes, Alberto; Sánchez-García, Aurora; Cuevas, Elvis; Santamaria, Abel

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor involved in neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. RAGE induces cellular signaling upon binding to a variety of ligands. Evidence suggests that RAGE up-regulation is involved in quinolinate (QUIN)-induced toxicity. We investigated the QUIN-induced toxic events associated with early noxious responses, which might be linked to signaling cascades leading to cell death. The extent of early cellular damage caused by this receptor in the rat striatum was characterized by image processing methods. To document the direct interaction between QUIN and RAGE, we determined the binding constant (Kb) of RAGE (VC1 domain) with QUIN through a fluorescence assay. We modeled possible binding sites of QUIN to the VC1 domain for both rat and human RAGE. QUIN was found to bind at multiple sites to the VC1 dimer, each leading to particular mechanistic scenarios for the signaling evoked by QUIN binding, some of which directly alter RAGE oligomerization. This work contributes to the understanding of the phenomenon of RAGE-QUIN recognition, leading to the modulation of RAGE function. PMID:25757085

  13. Advanced glycation end products impair function of late endothelial progenitor cells through effects on protein kinase Akt and cyclooxygenase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qin; Dong Li; Wang Lian; Kang Lina; Xu Biao

    2009-04-03

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) exhibit impaired function in the context of diabetes, and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which accumulate in diabetes, may contribute to this. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which AGEs impair late EPC function. EPCs from human umbilical cord blood were isolated, and incubated with AGE-modified albumin (AGE-albumin) at different concentrations found physiologically in plasma. Apoptosis, migration, and tube formation assays were used to evaluate EPC function including capacity for vasculogenesis, and expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) were determined. Anti-RAGE antibody was used to block RAGE function. AGE-albumin concentration-dependently enhanced apoptosis and depressed migration and tube formation, but did not affect proliferation, of late EPCs. High AGE-albumin increased RAGE mRNA and protein expression, and decreased Akt and COX-2 protein expression, whilst having no effect on eNOS mRNA or protein in these cells. These effects were inhibited by co-incubation with anti-RAGE antibody. These results suggest that RAGE mediates the AGE-induced impairment of late EPC function, through down-regulation of Akt and COX-2 in these cells.

  14. Levels of Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid in Patients with Various Inflammatory Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Tetsuro; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Tokuda, Yuriko; Suzuki, Shoji; Asakura, Takanori; Yagi, Kazuma; Namkoong, Ho; Ishii, Makoto; Hasegawa, Naoki; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor of S100/calgranulins, high-mobility group box 1, and others, and it is associated with the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and circulatory diseases. The soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE) is a decoy receptor and competitively inhibits membrane-bound RAGE activation. In this study, we measured sRAGE levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of 78 patients, including 41 with interstitial pneumonia, 11 with sarcoidosis, 9 with respiratory infection, 7 with ARDS, 5 with lung cancer, and 5 with vasculitis. Among them, sRAGE was detectable in BALF of 73 patients (94%). In patients with ARDS and vasculitis, the sRAGE levels were significantly higher than in the control subjects and those with interstitial pneumonia. The sRAGE levels were positively correlated with total cell counts in BALF and serum levels of surfactant protein-D, lactate dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein. There was an inverse correlation between PaO2/FIO2 ratio and sRAGE levels. These results indicate that sRAGE in BALF might be considered as a biomarker of lung inflammatory disorders, especially ARDS and vasculitis. PMID:27147899

  15. Specific siRNA Targeting Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Decreases Proliferation in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Radia, AL-Madhagi; Yaser, AL-Madhagi; Ma, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Juan; Yang, Cejun; Dong, Qiong; Rong, Pengfei; Ye, Bin; Liu, Sheng; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) is an oncogenic trans-membranous receptor overexpressed in various human cancers. However, the role of RAGE in breast cancer development and proliferation is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that RAGE expression levels are correlated to the degree of severity of breast cancer. Furthermore, there is a decrease in the proliferation of all sub-types of breast cancer, MCF-7, SK-Br-3 and MDA-MB-231, as a result of the effect of RAGE siRNA. RAGE siRNA arrested cells in the G1 phase and inhibited DNA synthesis (p < 0.05). Moreover, qRT-PCR and Western Blot results demonstrated that RAGE siRNA decreases the expression of transcriptional factor NF-κB p65 as well as the expression of cell proliferation markers PCNA and cyclinD1. RAGE and RAGE ligands can thus be considered as possible targets for breast cancer management and therapy. PMID:23579957

  16. Specific siRNA targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) decreases proliferation in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Radia, Al-Madhagi; Yaser, Al-Madhagi; Ma, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Juan; Yang, Cejun; Dong, Qiong; Rong, Pengfei; Ye, Bin; Liu, Sheng; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) is an oncogenic trans-membranous receptor overexpressed in various human cancers. However, the role of RAGE in breast cancer development and proliferation is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that RAGE expression levels are correlated to the degree of severity of breast cancer. Furthermore, there is a decrease in the proliferation of all sub-types of breast cancer, MCF-7, SK-Br-3 and MDA-MB-231, as a result of the effect of RAGE siRNA. RAGE siRNA arrested cells in the G1 phase and inhibited DNA synthesis (p < 0.05). Moreover, qRT-PCR and Western Blot results demonstrated that RAGE siRNA decreases the expression of transcriptional factor NF-κB p65 as well as the expression of cell proliferation markers PCNA and cyclinD1. RAGE and RAGE ligands can thus be considered as possible targets for breast cancer management and therapy. PMID:23579957

  17. UVA Light-excited Kynurenines Oxidize Ascorbate and Modify Lens Proteins through the Formation of Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Raghavan, Cibin T.; Johar, Kaid; Fan, Xingjun; Monnier, Vincent M.; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to lens protein pigmentation and cross-linking during aging and cataract formation. In vitro experiments have shown that ascorbate (ASC) oxidation products can form AGEs in proteins. However, the mechanisms of ASC oxidation and AGE formation in the human lens are poorly understood. Kynurenines are tryptophan oxidation products produced from the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-mediated kynurenine pathway and are present in the human lens. This study investigated the ability of UVA light-excited kynurenines to photooxidize ASC and to form AGEs in lens proteins. UVA light-excited kynurenines in both free and protein-bound forms rapidly oxidized ASC, and such oxidation occurred even in the absence of oxygen. High levels of GSH inhibited but did not completely block ASC oxidation. Upon UVA irradiation, pigmented proteins from human cataractous lenses also oxidized ASC. When exposed to UVA light (320–400 nm, 100 milliwatts/cm2, 45 min to 2 h), young human lenses (20–36 years), which contain high levels of free kynurenines, lost a significant portion of their ASC content and accumulated AGEs. A similar formation of AGEs was observed in UVA-irradiated lenses from human IDO/human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter-2 mice, which contain high levels of kynurenines and ASC. Our data suggest that kynurenine-mediated ASC oxidation followed by AGE formation may be an important mechanism for lens aging and the development of senile cataracts in humans. PMID:24798334

  18. Identification of the advanced glycation end products N -carboxymethyllysine in the synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Drinda, S; Franke, S; Canet, C; Petrow, P; Brauer, R; Huttich, C; Stein, G; Hein, G

    2002-01-01

    Background: Generation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is an inevitable process in vivo and can be accelerated under pathological conditions such as oxidative stress. In serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) raised AGE levels have been found. Objective: To determine the presence of N -carboxymethyllysine (CML; marker of oxidative stress) in RA synovial tissue by immunohistology. Methods: Frozen synovial tissue samples from 10 patients with RA and eight controls (four patients without joint disease and four patients with osteoarthritis (OA)) were treated with rabbit-anti-CML-IgG and goat-antirabbit-IgG. Immunostaining was visualised by streptavidine-alkaline phosphatase (chromogen fuchsin). Cell differentiation was performed with antibodies against CD68, CD45RO, and CD20. Results: CML was detected in the synovial lining, sublining, and endothelium in 10/10 RA and 4/4 OA synovial specimens. In RA some macrophages (CD68+) and T cells (CD45RO+) showed positive immunostaining for CML, whereas B cells were negative. Staining in OA synovial sublining was weak compared with RA. Conclusions: CML was detected for the first time in RA and OA synovial tissue. Different patterns of immunostaining in RA and OA and the presence of CML on macrophages and T cells, suggest a role for CML in the pathogenesis of RA. This might be due to presentation of new epitopes which can maintain or even trigger an autoimmune response. PMID:12006318

  19. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Risk Factors for Chronic Disease: A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Rachel E.; Dordevic, Aimee L.; Tan, Sih Min; Ryan, Lisa; Coughlan, Melinda T.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) form during heating and processing of food products and are widely prevalent in the modern Western diet. Recent systematic reviews indicate that consumption of dietary AGEs may promote inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Experimental evidence indicates that dietary AGEs may also induce renal damage, however, this outcome has not been considered in previous systematic reviews. The purpose of this review was to examine the effect of consumption of a high AGE diet on biomarkers of chronic disease, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), in human randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Six databases (SCOPUS, CINHAL, EMBASE, Medline, Biological abstracts and Web of Science) were searched for randomised controlled dietary trials that compared high AGE intake to low AGE intake in adults with and without obesity, diabetes or CKD. Twelve dietary AGE interventions were identified with a total of 293 participants. A high AGE diet increased circulating tumour necrosis factor-alpha and AGEs in all populations. A high AGE diet increased 8-isoprostanes in healthy adults, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in patients with diabetes. Markers of CKD were not widely assessed. The evidence presented indicates that a high AGE diet may contribute to risk factors associated with chronic disease, such as inflammation and oxidative stress, however, due to a lack of high quality randomised trials, more research is required. PMID:26938557

  20. Phenolics from Garcinia mangostana Inhibit Advanced Glycation Endproducts Formation: Effect on Amadori Products, Cross-Linked Structures and Protein Thiols.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Hossam M; El-Bassossy, Hany; Mohamed, Gamal A; El-Halawany, Ali M; Alshali, Khalid Z; Banjar, Zainy M

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) in body tissues plays a major role in the development of diabetic complications. Here, the inhibitory effect of bioactive metabolites isolated from fruit hulls of Garcinia mangostana on AGE formation was investigated through bio-guided approach using aminoguanidine (AG) as a positive control. Including G. mangostana total methanol extract (GMT) in the reaction mixture of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glucose or ribose inhibited the fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner. The bioassay guided fractionation of GMT revealed isolation of four bioactive constituents from the bioactive fraction; which were identified as: garcimangosone D (1), aromadendrin-8-C-glucopyranoside (2), epicatechin (3), and 2,3',4,5',6-pentahydroxybenzophenone (4). All the tested compounds significantly inhibited fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner whereas compound 3 (epicatechin) was found to be the most potent. In search for the level of action, addition of GMT, and compounds 2-4 inhibited fructosamine (Amadori product) and protein aggregation formation in both glucose and ribose. To explore the mechanism of action, it was found that addition of GMT and only compound (3) to reaction mixture increased protein thiol in both glucose and ribose while compounds 1, 2 and 4 only increased thiol in case of ribose. In conclusion, phenolic compounds 1-4 inhibited AGEs formation at the levels of Amadori product and protein aggregation formation through saving protein thiol. PMID:26907243

  1. Fat Mass Is Inversely Associated with Serum Carboxymethyl-Lysine, An Advanced Glycation End Product, in Adults12

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Richard D.; Arab, Lenore; Sun, Kai; Nicklett, Emily J.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    High levels of circulating advanced glycation end products (AGE) are associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and increased mortality, but factors that influence levels of circulating AGE are not well known. Our objective was to characterize the relationship between serum carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), a major circulating AGE, and body composition in adults. In a cross-sectional study, total body DXA was performed and serum CML was measured in 592 adults, aged 26–93 y, from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Median (25th, 75th percentile) CML concentrations were 2.26 (1.86, 2.67) μmol/L. Total fat mass [β = −0.17 (95% CI −0.10, −0.24); P < 0.0001], truncal fat mass [β = −0.17 (95% CI −0.10, −0.25); P < 0.0001], and appendicular fat mass [β = −0.13 (95% CI −0.05, −0.20); P = 0.001] per 1 SD increase were inversely associated with serum CML in separate multivariate linear regression models, adjusting for age, sex, BMI, systolic blood pressure, TG, HDL cholesterol, and renal function. Lean body mass was not independently associated with serum CML. These findings suggest that serum CML concentration is strongly affected by body fat, possibly because CML is preferentially deposited in fat tissue or because adipocytes affect the metabolism of AGE. PMID:21775524

  2. Pigment epithelium-derived factor inhibits advanced glycation end product-elicited mesangial cell damage by blocking NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Ide, Yuichiro; Matsui, Takanori; Ishibashi, Yuji; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2010-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE), senescent macroprotein derivatives formed at an accelerated rate under hyperglycemic conditions, elicit oxidative stress generation and inflammatory reactions, thus being involved in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we, along with others, have found that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a glycoprotein with potent neuronal differentiating activity, inhibits AGE-elicited endothelial cell damage through its anti-oxidative properties and blocks the progression of experimental diabetic retinopathy. However, a role of PEDF in diabetic nephropathy is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated whether and how PEDF could protect against AGE-elicited mesangial cell damage in vitro. PEDF mRNA and protein levels were decreased by the treatments of AGE. PEDF or neutralizing antibody raised against RAGE (receptor for AGE) was found to inhibit the AGE-induced oxidative stress generation and subsequent NF-kappaB activation in mesangial cells. Further, AGE increased mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in mesangial cells, all of which were prevented by the treatments with PEDF, RAGE antibody or pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a NF-kappaB inhibitor. The present results demonstrated for the first time that PEDF blocked the AGE-RAGE-mediated mesangial cell injury by inhibiting NF-kappaB activation via suppression of reactive oxygen species generation. Our present study suggests that substitution of PEDF proteins may be a promising strategy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:20381502

  3. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}. {yields} GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-{beta} gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression

  4. Contrasting roles for the receptor for advanced glycation end-products on structural cells in allergic airway inflammation vs. airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Akihiko; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Waseda, Koichi; Kurimoto, Etsuko; Fujii, Utako; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Mikio; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Gelfand, Erwin W; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kanehiro, Arihiko

    2015-10-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. RAGE is reported to be involved in various inflammatory disorders; however, studies that address the role of RAGE in allergic airway disease are inconclusive. RAGE-sufficient (RAGE+/+) and RAGE-deficient (RAGE-/-) mice were sensitized to ovalbumin, and airway responses were monitored after ovalbumin challenge. RAGE-/- mice showed reduced eosinophilic inflammation and goblet cell metaplasia, lower T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine production from spleen and peribronchial lymph node mononuclear cells, and lower numbers of group 2 innate lymphoid cells in the lung compared with RAGE+/+ mice following sensitization and challenge. Experiments using irradiated, chimeric mice showed that the mice expressing RAGE on radio-resistant structural cells but not hematopoietic cells developed allergic airway inflammation; however, the mice expressing RAGE on hematopoietic cells but not structural cells showed reduced airway inflammation. In contrast, absence of RAGE expression on structural cells enhanced innate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). In the absence of RAGE, increased interleukin (IL)-33 levels in the lung were detected, and blockade of IL-33 receptor ST2 suppressed innate AHR in RAGE-/- mice. These data identify the importance of RAGE expressed on lung structural cells in the development of allergic airway inflammation, T helper type 2 cell activation, and group 2 innate lymphoid cell accumulation in the airways. RAGE on lung structural cells also regulated innate AHR, likely through the IL-33-ST2 pathway. Thus manipulating RAGE represents a novel therapeutic target in controlling allergic airway responses. PMID:26472810

  5. Effect of Moringa oleifera on advanced glycation end-product formation and lipid metabolism gene expression in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sangkitikomol, W; Rocejanasaroj, A; Tencomnao, T

    2014-01-01

    In Thai traditional medicine, Moringa oleifera is used for the treatment of diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of many degenerative diseases, such as hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. We evaluated the antioxidant effect of M. oleifera extract (MOE) for reduction of advanced glycation end-product (AGE) formation, cell viability, oxidative stress, and lipid metabolism gene expression in HepG2 cells. We found that the lyophilized form of MOE in 80% ethanol possessed mean (± SD) total antioxidant, polyphenolic, and flavonoid contents of 9307 ± 364 TE mM/kg dry mass, 218 ± 1 GE mM/kg dry mass, and 286 ± 12 QE mM/kg dry mass, determined using an oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, a Folin Ciocalteu phenol assay, and a total flavonoids assay, respectively. Concentrations of 2.5-10.0 mg/mL MOE could inhibit AGE-formation by 10-45%, and 100-1000 mg/L MOE reduced intracellular oxidative stress (P < 0.05) in a dose-dependent manner in the DCFH-DA assay. However, MOE induced cytotoxicity at high doses (2000-3000 mg/L), as shown by the MTT assay. MOE significantly downregulated the mRNA expression of the HMG-CoAR, PPARα1, and PPARγ genes (P < 0.05). We concluded that M. oleifera could have benefits for human health by reducing oxidative stress and AGE formation. Moreover, M. oleifera may reduce cholesterol and lipid synthesis by suppression of HMG-CoAR, PPARα1, and PPARγ gene expression, thereby maintaining lipid homeostasis. PMID:24615037

  6. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and matrix metalloproteinase-13 in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Zafar; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Akhtar, Nahid; Ramamurthy, Sangeetha; Voss, Frank R; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The major risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA) is aging, but the mechanisms underlying this risk are only partly understood. Age-related accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) can activate chondrocytes and induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In the present study, we examined the effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on AGE-modified-BSA (AGE-BSA)-induced activation and production of TNFα and MMP-13 in human OA chondrocytes. Methods Human chondrocytes were derived from OA cartilage by enzymatic digestion and stimulated with in vitro-generated AGE-BSA. Gene expression of TNFα and MMP-13 was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. TNFα protein in culture medium was determined using cytokine-specific ELISA. Western immunoblotting was used to analyze the MMP-13 production in the culture medium, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and the activation of NF-κB. DNA binding activity of NF-κB p65 was determined using a highly sensitive and specific ELISA. IκB kinase (IKK) activity was determined using an in vitro kinase activity assay. MMP-13 activity in the culture medium was assayed by gelatin zymography. Results EGCG significantly decreased AGE-stimulated gene expression and production of TNFα and MMP-13 in human chondrocytes. The inhibitory effect of EGCG on the AGE-BSA-induced expression of TNFα and MMP-13 was mediated at least in part via suppression of p38-MAPK and JNK activation. In addition, EGCG inhibited the phosphorylating activity of IKKβ kinase in an in vitro activity assay and EGCG inhibited the AGE-mediated activation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB by suppressing the degradation of its inhibitory protein IκBα in the cytoplasm. Conclusions These novel pharmacological actions of EGCG on AGE-BSA-stimulated human OA chondrocytes provide new suggestions that EGCG or EGCG-derived compounds may inhibit cartilage degradation by suppressing AGE

  7. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Signaling Interferes with the Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Contractile Phenotype and Function.

    PubMed

    Simard, Elie; Söllradl, Thomas; Maltais, Jean-Sébastien; Boucher, Julie; D'Orléans-Juste, Pédro; Grandbois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Increased blood glucose concentrations promote reactions between glucose and proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGE). Circulating AGE in the blood plasma can activate the receptor for advanced end-products (RAGE), which is present on both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). RAGE exhibits a complex signaling that involves small G-proteins and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), which lead to increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. While RAGE signaling has been previously addressed in endothelial cells, little is known regarding its impact on the function of VSMC. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAGE signaling leads to alterations in the mechanical and functional properties of VSMC, which could contribute to complications associated with diabetes. We demonstrated that RAGE is expressed and functional in the A7r5 VSMC model, and its activation by AGE significantly increased NF-κB activity, which is known to interfere with the contractile phenotype of VSMC. The protein levels of the contraction-related transcription factor myocardin were also decreased by RAGE activation with a concomitant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of transgelin (SM-22α), a regulator of VSMC contraction. Interestingly, we demonstrated that RAGE activation increased the overall cell rigidity, an effect that can be related to an increase in myosin activity. Finally, although RAGE stimulation amplified calcium signaling and slightly myosin activity in VSMC challenged with vasopressin, their contractile capacity was negatively affected. Overall, RAGE activation in VSMC could represent a keystone in the development of vascular diseases associated with diabetes by interfering with the contractile phenotype of VSMC through the modification of their mechanical and functional properties. PMID:26248341

  8. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Signaling Interferes with the Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Contractile Phenotype and Function

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Elie; Söllradl, Thomas; Maltais, Jean-Sébastien; Boucher, Julie; D’Orléans-Juste, Pédro; Grandbois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Increased blood glucose concentrations promote reactions between glucose and proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGE). Circulating AGE in the blood plasma can activate the receptor for advanced end-products (RAGE), which is present on both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). RAGE exhibits a complex signaling that involves small G-proteins and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), which lead to increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. While RAGE signaling has been previously addressed in endothelial cells, little is known regarding its impact on the function of VSMC. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAGE signaling leads to alterations in the mechanical and functional properties of VSMC, which could contribute to complications associated with diabetes. We demonstrated that RAGE is expressed and functional in the A7r5 VSMC model, and its activation by AGE significantly increased NF-κB activity, which is known to interfere with the contractile phenotype of VSMC. The protein levels of the contraction-related transcription factor myocardin were also decreased by RAGE activation with a concomitant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of transgelin (SM-22α), a regulator of VSMC contraction. Interestingly, we demonstrated that RAGE activation increased the overall cell rigidity, an effect that can be related to an increase in myosin activity. Finally, although RAGE stimulation amplified calcium signaling and slightly myosin activity in VSMC challenged with vasopressin, their contractile capacity was negatively affected. Overall, RAGE activation in VSMC could represent a keystone in the development of vascular diseases associated with diabetes by interfering with the contractile phenotype of VSMC through the modification of their mechanical and functional properties. PMID:26248341

  9. Modulation of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products by angiotensin-converting enzyme-1 inhibition in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Josephine M; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Thallas-Bonke, Vicki; Pete, Josefa; Thomas, Merlin C; Deemer, Elizabeth R; Bassal, Sahar; El-Osta, Assam; Long, David M; Panagiotopoulos, Sianna; Jerums, George; Osicka, Tanya M; Cooper, Mark E

    2005-08-01

    Recent studies have identified that first-line renoprotective agents that interrupt the renin-angiotensin system not only reduce BP but also can attenuate advanced glycation end product (AGE) accumulation. This study used in vitro, preclinical, and human approaches to explore the potential effects of these agents on the modulation of the receptor for AGE (RAGE). Bovine aortic endothelial cells that were exposed to the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) ramiprilat in the presence of high glucose demonstrated a significant increase in soluble RAGE (sRAGE) secreted into the medium. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, ramipril treatment (ACEi) at 3 mg/L for 24 wk reduced the accumulation of skin collagen-linked carboxymethyllysine and pentosidine, as well as circulating and renal AGE. Renal gene upregulation of total RAGE (all three splice variants) was observed in ACEi-treated animals. There was a specific increase in the gene expression of the splice variant C-truncated RAGE (sRAGE). There were also increases in sRAGE protein identified within renal cells with ACEi treatment, which showed AGE-binding ability. This was associated with decreases in renal full-length RAGE protein from ACEi-treated rats. Decreases in plasma soluble RAGE that were significantly increased by ACEi treatment were also identified in diabetic rats. Similarly, there was a significant increase in plasma sRAGE in patients who had type 1 diabetes and were treated with the ACEi perindopril. Complexes between sRAGE and carboxymethyllysine were identified in human and rodent diabetic plasma. It is postulated that ACE inhibition reduces the accumulation of AGE in diabetes partly by increasing the production and secretion of sRAGE into plasma. PMID:15930093

  10. Advanced glycation endproducts increase proliferation, migration and invasion of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Hana; Matou-Nasri, Sabine; Wang, Qiuyu; Rabhan, Zaki; Al-Eidi, Hamad; Al Abdulrahman, Abdulkareem; Ahmed, Nessar

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic patients have increased likelihood of developing breast cancer. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) underlie the pathogenesis of diabetic complications but their impact on breast cancer cells is not understood. This study aims to determine the effects of methylglyoxal-derived bovine serum albumin AGEs (MG-BSA-AGEs) on the invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. By performing cell counting, using wound-healing assay, invasion assay and zymography analysis, we found that MG-BSA-AGEs increased MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation, migration and invasion through Matrigel™ associated with an enhancement of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activities, in a dose-dependent manner. Using Western blot and flow cytometry analyses, we demonstrated that MG-BSA-AGEs increased expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) and phosphorylation of key signaling protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2. Furthermore, in MG-BSA-AGE-treated cells, phospho-protein micro-array analysis revealed enhancement of phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein 70 serine S6 kinase beta 1 (p70S6K1), which is known to be involved in protein synthesis, the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38, which are involved in cell survival. Blockade of MG-BSA-AGE/RAGE interactions using a neutralizing anti-RAGE antibody inhibited MG-BSA-AGE-induced MDA-MB-231 cell processes, including the activation of signaling pathways. Throughout the study, non-modified BSA had a negligible effect. In conclusion, AGEs might contribute to breast cancer development and progression partially through the regulation of MMP-9 activity and RAGE signal activation. The up-regulation of RAGE and the concomitant increased phosphorylation of p70S6K1 induced by AGEs may represent promising targets for drug therapy to treat diabetic patients with breast cancer. PMID:25514746