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Sample records for supraglottic airway devices

  1. Supraglottic airway devices.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Kumar, Anjana M

    2014-06-01

    Supraglottic airway devices (SADs) are used to keep the upper airway open to provide unobstructed ventilation. Early (first-generation) SADs rapidly replaced endotracheal intubation and face masks in > 40% of general anesthesia cases due to their versatility and ease of use. Second-generation devices have further improved efficacy and utility by incorporating design changes. Individual second-generation SADs have allowed more dependable positive-pressure ventilation, are made of disposable materials, have integrated bite blocks, are better able to act as conduits for tracheal tube placement, and have reduced risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. SADs now provide successful rescue ventilation in > 90% of patients in whom mask ventilation or tracheal intubation is found to be impossible. However, some concerns with these devices remain, including failing to adequately ventilate, causing airway damage, and increasing the likelihood of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Careful patient selection and excellent technical skills are necessary for successful use of these devices. PMID:24891199

  2. Supraglottic airway devices in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R

    2011-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia practice in children was made possible by the invention of the endotracheal tube (ET), which made lengthy and complex surgical procedures feasible without the disastrous complications of airway obstruction, aspiration of gastric contents or asphyxia. For decades, endotracheal intubation or bag-and-mask ventilation were the mainstays of airway management. In 1983, this changed with the invention of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), the first supraglottic airway device that blended features of the facemask with those of the ET, providing ease of placement and hands-free maintenance along with a relatively secure airway. The invention and development of the LMA by Dr. Archie Brain has had a significant impact on the practice of anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and neonates. This review article will be a brief about the clinical applications of supraglottic airways in children. PMID:22174464

  3. [Supraglottic airway devices in emergency medicine : impact of gastric drainage].

    PubMed

    Mann, V; Mann, S T; Alejandre-Lafont, E; Röhrig, R; Weigand, M A; Müller, M

    2013-04-01

    This case report describes a life-saving use of a supraglottic airway device (LT-D™-Larynxtubus, VBM Medizintechnik, Sulz, Germany) in an out-of-hospital emergency patient suffering from severe traumatic brain injury. Mechanical ventilation with the laryngeal tube was complicated by repeated airway obstructions and pronounced gastric distension with air as a consequence of oropharyngeal leakage. In this situation pulmonary ventilation of the patient was compromised so that emergency endotracheal intubation became necessary in the resuscitation area with vital indications. In this context the status of supraglottic airway devices in emergency medicine is discussed as well as the reasons for the gastric distension. Besides the immediate drastic consequences of gastric distension with respect to pulmonary ventilation, potential deleterious non-pulmonary consequences of this complication are highlighted. The clinical relevance of the described complications as well as the associated possibility of an optimized position control necessitate the recommendation only to use second generation supraglottic airway devices with integrated gastric access in (out-of-hospital) emergency medicine. PMID:23494024

  4. Air-Q intubating laryngeal airway: A study of the second generation supraglottic airway device

    PubMed Central

    Attarde, Viren Bhaskar; Kotekar, Nalini; Shetty, Sarika M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Air-Q intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILA) is used as a supraglottic airway device and as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. This study aims to assess the efficacy of the Air-Q ILA regarding ease of insertion, adequacy of ventilation, rate of successful intubation, haemodynamic response and airway morbidity. Methods: Sixty patients presenting for elective surgery at our Medical College Hospital were selected. Following adequate premedication, baseline vital parameters, pulse rate and blood pressure were recorded. Air-Q size 3.5 for patients 50-70 kg and size 4.5 for 70-100 kg was selected. After achieving adequate intubating conditions, Air-Q ILA was introduced. Confirming adequate ventilation, appropriate sized endotracheal tube was advanced through the Air-Q blindly to intubate the trachea. Placement of the endotracheal tube in trachea was confirmed. Results: Air-Q ILA was successfully inserted in 88.3% of patients in first attempt and 11.7% patients in second attempt. Ventilation was adequate in 100% of patients. Intubation was successful in 76.7% of patients with Air-Q ILA. 23.3% of patients were intubated by direct laryngoscopy following failure with two attempts using Air-Q ILA. Post-intubation the change in heart rate was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). 10% of patients were noted to have a sore throat and 5% of patients had mild airway trauma. Conclusion: Air-Q ILA is a reliable device as a supraglottic airway ensuring adequate ventilation as well as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. It benefits the patient by avoiding the stress of direct laryngoscopy and is also superior alternative device for use in a difficult airway. PMID:27212722

  5. Cranial nerve injuries with supraglottic airway devices: a systematic review of published case reports and series.

    PubMed

    Thiruvenkatarajan, V; Van Wijk, R M; Rajbhoj, A

    2015-03-01

    Cranial nerve injuries are unusual complications of supraglottic airway use. Branches of the trigeminal, glossopharyngeal, vagus and the hypoglossal nerve may all be injured. We performed a systematic review of published case reports and case series of cranial nerve injury from the use of supraglottic airway devices. Lingual nerve injury was the most commonly reported (22 patients), followed by recurrent laryngeal (17 patients), hypoglossal (11 patients), glossopharyngeal (three patients), inferior alveolar (two patients) and infra-orbital (one patient). Injury is generally thought to result from pressure neuropraxia. Contributing factors may include: an inappropriate size or misplacement of the device; patient position; overinflation of the device cuff; and poor technique. Injuries other than to the recurrent laryngeal nerve are usually mild and self-limiting. Understanding the diverse presentation of cranial nerve injuries helps to distinguish them from other complications and assists in their management. PMID:25376257

  6. Standard versus Rotation Technique for Insertion of Supraglottic Airway Devices: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Ha; Lee, Jong Seok; Nam, Sang Beom; Ju, Jin Wu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Supraglottic airway devices have been widely utilized as an alternative to tracheal intubation in various clinical situations. The rotation technique has been proposed to improve the insertion success rate of supraglottic airways. However, the clinical efficacy of this technique remains uncertain as previous results have been inconsistent, depending on the variable evaluated. Materials and Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in April 2015 for randomized controlled trials that compared the rotation and standard techniques for inserting supraglottic airways. Results Thirteen randomized controlled trials (1505 patients, 753 with the rotation technique) were included. The success rate at the first attempt was significantly higher with the rotation technique than with the standard technique [relative risk (RR): 1.13; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05 to 1.23; p=0.002]. The rotation technique provided significantly higher overall success rates (RR: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.09; p<0.001). Device insertion was completed faster with the rotation technique (mean difference: -4.6 seconds; 95% CI: -7.37 to -1.74; p=0.002). The incidence of blood staining on the removed device (RR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.47; p<0.001) was significantly lower with the rotation technique. Conclusion The rotation technique provided higher first-attempt and overall success rates, faster insertion, and a lower incidence of blood on the removed device, reflecting less mucosal trauma. Thus, it may be considered as an alternative to the standard technique when predicting or encountering difficulty in inserting supraglottic airways. PMID:27189296

  7. A performance comparison of the paediatric i-gel with other supraglottic airway devices.

    PubMed

    Smith, P; Bailey, C R

    2015-01-01

    We performed a review of published literature comparing the i-gel with other supraglottic airway devices in children. Sixty-two articles were identified following a literature search; we included data from 14 randomised controlled trials and eight observational studies that compared i-gel sizes 1-2.5 with other commonly used, equivalently-sized, devices. The primary outcome in most studies was oropharyngeal leak pressure. In the 14 randomised trials the i-gel performed the same as the comparator device in five trials, significantly better in eight studies (p < 0.05) and significantly worse in one (p < 0.01). Seven studies assessed fibreoptic views of the larynx through the device; two found significantly better views through the i-gel. Three studies reported a shorter insertion time for the i-gel, whereas two reported a longer time. Insertion success rate, gastric tube placement and complications were similar for all the devices. Seven of the eight observational studies measured average oropharyngeal leak pressures of 20-27 cmH2O and all had first-time insertion success rates exceeding 90%. We conclude that the i-gel is at least equivalent to other supraglottic airway devices currently available for use in children, and may enable a higher oropharyngeal leak pressure and an improved fibreoptic view of the glottis. PMID:25187212

  8. Assessment of v-gel supraglottic airway device placement in cats performed by inexperienced veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Barletta, M; Kleine, S A; Quandt, J E

    2015-11-21

    Endotracheal intubation has been associated with several complications in cats. The v-gel supraglottic airway device (SGAD) has been developed to adapt to the unique oropharynx of the cat and to overcome these complications. Thirty-three cats were randomly assigned to receive an endotracheal tube (ETT group) or a v-gel SGAD (v-gel group) after induction of general anaesthesia. Third year veterinary students without previous clinical experience placed these devices under direct supervision of an anaesthesiologist. Amount of propofol, number of attempts, time required to secure the airway, leakage around the device, signs of upper airway discomfort and food consumption were compared between the two groups. The v-gel group required less propofol (P=0.03), less time (P<0.01) and fewer attempts (P<0.01) to secure the cats' airway. The incidence of leakage was lower for the v-gel group immediately after placement of the device (P<0.01) and 60 minutes after induction of general anaesthesia (P=0.04). Cats that received the v-gel SGAD presented a lower incidence of upper airway discomfort immediately after the device was removed (P=0.03) and recorded a higher food consumption score (P=0.03). The v-gel SGAD is a feasible way to secure the airway of healthy cats when performed by inexperienced personnel. PMID:26543177

  9. Complications Associated with the Use of Supraglottic Airway Devices in Perioperative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, William; Vobrubova, Eliska; Hakl, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Supraglottic airway devices are routinely used for airway maintenance in elective surgical procedures where aspiration is not a significant risk and also as rescue devices in difficult airway management. Some devices now have features mitigating risk of aspiration, such as drain tubes or compartments to manage regurgitated content. Despite this, the use of these device may be associated with various complications including aspiration. This review highlights the types and incidence of these complications. They include regurgitation and aspiration of gastric contents, compression of vascular structures, trauma, and nerve injury. The incidence of such complications is quite low, but as some carry with them a significant degree of morbidity the need to follow manufacturers' advice is underlined. The incidence of gastric content aspiration associated with the devices is estimated to be as low as 0.02% with perioperative regurgitation being significantly higher but underreported. Other serious, but extremely rare, complications include pharyngeal rupture, pneumomediastinum, mediastinitis, or arytenoid dislocation. Mild short-lasting adverse effects of the devices have significantly higher incidence than serious complications and involve postoperative sore throat, dysphagia, pain on swallowing, or hoarseness. Devices may have deleterious effect on cervical mucosa or vasculature depending on their cuff volume and pressure. PMID:26783527

  10. Comparison of Five 2nd-Generation Supraglottic Airway Devices for Airway Management Performed by Novice Military Operators

    PubMed Central

    Henlin, Tomas; Sotak, Michal; Kovaricek, Petr; Tyll, Tomas; Balcarek, Lukas; Michalek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Five different second-generation supraglottic airway devices, ProSeal LMA, Supreme LMA, i-gel, SLIPA, and Laryngeal Tube Suction-D, were studied. Operators were inexperienced users with a military background, combat lifesavers, nurses, and physicians. Methods. This was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded study. Devices were inserted in the operating room in low light conditions after induction of general anesthesia. Primary outcome was successful insertion on the first attempt while secondary aims were insertion time, number of attempts, oropharyngeal seal pressure, ease of insertion, fibre optic position of device, efficacy of ventilation, and intraoperative trauma or regurgitation of gastric contents. Results. In total, 505 patients were studied. First-attempt insertion success rate was higher in the Supreme LMA (96%), i-gel (87.9%), and ProSeal LMA (85.9%) groups than in the Laryngeal Tube Suction-D (80.6%) and SLIPA (69.4%) groups. Insertion time was shortest in the Supreme LMA (70.4 ± 32.5 s) and i-gel (74.4 ± 41.1 s) groups (p < 0.001). Oropharyngeal seal pressures were higher in the Laryngeal Tube Suction-D and ProSeal LMA groups than in other three devices. Conclusions. Most study parameters for the Supreme LMA and i-gel were found to be superior to the other three tested supraglottic airway devices when inserted by novice military operators. PMID:26495289

  11. Insertion of six different supraglottic airway devices whilst wearing chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-personal protective equipment: a manikin study.

    PubMed

    Castle, N; Pillay, Y; Spencer, N

    2011-11-01

    Six different supraglottic airway devices: Combitube™, laryngeal mask airway, intubating laryngeal mask airway (Fastrach™), i-gel™, Laryngeal Tube™ and Pro-Seal™ laryngeal mask airway were assessed by 58 paramedic students for speed and ease of insertion in a manikin, whilst wearing either chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear-personal protective equipment (CBRN-PPE) or a standard uniform. All devices took significantly longer to insert when wearing CBRN-PPE compared with standard uniform (p < 0.001). In standard uniform, insertion time was shorter than 45 s in 90% of attempts for all devices except the Combitube, for which 90% of attempts were completed by 53 s. Whilst wearing CBRN-PPE the i-gel was the fastest device to insert with a mean (SD (95% CI)) insertion time of 19 (8 (17-21))s, p < 0.001, with the Combitube the slowest with mean (65 (23 (59-71))s. Wearing of CBRN-PPE has a negative impact on supraglottic airway insertion time. PMID:21883122

  12. A randomised crossover comparison of manikin ventilation through Soft Seal®, i-gel™ and AuraOnce™ supraglottic airway devices by surf lifeguards.

    PubMed

    Adelborg, K; Al-Mashhadi, R H; Nielsen, L H; Dalgas, C; Mortensen, M B; Løfgren, B

    2014-04-01

    Forty surf lifeguards attempted to ventilate a manikin through one out of three supraglottic airways inserted in random order: the Portex® Soft Seal®; the Intersurgical® i-gel™; and the Ambu® AuraOnce™. We recorded the time to ventilate and the proportion of inflations that were successful, without and then with concurrent chest compressions. The mean (SD) time to ventilate with the Soft Seal, i-gel and AuraOnce was 35.2 (7.2)s, 15.6 (3.3)s and 35.1 (8.5) s, respectively, p < 0.0001. Concurrent chest compression prolonged the time to ventilate by 5.0 (1.3-8.1)%, p = 0.0072. The rate of successful ventilations through the Soft Seal (100%) was more than through the AuraOnce (92%), p < 0.0001, neither of which was different from the i-gel (97%). The mean (SD) tidal volumes through the Soft Seal, i-gel and AuraOnce were 0.65 (0.14) l, 0.50 (0.16) l and 0.39 (0.19) l, respectively. Most lifeguards (85%) preferred the i-gel. Ventilation through supraglottic airway devices may be considered for resuscitation by surf lifeguards. PMID:24506226

  13. Small is the new big: An overview of newer supraglottic airways for children

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Rakhee

    2015-01-01

    Almost all supraglottic airways (SGAs) are now available in pediatric sizes. The availability of these smaller sizes, especially in the last five years has brought a marked change in the whole approach to airway management in children. SGAs are now used for laparoscopic surgeries, head and neck surgeries, remote anesthesia; and for ventilation during resuscitation. A large number of reports have described the use of SGAs in difficult airway situations, either as a primary or a rescue airway. Despite this expanded usage, there remains little evidence to support its usage in prolonged surgeries and in the intensive care unit. This article presents an overview of the current options available, suitability of one over the other and reviews the published data relating to each device. In this review, the author also addresses some of the general concerns regarding the use of SGAs and explores newer roles of their use in children. PMID:26702197

  14. Comparison of i-gel supraglottic airway and LMA-ProSeal™ in pediatric patients under controlled ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Saran, Sai; Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Badhe, Ashok Shankar; Vasudevan, Arumugam; Elakkumanan, Lenin Babu; Mishra, Gayatri

    2014-01-01

    Background: i-gel™ and the ProSeal™ laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) are two supraglottic airway devices with gastric channel used for airway maintenance in anesthesia. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of i-gel compared with PLMA for airway maintenance in pediatric patients under general anesthesia with controlled ventilation. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2 patients were included in the study and randomized to either i-gel or PLMA group. After induction of anesthesia using a standardized protocol for all the patients, one of supraglottic airway devices was inserted. Insertion parameters, ease of gastric tube insertion and fiber-optic scoring of the glottis were noted. Airway parameters such as end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2), peak airway pressures and leak airway pressures were noted. Patients were observed for any complications in the first 12 h of the post-operative period. Results: Both groups were comparable in terms of ease of insertion, number of attempts and other insertion parameters. Ease of gastric tube insertion, EtCO2, airway pressures (peak and leak airway pressure) and fiber-optic view of the glottis were comparable in both groups. There were no clinically significant complications in the first 12 h of the post-operative period. Conclusion: i-gel is as effective as PLMA in pediatric patients under controlled ventilation. PMID:24803756

  15. Does prewarming the i-gel supraglottic airway device fit the larynx better compared to keeping it at room temperature for non-paralysed, sedated patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Nishihara, Isao; Tatsumi, Shinichi; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to test the hypothesis that the i-gel supraglottic airway device would fit the larynx and provide better sealing pressure if prewarmed to 42°C relative to the device kept at room temperature in non-paralysed, sedated patients. Methods A total of 74 adult patients were assigned to the warm (i-gel prewarmed to 42°C; W group; 37 patients) or the control (i-gel kept at room temperature; C group; 37 patients) groups. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and fentanyl. The i-gel was prewarmed to 42°C for 30 min before insertion in the W group, but kept at room temperature (approximately 23°C) for the C group. The number of attempts made until successful insertion and sealing pressure were compared between the two groups. Results Insertion was successful with one attempt in 35 cases each for the W and C groups. Two attempts were needed in two cases for the W group and one case for the C group. There was one failed attempt in the C group, but none in the W group. None of the differences between the two groups were significant (p=0.51). Sealing pressure was slightly, but not significantly, higher in the W group than in the C group (W group 22.6±6.1 cm H2O; C group 20.7±6.1 cm H2O; p=0.15). Conclusions Prewarming of the i-gel to 42°C did not increase the success rate of insertion, nor did it significantly increase sealing pressure in anaesthetised, non-paralysed patients. Our data suggest that we can keep the i-gel at room temperature for emergency airway management for non-paralysed, sedated patients. Trial registration number University Medical Information Network, Japan 000012287. PMID:25586372

  16. Comparison of three supraglottic devices in anesthetised paralyzed children undergoing elective surgery

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bikramjit; Mitra, Subhro; Jamil, Shahin N.; Varshney, Rohit K.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The newest variation of the i-gel supraglottic airway is a pediatric version. Aims: This study was designed to investigate the usefulness of the size 2 i-gel compared with the ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) and classic laryngeal mask airway (cLMA) of the same size in anesthetized, paralyzed children. Settings and design: A prospective, randomized, single-blinded study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods: Ninety ASA grade I–II patients undergoing lower abdominal, inguinal and orthopedic surgery were included in this prospective study. The patients were randomly assigned to the i-gel, PLMA and cLMA groups (30 patients in each group). Size 2 supraglottic airway was inserted according to the assigned group. We assessed ease of insertion, hemodynamic data, oropharyngeal sealing pressure and postoperative complications. Results: There were no differences in the demographic and hemodynamic data among the three groups. The airway leak pressure of the i-gel group (27.1±2.6 cmH2O) was significantly higher than that of the PLMA group (22.73±1.2 cmH2O) and the cLMA group (23.63±2.3 cmH2O). The success rates for first attempt of insertion were similar among the three devices. There were no differences in the incidence of postoperative airway trauma, sore throat or hoarse cry in the three groups. Conclusions: Hemodynamic parameters, ease of insertion and postoperative complications were comparable among the i-gel, PLMA and cLMA groups, but airway sealing pressure was significantly higher in the i-gel group. PMID:23162394

  17. Simulation analysis of three intubating supraglottic devices during infant chest compression.

    PubMed

    Kohama, Hanako; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Ueki, Ryusuke; Kaminoh, Yoshiroh; Nishi, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines for pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation suggest that supraglottic devices are alternatives for tracheal intubation with minimal interruption of chest compression. We examined the utility of three intubating supraglottic devices, air-Q® (air-Q), Ambu® aura-i (aura-i), and i-gel® (i-gel), utilizing manikin simulation. Twenty-two novice physicians performed securing of airway on an infant manikin with the three devices. We measured the rate of success on ventilation and the insertion time with or without chest compression. Successful ventilation rate did not significantly decrease with chest compression in the three devices (without chest compression: air-Q, 21/22; aura-i, 20/22; i-gel, 20/22, during chest compression: air-Q, 20/22; aura-i, 20/22; i-gel, 18/22). The insertion time with air-Q and aura-i did not extend significantly for chest compression. In contrast, the insertion time with i-gel was significantly extended in chest compression (P < 0.05). Air-Q and aura-i are more useful for airway management during chest compression than i-gel. PMID:25711262

  18. Lateral Oropharyngeal Wall and Supraglottic Airway Collapse Associated With Failure in Sleep Apnea Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Danny; Sinawe, Hadeer; Folbe, Adam J.; Yoo, George; Badr, Safwan; Rowley, James A.; Lin, Ho-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis To identify patterns of airway collapse during preoperative drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) as predictors of surgical failure following multilevel airway surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Study Design Retrospective clinical chart review. Methods Medical records of patients who underwent site-specific surgical modification of the upper airway for treatment of OSHAS were reviewed. Patients were included in this study if they had a preoperative airway evaluation with DISE as well as preoperative and postoperative polysomnography. Airway obstruction on DISE was described according to airway level, severity, and axis of collapse. Severe airway obstruction was defined as >75% collapse on endoscopy. Surgical success was described as a postoperative apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of <20 and a >50% decrease in preoperative AHI. Results A total of 34 patients were included in this study. The overall surgical success rate was 56%. Surgical success (n = 19) and surgical failure (n = 15) patients were similar with regard to age, gender, body mass index, preoperative AHI, Friedman stage, adenotonsillar grades, and surgical management. DISE findings in the surgical failure group demonstrated greater incidence of severe lateral oropharyngeal wall collapse (73.3% vs. 36.8%, P = .037) and severe supraglottic collapse (93.3% vs. 63.2%, P = .046) as compared to the surgical success group. Conclusions The presence of severe lateral pharyngeal wall and/or supraglottic collapse on preoperative DISE is associated with OSAHS surgical failure. The identification of this failure-prone collapse pattern may be useful in preoperative patient counseling as well as in directing an individualized and customized approach to the treatment of OSHAS. PMID:22253047

  19. Retrospective cohort investigation of perioperative upper respiratory events in children undergoing general anesthesia via a supraglottic airway

    PubMed Central

    No, Hyun-Joung; Koo, Bon-Wook; Oh, Ah-Young; Seo, Kwang-Suk; Na, Hyo-Seok; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Lee, Soo-Won

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Desflurane is the most pungent of the currently used volatile anesthetics. We assessed whether the incidence of perioperative upper respiratory events in children undergoing general anesthesia via a supraglottic airway is higher with desflurane than with sevoflurane as maintenance anesthetic. We retrospectively reviewed and analyzed the electronic medical records of consecutive children 1 to 15 years of age who underwent general anesthesia via a supraglottic airway at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between June 2013 and June 2015. The patients were assigned to the sevoflurane or desflurane group according to the anesthetic used. The characteristics of the patients were compared. The primary outcome variable was the incidence of upper respiratory events. The incidence of upper respiratory events in the 3439 evaluated patients was 0.43% (12/2777) in the sevoflurane group and 0.30% (2/662) in the desflurane group (P = 0.75; odds ratio = 0.69 [95% confidence interval = 0.16–3.13]). The difference between the 2 groups was not significant. Compared with sevoflurane, desflurane does not increase the risk of perioperative upper respiratory events in children receiving general anesthesia via a supraglottic airway. PMID:27428242

  20. Retrospective cohort investigation of perioperative upper respiratory events in children undergoing general anesthesia via a supraglottic airway: A comparison of sevoflurane and desflurane.

    PubMed

    No, Hyun-Joung; Koo, Bon-Wook; Oh, Ah-Young; Seo, Kwang-Suk; Na, Hyo-Seok; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Lee, Soo-Won

    2016-07-01

    Desflurane is the most pungent of the currently used volatile anesthetics. We assessed whether the incidence of perioperative upper respiratory events in children undergoing general anesthesia via a supraglottic airway is higher with desflurane than with sevoflurane as maintenance anesthetic.We retrospectively reviewed and analyzed the electronic medical records of consecutive children 1 to 15 years of age who underwent general anesthesia via a supraglottic airway at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between June 2013 and June 2015. The patients were assigned to the sevoflurane or desflurane group according to the anesthetic used. The characteristics of the patients were compared. The primary outcome variable was the incidence of upper respiratory events.The incidence of upper respiratory events in the 3439 evaluated patients was 0.43% (12/2777) in the sevoflurane group and 0.30% (2/662) in the desflurane group (P = 0.75; odds ratio = 0.69 [95% confidence interval = 0.16-3.13]). The difference between the 2 groups was not significant.Compared with sevoflurane, desflurane does not increase the risk of perioperative upper respiratory events in children receiving general anesthesia via a supraglottic airway. PMID:27428242

  1. Essentials of airway management, oxygenation, and ventilation: part 1: basic equipment and devices.

    PubMed

    Becker, Daniel E; Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2014-01-01

    Offices and outpatient dental facilities must be properly equipped with devices for airway management, oxygenation, and ventilation. Optimizing patient safety using crisis resource management (CRM) involves the entire dental office team being familiar with airway rescue equipment. Basic equipment for oxygenation, ventilation, and airway management is mandated in the majority of US dental offices per state regulations. The immediate availability of this equipment is especially important during the administration of sedation and anesthesia as well as the treatment of medical urgencies/emergencies. This article reviews basic equipment and devices essential in any dental practice whether providing local anesthesia alone or in combination with procedural sedation. Part 2 of this series will address advanced airway devices, including supraglottic airways and armamentarium for tracheal intubation and invasive airway procedures. PMID:24932982

  2. Essentials of Airway Management, Oxygenation, and Ventilation: Part 1: Basic Equipment and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.; Rosenberg, Morton B.; Phero, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Offices and outpatient dental facilities must be properly equipped with devices for airway management, oxygenation, and ventilation. Optimizing patient safety using crisis resource management (CRM) involves the entire dental office team being familiar with airway rescue equipment. Basic equipment for oxygenation, ventilation, and airway management is mandated in the majority of US dental offices per state regulations. The immediate availability of this equipment is especially important during the administration of sedation and anesthesia as well as the treatment of medical urgencies/emergencies. This article reviews basic equipment and devices essential in any dental practice whether providing local anesthesia alone or in combination with procedural sedation. Part 2 of this series will address advanced airway devices, including supraglottic airways and armamentarium for tracheal intubation and invasive airway procedures. PMID:24932982

  3. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  4. Comparative Efficacy of the Air-Q Intubating Laryngeal Airway during General Anesthesia in Pediatric Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Eun Jin; Choi, Geun Joo; Kang, Hyun; Baek, Chong Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Cheol; Bang, Si Ra

    2016-01-01

    Air-Q® (air-Q) is a supraglottic airway device which can be used as a guidance of intubation in pediatric as well as in adult patients. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of air-Q compared to other airway devices during general anesthesia in pediatric patients by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of 10 studies including 789 patients were included in the final analysis. Compared with other supraglottic airway devices, air-Q showed no evidence for a difference in leakage pressure and insertion time. The ease of insertion was significantly lower than other supraglottic airway devices. The success rate of intubation was significantly lower than other airway devices. However, fiberoptic view was better through the air-Q than other supraglottic airway devices. Therefore, air-Q could be a safe substitute for other airway devices and may provide better fiberoptic bronchoscopic view. PMID:27419134

  5. Paediatric airway management: What is new?

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R; Archana, SR

    2012-01-01

    Airway management plays a pivotal role in Paediatric Anaesthesia. Over the last two decades many improvements in this area have helped us to overcome this final frontier. From an era where intubation with a conventional laryngoscope or blind nasal intubation was the only tool for airway management, we have come a long way. Today supraglottic airway devices have pride of place in the Operating Room and are becoming important airway devices used in routine procedures. Direct and indirect fibreoptic laryngoscopes and transtracheal devices help us overcome difficult and previously impossible airway situations. These developments mean that we need to update our knowledge on these devices. Also much of our basic understanding of the physiology and anatomy of the paediatric airway has changed. This article attempts to shed light on some of the most important advances/opinions in paediatric airway management like, cuffed endotracheal tubes, supraglottic airway devices, video laryngoscopes, rapid sequence intubation, the newly proposed algorithm for difficult airway management and the role of Ex Utero Intrapartum Treatment (EXIT) procedure in the management of the neonatal airway. PMID:23293383

  6. Oxygenation via a Biventricular Assist Device for Emergency Airway Management.

    PubMed

    Howitt, Samuel Henry; Stirling, Sarah; Krysiak, Piotr; Pate, Bryce; Maybauer, Marc Oliver

    2016-05-01

    A 56-year-old man receiving mechanical circulatory support via a biventricular assist device suffered an airway emergency secondary to bleeding into the airway. An improvised solution to gain control of the airway in the short term was devised, and an oxygenator was inserted into the circuit, providing an alternative means of gas exchange while definitive control of the airway was achieved. This case changed practice in our institution, where we now make contingency plans for emergency oxygenator insertion into the circuits of all patients with a biventricular assist device who show any sign of airway hemorrhage. PMID:27136082

  7. Detection of Upper Airway Status and Respiratory Events by a Current Generation Positive Airway Pressure Device

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing Yun; Berry, Richard B.; Goetting, Mark G.; Staley, Bethany; Soto-Calderon, Haideliza; Tsai, Sheila C.; Jasko, Jeffrey G.; Pack, Allan I.; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare a positive airway pressure (PAP) device's detection of respiratory events and airway status during device-detected apneas with events scored on simultaneous polysomnography (PSG). Design: Prospective PSGs of patients with sleep apnea using a new-generation PAP device. Settings: Four clinical and academic sleep centers. Patients: Forty-five patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and complex sleep apnea (Comp SA) performed a PSG on PAP levels adjusted to induce respiratory events. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: PAP device data identifying the type of respiratory event and whether the airway during a device-detected apnea was open or obstructed were compared to time-synced, manually scored respiratory events on simultaneous PSG recording. Intraclass correlation coefficients between device-detected and PSG scored events were 0.854 for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), 0.783 for apnea index, 0.252 for hypopnea index, and 0.098 for respiratory event-related arousals index. At a device AHI (AHIFlow) of 10 events/h, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.98, with sensitivity 0.92 and specificity 0.84. AHIFlow tended to overestimate AHI on PSG at values less than 10 events/h. The device detected that the airway was obstructed in 87.4% of manually scored obstructive apneas. Of the device-detected apneas with clear airway, a minority (15.8%) were manually scored as obstructive apneas. Conclusions: A device-detected apnea-hypopnea index (AHIFlow) < 10 events/h on a positive airway pressure device is strong evidence of good treatment efficacy. Device-detected airway status agrees closely with the presumed airway status during polysomnography scored events, but should not be equated with a specific type of respiratory event. Citation: Li QY, Berry RB, Goetting MG, Staley B, Soto-Calderon H, Tsai SC, Jasko JG, Pack AI, Kuna ST. Detection of upper airway status and respiratory events by a current generation positive

  8. Management of supraglottic dysgenesis presenting as laryngomalacia.

    PubMed

    Aynehchi, Behrad B; Goldstein, Nira A; Goldsmith, Ari J

    2011-09-01

    Laryngomalacia is a common source of stridor and can lead to significant upper airway obstruction and feeding disturbances in infants. We describe a unique case of supraglottic dysgenesis presenting as laryngomalacia featuring a prominent "s-shaped" epiglottis with both posterior edges fused to the right aryepiglottic fold/arytenoid complex. Although this anomaly is not accounted for in any of the current laryngomalacia classification schemes, modified laser supraglottoplasty was a satisfactory approach leading to successful decannulation. Laryngeal embryology and possible timing of the pathogenesis of this rare occurrence are reviewed as well. PMID:21726906

  9. Mechanisms of recovery of swallow after supraglottic laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Logemann, J A; Gibbons, P; Rademaker, A W; Pauloski, B R; Kahrilas, P J; Bacon, M; Bowman, J; McCracken, E

    1994-10-01

    This study examines oropharyngeal swallow disorders and measures of pharyngeal and laryngeal movement during deglutition from videofluorographic studies of oropharyngeal swallow in 9 patients who had undergone supraglottic laryngectomy and 9 age-matched normal subjects. The swallows of surgical patients were examined at 2 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. Two critical factors in recovery of swallowing were identified: (a) airway closure at the laryngeal entrance, that is, the space between the arytenoid cartilage and the base of the tongue, and (b) the movement of the tongue base to make complete contact with the posterior pharyngeal wall. When patients achieved these two functions, they returned to normal swallowing. The duration of tongue base contact to the posterior pharyngeal wall and extent of anterior movement of the arytenoid increased significantly from 2 weeks to 3 months in the surgical patients. At 2 weeks postsurgery, patients who had undergone supraglottic laryngectomy exhibited significantly shorter airway closure and tongue base to pharyngeal wall contact, reduced laryngeal elevation, increased width of cricopharyngeal (CP) opening, and later onset of airway closure and tongue base movement than normal subjects. These significant differences remained at 3 months postoperatively, although swallow measures were moving toward normal in the patients who had undergone supraglottic laryngectomy. Comparison of patients not eating at 2 weeks with patients at the time of first eating revealed significantly longer duration of tongue base contact to the pharyngeal wall, longer duration of airway closure, and greater movement of the arytenoid in patients who were eating. Results indicate that the focus of swallowing therapy after supraglottic laryngectomy should be on improvement of posterior movement of the tongue base and anterior tilting of the arytenoid to close the airway entrance and improve bolus propulsion (in the case of the tongue base). PMID

  10. Airway management evolution - in a search for an ideal extraglottic airway device.

    PubMed

    Michálek, Pavel; Miller, Donald M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EADs) are commonly used equipment for airway maintenance during elective procedures under general anaesthesia. They may be used also in other indications such as conduit for tracheal intubation or rescue airway device in prehospital medicine. Current classifications of the EADs lack systematic approach and therefore classification according to the sealing sites and sealing mechanisms is suggested in this review article. Modern EADs are disposable, latex-free devices made of plastic materials most commonly from polyvinylchloride (PVC). The bowl of uncuffed sealers is manufactured from different materials such as thermoplastic elastomers or ethylene-vinyl-acetate co-polymer. EADs create various physical forces exerted on the adjacent tissues which may contribute to different sealing characteristic of particular device or to variable incidence of postoperative complications. Desired features of an ideal EAD involve easy insertion, high insertion success rate even by inexperienced users, protection against aspiration of gastric contents and low incidence of postoperative complications such as sore throat, hoarseness, cough or swallowing difficulties. PMID:25626328

  11. Continuous positive airway pressure: Physiology and comparison of devices.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Samir; Donn, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is increasingly used for respiratory support in preterm babies at birth and after extubation from mechanical ventilation. Various CPAP devices are available for use that can be broadly grouped into continuous flow and variable flow. There are potential physiologic differences between these CPAP systems and the choice of a CPAP device is too often guided by individual expertise and experience rather than by evidence. When interpreting the evidence clinicians should take into account the pressure generation sources, nasal interface, and the factors affecting the delivery of pressure, such as mouth position and respiratory drive. With increasing use of these devices, better monitoring techniques are required to assess the efficacy and early recognition of babies who are failing and in need of escalated support. PMID:26948884

  12. Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines for management of unanticipated difficult intubation in adults.

    PubMed

    Frerk, C; Mitchell, V S; McNarry, A F; Mendonca, C; Bhagrath, R; Patel, A; O'Sullivan, E P; Woodall, N M; Ahmad, I

    2015-12-01

    These guidelines provide a strategy to manage unanticipated difficulty with tracheal intubation. They are founded on published evidence. Where evidence is lacking, they have been directed by feedback from members of the Difficult Airway Society and based on expert opinion. These guidelines have been informed by advances in the understanding of crisis management; they emphasize the recognition and declaration of difficulty during airway management. A simplified, single algorithm now covers unanticipated difficulties in both routine intubation and rapid sequence induction. Planning for failed intubation should form part of the pre-induction briefing, particularly for urgent surgery. Emphasis is placed on assessment, preparation, positioning, preoxygenation, maintenance of oxygenation, and minimizing trauma from airway interventions. It is recommended that the number of airway interventions are limited, and blind techniques using a bougie or through supraglottic airway devices have been superseded by video- or fibre-optically guided intubation. If tracheal intubation fails, supraglottic airway devices are recommended to provide a route for oxygenation while reviewing how to proceed. Second-generation devices have advantages and are recommended. When both tracheal intubation and supraglottic airway device insertion have failed, waking the patient is the default option. If at this stage, face-mask oxygenation is impossible in the presence of muscle relaxation, cricothyroidotomy should follow immediately. Scalpel cricothyroidotomy is recommended as the preferred rescue technique and should be practised by all anaesthetists. The plans outlined are designed to be simple and easy to follow. They should be regularly rehearsed and made familiar to the whole theatre team. PMID:26556848

  13. Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines for management of unanticipated difficult intubation in adults†

    PubMed Central

    Frerk, C.; Mitchell, V. S.; McNarry, A. F.; Mendonca, C.; Bhagrath, R.; Patel, A.; O'Sullivan, E. P.; Woodall, N. M.; Ahmad, I.

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide a strategy to manage unanticipated difficulty with tracheal intubation. They are founded on published evidence. Where evidence is lacking, they have been directed by feedback from members of the Difficult Airway Society and based on expert opinion. These guidelines have been informed by advances in the understanding of crisis management; they emphasize the recognition and declaration of difficulty during airway management. A simplified, single algorithm now covers unanticipated difficulties in both routine intubation and rapid sequence induction. Planning for failed intubation should form part of the pre-induction briefing, particularly for urgent surgery. Emphasis is placed on assessment, preparation, positioning, preoxygenation, maintenance of oxygenation, and minimizing trauma from airway interventions. It is recommended that the number of airway interventions are limited, and blind techniques using a bougie or through supraglottic airway devices have been superseded by video- or fibre-optically guided intubation. If tracheal intubation fails, supraglottic airway devices are recommended to provide a route for oxygenation while reviewing how to proceed. Second-generation devices have advantages and are recommended. When both tracheal intubation and supraglottic airway device insertion have failed, waking the patient is the default option. If at this stage, face-mask oxygenation is impossible in the presence of muscle relaxation, cricothyroidotomy should follow immediately. Scalpel cricothyroidotomy is recommended as the preferred rescue technique and should be practised by all anaesthetists. The plans outlined are designed to be simple and easy to follow. They should be regularly rehearsed and made familiar to the whole theatre team. PMID:26556848

  14. Comparing the Laryngeal Mask Airway, Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway and Face Mask in Children Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Beyza; Hatipoğlu, Zehra; Türktan, Mediha; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Objective We compared the effects of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), face mask and Cobra perilaryngeal airway (PLA) in the airway management of spontaneously breathing paediatric patients undergoing elective inguinal surgery. Methods In this study, 90 cases of 1–14-year-old children undergoing elective inguinal surgery were scheduled. The patients were randomly divided into three groups. Anaesthesia was provided with sevoflurane and 50%–50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. After providing an adequate depth of anaesthesia, supraglottic airway devices were inserted in the group I and II patients. The duration and number of insertion, haemodynamic parameters, plateau and peak inspiratory pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure of the patients were recorded preoperatively, after induction and at 5, 10, 15 and 30 min peroperatively. Results There were no statistical differences between the groups in terms of haemodynamic parameters (p>0.05). In group II, instrumentation success was higher and instrumentation time was shorter than group II. The positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau and peak inspiratory pressure values were statistically lower in group II (p<0.05). Conclusion We concluded that for airway safety and to avoid possible complications, LMA and Cobra PLA could be alternatives to face mask and that the Cobra PLA provided lower airway pressure and had a faster and more easy placement than LMA. PMID:27366563

  15. 21 CFR 868.5115 - Device to relieve acute upper airway obstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Device to relieve acute upper airway obstruction. 868.5115 Section 868.5115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5115 Device...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5115 - Device to relieve acute upper airway obstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Device to relieve acute upper airway obstruction. 868.5115 Section 868.5115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5115 Device...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5115 - Device to relieve acute upper airway obstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device to relieve acute upper airway obstruction. 868.5115 Section 868.5115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5115 Device...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5115 - Device to relieve acute upper airway obstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Device to relieve acute upper airway obstruction. 868.5115 Section 868.5115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5115 Device...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5115 - Device to relieve acute upper airway obstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Device to relieve acute upper airway obstruction. 868.5115 Section 868.5115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5115 Device...

  20. Influence of vortical flow structures on the glottal jet location in the supraglottal region.

    PubMed

    Kniesburges, Stefan; Hesselmann, Christina; Becker, Stefan; Schlücker, Eberhard; Döllinger, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Within the fully coupled multiphysics phonation process, the fluid flow plays an important role for sound production. This study addresses phenomena in the flow downstream of synthetic self-oscillating vocal folds. An experimental setup consisting of devices for producing and conditioning the flow including the main test channel was applied. The supraglottal channel was designed to prevent an acoustic coupling to the vocal folds. Hence, the oscillations were aerodynamically driven. The cross-section of the supraglottal channel was systematically varied by increasing the distance between the lateral channel walls. The vocal folds consisted of silicone rubber of homogenous material distribution generating self-sustained oscillations. The airflow was visualized in the immediate supraglottal region using a laser-sheet technique and a digital high-speed camera. Furthermore, the flow was studied by measuring the static pressure distributions on both lateral supraglottal channel walls. The results clearly showed different flow characteristics depending on the supraglottal configuration. In all cases with supraglottal channel, the jet was located asymmetrical and bent in medial-lateral direction. Furthermore, the side to which the jet was deflected changed in between the consecutive cycles showing a bifurcational behavior. Previously, this phenomenon was explained by the Coanda effect. However, the present data suggest that the deflection of the jet was mainly caused by large air vortices in the supraglottal channel produced by the flow field of previous oscillations. In contrast, for the case without supraglottal channel, the air jet was found totally symmetrical stabilized by the constant pressure in the ambient region. The emitted sound signal showed additional subharmonic tonal peaks for the asymmetric flow cases, which are characteristics for diplophonia. PMID:23911009

  1. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  2. [Airway rescue in a patient with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and impossible ventilation after induction of general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Kusunoki, Tomohiro; Soen, Masako; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-06-01

    We report the successful rescue ventilation of a patient with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome after induction of general anesthesia using the i-gel supraglottic airway device. A 55-year-old man was scheduled for resection of a cerebellopontine angle tumor. He suffered from severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and routinely used continuous positive airway pressure. His apnea hypopnea index was 57.8. Manual assisted ventilation following propofol and fentanyl administration was successful. On rocuronium administration, manual ventilation became impossible and oropharyngeal airway could not release this condition. We immediately inserted the i-gel device to provide sufficient ventilation. As tracheal intubation with the i-gel device was difficult, we intubated a spiral tube (internal diameter, 8.0 mm) using the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope. Our findings suggest that the i-gel device may be useful for emergent airway rescue in the event of impossible ventilation for patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. PMID:24979854

  3. Essentials of Airway Management, Oxygenation, and Ventilation: Basic Equipment and Devices.

    PubMed

    Becker, Daniel E; Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Offices and outpatient dental facilities must be properly equipped with devices for airway management, oxygenation, and ventilation. Optimizing patient safety using crisis resource management involves the entire dental office team being familiar with airway rescue equipment. Basic equipment for oxygenation, ventilation, and airway management is mandated in the majority of U.S. dental offices, per state regulations. The immediate availability of this equipment is especially important during the administration of sedation and anesthesia, as well as the treatment of medical urgencies/emergencies. This article reviews basic equipment and devices essential in any dental practice, whether providing local anesthesia alone or in combination with procedural sedation. PMID:26168530

  4. Transoral laser surgery for supraglottic cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Juan P; Suárez, Carlos; Silver, Carl E; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ambrosch, Petra; Fagan, Johannes J; Genden, Eric M; Ferlito, Alfio

    2008-05-01

    The goal of treatment for supraglottic cancer is to achieve cure and to preserve laryngeal function. Organ preservation strategies include both endoscopic and open surgical approaches as well as radiation and chemotherapy. The challenge is to select the correct modalities for each patient. Endoscopic procedures should be limited to tumors that can be completely visualized during diagnostic microlaryngoscopy. If complete resection can be achieved, the oncologic results of transoral laser surgery appear to be comparable to those of classic supraglottic laryngectomy. In addition, functional results of transoral laser resection are superior to those of the conventional open approach, in terms of the time required to restore swallowing, tracheotomy rate, incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistulae, and shorter hospital stay. The management of the neck remains of paramount importance, as survival of patients with supraglottic cancer depends more on cervical metastasis than on the primary tumor. Most authors advocate bilateral elective neck dissection. However, in selected cases (T1,T2 clinically negative [N0] lateral supraglottic cancers), ipsilateral selective neck dissection could be performed without compromising survival. The authors conclude that with careful selection of patients, laser supraglottic laryngectomy is a suitable, and often the preferred, treatment option for supraglottic cancer. PMID:18327778

  5. Implantation of a defibrillator in a patient with an upper airway stimulation device.

    PubMed

    Ong, Adrian A; O'Brien, Terrence X; Nguyen, Shaun A; Gillespie, M Boyd

    2016-02-01

    The patient is a 62-year-old man with continuous positive airway pressure-intolerant obstructive sleep apnea who was enrolled in a study for a hypoglossal nerve upper airway stimulation device (UAS). Nearly 2.5 years later, he was admitted to the hospital for unstable angina. Diagnostic workup revealed a prior myocardial infarction, an ejection fraction of 30% on maximal medical therapy, and episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. During hospitalization, the patient received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). This is the first reported case of simultaneous use of a UAS and an ICD, and we report no untoward device interference between the two implantable devices. PMID:26403681

  6. A Supraglottic Pseudotumor in an Immunocompromised Patient with Nephrotic Syndrome, Herpes Zoster, and a Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Several viral infections may occasionally induce supraglottic mass lesions, resulting in an obstructive airway emergency. We herein report one such case in a 63-year-old male immunocompromised patient with nephrotic syndrome due to membranous nephropathy who also had ophthalmic herpes zoster with a laryngeal mass, which required urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation. The patient was initially treated with acyclovir; however, because a serological analysis revealed a concurrent cytomegalovirus infection, we discontinued the administration of acyclovir and gave priority to the simultaneous treatment of the cytomegalovirus and varicella-zoster virus infections with ganciclovir. The clinical course was favorable, and he was weaned from the ventilator 10 days later when a serial imaging analysis revealed no signs of the supraglottic mass, leading us to conclude that these two viral infections could have additively or synergistically contributed to the development of the local pseudotumor. The diagnostic and therapeutic concerns arising in the current case are also discussed. PMID:27547043

  7. Mechanisms Linking Advanced Airway Management and Cardiac Arrest Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Justin L.; Prince, David K.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced airway management – such as endotracheal intubation (ETI) or supraglottic airway (SGA) insertion – is one of the most prominent interventions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. While randomized controlled trials are currently in progress to identify the best advanced airway technique in OHCA, the mechanisms by which airway management may influence OHCA outcomes remain unknown. We provide a conceptual model describing potential mechanisms linking advanced airway management with OHCA outcomes. PMID:26073275

  8. Acquired idiopathic laryngomalacia treated by laser supraglottic laryngoplasty.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Ai; Katori, Yukio; Honkura, Yohei; Ogura, Masaki; Takanashi, Yoshitaka; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    Laryngomalacia is the most common cause of stridor in neonates and infants, where the soft cartilages and tissues surrounding the upper larynx collapse inward during respiration. On the other hand, acquired idiopathic laryngomalacia in adults is quite rare, but should be borne in mind for differential diagnosis of upper airway distress. Allergic factors may cause airway distress, but have not been highlighted previously as the background of laryngomalacia. In this report, we describe two patients with acquired idiopathic laryngomalacia with reference to allergic rhinitis and high serum levels of immunoglobulin E. The first patient was a 16-year-old female who presented with inspiratory stridor and dyspnea due to attachment between the epiglottis and bilateral arytenoids, and the second patient was an 18-year-old male who also presented with inspiratory stridor due to attachment between the epiglottis and posterior pharyngeal wall. The respiratory function of both patients was within the normal range but the inspiratory stridor interfered with daily life. Laryngomicrosurgery was performed in both patients using a CO2 laser to remove the arytenoid mucosa in the first patient, and to remove the tip of the epiglottis in the second. Both patients were followed up while receiving oral anti-allergic agents. Laser supraglottic laryngoplasty to remove the vibrating excess tissue was effective for resolving the symptoms. However, recurrence occurred three times in the first patient, and inferior turbinotomy to improve nasal respiration was useful for diminishing the symptoms. PMID:23728505

  9. Role of laryngeal mask airway in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Beleña, José M; Ochoa, Ernesto Josué; Núñez, Mónica; Gilsanz, Carlos; Vidal, Alfonso

    2015-11-27

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures and the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is the most common supraglottic airway device used by the anesthesiologists to manage airway during general anesthesia. Use of LMA has some advantages when compared to endotracheal intubation, such as quick and ease of placement, a lesser requirement for neuromuscular blockade and a lower incidence of postoperative morbididy. However, the use of the LMA in laparoscopy is controversial, based on a concern about increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The ability of these devices to provide optimal ventilation during laparoscopic procedures has been also questioned. The most important parameter to secure an adequate ventilation and oxygenation for the LMA under pneumoperitoneum condition is its seal pressure of airway. A good sealing pressure, not only state correct patient ventilation, but it reduces the potential risk of aspiration due to the better seal of airway. In addition, the LMAs incorporating a gastric access, permitting a safe anesthesia based on these commented points. We did a literature search to clarify if the use of LMA in preference to intubation provides inadequate ventilation or increase the risk of aspiration in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We found evidence stating that LMA with drain channel achieves adequate ventilation for these procedures. Limited evidence was found to consider these devices completely safe against aspiration. However, we observed that the incidence of regurgitation and aspiration associated with the use of the LMA in laparoscopic surgery is very low. PMID:26649155

  10. Investigation of the hygienic safety of continuous positive airways pressure devices after reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Steinhauer, K; Goroncy-Bermes, P

    2005-10-01

    With the widespread use of continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy, the safety of CPAP devices after reprocessing is the subject of debate. In this study, the contamination of CPAP devices and the effectiveness of disinfection was investigated. A total of 122 CPAP devices were examined including 50 CPAP devices used by patients, which were examined before and after reprocessing. Seventy-two new CPAP devices that had not been in contact with patients served as controls. The results of this study show that the microbial contamination of new and used CPAP devices is only minimal. Contaminating micro-organisms were predominantly micro-organisms reflecting the normal environmental microflora such as Penicillium spp., Aspergillus spp., Micrococcaceae and Bacillaceae. Gram-negative species could only be found in rare cases. The data obtained give no indication of poor disinfection of CPAP devices. PMID:16023258

  11. Treatment of sleep-disordered breathing with positive airway pressure devices: technology update.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karin Gardner; Johnson, Douglas Clark

    2015-01-01

    Many types of positive airway pressure (PAP) devices are used to treat sleep-disordered breathing including obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and sleep-related hypoventilation. These include continuous PAP, autoadjusting CPAP, bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, and volume-assured pressure support. Noninvasive PAP has significant leak by design, which these devices adjust for in different manners. Algorithms to provide pressure, detect events, and respond to events vary greatly between the types of devices, and vary among the same category between companies and different models by the same company. Many devices include features designed to improve effectiveness and patient comfort. Data collection systems can track compliance, pressure, leak, and efficacy. Understanding how each device works allows the clinician to better select the best device and settings for a given patient. This paper reviews PAP devices, including their algorithms, settings, and features. PMID:26604837

  12. Treatment of sleep-disordered breathing with positive airway pressure devices: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Karin Gardner; Johnson, Douglas Clark

    2015-01-01

    Many types of positive airway pressure (PAP) devices are used to treat sleep-disordered breathing including obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and sleep-related hypoventilation. These include continuous PAP, autoadjusting CPAP, bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, and volume-assured pressure support. Noninvasive PAP has significant leak by design, which these devices adjust for in different manners. Algorithms to provide pressure, detect events, and respond to events vary greatly between the types of devices, and vary among the same category between companies and different models by the same company. Many devices include features designed to improve effectiveness and patient comfort. Data collection systems can track compliance, pressure, leak, and efficacy. Understanding how each device works allows the clinician to better select the best device and settings for a given patient. This paper reviews PAP devices, including their algorithms, settings, and features. PMID:26604837

  13. A microfluidic device to apply shear stresses to polarizing ciliated airway epithelium using air flow

    PubMed Central

    Trieu, Dennis; Waddell, Thomas K.; McGuigan, Alison P.

    2014-01-01

    Organization of airway epithelium determines ciliary beat direction and coordination for proper mucociliary clearance. Fluidic shear stresses have the potential to influence ciliary organization. Here, an in vitro fluidic flow system was developed for inducing long-term airflow shear stresses on airway epithelium with a view to influencing epithelial organization. Our system consists of a fluidic device for cell culture, integrated into a humidified airflow circuit. The fluidic device has a modular design and is made from a combination of polystyrene and adhesive components incorporated into a 6-well filter membrane insert. We demonstrate the system operates within physiologically relevant shear and pressure ranges and estimate the shear stress exerted on the epithelial cell layer as a result of air flow using a computational model. For both the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS2B and primary human tracheal airway epithelial cells, we demonstrate that cells remain viable within the device when exposed to airflow for 24 h and that normal differentiation and cilia formation occurs. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of our device for exploring the impact of exposing cells to airflow: our tool enables quantification of cytoskeletal organization, and is compatible with in situ bead assays to assess the orientation of cilia beating. PMID:25553181

  14. Post- Thyroidectomy Haematoma Causing Severe Supraglottic Oedema and Pulmonary Oedema - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pujari, Vinayak Seenappa; Anandaswamy, Tejesh C; Vig, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Large, long standing goiters present multiple challenges to anaesthesiologist. Post thyroidectomy haematoma is a rare but life threatening complication of thyroid surgery leading to airway obstruction. We report a case of huge goiter that underwent near total thyroidectomy and developed post thyroidectomy haematoma. Within no time it resulted in near fatal airway obstruction, pulmonary oedema and cardiac arrest. The haematoma was evacuated immediately and patient was resuscitated successfully. Pulmonary oedema was further worsened by subsequent aggressive fluid resuscitation. She was electively ventilated with PEEP and was extubated after five days. Except for right vocal cord palsy her postoperative stay was uneventful. This is unique case where a post thyoidectomy haematoma has resulted in fatal supraglottic oedema and pulmonary oedema. Early recognition, immediate intubation and evacuation of haematoma are the key to manage this complication. We highlight on the pathophysiology of haematoma and discuss the strategies to prevent similar events in future. PMID:25300409

  15. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway. (a... provide a patent airway. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  17. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  18. Analysis of Measured and Simulated Supraglottal Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Rubén; Evdokimova, Vera V; Evgrafova, Karina V; Godino-Llorente, Juan I; Skrelin, Pavel A

    2016-09-01

    To date, although much attention has been paid to the estimation and modeling of the voice source (ie, the glottal airflow volume velocity), the measurement and characterization of the supraglottal pressure wave have been much less studied. Some previous results have unveiled that the supraglottal pressure wave has some spectral resonances similar to those of the voice pressure wave. This makes the supraglottal wave partially intelligible. Although the explanation for such effect seems to be clearly related to the reflected pressure wave traveling upstream along the vocal tract, the influence that nonlinear source-filter interaction has on it is not as clear. This article provides an insight into this issue by comparing the acoustic analyses of measured and simulated supraglottal and voice waves. Simulations have been performed using a high-dimensional discrete vocal fold model. Results of such comparative analysis indicate that spectral resonances in the supraglottal wave are mainly caused by the regressive pressure wave that travels upstream along the vocal tract and not by source-tract interaction. On the contrary and according to simulation results, source-tract interaction has a role in the loss of intelligibility that happens in the supraglottal wave with respect to the voice wave. This loss of intelligibility mainly corresponds to spectral differences for frequencies above 1500 Hz. PMID:26377510

  19. Supraglottic Kaposi's Sarcoma in HIV-Negative Patients: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Server, Ela A.; Durna, Yusuf M.; Yigit, Ozgur; Bozkurt, Erol R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case report of an HIV-negative, supraglottic Kaposi's sarcoma patient. The 80-year-old male patient was admitted with complaints of hoarseness, difficulty in swallowing, and a stinging sensation in his throat for approximately six months. The endoscopic larynx examination revealed a lesion which had completely infiltrated the epiglottis, reached right aryepiglottic fold, was vegetating, pink and purple in color, multilobular, fragile, and shaped like a bunch of grapes, and partially blocked the bleeding airway passage. The case was discussed by the hospital's head-neck cancer committee and a surgery decision was made. A tracheotomy was performed under local anesthesia before the operation due to respiratory distress and endotracheal intubation difficulty. Direct laryngoscopy showed that the mass was limited in the supraglottic area, had invaded the entire left aryepiglottic fold and one-third of the front right aryepiglottic fold, and completely covered epiglottis. It should be remembered that although rare, Kaposi's sarcoma may be encountered in larynx malignancy cases. Disease-free survival may be achieved through local excision and postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:27375914

  20. Solitary fibrous tumour of the supraglottic larynx.

    PubMed

    Grammatica, A; Bolzoni Villaret, A; Ravanelli, M; Nicolai, P

    2016-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare, benign, mesenchymal neoplasm that usually arises in the pleura, but rarely involves other sites outside the serosal space (mediastinum, lung, liver, thyroid gland); larynx involvement is very rare with only sporadic cases reported in the literature. We report a case of SFT in a 41-year-old woman with supraglottic laryngeal invovlement; symptoms included dysphonia and mild odynophagia lasting 2 years, and fibre-optic laryngeal evaluation showed a sub-mucosal mass involving the left supraglottis and medial wall of the pyriform sinus. MRI represents the gold standard tool for differential diagnosis (with schwannoma, paraganglioma and haemangioma) and correct staging, while immunohistochemical and cytomorphologic analysis (bcl-2 and CD34 positivity in 90% of cases) is needed for definitive diagnosis. Surgery is the main treatment (endoscopic and open conservative technique), and its goal is a balance between safe oncological resection and good preservation of laryngeal functions; in this particular case an open laryngeal approach was scheduled due to the size of the tumour. Prognosis is good and in only a few cases (especially in pleural SFT) does the biological behaviour take a malignant course. PMID:27070539

  1. The development of supraglottal flow structures during speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron; Plesniak, Michael

    2009-11-01

    During voiced speech, periodic vocal fold oscillations create a pulsatile jet that emanates from the glottis and is convected through the supraglottal tract. Unsteadiness in the supraglottal jet trajectory (superior to the vocal folds) has been observed in a variety of laryngeal flow investigations, contributing to sound production due to vortex pairing which occurs within the jet as well as the impingement of the deflected jet on physiological structures. However, there is confusion in the literature concerning the mechanisms which contribute to the flow variability. Instabilities in the supraglottal jet include the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, as well as the hypothesized presence of jet 'flip-flopping', the tendency of the glottal jet to detach from one vocal fold wall and reattach to the opposing wall mid-cycle. The morphology of the supraglottal flow field is investigated using phase-averaged PIV measurements acquired in the anterior-posterior midplane of the superior vocal fold tract of a dynamically controlled 7.5 time life-size vocal fold model. Flow parameters are scaled to match physiological values. The relevant fluid flow phenomena that impact the supraglottal jet trajectory are identified.

  2. Accuracy and Linearity of Positive Airway Pressure Devices: A Technical Bench Testing Study

    PubMed Central

    Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; López-Escárcega, Elodia; Carrillo-Alduenda, José Luis; Arredondo-del-Bosque, Fernando; Reyes-Zúñiga, Margarita; Castorena-Maldonado, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To analyze the accuracy and linearity of different CPAP devices outside of the manufacturers' own quality control environment. Methods: Accuracy (how well readings agree with the gold standard) and linearity were evaluated by comparing programmed pressure to measured CPAP pressure using an instrument established as the gold standard. Comparisons were made centimeter-by-centimeter (linearity) throughout the entire programming spectrum of each device (from 4 to 20 cm H2O). Results: A total of 108 CPAP devices were tested (1836 measurements); mean use of the devices was 956 hours. Twenty-two of them were new. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) decreased from 0.97 at pressures programmed between 4 and 10 cm H2O, to 0.84 at pressures of 16 to 20 cm H2O. Despite this high ICC, the 95% agreement limit oscillated between −1 and 1 cm H2O. This same behavior was observed in relation to hours of use: the ICC for readings taken on devices with < 2,000 hours of use was 0.99, while that of the 50 measurements made on devices with > 6,000 hours was 0.97 (the agreement limit oscillated between −1.3 and 2.5 cm H2O). “Adequate adjustments” were documented in 97% of measurements when the definition was ± 1 cm H2O of the programmed pressure, but this index of adequate adjustment readings decreased to 85% when the ± 0.5 cm H2O criterion was applied. Conclusions: In general, the CPAP devices were accurate and linear throughout the spectrum of programmable pressures; however, strategies to assure short- and long-term equipment reliability are required in conditions of routine use. Citation: Torre-Bouscoulet L; López-Escárcega E; Carrillo-Alduenda JL; Arredondo-del-Bosque F; Reyes-Zúñiga M; Castorena-Maldonado A. Accuracy and linearity of positive airway pressure devices: a technical bench testing study. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(4):369-373. PMID:20726286

  3. Evaluation of Karl Storz CMAC Tip™ Device Versus Traditional Airway Suction in a Cadaver Model

    PubMed Central

    Lipe, Demis N.; Lindstrom, Randi; Tauferner, Dustin; Mitchell, Christopher; Moffett, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We compared the efficacy of Karl Storz CMAC Tip™ with inline suction to CMAC with traditional suction device in cadaveric models simulating difficult airways, using media mimicking pulmonary edema and vomit. Methods This was a prospective, cohort study in which we invited emergency medicine faculty and residents to participate. Each participant intubated 2 cadavers (one with simulated pulmonary edema and one with simulated vomit), using CMAC with inline suction and CMAC with traditional suction. Thirty emergency medicine providers performed 4 total intubations each in a crossover trial comparing the CMAC with inline suction and CMAC with traditional suction. Two intubations were performed with simulated vomit and two with simulated pulmonary edema. The primary outcome was time to successful intubation; and the secondary outcome was proportion of successful intubation. Results The median time to successful intubation using the CMAC with inline suction versus traditional suction in the pulmonary edema group was 29s and 30s respectively (p=0.54). In the vomit simulation, the median time to successful intubation was 40s using the CMAC with inline suction and 41s using the CMAC with traditional suction (p=0.70). There were no significant differences in time to successful intubation between the 2 devices. Similarly, the proportions of successful intubation were also not statistically significant between the 2 devices. The proportions of successful intubations using the inline suction were 96.7% and 73.3%, for the pulmonary edema and vomit groups, respectively. Additionally using the handheld suction device, the proportions for the pulmonary edema and vomit group were 100% and 66.7%, respectively. Conclusion CMAC with inline suction was no different than CMAC with traditional suction and was associated with no statistically significant differences in median time to intubation or proportion of successful intubations. PMID:25035766

  4. Surgeons' exposure to sevoflurane during paediatric adenoidectomy: a comparison of three airway devices.

    PubMed

    Herzog-Niescery, J; Gude, P; Gahlen, F; Seipp, H-M; Bartz, H; Botteck, N M; Bellgardt, M; Dazert, S; Weber, T P; Vogelsang, H

    2016-08-01

    Although sevoflurane is commonly used in anaesthesia, a threshold value for maximum exposure to personnel does not exist and although anaesthetists are aware of the problem, surgeons rarely focus on it. We used a photo-acoustic infrared device to measure the exposure of surgeons to sevoflurane during paediatric adenoidectomies. Sixty children were randomly allocated to laryngeal mask, cuffed tracheal tube or uncuffed tracheal tube. The average mean (maximum) sevoflurane concentrations within the surgeons' operating area were 1.05 (10.05) ppm in the laryngeal mask group, 0.33 (1.44) ppm in the cuffed tracheal tube group and 1.79 (18.02) ppm in the uncuffed tracheal tube group, (p < 0.001), laryngeal mask and cuffed tracheal tube groups vs. uncuffed tube group. The presence of sevoflurane was noticed by surgeons in 20% of cases but there were no differences between the groups (p = 0.193). Surgical and anaesthetic complications were similar in all three groups. We conclude that sevoflurane can be safely used during adenoidectomies with all three airway devices, but in order to minimise sevoflurane peak concentrations, cuffed tracheal tubes are preferred. PMID:27277674

  5. [Combined Use of a Videolaryngoscope and a Transilluminating Device for Intubation with Two Difficult Airways].

    PubMed

    Saima, Shunsuke; Asai, Takashi; Kimura, Rie; Terada, Satoshi; Arai, Takerou; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2015-10-01

    Videolaryngoscope is useful in patients with difficult airways, but it may not be in some patients. We report the use of a lighted stylet to facilitate tracheal intubation in 2 patients in whom laryngoscopy with a videolaryngoscope was difficult. Case 1: A 52-year-old female with loose teeth and lockjaw presented for a scoliosis surgery under general anesthesia. Laryngoscopy using a blade 3 of a Glide-Scope® (Laerdal Medical Corporation, New York, NY, USA) videolaryngoscope (GVL) showed a Cormack-Lehanne grade 3 view. Bag mask ventilation was easily achieved. By using the Trachilight™ (Saturn Biomedical System Burnaby, BC, Canada) with the GVL, we could intubate the trachea succesfully. Case 2: A 16-year-old male with a history of difficult tracheal intubation due to a limited cervical spine movement presented for an external fixation of a femur under general anesthesia. After induction of anaesthesia, bag mask ventilation was easily achieved but the GVL laryngoscopy did not provide a good view of the glottis (Cormack-Lehanne grade 3). Combined use of the Trachilight™ with the GVL, facilitated tracheal intubation. The Trachilight™ is a recognized aid to facilitate trachal intubation but the device is now commercially not available. Neverthless, we believe that a lighted stylet is potentially useful for tracheal intubation when the view of the glottis with a videolaryngoscopy is not ideal. PMID:26742405

  6. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent) for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Muhammad; Certal, Victor; Nigam, Gaurav; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Kushida, Clete A; Camacho, Macario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP) devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients) were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD) for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in 345 patients decreased from 27.32 ± 22.24 to 12.78 ± 16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%). Random effects modeling mean difference (MD) was -14.78 events/hr [95% CI -19.12, -10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI) in 247 patients decreased from 21.2 ± 19.3 to 12.4 ± 14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001). Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT) M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2 ± 6.8% to 86.2 ± 11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) M ± SD improved (359 patients) from 9.9 ± 5.3 to 7.4 ± 5.0, MD -2.5 [95% CI -3.2, -1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent) reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding) that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent). PMID:26798519

  7. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent) for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Muhammad; Certal, Victor; Nigam, Gaurav; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Kushida, Clete A.; Camacho, Macario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP) devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients) were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD) for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in 345 patients decreased from 27.32 ± 22.24 to 12.78 ± 16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%). Random effects modeling mean difference (MD) was −14.78 events/hr [95% CI −19.12, −10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI) in 247 patients decreased from 21.2 ± 19.3 to 12.4 ± 14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001). Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT) M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2 ± 6.8% to 86.2 ± 11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) M ± SD improved (359 patients) from 9.9 ± 5.3 to 7.4 ± 5.0, MD −2.5 [95% CI −3.2, −1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent) reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding) that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent). PMID:26798519

  8. Effects of subglottal and supraglottal acoustic loading on voice production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Mongeau, Luc; Frankel, Steven

    2002-05-01

    Speech production involves sound generation by confined jets through an orifice (the glottis) with a time-varying area. Predictive models are usually based on the quasi-steady assumption. This assumption allows the complex unsteady flows to be treated as steady flows, which are more effectively modeled computationally. Because of the reflective properties of the human lungs, trachea and vocal tract, subglottal and supraglottal resonance and other acoustic effects occur in speech, which might affect glottal impedance, especially in the regime of unsteady flow separation. Changes in the flow structure, or flow regurgitation due to a transient negative transglottal pressure, could also occur. These phenomena may affect the quasi-steady behavior of speech production. To investigate the possible effects of the subglottal and supraglottal acoustic loadings, a dynamic mechanical model of the larynx was designed and built. The subglottal and supraglottal acoustic loadings are simulated using an expansion in the tube upstream of the glottis and a finite length tube downstream, respectively. The acoustic pressures of waves radiated upstream and downstream of the orifice were measured and compared to those predicted using a model based on the quasi-steady assumption. A good agreement between the experimental data and the predictions was obtained for different operating frequencies, flow rates, and orifice shapes. This supports the validity of the quasi-steady assumption for various subglottal and supraglottal acoustic loadings.

  9. Transoral resection of supraglottic tumours using microelectrodes (54 cases).

    PubMed

    Basterra, Jorge; Esteban, Francisco; Reboll, Rosa; Menoyo, Alicia; Zapater, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    We present the oncological and functional results of surgical transoral resection of supraglottic laryngeal carcinomas using microelectrodes. This prospective multicentre trial was conducted from 2005 to 2009. It included 54 patients (23 T1, 14 T2, and 17 T3) with supraglottic cancer, with a follow-up of 2 years. Outcome measurements were: tracheostomy, hospital stay, nasogastric feeding and recurrences. Four patients required permanent tracheostomies. The mean hospital stay was 8.1 days. Temporary nasogastric feeding was necessary in 13 patients. Postoperative complications included two incidences of haemorrhage requiring surgical intervention and one pneumonia. Four patients out of eight with T3 tumours had regional recurrence; in these cases salvage surgery was performed: two cases by the transoral approach and six total laryngectomies. Clinical results were similar to those obtained with CO2 laser therapy. We list other advantages of the technique and include a literature review. PMID:24695940

  10. Pilot Study of Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices for the Treatment of Childhood Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kureshi, Suraiya A.; Gallagher, Paul R.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Cornaglia, Mary Anne; Maggs, Jill; Samuel, John; Traylor, Joel; Marcus, Carole L.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Alternative therapies for childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are needed as OSAS may persist despite adenotonsillectomy, and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence is low. Nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (NEPAP) devices have not been studied in children. We hypothesized that NEPAP would result in polysomnographic improvement. Further, we aimed to determine NEPAP adherence, effects on sleepiness, behavior, and quality of life. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover pilot study was performed. CPAP candidates, 8-16 years old, underwent NEPAP and placebo polysomnograms. Subjects with ≥ 50% reduction in the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) from placebo to NEPAP night or AHI < 5/h on NEPAP night wore NEPAP at home for 30 days. Adherence was assessed by daily phone calls/emails and collecting used devices. Results: Fourteen subjects (age 13.4 ± 1.9 years, BMI z-scores 2.2 ± 1 [mean ± SD]) were studied. There was significant improvement in the obstructive apnea index with NEPAP vs. placebo: 0.6 (0-21.1)/h vs. 4.2 (0-41.9)/h (median [range], p = 0.010) and trends for improvement in other polysomnographic parameters. However, responses were variable, with 3 subjects not improving and 2 worsening. Older children and those with less hypercapnia had a better response. Eight subjects were sent home with devices; one was lost to follow-up, and adherence in the remainder was 83% of nights; these subjects had a significant improvement in sleepiness and quality of life. Conclusions: NEPAP devices are a potential alternative therapy for OSAS in a small subset of children. Due to variability in individual responses, efficacy of NEPAP should be evaluated with polysomnography. Clinical Trial Registration: www.clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT01768065 Citation: Kureshi SA, Gallagher PR, McDonough JM, Cornaglia MA, Maggs J, Samuel J, Traylor J, Marcus CL. Pilot study of nasal expiratory positive airway

  11. Dose-response relationship for supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, L.J.; Thomas, H.D. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    In this editorial, two important issues in the treatment of cancers of the supraglottic larynx which had been raised by other authors, Harwood et al., are discussed. The first is the technique of elective irradiation of clinically uninvolved neck nodes. The second is the question of dose-response relationships for local control of tumors of this site. The present authors do not believe that the data of Harwood et al. can be construed as convincing evidence against a dose-response relationship, because of the heterogeneity of the clinical material and the narrow range of doses represented.(KRM)

  12. [Pressure-related dysphonia, recurring pneumonia and supraglottic tumor].

    PubMed

    Jahn, K; Straehler-Pohl, H-J; Fischer, H-P; Schade, G

    2010-09-01

    Urbach-Wiethe syndrome (hyalinosis cutis et mucosae) is an autosomal-recessive inherited disease. It often presents with typical symptoms such as skin lesions (especially in the face and neck area), dyspnea, and maldigestion. Hoarseness is a leading symptom in young children. These manifestations are caused by the assimilation of glycoproteins in mesenchymal tissue. Our case report shows that hoarseness does not necessarily appear only in children, but can also appear later. Furthermore, the assimilation of glycoproteins in the supraglottic area may also cause dysphonia. Due to the varied features of this disease, interdisciplinary check-ups are necessary at regular intervals. PMID:20464358

  13. Use of the Airtraq® device for airway management in the prehospital setting – a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Difficulties with prehospital intubations have encouraged the development of indirect laryngoscopy techniques, facilitating laryngeal visualization. Airtraq® is a relatively new single-use indirect laryngoscope. The Airtraq® has been evaluated in several prehospital mannequin intubation trials. However, prehospital clinical experience with the device is limited. Methods A retrospective medical chart review was performed for patients who underwent prehospital endotracheal intubation in the Stockholm County between January 2008 and December 2012. Both anaesthesiologists and nurse anaesthetists performed prehospital intubations during the study period. All Airtraq® intubations during this period were included in the analysis. The objective was to estimate the success rate of Airtraq® used in a prehospital setting. Results During the 5-year period (January 2008- December 2012), 2453 tracheal intubations were performed. Airtraq® was used in 28 cases (1%). The overall Airtraq® intubation success rate was 68%. Among patients with anticipated or unexpected difficult airway (23/28) the Airtraq® success rate was 61% (14/23). Among patients who underwent drug facilitated or rapid-sequence intubation protocols 4/5 (80%) were successfully intubated with Airtraq®. Conclusion In conclusion, this retrospective study showed a higher Airtraq® success rate than previous prospective prehospital trials. However, compared to other prehospital direct and indirect intubation methods the Airtraq success rate is low. Further clinical trials are necessary to evaluate the role of Airtraq® in the prehospital airway management. PMID:24484856

  14. An Index to Objectively Score Supraglottic Abnormalities in Refractory Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Good, James T.; Rollins, Donald R.; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Lommatzsch, Steven E.; Carolan, Brendan J.; Stubenrauch, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with refractory asthma frequently have elements of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) with potential aspiration contributing to their poor control. We previously reported on a supraglottic index (SGI) scoring system that helps in the evaluation of LPR with potential aspiration. However, to further the usefulness of this SGI scoring system for bronchoscopists, a teaching system was developed that included both interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility. Methods: Five pulmonologists with expertise in fiber-optic bronchoscopy but novice to the SGI participated. A training system was developed that could be used via Internet interaction to make this learning technique widely available. Results: By the final testing, there was excellent interreader agreement (κ of at least 0.81), thus documenting reproducibility in scoring the SGI. For the measure of intrareader consistency, one reader was arbitrarily selected to rescore the final test 4 weeks later and had a κ value of 0.93, with a 95% CI of 0.79 to 1.00. Conclusions: In this study, we demonstrate that with an organized educational approach, bronchoscopists can develop skills to have highly reproducible assessment and scoring of supraglottic abnormalities. The SGI can be used to determine which patients need additional intervention to determine causes of LPR and gastroesophageal reflux. Identification of this problem in patients with refractory asthma allows for personal, individual directed therapy to improve asthma control. PMID:24202552

  15. Fluoroscopy assisted tracheal intubation in a case of anticipated difficult airway: Fail safe devices can also fail.

    PubMed

    Arulvelan, Appavoo; Soumya, Madhusudhan; Santhosh, Kannath

    2015-01-01

    Difficulty in airway management is the most important cause of major anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. Unexpected difficulties may arise even with proper preanesthesia planning. Here, we report a case of anticipated difficult airway primarily planned for flexible fibreoptic bronchoscope assisted intubation, but due to unexpected failure of light source, fluoroscopy was used, and the airway was successfully secured. PMID:26240555

  16. Fluoroscopy assisted tracheal intubation in a case of anticipated difficult airway: Fail safe devices can also fail

    PubMed Central

    Arulvelan, Appavoo; Soumya, Madhusudhan; Santhosh, Kannath

    2015-01-01

    Difficulty in airway management is the most important cause of major anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. Unexpected difficulties may arise even with proper preanesthesia planning. Here, we report a case of anticipated difficult airway primarily planned for flexible fibreoptic bronchoscope assisted intubation, but due to unexpected failure of light source, fluoroscopy was used, and the airway was successfully secured. PMID:26240555

  17. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics*

    PubMed Central

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-01-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent the rapid oxygen desaturation seen in pregnant women by advocating nasal oxygenation and mask ventilation immediately after induction; limiting intubation attempts to two; and consideration of early release of cricoid pressure if difficulties are encountered. Algorithm 2 summarises the management after declaring failed tracheal intubation with clear decision points, and encourages early insertion of a (preferably second-generation) supraglottic airway device if appropriate. Algorithm 3 covers the management of the ‘can't intubate, can't oxygenate’ situation and emergency front-of-neck airway access, including the necessity for timely perimortem caesarean section if maternal oxygenation cannot be achieved. Table 1 gives a structure for assessing the individual factors relevant in the decision to awaken or proceed should intubation fail, which include: urgency related to maternal or fetal factors; seniority of the anaesthetist; obesity of the patient; surgical complexity; aspiration risk; potential difficulty with provision of alternative anaesthesia; and post-induction airway device and airway patency. This decision should be considered by the team in advance of performing a general anaesthetic to make a provisional plan should failed intubation occur. The table is also intended to be used as a teaching tool to facilitate discussion and learning regarding the complex nature of decision-making when faced with a failed intubation. Table 2 gives practical considerations of how

  18. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-11-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent the rapid oxygen desaturation seen in pregnant women by advocating nasal oxygenation and mask ventilation immediately after induction; limiting intubation attempts to two; and consideration of early release of cricoid pressure if difficulties are encountered. Algorithm 2 summarises the management after declaring failed tracheal intubation with clear decision points, and encourages early insertion of a (preferably second-generation) supraglottic airway device if appropriate. Algorithm 3 covers the management of the 'can't intubate, can't oxygenate' situation and emergency front-of-neck airway access, including the necessity for timely perimortem caesarean section if maternal oxygenation cannot be achieved. Table 1 gives a structure for assessing the individual factors relevant in the decision to awaken or proceed should intubation fail, which include: urgency related to maternal or fetal factors; seniority of the anaesthetist; obesity of the patient; surgical complexity; aspiration risk; potential difficulty with provision of alternative anaesthesia; and post-induction airway device and airway patency. This decision should be considered by the team in advance of performing a general anaesthetic to make a provisional plan should failed intubation occur. The table is also intended to be used as a teaching tool to facilitate discussion and learning regarding the complex nature of decision-making when faced with a failed intubation. Table 2 gives practical considerations of how to

  19. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Airway connector. 868.5810 Section 868.5810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5810 Airway connector. (a) Identification. An airway connector is a device intended to...

  20. Evaluation of carbon dioxide rebreathing during pressure support ventilation with airway management system (BiPAP) devices.

    PubMed

    Lofaso, F; Brochard, L; Touchard, D; Hang, T; Harf, A; Isabey, D

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether carbon dioxide (CO2) rebreathing occurs in acute respiratory failure patients ventilated using the standard airway management system (BiPAP pressure support ventilator; Respironics; Murrysville, Pa) with positive inspiratory airway pressure and a minimal level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and whether any CO2 rebreathing may be efficiently prevented by the addition of a nonrebreathing valve to the BiPAP system circuit. In the first part of the study, the standard device was tested on a lung model with a nonrebreathing valve (BiPAP-NRV) and with the usual Whisper Swivel connector (BiPAP-uc). With the BiPAP-uc device, the resident volume of expired air in the inspiratory circuit at the end of expiration (RVEA) was 55% of the tidal volume (VT) when the inspiratory pressure was 10 cm H2O and the frequency was at 15 cycles per minute. The BiPAP-NRV device efficiently prevented CO2 rebreathing but resulted in a slight decrease in VT, which was due to a significant increase in external PEEP (2.4 vs 1.3 cm H2O) caused by the additional expiratory valve resistance. For similar reasons, both the pressure swing necessary to trigger pressure support and the imposed expiratory work were increased in the lung model when the nonrebreathing valve was used. In the second part of the study, seven patients weaned from mechanical ventilation were investigated using a randomized crossover design to compare three situations: pressure support ventilation with a conventional intensive care ventilator (CIPS), BiPAP system use, and BiPAP-NRV. When we compared the BiPAP system use with the other two systems, we observed no significant effect on blood gases but found significant increases in VT, minute ventilation, and work of breathing. These findings are experimental and are clinical evidence that significant CO2 rebreathing occurs with the standard BiPAP system. This drawback can be overcome by using a non-rebreathing valve

  1. Unsteady flow motions in the supraglottal region during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Dai, Hu

    2008-11-01

    The highly unsteady flow motions in the larynx are not only responsible for producing the fundamental frequency tone in phonation, but also have a significant contribution to the broadband noise in the human voice. In this work, the laryngeal flow is modeled either as an incompressible pulsatile jet confined in a two-dimensional channel, or a pressure-driven flow modulated by a pair of viscoelastic vocal folds through the flow--structure interaction. The flow in the supraglottal region is found to be dominated by large-scale vortices whose unsteady motions significantly deflect the glottal jet. In the flow--structure interaction, a hybrid model based on the immersed-boundary method is developed to simulate the flow-induced vocal fold vibration, which involves a three-dimensional vocal fold prototype and a two-dimensional viscous flow. Both the flow behavior and the vibratory characteristics of the vocal folds will be presented.

  2. Histological investigation of the supra-glottal structures in humans for understanding abnormal phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Miwako; Sakakibara, Ken-Ichi; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Chan, Roger; Niimi, Seijii; Tayama, Niro

    2002-11-01

    Phonation is the vocal fold vibration on normal voice. But sometimes we can observe the other phonation styles like as the pressed voice or some throat singings like as ''kargyraa'' or ''drone'' in Khoomei in Mongolian music. Also, clinically, we know that some patients who have the wide glottal slit in phonation because of the recurrence nerve palsy or after partial laryngectomy, could make the ''supra-glottal phonation.'' The ''supra-glottal phonation'' would be made from the vibration of ''supra-glottal structures'' such as the false vocal folds, the arytenoids and the epiglottis, etc. Endoscopic examination suggests the existence of some contractile functions in supra-glottal space. However, these phonation systems have not been clear to explain their neuromuscular mechanism in histology. This study aimed to find the basis for making the supra-glottal phonation from the points of view of the histological structures. We tried to investigate if there were any muscles that could contract the supra-glottal structures. The samples are the excised larynx of human beings. They were fixed by formalin after excision. We observed their macroscopic anatomy, and also with the microscopic observation their histological preparations after the process of the embedding in paraffin, slicing for the preparation and HE (hematoxylin-eosin) staining.

  3. Conquering the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Gandy, William E

    2008-01-01

    Every medic should practice regularly for the inevitable difficult airway case. Practice should include review of the causes of difficult airways, as well as skill practice. Having a preassembled airway kit can make your response to an unexpected difficult situation easier. Of all the devices mentioned, the bougie is the airway practitioner's best friend. Using the BURP technique, if not contraindicated, together with the bougie will enable you to intubate many difficult patients with confidence. Remember, "If your patient cannot breathe, nothing else matters. PMID:18251307

  4. [Difficult airway management using the air-Q in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Soen, Masako; Kusunoki, Tomohiro; Tatsumi, Shinichi; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-06-01

    Patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) frequently encounter difficult airway management due to skeletal abnormalities, including fusion of two or more vertebrae and short neck. We report successful tracheal intubation using the air-Q supraglottic airway device (air-Q). A 46-year-old woman (height, 149 cm; weight, 62 kg) with KFS was scheduled to undergo vertebral arch plasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. She could open her mouth sufficiently but could not tilt her head due to C1-3 fusion. Following administration of fentanyl 100 microg and propofol 120 mg, mask ventilation was achieved with jaw thrust maneuver. We then administered rocuronium 50 mg for immobilization and attempted tracheal intubation using the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope with a thin pediatric Intlock. However, we could not target the glottis, and ventilation via a size 3 i-gel or size 3.5 air-Q was unsuccessful. Using a size 2.5 air-Q, sufficient ventilation was finally achieved. We performed fiberoptic tracheal intubation through the air-Q using a tube with an internal diameter of 6.0-mm. We then exchanged the 6.0-mm tracheal tube with a 7.0-mm spiral tube using a 10 Fr tracheal tube introducer. PMID:24979859

  5. Ease of insertion of the laryngeal mask airway in pediatric surgical patients: Predictors of failure and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Asida, SM; Ahmed, SS

    2016-01-01

    Background: Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is an useful alternative to endotracheal tube for airway management. The risk of life-threatening adverse respiratory events during its use is rare, but we need to know about the risk-adjusted prediction of its insertion failure requiring rescue tracheal intubation and its impact on patient outcome. Materials and Methods: Five hundred patients; 6 months to 12-year-old, American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II scheduled to undergo elective surgical procedures that require general anesthesia were included in this study. LMA was inserted after induction of anesthesia. The insertion conditions, intra, and postoperative events were recorded. Our primary outcome variable was trial success from the first time. Results: We recorded 426 cases (85.2%) of first trial success with clear airway compared to 46 case (9.2%) of second trial success (P ≤ 0.001). Predictors of failure of first attempt of LMA insertion include abnormal airway anatomy (91%), body weight <16 kg and age below 5 years (44%), the use of LMA size of 1 and 1.5 (3.8%), the intraoperative lateral position (3.8%). Conclusion: The data obtained from this study support the use of the LMA as a reliable pediatric supraglottic airway device, demonstrating relatively low failure rates. Predictors of LMA failure in the pediatric surgical population should be independently considered. Trial Registration: The study is registered in the Australian and New Zealand clinical trial registry with the allocated trial number: ACTRN12614000994684. Web address of trial: http://www.ANZCTR.org.au/A CTRN12614000994684.aspx. PMID:27375384

  6. ProSeal laryngeal mask airway: An alternative to endotracheal intubation in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Jaya; Dubey, Kamta Prasad; Sahu, Bal Swaroop; Shah, Pratibha Jain

    2010-01-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is a supraglottic airway management device. The LMA is preferred for airway management in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures. The recently introduced ProSeal (PLMA), a modification of Classic LMA, has a gastric drainage tube placed lateral to main airway tube which allows the regurgitated gastric contents to bypass the glottis and prevents the pulmonary aspiration. This study was done to compare the efficacy of ProSeal LMA with an endotracheal tube in paediatric patients with respect to number of attempts for placement of devices, haemodynamic responses and perioperative respiratory complications. Sixty children, ASA I and II, weighing 10-20 kg between 2 and 8 years of age group of either sex undergoing elective ophthalmological and lower abdominal surgeries of 30-60 min duration, randomly divided into two groups of 30 patients each were studied. The number of attempts for endotracheal intubation was less than the placement of PLMA. Haemodynamic responses were significantly higher (P<0.05) after endotracheal intubation as compared to the placement of PLMA. There were no significant differences in mean SpO2 (%) and EtCO2 levels recorded at different time intervals between the two groups. The incidence of post-operative respiratory complications cough and bronchospasm was higher after extubation than after removal of PLMA. The incidence of soft tissue trauma was noted to be higher for PLMA after its removal. There were no incidences of aspiration and hoarseness/sore throat in either group. It is concluded that ProSeal LMA can be safely considered as a suitable and effective alternative to endotracheal intubation in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures. PMID:21224972

  7. A randomized control study comparing the pharyngolaryngeal morbidity of laryngeal mask airway versus endotracheal tube

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, A.; Jacob, Ron Mathew; Koshy, Rachel Cherian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Endotracheal tube (ETT) has been associated with various pharyngolaryngeal morbidities (PLMs) following general anesthesia (GA). Laryngeal mask airway (LMA), currently the most commonly used supraglottic airway device, has several advantageous over the ETT but has been associated with varying results of PLM. The aim of our study was to compare the PLM between them and to know whether LMA is a better alternative. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventy American Society of Anesthesiologists Grades 1 and 2 women scheduled for elective mastectomy were included in the study, 85 each in either group, E Group (intubated with ETT) and L Group (using LMA) on a random basis. All patients received GA with controlled ventilation using a muscle relaxant. PLMs such as hoarseness, pain on phonation, sore throat, and difficulty in swallowing were documented by an interview done postoperatively. Peroperative parameters such as intubation attempts, trauma during airway device insertion, and intraoperative incidents were also analyzed. A sample size of 85 patients in each group was calculated in order to achieve a study power of 0.8 and alpha level was taken as 0.05. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 using Chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test and Fisher's exact test were used as nonparametric tests. A two-tailed P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Patients in E Group had statistically significant increased incidence of a sore throat and voice complaints whereas L Group showed a statistically significant increase of swallowing problems. There was also a significant correlation between traumatic insertion and sore throat, pain on swallowing in the L Group, which could be due to direct trauma. Conclusions: ETT was associated with an increased incidence of voice problems and sore throat whereas LMA had an increased incidence of dysphagia and odynophagia. Use of LMA changes the pharyngolaryngeal profile to a more acceptable one. PMID:27212745

  8. Differentiation of pyriform sinus cancer from supraglottic laryngeal cancer by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, S.; Mancuso, A.; Hoover, L.; Hanafee, W.

    1981-11-01

    Nine pyriform sinus tumors and 16 supraglottic laryngeal lesions were studied by computed tomography. The pyriform sinus tumors had a much higher incidence of thyroid cartilage invasion (five of nine patients) and involved the posterolateral margins of the cartilage. Only two of 16 supraglottic tumors reached the thyroid cartilage, involving the midline or more inferior margins. The supraglottic tumors grew in a circumferential pattern, and when the preepiglottic space was involved, extension was bilaterial. Lesions of the pyriform sinus more frequently showed unilateral involvement. Lymph node metastases were seen in an approximately equal proportion of patients in the two groups, and they correlated more with the size of the primary tumor than with its site of origin. Posteroinferior invasion of the space between the thyroid and cricoid cartilage was seen only with pyriform sinus lesions.

  9. Use of a home positive airway pressure device during intraoperative monitored anesthesia care for outpatient surgery.

    PubMed

    Borg, Lindsay; Walters, Tessa L; Siegel, Lawrence C; Dazols, John; Mariano, Edward R

    2016-08-01

    Perioperative positive airway pressure (PAP) is recommended by the American Society of Anesthesiologists for patients with obstructive sleep apnea, but a readily available and personalized intraoperative delivery system does not exist. We present the successful use of a patient's own nasal PAP machine in the operating room during outpatient foot surgery which required addition of a straight adaptor for oxygen delivery and careful positioning of the gas sampling line to permit end-tidal carbox dioxide monitoring. Home PAP machines may provide a potential alternative to more invasive methods of airway management for patients with obstructive sleep apnea under moderate sedation. PMID:27169990

  10. Effectiveness of flow inflating device in providing Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for critically ill children in limited-resource settings: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, G. Fatima Shirly; Velmurugan, Lakshmi; Sangareddi, Shanthi; Nedunchelian, Krishnamurthy; Selvaraj, Vinoth

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is an emerging popular concept, which includes bi-level positive airway pressure or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In settings with scarce resources for NIV machines, CPAP can be provided through various indigenous means and one such mode is flow inflating device - Jackson-Rees circuit (JR)/Bain circuit. The study analyses the epidemiology, various clinical indications, predictors of CPAP failure, and stresses the usefulness of flow inflating device as an indigenous way of providing CPAP. Methods: A prospective observational study was undertaken in the critical care unit of a Government Tertiary Care Hospital, from November 2013 to September 2014. All children who required CPAP in the age group 1 month to 12 years of both sexes were included in this study. They were started on indigenous CPAP through flow inflating device on clinical grounds based on the pediatric assessment triangle, and the duration and outcome were analyzed. Results: This study population included 214 children. CPAP through flow inflating device was successful in 89.7% of cases, of which bronchiolitis accounted for 98.3%. A prolonged duration of CPAP support of >96 h was required in pneumonia. CPAP failure was noted in 10.3% of cases, the major risk factors being children <1 year and pneumonia with septic shock. Conclusion: We conclude that flow inflating devices - JR/Bain circuit are effective as an indigenous CPAP in limited resource settings. Despite its benefits, CPAP is not a substitute for invasive ventilation, as when the need for intubation arises timely intervention is needed.

  11. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  13. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  15. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  16. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1780 Inspiratory airway pressure meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper...

  19. Supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma: an analysis of dose-time-volume factors in 410 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, A.R.; Beale, F.A.; Cummings, B.J.; Keane, T.J.; Payne, D.G.; Rider, W.D.; Rawlinson, E.; Elhakim, T.

    1983-03-01

    Four hundred and ten patients with supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma treated with moderate dose radical radiotherapy with surgery for salvage (RRSS) were analyzed in detail to determine optimal dose-time-volume parameters to be used in the treatment of each stage of supraglottic carcinoma. In the RRSS group 41% are alive and well at 5 years, 38% died of their tumor and 21% of intercurrent disease. Presence or absence of nodal disease has a major impact on survival. Local control is approximately 70% in T1, T2N0 patients and approximately 50% in T3 and T4N0 patients. Seventeen percent of T1 and T2N0 patients failed in the initially negative neck. Ten major complications (2.4%) have been seen. Local control by irradiation was not influenced by dose or field size. Regional control in the initially negative neck was markedly increased with the use of larger irradiation field sizes. Field sizes of less than 7 x 7 cm resulted in an 18% neck failure rate as commpared to 3% with larger field sizes (p = 0.00005). This particularly applied to early stage disease. As a result of the use of larger irradiation field sizes giving reduced neck failure rates, improvement in survival has been seen in early stage supraglottic patients. The results are compared with published results. There is no statistically significant dose response curve in any stage of supraglottic cancer over the dose range 1650-2300 ret. Optimal treatment factors for supraglottic cancer are discussed.

  20. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  1. Management of the artificial airway.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Gomaa, Dina; Rodriquez, Dario

    2014-06-01

    Management of the artificial airway includes securing the tube to prevent dislodgement or migration as well as removal of secretions. Preventive measures include adequate humidification and appropriate airway suctioning. Monitoring airway patency and removing obstruction are potentially life-saving components of airway management. Cuff pressure management is important for preventing aspiration and mucosal damage as well as assuring adequate ventilation. A number of new monitoring techniques have been introduced, and automated cuff pressure control is becoming more common. The respiratory therapist should be adept with all these devices and understand the appropriate application and management. PMID:24891202

  2. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  3. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  4. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  5. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  7. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  8. 21 CFR 868.5110 - Oropharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oropharyngeal airway. 868.5110 Section 868.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5110 Oropharyngeal airway....

  9. 21 CFR 868.5100 - Nasopharyngeal airway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal airway. 868.5100 Section 868.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5100 Nasopharyngeal airway....

  10. The Importance of Airway Management in Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lenworth M.

    1988-01-01

    The airway is the most important priority in the management of the severely injured patient. It is essential to open and clear the airway to allow free access of air to the distal endobronchial tree. Manual methods of opening the airway are described. Numerous methods for establishing definitive control of the airway as well as the associated devices currently available to maintain control are described. Once the airway is maintained, it is important to ensure adequate oxygenation and ventilation through the airway. Modern portable devices that monitor the carbon dioxide in the expired air at the end of each breath are currently available. These devices allow the physician to verify the position of the tube in the airway as well as to continuously monitor the efficacy of ventilation. PMID:3073226

  11. Physical principle of airway design in human lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keunhwan; Son, Taeho; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-11-01

    From an engineering perspective, lungs are natural microfluidic devices that extract oxygen from air. In the bronchial tree, airways branch by dichotomy with a systematic reduction of their diameters. It is generally accepted that in conducting airways, which air passes on the way to the acinar airways from the atmosphere, the reduction ratio of diameter is closely related to the minimization of viscous dissipation. Such a principle is formulated as the Hess-Murray law. However, in acinar airways, where oxygen transfer to alveolae occurs, the diameter reduction with progressive generations is more moderate than in conducting airways. Noting that the dominant transfer mechanism in acinar airways is diffusion rather than advection, unlike conducting airways, we construct a mathematical model for oxygen transfer through a series of acinar airways. Our model allows us to predict the optimal airway reduction ratio that maximizes the oxygen transfer in a finite airway volume, thereby rationalizing the observed airway reduction ratio in acinar airways.

  12. Surgical anatomy of oropharynx and supraglottic larynx for transoral robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gun, Ramazan; Ozer, Enver

    2015-12-01

    Traditional external surgical approaches have been used for the surgical management of the oropharyngeal and laryngeal tumors. Trans-oral robotic surgery allows surgeon to operate oropharyngeal and supraglottic tumors through the mouth with preservation of functions. The surgeons must be knowledgeable about the anatomy of the oral cavity and oropharynx medial to lateral perspective. In this article, we will describe the relevant inside out surgical anatomy and its clinical implications for trans-oral robotic surgery. PMID:26541478

  13. Mechanics of airway and alveolar collapse in human breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Fitz-Clarke, John R

    2007-11-15

    A computational model of the human respiratory tract was developed to study airway and alveolar compression and re-expansion during deep breath-hold dives. The model incorporates the chest wall, supraglottic airway, trachea, branched airway tree, and elastic alveoli assigned time-dependent surfactant properties. Total lung collapse with degassing of all alveoli is predicted to occur around 235 m, much deeper than estimates for aquatic mammals. Hysteresis of the pressure-volume loop increases with maximum diving depth due to progressive alveolar collapse. Reopening of alveoli occurs stochastically as airway pressure overcomes adhesive and compressive forces on ascent. Surface area for gas exchange vanishes at collapse depth, implying that the risk of decompression sickness should reach a plateau beyond this depth. Pulmonary capillary transmural stresses cannot increase after local alveolar collapse. Consolidation of lung parenchyma might provide protection from capillary injury or leakage caused by vascular engorgement due to outward chest wall recoil at extreme depths. PMID:17827075

  14. Management of early supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma by irradiation with surgery in reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, A.R.; Beale, F.A.; Cummings, B.J.; Keane, T.J.; Payne, D.G.; Rider, W.D.

    1983-09-01

    The results of radical radiotherapy with surgery in reserve for 136 patients with stage T1 and T2 NO supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma seen during a 20-year period are analyzed herein. Approximately one half of all patients were alive and well five years after treatment, while one fifth of patients died of supraglottic cancer. The cancer in two thirds of these patients was locally controlled by irradiation; of particular note was an 11% to 18% recurrence rate in patients whose necks were initially noted to be free of cancer. Analysis of the results of irradiation treatment disclosed a major reduction in nodal recurrence from the use of irradiation fields larger than 7 X 7 cm (3%, as compared with 19% with a smaller irradiation field). During the 20-year period of the study, there was a major reduction observed in tumor-related deaths; this is attributed to the use of larger irradiation fields and more aggressive use of surgery for irradiation failures. The results obtained are compared herein with the results of primary surgery, and conclusions are drawn as to the optimal management of early-stage supraglottic cancer.

  15. Contribution of the supraglottic larynx to the vocal product: imaging and acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracco, L. Carol

    1996-04-01

    Horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a mass lesion located in the region of the pharynx superior to the true vocal folds. In contrast to full or partial laryngectomy, patients who undergo horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy often present with little or nor involvement to the true vocal folds. This population provides an opportunity to examine the acoustic consequences of altering the pharynx while sparing the laryngeal sound source. Acoustic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were acquired in a group of four patients before and after supraglottic laryngectomy. Acoustic measures included the identification of vocal tract resonances and the fundamental frequency of the vocal fold vibration. 3D reconstruction of the pharyngeal portion of each subjects' vocal tract were made from MRIs taken during phonation and volume measures were obtained. These measures reveal a variable, but often dramatic difference in the surgically-altered area of the pharynx and changes in the formant frequencies of the vowel/i/post surgically. In some cases the presence of the tumor created a deviation from the expected formant values pre-operatively with post-operative values approaching normal. Patients who also underwent radiation treatment post surgically tended to have greater constriction in the pharyngeal area of the vocal tract.

  16. Management of early supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma by irradiation with surgery in reserve.

    PubMed

    Harwood, A R; Beale, F A; Cummings, B J; Keane, T J; Payne, D G; Rider, W D

    1983-09-01

    The results of radical radiotherapy with surgery in reserve for 136 patients with stage T1 and T2 NO supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma seen during a 20-year period are analyzed herein. Approximately one half of all patients were alive and well five years after treatment, while one fifth of patients died of supraglottic cancer. The cancer in two thirds of these patients was locally controlled by irradiation; of particular note was an 11% to 18% recurrence rate in patients whose necks were initially noted to be free of cancer. Analysis of the results of irradiation treatment disclosed a major reduction in nodal recurrence from the use of irradiation fields larger than 7 X 7 cm (3%, as compared with 19% with a smaller irradiation field). During the 20-year period of the study, there was a major reduction observed in tumor-related deaths; this is attributed to the use of larger irradiation fields and more aggressive use of surgery for irradiation failures. The results obtained are compared herein with the results of primary surgery, and conclusions are drawn as to the optimal management of early-stage supraglottic cancer. PMID:6882266

  17. Comparison of the Disposable Streamlined Liner of the Pharynx Airway and the Disposable I-gel in Anaesthetized, Paralyzed Adults: A Randomized Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    EL-Radaideh, Khaled; Alhowary, Ala"a; Bani Hani, Diab

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study compared streamlined liner of the pharynx airway (SLIPA) and I-gel noninflatable, single-use, supraglottic airway device (SAD) performance in anesthetized, paralyzed adults. Methods. Eighty adults (ASA physical statuses I–III) who were undergoing elective procedures under general anesthesia with an SAD were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, single-blind study. Subjects were randomly and evenly assigned to the SLIPA or I-gel group for intraoperative airway management. Ease and number of insertions, insertion time, oropharyngeal sealing pressure, hemodynamic response, oxygen saturation (SpO2), end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2), and peri- and postoperative complications were examined. Results. The SLIPA and I-gel devices were successfully inserted in 100% and 95% of subjects, respectively. In two I-gel subjects (5%), ventilation was not possible after two attempts, but a size 55 SLIPA was successfully inserted in both cases. Forty-two and 38 patients were ultimately included in the SLIPA and I-gel groups, respectively. Insertion time was significantly shorter with the SLIPA (11.19 ± 3.03 s) than with the I-gel (15.05 ± 6.37 s, P = 0.003). Oropharyngeal sealing pressure was significantly higher in SLIPA (28.76 ± 3.11 cmH2O) than in I-gel (25.9 ± 3.65 cmH2O) subjects (P = 0.001). Blood staining occurred more frequently in SLIPA (n = 8, 19.0%) than in I-gel (n = 5, 13.2%) patients (P < 0.01). Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, SpO2, and EtCO2 were not significantly different between groups. Conclusion. Although blood staining incidence was higher, SLIPA insertion was easier and faster than I-gel insertion. The SLIPA provided better airway sealing pressure. Both devices had similar mechanical ventilation and oxygenation characteristics and comparable hemodynamic stability. Both noninflatable SADs are useful, but SLIPA rapid insertion and good airway sealing make it an effective alternative to the I-gel. PMID:26697064

  18. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5810 - Airway connector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... airway connector is a device intended to connect a breathing gas source to a tracheal tube, tracheostomy tube, or mask. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  2. Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of oral mandibular advancement devices and continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Linda D; Clutterbuck-James, Abigail L; Glover, Matthew J; Bennett, Maxine S; Chadwick, Rebecca; Pittman, Marcus A; Quinnell, Timothy G

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (OSAH) causes excessive daytime sleepiness, impairs quality-of-life, and increases cardiovascular disease and road traffic accident risks. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and mandibular advancement devices (MAD) have been shown to be effective in individual trials but their effectiveness particularly relative to disease severity is unclear. A MEDLINE, Embase and Science Citation Index search updating two systematic reviews to August 2013 identified 77 RCTs in adult OSAH patients comparing: MAD with conservative management (CM); MAD with CPAP; or CPAP with CM. Overall MAD and CPAP significantly improved apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) (MAD -9.3/hr (p < 0.001), CPAP -25.4 (p < 0.001)). In direct comparisons mean AHI and Epworth sleepiness scale score were lower (7.0/hr (p < 0.001) and 0.67 (p = 0.093) respectively) for CPAP. There were no CPAP vs. MAD trials in mild OSAH but in comparisons with CM, MAD and CPAP reduced ESS similarly (MAD 2.01 (p < 0.001); CPAP 1.23 (p = 0.012). Both MAD and CPAP are clinically effective in the treatment of OSAH. Although CPAP has a greater treatment effect, MAD is an appropriate treatment for patients who are intolerant of CPAP and may be comparable to CPAP in mild disease. PMID:26163056

  3. Impact of CPAP interface and mandibular advancement device on upper airway mechanical properties assessed with phrenic nerve stimulation in sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Borel, Jean-Christian; Gakwaya, Simon; Masse, Jean-François; Melo-Silva, Cesar Augusto; Sériès, Frédéric

    2012-08-15

    Oronasal mask (ONM) can be used when mouth leaks impair nasal-CPAP effectiveness. However, ONM's constraint on the chin and straps' traction may alter upper airway (UA) mechanical properties. In contrast, mandibular advancement device associated with nasal-CPAP (NM+MAD) may reduce UA resistance. The aim of this exploratory study was to compare the effects of ONM, NM, and NM+MAD on UA mechanical properties. The three interface modalities were assessed in 11 OSAS patients at 6, 8, 10 cmH(2)O CPAP using a phrenic nerve magnetic stimulation (PNMS) protocol. PNMS-twitches' related flow, pharyngeal pressures (nasopharynx, velopharynx, oropharynx) and UA resistances were determined. Regardless of CPAP level, twitch-induced maximum flow was higher with NM+MAD than with ONM. Velopharyngeal resistance was higher with ONM than with NM+MAD. Oropharyngeal resistance was higher with ONM than with NM. In conclusion, NM+MAD reduced velopharyngeal resistance compared to those measured with ONM and NM alone. We hypothesize that this strategy may help reducing the effective pressure level and thus further limit the risk for mouth leaks. PMID:22772315

  4. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5090 Emergency airway needle....

  5. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5090 Emergency airway needle....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5090 Emergency airway needle....

  7. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5090 Emergency airway needle....

  8. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5090 Emergency airway needle....

  9. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section 868.2600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor....

  10. Effect of visual biofeedback to acquire supraglottic swallow in healthy individuals: a randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Imada, Miho; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Ishiguro, Yuriko; Kato, Miho; Inamoto, Yoko; Tanaka, Takashi; Shibata, Seiko; Saitoh, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of visual biofeedback therapy in acquiring supraglottic swallow (SGS) in a randomized-controlled trial with healthy individuals. Eighteen individuals (mean age, 26 years) who could not close or keep closed the vocal folds before and during the swallow in SGS were allocated randomly to either a visual biofeedback group (eight individuals) or a nonbiofeedback group (10 individuals). A videoendoscope was inserted intranasally and an SGS exercise, using 4 ml of green-colored water, was performed 30 times per day up to 5 days. When the participant failed to perform SGS, the result was provided only to the participants in the visual biofeedback group. The median length of time until acquiring SGS was 1.5 days in the visual biofeedback group and 3.5 days in the nonbiofeedback group (P=0.040). We concluded that visual biofeedback effectively enabled participants to acquire SGS earlier. PMID:26795716

  11. Carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx: A basis for comparing the results of radiotherapy and surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Parsons, J.T.; Stringer, S.P.; Cassisi, N.J.; Million, R.R. )

    1990-05-01

    An analysis of 129 patients with 131 squamous cell carcinomas of the supraglottic larynx treated between October 1964 and April 1987 with radiotherapy alone or radiotherapy followed by neck dissection is presented. All patients had a minimum 2-year follow-up. Patients were excluded from analysis of disease control at the primary site and/or neck if they died within 2 years of treatment with the site(s) continuously disease-free. Local control rates with radiotherapy and ultimate local control rates, including patients successfully salvaged after a local recurrence, were as follows: T1, 13 of 13 and 13 of 13; T2, 34 of 42 (81%) and 37 of 42 (88%); T3, 25 of 41 (61%) and 34 of 41 (83%); and T4, 3 of 9 and 6 of 9. There was no significant difference in local control rates when comparing patients who were anatomically suitable for a supraglottic laryngectomy with those who would have required a total laryngectomy. Local control rates were slightly diminished in patients with T2-T3 lesions who had impaired or absent vocal cord mobility. The overall rates of ultimate local control with voice preservation for the entire series of 129 patients were as follows: T1, 100%; T2, 87%; T3, 69%; and T4, 57%. Cause-specific survival rates at 5 years by stage were I, 2 of 2; II, 10 of 12 (83%); III, 9 of 13 (69%); IVA, 4 of 6; and IVB, 7 of 22 (32%). The incidence of severe complications was 4 of 115 (3%) for T1-T3 lesions and 4 of 14 (29%) for T4 lesions.

  12. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... Emergency airway puncture is done in an emergency situation, when someone is choking and all other efforts ...

  13. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  14. [Airway Management in a Patient with Forestier's Disease].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuriko; Echigo, Noriyuki; Akata, Mariko; Yokoyama, Kaori; Takasugi, Naoya; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-04-01

    Airway management in a patient with Forestier's disease can be challenging clinically because this disease may cause not only dysphagia but also airway obstruction due to the compression of the pharynx and esophagus caused by the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament. We report our anesthetic management in a patient with Forestier's disease. Meanwhile, we studied the causes of difficult airway and the most suitable airway device for a patient with this disease from a standpoint of anatomy of upper airway. Our study indicated the possibility that the most suitable airway device differed depending on the actual location of the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine and that more prudent airway management would be required if its lesion location extended to upper cervical spine. PMID:27188118

  15. On the acoustic effects of the supraglottic structures in excised larynges

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Finnegan, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic effects of the supraglottic laryngeal structures (SGSs), including the false vocal folds (FVFs) laryngeal ventricle, and the epiglottis were investigated in an excised canine larynx model with and without these anatomical structures. The purpose of this study was to better understand the acoustic contributions of these structures to phonation. Canine larynges were prepared and mounted over a 3/4 in. tube, which supplied pressurized, heated, and humidified air. Glottal adduction was accomplished by rotating the arytenoids with a suture passed behind the vocal folds to simulate the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle action. The SGSs were kept intact in the first part of the experiment and were removed in the second part. Results indicated that when the FVFs vibrated, a low frequency component was observed in the spectral data. The excised larynx with a SGS had a limited range of frequency with subglottal pressure, while the larynx without a SGS had a larger frequency range. The excised canine larynx with a SGS oscillated with a higher phonation threshold pressure and significantly louder. PMID:23654402

  16. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness results from the randomised controlled Trial of Oral Mandibular Advancement Devices for Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (TOMADO) and long-term economic analysis of oral devices and continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, Linda; Glover, Matthew; Clutterbuck-James, Abigail; Bennett, Maxine; Jordan, Jake; Chadwick, Rebecca; Pittman, Marcus; East, Clare; Cameron, Malcolm; Davies, Mike; Oscroft, Nick; Smith, Ian; Morrell, Mary; Fox-Rushby, Julia; Quinnell, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (OSAH) causes excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), impairs quality of life (QoL) and increases cardiovascular disease and road traffic accident risks. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment is clinically effective but undermined by intolerance, and its cost-effectiveness is borderline in milder cases. Mandibular advancement devices (MADs) are another option, but evidence is lacking regarding their clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in milder disease. OBJECTIVES (1) Conduct a randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MADs against no treatment in mild to moderate OSAH. (2) Update systematic reviews and an existing health economic decision model with data from the Trial of Oral Mandibular Advancement Devices for Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (TOMADO) and newly published results to better inform long-term clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MADs and CPAP in mild to moderate OSAH. TOMADO A crossover RCT comparing clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three MADs: self-moulded [SleepPro 1™ (SP1); Meditas Ltd, Winchester, UK]; semibespoke [SleepPro 2™ (SP2); Meditas Ltd, Winchester, UK]; and fully bespoke [bespoke MAD (bMAD); NHS Oral-Maxillofacial Laboratory, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK] against no treatment, in 90 adults with mild to moderate OSAH. All devices improved primary outcome [apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI)] compared with no treatment: relative risk 0.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62 to 0.89] for SP1; relative risk 0.67 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.76) for SP2; and relative risk 0.64 (95% CI 0.55 to 0.76) for bMAD (p < 0.001). Differences between MADs were not significant. Sleepiness [as measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)] was scored 1.51 [95% CI 0.73 to 2.29 (SP1)] to 2.37 [95% CI 1.53 to 3.22 (bMAD)] lower than no treatment (p < 0.001), with SP2 and bMAD significantly better than SP1

  17. Larynx during exercise: the unexplored bottleneck of the airways.

    PubMed

    Røksund, Ola Drange; Heimdal, John-Helge; Olofsson, Jan; Maat, Robert Christiaan; Halvorsen, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Exercise-induced shortness of breath is not uncommon in otherwise healthy young people. Based on the presenting symptoms alone, it is challenging to distinguish exercise-induced asthma (EIA) from exercise-induced obstruction of central airways, sometimes leading to diagnostic errors and inadequate treatment. Central airway obstruction usually presents with exercise-induced inspiratory symptoms (EIIS) during ongoing exercise. EIIS tends to peak towards the end of an exercise session or immediately after its completion, contradicting symptoms of EIA typically peaking 3-15 min after the exercise has stopped. EIIS is usually associated with some form of laryngeal obstruction. Transnasal flexible laryngoscopy performed continuously throughout an incremental exercise test from rest to exhaustion or to intolerable symptoms is usually diagnostic, and also provides information that is important for further handling and treatment. Reflecting the complex anatomy and functional features of the larynx, exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) appears to be a heterogeneous condition. Contradicting previous beliefs, recent literature suggests that laryngeal adduction in a majority of cases starts in supraglottic structures and that vocal cord adduction (VCD) most often occurs as a secondary phenomenon. However, EILO is poorly understood and more and better research is needed to unravel causal mechanisms. The evidence base for treatment of EILO is weak. Speech therapy, psychotherapy, biofeedback, muscle training, anticholinergic aerosols have all been applied, as has laser supraglottoplasty. Randomized controlled trials with well-defined and verifiable inclusion and success criteria are required to establish evidence-based treatment schemes. PMID:25033930

  18. Pediatric airway management: current practices and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sunder, Rani A; Haile, Dawit T; Farrell, Patrick T; Sharma, Anshuman

    2012-10-01

    Management of a pediatric airway can be a challenge, especially for the non-pediatric anesthesiologists. Structured algorithms for an unexpected difficult pediatric airway have been missing so far. A recent step wise algorithm, based on the Difficult Airway society (DAS) adult protocol, is a step in the right direction. There have been some exciting advances in development of pediatric extra-glottic devices for maintaining ventilation, and introduction of pediatric versions of new 'non line of sight' laryngoscopes and optical stylets. The exact role of these devices in routine and emergent situations is still evolving. Recent advances in simulation technology has become a valuable tool in imparting psychomotor and procedural skills to trainees and allied healthcare workers. Moving toward the goal of eliminating serious adverse events during the management of routine and difficult pediatric airway, authors propose that institutions develop a dedicated Difficult Airway Service comprising of a team of experts in advanced airway management. PMID:22967160

  19. Upper airway test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An upper airway biopsy is obtained by using a flexible scope called a bronchoscope. The scope is passed down through ... may be performed when an abnormality of the upper airway is suspected. It may also be performed as ...

  20. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  1. Assessment of suitability of i-gel and laryngeal mask airway-supreme for controlled ventilation in anesthetized paralyzed patients: A prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, Kusuma Srividya; Sripriya, R.; Ravishankar, M.; Hemanth Kumar, V. R.; Jaya, V.; Parthasarathy, S.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Laryngeal mask airway supreme (LMA-S) has an inflatable cuff while i-gel has a noninflatable cuff made of thermoplastic elastomer. Aims: To study the efficacy of ventilation and the laryngeal seal pressures (LSPs) with either device. Our secondary objectives were to compare the ease of insertion, adequacy of positioning the device, hemodynamic response to device insertion, and any postoperative oropharyngeal morbidity. Settings and Design: A prospective, randomized, single-blinded study at Teaching Medical School in South India. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients posted for surgery under general anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups - LMA-S and i-gel. After a standardized premedication and anesthesia induction sequence, the supra-glottic devices were introduced. Ease of insertion was assessed from the number of attempts taken to insert, insertion time, and any maneuvers required to insert the device. Position of the device was assessed by the ease of gastric catheter placement and the fibreoptic grading of laryngeal visualization. Efficacy of ventilation was determined from the LSP, peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), and end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2)values. Any postoperative oropharyngeal morbidity was also recorded. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive analysis was reported as a mean and standard deviation, median, and range of continuous variables. Demographics were analyzed using a unpaired t-test for parametric data and Chi-square test for nonparametric data. Respiratory and hemodynamic data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA to find statistical difference within and between the two groups. Results: LMA-S was successfully inserted in 95% of patients and i-gel in 85.5% of patients. There was a significant difference (P = 0.021) in the LSPs between the two groups (18.15 cmH2O in LMA-S and 21.28 cmH2O in the i-gel group). There was no significant difference in the PIPs, leak fraction, and the EtCO2values. Conclusion: Both devices are

  2. The Physiologically Difficult Airway.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C

    2015-12-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  3. The Physiologically Difficult Airway

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Jarrod M.; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  4. 21 CFR 868.1780 - Inspiratory airway pressure meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inspiratory airway pressure meter. 868.1780 Section 868.1780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... meter. (a) Identification. An inspiratory airway pressure meter is a device used to measure the...

  5. Noninvasive clearance of airway secretions.

    PubMed

    Hardy, K A; Anderson, B D

    1996-06-01

    Airway clearance techniques are indicated for specific diseases that have known clearance abnormalities (Table 2). Murray and others have commented that such techniques are required only for patients with a daily sputum production of greater than 30 mL. The authors have observed that patients with diseases known to cause clearance abnormalities can have sputum clearance with some techniques, such as positive expiratory pressure, autogenic drainage, and active cycle of breathing techniques, when PDPV has not been effective. Hasani et al has shown that use of the forced exhalatory technique in patients with nonproductive cough still resulted in movement of secretions proximally from all regions of the lung in patients with airway obstruction. It is therefore reasonable to consider airway clearance techniques for any patient who has a disease known to alter mucous clearance, including CF, dyskinetic cilia syndromes, and bronchiectasis from any cause. Patients with atelectasis from mucous plugs and hypersecretory states, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, patients with pain secondary to surgical procedures, and patients with neuromuscular disease, weak cough, and abnormal patency of the airway may also benefit from the application of airway clearance techniques. Infants and children up to 3 years of age with airway clearance problems need to be treated with PDPV. Manual percussion with hands alone or a flexible face mask or cup and small mechanical vibrator/percussors, such as the ultrasonic devices, can be used. The intrapulmonary percussive ventilator shows growing promise in this area. The high-frequency oscillator is not supplied with vests of appropriate sizes for tiny babies and has not been studied in this group. Young patients with neuromuscular disease may require assisted ventilation and airway oscillations can be applied. CPAP alone has been shown to improve achievable flow rates that will increase air-liquid interactions for patients with these diseases

  6. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  7. Brachycephalic airway syndrome: management.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Dena L; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2012-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) is a group of primary and secondary abnormalities that result in upper airway obstruction. Several of these abnormalities can be addressed medically and/or surgically to improve quality of life. This article reviews potential complications, anesthetic considerations, recovery strategies, and outcomes associated with medical and surgical management of BAS. PMID:22935992

  8. Simvastatin Inhibits Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Amir A.; Franzi, Lisa; Last, Jerold; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Statin use has been linked to improved lung health in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We hypothesize that statins inhibit allergic airway inflammation and reduce airway hyperreactivity via a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. Objectives: To determine whether simvastatin attenuates airway inflammation and improves lung physiology by mevalonate pathway inhibition. Methods: BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin over 4 weeks and exposed to 1% ovalbumin aerosol over 2 weeks. Simvastatin (40 mg/kg) or simvastatin plus mevalonate (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally before each ovalbumin exposure. Measurements and Main Results: Simvastatin reduced total lung lavage leukocytes, eosinophils, and macrophages (P < 0.05) in the ovalbumin-exposed mice. Cotreatment with mevalonate, in addition to simvastatin, reversed the antiinflammatory effects seen with simvastatin alone (P < 0.05). Lung lavage IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were all reduced by treatment with simvastatin (P < 0.05). Simvastatin treatment before methacholine bronchial challenge increased lung compliance and reduced airway hyperreactivity (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Simvastatin attenuates allergic airway inflammation, inhibits key helper T cell type 1 and 2 chemokines, and improves lung physiology in a mouse model of asthma. The mevalonate pathway appears to modulate allergic airway inflammation, while the beneficial effects of simvastatin on lung compliance and airway hyperreactivity may be independent of the mevalonate pathway. Simvastatin and similar agents that modulate the mevalonate pathway may prove to be treatments for inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma. PMID:19608720

  9. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  10. Airway Scope: early clinical experience in 405 patients.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Yoshihiro; Seo, Norimasa

    2008-01-01

    The Airway Scope (Pentax, Tokyo, Japan) is a new device used for tracheal intubation. It allows visualization of the glottis through a non-line-of sight view. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of this device for the tracheal intubation of surgical patients. In this prospective study, the Airway Scope was used for the endotracheal intubation of 405 patients by 74 airway operators. The Airway Scope allowed visualization of the glottis in all 405 patients, including those with a Cormack-Lehane view of grade III (n = 15) or grade IV (n = 1) on Macintosh laryngoscopy. All tracheal intubations using the Airway Scope were successful. The mean time to complete tracheal intubation was 42.4 +/- 19.7 s (+/-SD; range, 13-192 s). No dental damage was encountered, though minor mucosal injury caused by the blade was experienced in 2 patients. The Airway Scope consistently permitted a better intubation environment. With its potential advantages, the Airway Scope could be an effective aid to airway management in surgical patients. PMID:18306022

  11. Airway dysfunction in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Elite competitive swimmers are particularly affected by airway disorders that are probably related to regular and intense training sessions in a chlorinated environment. Upper and lower airway respiratory symptoms, rhinitis, airway hyper-responsiveness, and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction are highly prevalent in these athletes, but their influence on athletic performance is still unclear. The authors reviewed the main upper and lower respiratory ailments observed in competitive swimmers who train in indoor swimming pools, their pathophysiology, clinical significance and possible effects on performance. Issues regarding the screening of these disorders, their management and preventive measures are addressed. PMID:22247299

  12. Meteorological conditions along airways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, W R

    1927-01-01

    This report is an attempt to show the kind of meteorological information that is needed, and is in part available, for the purpose of determining operating conditions along airways. In general, the same factors affect these operating conditions along all airways though in varying degree, depending upon their topographic, geographic, and other characteristics; but in order to bring out as clearly as possible the nature of the data available, a specific example is taken, that of the Chicago-Dallas airway on which regular flying begins this year (1926).

  13. High-frequency oscillation of the airway and chest wall.

    PubMed

    Fink, James B; Mahlmeister, Michael J

    2002-07-01

    High-frequency oscillation (HFO), applied to either the airway or chest wall, has been associated with changes in sputum attributes and clearance. The evolution of evidence, both in vitro and in vivo, supporting the use of HFO is reviewed. Devices that apply HFO to the airway range from the relatively simple mechanical Flutter and Acapella devices to the more complex Percussionaire Intrapercussive Ventilators. and the Hayek Oscillator are designed to provide high-frequency chest wall compression. Operation and use of these devices are described with examples of differentiation of device types by characterization of flows, and airway and esophageal pressures. Although HFO devices span a broad range of costs, they provide a reasonable therapeutic option to support secretion clearance for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:12088550

  14. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  15. Computed tomography of nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Krystina; O'Brien, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Upper airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening problem in cats and for which a noninvasive, sensitive method rapid diagnosis is needed. The purposes of this prospective study were to describe a computed tomography (CT) technique for nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction, CT characteristics of obstructive diseases, and comparisons between CT findings and findings from other diagnostic tests. Ten cats with clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited for the study. Four cats with no clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited as controls. All cats underwent computed tomography imaging without sedation or anesthesia, using a 16-slice helical CT scanner and a previously described transparent positional device. Three-dimensional (3D) internal volume rendering was performed on all CT image sets and 3D external volume rendering was also performed on cats with evidence of mass lesions. Confirmation of upper airway obstruction was based on visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, fine-needle aspirate, biopsy, or necropsy. Seven cats were diagnosed with intramural upper airway masses, two with laryngotracheitis, and one with laryngeal paralysis. The CT and 3D volume-rendered images identified lesions consistent with upper airway disease in all cats. In cats with mass lesions, CT accurately identified the mass and location. Findings from this study supported the use of CT imaging as an effective technique for diagnosing upper airway obstruction in nonanesthetized cats. PMID:23441677

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema: a multicenter review and an algorithm for airway management.

    PubMed

    Chiu, A G; Newkirk, K A; Davidson, B J; Burningham, A R; Krowiak, E J; Deeb, Z E

    2001-09-01

    Angioedema is a nonpitting edema of which the presentation ranges from benign facial swelling to airway obstruction managed by intubation or tracheotomy. The presentation of this disease is reviewed, and a treatment algorithm based on initial signs and symptoms is proposed for proper airway management. We performed a retrospective review of 108 patients treated in 2 tertiary care centers in the Washington, DC, area over a 5-year period. Ninety-eight patients (90.7%) were African-American, and 81 (75%) were female. Seventy-four patients (68.5%) were taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). A classification system was developed based on the location of the edema at initial presentation: 1) isolated facial swelling and oral cavity edema, excluding the floor of the mouth; 2) floor of mouth and/or oropharyngeal edema, and 3) oropharyngeal edema with glottic and/or supraglottic involvement. Fourteen patients (13%) needed airway intervention, 2 of whom underwent a cricothyrotomy after a failed intubation attempt. Eleven (78.6%) were taking ACEIs. The indication for each intubation was massive tongue and floor of mouth edema. The patients were extubated 48 to 72 hours later. No patient demonstrated symptom progression after medical treatment was initiated. Therapy included discontinuation of the ACEI or other inciting agent, a high-humidity face tent, an initial dose of intravenous antihistamines, and a continued course of intravenous steroids. Within 48 hours, most patients had a resolution of their edema. Only cases of significant tongue and oropharyngeal edema took longer than 48 hours to resolve. The ACEIs are a common cause of angioedema. Left untreated, angioedema may progress to involve the oropharynx and supraglottis, resulting in a life-threatening airway compromise. Marked floor of mouth and tongue edema are the indications for airway intervention. An algorithm based on the initial presentation is essential for proper airway and patient management

  17. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient's risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  18. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient’s risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  19. Adjuvant intravenous methotrexate or definitive radiotherapy alone for advanced squamous cancers of the oral cavity, oropharynx, supraglottic larynx or hypopharynx

    SciTech Connect

    Fazekas, J.T.; Sommer, C.; Kramer, S.

    1980-05-01

    Three hundred twenty-six patients with advanced head and neck cancers were randomized to receive definitive radiotherapy alone while 312 similar patients first received intravenous Methotrexate. No significant bias was demonstrated between the two patient populations. The number of annual deaths among the two randomized categories was essentially equal during the first 5 years. Nearly one-half occurred in the first year (146 for radiation alone and 143 in the chemotherapy plus irradiation groups). Median metastasis-free survival was between 12 to 13 months in both categories. The unadjusted 5 year survivals were in the 11 to 22% range for oral cavity, oropharynx, and supraglottic larynx and 3 to 9% for hypopharynx primaries. Although several variables did exert an impact upon survival, primary (T) and lymph node (N) stage seem to be of paramount importance and Methotrexate of minor consideration. Median and 5-year survivals within the various anatomic regions were consistently better when Methotrexate was given. However, these improvements were minimal and depended upon whether comparisons were performed on adjusted or unadjusted survival figures. In view of the modest benefits attained by using this Methotrexate regimen the authors suggest that other adjuvant programs be investigated and that this schedule not be adopted for routine clinical usage.

  20. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  1. Year in review 2014: airway clearance.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Shawna L

    2015-04-01

    The respiratory therapist has had integrated adjuncts to improve mucus clearance for decades. However, there is a lack of literature describing the impact of these interventions on specific patient populations, resulting in an inability to make recommendations about the use of devices and techniques. The purpose of this article is to review recent literature regarding airway clearance therapies in a manner that is most likely to have interest to the readers of Respiratory Care. PMID:25784773

  2. Airway nitric oxide in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, D.; Gustafsson, L.; Hemmingsson, Tryggve; Frostell, C.; Paiva, M.

    2005-10-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO), a molecule with a wide range of biological effects, is found in exhaled gas. Elevation of expired NO is an early sign of airway inflammation in asthma and dust inhalation. Animal experiments have demonstrated a marked increase of expired NO after venous gas emboli (bubbles, VGE), which may occur after decompression in conjunction with extravehicular activity (EVA). For this MAP project, astronauts will perform a simple inhalation-exhalation procedure weekly during their flights, and before and after EVA. Furthermore, the microgravity environment offers a possibility to gain new insights into how and where NO is formed in the lungs and what local effects NO may have there. The planned experiments have been made possible by recent developments of new techniques by the team's industrial partners; Aerocrine has developed a highly compact and accurate NO analyser, and Linde Gas Theapeutics has developed a highly compact device for NO administration in the inhaled air.

  3. Issues of critical airway management (Which anesthesia; which surgical airway?).

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    Which anesthesia for patients with critical airway? Safe and effective analgesia and anesthesia in critical airway is a skilled task especially after severe maxillofacial injury combined with head injury and hemorrhagic shock. If on one side sedation is wanted, on the other hand it may worsen the airway and hemodynamic situation to a point where hypoventilation and decrease of blood pressure, common side-effect of many opioids, may prejudice the patient's level of consciousness and hemodynamic compensation, compounding an already critical situation. What to do when endotracheal intubation fails and blood is trickling down the airways in an unconscious patient or when a conscious patient has to sit up to breathe? Which surgical airway in critical airway? Comparative studies among the various methods of emergency surgical airway would be unethical; furthermore, operator's training and experience is relevant for indications and performance. PMID:23248494

  4. Epithelial hyperplasia, airways

    Cancer.gov

    Number of respiratory epithelial cells is increased diffusely or focally. Frequently luminal protrusions are observed, sometimes forming papillae. Mucous (goblet) cell metaplastic hyperplasia is a variant, in which the respiratory epithelium of conducting airways is replaced by mucous cells either as a single or a pseudostratified layer.

  5. Posttreatment FDG-PET Uptake in the Supraglottic and Glottic Larynx Correlates With Decreased Quality of Life After Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dornfeld, Ken Hopkins, Shane; Simmons, Joel; Spitz, Douglas R.; Menda, Yusuf; Graham, Michael; Smith, Russell; Funk, Gerry; Karnell, Lucy; Karnell, Michael; Dornfeld, Maude; Yao Min; Buatti, John

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Inflammation and increased metabolic activity associated with oxidative stress in irradiated normal tissues may contribute to both complications following radiotherapy and increased glucose uptake as detected by posttherapy fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET imaging. We sought to determine whether increased glucose uptake in normal tissues after chemoradiotherapy is associated with increased toxicity. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy and free of recurrence at 1 year were studied. FDG-PET imaging was obtained at 3 and 12 months posttreatment. Standardized uptake value (SUV) levels were determined at various head and neck regions. Functional outcome was measured using a quality of life questionnaire and weight loss and type of diet tolerated 1 year after therapy. A one-tailed Pearson correlation test was used to examine associations between SUV levels and functional outcome measures. Results: Standardized uptake value levels in the supraglottic and glottic larynx from FDG-PET imaging obtained 12 months posttreatment were inversely associated with quality of life measures and were correlated with a more restricted diet 1 year after therapy. SUV levels at 3 months after therapy did not correlate with functional outcome. Increases in SUV levels in normal tissues between 3 and 12 months were commonly found in the absence of recurrence. Conclusion: Altered metabolism in irradiated tissues persists 1 year after therapy. FDG-PET scans may be used to assess normal tissue damage following chemoradiotherapy. These data support investigating hypermetabolic conditions associated with either inflammation, oxidative stress, or both, as causal agents for radiation-induced normal tissue damage.

  6. Supraglottic carcinoma: Impact of radiation therapy on outcome of patients with positive margins and extracapsular nodal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Devineni, V.R.; Simpson, J.R.; Sessions, D.; Spector, J.G.; Hayden, R.; Fredrickson, J.; Fineberg, B. )

    1991-07-01

    Seventy-nine patients with supraglottic carcinoma treated between 1966 and 1985 are reviewed. All patients were treated with surgery and postoperative radiation therapy. Thirty-five percent of the patients had positive margins at the site of resection of the primary tumor. Of the 25 patients who had positive nodal disease, 13 patients (52%) had either extracapsular extension or soft-tissue or adjacent organ invasion, referred to in composite as grave signs. The median follow-up of the patients was 4.9 years and all patients were followed for a minimum of 3 years. The disease-free survival for all patients was 76% at 2 years and 71% at 3 years. The locoregional control rate for all patients was 70%. This study demonstrates that there is no difference in local recurrence or disease-free survival, or time to recurrence relative to the status of the surgical margins, which may be a benefit of the postoperative radiation therapy. This study also demonstrates that there is an increase in the number of patients with grave signs with increasing nodal stage. The rate of neck recurrence in patients with grave signs was substantially higher (54%) than in patients without grave signs (8%), even though these patients also had positive lymph nodes. Interestingly, there was also a higher rate of local recurrence among patients who had grave signs. Patients receiving doses higher than 6000 cGy to the primary site had fewer local failures, although within each group of patients with positive or negative surgical margins the differences in survival were minimal.

  7. Advances in prehospital airway management

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, PE; Grabinsky, A

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital airway management is a key component of emergency responders and remains an important task of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systems worldwide. The most advanced airway management techniques involving placement of oropharyngeal airways such as the Laryngeal Mask Airway or endotracheal tube. Endotracheal tube placement success is a common measure of out-of-hospital airway management quality. Regional variation in regard to training, education, and procedural exposure may be the major contributor to the findings in success and patient outcome. In studies demonstrating poor outcomes related to prehospital-attempted endotracheal intubation (ETI), both training and skill level of the provider are usually often low. Research supports a relationship between the number of intubation experiences and ETI success. National standards for certification of emergency medicine provider are in general too low to guarantee good success rate in emergency airway management by paramedics and physicians. Some paramedic training programs require more intense airway training above the national standard and some EMS systems in Europe staff their system with anesthesia providers instead. ETI remains the cornerstone of definitive prehospital airway management, However, ETI is not without risk and outcomes data remains controversial. Many systems may benefit from more input and guidance by the anesthesia department, which have higher volumes of airway management procedures and extensive training and experience not just with training of airway management but also with different airway management techniques and adjuncts. PMID:24741499

  8. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry. PMID:27238174

  9. The Tulip GT® airway versus the facemask and Guedel airway: a randomised, controlled, cross-over study by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers in anaesthetised patients.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, A; Robinson, P N; Hasan, M

    2016-03-01

    We performed a randomised, controlled, cross-over study of lung ventilation by Basic Life Support-trained providers using either the Tulip GT® airway or a facemask with a Guedel airway in 60 anaesthetised patients. Successful ventilation was achieved if the provider produced an end-tidal CO2 > 3.5 kPa and a tidal volume > 250 ml in two of the first three breaths, within 60 sec and within two attempts. Fifty-seven (95%) providers achieved successful ventilation using the Tulip GT compared with 35 (58%) using the facemask (p < 0.0001). Comparing the Tulip GT and facemask, the mean (SD) end-tidal CO2 was 5.0 (0.7) kPa vs 2.5 (1.5) kPa, tidal volume was 494 (175) ml vs 286 (186) ml and peak inspiratory pressure was 18.3 (3.4) cmH2 O vs 13.6 (7) cmH2 O respectively (all p < 0.0001). Forty-seven (78%) users favoured the Tulip GT airway. These results are similar to a previous manikin study using the same protocol, suggesting a close correlation between human and manikin studies for this airway device. We conclude that the Tulip GT should be considered as an adjunct to airway management both within and outside hospitals when ventilation is being undertaken by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers. PMID:26684684

  10. Management of the Traumatized Airway.

    PubMed

    Jain, Uday; McCunn, Maureen; Smith, Charles E; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence-based approach regarding the best practice for airway management in patients with a traumatized airway. General recommendations for the management of the traumatized airway are summarized in table 5. Airway trauma may not be readily apparent, and its evaluation requires a high level of suspicion for airway disruption and compression. For patients with facial trauma, control of the airway may be significantly impacted by edema, bleeding, inability to clear secretions, loss of bony support, and difficulty with face mask ventilation. With the airway compression from neck swelling or hematoma, intubation attempts can further compromise the airway due to expanding hematoma. For patients with airway disruption, the goal is to pass the tube across the injured area without disrupting it or to insert the airway distal to the injury using a surgical approach. If airway injury is extensive, a surgical airway distal to the site of injury may be the best initial approach. Alternatively, if orotracheal intubation is chosen, spontaneous ventilation may be maintained or RSI may be performed. RSI is a common approach. Thus, some of the patients intubated may subsequently require tracheostomy. A stable patient with limited injuries may not require intubation but should be watched carefully for at least several hours. Because of a paucity of evidence-based data, the choice between these approaches and the techniques utilized is a clinical decision depending on the patient's condition, clinical setting, injuries to airway and other organs, and available personnel, expertise, and equipment. Inability to obtain a definitive airway is always an absolute indication for an emergency cricothyroidotomy or surgical tracheostomy. PMID:26517857

  11. Fully biodegradable airway stents using amino alcohol-based poly(ester amide) elastomers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jane; Boutin, Kyle G; Abdulhadi, Omar; Personnat, Lyndia D; Shazly, Tarek; Langer, Robert; Channick, Colleen L; Borenstein, Jeffrey T

    2013-10-01

    Airway stents are often used to maintain patency of the tracheal and bronchial passages in patients suffering from central airway obstruction caused by malignant tumors, scarring, and injury. Like most conventional medical implants, they are designed to perform their functions for a limited period of time, after which surgical removal is often required. Two primary types of airway stents are in general use, metal mesh devices and elastomeric tubes; both are constructed using permanent materials, and must be removed when no longer needed, leading to potential complications. This paper describes the development of process technologies for bioresorbable prototype elastomeric airway stents that would dissolve completely after a predetermined period of time or by an enzymatic triggering mechanism. These airway stents are constructed from biodegradable elastomers with high mechanical strength, flexibility and optical transparency. This work combines microfabrication technology with bioresorbable polymers, with the ultimate goal of a fully biodegradable airway stent ultimately capable of improving patient safety and treatment outcomes. PMID:23526787

  12. Upper Airway Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Verbraecken, Johan A.; De Backer, Wilfried A.

    2009-01-01

    This review discusses the pathophysiological aspects of sleep-disordered breathing, with focus on upper airway mechanics in obstructive and central sleep apnoea, Cheyne-Stokes respiration and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to substantial pathology, i.e. increased upper airway collapsibility, control of breathing instability, increased work of breathing, disturbed ventilatory system mechanics and neurohormonal changes. Concepts are changing. Although sleep apnoea is considered more and more to be an increased loop gain disorder, the central type of apnoea is now considered as an obstructive event, because it causes pharyngeal narrowing, associated with prolonged expiration. Although a unifying concept for the pathogenesis is lacking, it seems that these patients are in a vicious circle. Knowledge of common patterns of sleep-disordered breathing may help to identify these patients and guide therapy. PMID:19478479

  13. Brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meola, Stacy D

    2013-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome is a common finding in brachycephalic breeds. A combination of primary and secondary changes can progress to life-threatening laryngeal collapse. Early recognition of primary anatomic abnormalities that include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea would allow the clinician to make early recommendations for medical and surgical management, which can improve the quality of life in affected animals. PMID:24182996

  14. Upper airway resistance syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hasan, N; Fletcher, E C

    1998-07-01

    Many clinicians are familiar with the clinical symptoms and signs of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In its most blatant form, OSA is complete airway obstruction with repetitive, prolonged pauses in breathing, arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation; followed by arousal with resumption of breathing. Daytime symptoms of this disorder include excessive daytime somnolence, intellectual dysfunction, and cardiovascular effects such as systemic hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction, and stroke. It has been recently recognized that increased pharyngeal resistance with incomplete obstruction can lead to a constellation of symptoms identical to OSA called "upper airway resistance syndrome" (UARS). The typical findings of UARS on sleep study are: (1) repetitive arousals from EEG sleep coinciding with a (2) waxing and waning of the respiratory airflow pattern and (3) increased respiratory effort as measured by esophageal pressure monitoring. There may be few, if any, obvious apneas or hypopneas with desaturation, but snoring may be a very prominent finding. Treatment with nasal positive airway pressure (NCPAP) eliminates the symptoms and confirms the diagnosis. Herein we describe two typical cases of UARS. PMID:9676067

  15. Airway closure in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Dutrieue, Brigitte; Verbanck, Sylvia; Darquenne, Chantal; Prisk, G Kim

    2005-08-25

    Recent single breath washout (SBW) studies in microgravity and on the ground have suggested an important effect of airway closure on gas mixing in the human lung, reflected particularly in the phase III slope of vital capacity SBW and bolus tests. In order to explore this effect, we designed a SBW in which subjects inspired 2-l from residual volume (RV) starting with a 150 ml bolus of He and SF6. In an attempt to vary the pattern of airways closure configuration before the test, the experiments were conducted in 1G and in microgravity during parabolic flight allowing the pre-test expiration to RV to be either in microgravity or at 1.8 G, with the actual test gas inhalation performed entirely in microgravity. Contrary to our expectations, the measured phase III slope and phase IV height and volume obtained from seven subjects in microgravity were essentially identical irrespective of the gravity level during the pre-test expiration to RV. The results suggest that airway closure configuration at RV before the test inspiration has no apparent impact on phases III and IV generation. PMID:15979418

  16. [Clinical relevance of distal airway involvement in asthma].

    PubMed

    Torrego Fernández, Alfons; Muñoz Cano, Rosa M

    2011-04-01

    Asthma continues to be a global health problem, despite advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment. The inflammatory nature of asthma is currently indisputable, as is the involvement of the entire respiratory tree, both the proximal and most distal airways, which has been demonstrated in multiple studies. The development of the therapeutic arsenal, with more potent drugs and improved inhalation devices, has allowed a certain control to be maintained over the inflammatory process, although the inability to reach the most distal points of the airways has posed a stumbling block that seems difficult to overcome. However, the available information on the real role of distal airway involvement in asthma remains very scarce. Physiopathological evidence shows that, in addition to the large airways, the small or distal airways (those with a diameter of less than 2 mm) substantially contribute to the severity of asthma. Several studies have shown that the inflammatory process seems to be more intense in this area. This finding has been related to nocturnal asthma and an increase in glucocorticoid receptor-beta-expressing cells, associated with corticosteroid-resistant asthma and fatal asthma. Equally, small airway involvement seems to be a highly important factor in asthma in the pediatric age group. PMID:21640280

  17. Catheter-Based Sensing In The Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouke, J. M.; Saunders, K. G.

    1988-04-01

    Studies attempting to define the role of the respiratory tract in heating and humidifying inspired air point to the need for sensing many variables including airway wall and airstream temperatures, humidity, and surface fluid pH and osmolarity. In order to make such measurements in vivo in human volunteers, catheter based technologies must be exploited both to assure subject safety and subject comfort. Miniturization of the electrodes or sensors becomes a top priority. This paper describes the use of thin-film microelectronic technology to fabricate a miniature, flexible sensor which can be placed directly onto the surface of the airway to measure the electrical conductance of the fluids present. From this information the osmolarity of the surface fluid was calculated. Physiologic evaluation of the device and corroboration of the calculations was performed in mongrel dogs. We also describe the successful application of current thermistor technology for the thermal mapping of the airways in humans in order to characterize the dynamic intrathoracic events that occur during breathing. The thermal probe consisted of a flexible polyvinyl tube that contained fourteen small thermistors fixed into the catheter. Data have been obtained in dozens of people, both normal subjects and asthmatic patients, under a variety of interventions. These data have substantively advanced the study of asthma, a particularly troublesome chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.

  18. Brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wykes, P M

    1991-06-01

    This is a complex condition, recognized primarily in brachycephalic breeds, that results in varying degrees of upper airway obstruction. The signs consist of respiratory distress, stridor, reduced exercise tolerance, and in more severe cases, cyanosis and collapse. The inherent anatomy of the brachycephalic skull contributes to the development of these signs. Such anatomic features include: a shortened and distorted nasopharynx, stenotic nares, an elongated soft palate, and everted laryngeal saccules. The increased negative pressure created in the pharyngolaryngeal region, as a result of these obstructing structures, ultimately results in distortion and collapse of the arytenoid cartilages of the larynx. PMID:1802247

  19. Particle Deposition During Airway Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Cheng-Feng; Halpern, David; Grotberg, James B.

    2011-11-01

    Inhaled aerosol particles deposit in the lung and may be from environmental, toxic, or medical therapy sources. While much research focuses on inspiratory deposition, primarily at airway bifurcations due to inertial impaction, there are other mechanisms that allow the particles to reach the airway surface, such as gravitational settling and diffusion depending on particle size. We introduce a new mechanism not previously studied, i.e. aerosol deposition from airway closure. The airways are lined with a liquid layer. Due to the surface tension driven instability, a liquid plug can form from this layer which blocks the airway. This process of airway closure tends to occur toward the end of expiration. In this study, the efficiency of the impaction of the particles during airway closure will be investigated. The particles will be released from the upstream of the airway and convected by the air flow and deposited onto the closing liquid layer. We solve the governing equations using a finite volume approach in conjunction with a sharp interface method for the interfaces. Once the velocity field of the gas flow is obtained, the path of the particles will be calculated and the efficiency of the deposition can be estimated. We acknowledge support from the National Institutes of Health grant number NIH HL85156.

  20. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  1. Advances in Positive Airway Pressure Treatment Modalities for Hypoventilation Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Dan; Shetty, Safal; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Rationale Positive airway pressure therapy for hypoventilation syndromes can significantly improve health-related quality of life (HR-QOL), healthcare costs, and even mortality. The sleep-disordered breathing in such individuals are quite complex and require sophisticated devices with algorithms that are designed to accurately detect and effectively treat respiratory events that includes hypoventilation, upper airway obstruction, lower airway obstruction, central apneas and central hypopneas and reduce the work of breathing while maintaining breathing comfort. Objectives The therapeutic physiological rationale for the various advanced PAP modalities and the details about the principles of operation and technology implementation are provided here. Conclusions The physiological rationale for advanced PAP modalities is sound considering the complexity of sleep-disordered breathing in patients with hypoventilation syndromes. Although such devices are increasingly used in clinical practice, the supporting clinical evidence – specifically comparative-effectiveness studies in real-life conditions -- needs to be performed. Moreover, there is much opportunity for further refining these devices that include the ability of the device to reliably monitor gas-exchange, sleep-wakefulness state, and for reducing variability in device efficacy due to provider-selected device-settings. PMID:25346650

  2. Steady Flow in Subject-Specific Human Airways from Mouth to Sixth Bronchial Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banko, Andrew; Coletti, Filippo; Schiavazzi, Daniele; Elkins, Christopher; Eaton, John

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the complex flow topology within the human lung is critical to assess gas exchange and particle transport as they relate to the development and treatment of respiratory diseases. While idealized airway models have been investigated extensively, only limited information is available for anatomically accurate geometries. We have measured the full three-dimensional, mean velocity field from the mouth to the sixth bronchial generation in a patient-specific geometry at steady inspiration. Magnetic resonance velocimetry is used to measure the flow of water at realistic Reynolds number in a 3D-printed model derived from the CT scan of a healthy subject. The canonical laryngeal jet is observed; however, its structure is altered by an upstream jet behind the tongue, which is not discussed in the literature. Regions of separation in the supraglottic space are found to generate streamwise vortices. The resulting swirl persists to the first bifurcation and modifies the vorticity distribution in the main bronchi relative to that of a symmetric bifurcation with uniform inlet conditions. An integral momentum distortion parameter is calculated along several complete bronchial paths to assess the impact of branching angle and generation length on the flow field.

  3. Computational Flow Modeling of Human Upper Airway Breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylavarapu, Goutham

    Computational modeling of biological systems have gained a lot of interest in biomedical research, in the recent past. This thesis focuses on the application of computational simulations to study airflow dynamics in human upper respiratory tract. With advancements in medical imaging, patient specific geometries of anatomically accurate respiratory tracts can now be reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) or Computed Tomography (CT) scans, with better and accurate details than traditional cadaver cast models. Computational studies using these individualized geometrical models have advantages of non-invasiveness, ease, minimum patient interaction, improved accuracy over experimental and clinical studies. Numerical simulations can provide detailed flow fields including velocities, flow rates, airway wall pressure, shear stresses, turbulence in an airway. Interpretation of these physical quantities will enable to develop efficient treatment procedures, medical devices, targeted drug delivery etc. The hypothesis for this research is that computational modeling can predict the outcomes of a surgical intervention or a treatment plan prior to its application and will guide the physician in providing better treatment to the patients. In the current work, three different computational approaches Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Flow-Structure Interaction (FSI) and Particle Flow simulations were used to investigate flow in airway geometries. CFD approach assumes airway wall as rigid, and relatively easy to simulate, compared to the more challenging FSI approach, where interactions of airway wall deformations with flow are also accounted. The CFD methodology using different turbulence models is validated against experimental measurements in an airway phantom. Two case-studies using CFD, to quantify a pre and post-operative airway and another, to perform virtual surgery to determine the best possible surgery in a constricted airway is demonstrated. The unsteady

  4. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  5. Putting the Squeeze on Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2015-07-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and progressive airway remodeling. The airway epithelium is known to play a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of these processes. Here, we review how excessive epithelial stress generated by bronchoconstriction is sufficient to induce airway remodeling, even in the absence of inflammatory cells. PMID:26136543

  6. Airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness.

    PubMed

    Gauld, Leanne Maree

    2009-05-01

    Impaired airway clearance leads to recurrent chest infections and respiratory deterioration in neuromuscular weakness. It is frequently the cause of death. Cough is the major mechanism of airway clearance. Cough has several components, and assessment tools are available to measure the different components of cough. These include measuring peak cough flow, respiratory muscle strength, and inspiratory capacity. Each is useful in assessing the ability to generate an effective cough, and can be used to guide when techniques of assisting airway clearance may be effective for the individual and which are most effective. Techniques to assist airway clearance include augmenting inspiration by air stacking, augmenting expiration by assisting the cough, and augmenting both inspiration and expiration with the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator or by direct suctioning via a tracheostomy. Physiotherapists are invaluable in assisting airway clearance, and in teaching patients and their families how to use these techniques. Use of the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator has gained popularity in recent times, but several simpler, more economical methods are available to assist airway clearance that can be used effectively alone or in combination. This review examines the literature available on the assessment and management of impaired airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness. PMID:19379290

  7. The ProSeal laryngeal mask airway.

    PubMed

    Brimacombe, Joseph; Keller, Christian

    2002-12-01

    The ProSeal LMA is a major advance over the Classic LMA because of the following reasons: it allows ventilation at much higher airway pressures; it protects the lungs from aspiration and the stomach from gastric insufflation; it facilitates passage of a gastric tube and monitoring devices into the esophagus; it can be inserted like the Classic or Intubating LMA; it has its own built-in bite block; malposition is detected more readily; and, through use of techniques such as gum elastic bougie-guided insertion, correct positioning is almost guaranteed. The ProSeal can be considered a replacement device for the Classic LMA, but the Flexible LMA is still preferable for most intraoral procedures, and the Intubating LMA is still preferable whenever intubation is required. Limitations are that it is slightly more difficult to insert and requires more careful thought to use optimally. PMID:12512267

  8. Irritant-induced airway disorders.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Stuart M; Bernstein, I Leonard

    2011-11-01

    Thousands of persons experience accidental high-level irritant exposures each year but most recover and few die. Irritants function differently than allergens because their actions proceed nonspecifically and by nonimmunologic mechanisms. For some individuals, the consequence of a single massive exposure to an irritant, gas, vapor or fume is persistent airway hyperresponsiveness and the clinical picture of asthma, referred to as reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). Repeated irritant exposures may lead to chronic cough and continual airway hyperresponsiveness. Cases of asthma attributed to repeated irritant-exposures may be the result of genetic and/or host factors. PMID:21978855

  9. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simren K.; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P.; Baines, Deborah L.; Moore, Luke S.P.; Holmes, Alison H.; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  10. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  11. Rare Upper Airway Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Alanna; Clemmens, Clarice; Jacobs, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    A broad spectrum of congenital upper airway anomalies can occur as a result of errors during embryologic development. In this review, we will describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management strategies for a few select, rare congenital malformations of this system. The diagnostic tools used in workup of these disorders range from prenatal tests to radiological imaging, swallowing evaluations, indirect or direct laryngoscopy, and rigid bronchoscopy. While these congenital defects can occur in isolation, they are often associated with disorders of other organ systems or may present as part of a syndrome. Therefore workup and treatment planning for patients with these disorders often involves a team of multiple specialists, including paediatricians, otolaryngologists, pulmonologists, speech pathologists, gastroenterologists, and geneticists. PMID:26277452

  12. [Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Orriols, R

    2005-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, better known as RADS, was described as a clinical entity consisting in the appearance of bronchial asthma due to massive toxic inhalation. The term was coined and recognised for the first time in 1985. Since then different publications have verified new cases as well as different causal agents. It usually arises from an accident at the work place and in closed or poorly ventilated spaces, where high concentrations of irritant products are inhaled in the form of gas, smoke or vapour. In the following minutes or hours symptoms of bronchial obstruction appear in an acute form, with bronchial hyperresponsiveness persisting for months or years. The affected patients do not show a recurrence of symptoms following exposure to non-toxic doses of the same agent that started the symptoms. This is why diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations as it is not reproducible through a provocation test. PMID:15915173

  13. Impending Complete Airway Obstruction from a Reinforced Orotracheal Tube: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Nima; Samadi, Shahram; Jafari Javid, Mihan; Takzare, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Reinforced tubes are commonly used to minimize the opportunity of upper airway obstruction in patients at risk. There are a few reports of the airway obstruction resulted from kinked reinforced tubes. This report describes the obstruction of a reinforced tube in an adult patient who underwent tonsillectomy. Under general anesthesia; an armoured endotracheal tube was inserted into the trachea uneventfully. A few minutes after starting the surgery, the anesthesia machine detected a high airway pressure and an increased ETCO2 (end-tidal CO2) up to 50 mmHg. Further evaluation showed spiral wire damage resulted from Mouth Gag device that led to airway obstruction. Early anticipation of the complications leads to proper management of such critical and life threatening complications and prevention of hypoxia, hypercapnia, pneumothorax, and pulmonary edema. Based on our experience using an armoured endotracheal tube in tonsillectomy does not guarantee a safe airway and intensive monitoring is necessary. PMID:26553090

  14. Clinical benefits of visualization of airway anatomy and manipulation of the endotracheal tube cuff with the GlideScope in the morbidly obese patient during tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Michael T; Lang, John

    2009-12-01

    Inadvertent deflation of the endotracheal tube cuff during a tracheotomy can complicate the surgical procedure, especially in a morbidly obese patient. Also, the anesthesia provider may lose control of the airway, with the inability to reintubate in case of airway edema, airway secretions, or airway fire. The use of the GlideScope video laryngoscope (Verathon Inc, Bothell, Washington) in the morbidly obese patient undergoing a tracheotomy has clinical benefits. This device allowed the visualization of the airway anatomy in 2 patients and the manipulation of the punctured endotracheal tube cuff in one case. PMID:20108730

  15. Eosinophilic phenotypes of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Pavord, Ian D

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the clinical implications of eosinophilic airway inflammation has increased significantly over the last 20 years, aided by the development of noninvasive means to assess it. This pattern of airway inflammation can occur in a diverse range of airway diseases. It is associated with a positive response to corticosteroids and a high risk of preventable exacerbations. Our new understanding of the role of eosinophilic airway inflammation has paved the way for the clinical development of a number of more specific inhibitors that may become new treatment options. Different definitions, ideas of disease, and adoption of biomarkers that are not well known are necessary to fully realize the potential of these treatments. PMID:24313765

  16. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  17. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  18. Imaging of the Distal Airways

    PubMed Central

    Tashkin, Donald P.; de Lange, Eduard E.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging techniques of the lung continues to advance with improving ability to image the more distal airways. Two imaging techniques are reviewed, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance with hyperpolarized helium-3. PMID:19962040

  19. The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench.

    PubMed

    Quammen, Cory W; Taylor Ii, Russell M; Krajcevski, Pavel; Mitran, Sorin; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Superfine, Richard; Davis, Brad; Davis, Stephanie; Zdanski, Carlton

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench (VPAW) is a patient-centered surgical planning software system targeted to pediatric patients with airway obstruction. VPAW provides an intuitive surgical planning interface for clinicians and supports quantitative analysis regarding prospective surgeries to aid clinicians deciding on potential surgical intervention. VPAW enables a full surgical planning pipeline, including importing DICOM images, segmenting the airway, interactive 3D editing of airway geometries to express potential surgical treatment planning options, and creating input files for offline geometric analysis and computational fluid dynamics simulations for evaluation of surgical outcomes. In this paper, we describe the VPAW system and its use in one case study with a clinician to successfully describe an intended surgery outcome. PMID:27046595

  20. Tachykinin receptors and airway pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A

    1993-05-01

    The mammalian tachykinins (TKs), substance P and neurokinin A, are present in sensory nerve fibres in the upper and lower airways of various mammalian species, including humans. TKs are released from these afferent nerves in an "efferent" mode at peripheral level, especially in response to irritant stimuli. TKs exert a variety of biological effects (bronchoconstriction, plasma protein extravasation, stimulation of mucus secretion), collectively known as "neurogenic inflammation", and this process is thought to be of potential pathogenic relevance for various airway diseases. The recent development of potent and selective TK receptor antagonists on the one hand provides important new tools for the understanding of basic airway physiology and pathophysiology and, on the other, opens new possibilities for therapy of airway diseases. PMID:8390944

  1. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and

  2. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  3. Tachykinin antagonists and the airways.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; Kips, J C; Peleman, R A; Pauwels, R A

    1995-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence for the presence of substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) in human airway nerves. Studies on autopsy tissue, on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and on sputum suggest that SP may be present in increased amounts in the asthmatic airway. Substance P and NKA are potent bronchoconstrictors of human airways, asthmatics being more sensitive than normal persons. The major enzyme responsible for the degradation of the tachykinins, the neutral endopeptidase, is present in the airways and is involved in the breakdown of exogenously administered SP and NKA, both in normal and asthmatic persons. Other, less well documented airway effects of SP and NKA include mucus secretion, vasodilation and plasma extravasation, as well as the chemoattraction and stimulation of various cells presumed to be involved in asthmatic airway inflammation. NK2 receptors and, to a lesser extent, NK1 receptors have been shown to be involved in bronchoconstriction, whereas NK1 receptors were found to be involved in mucus secretion, microvascular leakage and vasodilatation, and in most of the effects on inflammatory cells. The first clinical trial with FK224, a peptide NK1 and NK2 receptor antagonist, and CP99994, a nonpeptide NK1 receptor antagonist, are negative. However, FK224 failed to block the bronchoconstrictor effect of NKA in asthmatics and the dose of CP99994, needed to antagonize tachykinin effects in man, remains to be determined. PMID:7543746

  4. Surfactant and allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Carla; Hohlfeld, Jens M

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of unique proteins and lipids that covers the airway lumen. Surfactant prevents alveolar collapse and maintains airway patency by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Furthermore, it provides a defence against antigen uptake by binding foreign particles and enhancing cellular immune responses. Allergic asthma is associated with chronic airway inflammation and presents with episodes of airway narrowing. The pulmonary inflammation and bronchoconstriction can be triggered by exposure to allergens or pathogens present in the inhaled air. Pulmonary surfactant has the potential to interact with various immune cells which orchestrate allergen- or pathogen-driven episodes of airway inflammation. The complex nature of surfactant allows multiple sites of interaction, but also makes it susceptible to external alterations, which potentially impair its function. This duality of modulating airway physiology and immunology during inflammatory conditions, while at the same time being prone to alterations accompanied by restricted function, has stimulated numerous studies in recent decades, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:23896983

  5. Bonfils assisted double lumen endobronchial tube placement in an anticipated difficult airway

    PubMed Central

    Subramani, Sudhakar; Poopalalingam, Ruban

    2014-01-01

    The role of various airway adjuncts in the management of difficult airway has been described in the literature. Bonfils rigid fiberscope is one of the airway assist devices widely used for endotracheal intubation in the individuals with cervical instability warranting limited neck movements. With our experience in the utilization of Bonfils for single lumen endotracheal tube placement, we are increasingly using for double lumen endobronchial (DLT) intubation as well. We would like to describe our experience in the use of Bonfils for DLT placement and outline the merits and limitations of the other suitable airway assist devices in this report. The double lumen tube has to be modified by decreasing the length of DLT to accommodate the Bonfils fiberscope and this is applicable only in certain type of double lumen tubes for e.g. Bronchocath. PMID:25425788

  6. Air-Q laryngeal airway for rescue and tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Ads, Ayman; Auerbach, Frederic; Ryan, Kelly; El-Ganzouri, Abdel R

    2016-08-01

    We report the successful use of the Air-Q laryngeal airway (Air-Q LA) as a ventilatory device and a conduit for tracheal intubation to rescue the airway in a patient with difficult airway and tracheal stenosis. This is the first case report of the device to secure the airway after two episodes of hypoxemia in the operating room and intensive care unit. Consent for submission of this case report was obtained from our institution's human studies institutional review board given that the patient died a few months after his discharge from the hospital before his personal consent could be obtained and before preparation of this report. All personal identifiers that could lead to his identification have been removed from this report. A 59-year-old man was scheduled for a flexible and rigid bronchoscopy with possible laser excision of tracheal stenosis. He had a history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes. Assessment of airway revealed a thyromental distance of 6.5 cm, Mallampati class II, and body weight of 110 kg. He had hoarseness and audible inspiratory/expiratory stridor with Spo2 90% breathing room air. After induction and muscle relaxation, tracheal intubation and flexible bronchoscopy were achieved without incident. The patient was then extubated and a rigid bronchoscopy was attempted but failed with Spo2 dropping to 92%; rocuronium 60 mg was given, and reintubation was accomplished with a 7.5-mm endotracheal tube. A second rigid bronchoscopy attempt failed, with Spo2 dropping to 63%. Subsequent direct laryngoscopy revealed a bloody hypopharynx. A size 4.5 Air-Q LA was placed successfully and confirmed with capnography, and Spo2 returned to 100%. The airway was suctioned through the Air-Q LA device, and the airway was secured using a fiberoptic bronchoscope to place an endotracheal tube of 7.5-mm internal diameter. The case was canceled because of edema of the upper airway from multiple attempts with rigid bronchoscopy. The patient was transported

  7. A modified Guedel airway for continuous oxygenation and suctioning during fibreoptic bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, C; Itani, M M; Lteif, A; Baraka, A

    2000-05-01

    We describe a modification to the Guedel airway that improves suction and oxygenation during fibreoptic bronchoscopy. The entire roof of a Guedel airway was removed. Two 2.5-mm internal diameter tracheal tubes were inserted into the modified airway to allow continuous oxygen delivery and suction throughout fibreoptic bronchoscopy. It was tested as a single-use device in ten patients undergoing awake fibreoptic bronchoscopy under sedation and topical anasthesia. During the procedure there were no problems with either fogging of the lens or secretions in the pharynx. In addition, oxyhaemoglobin saturation, as monitored continuously by pulse oximetry, was >/= 97% in all patients. PMID:10792137

  8. Elective use of the Ventrain for upper airway obstruction during high-frequency jet ventilation.

    PubMed

    Fearnley, Robert A; Badiger, Sheela; Oakley, Richard J; Ahmad, Imran

    2016-09-01

    The safety of high pressure source ventilation (jet ventilation) is dependent upon upper airway patency to facilitate adequate passive expiration and prevent increasing intrathoracic pressure and its associated deleterious sequelae. Distortions in airway anatomy may make passive expiration inadequate or impossible in some patients. We report the elective use of the Ventrain device to provide ventilation in a clinical setting of upper airway obstruction in a patient with post radiation fibrosis that had previously prevented passive expiration during attempted high pressure source ventilation. PMID:27555171

  9. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  10. Role of Small Airways in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Finkas, Lindsay K; Martin, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory condition of both the small and large airways. Recently the small airways have gained attention as studies have shown significant inflammation in the small airways in all severities of asthma. This inflammation has correlated with peripheral airway resistance and as a result, noninvasive methods to reliably measure small airways have been pursued. In addition, recent changes in asthma inhalers have led to alterations in drug formulations and the development of extrafine particle inhalers that improve delivery to the distal airways. PMID:27401620

  11. Duration of continuous positive airway pressure in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Bamat, Nicolas; Jensen, Erik A; Kirpalani, Haresh

    2016-06-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been used for respiratory support in premature infants for more than 40 years and is now a cornerstone of modern neonatal care. Clinical research on CPAP has primarily focused on understanding which devices and pressure sources best implement this therapy. In contrast, less research has examined the optimal duration over which CPAP is administered. We review this aspect of CPAP therapy. PMID:26948885

  12. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  13. The Airway Microbiome at Birth.

    PubMed

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  14. Airway Gland Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Submucosal glands contribute to airway surface liquid (ASL), a film that protects all airway surfaces. Glandular mucus comprises electrolytes, water, the gel-forming mucin MUC5B, and hundreds of different proteins with diverse protective functions. Gland volume per unit area of mucosal surface correlates positively with impaction rate of inhaled particles. In human main bronchi, the volume of the glands is ∼ 50 times that of surface goblet cells, but the glands diminish in size and frequency distally. ASL and its trapped particles are removed from the airways by mucociliary transport. Airway glands have a tubuloacinar structure, with a single terminal duct, a nonciliated collecting duct, then branching secretory tubules lined with mucous cells and ending in serous acini. They allow for a massive increase in numbers of mucus-producing cells without replacing surface ciliated cells. Active secretion of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) by serous cells produces most of the fluid of gland secretions. Glands are densely innervated by tonically active, mutually excitatory airway intrinsic neurons. Most gland mucus is secreted constitutively in vivo, with large, transient increases produced by emergency reflex drive from the vagus. Elevations of [cAMP]i and [Ca(2+)]i coordinate electrolyte and macromolecular secretion and probably occur together for baseline activity in vivo, with cholinergic elevation of [Ca(2+)]i being mainly responsive for transient increases in secretion. Altered submucosal gland function contributes to the pathology of all obstructive diseases, but is an early stage of pathogenesis only in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26336032

  15. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  16. [Orthodontics and the upper airway].

    PubMed

    Cobo Plana, J; de Carlos Villafranca, F; Macías Escalada, E

    2004-03-01

    One of the general aims of orthodontic treatment and of the combination of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery is to achieve good occlusion and aesthetic improvement, especially in cases of severe dentoskeletal deformities. However, on many occasions, the parameters of the upper airways are not taken into account when the aims of conventional treatment are fulfilled. Patients with obstructive alterations during sleep represent for the orthodontist a type of patient who differs from the normal; for them, treatment should include the objective of improving oxygen saturation. Here, functional considerations should outweigh purely aesthetic ones. It is important, when making an orthodontic, surgical or combined diagnosis for a patient, to bear in mind the impact that treatment may have on the upper airways. Good aesthetics should never be achieved for some of our patients at the expense of diminishing the capacity of their upper airways. PMID:15301356

  17. Site of Fluid Secretion in Small Airways.

    PubMed

    Flores-Delgado, Guillermo; Lytle, Christian; Quinton, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    The secretion and management of readily transportable airway surface liquid (ASL) along the respiratory tract is crucial for the clearance of debris and pathogens from the lungs. In proximal large airways, submucosal glands (SMGs) can produce ASL. However, in distal small airways, SMGs are absent, although the lumens of these airways are, uniquely, highly plicated. Little is known about the production and maintenance of ASL in small airways, but using electrophysiology, we recently found that native porcine small airways simultaneously secrete and absorb. How these airways can concurrently transport ASL in opposite directions is puzzling. Using high expression of the Na-K-2Cl cotransport (NKCC) 1 protein (SLC12a2) as a phenotypic marker for fluid secretory cells, immunofluorescence microscopy of porcine small airways revealed two morphologically separated sets of luminal epithelial cells. NKCC1 was abundantly expressed by most cells in the contraluminal regions of the pleats but highly expressed very infrequently by cells in the luminal folds of the epithelial plications. In larger proximal airways, the acini of SMGs expressed NKCC1 prominently, but cells expressing NKCC1 in the surface epithelium were sparse. Our findings indicate that, in the small airway, cells in the pleats of the epithelium secrete ASL, whereas, in the larger proximal airways, SMGs mainly secrete ASL. We propose a mechanism in which the locations of secretory cells in the base of pleats and of absorptive cells in luminal folds physically help maintain a constant volume of ASL in small airways. PMID:26562629

  18. Chronic effects of mechanical force on airways.

    PubMed

    Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    Airways are embedded in the mechanically dynamic environment of the lung. In utero, this mechanical environment is defined largely by fluid secretion into the developing airway lumen. Clinical, whole lung, and cellular studies demonstrate pivotal roles for mechanical distention in airway morphogenesis and cellular behavior during lung development. In the adult lung, the mechanical environment is defined by a dynamic balance of surface, tissue, and muscle forces. Diseases of the airways modulate both the mechanical stresses to which the airways are exposed as well as the structure and mechanical behavior of the airways. For instance, in asthma, activation of airway smooth muscle abruptly changes the airway size and stress state within the airway wall; asthma also results in profound remodeling of the airway wall. Data now demonstrate that airway epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts respond to their mechanical environment. A prominent role has been identified for the epithelium in transducing mechanical stresses, and in both the fetal and mature airways, epithelial cells interact with mesenchymal cells to coordinate remodeling of tissue architecture in response to the mechanical environment. PMID:16460284

  19. Laryngeal mask airway: an alternative for the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Jones, J R

    1995-10-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was invented by Dr. Archie Brain at the London Hospital, Whitechapel, in 1981. Dr. Brain's main objective for the LMA was that it would provide a better method of maintaining a patient's airway than by face mask. Also, the LMA would be less hemodynamically stressful than with insertion of an endotracheal tube. The LMA consists of a silicone rubber tube connected to a miniature silicone mask. The perimeter of the mask consists of an inflatable elliptical cuff, which forms a tip at the distal aspect of the LMA. The aperture bars in the dome of the mask lift the epiglottis away, so the lumen remains unobstructive. The LMA forms a low pressure seal around the larynx. The LMA is contraindicated in any situation where the patient is at risk for pulmonary aspiration. The LMA is not a substitute for a properly placed endotracheal tube in this situation. The American Society of Anesthesiologists' difficult airway algorithm recommends the insertion of an LMA when ventilation and/or intubation are difficult. The distal aperture of the LMA is in close approximation to the vocal cords, so a 6.0-mm internal diameter endotracheal tube can be passed over an intubating stylet or a pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscope to secure a patient's airway. PMID:7502644

  20. The Vortex: a universal 'high-acuity implementation tool' for emergency airway management.

    PubMed

    Chrimes, N

    2016-09-01

    Factors influencing performance during emergency airway management can be broadly divided into issues with preparation and those with implementation. Effective design of resources that provide guidance on management requires consideration of the context in which they are to be used. Many of the major airway guidelines do not specify whether they are intended to be used during preparation or implementation and may not take the context for use into account in their design. This can produce tools which may be not only ineffective but actively disruptive to team function in an emergency. The Vortex is a novel, simple, and predominantly visually based cognitive aid, which has been specifically designed to be used in real time during airway emergencies to support team function and target recognized failings in airway crisis management. Unlike the major algorithms, which are context specific, the Vortex is flexible enough for the same tool to be applied to any circumstance in which airway management takes place, independent of context, patient type, or the intended airway device. This makes the same tool suitable for use by emergency physicians, intensivists, paramedical staff, and anaesthetists. The Vortex contains many of the recognized features of an ideal cognitive tool and may be effective in reducing implementation errors in emergency airway management. Experimental evidence is required to establish this. PMID:27440673

  1. [Airway equipment and its maintenance for a non difficult adult airway management (endotracheal intubation and its alternative: face mask, laryngeal mask airway, laryngeal tube)].

    PubMed

    Francon, D; Estèbe, J P; Ecoffey, C

    2003-08-01

    The airway equipment for a non difficult adult airway management are described: endotracheal tubes with a specific discussion on how to inflate the balloon, laryngoscopes and blades, stylets and intubation guides, oral airways, face masks, laryngeal mask airways and laryngeal tubes. Cleaning and disinfections with the maintenance are also discussed for each type of airway management. PMID:12943860

  2. Jaw thrust can deteriorate upper airway patency.

    PubMed

    von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Erb, T O; Frei, F J

    2005-04-01

    Upper airway obstruction is a frequent problem in spontaneously breathing children undergoing anesthesia or sedation procedures. Failure to maintain a patent airway can rapidly result in severe hypoxemia, bradycardia, or asystole, as the oxygen demand of children is high and oxygen reserve is low. We present two children with cervical masses in whom upper airway obstruction exaggerated while the jaw thrust maneuver was applied during induction of anesthesia. This deterioration in airway patency was probably caused by medial displacement of the lateral tumorous tissues which narrowed the pharyngeal airway. PMID:15777312

  3. Sensory neuropeptides and airway function.

    PubMed

    Solway, J; Leff, A R

    1991-12-01

    Sensory nerves synthesize tachykinins and calcitonin-gene related peptide and package these neuropeptides together in synaptic vesicles. Stimulation of these C-fibers by a range of chemical and physical factors results in afferent neuronal conduction that elicits central parasympathetic reflexes and in antidromic conduction that results in local release of neuropeptides through the axon reflex. In the airways, sensory neuropeptides act on bronchial smooth muscle, the mucosal vasculature, and submucosal glands to promote airflow obstruction, hyperemia, microvascular hyperpermeability, and mucus hypersecretion. In addition, tachykinins potentiate cholinergic neurotransmission. Proinflammatory effects of these peptides also promote the recruitment, adherence, and activation of granulocytes that may further exacerbate neurogenic inflammation (i.e., neuropeptide-induced plasma extravasation and vasodilation). Enzymatic degradation limits the physiological effects of tachykinins but may be impaired by respiratory infection or other factors. Given their sensitivity to noxious compounds and physical stimuli and their potent effects on airway function, it is possible that neuropeptide-containing sensory nerves play an important role in mediating airway responses in human disease. Supporting this view are the striking phenomenological similarities between hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB) in guinea pigs and HIB in patients with exercise-induced asthma. Endogenous tachykinins released from airway sensory nerves mediate HIB in guinea pigs and also cause hyperpnea-induced bronchovascular hyperpermeability in these animals. On the basis of these observations, it is reasonable to speculate that sensory neuropeptides participate in the pathogenesis of hyperpnea-induced airflow obstruction in human asthmatic subjects as well. PMID:1663932

  4. Origins of and implementation concepts for upper airway stimulation therapy for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Strohl M D, Kingman P; Baskin M D, Jonathan; Lance M D, Colleen; Ponsky M D, Diana; Weidenbecher M D, Mark; Strohl B A, Madeleine; Yamauchi M D, Motoo

    2016-07-01

    Upper airway stimulation, specifically hypoglossal (CN XII) nerve stimulation, is a new, alternative therapy for patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome who cannot tolerate positive airway pressure, the first-line therapy for symptomatic patients. Stimulation therapy addresses the cause of inadequate upper airway muscle activation for nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal airway collapse during sleep. The purpose of this report is to outline the development of this first-in-class therapy and its clinical implementation. Another practical theme is assessment of the features for considering a surgically implanted device and the insight as to how both clinical and endoscopic criteria increase the likelihood of safe and durable outcomes for an implant and how to more generally plan for management of CPAP-intolerant patients. A third theme is the team building required among sleep medicine and surgical specialties in the provision of individualized neurostimulation therapy. PMID:27424823

  5. Acoustically detectable cellular-level lung injury induced by fluid mechanical stresses in microfluidic airway systems.

    PubMed

    Huh, Dongeun; Fujioka, Hideki; Tung, Yi-Chung; Futai, Nobuyuki; Paine, Robert; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2007-11-27

    We describe a microfabricated airway system integrated with computerized air-liquid two-phase microfluidics that enables on-chip engineering of human airway epithelia and precise reproduction of physiologic or pathologic liquid plug flows found in the respiratory system. Using this device, we demonstrate cellular-level lung injury under flow conditions that cause symptoms characteristic of a wide range of pulmonary diseases. Specifically, propagation and rupture of liquid plugs that simulate surfactant-deficient reopening of closed airways lead to significant injury of small airway epithelial cells by generating deleterious fluid mechanical stresses. We also show that the explosive pressure waves produced by plug rupture enable detection of the mechanical cellular injury as crackling sounds. PMID:18006663

  6. Comparison of laryngeal mask airway use with endotracheal intubation during anesthesia of western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Cerveny, Shannon N; D'Agostino, Jennifer J; Davis, Michelle R; Payton, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    The laryngeal mask airway is an alternative to endotracheal intubation that achieves control of the airway by creating a seal around the larynx with an inflatable cuff. This study compared use of the laryngeal mask airway with endotracheal intubation in anesthetized western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Eight adult gorillas were immobilized for routine and diagnostic purposes for a total of nine anesthetic events. During each anesthetic event, gorillas were either intubated (n = 4; group A) or fitted with a laryngeal mask airway (n= 5; group B). Time required to place each airway device, physiologic parameters, and arterial blood gas were measured and compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups for time required to place airway device, heart rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, end-tidal carbon dioxide, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, or arterial pH between the two groups. Mean arterial partial pressure of oxygen was significantly greater in group B, 15 (group A: 94 +/- 44 mm Hg; group B: 408 +/- 36 mm Hg; P= 0.0025) and 45 (group A: 104 +/- 21 mm Hg; group B: 407 +/- 77 mm Hg; P = 0.0026) min after airway device placement. Mean respiratory rate was significantly greater in group A at multiple time points. Mean arterial pressure (group A: 129 +/- 16 mm Hg; group B: 60 +/- 8 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (group A: 115 +/- 21 mm Hg; group B: 36 +/- 10 mm Hg) were significantly greater in group A at the time of airway device placement. The laryngeal mask airway maintained oxygenation and ventilation effectively in all gorillas and is a useful alternative to endotracheal intubation in western lowland gorillas. PMID:23272342

  7. Systems-level airway models of bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Graham M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding lung and airway behavior presents a number of challenges, both experimental and theoretical, but the potential rewards are great in terms of both potential treatments for disease and interesting biophysical phenomena. This presents an opportunity for modeling to contribute to greater understanding, and here, we focus on modeling efforts that work toward understanding the behavior of airways in vivo, with an emphasis on asthma. We look particularly at those models that address not just isolated airways but many of the important ways in which airways are coupled both with each other and with other structures. This includes both interesting phenomena involving the airways and the layer of airway smooth muscle that surrounds them, and also the emergence of spatial ventilation patterns via dynamic airway interaction. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:459-467. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1349 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27348217

  8. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed. PMID:22082167

  9. Postoperative sore throat: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    El-Boghdadly, K; Bailey, C R; Wiles, M D

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative sore throat has a reported incidence of up to 62% following general anaesthesia. In adults undergoing tracheal intubation, female sex, younger age, pre-existing lung disease, prolonged duration of anaesthesia and the presence of a blood-stained tracheal tube on extubation are associated with the greatest risk. Tracheal intubation without neuromuscular blockade, use of double-lumen tubes, as well as high tracheal tube cuff pressures may also increase the risk of postoperative sore throat. The expertise of the anaesthetist performing tracheal intubation appears to have no influence on the incidence in adults, although it may in children. In adults, the i-gel(™) supraglottic airway device results in a lower incidence of postoperative sore throat. Cuffed supraglottic airway devices should be inflated sufficiently to obtain an adequate seal and intracuff pressure should be monitored. Children with respiratory tract disease are at increased risk. The use of supraglottic airway devices, oral, rather than nasal, tracheal intubation and cuffed, rather than uncuffed, tracheal tubes have benefit in reducing the incidence of postoperative sore throat in children. Limiting both tracheal tube and supraglottic airway device cuff pressure may also reduce the incidence. PMID:27158989

  10. Airway and ventilatory equipment in field anesthesia: what's new?

    PubMed

    Tang, Kong-Choong; Chiu, Jen W; Low, Edwin

    2004-05-01

    Advances in medical technology provide the modern day field anesthetist with the extra edge to meet the challenges faced in the harsh environment of the battlefield and enhance the survivability of casualties. The tasks of triage, resuscitation, and administration of anesthesia can be facilitated with the use of new airway devices, portable ventilators, and monitoring devices. Before such equipment is used in the field, the anesthetist must carefully weigh the advantages and disadvantages and must be cognizant of the limitations of individual devices in different environmental settings. These devices should ideally be portable, lightweight, rugged in construction, durable, easy to use (requiring minimal training and supervision), readily replaceable, and cost-effective. PMID:15185996

  11. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers). PMID:24925919

  12. Interaction between haemopoietic regulation and airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, P M; Gauvreau, G M; Wood, L J

    1999-06-01

    Asthma is characterized by reversible airway narrowing, by airway hyperresponsiveness, and by airway inflammation. Inhaled allergens are the most important of the stimuli known to cause asthma. Methods for studying inhaled allergen in the laboratory have been well standardized and extensively used for the investigation of the pathophysiology and the pharmacological modulation of allergen-induced airway responses. Allergen inhalation by a sensitized subject results in an early asthmatic response, and, in the majority of subjects, a late asthmatic response and airway hyperresponsiveness. The late response and airway hyperresponsiveness are associated with increases in airway eosinophils and metachromatic cells. Allergen-induced airway inflammation in dogs (predominantly neutrophilic) is associated with increased granulocyte-macrophage progenitors in bone marrow, which is dependent on the effects of a circulating serum factor stimulating the bone marrow. The newly formed cells traffic to the airways. These increases in granulocyte-macrophage progenitors are blocked by inhaled corticosteroids. In human subjects, allergen-induced eosinophilic inflammation is associated with increases in Eo/B progenitors, mediated through up-regulation if the IL-5 receptor on progenitors and increases responsiveness to IL-5. Inhaled corticosteroids also attenuate all allergen-induced physiological responses and airway inflammation, an effect possibly mediated, in part, through inhibition of eosinophil and basophil maturation or release from the bone marrow. PMID:10421819

  13. A pilot study to examine the effect of the Tulip oropharyngeal airway on ventilation immediately after mask ventilation following the induction of anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P N; Shaikh, A; Sabir, N M; Vaughan, D J A; Kynoch, M; Hasan, M

    2014-07-01

    The Tulip airway is an adult, disposable, single-sized oropharyngeal airway, that is connectable to an anaesthetic circuit. After a standardised induction of anaesthesia in 75 patients, the ease of insertion, intracuff pressure and intracuff volume were measured, as were the end-tidal carbon dioxide levels, airway pressures and tidal volumes over three breaths. Successful first-time insertion was achieved in 72 patients (96%, CI 88.8-99.2%) and after two attempts in 74 patients (99%, CI 92.8-100%). There was outright failure only in one patient. In 60 patients (80%, CI 72.2-90.4%), the Tulip airway provided a patent airway without additional manoeuvres, but in 14 patients, jaw thrust or head extension was necessary for airway patency. The main need for these adjuncts appeared to be an initial under-inflation of the cuff. These promising results are consistent with recent manikin studies using this device. PMID:24773326

  14. Airway anastomosis for lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Diso, Daniele; Rendina, Erino Angelo; Venuta, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LT) is the only viable option for a selected group of patients with end stage pulmonary diseases. During the recent years satisfactory results in terms of long-term survival and quality of life have been achieved with improvements in surgical technique, immunosuppression and perioperative management. Since the beginning, the airway anastomosis has been considered crucial and significant efforts have been made to understand the healing process. A number of experimental studies allowed improving the surgical technique by modifying the technique of suturing, the anastomotic protection and type and dose of immunosuppression, reducing the risk of airway complications. Furthermore, a huge progress has been made in the management of such complications. Early diagnosis of bronchial complications and their prompt and correct management are crucial to achieve long-term survival. PMID:26981271

  15. Partial airway obstruction following manufacturing defect in laryngeal mask airway (Laryngeal Mask Silken™).

    PubMed

    Jangra, Kiran; Malhotra, Surender Kumar; Saini, Vikas

    2014-10-01

    Laryngeal mask (LM) airway is commonly used for securing airway in day-care surgeries. Various problems have been described while using LM airway. Out of those, mechanical obstruction causing airway compromise is most common. Here, we describe a case report of 4-year-old child who had partial upper airway obstruction due to LM manufacturer's defect. There was a silicon band in upper one-third of shaft of LM airway. This band was made up of the same material as that of LM airway so it was not identifiable on external inspection of transparent shaft. We suggest that such as non-transparent laryngeal mask, a transparent LM airway should also be inspected looking inside the lumen with naked eyes or by using a probe to rule out any manufacturing defect before its insertion. PMID:25422617

  16. Airway management in cervical spine injury

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Naola; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Dagal, Arman

    2014-01-01

    To minimize risk of spinal cord injury, airway management providers must understand the anatomic and functional relationship between the airway, cervical column, and spinal cord. Patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury may require emergent intubation for airway protection and ventilatory support or elective intubation for surgery with or without rigid neck stabilization (i.e., halo). To provide safe and efficient care in these patients, practitioners must identify high-risk patients, be comfortable with available methods of airway adjuncts, and know how airway maneuvers, neck stabilization, and positioning affect the cervical spine. This review discusses the risks and benefits of various airway management strategies as well as specific concerns that affect patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury. PMID:24741498

  17. Airway injury during high-level exercise.

    PubMed

    Kippelen, Pascale; Anderson, Sandra D

    2012-05-01

    Airway epithelial cells act as a physical barrier against environmental toxins and injury, and modulate inflammation and the immune response. As such, maintenance of their integrity is critical. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that exercise can cause injury to the airway epithelium. This seems the case particularly for competitive athletes performing high-level exercise, or when exercise takes place in extreme environmental conditions such as in cold dry air or in polluted air. Dehydration of the small airways and increased forces exerted on to the airway surface during severe hyperpnoea are thought to be key factors in determining the occurrence of injury of the airway epithelium. The injury-repair process of the airway epithelium may contribute to the development of the bronchial hyper-responsiveness that is documented in many elite athletes. PMID:22247295

  18. Cervical spine movement during laryngoscopy using the Airway Scope compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Y; Fujita, A; Seo, N; Sugimoto, H

    2007-10-01

    The Airway Scope is a new rigid laryngoscope. This intubation device provides a non-line-of sight view of the glottis. A non-line-of sight view is expected to cause less movement of the cervical spine during laryngeal visualisation. We compared the degree of cervical spine movement during laryngoscopy with the Airway Scope and conventional direct laryngoscope. Twenty patients requiring general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation were studied. Movements of the cervical spine were measured using radiography in the same patient during laryngoscopy with the Airway Scope and a Macintosh laryngoscope. Cervical spine movement during laryngoscopy with the Airway Scope was 37%, 37% and 68% less than that with the Macintosh laryngoscope at the C0/C1, C1/C2 and C3/C4 motion segments, respectively (p < 0.05). The movement of the atlanto-occipital distance using the Airway Scope was 42% less than that during laryngoscopy using the Macintosh laryngoscope (p < 0.05). Laryngoscopy using the Airway Scope involves less movement of the cervical spine compared to conventional laryngoscopy using the Macintosh laryngoscope. PMID:17845658

  19. LARYNGEAL CHONDROSARCOMA: SUCCESSFUL USE OF VIDEO LARYNGOSCOPE IN ANTICIPATED DIFFICULT AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Dolinaj, Vladimir; Milošev, Sanja; Janjević, Dušanka

    2016-03-01

    Laryngeal chondrosarcoma is a rare mesenchymal tumor, most frequently affecting cricoid cartilage. The objective of this report is to present successful video laryngoscope usage in a patient with anticipated difficult airway who refused awake fiberoptic endotracheal intubation (AFOI). A 59-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital due to difficulty breathing and swallowing. On clinical examination performed by ENT surgeon, preoperative endoscopic airway examination (PEAE) could not be performed properly due to the patient's uncooperativeness. Computed tomography revealed a spherical tumor that obstructed the subglottic area almost entirely. Due to the narrowed airway, the first choice for the anticipated difficult airway management was AFOI, which the patient refused. Consequently, we decided to perform endotracheal intubation with indirect laryngoscope using a C-MAC video laryngoscope (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). Reinforced endotracheal tube (6.0 mm internal diameter) was placed gently between the tumor mass and the posterior wall of the trachea in the first attempt. Confirmation of endotracheal intubation was done by capnography. In a patient with subglottic area chondrosarcoma refusing PEAE and AFOI, video laryngoscope is a particularly helpful device for difficult airway management when difficult airway is anticipated. PMID:27276783

  20. Airway Assessment for Office Sedation/Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Whenever a patient is about to receive sedation or general anesthesia, no matter what the technique, the preoperative assessment of the airway is one of the most important steps in ensuring patient safety and positive outcomes. This article, Part III in the series on airway management, is directed at the ambulatory office practice and focuses on predicting the success of advanced airway rescue techniques. PMID:26061578

  1. Airway sonography in live models and cadavers.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ban; Ip, Vivian; Walji, Anil

    2013-06-01

    Sonography using cadavers is beneficial in teaching and learning sonoanatomy, which is particularly important because imaging of the airway can be challenging due to the cartilaginous landmarks and air artifacts. In this exploratory study, we have attempted to compare the airway sonoanatomy of cadavers and live models. Our observations support the use of cadavers as teaching tools for learning airway sonoanatomy and practicing procedures involving airway structures, such as superior laryngeal nerve blocks, transtracheal injections, and needle cricothyroidotomy, before performance on patients in clinical situations. We believe this process will improve patient safety and enhance the competency of trainees and practitioners in rare procedures such as needle cricothyroidotomy. PMID:23716527

  2. Airway vascular damage in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Moreira, André; Palmares, Carmo; Lopes, Cristina; Delgado, Luís

    2011-11-01

    We postulated that high level swimming can promote airway inflammation and thus asthma by enhancing local vascular permeability. We aimed to test this hypothesis by a cross-sectional study comparing swimmers (n = 13, 17 ± 3 years, competing 7 ± 4 years, training 18 ± 3 h per week), asthmatic-swimmers (n = 6, 17 ± 2 years, competing 8 ± 3 years, training 16 ± 4 h per week), and asthmatics (n = 19, 14 ± 3 years). Subjects performed induced sputum and had exhaled nitric oxide, lung volumes, and airway responsiveness determined. Airway vascular permeability index was defined as the ratio of albumin in sputum and serum. Results from the multiple linear regression showed each unit change in airway vascular permeability index was associated with an increase of 0.97% (95%CI: 0.02 to 1.92; p = 0.047) in sputum eosinophilis, and of 2.64% (95%CI:0.96 to 4.31; p = 0.006) in sputum neutrophils after adjustment for confounders. In a general linear model no significant differences between airway vascular permeability between index study groups existed, after controlling for sputum eosinophilis and neutrophils. In conclusion, competitive swimmers training in chlorine-rich pools have similar levels of airway vascular permeability than asthmatics. Although competitive swimming has been associated with asthma, airway inflammation and airway hyperesponsiveness do not seem to be dependent on increased airway vascular permeability. PMID:21669516

  3. A bug's view of allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Peter S; Campbell, Dianne E

    2016-06-01

    The increase in allergic airways disease has been linked to modern urbanization and lifestyle. Recent evidence suggests that the associated reduction in microbial exposure, reduction in dietary fibre intake and increased antibiotic use may cause early dysbiosis in infancy, which predisposes to immune dysregulation and allergic airways disease later in life. This implies that there may be a window of opportunity for primary prevention strategies aimed to protect or restore the microbiome early in life and thereby decrease the risk of developing allergic airways disease. Alternatively, strategies that correct dysbiosis may aid in the treatment of established allergic airways disease. PMID:27012478

  4. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  5. Automated lobe-based airway labeling.

    PubMed

    Gu, Suicheng; Wang, Zhimin; Siegfried, Jill M; Wilson, David; Bigbee, William L; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-01-01

    Regional quantitative analysis of airway morphological abnormalities is of great interest in lung disease investigation. Considering that pulmonary lobes are relatively independent functional unit, we develop and test a novel and efficient computerized scheme in this study to automatically and robustly classify the airways into different categories in terms of pulmonary lobe. Given an airway tree, which could be obtained using any available airway segmentation scheme, the developed approach consists of four basic steps: (1) airway skeletonization or centerline extraction, (2) individual airway branch identification, (3) initial rule-based airway classification/labeling, and (4) self-correction of labeling errors. In order to assess the performance of this approach, we applied it to a dataset consisting of 300 chest CT examinations in a batch manner and asked an image analyst to subjectively examine the labeled results. Our preliminary experiment showed that the labeling accuracy for the right upper lobe, the right middle lobe, the right lower lobe, the left upper lobe, and the left lower lobe is 100%, 99.3%, 99.3%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Among these, only two cases are incorrectly labeled due to the failures in airway detection. It takes around 2 minutes to label an airway tree using this algorithm. PMID:23093951

  6. Liquid plug propagation in flexible microchannels: A small airway model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Fujioka, H.; Bian, S.; Torisawa, Y.; Huh, D.; Takayama, S.; Grotberg, J. B.

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate the effect of wall flexibility on the plug propagation and the resulting wall stresses in small airway models with experimental measurements and numerical simulations. Experimentally, a flexible microchannel was fabricated to mimic the flexible small airways using soft lithography. Liquid plugs were generated and propagated through the microchannels. The local wall deformation is observed instantaneously during plug propagation with the maximum increasing with plug speed. The pressure drop across the plug is measured and observed to increase with plug speed, and is slightly smaller in a flexible channel compared to that in a rigid channel. A computational model is then presented to model the steady plug propagation through a flexible channel corresponding to the middle plane in the experimental device. The results show qualitative agreements with experiments on wall shapes and pressure drops and the discrepancies bring up interesting questions on current field of modeling. The flexible wall deforms inward near the plug core region, the deformation and pressure drop across the plug increase with the plug speed. The wall deformation and resulting stresses vary with different longitudinal tensions, i.e., for large wall longitudinal tension, the wall deforms slightly, which causes decreased fluid stress and stress gradients on the flexible wall comparing to that on rigid walls; however, the wall stress gradients are found to be much larger on highly deformable walls with small longitudinal tensions. Therefore, in diseases such as emphysema, with more deformable airways, there is a high possibility of induced injuries on lining cells along the airways because of larger wall stresses and stress gradients.

  7. Effects of tracheal airway occlusion on hyoid muscle length and upper airway volume.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, E; Haxhiu, M A; Cherniack, N S

    1989-12-01

    Complex relationships exist among electromyograms (EMGs) of the upper airway muscles, respective changes in muscle length, and upper airway volume. To test the effects of preventing lung inflation on these relationships, recordings were made of EMGs and length changes of the geniohyoid (GH) and sternohyoid (SH) muscles as well as of tidal changes in upper airway volume in eight anesthetized cats. During resting breathing, tracheal airway occlusion tended to increase the inspiratory lengthening of GH and SH. In response to progressive hypercapnia, the GH eventually shortened during inspiration in all animals; the extent of muscle shortening was minimally augmented by airway occlusion despite substantial increases in EMGs. SH lengthened during inspiration in six of eight animals under hypercapnic conditions, and in these cats lengthening was greater during airway occlusion even though EMGs increased. Despite the above effects on SH and GH length, upper airway tidal volume was increased significantly by tracheal occlusion under hypercapnic conditions. These data suggest that the thoracic and upper airway muscle reflex effects of preventing lung inflation during inspiration act antagonistically on hyoid muscle length, but, because of the mechanical arrangement of the hyoid muscles relative to the airway and thorax, they act agonistically to augment tidal changes in upper airway volume. The augmentation of upper airway tidal volume may occur in part as a result of the effects of thoracic movements being passively transmitted through the hyoid muscles. PMID:2606835

  8. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma

    PubMed Central

    An, S.S.; Bai, T.R.; Bates, J.H.T.; Black, J.L.; Brown, R.H.; Brusasco, V.; Chitano, P.; Deng, L.; Dowell, M.; Eidelman, D.H.; Fabry, B.; Fairbank, N.J.; Ford, L.E.; Fredberg, J.J.; Gerthoffer, W.T.; Gilbert, S.H.; Gosens, R.; Gunst, S.J.; Halayko, A.J.; Ingram, R.H.; Irvin, C.G.; James, A.L.; Janssen, L.J.; King, G.G.; Knight, D.A.; Lauzon, A.M.; Lakser, O.J.; Ludwig, M.S.; Lutchen, K.R.; Maksym, G.N.; Martin, J.G.; Mauad, T.; McParland, B.E.; Mijailovich, S.M.; Mitchell, H.W.; Mitchell, R.W.; Mitzner, W.; Murphy, T.M.; Paré, P.D.; Pellegrino, R.; Sanderson, M.J.; Schellenberg, R.R.; Seow, C.Y.; Silveira, P.S.P.; Smith, P.G.; Solway, J.; Stephens, N.L.; Sterk, P.J.; Stewart, A.G.; Tang, D.D.; Tepper, R.S.; Tran, T.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not “cure” asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored. PMID:17470619

  9. Athletic Trainers' Knowledge Regarding Airway Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edler, Jessica R.; Eberman, Lindsey E.; Kahanov, Leamor; Roman, Christopher; Mata, Heather Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Context: Research suggests that knowledge gaps regarding the appropriate use of airway adjuncts exist among various health care practitioners, and that knowledge is especially limited within athletic training. Objective: To determine the relationship between perceived knowledge (PK) and actual knowledge (AK) of airway adjunct use and the…

  10. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...