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Sample records for surface band structure

  1. Investigations of the Band Structure and Morphology of Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Kevin R.

    2011-12-01

    In this dissertation, I examine the electronic structure of two very different types of two-dimensional systems: valence band electrons in single layer graphene and electronic states created at the vacuum interface of single crystal copper surfaces. The characteristics of both electronic systems depend intimately on the morphology of the surfaces they inhabit. Thus, in addition to discussing the respective band structures of these systems, a significant portion of this dissertation will be devoted to measurements of the surface morphology of these systems. Free-standing exfoliated monolayer graphene is an ultra-thin flexible membrane and, as such, is known to exhibit large out-of-plane deformation due to substrate and adsorbate interaction as well as thermal vibrations and, possibly, intrinsic buckling. Such crystal deformation is known to limit mobility and increase local chemical reactivity. Additionally, deformations present a measurement challenge to researchers wishing to determine the band structure by angle-resolved photoemission since they limit electron coherence in such measurements. In this dissertation, I present low energy electron microscopy and micro probe diffraction measurements, which are used to image and characterize corrugation in SiO2-supported and suspended exfoliated graphene at nanometer length scales. Diffraction line-shape analysis reveals quantitative differences in surface roughness on length scales below 20 nm which depend on film thickness and interaction with the substrate. Corrugation decreases with increasing film thickness, reflecting the increased stiffness of multilayer films. Specifically, single-layer graphene shows a markedly larger short range roughness than multilayer graphene. Due to the absence of interactions with the substrate, suspended graphene displays a smoother morphology and texture than supported graphene. A specific feature of suspended single-layer films is the dependence of corrugation on both adsorbate load

  2. Effect of tool eccentricity on surface periodic banded structures in friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, N.; Wang, M. R.; Meng, Q.; Zhou, L.; Tang, D. Y.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the relationship between tool eccentricity and surface formation of periodic banded structures in friction stir welding. Motion characteristics of welding tool are calculated to explore the forming mechanism of banded structures. The results reveal that the welding tool motion differences on advancing side and retreating side caused by eccentricity are crucial for the formation of banded structures. The crests and troughs of banded structures form during tool motion on retreating side and advancing side, respectively.

  3. Energy loss of ions at metal surfaces: Band-structure effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alducin, M.; Silkin, V.M.; Juaristi, J.I.; Chulkov, E.V.

    2003-03-01

    We study band-structure effects on the energy loss of protons scattered off the Cu (111) surface. The distance dependent stopping power for a projectile traveling parallel to the surface is calculated within the linear response theory. The self-consistent electronic response of the system is evaluated within the random-phase approximation. In order to characterize the surface band structure, the electronic single-particle wave functions and energies are obtained by solving the Schroedinger equation with a realistic one-dimensional model potential. This potential reproduces the main features of the Cu (111) surface: the energy band gap for electron motion along the surface normal, as well as the binding energy of the occupied surface state and the first image state. Comparison of our results with those obtained within the jellium model allows us to characterize the band-structure effects in the energy loss of protons interacting with the Cu (111) surface.

  4. Tuning two-dimensional band structure of Cu(111) surface-state electrons that interplay with artificial supramolecular architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyong; Wang, Weihua; Tan, Liang Z.; Li, Xing Guang; Shi, Zilang; Kuang, Guowen; Liu, Pei Nian; Louie, Steven G.; Lin, Nian

    2013-12-01

    We report on the modulation of two-dimensional (2D) bands of Cu(111) surface-state electrons by three isostructural supramolecular honeycomb architectures with different periodicity or constituent molecules. Using Fourier-transformed scanning tunneling spectroscopy and model calculations, we resolved the 2D band structures and found that the intrinsic surface-state band is split into discrete bands. The band characteristics including band gap, band bottom, and bandwidth are controlled by the network unit cell size and the nature of the molecule-surface interaction. In particular, Dirac cones emerge where the second and third bands meet at the K points of the Brillouin zone of the supramolecular lattice.

  5. Understanding the electronic band structure of Pt-alloys for surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jongkeun; Kim, Beomyoung; Hong, Ji Sook; Jin, Tae Won; Shim, Ji Hoon; Nemsak, Slavomir; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Masashi, Arita; Kenya, Shimada; Kim, Changyoung; Mun, Bongjin Simon

    In polymer exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at cathode side has been continuously investigated due to its critical importance in performance of fuel cell. So far, even with best industrial catalyst made with Pt, the performance of ORR is too far below from the commercial purpose. In 2007, Stamenkovic et al. showed that Pt alloys with 3- dtransition metal exhibited significantly improved ORR performance and pointed out the altered electronic structure of surface as the major contributing factor for enhanced ORR. Since 1990, with the advance of DFT calculation, the trend of surface chemical reactivity is explained with the analysis of d-band structures, known as d-band model. While d-band provides valid insight on surface chemical reactivity based on the valence band DOS, the relation between surface work function and DOS has not been well understood. The element-specific local electronic band structure of Pt alloys are identified by ARPES measurement, and the correlation between surface work function and local charge density is investigated.

  6. Electromagnetic wave band structure due to surface plasmon resonances in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, S. V.; Ishihara, O.

    2016-07-01

    The dielectric properties of complex plasma containing either metal or dielectric spherical inclusions (macroparticles, dust) are investigated. We focus on surface plasmon resonances on the macroparticle surfaces and their effect on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is demonstrated that the presence of surface plasmon oscillations can significantly modify plasma electromagnetic properties by resonances and cutoffs in the effective permittivity. This leads to related branches of electromagnetic waves and to the wave band gaps. The conditions necessary to observe the band-gap structure in laboratory dusty plasma and/or space (cosmic) dusty plasmas are discussed.

  7. Electromagnetic wave band structure due to surface plasmon resonances in a complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, S V; Ishihara, O

    2016-07-01

    The dielectric properties of complex plasma containing either metal or dielectric spherical inclusions (macroparticles, dust) are investigated. We focus on surface plasmon resonances on the macroparticle surfaces and their effect on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is demonstrated that the presence of surface plasmon oscillations can significantly modify plasma electromagnetic properties by resonances and cutoffs in the effective permittivity. This leads to related branches of electromagnetic waves and to the wave band gaps. The conditions necessary to observe the band-gap structure in laboratory dusty plasma and/or space (cosmic) dusty plasmas are discussed. PMID:27575225

  8. Electronic structure of reconstructed InAs(001) surfaces - identification of bulk and surface bands based on their symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszowska, Natalia; Kolodziej, Jacek J.

    2016-02-01

    Using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) band structures of indium- and arsenic-terminated InAs(001) surfaces are investigated. These surfaces are highly reconstructed, elementary cells of their lattices contain many atoms in different chemical configurations, and moreover, they are composed of domains having related but different reconstructions. These domain-type surface reconstructions result in the reciprocal spaces containing regions with well-defined k→∥-vector and regions with not-well-defined one. In the ARPES spectra most of the surface related features appear as straight lines in the indeterminate k→∥-vector space. It is shown that, thanks to differences in crystal and surface symmetries, the single photon energy ARPES may be successfully used for classification of surface and bulk bands of electronic states on complex, highly reconstructed surfaces instead of the most often used variable photon energy studies.

  9. Band-structure-based collisional model for electronic excitations in ion-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Faraggi, M.N.; Gravielle, M.S.; Alducin, M.; Silkin, V.M.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2005-07-15

    Energy loss per unit path in grazing collisions with metal surfaces is studied by using the collisional and dielectric formalisms. Within both theories we make use of the band-structure-based (BSB) model to represent the surface interaction. The BSB approach is based on a model potential and provides a precise description of the one-electron states and the surface-induced potential. The method is applied to evaluate the energy lost by 100 keV protons impinging on aluminum surfaces at glancing angles. We found that when the realistic BSB description of the surface is used, the energy loss obtained from the collisional formalism agrees with the dielectric one, which includes not only binary but also plasmon excitations. The distance-dependent stopping power derived from the BSB model is in good agreement with available experimental data. We have also investigated the influence of the surface band structure in collisions with the Al(100) surface. Surface-state contributions to the energy loss and electron emission probability are analyzed.

  10. Band structure, Fermi surface, superconductivity, and resistivity of actinium under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dakshinamoorthy, M.; Iyakutti, K.

    1984-12-15

    The electronic band structures of fcc actinium (Ac) have been calculated for a wide range of pressures by reducing the unit-cell volume from 1.0V/sub 0/ to 0.5V/sub 0/ with use of the relativistic augmented-plane-wave method. The density of states and Fermi-surface cross sections corresponding to various volumes are obtained. Calculations for the band-structure-related quantities such as electron-phonon mass enhancement factor lambda, superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/, and resistivity rho corresponding to different volumes are performed. It is seen that T/sub c/ increases with pressure, i.e., with decreasing volume. A new empirical relation for the volume dependence of T/sub c/ is proposed and its validity is checked using the T/sub c/ values obtained from the above band-structure results. The resistivity rho first increases with increasing pressure (i.e., with decreasing volume) and then decreases for higher pressures (i.e., for smaller volumes).

  11. Accessing Surface Brillouin Zone and Band Structure of Picene Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qian; Duhm, Steffen; Bussolotti, Fabio; Akaike, Kouki; Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Aoki, Hideo; Kosugi, Taichi; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo

    2012-06-01

    We have experimentally revealed the band structure and the surface Brillouin zone of insulating picene single crystals (SCs), the mother organic system for a recently discovered aromatic superconductor, with ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and low-energy electron diffraction with a laser for photoconduction. A hole effective mass of 2.24m0 and the hole mobility μh≥9.0cm2/Vs (298 K) were deduced in the Γ-Y direction. We have further shown that some picene SCs did not show charging during UPS even without the laser, which indicates that pristine UPS works for high-quality organic SCs.

  12. Polarization sensitive surface band structure of doped BaTiO3(001).

    PubMed

    Rault, J E; Dionot, J; Mathieu, C; Feyer, V; Schneider, C M; Geneste, G; Barrett, N

    2013-09-20

    We present a spatial and wave-vector resolved study of the electronic structure of micron sized ferroelectric domains at the surface of a BaTiO(3)(001) single crystal. The n-type doping of the BaTiO(3) is controlled by in situ vacuum and oxygen annealing, providing experimental evidence of a surface paraelectric-ferroelectric transition below a critical doping level. Real space imaging of photoemission threshold, core level and valence band spectra show contrast due to domain polarization. Reciprocal space imaging of the electronic structure using linearly polarized light provides unambiguous evidence for the presence of both in- and out-of-plane polarization with two- and fourfold symmetry, respectively. The results agree well with first principles calculations. PMID:24093301

  13. Unconventional band structure for a periodically gated surface of a three dimensional Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sankalpa; Mondal, Puja

    The surface states of the three dimensional (3D) Topological Insulators are described by two-dimensional (2D) massless dirac equation. A gate voltage induced one dimensional potential barrier on such surface creates a discrete bound state in the forbidden region outside the dirac cone. Even for a single barrier it is shown such bound state can create electrostatic analogue of Shubnikov de Haas oscillation which can be experimentally observed for relatively smaller size samples. However when these surface states are exposed to a periodic arrangement of such gate voltage induced potential barriers, the band structure of the same got nontrivially modified. This is expected to significantly alters the properties of macroscopic system. We also suggest that in suitable limit the system may offer ways to control electron spin electrostatically which may be practically useful Supported by UGC Fellowship (PM) and a UKIERI-UGC Thematic Partnership.

  14. Unconventional band structure for a periodically gated surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Puja; Ghosh, Sankalpa

    2015-12-01

    The surface states of the three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators are described by a two-dimensional (2D) massless dirac equation. A gate-voltage-induced one-dimensional potential barrier on such surfaces creates a discrete bound state in the forbidden region outside the dirac cone. Even for a single barrier it is shown that such a bound state can create an electrostatic analogue of Shubnikov de Haas oscillation which can be experimentally observed for relatively smaller size samples. However, when these surface states are exposed to a periodic arrangement of such gate-voltage-induced potential barriers, the band structure of the same was significantly modified. This is expected to significantly alter the properties of the macroscopic system. We also suggest that, within suitable limits, the system may offer ways to control electron spin electrostatically, which may be practically useful.

  15. Correlation between morphology, electron band structure, and resistivity of Pb atomic chains on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface.

    PubMed

    Jałochowski, M; Kwapiński, T; Łukasik, P; Nita, P; Kopciuszyński, M

    2016-07-20

    Structural and electron transport properties of multiple Pb atomic chains fabricated on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface are investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, reflection high electron energy diffraction, angular resolved photoemission electron spectroscopy and in situ electrical resistance. The study shows that Pb atomic chains growth modulates the electron band structure of pristine Si(5 5 3)-Au surface and hence changes its sheet resistivity. Strong correlation between chains morphology, electron band structure and electron transport properties is found. To explain experimental findings a theoretical tight-binding model of multiple atomic chains interacting on effective substrate is proposed. PMID:27228462

  16. Correlation between morphology, electron band structure, and resistivity of Pb atomic chains on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jałochowski, M.; Kwapiński, T.; Łukasik, P.; Nita, P.; Kopciuszyński, M.

    2016-07-01

    Structural and electron transport properties of multiple Pb atomic chains fabricated on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface are investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, reflection high electron energy diffraction, angular resolved photoemission electron spectroscopy and in situ electrical resistance. The study shows that Pb atomic chains growth modulates the electron band structure of pristine Si(5 5 3)-Au surface and hence changes its sheet resistivity. Strong correlation between chains morphology, electron band structure and electron transport properties is found. To explain experimental findings a theoretical tight-binding model of multiple atomic chains interacting on effective substrate is proposed.

  17. Electronic structure of graphene on a reconstructed Pt(100) surface: Hydrogen adsorption, doping, and band gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulstrup, Søren; Nilsson, Louis; Miwa, Jill A.; Balog, Richard; Bianchi, Marco; Hornekær, Liv; Hofmann, Philip

    2013-09-01

    We probe the structure and electronic band structure of graphene grown on a Pt(100) substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. It is found that the graphene layer lacks a well-defined azimuthal orientation with respect to the substrate, causing a circular smearing of the π band instead of a well-defined Dirac cone near the Fermi level. The graphene is found to be electron doped placing the Dirac point ˜0.45 eV below the Fermi level, and a gap of 0.15±0.03 eV is found at the Dirac point. We dose atomic hydrogen and monitor the coverage on the graphene by analyzing the impurity-induced broadening of the π-band width. Saturation of graphene on Pt(100) with hydrogen does not expand the band gap, but instead hydrogen-mediated broadening and rehybridization of the graphene sp2 bonds into sp3 leads to a complete disruption of the graphene π band, induces a lifting of the Pt(100) reconstruction, and introduces a dispersing Pt state near the Fermi level. Deposition of rubidium on graphene on Pt(100) leads to further electron doping, pushing the Dirac point to a binding energy of ˜1.35 eV, and increasing the band gap to 0.65±0.04 eV.

  18. Microwave band gap and cavity mode in spoof-insulator-spoof waveguide with multiscale structured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Jun Jun; Han, Dezhuan; Qin, Fei Fei; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Yao, Yong

    2015-05-01

    We propose a multiscale spoof-insulator-spoof (SIS) waveguide by introducing periodic geometry modulation in the wavelength scale to a SIS waveguide made of a perfect electric conductor. The MSIS consists of multiple SIS subcells. The dispersion relationship of the fundamental guided mode of the spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) is studied analytically within the small gap approximation. It is shown that the multiscale SIS possesses microwave band gap (MBG) due to the Bragg scattering. The ‘gap maps’ in the design parameter space are provided. We demonstrate that the geometry of the subcells can efficiently adjust the effective refraction index of the elementary SIS and therefore further control the width and the position of the MBG. The results are in good agreement with numerical calculations by the finite element method (FEM). For finite-sized MSIS of given geometry in the millimeter scale, FEM calculations show that the first-order symmetric SSPP mode has zero transmission in the MBG within frequency range from 4.29 to 5.1 GHz. A cavity mode is observed inside the gap at 4.58 GHz, which comes from a designer ‘point defect’ in the multiscale SIS waveguide. Furthermore, ultrathin MSIS waveguides are shown to have both symmetric and antisymmetric modes with their own MBGs, respectively. The deep-subwavelength confinement and the great degree of control of the propagation of SSPPs in such structures promise potential applications in miniaturized microwave device.

  19. Band structure and fermi surface of Electron-Doped C{sub 60} Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.L.; Brouet, V.; Zhou, X.J.; Choi, Hyoung J.; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Kellar, S.A.; Bogdanov, P.V.; Lanzara, A.; Goldoni, A.; Parmigiani, F.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z-X.

    2003-11-06

    C60 fullerides are challenging systems because both the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions are large on the energy scale of the expected narrow band width. We report angle-resolved photoemission data on the band dispersion for an alkali doped C60 monolayer and a detailed comparison with theory. Compared to the maximum bare theoretical band width of 170 meV, the observed 100-meV dispersion is within the range of renormalization by electron-phonon coupling. This dispersion is only a fraction of the integrated peak width, revealing the importance of many-body effects. Additionally, measurements on the Fermi surface indicate the robustness of the Luttinger theorem even for materials with strong interactions.

  20. Band structure and Fermi surface of electron-doped C60 monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yang, W L; Brouet, V; Zhou, X J; Choi, Hyoung J; Louie, Steven G; Cohen, Marvin L; Kellar, S A; Bogdanov, P V; Lanzara, A; Goldoni, A; Parmigiani, F; Hussain, Z; Shen, Z-X

    2003-04-11

    C60 fullerides are challenging systems because both the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions are large on the energy scale of the expected narrow band width. We report angle-resolved photoemission data on the band dispersion for an alkali-doped C60 monolayer and a detailed comparison with theory. Compared to the maximum bare theoretical band width of 170 meV, the observed 100-meV dispersion is within the range of renormalization by electron-phonon coupling. This dispersion is only a fraction of the integrated peak width, revealing the importance of many-body effects. Additionally, measurements on the Fermi surface indicate the robustness of the Luttinger theorem even for materials with strong interactions. PMID:12690192

  1. Surface band structure of CdTe(111)-2 × 2 by angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowitz, C.; Manzke, R.; Skibowski, M.; Orlowski, B. A.

    1991-05-01

    The surface band structure of non-cleavable CdTe(111)-2 × 2 reconstructed surfaces is determined by means of angle-resolved photoemission and constant-final-state (CFS) spectroscopy. The experiments were performed with He I radiation and synchrotron radiation from the DORIS II storage ring at HASYLAB. High-quality (111)-2 × 2 surfaces were prepared by sputtering and annealing controlled by electron diffraction (LEED and RHEED). In order to distinguish between surface and bulk related emissions in the spectra we utilized, besides the criteria that the k∥ dispersion of surface states should reveal the 2 × 2 periodicity of the surfac mesh, also photon energy dependent CFS series at several critical points of the surface Brillouin zone. The data on CdTe(111) will be compared with experimental and theoretical results which are available for the electronically similar GaAs(111) surface.

  2. Electronic structure modification of graphene on d-band metal surfaces and its Raman signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Sinisa; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-03-01

    We find strong modifications of the graphene electronic structure when it is placed on a platinum surface. Additionally, these modifications strongly depend on the relative orientation of the graphene and platinum lattices. We expect that the same will occur whenever graphene is brought in contact with a surface of a material that has d-orbital close to the Fermi level. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that these modifications leave a distinct signature in the Raman spectrum of graphene. Out of two prominent graphene Raman peaks, one is unaffected (the G peak) while the other (the 2D peak) is severely affected, in proportion with the modification of the graphene electronic structure. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by the DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility.

  3. Valence band structure of PDMS surface and a blend with MWCNTs: A UPS and MIES study of an insulating polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerl, Natalya M.; Khodakov, Dmitriy A.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Ellis, Amanda V.; Andersson, Gunther G.

    2015-10-01

    The use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is increasing with new technologies working toward compact, flexible and transparent devices for use in medical and microfluidic systems. Electronic characterization of PDMS and other insulating materials is difficult due to charging, yet necessary for many applications where the interfacial structure is vital to device function or further modification. The outermost layer in particular is of importance as this is the area where chemical reactions such as surface functionalization will occur. Here, we investigate the valence band structure of the outermost layer and near surface area of PDMS through the use of metastable induced photoelectron spectroscopy (MIES) paired with ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The chemical composition of the samples under investigation were measured via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the vertical distribution of the polymer was shown with neutral impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (NICISS). Three separate methods for charge compensation are used for the samples, and their effectiveness is compared.

  4. Electronic structure of the conduction band upon the formation of ultrathin fullerene films on the germanium oxide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komolov, A. S.; Lazneva, E. F.; Gerasimova, N. B.; Panina, Yu. A.; Baramygin, A. V.; Zashikhin, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    The results of the investigation of the electronic structure of the conduction band in the energy range 5-25 eV above the Fermi level E F and the interfacial potential barrier upon deposition of aziridinylphenylpyrrolofullerene (APP-C60) and fullerene (C60) films on the surface of the real germanium oxide ((GeO2)Ge) have been presented. The content of the oxide on the (GeO2)Ge surface has been determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electronic properties have been measured using the very low energy electron diffraction (VLEED) technique in the total current spectroscopy (TCS) mode. The regularities of the change in the fine structure of total current spectra (FSTCS) with an increase in the thickness of the APP-C60 and C60 coatings to 7 nm have been investigated. A comparison of the structures of the FSTCS maxima for the C60 and APP-C60 films has made it possible to reveal the energy range (6-10 eV above the Fermi level E F) in which the energy states are determined by both the π* and σ* states and the FSTCS spectra have different structures of the maxima for the APP-C60 and unsubstituted C60 films. The formation of the interfacial potential barrier upon deposition of APP-C60 and C60 on the (GeO2)Ge surface is accompanied by an increase in the work function of the surface E vac- E F by the value of 0.2-0.3 eV, which corresponds to the transfer of the electron density from the substrate to the organic films under investigation. The largest changes occur with an increase in the coating thickness to 3 nm, and with further deposition of APP-C60 and C60, the work function of the surface changes only slightly.

  5. Band structure in 113Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, P.; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Sharma, H. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of collective bands in 113Sn, populated in the reaction 100Mo(19F,p 5 n ) at a beam energy of 105 MeV, has been studied. A new positive-parity sequence of eight states extending up to 7764.9 keV and spin (39 /2+) has been observed. The band is explained as arising from the coupling of the odd valence neutron in the g7 /2 or the d5 /2 orbital to the deformed 2p-2h proton configuration of the neighboring even-A Sn isotope. Lifetimes of six states up to an excitation energy of 9934.9 keV and spin 47 /2-belonging to a Δ I =2 intruder band have been measured for the first time, including an upper limit for the last state, from Doppler-shift-attenuation data. A moderate average quadrupole deformation β2=0.22 ±0.02 is deduced from these results for the five states up to spin 43 /2- . The transition quadrupole moments decrease with increase in rotational frequency, indicating a reduction of collectivity with spin, a feature common for terminating bands. The behavior of the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia as a function of rotational frequency has been studied and total Routhian surface calculations have been performed in an attempt to obtain an insight into the nature of the states near termination.

  6. Sagittal acoustic waves in finite solid-fluid superlattices: Band-gap structure, surface and confined modes, and omnidirectional reflection and selective transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassouani, Y.; El Boudouti, E. H.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Aynaou, H.

    2008-11-01

    Using a Green’s function method, we present a comprehensive theoretical analysis of the propagation of sagittal acoustic waves in superlattices (SLs) made of alternating elastic solid and ideal fluid layers. This structure may exhibit very narrow pass bands separated by large stop bands. In comparison with solid-solid SLs, we show that the band gaps originate both from the periodicity of the system (Bragg-type gaps) and the transmission zeros induced by the presence of the solid layers immersed in the fluid. The width of the band gaps strongly depends on the thickness and the contrast between the elastic parameters of the two constituting layers. In addition to the usual crossing of subsequent bands, solid-fluid SLs may present a closing of the bands, giving rise to large gaps separated by flat bands for which the group velocity vanishes. Also, we give an analytical expression that relates the density of states and the transmission and reflection group delay times in finite-size systems embedded between two fluids. In particular, we show that the transmission zeros may give rise to a phase drop of π in the transmission phase, and therefore, a negative delta peak in the delay time when the absorption is taken into account in the system. A rule on the confined and surface modes in a finite SL made of N cells with free surfaces is demonstrated, namely, there are always N-1 modes in the allowed bands, whereas there is one and only one mode corresponding to each band gap. Finally, we present a theoretical analysis of the occurrence of omnidirectional reflection in a layered media made of alternating solid and fluid layers. We discuss the conditions for such a structure to exhibit total reflection of acoustic incident waves in a given frequency range for all incident angles. Also, we show how this structure can be used as an acoustic filter that may transmit selectively certain frequencies within the omnidirectional gaps. In particular, we show the possibility of

  7. Electronic bands, Fermi surface, and elastic properties of new 4.2 K superconductor SrPtAs with a honeycomb structure from first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shein, I. R.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    2011-10-01

    The hexagonal phase SrPtAs (s.g. P6/ mmm; #194) with a honeycomb lattice structure was recently declared as a new low-temperature ( T C ∼ 4.2 K) superconductor. Here, by means of first-principles calculations the optimized structural parameters, electronic bands, Fermi surface, total and partial densities of states, inter-atomic bonding picture, independent elastic constants, bulk and shear moduli for SrPtAs were obtained for the first time and analyzed in comparison with the related layered superconductor SrPt 2As 2.

  8. Formation of the conduction band electronic structure during deposition of ultrathin dicarboximide-substituted perylene films on the oxidized silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komolov, A. S.; Lazneva, E. F.; Gerasimova, N. B.; Panina, Yu. A.; Baramygin, A. V.; Ovsyannikov, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    The results of the investigation of the conduction band electronic structure and the interfacial potential barrier during deposition of ultrathin dicarboximide-substituted perylene films (PTCBI-C8) on the oxidized silicon surface have been presented. The measurements have been performed using the very low energy electron diffraction (VLEED) technique implemented in the total current spectroscopy (TCS) mode with a variation in the incident electron energy from 0 to 25 eV. Changes in the intensities of the maxima from the deposited PTCBI-C8 film and from the substrate with an increase in the organic coating thickness to 7 nm have been analyzed using TCS measurements. A comparison of the structure of the maxima of PTCBI-C8 and perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) films has made it possible to distinguish the energy range (8-13 eV above E F) in which distinct differences in the structures of maxima for PTCDA and PTCBI-C8 films are observed. This energy range corresponds to low-lying σ*-states of the conduction band of the films studied. The formation of the interfacial region of the PTCBI-C8 film and (SiO2) n-Si substrate is accompanied by an increase in the surface work function by 0.6 eV, which corresponds to the electron density charge transfer from the (SiO2) n-Si substrate to the PTCBI-C8 film.

  9. Interband interaction between bulk and surface resonance bands of a Pb-adsorbed Ge(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Tomohiro; Takeda, Sakura N.; Kitagawa, Kosuke; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the valence band structure of a Pb-adsorbed Ge(001) surface by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Three Ge bands, G1, G2, and G3, were observed in a Ge(001) 2 × 1 clean surface. In addition to these three bands, a fourth band (R band) is found on the surface with 2 ML of Pb. The R band continuously appeared even when the surface superstructure was changed. The position of the R band does not depend on Pb coverage. These results indicate that the R band derives from Ge subsurface states, known as surface resonance states. Furthermore, the effective mass of G3 is significantly reduced when the R band exists. We found that this reduction of G3 effective mass was explained by the interaction of the G3 and R bands. Consequently, the surface resonance band is considered to penetrate into the Ge subsurface region affecting the Ge bulk states. We determine the hybridization energy to be 0.068 eV by fitting the observed bands.

  10. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  11. Effect of the band structure of InGaN/GaN quantum well on the surface plasmon enhanced light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Rong E-mail: bliu@nju.edu.cn; Liu, Bin E-mail: bliu@nju.edu.cn; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Guogang; Tao, Tao; Zhuang, Zhe; Zhi, Ting; Zheng, Youdou

    2014-07-07

    The spontaneous emission (SE) of InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) structure with silver(Ag) coated on the n-GaN layer has been investigated by using six-by-six K-P method taking into account the electron-hole band structures, the photon density of states of surface plasmon polariton (SPP), and the evanescent fields of SPP. The SE into SPP mode can be remarkably enhanced due to the increase of electron-hole pairs near the Ag by modulating the InGaN/GaN QW structure or increasing the carrier injection. However, the ratio between the total SE rates into SPP mode and free space will approach to saturation or slightly decrease for the optimized structures with various distances between Ag film and QW layer at a high injection carrier density. Furthermore, the Ga-face QW structure has a higher SE rate than the N-face QW structure due to the overlap region of electron-hole pairs nearer to the Ag film.

  12. Monolithic phononic crystals with a surface acoustic band gap from surface phonon-polariton coupling.

    PubMed

    Yudistira, D; Boes, A; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Pennec, Y; Yeo, L Y; Mitchell, A; Friend, J R

    2014-11-21

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the existence of complete surface acoustic wave band gaps in surface phonon-polariton phononic crystals, in a completely monolithic structure formed from a two-dimensional honeycomb array of hexagonal shape domain-inverted inclusions in single crystal piezoelectric Z-cut lithium niobate. The band gaps appear at a frequency of about twice the Bragg band gap at the center of the Brillouin zone, formed through phonon-polariton coupling. The structure is mechanically, electromagnetically, and topographically homogeneous, without any physical alteration of the surface, offering an ideal platform for many acoustic wave applications for photonics, phononics, and microfluidics. PMID:25479504

  13. Band structure, Fermi surface, elastic, thermodynamic, and optical properties of AlZr 3 , AlCu 3 , and AlCu 2 Zr: First-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvin, R.; Parvin, F.; Ali, M. S.; Islam, A. K. M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties (Fermi surface, band structure, and density of states (DOS)) of Al-based alloys AlM 3 (M = Zr and Cu) and AlCu2Zr are investigated using the first-principles pseudopotential plane wave method within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The structural parameters and elastic constants are evaluated and compared with other available data. Also, the pressure dependences of mechanical properties of the compounds are studied. The temperature dependence of adiabatic bulk modulus, Debye temperature, specific heat, thermal expansion coefficient, entropy, and internal energy are all obtained for the first time through quasi-harmonic Debye model with phononic effects for T = 0 K–100 K. The parameters of optical properties (dielectric functions, refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption spectrum, conductivity, energy-loss spectrum, and reflectivity) of the compounds are calculated and discussed for the first time. The reflectivities of the materials are quite high in the IR–visible–UV region up to ∼ 15 eV, showing that they promise to be good coating materials to avoid solar heating. Some of the properties are also compared with those of the Al-based Ni3Al compound.

  14. Surface band gaps and superexchange interaction in transition metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Pothuizen, J.J.M.; Cohen, O.; Sawatzky, G.A.

    1996-11-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss the change in the band gap of charge transfer insulators for different surface terminations. They have calculated the Madelung potential of the unreconstructed (100) surfaces of the rocksalt structured TM-O compounds (TM = Mn, Fe, Co and Ni). They also considered possible step defects on a (100) surface. The presented results are calculated in both the purely ionic case (TM{sup 2+}O{sup 2{minus}}) and in the strong ligand p - cation 4s,p hybridization (TM{sup 1+}O{sup 1{minus}}) case. In both cases the charge transfer gap, {Delta}, for the surface is reduced compared to the bulk value. As a consequence of this reduction there is a large increase of the surface superexchange interaction, J{sub sur}, and a decrease of the band gap.

  15. Fractional Band Filling in an Atomic Chain Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, J. N.; Kirakosian, A.; Altmann, K. N.; Bromberger, C.; Erwin, S. C.; McChesney, J. L.; Lin, J.-L.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2003-05-01

    A new chain structure of Au is found on stepped Si(111) which exhibits a 1/4-filled band and a pair of ≥1/2-filled bands with a combined filling of 4/3. Band dispersions and Fermi surfaces for Si(553)-Au are obtained by photoemission and compared to that of Si(557)-Au. The dimensionality of both systems is determined using a tight binding fit. The fractional band filling makes it possible to preserve metallicity in the presence of strong correlations.

  16. Band structure of 235U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Clark, R. M.; Cline, D.; Cromaz, M.; Deleplanque, M. A.; Diamond, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Görgen, A.; Hayes, A. B.; Lane, G. J.; Lee, I.-Y.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Schmidt, G.; Stephens, F. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Teng, R.; Vetter, K.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Over a period of several years we have performed three separate experiments at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron in which 235U (thick target) was Coulomb-excited. The program involved stand-alone experiments with Gammmasphere and with the 8pi Spectrometer using 136Xe beams at 720 MeV, and a CHICO-Gammasphere experiment with a 40Ca beam at 184 MeV. In addition to extending the known negative-parity bands to high spin, we have assigned levels in some seven positive-parity bands which are in some cases (e.g., [631]1/2, [624]7/2, and [622]5/2) strongly populated by E3 excitation. The CHICO data have been analyzed to extract E2 and E3 matrix elements from the observed yields. Additionally, many M1 matrix elements could be extracted from the γ-ray branching ratios. A number of new features have emerged, including the unexpected attenuation of magnetic transitions between states of the same Nilsson multiplet, the breakdown of Coriolis staggering at high spin, and the effect of E3 collectivity on Coriolis interactions.

  17. Band structure of W and Mo by empirical pseudopotential method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, C. G.; Whiting, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    The empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) is used to calculate the band structure of tungsten and molybdenum. Agreement between the calculated reflectivity, density of states, density of states at the Fermi surface and location of the Fermi surface from this study and experimental measurements and previous calculations is good. Also the charge distribution shows the proper topological distribution of charge for a bcc crystal.

  18. Quasiparticle band structure of HgSe

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, M.; Louie, S.G.

    1998-04-01

    Motivated by a recent discussion about the existence of a fundamental gap in HgSe [Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 78}, 3165 (1997)], we calculate the quasiparticle band structure of HgSe within the GW approximation for the electron self-energy. The band-structure results show that HgSe is a semimetal, which is in agreement with most experimental data. We observe a strong wave-vector dependence of the self-energy of the lowest conduction band, leading to an increased dispersion and a small effective mass. This may help to interpret recent photoemission spectroscopy measurements. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Nonreciprocal microwave band-gap structures.

    PubMed

    Belov, P A; Tretyakov, S A; Viitanen, A J

    2002-07-01

    An electrically controlled nonreciprocal electromagnetic band-gap material is proposed and studied. The new material is a periodic three-dimensional regular lattice of small magnetized ferrite spheres. In this paper, we consider plane electromagnetic waves in this medium and design an analytical model for the material parameters. An analytical solution for plane-wave reflection from a planar interface is also presented. In the proposed material, a new electrically controlled stop band appears for one of the two circularly polarized eigenwaves in a frequency band around the ferrimagnetic resonance frequency. This frequency can be well below the usual lattice band gap, which allows the realization of rather compact structures. The main properties of the material are outlined. PMID:12241501

  20. Unfolding the band structure of non-crystalline photonic band gap materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitrin, Samuel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Amoah, Timothy; Nahal, Geev; Chan, Ho Leung; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining

    2015-08-01

    Non-crystalline photonic band gap (PBG) materials have received increasing attention, and sizeable PBGs have been reported in quasi-crystalline structures and, more recently, in disordered structures. Band structure calculations for periodic structures produce accurate dispersion relations, which determine group velocities, dispersion, density of states and iso-frequency surfaces, and are used to predict a wide-range of optical phenomena including light propagation, excited-state decay rates, temporal broadening or compression of ultrashort pulses and complex refraction phenomena. However, band calculations for non-periodic structures employ large super-cells of hundreds to thousands building blocks, and provide little useful information other than the PBG central frequency and width. Using stereolithography, we construct cm-scale disordered PBG materials and perform microwave transmission measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The photonic dispersion relations are reconstructed from the measured and simulated phase data. Our results demonstrate the existence of sizeable PBGs in these disordered structures and provide detailed information of the effective band diagrams, dispersion relation, iso-frequency contours, and their angular dependence. Slow light phenomena are also observed in these structures near gap frequencies. This study introduces a powerful tool to investigate photonic properties of non-crystalline structures and provides important effective dispersion information, otherwise difficult to obtain.

  1. Unfolding the band structure of non-crystalline photonic band gap materials.

    PubMed

    Tsitrin, Samuel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Amoah, Timothy; Nahal, Geev; Chan, Ho Leung; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining

    2015-01-01

    Non-crystalline photonic band gap (PBG) materials have received increasing attention, and sizeable PBGs have been reported in quasi-crystalline structures and, more recently, in disordered structures. Band structure calculations for periodic structures produce accurate dispersion relations, which determine group velocities, dispersion, density of states and iso-frequency surfaces, and are used to predict a wide-range of optical phenomena including light propagation, excited-state decay rates, temporal broadening or compression of ultrashort pulses and complex refraction phenomena. However, band calculations for non-periodic structures employ large super-cells of hundreds to thousands building blocks, and provide little useful information other than the PBG central frequency and width. Using stereolithography, we construct cm-scale disordered PBG materials and perform microwave transmission measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The photonic dispersion relations are reconstructed from the measured and simulated phase data. Our results demonstrate the existence of sizeable PBGs in these disordered structures and provide detailed information of the effective band diagrams, dispersion relation, iso-frequency contours, and their angular dependence. Slow light phenomena are also observed in these structures near gap frequencies. This study introduces a powerful tool to investigate photonic properties of non-crystalline structures and provides important effective dispersion information, otherwise difficult to obtain. PMID:26289434

  2. Unfolding the band structure of non-crystalline photonic band gap materials

    PubMed Central

    Tsitrin, Samuel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Amoah, Timothy; Nahal, Geev; Chan, Ho Leung; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining

    2015-01-01

    Non-crystalline photonic band gap (PBG) materials have received increasing attention, and sizeable PBGs have been reported in quasi-crystalline structures and, more recently, in disordered structures. Band structure calculations for periodic structures produce accurate dispersion relations, which determine group velocities, dispersion, density of states and iso-frequency surfaces, and are used to predict a wide-range of optical phenomena including light propagation, excited-state decay rates, temporal broadening or compression of ultrashort pulses and complex refraction phenomena. However, band calculations for non-periodic structures employ large super-cells of hundreds to thousands building blocks, and provide little useful information other than the PBG central frequency and width. Using stereolithography, we construct cm-scale disordered PBG materials and perform microwave transmission measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The photonic dispersion relations are reconstructed from the measured and simulated phase data. Our results demonstrate the existence of sizeable PBGs in these disordered structures and provide detailed information of the effective band diagrams, dispersion relation, iso-frequency contours, and their angular dependence. Slow light phenomena are also observed in these structures near gap frequencies. This study introduces a powerful tool to investigate photonic properties of non-crystalline structures and provides important effective dispersion information, otherwise difficult to obtain. PMID:26289434

  3. Band structure engineering in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Martin; Tress, Wolfgang; Beyer, Beatrice; Gao, Feng; Scholz, Reinhard; Poelking, Carl; Ortstein, Katrin; Günther, Alrun A; Kasemann, Daniel; Andrienko, Denis; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-17

    A key breakthrough in modern electronics was the introduction of band structure engineering, the design of almost arbitrary electronic potential structures by alloying different semiconductors to continuously tune the band gap and band-edge energies. Implementation of this approach in organic semiconductors has been hindered by strong localization of the electronic states in these materials. We show that the influence of so far largely ignored long-range Coulomb interactions provides a workaround. Photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the ionization energies of crystalline organic semiconductors can be continuously tuned over a wide range by blending them with their halogenated derivatives. Correspondingly, the photovoltaic gap and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells can be continuously tuned by the blending ratio of these donors. PMID:27313043

  4. Complex banded structures in directional solidification processes.

    PubMed

    Korzhenevskii, A L; Rozas, R E; Horbach, J

    2016-01-27

    A combination of theory and numerical simulation is used to investigate impurity superstructures that form in rapid directional solidification (RDS) processes in the presence of a temperature gradient and a pulling velocity with an oscillatory component. Based on a capillary wave model, we show that the RDS processes are associated with a rich morphology of banded structures, including frequency locking and the transition to chaos. PMID:26704726

  5. Magnon band structure of periodic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, J. O.; Dobrzynski, L.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Puszkarski, H.

    1996-07-01

    innodata J. O. VASSEUR et al. MAGNON BAND STRUCTURE OF PERIODIC COMPOSITES We calculate the spin-wave spectra of two-dimensional composite materials consisting of periodic square arrays of parallel cylinders made of a ferromagnetic material embedded in a ferromagnetic background. Each material is described by its spontaneous magnetization MS and exchange constant A. An external static magnetic field is applied along the direction of the cylinders and both ferromagnetic materials are assumed to be magnetized parallel to this magnetic field. We consider the spin-waves propagation in the plane perpendicular to the cylinders. We reveal the existence of gaps in the magnon band structure of composite systems such as the periodic array of Fe cylinders in an EuO matrix. We investigate the existence of these gaps in relation to the physical parameters of the materials involved. We also study the influence of the lattice parameter (i.e., the square array periodicity) and the effect of the filling fraction of the cylinders on the magnon band structure.

  6. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  7. The band-gap enhanced photovoltaic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessler, Nir

    2016-05-01

    We critically examine the recently suggested structure that was postulated to potentially add 50% to the photo-conversion efficiency of organic solar cells. We find that the structure could be realized using stepwise increase in the gap as long as the steps are not above 0.1 eV. We also show that the charge extraction is not compromised due to an interplay between the contact's space charge and the energy level modification, which result in a flat energy band at the extracting contact.

  8. Band structure engineering of topological insulator heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Yeom, Han Woong; Jhi, Seung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the topological surface states in heterostructures formed from a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) and a two-dimensional insulating thin film, using first-principles calculations and the tight-binding method. Utilizing a single Bi or Sb bilayer on top of the topological insulators B i2S e3 , B i2T e3 , B i2T e2Se , and S b2T e3 , we find that the surface states evolve in very peculiar but predictable ways. We show that strong hybridization between the bilayer and TI substrates causes the topological surface states to migrate to the top bilayer. It is found that the difference in the work function of constituent layers, which determines the band alignment and the strength of hybridization, governs the character of newly emerged Dirac states.

  9. Band structure of doubly-odd nuclei around mass 130

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiyama, Koji; Yoshinaga, Naotaka

    2011-05-06

    Nuclear structure of the doublet bands in the doubly-odd nuclei with mass A{approx}130 is studied in terms of a pair-truncated shell model. The model reproduces quite well the energy levels of the doublet bands and the electromagnetic transitions. The analysis of the electromagnetic transitions reveals new band structure of the doublet bands.

  10. Micromechanics of slip bands on a free surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. R.; Lin, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    A micromechanics analysis for the formation and propagation of slip bands on the free surface of a polycrystal under monotonic loading is presented. For the growth of slip bands, the analysis satisfies the conditions of both equilibrium and displacement continuity, as well as the relation between slip and the resolved shear stress throughout the polycrystal. Numerical calculations show how the microstress field causes the concentration of plastic deformation in discrete sliding bands and give results which are in good qualitative agreement with known slip band observations on aluminum single crystals.

  11. Thermal Infrared Spectral Band Detection Limits for Unidentified Surface Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, Laurel E.; Herr, Kenneth C.; Salisbury, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra recorded by airborne or satellite spectrometers can be searched for spectral features to determine the composition of rocks on planetary surfaces. Surface materials are identified by detections of characteristic spectral bands. We show how to define whether to accept an observed spectral feature as a detection when the target material is unknown. We also use remotely sensed spectra measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System to illustrate the importance of instrument parameters and surface properties on band detection limits and how the variation in signal-to-noise ratio with wavelength affects the bands that are most detectable for a given instrument. The spectrometer's sampling interval, spectral resolution, signal-to-noise ratio as a function of wavelength, and the sample's surface properties influence whether the instrument can detect a spectral feature exhibited by a material. As an example, in the 6-13 micrometer wavelength region, massive carbonates exhibit two bands: a very strong, broad feature at approximately 6.5 micrometers and a less intense, sharper band at approximately 11.25 micrometers. Although the 6.5-micrometer band is stronger and broader in laboratory-measured spectra, the 11.25-micrometer band will cause a more detectable feature in TES spectra.

  12. Elucidating the stop bands of structurally colored systems through recursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel; Vukusic, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Interference is the source of some of the spectacular colors of animals and plants in nature. In some of these systems, the physical structure consists of an ordered array of layers with alternating high and low refractive indices. This periodicity leads to an optical band structure that is analogous to the electronic band structure encountered in semiconductor physics: specific bands of wavelengths (the stop bands) are perfectly reflected. Here, we present a minimal model for optical band structure in a periodic multilayer structure and solve it using recursion relations. The stop bands emerge in the limit of an infinite number of layers by finding the fixed point of the recursion. We compare to experimental data for various beetles, whose optical structure resembles the proposed model. Thus, using only the phenomenon of interference and the idea of recursion, we are able to elucidate the concept of band structure in the context of the experimentally observed high reflectance and iridescent appearance of structurally colored beetles.

  13. Rotational Band Structure in 32Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Heather; NSCL E11029 Collaboration Team

    2016-03-01

    There is significant evidence supporting the existence of deformed ground states within the neutron-rich N =20 neon, sodium, and magnesium isotopes that make up what is commonly called the ``Island of Inversion''. However, rotational band structures, a characteristic fingerprint of a rigid non-spherical shape, have yet to be observed. We report on a measurement and analysis of the yrast (lowest lying) rotational band in 32Mg up to spin I = 6+, produced in a two-step projectile fragmentation reaction and observed using the state-of-the-art γ-ray tracking detector array, GRETINA. Large-scale shell model calculations using the SDPF-U-MIX effective interaction show excellent agreement with the new data. Moreover, a theoretical analysis of the spectrum of rotational states as a function of the pairing gap, together with cranked shell model calculations, provides intriguing evidence for a reduction in pairing correlations with increased angular momentum, also in line with the shell-model results. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, NP Office under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL). GRETINA was funded by the U.S. DOE Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL was supported by NSF.

  14. Rotational band structure in 32Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, H. L.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Poves, A.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Bowry, M.; Campbell, C. M.; Carpenter, M. P.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Gade, A.; Ideguchi, E.; Iwasaki, H.; Langer, C.; Lee, I. Y.; Loelius, C.; Lunderberg, E.; Morse, C.; Richard, A. L.; Rissanen, J.; Smalley, D.; Stroberg, S. R.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wiens, A.; Williams, S. J.; Wimmer, K.; Yamamato, T.

    2016-03-01

    There is significant evidence supporting the existence of deformed ground states within the neutron-rich N ≈20 neon, sodium, and magnesium isotopes that make up what is commonly called the "island of inversion." However, the rotational band structures, which are a characteristic fingerprint of a rigid nonspherical shape, have yet to be observed. In this work, we report on a measurement and analysis of the yrast (lowest lying) rotational band in 32Mg up to spin I =6+ produced in a two-step projectile fragmentation reaction and observed using the state-of-the-art γ -ray tracking detector array, GRETINA (γ -ray energy tracking in-beam nuclear array). Large-scale shell-model calculations using the SDPF-U-MIX effective interaction show excellent agreement with the new data. Moreover, a theoretical analysis of the spectrum of rotational states as a function of the pairing gap, together with cranked-shell-model calculations, provides intriguing evidence for a reduction in pairing correlations with increased angular momentum, also in line with the shell-model results.

  15. Measurement of valence band structure in arbitrary dielectric films

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Choi, Eun H.

    2012-10-15

    A new way of measuring the band structure of various dielectric materials using the secondary electron emission from Auger neutralization of ions is introduced. The first example of this measurement scheme is the magnesium oxide (MgO) films with respect to the application of the films in the display industries. The density of state in the valence bands of MgO film and MgO film with a functional layer (FL) deposited over a dielectric surface reveals that the density peak of film with a FL is considerably less than that of film, thereby indicating a better performance of MgO film with functional layer in display devices. The second example of the measurement is the boron-zinc oxide (BZO) films with respect to the application of the films to the development of solar cells. The measurement of density of state in BZO film suggests that a high concentration of boron impurity in BZO films may enhance the transition of electrons and holes through the band gap from the valence to the conduction band in zinc oxide crystals; thereby improving the conductivity of the film. Secondary electron emission by the Auger neutralization of ions is highly instrumental for the determination of the density of states in the valence band of dielectric materials.

  16. Influence of Structural Parameters on a Novel Metamaterial Absorber Structure at K-band Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuong, Tran Manh; Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Tuan, Le Anh

    2016-05-01

    Metamaterials nowadays continue to gain attention thanks to their special electromagnetic characteristics. An increasing number of studies are being conducted on the absolute electromagnetic absorber configurations of high impedance surface materials at a certain frequency band. These configurations are usually fabricated with a layer of metal structure based on a dielectric sheet. In this study, we present an optimal design of a novel electromagnetic absorber metamaterial configuration working at a 23-GHz frequency range (K band).

  17. Electronic band structure and photoemission: A review and projection

    SciTech Connect

    Falicov, L.M.

    1987-09-01

    A brief review of electronic-structure calculations in solids, as a means of interpreting photoemission spectra, is presented. The calculations are, in general, of three types: ordinary one-electron-like band structures, which apply to bulk solids and are the basis of all other calculations; surface modified calculations, which take into account, self-consistently if at all possible, the presence of a vacuum-solid interface and of the electronic modifications caused thereby; and many-body calculations, which go beyond average-field approximations and consider dynamic rearrangement effects caused by electron-electron correlations during the photoemission process. 44 refs.

  18. Effects of d-band shape on the surface reactivity of transition-metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hongliang; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Voss, Johannes; Nørskov, Jens K.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2014-03-01

    The d-band shape of a metal site, governed by the local geometry and composition of materials, plays an important role in determining trends of the surface reactivity of transition-metal alloys. We discuss this phenomenon using the chemisorption of various adsorbates such as C, N, O, and their hydrogenated species on Pd bimetallic alloys as an example. For many alloys, the d-band center, even with consideration of the d-band width and sp electrons, can not describe variations in reactivity from one surface to another. We investigate the effect of the d-band shape, represented by higher moments of the d band, on the local electronic structure of adsorbates, e.g., energy and filling of adsorbate-metal antibonding states. The upper d-band edge ɛu, defined as the highest peak position of the Hilbert transform of the density of states projected onto d orbitals of an active metal site, is identified as an electronic descriptor for the surface reactivity of transition metals and their alloys, regardless of variations in the d-band shape. The utilization of the upper d-band edge with scaling relations enables a considerable reduction of the parameter space in search of improved alloy catalysts and further extends our understanding of the relationship between the electronic structure and chemical reactivity of metal surfaces.

  19. Segmental structure in banded mongoose calls.

    PubMed

    Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2012-01-01

    In complex animal vocalizations, such as bird or whale song, a great variety of songs can be produced via rearrangements of a smaller set of 'syllables', known as 'phonological syntax' or 'phonocoding' However, food or alarm calls, which function as referential signals, were previously thought to lack such combinatorial structure. A new study of calls in the banded mongoose Mungos mungo provides the first evidence of phonocoding at the level of single calls. The first portion of the call provides cues to the identity of the caller, and the second part encodes its current activity. This provides the first example known in animals of something akin to the consonants and vowels of human speech. PMID:23206277

  20. Segmental structure in banded mongoose calls

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In complex animal vocalizations, such as bird or whale song, a great variety of songs can be produced via rearrangements of a smaller set of 'syllables', known as 'phonological syntax' or 'phonocoding' However, food or alarm calls, which function as referential signals, were previously thought to lack such combinatorial structure. A new study of calls in the banded mongoose Mungos mungo provides the first evidence of phonocoding at the level of single calls. The first portion of the call provides cues to the identity of the caller, and the second part encodes its current activity. This provides the first example known in animals of something akin to the consonants and vowels of human speech. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/97 PMID:23206277

  1. A Theoretical Structure of High School Concert Band Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergee, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to verify a theoretical structure for high school concert band performance and to test that structure for viability, generality, and invariance. A total of 101 university students enrolled in two different bands rated two high school band performances (a "first"…

  2. 5 CFR 9701.321 - Structure of bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Structure of bands. 9701.321 Section 9701.321 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM... Structure of bands. (a) DHS may, after coordination with OPM, establish ranges of basic pay for bands,...

  3. Achieving Higher Energies via Passively Driven X-band Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipahi, Taylan; Sipahi, Nihan; Milton, Stephen; Biedron, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Due to their higher intrinsic shunt impedance X-band accelerating structures significant gradients with relatively modest input powers, and this can lead to more compact particle accelerators. At the Colorado State University Accelerator Laboratory (CSUAL) we would like to adapt this technology to our 1.3 GHz L-band accelerator system using a passively driven 11.7 GHz traveling wave X-band configuration that capitalizes on the high shunt impedances achievable in X-band accelerating structures in order to increase our overall beam energy in a manner that does not require investment in an expensive, custom, high-power X-band klystron system. Here we provide the design details of the X-band structures that will allow us to achieve our goal of reaching the maximum practical net potential across the X-band accelerating structure while driven solely by the beam from the L-band system.

  4. Sub-band structure engineering for advanced CMOS channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shin-ichi; Mizuno, T.; Tezuka, T.; Sugiyama, N.; Nakaharai, S.; Numata, T.; Koga, J.; Uchida, K.

    2005-05-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies of novel CMOS channels based on the concept of sub-band structure engineering. This device design concept can be realized as strained-Si channel MOSFETs, ultra-thin SOI MOSFETs and Ge-on-Insulator (GOI) MOSFETs. An important factor for the electron mobility enhancement is the introduction of larger sub-band energy splitting between the 2- and 4-fold valleys on a (1 0 0) surface, which can be obtained in strained-Si and ultra-thin body channels. The electrical properties of strained-Si MOSFETs are summarized with an emphasis on strained-SOI structures. Also, the importance of the precise control of ultra-thin SOI thickness is pointed out from the experimental results of the SOI thickness dependence of mobility. Furthermore, it is shown that the increase in the sub-band energy splitting can also be effective in obtaining higher current drive of n-channel MOSFETs under ballistic transport regime. This suggests that the current drive enhancement based on MOS channel engineering utilizing strain and ultra-thin body structures can be extended to ultra-short channel MOSFETs dominated by ballistic transport.

  5. Structural Evolution of a Warm Frontal Precipitation Band During GCPEx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colle, Brian A.; Naeger, Aaron; Molthan, Andrew; Nesbitt, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    A warm frontal precipitation band developed over a few hours 50-100 km to the north of a surface warm front. The 3-km WRF was able to realistically simulate band development, although the model is somewhat too weak. Band genesis was associated with weak frontogenesis (deformation) in the presence of weak potential and conditional instability feeding into the band region, while it was closer to moist neutral within the band. As the band matured, frontogenesis increased, while the stability gradually increased in the banding region. Cloud top generating cells were prevalent, but not in WRF (too stable). The band decayed as the stability increased upstream and the frontogenesis (deformation) with the warm front weakened. The WRF may have been too weak and short-lived with the band because too stable and forcing too weak (some micro issues as well).

  6. Electronic structures of TiO2-TCNE, -TCNQ, and -2,6-TCNAQ surface complexes studied by ionization potential measurements and DFT calculations: Mechanism of the shift of interfacial charge-transfer bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Hanaya, Minoru

    2016-06-01

    Interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions between inorganic semiconductors and π-conjugated molecules allow direct charge separation without loss of energy. This feature is potentially useful for efficient photovoltaic conversions. Charge-transferred complexes of TiO2 nanoparticles with 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and its analogues (TCNX) show strong ICT absorption in the visible region. The ICT band was reported to be significantly red-shifted with extension of the π-conjugated system of TCNX. In order to clarify the mechanism of the red-shift, in this work, we systematically study electronic structures of the TiO2-TCNX surface complexes (TCNX; TCNE, TCNQ, 2,6-TCNAQ) by ionization potential measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  7. Absence of X-point band overlap in divalent hexaborides and variability of the surface chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Gweon, Gey-Hong; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Allen, James W.; Sarrao, John L.; Bianchi, Adrian D.; Fisk, Zachary

    2001-11-04

    Angle-resolved photoemission measurements of divalent hexaborides reveals a >1 eV X-point gap between the valence and conduction bands, in contradiction to the band overlap assumed in several models of their novel ferromagnetism. While the global ARPES band structure and gap size observed are consistent with the results of bulk-sensitive soft x-ray absorption and emission boron K-edge spectroscopy, the surface-sensitive photoemission measurements also show a variation with cation, surface and time of the position of the surface chemical potential in the band structure.

  8. Emergence of topological bands on the surface of ZrSnTe crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, R.; Ma, J.-Z.; Xu, Q.-N.; Fu, B.-B.; Kong, L.-Y.; Shi, Y.-G.; Richard, P.; Weng, H.-M.; Fang, Z.; Sun, S.-S.; Wang, Q.; Lei, H.-C.; Qian, T.; Ding, H.; Wang, S.-C.

    2016-06-01

    By using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations, we reveal that the topmost unit cell of ZrSnTe crystal hosts two-dimensional (2D) electronic bands of the topological insulator (TI) state, although such a TI state is defined with a curved Fermi level instead of a global band gap. Furthermore, we find that by modifying the dangling bonds on the surface through hydrogenation, this 2D band structure can be manipulated so that the expected global energy gap is most likely to be realized. This facilitates the practical applications of 2D TI in heterostructural devices and those with surface decoration and coverage. Since ZrSnTe belongs to a large family of compounds having the similar crystal and band structures, our findings shed light on identifying more 2D TI candidates and superconductor-TI heterojunctions supporting topological superconductors.

  9. Möbius bands, unstretchable material sheets and developable surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-chao

    2016-01-01

    A Möbius band can be formed by bending a sufficiently long rectangular unstretchable material sheet and joining the two short ends after twisting by 180°. This process can be modelled by an isometric mapping from a rectangular region to a developable surface in three-dimensional Euclidean space. Attempts have been made to determine the equilibrium shape of a Möbius band by minimizing the bending energy in the class of mappings from the rectangular region to the collection of developable surfaces. In this work, we show that, although a surface obtained from an isometric mapping of a prescribed planar region must be developable, a mapping from a prescribed planar region to a developable surface is not necessarily isometric. Based on this, we demonstrate that the notion of a rectifying developable cannot be used to describe a pure bending of a rectangular region into a Möbius band or a generic ribbon, as has been erroneously done in many publications. Specifically, our analysis shows that the mapping from a prescribed planar region to a rectifying developable surface is isometric only if that surface is cylindrical with the midline being the generator. Towards providing solutions to this issue, we discuss several alternative modelling strategies that respect the distinction between the physical constraint of unstretchability and the geometrical notion of developability. PMID:27616933

  10. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  11. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  12. Theoretical studies of electronic band-tail states, Anderson transition and surfaces of amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jianjun

    In this dissertation, we study the Anderson transition within the electronic band tail states, and amorphous surfaces. The disorder induced band tail states is one of the unique character of amorphous semiconductors. Because of the proximity to the Fermi level, the nature of these band tail states is of obvious interest to theory of doping and transport. The study of amorphous solid surface is also an interesting area for theory. It is possible to have some major rearrangements near surfaces of amorphous solids (the amorphous analog of surface reconstruction), and the local bonding environment could be dramatically different from that of bulk. The study of the surfaces can also help people toward understanding the growth mechanism. First, electronic band tail states of amorphous silicon and amorphous diamond were studied based on the large (4096 atom) and realistic structural models. To solve the large tight-binding Hamiltonian matrices, we used two order N methods: the maximum entropy method for computing the total densities of states, and the modified Lanczos techniques for computing the individual energy eigenstates in the band gap regions. The DC conductivity was estimated with the Kubo formula. Next, the structural and electronic properties of the surfaces of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) were also studied with a first-principles, local basis LDA technique. We reported two structural models made under different conditions, and examined the transition of the local bonding environment from the bulk to the surface. In the study of band tail states, we observe that Anderson (local-to-extended) transition within the band states proceeds by "cluster proliferation". We interpret the nature of band tail states in terms of a "resonant cluster model" through which one can qualitatively understand the evolution of the states from midgap toward the mobility edges. In the study of ta-C surfaces, we observe that nearly 50% surface atoms are threefold coordinated and

  13. Photonic bands in two-dimensional microplasma arrays. I. Theoretical derivation of band structures of electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Osamu; Sakaguchi, Takui; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2007-04-01

    Two theoretical approaches appropriate for two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals reveal dispersions of propagating waves including photonic (electromagnetic) band gaps and multiflatbands. A modified plane-wave expansion method yields dispersions of collisional periodical plasmas, and the complex-value solution of a wave equation by a finite difference method enables us to obtain dispersions with structure effects in an individual microplasma. Periodical plasma arrays form band gaps as well as normal photonic crystals, and multiflatbands are present below the electron plasma frequency in the transverse electric field mode. Electron elastic collisions lower the top frequency of the multiflatbands but have little effect on band gap properties. The spatial gradient of the local dielectric constant resulting from an electron density profile widens the frequency region of the multiflatbands, as demonstrated by the change of surface wave distributions. Propagation properties described in dispersions including band gaps and flatbands agree with experimental observations of microplasma arrays.

  14. Band structure controlled by chiral imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, P.; Adrian Reyes, J.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2007-09-01

    Using the configuration of an imprinted cholesteric elastomer immersed in a racemic solvent, the authors find the solution of the boundary-value problem for the reflection and transmission of incident optical waves due to the elastomer. They show a significant width reduction of the reflection band for certain values of nematic penetration depth, which depends on the volume fraction of molecules from the solvent, whose handedness is preferably absorbed. The appearance of nested band gaps of both handednesses during the sorting mixed chiral process is also obtained. This suggests the design of chemically controlled optical filters and optically monitored chiral pumps.

  15. Broadening of effective photonic band gaps in biological chiral structures: From intrinsic narrow band gaps to broad band reflection spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, W. E.; Hernández-Jiménez, M.; Libby, E.; Azofeifa, D. E.; Solis, Á.; Barboza-Aguilar, C.

    2015-09-01

    Under normal illumination with non-polarized light, reflection spectra of the cuticle of golden-like and red Chrysina aurigans scarabs show a structured broad band of left-handed circularly polarized light. The polarization of the reflected light is attributed to a Bouligand-type left-handed chiral structure found through the scarab's cuticle. By considering these twisted structures as one-dimensional photonic crystals, a novel approach is developed from the dispersion relation of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves traveling through chiral media, to show how the broad band characterizing these spectra arises from an intrinsic narrow photonic band gap whose spectral position moves through visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  16. MODIS thermal emissive band calibration stability derived from surface targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenny, B. N.; Xiong, X.; Dodd, J.

    2009-09-01

    The 16 MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands (TEB), with wavelengths covering from 3.7μm to 14.4μm, are calibrated using scan-by-scan observations of an on-orbit blackbody (BB). Select Earth surface targets can be used to track the long-term consistency, stability and relative bias between the two MODIS instruments currently in orbit. Measurements at Dome C, Antarctica have shown a relative bias of less than 0.01K over a 5 year period between Terra and Aqua MODIS Band 31 (11μm). Dome C surface temperatures are typically outside the MODIS BB calibration range. Sea surface temperature (SST) measurements from data buoys provide a useful reference at higher scene temperatures. This paper extends the techniques previously applied only to Band 31 to the remaining TEB using both Dome C and SST sites. The long-term calibration stability and relative bias between Terra and Aqua MODIS is discussed.

  17. Banded surface flow maintained by convection in a model of the rapidly rotating giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.-P.; Schubert, G.; Glatzmaier, G. A.

    1993-04-01

    In three-dimensional numerical simulations of a rapidly rotating Boussinesq fluid shell, thermally driven convection in the form of columns parallel to the rotation axis generates an alternately directed mean zonal flow with a cylindrical structure. The mean structure at the outer spherical surface consists of a broad eastward flow at the equator and alternating bands of westward and eastward flows at higher latitudes in both hemispheres. The banded structure persists even though the underlying convective motions are time-dependent. These results, although still far from the actual motions seen on Jupiter and Saturn, provide support for theoretical suggestions that thermal convection can account for the remarkable banded flow structures on these planets.

  18. Electronic Band Structure and Sub-band-gap Absorption of Nitrogen Hyperdoped Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhen; Shao, Hezhu; Dong, Xiao; Li, Ning; Ning, Bo-Yuan; Ning, Xi-Jing; Zhao, Li; Zhuang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the atomic geometry, electronic band structure, and optical absorption of nitrogen hyperdoped silicon based on first-principles calculations. The results show that all the paired nitrogen defects we studied do not introduce intermediate band, while most of single nitrogen defects can introduce intermediate band in the gap. Considering the stability of the single defects and the rapid resolidification following the laser melting process in our sample preparation method, we conclude that the substitutional nitrogen defect, whose fraction was tiny and could be neglected before, should have considerable fraction in the hyperdoped silicon and results in the visible sub-band-gap absorption as observed in the experiment. Furthermore, our calculations show that the substitutional nitrogen defect has good stability, which could be one of the reasons why the sub-band-gap absorptance remains almost unchanged after annealing. PMID:26012369

  19. Valence band structure of the icosahedral Ag-In-Yb quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, H. R.; Simutis, G.; Dhanak, V. R.; Nugent, P. J.; McGrath, R.; Cui, C.; Shimoda, M.; Tsai, A. P.; Ishii, Y.

    2010-03-01

    The valence band structure of the icosahedral (i) Ag-In-Yb quasicrystal, which is isostructural to the binary i-Cd-Yb system, is investigated by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). Experimental results are compared with electronic-structure calculations of a cubic approximant of the same phase. UPS spectra from the fivefold, threefold, and twofold i-Ag-In-Yb surfaces reveal that the valence band near to the Fermi level is dominated by Yb 4f-derived states, in agreement with calculations. The spectra also exhibit peaks which are surface core level shifted, caused by changes in the electronic structure in surface layers. Calculations yield a pseudogap in the density of states due to a hybridization of the Yb 5d band with the Ag 5p and In 5p bands. Both experimental and calculated band features are very similar to those of Cd-Yb. The modification of the band structure after surface treatment by sputtering and by oxidation is also studied. Additionally, the work function of i-Ag-In-Yb measured from the width of UPS spectrum is found to be almost unaffected by surface orientation, but increases after sputtering or oxidation.

  20. Band Structure Controlled by Chiral Imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes Cervantes, Adrian; Castro-Garay, P.; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben

    2008-03-01

    Using the configuration of an imprinted cholesteric elastomer immersed in a racemic solvent, we find the solution of the boundary--value problem for the reflection and transmission of incident optical waves due to the elastomer. We show a significant width reduction of the reflection band for certain values of nematic penetration depth, which depends on the volume fraction of molecules from the solvent, whose handedness is preferably absorbed. The appearance of nested bandgaps of both handednesses during the sorting mixed chiral process is also obtained. This suggests the design of chemically controlled optical filters and optically monitored chiral pumps.

  1. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B.

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  2. Band structure in Yang-Mills theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachas, Constantin; Tomaras, Theodore

    2016-05-01

    We show how Yang-Mills theory on S3 × ℝ can exhibit a spectrum with continuous bands if coupled either to a topological 3-form gauge field, or to a dynamical axion with heavy Peccei-Quinn scale. The basic mechanism consists in associating winding histories to a bosonic zero mode whose role is to convert a circle in configuration space into a helix. The zero mode is, respectively, the holonomy of the 3-form field or the axion momentum. In these models different θ sectors coexist and are only mixed by (non-local) volume operators. Our analysis sheds light on, and extends Seiberg's proposal for modifying the topological sums in quantum field theories. It refutes a recent claim that B + L violation at LHC is unsuppressed.

  3. Monolayer-induced band shifts at Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mäkinen, A. J. Kim, Chul-Soo; Kushto, G. P.

    2014-01-27

    We report our study of the interfacial electronic structure of Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces that have been chemically modified with various organic monolayers, including octadecene and two para-substituted benzene derivatives. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals an upward band shift, associated with the assembly of these organic monolayers on the Si substrates, that does not correlate with either the dipole moment or the electron withdrawing/donating character of the molecular moieties. This suggests that the nature and quality of the self-assembled monolayer and the intrinsic electronic structure of the semiconductor material define the interfacial electronic structure of the functionalized Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces.

  4. The investigation of single, dual and tri-band frequency selective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abd.; Shukor, Mahfuzah Md.; Mustafa, Nur Hanim; Fauzi, Noor Azamiah Md; Ahmad, Badrul Hisham; Suaidi, Mohamad Kadim; Johar, Fauzi Mohd; Salleh, Siti Nadzirah; Azmin, Farah Ayuni; Malek, Mohd Fareq Abd.

    2015-05-01

    The single, dual and tri-band Frequency Selective Surface (FSS) design structure is designed and simulated by using CST Microwave Studio software. The reflection (S11) and transmission (S21) of the design FSS structure is analyzed based on the six types of configuration that have been set up. All configurations are simulated with the same size of the FSS design structure. The hybrid material (FR4 and glass) affects the transmission and reflection signals of the FSS which led to the compact structure. The measurement results are agreed for all FSS design structures but the difference is due to the transmission losses.

  5. Locally resonant periodic structures with low-frequency band gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhibao; Shi, Zhifei; Mo, Y. L.; Xiang, Hongjun

    2013-07-01

    Presented in this paper are study results of dispersion relationships of periodic structures composited of concrete and rubber, from which the frequency band gap can be found. Two models with fixed or free boundary conditions are proposed to approximate the bound frequencies of the first band gap. Studies are conducted to investigate the low-frequency and directional frequency band gaps for their application to engineering. The study finds that civil engineering structures can be designed to block harmful waves, such as earthquake disturbance.

  6. Banded Electron Structure Formation in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    Banded electron structures in energy-time spectrograms have been observed in the inner magnetosphere concurrent with a sudden relaxation of geomagnetic activity. In this study, the formation of these banded structures is considered with a global, bounce-averaged model of electron transport, and it is concluded that this structure is a natural occurrence when plasma sheet electrons are captured on closed drift paths near the Earth. These bands do not appear unless there is capture of plasma sheet electrons; convection along open drift paths making open pass around the Earth do not have time to develop this feature. The separation of high-energy bands from the injection population due to the preferential advection of the gradient-curvature drift creates spikes in the energy distribution, which overlap to form a series of bands in the energy spectrograms. The lowest band is the bulk of the injected population in the sub-key energy range. Using the Kp history for an observed banded structure event, a cloud of plasma sheet electrons is captured and the development of their distribution function is examined and discussed.

  7. Quasi one-dimensional band dispersion and surface metallization in long-range ordered polymeric wires

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vasseur, Guillaume; Fagot-Revurat, Yannick; Sicot, Muriel; Kierren, Bertrand; Moreau, Luc; Malterre, Daniel; Cardenas, Luis; Galeotti, Gianluca; Lipton-Duffin, Josh; Rosei, Frederico; et al

    2016-01-04

    We study the electronic structure of an ordered array of poly(para-phenylene) chains produced by surface-catalyzed dehalogenative polymerization of 1,4-dibromobenzene on copper (110). The quantization of unoccupied molecular states is measured as a function of oligomer length by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, with Fermi level crossings observed for chains longer than ten phenyl rings. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a quasi-one-dimensional valence band as well as a direct gap of 1.15 eV, as the conduction band is partially filled through adsorption on the surface. Tight-binding modelling and ab initio density functional theory calculations lead to a full description of the organic band-structure, includingmore » the k-dispersion, the gap size and electron charge transfer mechanisms, highlighting a strong substrate-molecule interaction that drives the system into a metallic behaviour. In summary, we have fully characterized the band structure of a carbon-based conducting wire. This model system may be considered as a fingerprint of -conjugation of surface organic frameworks.« less

  8. Mapping polarization induced surface band bending on the Rashba semiconductor BiTeI

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Christopher John; Yang, Hung-Hsiang; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Hsu, Shih-Hao; Sankar, Raman; Lu, Chun-I; Lu, Hsin-Yu; Yang, Kui-Hon Ou; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Kaun, Chao-Cheng; Shu, Guo-Jiun; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2014-01-01

    Surfaces of semiconductors with strong spin-orbit coupling are of great interest for use in spintronic devices exploiting the Rashba effect. BiTeI features large Rashba-type spin splitting in both valence and conduction bands. Either can be shifted towards the Fermi level by surface band bending induced by the two possible polar terminations, making Rashba spin-split electron or hole bands electronically accessible. Here we demonstrate the first real-space microscopic identification of each termination with a multi-technique experimental approach. Using spatially resolved tunnelling spectroscopy across the lateral boundary between the two terminations, a previously speculated on p-n junction-like discontinuity in electronic structure at the lateral boundary is confirmed experimentally. These findings realize an important step towards the exploitation of the unique behaviour of the Rashba semiconductor BiTeI for new device concepts in spintronics. PMID:24898943

  9. Dependence of the band structure of C-60 monolayers on molecularorientations and doping observed by angle resolved photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.X.

    2008-01-17

    We present angle resolved photoemission studies of C60monolayers deposited on Ag surfaces. The electronic structure of thesemonolayers is derived from the partial filling of the narrow, 6-folddegenerated, C60 conduction band. By comparing the band structure in twomonolayers deposited, respectively, on Ag(111) and Ag(100), we show thatthe molecular degree of freedom, in this case the relative orientationsbetween C60 molecules, is essential to describe the band structure. Wefurther show that the evolution of the band as a function of doping doesnot follow a rigid band-filling picture. Phase separation is observedbetween a metallic and an insulating phase, which might be a result ofstrong correlations.

  10. Band structure of core-shell semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistol, Mats-Erik; Pryor, Craig

    2009-03-01

    We present band structures of strained core-shell nanowires composed of zincblende III-V (binary) semiconductors. We consider all combinations of AlN, GaN, InN, and all combinations of AlP, GaP, AlAs, GaAs, InP, InAs, AlSb, GaSb, and InSb. We compute the γ- and X-conduction band minima as well as the valence band maximum, all as functions of the core and shell radii. The calculations were performed using continuum elasticity theory for the strain, eight-band strain-dependent k.p theory for the γ-point energies, and single band approximation for the X-point conduction minima. We identify structures with type-I, type-II and type-III band alignment, as well as systems in which one material becomes metallic due to a negative band-gap. We identify structures that may support exciton crystals with and without photoexcitation. We have also computed the effective masses, from which the confinement energy may be estimated. All the results [Pistol and Pryor, Phys. Rev. B 78, 115319] are available in graphical and tabular form at www.semiconductor.physics.uiowa.edu

  11. Development of X-Band Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Kinkead, A. K.

    2010-11-04

    This paper presents a progress report on the development and testing of X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structures. Recent tests on several quartz DLA structures with different inner diameters are reported. Designs for gap-free DLA structures are presented. Also, planned new experiments are discussed, including higher gradient traveling-wave and standing-wave structures and special grooved structures for multipactor suppression.

  12. Deep Surface Photometry of M87 with 13 Optical Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Zhou, Xu; Ma, Jun; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yanbin; Li, Jiuli; Chen, Jiansheng

    2005-06-01

    Multicolor surface photometry of M87 was undertaken with the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut photometric system, which contains 13 optical bands covering a range from 3800 to 10000 Å. Radial profiles have been derived for surface brightness, ellipticity, position angle, and the residuals from the fitted ellipses. The results show a good agreement with pure elliptical isophotes for M87, and no obvious substructure or dust is detected out to r=500'', corresponding to 40 kpc from the center. The surface brightness profile at r<190'' is well fitted by the de Vaucouleurs law. Moreover, a cD envelope is detected outside that radius. Given the surface brightness profiles of the 13 bands, the spectral energy distribution (SED) of M87 is obtained as a function of semimajor axis (SMA). By fitting the observed SEDs to synthetic ones derived from the PEGASE model, we explored the star formation history (SFH) of this giant elliptical galaxy. In the hypothesis that the evolution time T of M87 is the same as the mean age of its globular clusters, about 14 Gyr, we find that the characteristic timescale τ of the SFH increases monotonically from 2 to 7 Gyr as a function of SMA, while the luminosity-weighted mean stellar ages range from about 11 to 9 Gyr in a mild decrease, and the mean stellar metallicity Z drops from 0.017 to 0.014 as the SMA increases to r=500''. In the range 40''

  13. Coexisting Honeycomb and Kagome Characteristics in the Electronic Band Structure of Molecular Graphene.

    PubMed

    Paavilainen, Sami; Ropo, Matti; Nieminen, Jouko; Akola, Jaakko; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-06-01

    We uncover the electronic structure of molecular graphene produced by adsorbed CO molecules on a copper (111) surface by means of first-principles calculations. Our results show that the band structure is fundamentally different from that of conventional graphene, and the unique features of the electronic states arise from coexisting honeycomb and Kagome symmetries. Furthermore, the Dirac cone does not appear at the K-point but at the Γ-point in the reciprocal space and is accompanied by a third, almost flat band. Calculations of the surface structure with Kekulé distortion show a gap opening at the Dirac point in agreement with experiments. Simple tight-binding models are used to support the first-principles results and to explain the physical characteristics behind the electronic band structures. PMID:27176628

  14. Fabrication of frequency selective surface for band stop IR-filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Akshita; Sudheer, Tiwari, P.; Mondal, P.; Bhatt, H.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    Fabrication and characterization of frequency selective surfaces (FSS) on silicon dioxide/ silicon is reported. Electron beam lithography based techniques are used for the fabrication of periodic slot structure in tungsten layer on silicon dioxide/silicon. The fabrication process consists of growth of SiO2 on silicon, tungsten deposition, electron beam lithography, and wet etching of tungsten. The optical characterization of the structural pattern was carried out using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The reflectance spectra clearly show a resonance peak at 9.09 µm in the mid infrared region. This indicates that the patterned surface acts as band stop filter in the mid-infrared region.

  15. Effective band structure of random III-V alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Voicu; Zunger, Alex

    2010-03-01

    Random substitutional alloys have no long range order (LRO) or translational symmetry so rigorously speaking they have no E(k) band structure or manifestations thereof. Yet, many experiments on alloys are interpreted using the language of band theory, e.g. inferring Van Hove singularities, band dispersion and effective masses. Many standard alloy theories (VCA- or CPA-based) have the LRO imposed on the alloy Hamiltonian, assuming only on-site disorder, so they can not be used to judge the extent of LRO that really exists. We adopt the opposite way, by using large (thousand atom) randomly generated supercells in which chemically identical alloy atoms are allowed to have different local environments (a polymorphous representation). This then drives site-dependent atomic relaxation as well as potential fluctuations. The eigenstates from such supercells are then mapped onto the Brillouin zone (BZ) of the primitive cell, producing effective band dispersion. Results for (In,Ga)X show band-like behaviour only near the centre and faces of the BZ but rapidly lose such characteristics away from γ or for higher bands. We further analyse the effects of stoichiometry variation, internal relaxation, and short-range order on the alloy band structure.

  16. Band formation in coupled-resonator slow-wave structures.

    PubMed

    Möller, Björn M; Woggon, Ulrike; Artemyev, Mikhail V

    2007-12-10

    Sequences of coupled-resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) have been examined as slow-wave structures. The formation of photonic bands in finite systems is studied in the frame of a coupled oscillator model. Several types of resonator size tuning in the system are evaluated in a systematical manner. We show that aperiodicities in sequences of coupled microspheres provide an additional degree of freedom for the design of photonic bands. PMID:19551030

  17. Surface roughness of orthodontic band cements with different compositions

    PubMed Central

    van de SANDE, Françoise Hélène; da SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; MICHELON, Douver; PIVA, Evandro; CENCI, Maximiliano Sérgio; DEMARCO, Flávio Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The present study evaluated comparatively the surface roughness of four orthodontic band cements after storage in various solutions. Material and Methods eight standardized cylinders were made from 4 materials: zinc phosphate cement (ZP), compomer (C), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and resin cement (RC). Specimens were stored for 24 h in deionized water and immersed in saline (pH 7.0) or 0.1 M lactic acid solution (pH 4.0) for 15 days. Surface roughness readings were taken with a profilometer (Surfcorder SE1200) before and after the storage period. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (comparison among cements and storage solutions) or paired t-test (comparison before and after the storage period) at 5% significance level. Results The values for average surface roughness were statistically different (p<0.001) among cements at both baseline and after storage. The roughness values of cements in a decreasing order were ZP>RMGIC>C>R (p<0.001). After 15 days, immersion in lactic acid solution resulted in the highest surface roughness for all cements (p<0.05), except for the RC group (p>0.05). Compared to the current threshold (0.2 µm) related to biofilm accumulation, both RC and C remained below the threshold, even after acidic challenge by immersion in lactic acid solution. Conclusions Storage time and immersion in lactic acid solution increased the surface roughness of the majority of the tested cements. RC presented the smoothest surface and it was not influenced by storage conditions. PMID:21625737

  18. Sulfur passivation of GaAs surfaces: A model for reduced surface recombination without band flattening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindt, C. J.; Spicer, W. E.

    1989-10-01

    It has been shown by several workers that the passivation of GaAs surfaces using sulfides results in a large reduction in the surface recombination velocity accompanied by an increase in the band bending on n-type samples. This apparently contradictory pair of results leads to the suggestion that the responsible electronic states are a midgap donor compensated by an acceptor near the valence-band maximum. We explore the consequences of such a model, particularly when the midgap state is assumed to be a double donor. In the double donor case, simple qualitative arguments indicate that the surface recombination velocity can be reduced by a factor much greater than the reduction in surface-state density. The model is consistent with observations made using a variety of experimental techniques. A correlation between the electronic states and surface chemistry is made, and the As and Ga antisite defects are discussed as candidates for the donor and acceptor states.

  19. Self-consistent energy bands in aluminum and electronic surface states and resonances on the (001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seel, M.

    1983-07-01

    The band structure of aluminum has been calculated self-consistently with the use of the Kohn-Sham-Gaspar local exchange potential and the linear combination of Gaussian orbitals method. The resulting band structure, using a basis set of 28 contracted Gaussian-type orbitals, is in excellent agreement with the previous work of Singhal and Callaway in which a basis set of 60 uncontracted Gaussian functions was used. After projection of the bulk bands onto the two-dimensional (001) surface Brillouin zone, surface states and resonances have been calculated along the Δ¯ line with the use of the Green's-function formalism. At point Γ¯, the surface state is located 2.92 eV below EF, in excellent agreement with the experimental result, 2.8+/-0.2 eV below EF. In addition, a resonance is found 0.7 eV below EF with a half-width of 0.4 eV, hitherto interpreted only as Fermi edge intensity. From the midpoint of the Δ¯ axis moving onward up to the Fermi energy, the observed main peak is attributed to surface resonances.

  20. Surface origin and control of resonance Raman scattering and surface band gap in indium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcón-Lladó, Esther; Brazzini, Tommaso; Ager, Joel W.

    2016-06-01

    Resonance Raman scattering measurements were performed on indium nitride thin films under conditions where the surface electron concentration was controlled by an electrolyte gate. As the surface condition is tuned from electron depletion to accumulation, the spectral feature at the expected position of the (E 1, A 1) longitudinal optical (LO) near 590 cm‑1 shifts to lower frequency. The shift is reversibly controlled with the applied gate potential, which clearly demonstrates the surface origin of this feature. The result is interpreted within the framework of a Martin double resonance, where the surface functions as a planar defect, allowing the scattering of long wavevector phonons. The allowed wavevector range, and hence the frequency, is modulated by the electron accumulation due to band gap narrowing. A surface band gap reduction of over 500 meV is estimated for the conditions of maximum electron accumulation. Under conditions of electron depletion, the full InN bandgap (E g  =  0.65 eV) is expected at the surface. The drastic change in the surface band gap is expected to influence the transport properties of devices which utilize the surface electron accumulation layer.

  1. Band structure properties of (BGa)P semiconductors for lattice matched integration on (001) silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Nadir; Sweeney, Stephen; Hosea, Jeff; Liebich, Sven; Zimprich, Martin; Volz, Kerstin; Stolz, Wolfgang; Kunert, Bernerdette

    2013-12-04

    We report the band structure properties of (BGa)P layers grown on silicon substrate using metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy. Using surface photo-voltage spectroscopy we find that both the direct and indirect band gaps of (BGa)P alloys (strained and unstrained) decrease with Boron content. Our experimental results suggest that the band gap of (BGa)P layers up to 6% Boron is large and suitable to be used as cladding and contact layers in GaP-based quantum well heterostructures on silicon substrates.

  2. Band structure of hydrogenated silicene on Ag(111): Evidence for half-silicane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Olovsson, W.; Uhrberg, R. I. G.

    2016-02-01

    In the case of graphene, hydrogenation removes the conductivity due to the bands forming the Dirac cone by opening up a band gap. This type of chemical functionalization is of the utmost importance for electronic applications. As predicted by theoretical studies, a similar change in the band structure is expected for silicene, the closest analog to graphene. We here report a study of the atomic and electronic structures of hydrogenated silicene with hydrogen on one side, the so-called half-silicane. The ("2 √{3 }×2 √{3 } ") phase of silicene on Ag(111) was used in this Rapid Communication since it can be formed homogeneously across the entire surface of the Ag substrate. Low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy data clearly show that hydrogenation changes the structure of silicene on Ag(111) resulting in a (1 × 1) periodicity with respect to the silicene lattice. The hydrogenated silicene also exhibits a quasiregular (2 √{3 }×2 √{3 } )-like arrangement of vacancies. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy revealed two dispersive bands which can be unambiguously assigned to half-silicane. The common top of these bands is located at ˜0.9 eV below the Fermi level. We find that the experimental bands are closely reproduced by the theoretical band structure of free-standing silicene with H adsorbed on the upper hexagonal sublattice.

  3. Quasi one-dimensional band dispersion and surface metallization in long-range ordered polymeric wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Guillaume; Fagot-Revurat, Yannick; Sicot, Muriel; Kierren, Bertrand; Moreau, Luc; Malterre, Daniel; Cardenas, Luis; Galeotti, Gianluca; Lipton-Duffin, Josh; Rosei, Federico; di Giovannantonio, Marco; Contini, Giorgio; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Perepichka, Dmitrii F.

    2016-01-01

    On-surface covalent self-assembly of organic molecules is a very promising bottom-up approach for producing atomically controlled nanostructures. Due to their highly tuneable properties, these structures may be used as building blocks in electronic carbon-based molecular devices. Following this idea, here we report on the electronic structure of an ordered array of poly(para-phenylene) nanowires produced by surface-catalysed dehalogenative reaction. By scanning tunnelling spectroscopy we follow the quantization of unoccupied molecular states as a function of oligomer length, with Fermi level crossing observed for long chains. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a quasi-1D valence band as well as a direct gap of 1.15 eV, as the conduction band is partially filled through adsorption on the surface. Tight-binding modelling and ab initio density functional theory calculations lead to a full description of the band structure, including the gap size and charge transfer mechanisms, highlighting a strong substrate-molecule interaction that drives the system into a metallic behaviour.

  4. Quasi one-dimensional band dispersion and surface metallization in long-range ordered polymeric wires.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Guillaume; Fagot-Revurat, Yannick; Sicot, Muriel; Kierren, Bertrand; Moreau, Luc; Malterre, Daniel; Cardenas, Luis; Galeotti, Gianluca; Lipton-Duffin, Josh; Rosei, Federico; Di Giovannantonio, Marco; Contini, Giorgio; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Perepichka, Dmitrii F

    2016-01-01

    On-surface covalent self-assembly of organic molecules is a very promising bottom-up approach for producing atomically controlled nanostructures. Due to their highly tuneable properties, these structures may be used as building blocks in electronic carbon-based molecular devices. Following this idea, here we report on the electronic structure of an ordered array of poly(para-phenylene) nanowires produced by surface-catalysed dehalogenative reaction. By scanning tunnelling spectroscopy we follow the quantization of unoccupied molecular states as a function of oligomer length, with Fermi level crossing observed for long chains. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a quasi-1D valence band as well as a direct gap of 1.15 eV, as the conduction band is partially filled through adsorption on the surface. Tight-binding modelling and ab initio density functional theory calculations lead to a full description of the band structure, including the gap size and charge transfer mechanisms, highlighting a strong substrate-molecule interaction that drives the system into a metallic behaviour. PMID:26725974

  5. Complex band structure of topological insulator Bi2Se3.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, J; Li, S; Dang, X; Burton, J D; Tsymbal, E Y; Velev, J P

    2016-10-01

    Topological insulators are very interesting from a fundamental point of view, and their unique properties may be useful for electronic and spintronic device applications. From the point of view of applications it is important to understand the decay behavior of carriers injected in the band gap of the topological insulator, which is determined by its complex band structure (CBS). Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the dispersion and symmetry of the complex bands of Bi2Se3 family of three-dimensional topological insulators. We compare the CBS of a band insulator and a topological insulator and follow the CBS evolution in both when the spin-orbit interaction is turned on. We find significant differences in the CBS linked to the topological band structure. In particular, our results demonstrate that the evanescent states in Bi2Se3 are non-trivially complex, i.e. contain both the real and imaginary contributions. This explains quantitatively the oscillatory behavior of the band gap obtained from Bi2Se3 (0 0 0 1) slab calculations. PMID:27485021

  6. Simulation of the Band Structure of Graphene and Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mina, Aziz N.; Awadallah, Attia A.; Phillips, Adel H.; Ahmed, Riham R.

    2012-02-01

    Simulation technique has been performed to simulate the band structure of both graphene and carbon nanotube. Accordingly, the dispersion relations for graphene and carbon nanotube are deduced analytically, using the tight binding model & LCAO scheme. The results from the simulation of the dispersion relation of both graphene and carbon nanotube were found to be consistent with those in the literature which indicates the correctness of the process of simulation technique. The present research is very important for tailoring graphene and carbon nanotube with specific band structure, in order to satisfy the required electronic properties of them.

  7. Transient band structures in the ultrafast demagnetization of ferromagnetic gadolinium and terbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichmann, Martin; Frietsch, Björn; Döbrich, Kristian; Carley, Robert; Weinelt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We compare the laser-driven demagnetization dynamics of the rare earths gadolinium and terbium by mapping their transient valance band structures with time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. In both metals, the minority and majority spin valence bands evolve independently with different time constants after optical excitation. The ultrafast shift of the partially unoccupied minority spin bulk band to higher binding energy and of the majority spin surface state to lower binding energy suggests spin transport between surface and bulk. The slower response of the fully occupied majority spin band follows the lattice temperature and is attributed to Elliott-Yafet type spin-flip scattering. Terbium shows a stronger and faster decay of the exchange splitting, pointing to ultrafast magnon emission via 4 f spin-to-lattice coupling.

  8. Surface structure and electronic properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is developed to explain dopant effects on chemical vapor deposition. Auger analysis of the interaction between allotropic forms of carbon and silicon films has shown Si-C formation for all forms by glassy carbon. LEED intensity measurements have been used to determine the mean square displacement of surface atoms of silicon single crystals, and electron loss spectroscopy has shown the effect of structure and impurities on surface states located within the band gap. A thin film of Al has been used to enhance film crystallinity at low temperature.

  9. Novel structural flexibility identification in narrow frequency bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Moon, F. L.

    2012-12-01

    A ‘Sub-PolyMAX’ method is proposed in this paper not only for estimating modal parameters, but also for identifying structural flexibility by processing the impact test data in narrow frequency bands. The traditional PolyMAX method obtains denominator polynomial coefficients by minimizing the least square (LS) errors of frequency response function (FRF) estimates over the whole frequency range, but FRF peaks in different structural modes may have different levels of magnitude, which leads to the modal parameters identified for the modes with small FRF peaks being inaccurate. In contrast, the proposed Sub-PolyMAX method implements the LS solver in each subspace of the whole frequency range separately; thus the results identified from a narrow frequency band are not affected by FRF data in other frequency bands. In performing structural identification in narrow frequency bands, not in the whole frequency space, the proposed method has the following merits: (1) it produces accurate modal parameters, even for the modes with very small FRF peaks; (2) it significantly reduces computation cost by reducing the number of frequency lines and the model order in each LS implementation; (3) it accurately identifies structural flexibility from impact test data, from which structural deflection under any static load can be predicted. Numerical and laboratory examples are investigated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Reconfigurable wave band structure of an artificial square ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacocca, Ezio; Gliga, Sebastian; Stamps, Robert L.; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-04-01

    Artificial square ices are structures composed of magnetic nanoelements arranged on the sites of a two-dimensional square lattice, such that there are four interacting magnetic elements at each vertex, leading to geometrical frustration. Using a semianalytical approach, we show that square ices exhibit a rich spin-wave band structure that is tunable both by external magnetic fields and the magnetization configuration of individual elements. Internal degrees of freedom can give rise to equilibrium states with bent magnetization at the element edges leading to characteristic excitations; in the presence of magnetostatic interactions these form separate bands analogous to impurity bands in semiconductors. Full-scale micromagnetic simulations corroborate our semianalytical approach. Our results show that artificial square ices can be viewed as reconfigurable and tunable magnonic crystals that can be used as metamaterials for spin-wave-based applications at the nanoscale.

  11. Electronic band structure calculations of bismuth-antimony nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Andrei; Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2012-02-01

    Alloys of bismuth and antimony received initial interest due to their unmatched low-temperature thermoelectric performance, and have drawn more recent attention as the first 3D topological insulators. One-dimensional bismuth-antimony (BiSb) nanowires display interesting quantum confinement effects, and are expected to exhibit even better thermoelectric properties than bulk BiSb. Due to the small, anisotropic carrier effective masses, the electronic properties of BiSb nanowires show great sensitivity to nanowire diameter, crystalline orientation, and alloy composition. We develop a theoretical model for calculating the band structure of BiSb nanowires. For a given crystalline orientation, BiSb nanowires can be in the semimetallic, direct semiconducting, or indirect semiconducting phase, depending on nanowire diameter and alloy composition. These ``phase diagrams'' turn out to be remarkably similar among the different orientations, which is surprising in light of the anisotropy of the bulk BiSb Fermi surface. We predict a novel direct semiconducting phase for nanowires with diameter less than ˜15 nm, over a narrow composition range. We also find that, in contrast to the bulk and thin film BiSb cases, a gapless state with Dirac dispersion cannot be realized in BiSb nanowires.

  12. Polarization and angle insensitive dual-band bandpass frequency selective surface using all-dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fei; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jiafu; Ma, Hua; Du, Hongliang; Xu, Zhuo; Qu, Shaobo

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a dual-band bandpass all-dielectric frequency selective surface (FSS), the building elements of which are high-permittivity ceramic particles rather than metallic patterns. With proper structural design and parameter adjustment, the resonant frequency can be tuned at will. Dual-band bandpass response can be realized due to the coupling between electric and magnetic resonances. As an example, a dual-band bandpass FSS is designed in Ku band, which is composed of two-dimensional periodic arrays of complementary quatrefoil structures (CQS) cut from dielectric plates. Moreover, cylindrical dielectric resonators are introduced and placed in the center of each CQS to broaden the bandwidth and to sharpen the cut-off frequency. Theoretical analysis shows that the bandpass response arises from impedance matching caused by electric and magnetic resonances. In addition, effective electromagnetic parameters and dynamic field distributions are presented to explain the mechanism of impedance matching. The proposed FSS has the merits of polarization independence, stable transmission, and sharp roll-off frequency. The method can also be used to design all-dielectric FSSs with continuum structures at other frequencies.

  13. Large spin splitting of metallic surface-state bands at adsorbate-modified gold/silicon surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, L. V.; Gruznev, D. V.; Yakovlev, A. A.; Tupchaya, A. Y.; Usachov, D.; Vilkov, O.; Fedorov, A.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Eremeev, S. V.; Chulkov, E. V.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Finding appropriate systems with a large spin splitting of metallic surface-state band which can be fabricated on silicon using routine technique is an essential step in combining Rashba-effect based spintronics with silicon technology. We have found that originally poor structural and electronic properties of the surface can be substantially improved by adsorbing small amounts of suitable species (e.g., Tl, In, Na, Cs). The resultant surfaces exhibit a highly-ordered atomic structure and spin-split metallic surface-state band with a momentum splitting of up to 0.052 Å−1 and an energy splitting of up to 190 meV at the Fermi level. The family of adsorbate-modified surfaces, on the one hand, is thought to be a fascinating playground for exploring spin-splitting effects in the metal monolayers on a semiconductor and, on the other hand, expands greatly the list of material systems prospective for spintronics applications. PMID:23661151

  14. Monoclinic Tungsten Oxide with {100} Facet Orientation and Tuned Electronic Band Structure for Enhanced Photocatalytic Oxidations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Chen; Mei, Zongwei; Liu, Xiaohe; Qu, Xiaolei; Li, Yunxiang; Li, Siqi; Qi, Weihong; Zhang, Yuanjian; Ye, Jinhua; Roy, Vellaisamy A L; Ma, Renzhi

    2016-04-27

    Exploring surface-exposed highly active crystal facets for photocatalytic oxidations is promising in utilizing monoclinic WO3 semiconductor. However, the previously reported highly active facets for monoclinic WO3 were mainly toward enhancing photocatalytic reductions. Here we report that the WO3 with {100} facet orientation and tuned surface electronic band structure can effectively enhance photocatalytic oxidation properties. The {100} faceted WO3 single crystals are synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method. The UV-visible diffuse reflectance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy valence band spectra, and photoelectrochemical measurements suggest that the {100} faceted WO3 has a much higher energy level of valence band maximum compared with the normal WO3 crystals without preferred orientation of the crystal face. The density functional theory calculations reveal that the shift of O 2p and W 5d states in {100} face induce a unique band structure. In comparison with the normal WO3, the {100} faceted WO3 exhibits an O2 evolution rate about 5.1 times in water splitting, and also shows an acetone evolution rate of 4.2 times as well as CO2 evolution rate of 3.8 times in gaseous degradation of 2-propanol. This study demonstrates an efficient crystal face engineering route to tune the surface electronic band structure for enhanced photocatalytic oxidations. PMID:27045790

  15. Band energy control of molybdenum oxide by surface hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Keith T. Walsh, Aron; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Buckeridge, John; Scanlon, David O.; Bovill, Edward; Lidzey, David

    2015-12-07

    The application of oxide buffer layers for improved carrier extraction is ubiquitous in organic electronics. However, the performance is highly susceptible to processing conditions. Notably, the interface stability and electronic structure is extremely sensitive to the uptake of ambient water. In this study we use density functional theory calculations to asses the effects of adsorbed water on the electronic structure of MoO{sub x}, in the context of polymer-fullerene solar cells based on PCDTBT. We obtain excellent agreement with experimental values of the ionization potential for pristine MoO{sub 3} (010). We find that IP and EA values can vary by as much as 2.5 eV depending on the oxidation state of the surface and that adsorbed water can either increase or decrease the IP and EA depending on the concentration of surface water.

  16. 5 CFR 9701.321 - Structure of bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Structure of bands. 9701.321 Section 9701.321 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  17. Band-structure loops and multistability in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanna Venkatesh, B.; O'Dell, D. H. J.; Larson, J.

    2011-06-15

    We calculate the band structure of ultracold atoms located inside a laser-driven optical cavity. For parameters where the atom-cavity system exhibits bistability, the atomic band structure develops loop structures akin to the ones predicted for Bose-Einstein condensates in ordinary (noncavity) optical lattices. However, in our case the nonlinearity derives from the cavity back-action rather than from direct interatomic interactions. We find both bi- and tristable regimes associated with the lowest band, and show that the multistability we observe can be analyzed in terms of swallowtail catastrophes. Dynamic and energetic stability of the mean-field solutions is also discussed, and we show that the bistable solutions have, as expected, one unstable and two stable branches. The presence of loops in the atomic band structure has important implications for proposals concerning Bloch oscillations of atoms inside optical cavities [Peden et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 043803 (2009); Prasanna Venkatesh et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 063834 (2009)].

  18. Photonic Band Gap structures: A new approach to accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, N. |; Smith, D.R.; Schultz, S.

    1992-12-31

    We introduce a new accelerator cavity design based on Photonic Band Gap (PGB) structures. The PGB cavity consists of a two-dimensional periodic array of high dielectric, low loss cylinders with a single removal defect, bounded on top and bottom by conducting sheets. We present the results of both numerical simulations and experimental measurements on the PGB cavity.

  19. Quantification of electronic band gap and surface states on FeS2(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, F. W.; Krishnamoorthy, A.; Van Vliet, K. J.; Yildiz, B.

    2013-12-01

    The interfacial electronic properties and charge transfer characteristics of pyrite, FeS2, are greatly influenced by the presence of electronic states at the crystal free surface. We investigate the surface electronic structure of FeS2 (100) using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and interpret the results using tunneling current simulations informed by density functional theory. Intrinsic, dangling bond surface states located at the band edges reduce the fundamental band gap Eg from 0.95 eV in bulk FeS2 to 0.4 ± 0.1 eV at the surface. Extrinsic surface states from sulfur and iron defects contribute to Fermi level pinning but, due to their relatively low density of states, no detectable tunneling current was measured at energies within the intrinsic surface Eg. These findings help elucidate the nature of energy alignment for electron transfer processes at pyrite surfaces, which are relevant to evaluation of electrochemical processes including corrosion and solar energy conversion.

  20. Isolated True Surface Wave in a Radiative Band on a Surface of a Stressed Auxetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzupek, D.; Zieliński, P.

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate that a surface resonance (pseudosurface wave) may transform into a true surface wave, i.e., acquire an infinite lifetime, at a single isolated point within a bulk band (radiative region) in a model of a stressed auxetic material. In contrast with the secluded supersonic elastic surface waves, the one found here does not belong to a dispersion line of true surface waves. Therefore we propose to call it an isolated true surface wave (ITSW). The ITSW manifests itself by a deltalike peak in the local density of states and by anomalies in reflection coefficients. The phenomenon may be useful in redirecting energy and/or information from the bulk to the surface in devices supporting guided acoustic waves.

  1. Complex band structure in neutron-deficient {sup 178}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Kondev, F. G.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Alcorta, M.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Brown, L. T.; Davids, C. N.; Fischer, S. M.; Khoo, T. L.

    2000-01-01

    Using the GAMMASPHERE array in conjunction with the Fragment Mass Analyzer, the level structure of the near drip-line nucleus {sup 178}Hg has been considerably expanded with the recoil-decay tagging technique. Of particular interest is a new rotational band which exhibits a complex decay towards the low spin states arising from both the prolate-deformed and the nearly spherical coexisting minima. It is proposed that this band is associated at low spin with an octupole vibration which is crossed at moderate frequency by a shape driving, two quasiproton excitation. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  2. Electronic band structure of magnetic bilayer graphene superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, C. Huy; Nguyen, T. Thuong

    2014-09-28

    Electronic band structure of the bilayer graphene superlattices with δ-function magnetic barriers and zero average magnetic flux is studied within the four-band continuum model, using the transfer matrix method. The periodic magnetic potential effects on the zero-energy touching point between the lowest conduction and the highest valence minibands of pristine bilayer graphene are exactly analyzed. Magnetic potential is shown also to generate the finite-energy touching points between higher minibands at the edges of Brillouin zone. The positions of these points and the related dispersions are determined in the case of symmetric potentials.

  3. Inter-band optoelectronic properties in quantum dot structure of low band gap III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Anup; Maiti, Biswajit; Chanda, Debasree

    2014-04-14

    A generalized theory is developed to study inter-band optical absorption coefficient (IOAC) and material gain (MG) in quantum dot structures of narrow gap III-V compound semiconductor considering the wave-vector (k{sup →}) dependence of the optical transition matrix element. The band structures of these low band gap semiconducting materials with sufficiently separated split-off valance band are frequently described by the three energy band model of Kane. This has been adopted for analysis of the IOAC and MG taking InAs, InSb, Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te, and In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}As{sub y}P{sub 1−y} lattice matched to InP, as example of III–V compound semiconductors, having varied split-off energy band compared to their bulk band gap energy. It has been found that magnitude of the IOAC for quantum dots increases with increasing incident photon energy and the lines of absorption are more closely spaced in the three band model of Kane than those with parabolic energy band approximations reflecting the direct the influence of energy band parameters. The results show a significant deviation to the MG spectrum of narrow-gap materials having band nonparabolicity compared to the parabolic band model approximations. The results reflect the important role of valence band split-off energies in these narrow gap semiconductors.

  4. Coupling effect of quantum wells on band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Chen; Weiyou, Zeng

    2015-10-01

    The coupling effects of quantum wells on band structure are numerically investigated by using the Matlab programming language. In a one dimensional finite quantum well with the potential barrier V0, the calculation is performed by increasing the number of inserted barriers with the same height Vb, and by, respectively, varying the thickness ratio of separated wells to inserted barriers and the height ratio of Vb to V0. Our calculations show that coupling is strongly influenced by the above parameters of the inserted barriers and wells. When these variables change, the width of the energy bands and gaps can be tuned. Our investigation shows that it is possible for quantum wells to achieve the desired width of the bands and gaps.

  5. Rotational band structure in odd-odd /sup 132/La

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, J. R. B.; Emediato, L. G. R.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Ribas, R. V.; Seale, W. A.; Rao, M. N.; Medina, N. H.; Botelho, S.; Cybulska, E. W.

    1989-06-01

    The level scheme of /sup 132/La was obtained with in-beam gamma spectroscopy techniques using fusion evaporation reactions with /sup 10,11/B, /sup 14/N beams and isotopic targets of Te and Sn. Two rotational band structures were seen. One band, assigned to the ..pi../ital h//sub 11/2//direct product/..nu..h/sub 11/2/, shows a smaller signature splitting as compared to the isotones /sup 134/Pr and /sup 136/Pm, indicating a slight reduction of triaxiality. The other band has been tentatively assigned the ..pi..(422)3/2/sup +//direct product/..nu..h/sub 11/2/ configuration, and shows no signature splitting indicating a near prolate shape.

  6. Mid-frequency Band Dynamics of Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppolino, Robert N.; Adams, Douglas S.

    2004-01-01

    High and low intensity dynamic environments experienced by a spacecraft during launch and on-orbit operations, respectively, induce structural loads and motions, which are difficult to reliably predict. Structural dynamics in low- and mid-frequency bands are sensitive to component interface uncertainty and non-linearity as evidenced in laboratory testing and flight operations. Analytical tools for prediction of linear system response are not necessarily adequate for reliable prediction of mid-frequency band dynamics and analysis of measured laboratory and flight data. A new MATLAB toolbox, designed to address the key challenges of mid-frequency band dynamics, is introduced in this paper. Finite-element models of major subassemblies are defined following rational frequency-wavelength guidelines. For computational efficiency, these subassemblies are described as linear, component mode models. The complete structural system model is composed of component mode subassemblies and linear or non-linear joint descriptions. Computation and display of structural dynamic responses are accomplished employing well-established, stable numerical methods, modern signal processing procedures and descriptive graphical tools. Parametric sensitivity and Monte-Carlo based system identification tools are used to reconcile models with experimental data and investigate the effects of uncertainties. Models and dynamic responses are exported for employment in applications, such as detailed structural integrity and mechanical-optical-control performance analyses.

  7. Identical band gaps in structurally re-entrant honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu-Wei; Deng, Zi-Chen

    2016-08-01

    Structurally re-entrant honeycomb is a sort of artificial lattice material, characterized by star-like unit cells with re-entrant topology, as well as a high connectivity that the number of folded sheets jointing at each vertex is at least six. In-plane elastic wave propagation in this highly connected honeycomb is investigated through the application of the finite element method in conjunction with the Bloch's theorem. Attention is devoted to exploring the band characteristics of two lattice configurations with different star-like unit cells, defined as structurally square re-entrant honeycomb (SSRH) and structurally hexagonal re-entrant honeycomb (SHRH), respectively. Identical band gaps involving their locations and widths, interestingly, are present in the two considered configurations, attributed to the resonance of the sketch folded sheets, the basic component elements for SSRH and SHRH. In addition, the concept of heuristic models is implemented to elucidate the underlying physics of the identical gaps. The phenomenon of the identical bandgaps is not only beneficial for people to further explore the band characteristics of lattice materials, but also provides the structurally re-entrant honeycombs as potential host structures for the design of lattice-based metamaterials of interest for elastic wave control. PMID:27586722

  8. Switching band-gaps of a phononic crystal slab by surface instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Alireza; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2015-07-01

    High-amplitude wrinkle formation is employed to propose a one-dimensional phononic crystal slab consists of a thin film bonded to a thick compliant substrate. Buckling induced surface instability generates a wrinkly structure triggered by a compressive strain. It is demonstrated that a surface periodic pattern and corresponding stress can control elastic wave propagation in the low thickness composite slab. Simulation results show that the periodic wrinkly structure can be used as a transformative phononic crystal that can switch the band diagram of the structure in a reversible manner. The results of this study provide opportunities for the smart design of tunable switches and frequency filters at ultrasonic and hypersonic frequency ranges.

  9. Band structure of the quasi two-dimensional purple molybdenum bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, H.; Balaska, H.; Perrier, P.; Marcus, J.

    2006-09-01

    The molybdenum purple bronze KMo 6O 17 is quasi two-dimensional (2D) metallic oxide that shows a Peierls transition towards a metallic charge density wave state. Since this specific transition is directly related to the electron properties of the normal state, we have investigated the electronic structure of this bronze at room temperature. The shape of the Mo K1s absorption edge reveals the presence of distorted MoO 6 octahedra in the crystallographic structure. Photoemission experiments evidence a large conduction band, with a bandwidth of 800 meV and confirm the metallic character of this bronze. A wide depleted zone separates the conduction band from the valence band that exhibits a fourfold structure, directly connected to the octahedral symmetry of the Mo sites. The band structure is determined by ARUPS in two main directions of the (0 0 1) Brillouin zone. It exhibits some unpredicted features but corroborates the earlier theoretical band structure and Fermi surface. It confirms the hidden one-dimensionality of KMo 6O 17 that has been proposed to explain the origin of the Peierls transition in this 2D compound.

  10. Spin wave band structure of artificial square ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacocca, Ezio; Gliga, Sebastian; Stamps, Robert; Heinonen, Olle

    Artificial square spin ices are structures composed of magnetic elements located on the sites of a geometrically frustrated, two-dimensional square lattice. Using a semi-analytical approach, we show that square spin ices exhibit a rich spin wave band structure that is tunable both by external magnetic fields and the magnetic state of individual elements. Internal degrees of freedom can give rise to equilibrium states with bent magnetization at the edges of each element, leading to characteristic excitations; in the presence of magnetostatic interactions these form separate bands analogous to impurity bands in semiconductors. Full-scale micromagnetic simulations corroborate our semi-analytical approach. This study shows that the magnon spectra, and therefore group and phase velocities and band gap, can be manipulated by external fields, temperature, or more sophisticated techniques such as using spin torque on individual elements, and suggesting that artificial square spin ices can be used as metamaterials for spin waves. Our results close the gap between the research fields of artificial spin ices and magnonics. E.I. acknowledges the Swedish Research Council, Reg.No. 637-2014-6863. The work by O.H. was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division. The work by R.L.S. was funded by EPSRC EP/L002922/1.

  11. Ultrafast Band Structure Control of a Two-Dimensional Heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Ulstrup, Søren; Čabo, Antonija Grubišić; Miwa, Jill A; Riley, Jonathon M; Grønborg, Signe S; Johannsen, Jens C; Cacho, Cephise; Alexander, Oliver; Chapman, Richard T; Springate, Emma; Bianchi, Marco; Dendzik, Maciej; Lauritsen, Jeppe V; King, Phil D C; Hofmann, Philip

    2016-06-28

    The electronic structure of two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors can be significantly altered by screening effects, either from free charge carriers in the material or by environmental screening from the surrounding medium. The physical properties of 2D semiconductors placed in a heterostructure with other 2D materials are therefore governed by a complex interplay of both intra- and interlayer interactions. Here, using time- and angle-resolved photoemission, we are able to isolate both the layer-resolved band structure and, more importantly, the transient band structure evolution of a model 2D heterostructure formed of a single layer of MoS2 on graphene. Our results reveal a pronounced renormalization of the quasiparticle gap of the MoS2 layer. Following optical excitation, the band gap is reduced by up to ∼400 meV on femtosecond time scales due to a persistence of strong electronic interactions despite the environmental screening by the n-doped graphene. This points to a large degree of tunability of both the electronic structure and the electron dynamics for 2D semiconductors embedded in a van der Waals-bonded heterostructure. PMID:27267820

  12. Band bending and surface defects in β-Ga2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Chen, Renyu; Zheng, X.; Villora, E. G.; Shimamura, K.; Yoshikawa, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Ueda, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Dunham, S. T.; Ohuchi, F. S.; Olmstead, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Surface band bending and surface defects on the UV-transparent conducting oxide β-Ga2O3 (100) are studied with hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Highly doped β-Ga2O3 shows flat bands near the surface, while the bands on nominally undoped (but still n-type), air-cleaved β-Ga2O3 are bent upwards by ≳0.5 eV. Negatively charged surface defects are observed on vacuum annealed β-Ga2O3, which also shows upward band bending. Density functional calculations show oxygen vacancies are not likely to be ionized in the bulk, but could be activated by surface band bending. The large band bending may also hinder formation of ohmic contacts.

  13. Calculation of complex band structure for low symmetry lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Manoj; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2009-03-01

    Complex band structure calculation is an integral part of a first-principles plane-wave based quantum transport method. [1] The direction of decay for the complex wave vectors is also the transport direction. The existing algorithm [1] has the limitation that it only allows the transport direction along a lattice vector perpendicular to the basal plane formed by two other lattice vectors, e.g., the c-axis of a tetragonal lattice. We generalize this algorithm to nonorthogonal lattices with transport direction not aligned with any lattice vector. We show that this generalization leads to changes in the boundary conditions and the Schrodinger's equation projected to the transport direction. We present, as an example, the calculation of the complex band structure of fcc Cu along a direction perpendicular to the (111) basal plane. [1] Hyoung Joon Choi and Jisoon Ihm, Phys. Rev. B 59, 2267 (1999).

  14. Graphene on Ru(0001): Evidence for two graphene band structures

    SciTech Connect

    Katsiev, Khabibulakh; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Zhou, Zihao; Vescovo, E; Liu, L.; Dowben, P. A.; Goodman, D. Wayne

    2012-05-03

    High-resolution photoemission illustrates that the band structure of graphene on Ru(0001) exhibits a well-defined splitting. This splitting is largest with the graphene directly on the Ru(0001) substrate, whereas with a chemisorbed oxygen spacer layer between the graphene and the metal substrate, this splitting is considerably reduced. This splitting is attributed to a combination of chemical interactions between graphene and Ru(0001) and to screening of the former by the latter, not spin-orbit coupling.

  15. Band structure and density of states of. beta. -silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, S.Y.; Ching, W.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The electronic energy band structure of ..beta..-Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ has been calculated using the first principles LCAO method. The bottom of the Conduction Band (CB) is at GAMMA and the top of the valence band (VB) is located along GAMMAA line. The very flat top VB along GAMMAA accounts for a large hole effective mass. The indirect band gap obtained is very close to the experimental value of 5.2 eV. The density of states (DOS) and partial DOS are also obtained and are in good agreement with photoemission data. In the VB region from -20. to -14. eV the states are entirely composed of N 2s states while in the range from -10.5 eV up, the states are predominately N 2p in character. In the CB region, the DOS is dominated by Si 3s and 3p orbital components. These results are consistent with charge analysis which indicates that on average, 0.56 electron is transferred from Si to N per Si-N bond.

  16. Bioinspired structured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-24

    Nature has evolved objects with desired functionality using commonly found materials. Nature capitalizes on hierarchical structures to achieve functionality. The understanding of the functions provided by objects and processes found in nature can guide us to produce nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes with desirable functionality. Various natural objects which provide functionality of commercial interest have been characterized to understand how a natural object provides functionality. We have modeled and fabricated structures in the lab using nature's route and developed optimum structures. Once it is understood how nature does it, optimum structures have been fabricated using smart materials and fabrication techniques. This feature article provides an overview of four topics: Lotus effect, rose petal effect, gecko feet, and shark skin. PMID:22233136

  17. Band structures extending to very high spin in Xe126

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønn Hansen, C.; Sletten, G.; Hagemann, G. B.; Herskind, B.; Jensen, D. R.; Bringel, P.; Engelhardt, C.; Hübel, H.; Neußer-Neffgen, A.; Singh, A. K.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Bednarczyk, P.; Byrski, T.; Curien, D.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Leoni, S.; Clark, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Korichi, A.; Roccaz, J.; Maj, A.; Wilson, J. N.; Lisle, J. C.; Steinhardt, T.; Thelen, O.; Ødegård, S. W.

    2007-09-01

    High-spin states in Xe126 have been populated in the Se82(Ca48,4n)Xe126 reaction in two experiments, one at the VIVITRON accelerator in Strasbourg using the Euroball detector array, and a subsequent one with ATLAS at Argonne using the Gammasphere Ge-detector array. Levels and assignments made previously for Xe126 up to I=20 have been confirmed and extended. Four regular bands extending to a spin of almost I=60, which are interpreted as two pairs of signature partners with opposite parity, are identified for the first time. The α = 0 partner of each pair is connected to the lower-lying levels, whereas the two α = 1 partners remain floating. A fractional Doppler shift analysis of transitions in the strongest populated (π,α)=(-,0) band provides a value of 5.20.50.4 b for the transition quadrupole moment, which can be related to a minimum in the potential-energy surface calculated by the ULTIMATE CRANKER cranked shell-model code at ɛ≈0.35 and γ≈5°. The four lowest bands calculated for this minimum compare well with the two signature pairs experimentally observed over a wide spin range. A sharp upbend at ℏω~1170 keV is interpreted as a crossing with a band involving the j15/2 neutron orbital, for which pairing correlations are expected to be totally quenched. The four long bands extend to within ˜5 spin units of a crossing with an yrast line defined by calculated hyperdeformed transitions and will serve as important stepping stones into the spin region beyond 60ħ for future experiments.

  18. Photoelectron spectroscopic study of band alignment of polymer/ZnO photovoltaic device structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, T.; Chikyow, T.; Oh, S.; Wakayama, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Ikeno, N.

    2013-01-28

    Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we investigated the band alignment of a Ag/poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT)/ZnO photovoltaic structure. At the P3HT/ZnO interface, a band bending of P3HT and a short surface depletion layer of ZnO were observed. The offset between the highest occupied molecular orbital of P3HT and the conduction band minimum of ZnO at the interface contributed to the open circuit voltage (Voc) was estimated to be approximately 1.5 {+-} 0.1 eV, which was bigger than that of the electrically measured effective Voc of P3HT/ZnO photovoltaic devices, meaning that the P3HT/ZnO photovoltaic structure has the potential to provide improved photovoltaic properties.

  19. Band to band tunneling in III-V semiconductors: Implications of complex band structure, strain, orientation, and off-zone center contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Kausik

    2014-05-07

    In this paper, we use a tight binding Hamiltonian with spin orbit coupling to study the real and complex band structures of relaxed and strained GaAs. A simple d orbital on-site energy shift coupled with appropriate scaling of the off-diagonal terms is found to correctly reproduce the band-edge shifts with strain. Four different 〈100〉 strain combinations, namely, uniaxial compressive, uniaxial tensile, biaxial compressive, and biaxial tensile strain are studied, revealing rich valence band structure and strong relative orientation dependent tunneling. It is found that complex bands are unable to provide unambiguous tunneling paths away from the Brillouin zone center. Tunneling current density distribution over the Brillouin zone is computed using non-equilibrium Green's function approach elucidating a physical picture of band to band tunneling.

  20. Wireless Channel Characterization in the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System Extension Band for Airport Surface Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David W.

    2007-01-01

    In this project final report, entitled "Wireless Channel Characterization in the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System Extension Band for Airport Surface Areas," we provide a detailed description and model representation for the wireless channel in the airport surface environment in this band. In this executive summary, we review report contents, describe the achieved objectives and major findings, and highlight significant conclusions and recommendations.

  1. Collective band structures in the 99Tc nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. J.; Xiao, Z. G.; Zhu, S. J.; Patial, M.; Qi, C.; Cederwall, B.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, R. S.; Yi, H.; Yan, W. H.; Cheng, W. J.; Huang, Y.; Lyu, L. M.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, X. G.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Li, G. S.; Li, C. B.; Li, H. W.; Liu, J. J.; Luo, P. W.; Hu, S. P.; Wang, J. L.; Wu, Y. H.

    2015-05-01

    Excited states in 99Tc with energies up to 6 MeV have been populated using the 96Zr(7Li,4 n )99Tc reaction with a laboratory beam energy of 35 MeV. Coincident γ rays from excited nuclei produced in the reactions were detected using an array of coaxial, planar, and clover-type high-purity germanium detectors. A total of 60 new γ -ray transitions and 21 new levels are identified and placed into a new level scheme. Two collective bands assigned to be built on the π g9 /2 [422 ]5 /2 + and π p1 /2 [301 ]1 /2 - Nilsson configurations have been extended with spins up to 35/2 and 33 /2 ℏ , respectively. Backbending and signature inversion have been observed in the yrast band. The large signature splitting of the positive-parity band in 99Tc may be caused by a triaxial deformation, which agrees well with the electromagnetic properties, theoretical calculations based on total Routhian surface, and triaxial particle-rotor model calculations.

  2. Measurements of the energy band gap and valence band structure of AgSbTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovovic, V.; Heremans, J. P.

    2008-06-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect, galvanomagnetic and thermomagnetic properties of high-quality crystals of AgSbTe2 are measured and analyzed. The transport properties reveal the material studied here to be a very narrow-gap semiconductor (Eg≈7.6±3meV) with ˜5×1019cm-3 holes in a valence band with a high density of states and thermally excited ˜1017cm-3 high-mobility (2200cm2/Vs) electrons at 300 K. The quantum oscillations are measured with the magnetic field oriented along the ⟨111⟩ axis. Taken together with the Fermi energy derived from the transport properties, the oscillations confirm the calculated valence band structure composed of 12 half-pockets located at the X -points of the Brillouin zone, six with a density-of-states effective mass mda∗≫0.21me and six with mdb∗≫0.55me , giving a total density-of-states effective mass, including Fermi pocket degeneracy, of md∗≈1.7±0.2me ( me is the free electron mass). The lattice term dominates the thermal conductivity, and the electronic contribution in samples with both electrons and holes present is in turn dominated by the ambipolar term. The low thermal conductivity and very large hole mass of AgSbTe2 make it a most promising p -type thermoelectric material.

  3. Electronic structure and optical properties of Cs2HgI4: Experimental study and band-structure DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, A. A.; Gabrelian, B. V.; Vu, V. T.; Shkumat, P. N.; Myronchuk, G. L.; Khvyshchun, M.; Fedorchuk, A. O.; Parasyuk, O. V.; Khyzhun, O. Y.

    2015-04-01

    High-quality single crystal of cesium mercury tetraiodide, Cs2HgI4, has been synthesized by the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method and its crystal structure has been refined. In addition, electronic structure and optical properties of Cs2HgI4 have been studied. For the crystal under study, X-ray photoelectron core-level and valence-band spectra for pristine and Ar+-ion irradiated surfaces have been measured. The present X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicate that the Cs2HgI4 single crystal surface is very sensitive with respect to Ar+ ion-irradiation. In particular, Ar+ bombardment of the single crystal surface alters the elemental stoichiometry of the Cs2HgI4 surface. To elucidate peculiarities of the energy distribution of the electronic states within the valence-band and conduction-band regions of the Cs2HgI4 compound, we have performed first-principles band-structure calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) as incorporated in the WIEN2k package. Total and partial densities of states for Cs2HgI4 have been calculated. The DFT calculations reveal that the I p states make the major contributions in the upper portion of the valence band, while the Hg d, Cs p and I s states are the dominant contributors in its lower portion. Temperature dependence of the light absorption coefficient and specific electrical conductivity has been explored for Cs2HgI4 in the temperature range of 77-300 K. Main optical characteristics of the Cs2HgI4 compound have been elucidated by the first-principles calculations.

  4. Birefringence and band structure of CdP2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beril, S. I.; Stamov, I. G.; Syrbu, N. N.; Zalamai, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    The spatial dispersion in CdP2 crystals was investigated. The dispersion is positive (nk||с>nk||у) at λ>λ0 and negative (nk||сbands. Minimal direct energy intervals correspond to transitions Г1→Г1 for Е||с and Г2→Г1 for Е⊥с. The temperature coefficient of energy gap sifting in the case of temperature changing between 2 and 4.2 K equals to 10.6 meV/K and 3.2 mev/K for Г1→Г1 and Г2→Г1 band gap correspondingly. Reflectivity spectra were measured for energy interval 1.5-10 eV and optical functions (n, k, ε1, ε2,d2ε1/dE2 and d2ε2/dE2) were calculated by using Kramers-Kronig analyses. All features were interpreted as optical transitions on the basis of both theoretical calculations of band structure.

  5. Band structure of odd-mass lanthanum nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Deepti; Verma, Preeti; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun; Khosa, S. K.

    2014-04-01

    Negative parity energy states in 121-131La have been studied using Projected Shell Model (PSM). Some nuclear structure properties like yrast spectra, back-bending in moment of inertia, reduced transition probabilities and band diagrams have been described. The experimental feature of the co-existence of prolate-oblate shapes in 125-131La isotopes has been satisfactorily explained by PSM results. Comparison of the theoretical data with their experimental counterparts has also been made. From the calculations, it is found that the yrast states arise because of multi-quasiparticle states.

  6. Band Structure Asymmetry of Bilayer Graphene Revealed by Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.Q.; Henriksen, E.A.; Jiang, Z.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Kim, P.; Stormer, H.L.; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2008-12-10

    We report on infrared spectroscopy of bilayer graphene integrated in gated structures. We observe a significant asymmetry in the optical conductivity upon electrostatic doping of electrons and holes. We show that this finding arises from a marked asymmetry between the valence and conduction bands, which is mainly due to the inequivalence of the two sublattices within the graphene layer and the next-nearest-neighbor interlayer coupling. From the conductivity data, the energy difference of the two sublattices and the interlayer coupling energy are directly determined.

  7. X-BAND TRAVELING WAVE RF DEFLECTOR STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Tantawi, S.; /SLAC

    2008-12-18

    Design studies on the X-Band transverse RF deflectors operating at HEM{sub ll} mode have been made for two different applications. One is for beam measurement of time-sliced emittance and slice energy spread for the upgraded LCLS project, its optimization in RF efficiency and system design are carefully considered. Another is to design an ultra-fast RF kicker in order to pick up single bunches from the bunch-train of the B-factory storage ring. The challenges are to obtain very short structure filling time with high RF group velocity and good RF efficiency with reasonable transverse shunt impedance. Its RF system will be discussed.

  8. Band structure and spin texture of Bi2Se3 3 d ferromagnetic metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Velev, Julian P.; Dang, Xiaoqian; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-07-01

    The spin-helical surface states in a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), such as Bi2Se3 , are predicted to have superior efficiency in converting charge current into spin polarization. This property is said to be responsible for the giant spin-orbit torques observed in ferromagnetic metal/TI structures. In this work, using first-principles and model tight-binding calculations, we investigate the interface between the topological insulator Bi2Se3 and 3 d -transition ferromagnetic metals Ni and Co. We find that the difference in the work functions of the topological insulator and the ferromagnetic metals shift the topological surface states down about 0.5 eV below the Fermi energy where the hybridization of these surface states with the metal bands destroys their helical spin structure. The band alignment of Bi2Se3 and Ni (Co) places the Fermi energy far in the conduction band of bulk Bi2Se3 , where the spin of the carriers is aligned with the magnetization in the metal. Our results indicate that the topological surface states are unlikely to be responsible for the huge spin-orbit torque effect observed experimentally in these systems.

  9. Compressive Broad-Band Hyperspectral Sum Frequency Generation Microscopy to Study Functionalized Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Desheng; Lu, Liyang; Li, Yun; Kelly, Kevin F; Baldelli, Steven

    2016-05-19

    A broad-band sum frequency generation microscope has been developed for the study of molecular monolayers on surfaces. Because sum frequency generation is a vibrational spectroscopy based on a second-order optical process, it is uniquely sensitive to detecting a molecule's vibrational fingerprints specifically at interfaces. In this microscope, a structured illumination beam generated by a spatial light modulator is used to irradiate the sample with a series of sparsifying pseudorandom patterns. The spectra associated with each pattern are then input into a reconstruction algorithm to compressively recover the full hyperspectral image cube. As a proof-of-principle, this system performed molecule-specific imaging of a microcontact-printed self-assembled monolayer of alkanethiolate on copper. This hyperspectral compressive imaging effectively recovered both spatial and spectral surface features with compression greater than 80%, meaning more than a 5-fold decrease in acquisition time compared to traditional methods. PMID:27121296

  10. Band structure and electron-phonon coupling in H3S : A tight-binding model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortenzi, L.; Cappelluti, E.; Pietronero, L.

    2016-08-01

    We present a robust tight-binding description, based on the Slater-Koster formalism, of the band structure of H3S in the Im3 ¯m structure, stable in the range of pressure P =180 -220 GPa. We show that the interatomic hopping between the 3 s and 3 p orbitals (and partially between the 3 p orbitals themselves) of sulfur is fundamental to capturing the relevant physics associated with the Van Hove singularities close to the Fermi level. Comparing the model so defined with density functional theory calculations we obtain a very good agreement not only of the overall band structure but also of the low-energy states and the Fermi surface properties. The description in terms of Slater-Koster parameters permits us also to evaluate at a microscopic level a hopping-resolved linear electron-lattice coupling which can be employed for further tight-binding analyses also at a local scale.

  11. Tuning semiconductor band edge energies for solar photocatalysis via surface ligand passivation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shenyuan; Prendergast, David; Neaton, Jeffrey B

    2012-01-11

    Semiconductor photocatalysts capable of broadband solar photon absorption may be nonetheless precluded from use in driving water splitting and other solar-to-fuel related reactions due to unfavorable band edge energy alignment. Using first-principles density functional theory and beyond, we calculate the electronic structure of passivated CdSe surfaces and explore the opportunity to tune band edge energies of this and related semiconductors via electrostatic dipoles associated with chemisorbed ligands. We predict substantial shifts in band edge energies originating from both the induced dipole at the ligand/CdSe interface and the intrinsic dipole of the ligand. Building on important induced dipole contributions, we further show that, by changing the size and orientation of the ligand's intrinsic dipole moment via functionalization, we can control the direction and magnitude of the shifts of CdSe electronic levels. Our calculations suggest a general strategy for enabling new active semiconductor photocatalysts with both optimal opto-electronic, and photo- and electrochemical properties. PMID:22192078

  12. InGaAs inversion layers band structure, electrostatics, and mobility modeling based on 8 band k → · p → theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Anh-Tuan; Jin, Seonghoon; Choi, Woosung; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Cho, Seong-Ho; Kim, Young-Tae; Lee, Keun-Ho; Park, Youngkwan

    2015-11-01

    8 band k → · p → method is used to calculate subband structures of InGaAs inversion layers accounting for strong coupling between conduction and valence bands around Γ point as well as quantum confinement. Inversion layer mobility is computed employing Kubo-Greenwood formalism. Scatterings due to acoustic phonons, polar optical phonons, ionized impurities, interface fixed charges, surface roughness, and alloy disorder are included. The simulated low-field electron mobility results are in good agreement with experimental data with and without an InP capping layer.

  13. Metal-induced gap states in ferroelectric capacitors and its relationship with complex band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junquera, Javier; Aguado-Puente, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    At metal-isulator interfaces, the metallic wave functions with an energy eigenvalue within the band gap decay exponentially inside the dielectric (metal-induced gap states, MIGS). These MIGS can be actually regarded as Bloch functions with an associated complex wave vector. Usually only real values of the wave vectors are discussed in text books, since infinite periodicity is assumed and, in that situation, wave functions growing exponentially in any direction would not be physically valid. However, localized wave functions with an exponential decay are indeed perfectly valid solution of the Schrodinger equation in the presence of defects, surfaces or interfaces. For this reason, properties of MIGS have been typically discussed in terms of the complex band structure of bulk materials. The probable dependence on the interface particulars has been rarely taken into account explicitly due to the difficulties to include them into the model or simulations. We aim to characterize from first-principles simulations the MIGS in realistic ferroelectric capacitors and their connection with the complex band structure of the ferroelectric material. We emphasize the influence of the real interface beyond the complex band structure of bulk materials. Financial support provided by MICINN Grant FIS2009-12721-C04-02, and by the European Union Grant No. CP-FP 228989-2 ``OxIDes''. Computer resources provided by the RES.

  14. Nutrient loss in leachate and surface runoff from surface-broadcast and subsurface-banded broiler litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface band application of poultry litter has been shown to reduce the transport of nutrients from fields in surface runoff, compared to the conventional surface broadcast application. Little in situ research has been conducted to determine effects of surface broadcast application and subsurfac...

  15. Effects of surface oxide formation on germanium nanowire band-edge photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Minaye Hashemi, Fatemeh Sadat; Laboratoire des Materiaux Semiconducteurs, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne ; Thombare, Shruti; Brongersma, Mark L.; Morral, Anna Fontcuberta i; McIntyre, Paul C.; Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305

    2013-06-24

    The effect of intentional surface oxide formation on band-edge photoluminescence (PL) of Ge nanowires was investigated. Thermal oxidation in molecular O{sub 2} was used to produce a surface oxide layer on assemblies of single crystal nanowires grown by the vapor-liquid-solid method. With increasing oxidation of the wires, the band-edge PL associated with the indirect gap transition becomes more intense. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the formation of an increasingly GeO{sub 2}-like surface oxide under annealing conditions that enhance the indirect-gap PL, consistent with surface oxide passivation of nonradiative recombination centers initially present on the nanowire surface.

  16. The effect of spin-orbit coupling in band structure of few-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Sahdan, Muhammad Fauzi Darma, Yudi

    2014-03-24

    Topological insulators are electronic materials that have a bulk band gap like an ordinary insulator but have protected conducting states on their edge or surface. This can be happened due to spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, the edge current flows through their edge or surface depends on its spin orientation and also it is robust against non-magnetic impurities. Therefore, topological insulators are predicted to be useful ranging from spintronics to quantum computation. Graphene was first predicted to be the precursor of topological insulator by Kane-Mele. They developed a Hamiltonian model to describe the gap opening in graphene. In this work, we investigate the band structure of few-layer graphene by using this model with analytical approach. The results of our calculations show that the gap opening occurs at K and K’ point, not only in single layer, but also in bilayer and trilayer graphene.

  17. Manifestation of a Second Dirac Surface State and Bulk Bands in THz Radiation from Topological Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Chien-Ming; Yeh, Tien-Tien; Tzeng, Wen-Yen; Chen, Yi-Ru; Chen, Hsueh-Ju; Ku, Shin-An; Luo, Chih-Wei; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Cheng, Cheng-Maw; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Berger, Helmuth; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are interesting quantum matters that have a narrow bandgap for bulk and a Dirac-cone-like conducting surface state (SS). The recent discovered second Dirac surface state (SS) and bulk bands (BBs) located ~1.5 eV above the first SS are important for optical coupling in TIs. Here, we report on the time-domain measurements of THz radiation generated from TIs n-type Cu0.02Bi2Se3 and p-type Bi2Te3 single crystals by ultrafast optical pulse excitation. The observed polarity-reversal of the THz pulse originated from transient current is unusual, and cannot be reconciled with the photo-Dember effect. The second SS and BBs are found to be indispensable for the explanation of the unusual phenomenon. Thanks to the existence of the second SS and BBs, TIs manifest an effective wide band gap in THz generation. The present study demonstrates that time-domain THz spectroscopy provide rich information of the optical coupling and the electronic structure of TIs. PMID:26370337

  18. Manifestation of a Second Dirac Surface State and Bulk Bands in THz Radiation from Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chien-Ming; Yeh, Tien-Tien; Tzeng, Wen-Yen; Chen, Yi-Ru; Chen, Hsueh-Ju; Ku, Shin-An; Luo, Chih-Wei; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Cheng, Cheng-Maw; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Berger, Helmuth; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang-Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are interesting quantum matters that have a narrow bandgap for bulk and a Dirac-cone-like conducting surface state (SS). The recent discovered second Dirac surface state (SS) and bulk bands (BBs) located ~1.5 eV above the first SS are important for optical coupling in TIs. Here, we report on the time-domain measurements of THz radiation generated from TIs n-type Cu0.02Bi2Se3 and p-type Bi2Te3 single crystals by ultrafast optical pulse excitation. The observed polarity-reversal of the THz pulse originated from transient current is unusual, and cannot be reconciled with the photo-Dember effect. The second SS and BBs are found to be indispensable for the explanation of the unusual phenomenon. Thanks to the existence of the second SS and BBs, TIs manifest an effective wide band gap in THz generation. The present study demonstrates that time-domain THz spectroscopy provide rich information of the optical coupling and the electronic structure of TIs.

  19. Manifestation of a Second Dirac Surface State and Bulk Bands in THz Radiation from Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chien-Ming; Yeh, Tien-Tien; Tzeng, Wen-Yen; Chen, Yi-Ru; Chen, Hsueh-Ju; Ku, Shin-An; Luo, Chih-Wei; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Cheng, Cheng-Maw; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Berger, Helmuth; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are interesting quantum matters that have a narrow bandgap for bulk and a Dirac-cone-like conducting surface state (SS). The recent discovered second Dirac surface state (SS) and bulk bands (BBs) located ~1.5 eV above the first SS are important for optical coupling in TIs. Here, we report on the time-domain measurements of THz radiation generated from TIs n-type Cu(0.02)Bi2Se3 and p-type Bi2Te3 single crystals by ultrafast optical pulse excitation. The observed polarity-reversal of the THz pulse originated from transient current is unusual, and cannot be reconciled with the photo-Dember effect. The second SS and BBs are found to be indispensable for the explanation of the unusual phenomenon. Thanks to the existence of the second SS and BBs, TIs manifest an effective wide band gap in THz generation. The present study demonstrates that time-domain THz spectroscopy provide rich information of the optical coupling and the electronic structure of TIs. PMID:26370337

  20. Coral Skeleton Density Banding: Biotic Response to Changes in Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C. A.; Sivaguru, M.; Fried, G. A.; Fouke, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    Density bands in the CaCO3 (aragonite) skeleton of scleractinian corals are commonly used as chronometers, where crystalline couplets of high and low density bands represent the span of one year. Isotopic analysis of these density bands provides a sensitive reconstructive tool for paleoclimatology and paleoecology. However, the detailed biotic mechanisms controlling coral skeleton aragonite nucleation and crystallization events and resulting skeletal growth rate remain uncertain. The coral tissue organic matrix, composed of macromolecules secreted by the calicoblastic ectoderm, is closely associated with skeletal precipitation and is itself incorporated into the skeleton. We postulate that density banding is primarily controlled by changes in the rate of aragonite crystal precipitation mediated by the coral holobiont response to changes in sea surface temperature (SST). To test this hypothesis, data were collected from coral skeleton-tissue biopsies (2.5 cm in diameter) extracted from four species of Montastraea growing on the fringing reef tract of Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. Annual mean variation in SST on Curacao range from 29o in mid-September to 26o C in late February. Samples were collected at strategic time periods spanning the 3o C annual variations in SST. Our nanometer-scale optical analyses of skeletal morphology have revealed consistent changes between high- and low-skeletal density bands, resulting in an 11% increase in the volume of aragonite precipitated in high-density skeletal bands. The re-localization and/or change in abundance of mucus, carbonic anhydrase (a molecule that catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide), calmodulin (a calcium-binding protein) and the change in density of gastrodermal symbiotic dinoflagellates has permitted estimates of seasonally-fluctuating carbon allocation by the coral holobiont in response to changing environmental conditions. This digital reconstruction of over 2000 images of one-micron-thick histological

  1. Domain Structures in Nematic Liquid Crystals on a Polycarbonate Surface

    PubMed Central

    Parshin, Alexander M.; Gunyakov, Vladimir A.; Zyryanov, Victor Y.; Shabanov, Vasily F.

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  2. Domain structures in nematic liquid crystals on a polycarbonate surface.

    PubMed

    Parshin, Alexander M; Gunyakov, Vladimir A; Zyryanov, Victor Y; Shabanov, Vasily F

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  3. Band structure and the optical gain of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells modeled within 10-band and 8-band kp model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladysiewicz, M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Miloszewski, J. M.; Weetman, P.; Misiewicz, J.; Wartak, M. S.

    2013-02-01

    The band structure and optical gain have been calculated for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) with various nitrogen concentrations within the 10-band and 8-band kp models. Two approaches to calculate optical properties of GaInNAs/GaAs QWs have been compared and discussed in the context of available material parameters for dilute nitrides and the conduction band nonparabolicity due to the band anti-crossing (BAC) interaction between the N-related resonant level and the conduction band of a host material. It has been clearly shown that this nonparabolicity can be neglected in optical gain calculations since the dispersion of conduction band up to the Femi level is very close to parabolic for carrier concentrations typical for laser operation, i.e., 5 × 1018 cm-3. This means that the 8-band kp model when used to calculate the optical gain is very realistic and much easier to apply in QWs containing new dilute nitrides for which the BAC parameters are unknown. In such an approach, the energy gap and electron effective mass for N-containing materials are needed, instead of BAC parameters. These parameters are available experimentally much easier than BAC parameters.

  4. The reflection and transmission properties of a triple band dichroic surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, S. W.; Munk, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a triple-band dichroic surface design is detailed that is reflective in the Ka-band from 22.5 to 27.3 GHz and the Ku-band from 13.7 to 15.1 GHz, yet transparent in the S-band from 2.0 to 2.3 GHz, for all planes of incidence, and for all angles of incidence out to eta = 45 deg. The design is comprised of two gangbuster whole-surfaces separated by a distance, d, that is comparable to a fraction of a wavelength in S-band, and enhanced by the addition of a dielectric matching plate. The gangbuster array is comprised of tightly packed straight skewed dipole elements referred to as half-surfaces. Two of these half-surfaces are oriented orthogonal to each other and placed an array separation distance, s, apart to form the gangbuster whole-surface which allows any arbitrary plane of incidence. Results are given for the triple-band design with and without dielectric and conduction losses. The cross polarization properties of the dichroic surface was further investigated. It is shown that the reflection cross polarized component is dominated by the geometry of the front whole surface of the design (particularly the array separation s) and is never more than -22.5 dB in the frequency band 0 to 30 GHz. The transmission cross polarization component is dependent on both whole-surfaces and is never more than -30 dB in the same frequency band.

  5. Band structure of topological insulators from noise measurements in tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cascales Sandoval, Juan Pedro; Martinez, Isidoro; Guerrero, Ruben; Chang, Cui-Zu; Katmis, Ferhat; Moodera, Jagadeesh; Aliev, Farkhad

    The unique properties of spin-polarized surface or edge states in topological insulators (TIs) make these quantum coherent systems interesting from the point of view of both fundamental physics and their implementation in low power spintronic devices. Here we present such a study in TIs, through tunnelling and noise spectroscopy utilizing TI/Al2O3/Co tunnel junctions with bottom TI electrodes of either Bi2Te3 or Bi2Se3. We demonstrate that features related to the band structure of the TI materials show up in the tunnelling conductance and even more clearly through low frequency noise measurements. The bias dependence of 1/f noise reveals peaks at specific energies corresponding to band structure features of the TI. TI tunnel junctions could thus simplify the study of the properties of such quantum coherent systems that can further lead to the manipulation of their spin-polarized properties for technological purposes.

  6. Surface structure determines dynamic wetting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Cannon, James J.; Yue, Feng; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Liquid wetting of a surface is omnipresent in nature and the advance of micro-fabrication and assembly techniques in recent years offers increasing ability to control this phenomenon. Here, we identify how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. We reveal that the roughness influence can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. We further identify a criterion to predict if the spreading will be controlled by this surface roughness or by liquid inertia. Our results point to the possibility of selectively controlling the wetting behavior by engineering the surface structure. PMID:25683872

  7. Analysis of the electronic structure of crystals through band structure unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. B.; Kosobutsky, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we consider an alternative implementation of the band structure unfolding method within the framework of the density functional theory, which combines the advantages of the basis of localized functions and plane waves. This approach has been used to analyze the electronic structure of the ordered CuCl x Br1- x copper halide alloys and F 0 center in MgO that enables us to reveal qualitatively the features remaining hidden when using the standard supercell method, because of the complex band structure of systems with defects.

  8. Band bending at ferroelectric surfaces and interfaces investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Apostol, Nicoleta Georgiana

    2014-11-24

    This work reports on the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to quantify band bending at ferroelectric free surfaces and at their interfaces with metals. Surfaces exhibiting out-of-plane ferroelectric polarization are characterized by a band bending, due to the formation of a dipole layer at the surface, composed by the uncompensated polarization charges (due to ionic displacement) and to the depolarization charge sheet of opposite sign, composed by mobile charge carriers, which migrate near surface, owing to the depolarization electric field. To this surface band bending due to out-of-plane polarization states, metal-semiconductor Schottky barriers must be considered additionally when ferroelectrics are covered by metal layers. It is found that the net band bending is not always an algebraic sum of the two effects discussed above, since sometimes the metal is able to provide additional charge carriers, which are able to fully compensate the surface charge of the ferroelectric, up to the vanishing of the ferroelectric band bending. The two cases which will be discussed in more detail are Au and Cu deposited by molecular beam epitaxy on PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3}(001) single crystal thin layers, prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Gold forms unconnected nanoparticles, and their effect on the band bending is the apparition of a Schottky band bending additional to the band bending due to the out-of-plane polarization. Copper, starting with a given thickness, forms continuous metal layers connected to the ground of the system, and provide electrons in sufficient quantity to compensate the band bending due to the out-of-plane polarization.

  9. Invariant expansion for the trigonal band structure of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Zülicke, U.

    2010-12-01

    We present a symmetry analysis of the trigonal band structure in graphene, elucidating the transformational properties of the underlying basis functions and the crucial role of time-reversal invariance. Group theory is used to derive an invariant expansion of the Hamiltonian for electron states near the K points of the graphene Brillouin zone. Besides yielding the characteristic k -linear dispersion and higher oder corrections to it, this approach enables the systematic incorporation of all terms arising from external electric and magnetic fields, strain, and spin-orbit coupling up to any desired order. Several new contributions are found, in addition to reproducing results obtained previously within tight-binding calculations. Physical ramifications of these new terms are discussed.

  10. Phononic and photonic band gap structures: modelling and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armenise, Mario N.; Campanella, Carlo E.; Ciminelli, Caterina; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Passaro, Vittorio M. N.

    2010-01-01

    Photonic crystals (PhCs) are artificial materials with a permittivity which is a periodic function of the position, with a period comparable to the wavelength of light. The most interesting characteristic of such materials is the presence of photonic band gaps (PBGs). PhCs have very interesting properties of light confinement and localization together with the strong reduction of the device size, orders of magnitude less than the conventional photonic devices, allowing a potential very high scale of integration. These structures possess unique characteristics enabling to operate as optical waveguides, high Q resonators, selective filters, lens or superprism. The ability to mould and guide light leads naturally to novel applications in several fields. Band gap formation in periodic structures also pertains to elastic wave propagation. Composite materials with elastic coefficients which are periodic functions of the position are named phononic crystals. They have properties similar to those of photonic crystals and corresponding applications too. By properly choosing the parameters one may obtain phononic crystals (PhnCs) with specific frequency gaps. An elastic wave, whose frequency lies within an absolute gap of a phononic crystal, will be completely reflected by it. This property allows realizing non-absorbing mirrors of elastic waves and vibration-free cavities which might be useful in high-precision mechanical systems operating in a given frequency range. Moreover, one can use elastic waves to study phenomena such as those associated with disorder, in more or less the same manner as with electromagnetic waves. The authors present in this paper an introductory survey of the basic concepts of these new technologies with particular emphasis on their main applications, together with a description of some modelling approaches.

  11. Role of interface band structure on hot electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garramone, John J.

    Knowledge of electron transport through materials and interfaces is fundamentally and technologically important. For example, metal interconnects within integrated circuits suffer increasingly from electromigration and signal delay due to an increase in resistance from grain boundary and sidewall scattering since their dimensions are becoming shorter than the electron mean free path. Additionally, all semiconductor based devices require the transport of electrons through materials and interfaces where scattering and parallel momentum conservation are important. In this thesis, the inelastic and elastic scattering of hot electrons are studied in nanometer thick copper, silver and gold films deposited on silicon substrates. Hot electrons are electron with energy greater than kBT above the Fermi level (EF). This work was performed utilizing ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) which is a three terminal scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique that measures the percentage of hot electrons transmitted across a Schottky barrier interface. Hot electron attenuation lengths of the metals were extracted by measuring the BEEM current as a function of metal overlayer thickness for both hot electron and hot hole injection at 80 K and under ultra high vacuum. The inelastic and elastic scattering lengths were extracted by fitting the energetic dependence of the measured attenuation lengths to a Fermi liquid based model. A sharp increase in the attenuation length is observed at low injection energies, just above the Schottky barrier height, only for metals on Si(001) substrates. In contrast, the attenuation length measured on Si(111) substrates shows a sharp decrease. These results indicate that interface band structure and parallel momentum conservation have significant impact upon the transport of hot electrons across non epitaxial metal-semiconductor interfaces. In addition, they help to separate effects upon hot electron transport that are inherent to the metal

  12. Vibrational effects on surface energies and band gaps in hexagonal and cubic ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Edgar A.; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.

    2016-07-01

    Surface energies of hexagonal and cubic water ice are calculated using first-principles quantum mechanical methods, including an accurate description of anharmonic nuclear vibrations. We consider two proton-orderings of the hexagonal and cubic ice basal surfaces and three proton-orderings of hexagonal ice prism surfaces, finding that vibrations reduce the surface energies by more than 10%. We compare our vibrational densities of states to recent sum frequency generation absorption measurements and identify surface proton-orderings of experimental ice samples and the origins of characteristic absorption peaks. We also calculate zero point quantum vibrational corrections to the surface electronic band gaps, which range from -1.2 eV for the cubic ice basal surface up to -1.4 eV for the hexagonal ice prism surface. The vibrational corrections to the surface band gaps are up to 12% smaller than for bulk ice.

  13. Electronic structure of the single-domain Si(111)-(3×1)-Li surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberger, C.; Crain, J. N.; Altmann, K. N.; Paggel, J. J.; Himpsel, F. J.; Fick, D.

    2003-08-01

    The band structure of the single-domain Si(111)-(3×1)-Li surface is investigated by angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) with synchrotron radiation. Vicinal surfaces are used as templates for obtaining a single-domain (3×1) reconstruction. The surface band structure consists of a single, well-pronounced state at about 0.9 eV below the valence band maximum. Its dispersion matches local density calculations for the honeycomb-chain-channel (HCC) structure, but the calculated energy is 0.31 eV too high. This shift is reminiscent of localized surface states on other silicon surfaces, such as Si(111)-H.

  14. Design of a wide-band metamaterial absorber based on fractal frequency selective surface and resistive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yong-Zhi; Nie, Yan; Gong, Rong-Zhou

    2013-10-01

    We present the design of a wide-band metamaterial absorber, based on fractal frequency selective surface and resistive films. The total thickness is only 0.8 mm and shows a polarization-insensitive and wide-angle strong absorption. Due to the multiband resonance properties of the Minkowski fractal loop structure and Ohmic loss properties of resistive films, a strongly absorptive bandwidth of about 19 GHz is demonstrated numerically in the range 6.51-25.42 GHz. This design provides an effective and feasible way to construct a broad-band absorber in stealth technology.

  15. Potassium Postdeposition Treatment-Induced Band Gap Widening at Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ Surfaces--Reason for Performance Leap?

    PubMed

    Handick, Evelyn; Reinhard, Patrick; Alsmeier, Jan-Hendrik; Köhler, Leonard; Pianezzi, Fabian; Krause, Stefan; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Ikenaga, Eiji; Koch, Norbert; Wilks, Regan G; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N; Bär, Marcus

    2015-12-16

    Direct and inverse photoemission were used to study the impact of alkali fluoride postdeposition treatments on the chemical and electronic surface structure of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin films used for high-efficiency flexible solar cells. We find a large surface band gap (E(g)(Surf), up to 2.52 eV) for a NaF/KF-postdeposition treated (PDT) absorber significantly increases compared to the CIGSe bulk band gap and to the Eg(Surf) of 1.61 eV found for an absorber treated with NaF only. Both the valence band maximum (VBM) and the conduction band minimum shift away from the Fermi level. Depth-dependent photoemission measurements reveal that the VBM decreases with increasing surface sensitivity for both samples; this effect is more pronounced for the NaF/KF-PDT CIGSe sample. The observed electronic structure changes can be linked to the recent breakthroughs in CIGSe device efficiencies. PMID:26633568

  16. Survival of hydrogen anions near atomically flat metal surfaces: Band gap confinement and image state recapture effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Andrew; Shaw, John; Chakraborty, Himadri; Thumm, Uwe

    2010-03-01

    Resonant charge transfer (RCT) between ions and surfaces is a key intermediate step in surface-chemical processes as well as in micro- and nano-fabrications on the surface. The RCT process in the collision of hydrogen anions with metal surfaces is described within a wave packet propagation methodology using Crank-Nicholson algorithm [1]. The ion-survival probability is found to strongly enhance at two different ion velocities perpendicular to the surface. The low velocity enhancement is induced from a dynamical confinement of the ion level inside the band gap, while the high velocity enhancement emerges owing to the recapture from transiently populated image states [2]. These structures are found to be somewhat sensitive to the ion's distance of closest approach to the surface and the choice of inter-atomic potentials between the ion and the surface atoms. [1] Chakraborty et al., Phys. Rev. A 70, 052903 (2004); [2] Schmitz et al., Phys. Rev. A (submitted).

  17. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Sandhya; Tuttle, Gary L.; Sigalas, Mihail; McCalmont, Jonathan S.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2001-08-14

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  18. Fragile surface zero-energy flat bands in three-dimensional chiral superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shingo; Tanaka, Yukio; Sato, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    We study surface zero-energy flat bands in three-dimensional chiral superconductors with pz(px+i py) ν -wave pairing symmetry (ν is a nonzero integer), based on topological arguments and tunneling conductance. It is shown that the surface flat bands are fragile against (i) the surface misorientation and (ii) the surface Rashba spin-orbit interaction. The fragility of (i) is specific to chiral SCs, whereas that of (ii) happens for general odd-parity SCs. We demonstrate that these flat-band instabilities vanish or suppress a zero-bias conductance peak in a normal/insulator/superconductor junction, which behavior is clearly different from high-Tc cuprates and noncentrosymmetric superconductors. By calculating the angle-resolved conductance, we also discuss a topological surface state associated with the coexistence of line and point nodes.

  19. Hyperspectral bands prediction based on inter-band spectral correlation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ayman M.; Sharkawy, Mohamed El.; Elramly, Salwa H.

    2013-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has been widely studied in many applications; notably in climate changes, vegetation, and desert studies. However, such kind of imaging brings a huge amount of data, which requires transmission, processing, and storage resources for both airborne and spaceborne imaging. Compression of hyperspectral data cubes is an effective solution for these problems. Lossless compression of the hyperspectral data usually results in low compression ratio, which may not meet the available resources; on the other hand, lossy compression may give the desired ratio, but with a significant degradation effect on object identification performance of the hyperspectral data. Moreover, most hyperspectral data compression techniques exploits the similarities in spectral dimensions; which requires bands reordering or regrouping, to make use of the spectral redundancy. In this paper, we analyze the spectral cross correlation between bands for AVIRIS and Hyperion hyperspectral data; spectral cross correlation matrix is calculated, assessing the strength of the spectral matrix, we propose new technique to find highly correlated groups of bands in the hyperspectral data cube based on "inter band correlation square", and finally, we propose a new technique of band regrouping based on correlation values weights for different group of bands as network of correlation.

  20. Band-structure analysis from photoreflectance spectroscopy in (Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrubchak, Oksana; Gluba, Lukasz; Zuk, Jerzy; Wosinski, Tadeusz; Andrearczyk, Tomasz; Domagala, Jaroslaw Z.; Sadowski, Janusz

    2013-12-04

    Modulation photoreflectance spectroscopy has been applied to study the band-structure evolution in (Ga,Mn)As epitaxial layers with increasing Mn content. Structural and magnetic properties of the layers were characterized with high-resolution X-ray diffractometry and SQUID magnetometery, respectively. The revealed results of decrease in the band-gap-transition energy in the (Ga,Mn)As layers with increasing Mn content are interpreted in terms of a disordered valence band, extended within the band gap, formed, in highly Mn-doped (Ga,Mn)As, as a result of merging the Mn-related impurity band with the host GaAs valence band.

  1. Flexible metamaterial narrow-band-pass filter based on magnetic resonance coupling between ultra-thin bilayer frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhengyuan; Zhang, Qing; Ju, Yongfeng; Tao, Guiju; Jiang, Xiongwei; Kang, Ning; Liu, Chengpu; Zhang, Long

    2016-02-01

    A novel flexible metamaterial narrow-band-pass filter is designed and proved to be reliable by both numerical simulations and experimental measurements. The unit cell of the designed structure consists of circle ring resonators on top of a thin dielectric layer backed by a metallic mesh. The investigations on the distribution of the surface current and magnetic field as well as the analysis of the equivalent circuit model reveal that the magnetic resonance response between layers induced by the reverse surface current contributes to the high quality factor band-pass property. Importantly, it is a flexible design with a tunable resonance frequency by just changing the radius of the circle rings and can also be easily extended to have the multi-band-pass property. Moreover, this simplified structure with low duty cycle and ultra-thin thickness is also a symmetric design which is insensitive to the polarization and incident angles. Therefore, such a metamaterial narrow-band-pass filter is of great importance in the practical applications such as filtering and radar stealth, and especially for the conformal structure applications in the infrared and optical window area.

  2. Band structure of ABC-trilayer graphene superlattice

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, Salah Chan, K. S.

    2014-11-28

    We investigate the effect of one-dimensional periodic potentials on the low energy band structure of ABC trilayer graphene first by assuming that all the three layers have the same potential. Extra Dirac points having the same electron hole crossing energy as that of the original Dirac point are generated by superlattice potentials with equal well and barrier widths. When the potential height is increased, the numbers of extra Dirac points are increased. The dispersions around the Dirac points are not isotropic. It is noted that the dispersion along the k{sub y} direction for k{sub x} = 0 oscillates between a non-linear dispersion and a linear dispersion when the potential height is increased. When the well and barrier widths are not identical, the symmetry of the conduction and valence bands is broken. The extra Dirac points are shifted either upward or downward depending on the barrier and well widths from the zero energy, while the position of the central Dirac point oscillates with the superlattice potential height. By considering different potentials for different layers, extra Dirac points are generated not from the original Dirac points but from the valleys formed in the energy spectrum. Two extra Dirac points appear from each pair of touched valleys, so four Dirac points appeared in the spectrum at particular barrier height. By increasing the barrier height of superlattice potential two Dirac points merge into the original Dirac point. This emerging and merging of extra Dirac points is different from the equal potential case.

  3. Micro-metric electronic patterning of a topological band structure using a photon beam.

    PubMed

    Frantzeskakis, E; De Jong, N; Zwartsenberg, B; Huang, Y K; Bay, T V; Pronk, P; Van Heumen, E; Wu, D; Pan, Y; Radovic, M; Plumb, N C; Xu, N; Shi, M; De Visser, A; Golden, M S

    2015-01-01

    In an ideal 3D topological insulator (TI), the bulk is insulating and the surface conducting due to the existence of metallic states that are localized on the surface; these are the topological surface states. Quaternary Bi-based compounds of Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te(3-y)Se(y) with finely-tuned bulk stoichiometries are good candidates for realizing ideal 3D TI behavior due to their bulk insulating character. However, despite its insulating bulk in transport experiments, the surface region of Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te(3-y)Se(y) crystals cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum also exhibits occupied states originating from the bulk conduction band. This is due to adsorbate-induced downward band-bending, a phenomenon known from other Bi-based 3D TIs. Here we show, using angle-resolved photoemission, how an EUV light beam of moderate flux can be used to exclude these topologically trivial states from the Fermi level of Bi1.46Sb0.54Te1.7Se1.3 single crystals, thereby re-establishing the purely topological character of the low lying electronic states of the system. We furthermore prove that this process is highly local in nature in this bulk-insulating TI, and are thus able to imprint structures in the spatial energy landscape at the surface. We illustrate this by 'writing' micron-sized letters in the Dirac point energy of the system. PMID:26543011

  4. Micro-metric electronic patterning of a topological band structure using a photon beam

    PubMed Central

    Frantzeskakis, E.; De Jong, N.; Zwartsenberg, B.; Huang, Y. K.; Bay, T. V.; Pronk, P.; Van Heumen, E.; Wu, D.; Pan, Y.; Radovic, M.; Plumb, N. C.; Xu, N.; Shi, M.; De Visser, A.; Golden, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    In an ideal 3D topological insulator (TI), the bulk is insulating and the surface conducting due to the existence of metallic states that are localized on the surface; these are the topological surface states. Quaternary Bi-based compounds of Bi2−xSbxTe3−ySey with finely-tuned bulk stoichiometries are good candidates for realizing ideal 3D TI behavior due to their bulk insulating character. However, despite its insulating bulk in transport experiments, the surface region of Bi2−xSbxTe3−ySey crystals cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum also exhibits occupied states originating from the bulk conduction band. This is due to adsorbate-induced downward band-bending, a phenomenon known from other Bi-based 3D TIs. Here we show, using angle-resolved photoemission, how an EUV light beam of moderate flux can be used to exclude these topologically trivial states from the Fermi level of Bi1.46Sb0.54Te1.7Se1.3 single crystals, thereby re-establishing the purely topological character of the low lying electronic states of the system. We furthermore prove that this process is highly local in nature in this bulk-insulating TI, and are thus able to imprint structures in the spatial energy landscape at the surface. We illustrate this by ‘writing’ micron-sized letters in the Dirac point energy of the system. PMID:26543011

  5. Micro-metric electronic patterning of a topological band structure using a photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantzeskakis, E.; de Jong, N.; Zwartsenberg, B.; Huang, Y. K.; Bay, T. V.; Pronk, P.; van Heumen, E.; Wu, D.; Pan, Y.; Radovic, M.; Plumb, N. C.; Xu, N.; Shi, M.; de Visser, A.; Golden, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    In an ideal 3D topological insulator (TI), the bulk is insulating and the surface conducting due to the existence of metallic states that are localized on the surface; these are the topological surface states. Quaternary Bi-based compounds of Bi2-xSbxTe3-ySey with finely-tuned bulk stoichiometries are good candidates for realizing ideal 3D TI behavior due to their bulk insulating character. However, despite its insulating bulk in transport experiments, the surface region of Bi2-xSbxTe3-ySey crystals cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum also exhibits occupied states originating from the bulk conduction band. This is due to adsorbate-induced downward band-bending, a phenomenon known from other Bi-based 3D TIs. Here we show, using angle-resolved photoemission, how an EUV light beam of moderate flux can be used to exclude these topologically trivial states from the Fermi level of Bi1.46Sb0.54Te1.7Se1.3 single crystals, thereby re-establishing the purely topological character of the low lying electronic states of the system. We furthermore prove that this process is highly local in nature in this bulk-insulating TI, and are thus able to imprint structures in the spatial energy landscape at the surface. We illustrate this by ‘writing’ micron-sized letters in the Dirac point energy of the system.

  6. Three-dimensional dynamic thermal imaging of structural flaws by dual-band infrared computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Dolan, K.W.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Kornblum, B.T.; Perkins, D.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1993-04-01

    We discuss three-dimensional (3D) dynamic thermal imaging of structure flaws using dual-band infrared (DBIR) computed tomography. Conventional thermography provides single-band infrared images which are difficult to interpret. Standard procedures yield imprecise (or qualitative) information about subsurface flaw sites which are typically masked by surface clutter. We use a DBIR imaging unique pioneered at LLNL to capture the time history of surface temperature difference for flash-heated targets. We relate these patterns to the location, size, shape and depth of subsurface flaws. We have demonstrated temperature accuracies of 0.2{degree}C, timing synchronizations of 3 ms (after onset of heat flash) and intervals of 42 ms, between images, during an 8 s cooling (and hearing) interval characterizing the front (and back) surface temperature-time history of an epoxy-glue disbond site in a flash-heated aluminum lap joint. This type of disbond played a significant role in causing damage to the Aloha Aircraft fuselage on the aged Boeing 737 jetliner. By ratioing DBIR images (near 5 and 10 micron), we located surface temperature patterns (generated by weak heat flow anomalies at subsurface flaw sites) and removed the emissivity mask (from surface roughness variations). We compared measurements with calculations from the three-dimensional, finite element computer code: TOPAZ3D. We combined infrared, ultrasound and x-ray imaging methods to characterize the lap joint disbond site spatial, bond quality, and material differences.

  7. Projected shell model study of band structure of 90Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Dhanvir; Gupta, Anuradha; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun

    2016-05-01

    A systematic study of two-quasiparticle bands of the odd-odd 90Nb nucleus is performed using the projected shell model approach. Yrast band with some other bands have been obtained and back-bending in moment of inertia has also been calculated and compared with the available experimental. On comparing the available experimental data, it is found that the treatment with PSM provides a satisfactory explanation of the available data.

  8. Influence of banded structure on the mechanical properties of a high-strength maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Salam, I.; Hashmi, F.H.; Khan, A.Q.

    1997-04-01

    Chemical inhomogeneity results in the formation of banded structure in high-strength maraging steels. Segregation of titanium and molybdenum was found to be the primary cause of banded structure formation. When the concentrations of these elements increased beyond certain critical levels, bands comprising different grain sizes formed. The inclusions existed preferentially along the interface of the bands. A high-temperature homogenization treatment substantially reduced or eliminated the banded structure. The large grain size resulting from the homogenization treatment was subsequently reduced by a grain refinement treatment. The mechanical properties of the steel substantially improved following homogenization and grain refinement.

  9. Improvement of Bare Surface Soil Moisture Estimation with L-Band Dual-Polarization Radar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study demonstrates a new algorithm development for estimating bare surface soil moisture using dual-polarization L-band backscattering measurements. Through our analyses on the numerically simulated surface backscattering database by Advanced Integral Equation Model (AIEM) with a wide range of ...

  10. Cotton response to poultry litter applied by subsurface banding relative to surface broadcasting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry poultry litter is typically land-applied by surface broadcasting, a practice that exposes certain litter nutrients to volatilization loss. Applying litter with a new, experimental implement that places the litter in narrow bands below the soil surface may reduce or eliminate such losses but has...

  11. Tuning surface reactivity by finite size effects: role of orbital symmetry in the d - band model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snijders, Paul; Yin, Xiangshi; Cooper, Valentino; Weitering, Hanno

    Catalytic activity depends sensitively on the strength of the interactions between reactant molecules and catalyst surface: too weak and the catalyst cannot capture enough molecules to react; too strong and the reaction products do not desorb, blocking further reactions. The ability to control the binding strength of molecules to metal surfaces is thus fundamental to the design of efficient and selective catalysts. Catalyst design often relies on increasing the interaction strength on relatively non-reactive materials by introducing active sites. Here, we present a complementary approach: we exploit finite size effects in the electronic structure of ultrathin Pd(111) films grown on Ru(0001) to tune their reactivity by changing the film thickness one atom layer at a time. While bulk Pd(111) is reactive toward oxygen, we find that Pd films thinner than 6 atom layers are surprisingly inert to oxidation. This observation can be explained with the d-band model only when it is applied to the orbitals directly involved in the bonding. The insight into orbital specific contributions to surface reactivity could be useful in the design of catalysts. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  12. Achieving all-dielectric metamaterial band-pass frequency selective surface via high-permittivity ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liyang; Wang, Jiafu; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jun; Feng, Mingde; Du, Hongliang; Yan, Mingbao; Zhang, Jieqiu; Qu, Shaobo; Xu, Zhuo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose the design of all-dielectric metamaterial band-pass frequency selective surfaces (FSSs) using high-permittivity ceramics based on effective medium theory and dielectric resonator theory. The band-pass response can be determined by the permittivity of the dielectric material, the periodicity, and geometrical shape of the dielectric unit cell. As an example, a band-pass FSS composed of H shaped ceramic resonators is demonstrated. Both the simulation and experiment results show that the FSS can achieve a pass band in X-band. Since such FSSs are made of low-loss high-permittivity ceramics, they are of important application values, especially in high-temperature, high-power environments. The design method can be readily extended to the design of FSSs in other frequencies.

  13. Surface properties in West Africa from spaceborne radars in C and Ku bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatras, Christophe; Frappart, Frédéric; Mougin, Eric; Frison, Pierre-Louis; Faye, Gayane; Jarlan, Lionel

    2013-04-01

    We propose to compare the backscattering responses of land surfaces in West Africa for different radar spaceborne sensors: the nadir-looking radar altimeters and the side-looking radar scatterometers at different frequencies (Ku and C bands). The data used come from Envisat-RA2 measurements in Ku-band over the period 2003-2010 and the Jason-2 measurements in C band over mid-2008-2011 for radar altimetry, and from QuikSCAT - SeaWinds in Ku-band and Metop - ASCAT in C-band for radar scatterometry over the same time-spans. Along-track profiles and their temporal variations are analyzed and their behaviours are related to surfaces properties such as soil types, vegetation cover, and surface hydrology. Temporal variations of backscattering coefficients are extracted for main land covers along the bio-climatic transect (stone and sand deserts, saharo-sahelian, sahelian, and soudano-sahelian savannahs, tropical-seasonal and tropical forests) and compared to both rainfall estimates from TRMM and vegetation activity (NDVI) from MODIS. Range of variations of the backscattering signals are given for different surfaces and ecosystems along with delays between peaks of rainfall, backscattering responses of radar altimetry and scatterometry, and vegetation activity. The stability of the backscattering is also estimated over deserts and during the dry season over Sahelian environments. Finally, the complementarity of the different spaceborne sensors for continental surfaces monitoring is pointed out.

  14. Global Kinetic Modeling of Banded Electron Structures in the Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    Significant fluxes of 10 eV to 30 keV electrons have been detected in the plasmasphere, appearing as banded structures in energy with broad spatial extents and slowly evolving over several days. It is thought that these populations are decaying plasma sheet electrons injected into the corotating region of near-Earth space. This capture can occur when the convective electric field drops rapidly and the Alfven boundary suddenly outward, trapping the inner edge of the plasma sheet along closed drift paths. Our bounce-averaged kinetic model of superthermal electron transport is able to simulate this capture and the subsequent drift, diffusion, and decay of the plasma cloud. Results of this simulation will be shown and discussed, from the initial injection during the elevated convection to the final loss of the particles. It is thought that not only Coulomb collisions but also wave-particle interactions play a significant role in altering the plasma cloud. Quasilinear diffusion is currently being incorporated into the model and the importance of this mechanism will be examined. Also, the high anisotropy of the trapped population could be unstable and generate plasma waves. These and other processes will be investigated to determine the final fate of the cloud and to quantify where, how, and when the energy of the plasma cloud is deposited. Comparisons with CRRES observations of these events are shown to verify the model and explain the data.

  15. Miniaturization of electromagnetic band gap structures for mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goussetis, G.; Feresidis, A. P.; Palikaras, G. K.; Kitra, M.; Vardaxoglou, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    It is well known that interference of the human body affects the performance of the antennas in mobile phone handsets. In this contribution, we investigate the use of miniaturized metallodielectric electromagnetic band gap (MEBG) structures embedded in the case of a mobile handset as a means of decoupling the antenna from the user's hand. The closely coupled MEBG concept is employed to achieve miniaturization of the order of 15:1. Full wave dispersion relations for planar closely coupled MEBG arrays are presented and are validated experimentally. The performance of a prototype handset with an embedded conformal MEBG is assessed experimentally and is compared to a similar prototype without the MEBG. Reduction in the detuning of the antenna because of the human hand by virtue of the MEBG is demonstrated. Moreover, the efficiency of the handset when loaded with a human hand model is shown to improve when the MEBG is in place. The improvements are attributed to the decoupling of the antenna from the user's hand, which is achieved by means of suppressing the fields in the locality of the hand.

  16. Pronounced Surface Band Bending of Thin-Film Silicon Revealed by Modeling Core Levels Probed with Hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Wippler, David; Wilks, Regan G; Pieters, Bart E; van Albada, Sacha J; Gerlach, Dominic; Hüpkes, Jürgen; Bär, Marcus; Rau, Uwe

    2016-07-13

    Enhancing the probing depth of photoemission studies by using hard X-rays allows the investigation of buried interfaces of real-world device structures. However, it also requires the consideration of photoelectron-signal attenuation when evaluating surface effects. Here, we employ a computational model incorporating surface band bending and exponential photoelectron-signal attenuation to model depth-dependent spectral changes of Si 1s and Si 2s core level lines. The data were acquired from hydrogenated boron-doped microcrystalline thin-film silicon, which is applied in silicon-based solar cells. The core level spectra, measured by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using different excitation energies, reveal the presence of a 0.29 nm thick surface oxide layer. In the silicon film a downward surface band bending of eVbb = -0.65 eV over ∼6 nm obtained via inverse modeling explains the observed core level shifts and line broadening. Moreover, the computational model allows the extraction of the "real" Si 1s and Si 2s bulk core level binding energies as 1839.13 and 150.39 eV, and their natural Lorentzian line widths as 496 and 859 meV, respectively. These values significantly differ from those directly extracted from the measured spectra. Because band bending usually occurs at material surfaces we highly recommend the detailed consideration of signal integration over depth for quantitative statements from depth-dependent measurements. PMID:27294978

  17. Gold nanoparticles with externally controlled, reversible shifts of local surface plasmon resonance bands.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Mustafa S; Jensen, Gary C; Penaloza, David P; Seery, Thomas A P; Pendergraph, Samuel A; Rusling, James F; Sotzing, Gregory A

    2009-11-17

    We have achieved reversible tunability of local surface plasmon resonance in conjugated polymer functionalized gold nanoparticles. This property was facilitated by the preparation of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) containing polynorbornene brushes on gold nanoparticles via surface-initiated ring-opening metathesis polymerization. Reversible tuning of the surface plasmon band was achieved by electrochemically switching the EDOT polymer between its reduced and oxidized states. PMID:19839619

  18. Band structure parameters of metallic diamond from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, H.; Achatz, P.; Nicolaou, A.; Le Fèvre, P.; Bertran, F.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Bustarret, E.

    2015-07-01

    The electronic band structure of heavily boron doped diamond was investigated by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on (100)-oriented epilayers. A unique set of Luttinger parameters was deduced from a comparison of the experimental band structure of metallic diamond along the Δ (Γ X ) and Σ (Γ K ) high-symmetry directions of the reciprocal space, with theoretical band structure calculations performed both within the local density approximation and by an analytical k . p approach. In this way, we were able to describe the experimental band structure over a large three-dimensional region of the reciprocal space and to estimate hole effective masses in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental papers.

  19. Vibrational dynamics and band structure of methyl-terminated Ge(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, Zachary M.; Nihill, Kevin J.; Campi, Davide; Wong, Keith T.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Bernasconi, M.; Benedek, G.; Sibener, S. J.

    2015-09-01

    A combined synthesis, experiment, and theory approach, using elastic and inelastic helium atom scattering along with ab initio density functional perturbation theory, has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics and band structure of a recently synthesized organic-functionalized semiconductor interface. Specifically, the thermal properties and lattice dynamics of the underlying Ge(111) semiconductor crystal in the presence of a commensurate (1 × 1) methyl adlayer were defined for atomically flat methylated Ge(111) surfaces. The mean-square atomic displacements were evaluated by analysis of the thermal attenuation of the elastic He diffraction intensities using the Debye-Waller model, revealing an interface with hybrid characteristics. The methyl adlayer vibrational modes are coupled with the Ge(111) substrate, resulting in significantly softer in-plane motion relative to rigid motion in the surface normal. Inelastic helium time-of-flight measurements revealed the excitations of the Rayleigh wave across the surface Brillouin zone, and such measurements were in agreement with the dispersion curves that were produced using density functional perturbation theory. The dispersion relations for H-Ge(111) indicated that a deviation in energy and lineshape for the Rayleigh wave was present along the nearest-neighbor direction. The effects of mass loading, as determined by calculations for CD3-Ge(111), as well as by force constants, were less significant than the hybridization between the Rayleigh wave and methyl adlayer librations. The presence of mutually similar hybridization effects for CH3-Ge(111) and CH3-Si(111) surfaces extends the understanding of the relationship between the vibrational dynamics and the band structure of various semiconductor surfaces that have been functionalized with organic overlayers.

  20. Vibrational dynamics and band structure of methyl-terminated Ge(111).

    PubMed

    Hund, Zachary M; Nihill, Kevin J; Campi, Davide; Wong, Keith T; Lewis, Nathan S; Bernasconi, M; Benedek, G; Sibener, S J

    2015-09-28

    A combined synthesis, experiment, and theory approach, using elastic and inelastic helium atom scattering along with ab initio density functional perturbation theory, has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics and band structure of a recently synthesized organic-functionalized semiconductor interface. Specifically, the thermal properties and lattice dynamics of the underlying Ge(111) semiconductor crystal in the presence of a commensurate (1 × 1) methyl adlayer were defined for atomically flat methylated Ge(111) surfaces. The mean-square atomic displacements were evaluated by analysis of the thermal attenuation of the elastic He diffraction intensities using the Debye-Waller model, revealing an interface with hybrid characteristics. The methyl adlayer vibrational modes are coupled with the Ge(111) substrate, resulting in significantly softer in-plane motion relative to rigid motion in the surface normal. Inelastic helium time-of-flight measurements revealed the excitations of the Rayleigh wave across the surface Brillouin zone, and such measurements were in agreement with the dispersion curves that were produced using density functional perturbation theory. The dispersion relations for H-Ge(111) indicated that a deviation in energy and lineshape for the Rayleigh wave was present along the nearest-neighbor direction. The effects of mass loading, as determined by calculations for CD3-Ge(111), as well as by force constants, were less significant than the hybridization between the Rayleigh wave and methyl adlayer librations. The presence of mutually similar hybridization effects for CH3-Ge(111) and CH3-Si(111) surfaces extends the understanding of the relationship between the vibrational dynamics and the band structure of various semiconductor surfaces that have been functionalized with organic overlayers. PMID:26429030

  1. Vibrational dynamics and band structure of methyl-terminated Ge(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Hund, Zachary M.; Nihill, Kevin J.; Sibener, S. J.; Campi, Davide; Bernasconi, M.; Wong, Keith T.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Benedek, G.

    2015-09-28

    A combined synthesis, experiment, and theory approach, using elastic and inelastic helium atom scattering along with ab initio density functional perturbation theory, has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics and band structure of a recently synthesized organic-functionalized semiconductor interface. Specifically, the thermal properties and lattice dynamics of the underlying Ge(111) semiconductor crystal in the presence of a commensurate (1 × 1) methyl adlayer were defined for atomically flat methylated Ge(111) surfaces. The mean-square atomic displacements were evaluated by analysis of the thermal attenuation of the elastic He diffraction intensities using the Debye-Waller model, revealing an interface with hybrid characteristics. The methyl adlayer vibrational modes are coupled with the Ge(111) substrate, resulting in significantly softer in-plane motion relative to rigid motion in the surface normal. Inelastic helium time-of-flight measurements revealed the excitations of the Rayleigh wave across the surface Brillouin zone, and such measurements were in agreement with the dispersion curves that were produced using density functional perturbation theory. The dispersion relations for H-Ge(111) indicated that a deviation in energy and lineshape for the Rayleigh wave was present along the nearest-neighbor direction. The effects of mass loading, as determined by calculations for CD{sub 3}-Ge(111), as well as by force constants, were less significant than the hybridization between the Rayleigh wave and methyl adlayer librations. The presence of mutually similar hybridization effects for CH{sub 3}-Ge(111) and CH{sub 3}-Si(111) surfaces extends the understanding of the relationship between the vibrational dynamics and the band structure of various semiconductor surfaces that have been functionalized with organic overlayers.

  2. The surface electronic structure of silicon terminated (100) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Tadich, A.; Sear, M. J.; Qi, D.; Wee, A. T. S.; Stacey, A.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-07-01

    A combination of synchrotron-based x-ray spectroscopy and contact potential difference measurements have been used to examine the electronic structure of the (3 × 1) silicon terminated (100) diamond surface under ultra high vacuum conditions. An occupied surface state which sits 1.75 eV below the valence band maximum has been identified, and indications of mid-gap unoccupied surface states have been found. Additionally, the pristine silicon terminated surface is shown to possess a negative electron affinity of ‑0.86 ± 0.1 eV.

  3. The surface electronic structure of silicon terminated (100) diamond.

    PubMed

    Schenk, A K; Tadich, A; Sear, M J; Qi, D; Wee, A T S; Stacey, A; Pakes, C I

    2016-07-01

    A combination of synchrotron-based x-ray spectroscopy and contact potential difference measurements have been used to examine the electronic structure of the (3 × 1) silicon terminated (100) diamond surface under ultra high vacuum conditions. An occupied surface state which sits 1.75 eV below the valence band maximum has been identified, and indications of mid-gap unoccupied surface states have been found. Additionally, the pristine silicon terminated surface is shown to possess a negative electron affinity of -0.86 ± 0.1 eV. PMID:27211214

  4. Momentum-Space Imaging of the Dirac Band Structure in Molecular Graphene via Quasiparticle Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Anna; Gomes, Kenjiro K.; Ko, Wonhee; Mar, Warren; Manoharan, Hari C.

    2014-03-01

    Molecular graphene is a nanoscale artificial lattice composed of carbon monoxide molecules arranged one by one, realizing a dream of exploring exotic quantum materials by design. This assembly is done by atomic manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) on a Cu(111) surface. To directly probe the transformation of normal surface state electrons into massless Dirac fermions, we map the momentum space dispersion through the Fourier analysis of quasiparticle scattering maps acquired at different energies with the STM. The Fourier analysis not only bridges the real-space and momentum-space data but also reveals the chiral nature of those quasiparticles, through a set of selection rules of allowed scattering involving the pseudospin and valley degrees of freedom. The graphene-like band structure can be reshaped with simple alterations to the lattice, such as the addition of a strain. We analyze the effect on the momentum space band structure of multiple types of strain on our system. Supported by DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  5. First principle study of band structure of SrMO3 perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daga, Avinash; Sharma, Smita

    2016-05-01

    First principle study of band structure calculations in the local density approximations (LDA) as well as in the generalized gradient approximations (GGA) have been used to determine the electronic structure of SrMO3 where M stands for Ti, Zr and Mo. Occurrence of band gap proves SrTiO3 and SrZrO3 to be insulating. A small band gap is observed in SrMoO3 perovskite signifies it to be metallic. Band structures are found to compare well with the available data in the literature showing the relevance of this approach. ABINIT computer code has been used to carry out all the calculations.

  6. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  7. Electronic structure of hydrogenated diamond: Microscopical insight into surface conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, S.; Alippi, Paola; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Offi, F.; Petaccia, L.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    We have correlated the surface conductivity of hydrogen-terminated diamond to the electronic structure in the Fermi region. Significant density of electronic states (DOS) in proximity of the Fermi edge has been measured by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) on surfaces exposed to air, corresponding to a p -type electric conductive regime, while upon annealing a depletion of the DOS has been achieved, resembling the diamond insulating state. The surface and subsurface electronic structure has been determined, exploiting the different probing depths of PES applied in a photon energy range between 7 and 31 eV. Ab initio density functional calculations including surface charge depletion and band-bending effects favorably compare with electronic states measured by angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Such states are organized in the energy-momentum space in a twofold structure: one, bulk-derived, band disperses in the Γ -X direction with an average hole effective mass of (0.43 ±0.02 ) m0 , where m0 is the bare electron mass; a second flatter band, with an effective mass of (2.2 ±0.9 ) m0 , proves that a hole gas confined in the topmost layers is responsible for the conductivity of the (2 ×1 ) hydrogen-terminated diamond (100 ) surface.

  8. Spin polarized surface resonance bands in single layer Bi on Ge(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottegoni, F.; Calloni, A.; Bussetti, G.; Camera, A.; Zucchetti, C.; Finazzi, M.; Duò, L.; Ciccacci, F.

    2016-05-01

    The spin features of surface resonance bands in single layer Bi on Ge(1 1 1) are studied by means of spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. We characterize the occupied and empty surface states of Ge(1 1 1) and show that the deposition of one monolayer of Bi on Ge(1 1 1) leads to the appearance of spin-polarized surface resonance bands. In particular, the C 3v symmetry, which Bi adatoms adopt on Ge(1 1 1), allows for the presence of Rashba-like occupied and unoccupied electronic states around the \\overline{\\text{M}} point of the Bi surface Brillouin zone with a giant spin–orbit constant |{α\\text{R}}| =≤ft(1.4+/- 0.1\\right) eV · Å.

  9. Spin polarized surface resonance bands in single layer Bi on Ge(1 1 1).

    PubMed

    Bottegoni, F; Calloni, A; Bussetti, G; Camera, A; Zucchetti, C; Finazzi, M; Duò, L; Ciccacci, F

    2016-05-18

    The spin features of surface resonance bands in single layer Bi on Ge(1 1 1) are studied by means of spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. We characterize the occupied and empty surface states of Ge(1 1 1) and show that the deposition of one monolayer of Bi on Ge(1 1 1) leads to the appearance of spin-polarized surface resonance bands. In particular, the C 3v symmetry, which Bi adatoms adopt on Ge(1 1 1), allows for the presence of Rashba-like occupied and unoccupied electronic states around the [Formula: see text] point of the Bi surface Brillouin zone with a giant spin-orbit constant [Formula: see text] eV · Å. PMID:27073190

  10. Band structures in silicene on monolayer gallium phosphide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Miaojuan; Li, Mingming; Zhang, Changwen; Yuan, Min; Li, Ping; Li, Feng; Ji, Weixiao; Chen, Xinlian

    2016-07-01

    Opening a sizable band gap in the zero-gap silicene is a key issue for its application in nanoelectronics. We design new 2D silicene and GaP heterobilayer (Si/GaP HBL) composed of silicene and monolayer (ML) GaP. Based on first-principles calculations, we find that the interaction energies are in the range of -295.5 to -297.5 meV per unit cell, indicating a weak interaction between silicene and gallium phosphide (GaP) monolayer. The band gap changes ranging from 0.06 to 0.44 eV in hybrid HBLs. An unexpected indirect-direct band gap crossover is also observed in HBLs, dependent on the stacking pattern. These provide a possible way to design effective FETs out of silicene on GaP monolayer.

  11. L-Band Microwave Observations over land Surface using a Two-Dimensional Synthetic Aperture Radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of studies have demonstrated the potential capabilities of passive microwave remote sensing at L-band (1.4 GHz) to measure surface soil moisture. Aperture synthesis is a technology for obtaining high spatial resolution at long wavelengths with a practical radiometer antenna. During the So...

  12. Surface plasmonic enhanced polarimetric longwave infrared photodetection with band pass spectral filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasinajindakaw, Puminun; Vaillancourt, Jarrod; Gu, Guiru; Lu, Xuejun

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we report a surface plasmonic enhanced polarimetric longwave infrared (LWIR) photodetector. Polarization-selective detection of LWIR incidence with different polarizations is achieved at different plasmonic resonant modes. Band-pass spectral filtering is also provided at the plasmonic resonant modes by the plasmonic enhancement. The extinction ratio (ER) of the polarimetric detection and its limiting factor is discussed.

  13. L-Band microwave observations over land surface using a two-dimensional synthetic aperture radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antenna size is major factor that has limited realization of the potential capabilities of L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave radiometry to estimate surface soil moisture from space. However, emerging interferometric technology, called aperture synthesis, has been developed to address this limitation. The ...

  14. L-Band Microwave Observations over Land Surface Using a Two-Dimensional Synthetic Aperture Radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antenna size is major factor that has limited realization of the potential capabilities of L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave radiometry to estimate surface soil moisture from space. However, emerging interferometric technology, called aperture synthesis, has been developed to address this limitation. The ...

  15. Parametric exponentially correlated surface emission model for L-band passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology and climate investigations. Current and future satellite missions with L-band passive microwave radiometers can provide valuable information for monitoring the global soil moisture. A factor that can play a significant role in the modeling...

  16. Microbial Communities in the Surface Mucopolysaccharide Layer and the Black Band Microbial Mat of Black Band-Diseased Siderastrea siderea

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Raju; Mills, DeEtta K.; Remily, Elizabeth R.; Voss, Joshua D.; Richardson, Laurie L.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial community profiles and species composition associated with two black band-diseased colonies of the coral Siderastrea siderea were studied by 16S rRNA-targeted gene cloning, sequencing, and amplicon-length heterogeneity PCR (LH-PCR). Bacterial communities associated with the surface mucopolysaccharide layer (SML) of apparently healthy tissues of the infected colonies, together with samples of the black band disease (BBD) infections, were analyzed using the same techniques for comparison. Gene sequences, ranging from 424 to 1,537 bp, were retrieved from all positive clones (n = 43 to 48) in each of the four clone libraries generated and used for comparative sequence analysis. In addition to LH-PCR community profiling, all of the clone sequences were aligned with LH-PCR primer sequences, and the theoretical lengths of the amplicons were determined. Results revealed that the community profiles were significantly different between BBD and SML samples. The SML samples were dominated by γ-proteobacteria (53 to 64%), followed by β-proteobacteria (18 to 21%) and α-proteobacteria (5 to 11%). In contrast, both BBD clone libraries were dominated by α-proteobacteria (58 to 87%), followed by verrucomicrobia (2 to 10%) and 0 to 6% each of δ-proteobacteria, bacteroidetes, firmicutes, and cyanobacteria. Alphaproteobacterial sequence types related to the bacteria associated with toxin-producing dinoflagellates were observed in BBD clone libraries but were not found in the SML libraries. Similarly, sequences affiliated with the family Desulfobacteraceae and toxin-producing cyanobacteria, both believed to be involved in BBD pathogenesis, were found only in BBD libraries. These data provide evidence for an association of numerous toxin-producing heterotrophic microorganisms with BBD of corals. PMID:16957217

  17. Surface Structure and Surface Electronic States Related to Plasma Cleaning of Silicon and Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaewon

    This thesis discusses the surface structure and the surface electronic states of Si and Ge(100) surfaces as well as the effects of oxidation process on the silicon oxide/Si(100) interface structure. The H-plasma exposure was performed in situ at low temperatures. The active species, produced in the H-plasma by the rf-excitation of H_2 gas, not only remove microcontaminants such as oxygen and carbon from the surface, but also passivate the surface with atomic hydrogen by satisfying the dangling bonds of the surface atoms. The surfaces were characterized by Angle Resolved UV-Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARUPS) and Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED). In the case of Si(100), H-plasma exposure produced ordered H-terminated crystallographic structures with either a 2 x 1 or 1 x 1 LEED pattern. The hydride phases, found on the surfaces of the cleaned Si(100), were shown to depend on the temperature of the surface during H-plasma cleaning. The electronic states for the monohydride and dihydride phases were identified by ARUPS. When the plasma cleaned surface was annealed, the phase transition from the dihydride to monohydride was observed. The monohydride Si-H surface bond was stable up to 460^circC, and the dangling bond surface states were identified after annealing at 500^circC which was accompanied by the spectral shift. The H-terminated surface were characterized to have a flat band structure. For the Ge(100) surface, an ordered 2 x 1 monohydride phase was obtained from the surface cleaned at 180 ^circC. After plasma exposure at <=170^circC a 1 x 1 surface was observed, but the ARUPS indicated that the surface was predominantly composed of disordered monohydride structures. After annealing above the H-dissociation temperatures, the shift in the spectrum was shown to occur with the dangling bond surface states. The H-terminated surfaces were identified to be unpinned. The interface structure of silicon oxide/Si(100) was studied using ARUPS. Spectral shifts were

  18. High-Pressure and Electronic Band Structure Studies on MoBC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconi, R.; de la Mora, P.; Morales, F.; Escamilla, R.; Camacho, C. O.; Acosta, M.; Escudero, R.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, high-pressure electrical resistivity measurements and electronic structure analysis on the intermetallic MoBC system are presented. Electrical resistivity measurements up to about 5 GPa using a diamond anvil cell on MoBC revealed that decreases in a non-monotonic way. Using Linearized Augmented Plane Wave method based on Density Functional Theory, we investigate the changes in the electronic structure of this compound as a function of pressure. The states at the Fermi level mainly come from the d orbitals of molybdenum atoms. As the pressure increases, the band width is enhanced and the total density of states at the Fermi level decreases. The Fermi surface for this compound possesses a two-dimensional character which prevails under an applied pressure of about 10 GPa. The results are compared with the chemical pressure effects on induced by the gradual and non-simultaneous elimination of B and C in the compound.

  19. Electronic transitions in GdN band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Vidyasagar, R. Kita, T.; Sakurai, T.; Ohta, H.

    2014-05-28

    Using the near-infrared (NIR) absorbance spectroscopy, electronic transitions and spin polarization of the GdN epitaxial film have been investigated; and the GdN epitaxial film was grown by a reactive rf sputtering technique. The GdN film exhibited three broad bands in the NIR frequency regimes; and those bands are attributable primarily to the minority and majority spin transitions at the X-point and an indirect transition along the Γ-X symmetric direction of GdN Brillouin zone. We experimentally observe a pronounced red-shift of the indirect band gap when cooling down below the Curie temperature which is ascribed to the orbital-dependent coulomb interactions of Gd-5dxy electrons, which tend to push-up the N-2p bands. On the other hand, we have evaluated the spin polarization of 0.17 (±0.005), which indicates that the GdN epitaxial film has almost 100% spin-polarized carriers. Furthermore, the experimental result of GdN electronic transitions are consistent with the previous reports and are thus well-reproduced. The Arrott plots evidenced that the Curie temperature of GdN film is 36 K and the large spin moment is explained by the nitrogen vacancies and the intra-atomic exchange interaction.

  20. Detecting forest structure and biomass with C-band multipolarization radar - Physical model and field tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Paris, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of C-band radar (4.75 GHz) to discriminate features of forest structure, including biomass, is tested using a truck-mounted scatterometer for field tests on a 1.5-3.0 m pygmy forest of cypress (Cupressus pygmaea) and pine (Pinus contorta ssp, Bolanderi) near Mendocino, CA. In all, 31 structural variables of the forest are quantified at seven sites. Also measured was the backscatter from a life-sized physical model of the pygmy forest, composed of nine wooden trees with 'leafy branches' of sponge-wrapped dowels. This model enabled independent testing of the effects of stem, branch, and leafy branch biomass, branch angle, and moisture content on radar backscatter. Field results suggested that surface area of leaves played a greater role in leaf scattering properties than leaf biomass per se. Tree leaf area index was strongly correlated with vertically polarized power backscatter (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01). Field results suggested that the scattering role of leaf water is enhanced as leaf surface area per unit leaf mass increases; i.e., as the moist scattering surfaces become more dispersed. Fog condensate caused a measurable rise in forest backscatter, both from surface and internal rises in water content. Tree branch mass per unit area was highly correlated with cross-polarized backscatter in the field (r = 0.93; P less than 0.01), a result also seen in the physical model.

  1. Advances in X-Band TW Accelerator Structures Operating in the 100 MV/M Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Higo, Toshiyasu; Higashi, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Shuji; Yokoyama, Kazue; Adolphsen, Chris; Dolgashev, Valery; Jensen, Aaron; Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Wang, Faya; Wang, Juwen; Dobert, Steffen; Grudiev, Alexej; Riddone, Germana; Wuensch, Walter; Zennaro, Riccardo; /CERN

    2012-07-05

    A CERN-SLAC-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band accelerator structure development for CLIC has been ongoing for three years. The major outcome has been the demonstration of stable 100 MV/m gradient operation of a number of CLIC prototype structures. These structures were fabricated using the technology developed from 1994 to 2004 for the GLC/NLC linear collider initiative. One of the goals has been to refine the essential parameters and fabrication procedures needed to realize such a high gradient routinely. Another goal has been to develop structures with stronger dipole mode damping than those for GLC/NLC. The latter requires that the surface temperature rise during the pulse be higher, which may increase the breakdown rate. One structure with heavy damping has been RF processed and another is nearly finished. The breakdown rates of these structures were found to be higher by two orders of magnitude compared to those with equivalent acceleration mode parameters but without the damping features. This paper presents these results together with some of the earlier results from non-damped structures.

  2. Superconducting proximity effect and Majorana flat bands at the surface of a Weyl semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Anffany; Franz, M.

    2016-05-01

    We study the proximity effect between an s -wave superconductor (SC) and the surface states of a Weyl semimetal. An interesting two-dimensional SC forms in such an interface with properties resembling in certain aspects the Fu-Kane superconductor with some notable differences. In a Weyl semimetal with unbroken time-reversal symmetry the interface SC supports completely flat Majorana bands in a linear Josephson junction with a π phase difference. We discuss the stability of these bands against disorder and propose ways in which they can be observed experimentally.

  3. Tunable Band Alignment with Unperturbed Carrier Mobility of On-Surface Synthesized Organic Semiconducting Wires.

    PubMed

    Basagni, Andrea; Vasseur, Guillaume; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Vilas-Varela, Manuel; Peña, Diego; Nicolas, Louis; Vitali, Lucia; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; de Oteyza, Dimas G; Sedona, Francesco; Casarin, Maurizio; Ortega, J Enrique; Sambi, Mauro

    2016-02-23

    The tunable properties of molecular materials place them among the favorites for a variety of future generation devices. In addition, to maintain the current trend of miniaturization of those devices, a departure from the present top-down production methods may soon be required and self-assembly appears among the most promising alternatives. On-surface synthesis unites the promises of molecular materials and of self-assembly, with the sturdiness of covalently bonded structures: an ideal scenario for future applications. Following this idea, we report the synthesis of functional extended nanowires by self-assembly. In particular, the products correspond to one-dimensional organic semiconductors. The uniaxial alignment provided by our substrate templates allows us to access with exquisite detail their electronic properties, including the full valence band dispersion, by combining local probes with spatial averaging techniques. We show how, by selectively doping the molecular precursors, the product's energy level alignment can be tuned without compromising the charge carrier's mobility. PMID:26841052

  4. Tunable Band Alignment with Unperturbed Carrier Mobility of On-Surface Synthesized Organic Semiconducting Wires

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The tunable properties of molecular materials place them among the favorites for a variety of future generation devices. In addition, to maintain the current trend of miniaturization of those devices, a departure from the present top-down production methods may soon be required and self-assembly appears among the most promising alternatives. On-surface synthesis unites the promises of molecular materials and of self-assembly, with the sturdiness of covalently bonded structures: an ideal scenario for future applications. Following this idea, we report the synthesis of functional extended nanowires by self-assembly. In particular, the products correspond to one-dimensional organic semiconductors. The uniaxial alignment provided by our substrate templates allows us to access with exquisite detail their electronic properties, including the full valence band dispersion, by combining local probes with spatial averaging techniques. We show how, by selectively doping the molecular precursors, the product’s energy level alignment can be tuned without compromising the charge carrier’s mobility. PMID:26841052

  5. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the electronic band structure of metal-organic frameworks of HKUST-1 type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhi-Gang; Heinke, Lars; Wöll, Christof; Neumann, Tobias; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Li, Qiang; Fink, Karin; Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2015-11-01

    The electronic properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are increasingly attracting the attention due to potential applications in sensor techniques and (micro-) electronic engineering, for instance, as low-k-dielectric in semiconductor technology. Here, the band gap and the band structure of MOFs of type HKUST-1 are studied in detail by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry applied to thin surface-mounted MOF films and by means of quantum chemical calculations. The analysis of the density of states, the band structure, and the excitation spectrum reveal the importance of the empty Cu-3d orbitals for the electronic properties of HKUST-1. This study shows that, in contrast to common belief, even in the case of this fairly "simple" MOF, the excitation spectra cannot be explained by a superposition of "intra-unit" excitations within the individual building blocks. Instead, "inter-unit" excitations also have to be considered.

  6. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the electronic band structure of metal-organic frameworks of HKUST-1 type

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Zhi-Gang; Heinke, Lars Wöll, Christof; Neumann, Tobias; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Li, Qiang; Fink, Karin; Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2015-11-02

    The electronic properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are increasingly attracting the attention due to potential applications in sensor techniques and (micro-) electronic engineering, for instance, as low-k-dielectric in semiconductor technology. Here, the band gap and the band structure of MOFs of type HKUST-1 are studied in detail by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry applied to thin surface-mounted MOF films and by means of quantum chemical calculations. The analysis of the density of states, the band structure, and the excitation spectrum reveal the importance of the empty Cu-3d orbitals for the electronic properties of HKUST-1. This study shows that, in contrast to common belief, even in the case of this fairly “simple” MOF, the excitation spectra cannot be explained by a superposition of “intra-unit” excitations within the individual building blocks. Instead, “inter-unit” excitations also have to be considered.

  7. Partitioning of Bacterial Communities between Seawater and Healthy, Black Band Diseased, and Dead Coral Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Bonheyo, George T.; Fouke, Bruce W.

    2002-01-01

    Distinct partitioning has been observed in the composition and diversity of bacterial communities inhabiting the surface and overlying seawater of three coral species infected with black band disease (BBD) on the southern Caribbean island of Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. PCR amplification and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes (rDNA) with universally conserved primers have identified over 524 unique bacterial sequences affiliated with 12 bacterial divisions. The molecular sequences exhibited less than 5% similarity in bacterial community composition between seawater and the healthy, black band diseased, and dead coral surfaces. The BBD bacterial mat rapidly migrates across and kills the coral tissue. Clone libraries constructed from the BBD mat were comprised of eight bacterial divisions and 13% unknowns. Several sequences representing bacteria previously found in other marine and terrestrial organisms (including humans) were isolated from the infected coral surfaces, including Clostridium spp., Arcobacter spp., Campylobacter spp., Cytophaga fermentans, Cytophaga columnaris, and Trichodesmium tenue. PMID:11976091

  8. High-Pressure Crystal Structure, Lattice Vibrations, and Band Structure of BiSbO4.

    PubMed

    Errandonea, Daniel; Muñoz, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Hernández, Placida; Gomis, Oscar; Achary, S Nagabhusan; Popescu, Catalin; Patwe, Sadeque J; Tyagi, Avesh K

    2016-05-16

    The high-pressure crystal structure, lattice-vibrations, and electronic band structure of BiSbO4 were studied by ab initio simulations. We also performed Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and diffuse-reflectance measurements, as well as synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. High-pressure X-ray diffraction measurements show that the crystal structure of BiSbO4 remains stable up to at least 70 GPa, unlike other known MTO4-type ternary oxides. These experiments also give information on the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameters. Calculations properly describe the crystal structure of BiSbO4 and the changes induced by pressure on it. They also predict a possible high-pressure phase. A room-temperature pressure-volume equation of state is determined, and the effect of pressure on the coordination polyhedron of Bi and Sb is discussed. Raman- and infrared-active phonons were measured and calculated. In particular, calculations provide assignments for all the vibrational modes as well as their pressure dependence. In addition, the band structure and electronic density of states under pressure were also calculated. The calculations combined with the optical measurements allow us to conclude that BiSbO4 is an indirect-gap semiconductor, with an electronic band gap of 2.9(1) eV. Finally, the isothermal compressibility tensor for BiSbO4 is given at 1.8 GPa. The experimental (theoretical) data revealed that the direction of maximum compressibility is in the (0 1 0) plane at ∼33° (38°) to the c-axis and 47° (42°) to the a-axis. The reliability of the reported results is supported by the consistency between experiments and calculations. PMID:27128858

  9. Doping mode, band structure and photocatalytic mechanism of B-N-codoped TiO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jixiang; Wang, Enjun; Chen, Yongmei; Yang, Wensheng; Yao, Jianghong; Cao, Yaan

    2011-06-01

    The photocatalyst B and N codoped TiO 2 (B-N-TiO 2) was prepared via the sol-gel method by using boric acid and ammonia as B and N precursors. The doping mode, band structure and photocatalytic mechanism of B-N-TiO 2 were investigated well and elucidated in detail. B-N-TiO 2 showed the narrowed band gap and thus extended the optical absorption due to interstitial N and [NOB] species in the TiO 2 crystal lattice. The coexistence of interstitial N and [NOB] species in the TiO 2 crystal lattice and surface NO x species allowed the more efficient utilization of visible light. Simultaneously, interstitial [NOB] and N species and surface B 2O 3 and NO x species facilitated the separation of photo generated electrons and holes and suppress their recombination effectively. Hence, B-N-TiO 2 showed a higher photocatalytic activity than pure TiO 2, N-doped TiO 2 (N-TiO 2) and B-doped TiO 2 (B-TiO 2) under both UV and visible light irradiation.

  10. Recent Results from Broad-Band Intensity Mapping Measurements of Cosmic Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemcov, Michael B.; CIBER, Herschel-SPIRE

    2016-01-01

    Intensity mapping integrates the total emission in a given spectral band over the universe's history. Tomographic measurements of cosmic structure can be performed using specific line tracers observed in narrow bands, but a wealth of information is also available from broad-band observations performed by instruments capable of capturing high-fidelity, wide-angle images of extragalactic emission. Sensitive to the continuum emission from faint and diffuse sources, these broad-band measurements provide a view on cosmic structure traced by components not readily detected in point source surveys. After accounting for measurement effects and astrophysical foregrounds, the angular power spectra of such data can be compared to predictions from models to yield powerful insights into the history of cosmic structure formation. This talk will highlight some recent measurements of large scale structure performed using broad-band intensity mapping methods that have given new insights on faint, distant, and diffuse components in the extragalactic background light.

  11. Fine structure of the amide i band in acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, G.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.

    1988-05-01

    Their absorption spectrum of both single crystals and powdered samples of acetanilide (a model system for proteins) has been studied in the amide i region, where a narrow band has been identified as a highly trapped soliton state. The powder-sample spectra have been decomposed using four Lorentzian bands. A strong temperature dependence has been found for the intensity of two of the subbands, which also show a complementary behavior. Polarization studies performed on thin crystals have shown that the subbands have the same polarization. Low-temperature spectra of partially deuterated samples show the presence of the subbands at the same absorption frequencies found using the fitting procedure in the spectra of nondeuterated samples. The soliton model currently proposed to explain the origin of the anomalous amide i component at 1650 cm-1 still holds, but some modification of the model is required to account for the new features revealed by this study.

  12. Band structure of germanium carbides for direct bandgap silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, C. A.; O'Brien, W. A.; Penninger, M. W.; Schneider, W. F.; Gillett-Kunnath, M.; Zajicek, J.; Yu, K. M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Stillwell, R. A.; Wistey, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Compact optical interconnects require efficient lasers and modulators compatible with silicon. Ab initio modeling of Ge1-xCx (x = 0.78%) using density functional theory with HSE06 hybrid functionals predicts a splitting of the conduction band at Γ and a strongly direct bandgap, consistent with band anticrossing. Photoreflectance of Ge0.998C0.002 shows a bandgap reduction supporting these results. Growth of Ge0.998C0.002 using tetrakis(germyl)methane as the C source shows no signs of C-C bonds, C clusters, or extended defects, suggesting highly substitutional incorporation of C. Optical gain and modulation are predicted to rival III-V materials due to a larger electron population in the direct valley, reduced intervalley scattering, suppressed Auger recombination, and increased overlap integral for a stronger fundamental optical transition.

  13. A Tri-Band Frequency Selective Surface (FSS) to Diplex Widely Separated Bands for Millimeter Wave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poojali, Jayaprakash; Ray, Shaumik; Pesala, Bala; Chitti, Krishnamurthy V.; Arunachalam, Kavitha

    2016-06-01

    A substrate-backed frequency selective surface (FSS) is presented for diplexing the widely separated frequency spectrum centered at 55, 89, and 183 GHz with varying bandwidth for spatial separation in the quasi-optical feed network of the millimeter wave sounder. A unit cell composed of a crossed dipole integrated with a circular ring and loaded inside a square ring is optimized for tri-band frequency response with transmission window at 89 GHz and rejection windows at 55 and 183 GHz. The reflection and transmission losses predicted for the optimized unit cell (728 μm × 728 μm) composed of dissimilar resonant shapes is less than 0.5 dB for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations and wide angle of incidence (0°-45°). The FSS is fabricated on a 175-μm-thick quartz substrate using microfabrication techniques. The transmission characteristics measured with continuous wave (CW) terahertz transmit receive system are in good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  14. Band structures in 98Ru and 99Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Voorthuysen, E. H. Du Marchie; Devoigt, M. J. A.; Blasi, N.; Jansen, J. F. W.

    1981-03-01

    The level schemes of 98, 99Ru were studied with the reactions 98Mo(α, 3nγ) and 98Mo(α, 4nγ) at Eα = 35 to 55 MeV, using a large variety of in-beam γ-ray detection techniques and conversion-electron measurements. A search for the 3 - state was carried out with the reaction 98Ru(p, p'). The ground-state band of 98Ru was excited up to Jπ = (12) + and a negative-parity band up to (15) -. New levels in 98Ru were found at Ex = 2285 ( Jπ = 4 +), 2435 ( Jπ = (3 -, 4 +)), 2671, 3540, 4224, 4847, 4915 ( Jπ = (12) +), 4989 ( Jπ = (12 +)), 5521 ( Jπ = (13) -), 5889, 6591 ( Jπ = (15) -), and 7621 keV. New unambiguous spin and parity assignments were made for the levels at Ex = 2014 and 3852 keV, as Jπ = 3 + and 9 -, respectively. New levels in 99Ru were found at Ex = 1976, 2021 ( J π = ( {15}/{2}+) ), 2393, 2401 ( J π = ( {17}/{2}+) ), 2875 (π = (+)), 3037, 3201 ( J π = ( {23}/{2}) -), 3460 ( J = ( {17}/{2}) ), 3484 ( J π = ( {21}/{2}+) ), 3985, 4224 ( J π = ( {27}/{2}-) ), and 5359 keV. The 1070 keV, J π = {11}/{2}- level in 99Ru has a half-life of 2.8 ns. A strongly excited negative-parity band is built on this level. A positive-parity band based on the ground state was excited up to J π = ( {21}/{2}+) . The level schemes are well reproduced by the interacting boson model in the vibrational limit.

  15. Ka-band backscattering from water surface at small incidence: A wind-wave tank study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisot, Olivier; Pioch, Sébastien; Fatras, Christophe; Caulliez, Guillemette; Bringer, Alexandra; Borderies, Pierre; Lalaurie, Jean-Claude; Guérin, Charles-Antoine

    2015-05-01

    We report on an experiment conducted at the large Pytheas wind-wave facility in Marseille to characterize the Ka-band radar return from water surfaces when observed at small incidence. Simultaneous measurements of capillary-gravity to gravity wave height and slopes and Normalized Radar Cross Section (NRCS) were carried out for various wind speeds and scattering angles. From this data set we construct an empirical two-dimensional wave number spectrum accounting for the surface current to describe water surface motions from decimeter to millimeter scales. Some consistency tests are proposed to validate the surface wave spectrum, which is then incorporated into simple analytical scattering models. The resulting directional NRCS is found in overall good agreement with the experimental values. Comparisons are performed with oceanic models as well as in situ measurements over different types of natural surfaces. The applicability of the present findings to oceanic as well as continental surfaces is discussed.

  16. Ultra-broad band and dual-band highly efficient polarization conversion based on the three-layered chiral structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kai-kai; Xiao, Zhong-yin; Tang, Jing-yao; Liu, De-jun; Wang, Zi-hua

    2016-07-01

    In the paper, a novel three-layered chiral structure is proposed and investigated, which consists of a split-ring resonator sandwiched between two layers of sub-wavelength gratings. This designed structure can achieve simultaneously asymmetric transmission with an extremely broad bandwidth and high amplitude as well as multi-band 90° polarization rotator with very low dispersion. Numerical simulations adopted two kinds of softwares with different algorithms demonstrate that asymmetric parameter can reach a maximum of 0.99 and over than 0.8 from 4.6 to 16.8 GHz, which exhibit magnitude and bandwidth improvement over previous chiral metamaterials in microwave bands (S, C, X and Ku bands). Specifically, the reason of high amplitude is analyzed in detail based on the Fabry-perot like resonance. Subsequently, the highly efficient polarization conversion with very low dispersion between two orthogonal linearly polarized waves is also analyzed by the optical activity and ellipticity. Finally, the electric fields are also investigated and further demonstrate the correctness of the simulated and calculated results.

  17. Surface-plasmon enhanced photodetection at communication band based on hot electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui; Wu, Shaolong; Deng, Jiajia; Li, Xiaofeng

    2015-08-01

    Surface plasmons can squeeze light into a deep-subwavelength space and generate abundant hot electrons in the nearby metallic regions, enabling a new paradigm of photoconversion by the way of hot electron collection. Unlike the visible spectral range concerned in previous literatures, we focus on the communication band and design the infrared hot-electron photodetectors with plasmonic metal-insulator-metal configuration by using full-wave finite-element method. Titanium dioxide-silver Schottky interface is employed to boost the low-energy infrared photodetection. The photodetection sensitivity is strongly improved by enhancing the plasmonic excitation from a rationally engineered metallic grating, which enables a strong unidirectional photocurrent. With a five-step electrical simulation, the optimized device exhibits an unbiased responsivity of ˜0.1 mA/W and an ultra-narrow response band (FWHM = 4.66 meV), which promises to be a candidate as the compact photodetector operating in communication band.

  18. Band structure of topological insulators from noise measurements in tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cascales, Juan Pedro Martínez, Isidoro; Aliev, Farkhad G.; Katmis, Ferhat; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Chang, Cui-Zu; Guerrero, Rubén

    2015-12-21

    The unique properties of spin-polarized surface or edge states in topological insulators (TIs) make these quantum coherent systems interesting from the point of view of both fundamental physics and their implementation in low power spintronic devices. Here we present such a study in TIs, through tunneling and noise spectroscopy utilizing TI/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Co tunnel junctions with bottom TI electrodes of either Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} or Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. We demonstrate that features related to the band structure of the TI materials show up in the tunneling conductance and even more clearly through low frequency noise measurements. The bias dependence of 1/f noise reveals peaks at specific energies corresponding to band structure features of the TI. TI tunnel junctions could thus simplify the study of the properties of such quantum coherent systems that can further lead to the manipulation of their spin-polarized properties for technological purposes.

  19. Electron momentum density, band structure, and structural properties of SrS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.; Munjal, N.; Vyas, V.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2013-10-15

    The electron momentum density, the electronic band structure, and the structural properties of SrS are presented in this paper. The isotropic Compton profile, anisotropies in the directional Compton profiles, the electronic band structure and density of states are calculated using the ab initio periodic linear combination of atomic orbitals method with the CRYSTAL06 code. Structural parameters of SrS-lattice constants and bulk moduli in the B1 and B2 phases-are computed together with the transition pressure. The computed parameters are well in agreement with earlier investigations. To compare the calculated isotropic Compton profile, measurement on polycrystalline SrS is performed using 5Ci-{sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Additionally, charge transfer is studied by means of the Compton profiles computed from the ionic model. The nature of bonding in the isovalent SrS and SrO compounds is compared on the basis of equal-valenceelectron-density profiles and the bonding in SrS is found to be more covalent than in SrO.

  20. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development, Phase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward; Isaacs, James; Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen. Steve

    2010-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." The proposed future C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface communication system, referred to as the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS), is anticipated to increase overall air-to-ground data communications systems capacity by using a new spectrum (i.e., not very high frequency (VHF)). Although some critical services could be supported, AeroMACS will also target noncritical services, such as weather advisory and aeronautical information services as part of an airborne System Wide Information Management (SWIM) program. AeroMACS is to be designed and implemented in a manner that will not disrupt other services operating in the C-band. This report defines the AeroMACS concepts of use, high-level system requirements, and architecture; the performance of supporting system analyses; the development of AeroMACS test and demonstration plans; and the establishment of an operational AeroMACS capability in support of C-band aeronautical data communications standards to be advanced in both international (International Civil Aviation Organization, ICAO) and national (RTCA) forums. This includes the development of system parameter profile recommendations for AeroMACS based on existing Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE) 802.16e- 2009 standards

  1. Characterization of the B/Si surface electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, R.; Yang, X.; Pianetta, P.

    1992-11-01

    High resolution angle resolved core level and valence band photoelectron spectroscopy have been used to characterize the electronic structures of the B/Si(111)-({radical}3 x {radical}3) surfaces. The results have been compared with theoretic calculations and other group III metals and Si terminated Si(111) surfaces that share the same type of surface reconstruction. We have observed a structure evolution from B-T{sub 4} to B-S{sub 5} and finally to Si- T{sub 4} as deposited boron atoms diffuse into the substrate with increasing annealing temperature. The chemically shifted component appearing in the Si 2p core level spectrum is attributed to charge transfer from the top layer Si and Si adatoms to the sublayer B-S{sub 5} atoms. For the Si/Si(111)-({radical}3 {times} {radical}3) surface, a newly discovered chemically shifted component is associated with back bond formation between the Si adatoms and the underneath Si atoms. A new emission feature has been observed in the valence band spectra unique to the B/Si(111)-({radical}3 {times} {radical}3) surface with B-S{sub 5} configuration. Thin Ge layer growth on this structure has also been performed, and we found that no epitaxial growth could be achieved and the underneath structure was little disturbed.

  2. Tunable band-notched coplanar waveguide based on localized spoof surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingzheng; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Liangliang; Xu, Jia; Chen, Chen; Ning, Pingping; Chen, Xinlei; Gu, Changqing

    2015-10-15

    This Letter proposes a simple band-notched coplanar waveguide (BNCPW), which consists of a coplanar waveguide (CPW) and an ultra-thin periodic corrugated metallic strip that supports spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) with defect units on the back of the substrate. By introducing a defect unit or multiple defect units into the strip, a narrow stopband or multiple narrow stopbands would be generated flexibly and conveniently. The band-notch function is based on the idea that a defect mode, which exists in the bandgap between the fundamental and the first higher mode of the SSPPs, can be introduced to form a stopband. Thus, the SSPPs field is localized around the defect units, which is another form of localized spoof surface plasmons (LSSPs). By properly tuning the dimensions of each defect unit, the absorption level and center frequency of the stopband could be adjusted independently. We offer theoretical analysis and experimental results to validate our idea and design. In this framework, a variety of band-notched devices and antennas in the microwave and terahertz (THz) frequencies can be easily designed without additional band-stop filters. PMID:26469594

  3. One-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structures formed by discharge plasmas in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipenko, V. I.; Simonchik, L. V. Usachonak, M. S.; Callegari, Th.; Sokoloff, J.

    2014-09-28

    We demonstrate the ability to develop one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure in X-band waveguide solely by using the positive columns of glow discharges in neon at the middle pressure. Plasma inhomogeneities are distributed uniformly along a typical X-band waveguide with cross section of 23×10 mm². It is shown that electron densities larger than 10¹⁴ cm ⁻³ are needed in order to create an effective one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure. Some applications for using the one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure in waveguide as a control of microwave (broadband filter and device for variation of pulse duration) are demonstrated.

  4. Reconstruction of crystal band structure from the power spectrum of strong-field generated high harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chang-Ming; Ho, Tak-San; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-05-01

    The study of high harmonic generation in solid driven by intense laser fields is a subject of much current interest. Recently we introduce a new optimization method to directly reconstruct the band structure of the crystal from the power spectrum of strong-field generated high harmonics. Without loss of generality, the reconstruction is formulated for a one-dimensional single band model as a minimization problem and solved by a derivative-free unconstrained optimization algorithm-NEWUOA. The method can be readily generalized to treat multi-band problems. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method, and the reconstructed band structure is found to be in excellent agreement with the exact one. It is also shown that our optimization method remains robust and efficient even starting from the poorly guessed band structure.

  5. Valence band structure of binary chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors by high-resolution XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyukhin, S.; Golovchak, R.; Kovalskiy, A.; Shpotyuk, O.; Jain, H.

    2011-04-15

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study regularities in the formation of valence band electronic structure in binary As{sub x}Se{sub 100-x}, As{sub x}S{sub 100-x}, Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} and Ge{sub x}S{sub 100-x} chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors. It is shown that the highest occupied energetic states in the valence band of these materials are formed by lone pair electrons of chalcogen atoms, which play dominant role in the formation of valence band electronic structure of chalcogen-rich glasses. A well-expressed contribution from chalcogen bonding p electrons and more deep s orbitals are also recorded in the experimental valence band XPS spectra. Compositional dependences of the observed bands are qualitatively analyzed from structural and compositional points of view.

  6. Lunar near-surface structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, M. R.; Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Seismic refraction data obtained at the Apollo 14, 16, and 17 landing sites permit a compressional wave velocity profile of the lunar near surface to be derived. Beneath the regolith at the Apollo 14 Fra Mauro site and the Apollo 16 Descartes site is material with a seismic velocity of about 300 m/sec, believed to be brecciated material or impact-derived debris. Considerable detail is known about the velocity structure at the Apollo 17 Taurus-Littrow site. Seismic velocities of 100, 327, 495, 960, and 4700 m/sec are observed. The depth to the top of the 4700-m/sec material is 1385 m, compatible with gravity estimates for the thickness of mare basaltic flows, which fill the Taurus-Littrow valley. The observed magnitude of the velocity change with depth and the implied steep velocity-depth gradient of more than 2 km/sec/km are much larger than have been observed on compaction experiments on granular materials and preclude simple cold compaction of a fine-grained rock powder to thicknesses of the order of kilometers.

  7. Nonlinear excitations in the honeycomb lattice: Beyond the high-symmetry points of the band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, Edward; Morales-Molina, Luis

    2016-05-01

    The interplay between nonlinearity and the band structure of pristine honeycomb lattices is systematically explored. For that purpose, a theory of collective excitations valid for the first Brillouin zone of the lattice is developed. Closed-form expressions of two-dimensional excitations are derived for Bloch wave numbers beyond the high-symmetry points of the band structure. A description of the regions of validity of different nonlinear excitations in the first-Brillouin zone is given. We find that the unbounded nature of these excitations in nonlinear honeycomb latices is a signature of the strong influence of the Dirac cones in other parts of the band structure.

  8. Band structure of Bi/sub 2/Sr/sub 2/CaCu/sub 2/O/sub 8/ studied by angle-resolved photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, T.; Matsuyama, H.; Katayama-Yoshida, H.; Okabe, Y.; Hosoya, S.; Seki, K.; Fujimoto, H.; Sato, M.; Inokuchi, H.

    1989-04-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission measurement with synchrotron radiation has been performed on single-crystal Bi/sub 2/Sr/sub 2/CaCu/sub 2/O/sub 8/. Two dispersive bands intersecting the Fermi level midway between the GAMMA point and the Brillouin-zone boundary were observed. The other bands with higher binding energy are almost dispersionless in contrast with the band-structure calculation. The present experimental result indicates the existence of a Fermi surface and Fermi-liquid states in the high-T/sub c/ superconductor as well as band renormalization due to the strong electron correlation.

  9. Optically decomposed near-band-edge structure and excitonic transitions in Ga2S3

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ching-Hwa; Chen, Hsin-Hung

    2014-01-01

    The band-edge structure and band gap are key parameters for a functional chalcogenide semiconductor to its applications in optoelectronics, nanoelectronics, and photonics devices. Here, we firstly demonstrate the complete study of experimental band-edge structure and excitonic transitions of monoclinic digallium trisulfide (Ga2S3) using photoluminescence (PL), thermoreflectance (TR), and optical absorption measurements at low and room temperatures. According to the experimental results of optical measurements, three band-edge transitions of EA = 3.052 eV, EB = 3.240 eV, and EC = 3.328 eV are respectively determined and they are proven to construct the main band-edge structure of Ga2S3. Distinctly optical-anisotropic behaviors by orientation- and polarization-dependent TR measurements are, respectively, relevant to distinguish the origins of the EA, EB, and EC transitions. The results indicated that the three band-edge transitions are coming from different origins. Low-temperature PL results show defect emissions, bound-exciton and free-exciton luminescences in the radiation spectra of Ga2S3. The below-band-edge transitions are respectively characterized. On the basis of experimental analyses, the optical property of near-band-edge structure and excitonic transitions in the monoclinic Ga2S3 crystal is revealed. PMID:25142550

  10. Europium underneath graphene on Ir(111): Intercalation mechanism, magnetism, and band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Stefan; Huttmann, Felix; Petrović, Marin; Witt, Christian; Förster, Daniel F.; Vo-Van, Chi; Coraux, Johann; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Sessi, Violetta; Vergara, Ignacio; Rückamp, Reinhard; Grüninger, Markus; Schleheck, Nicolas; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Frank; Ohresser, Philippe; Kralj, Marko; Wehling, Tim O.; Michely, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The intercalation of Eu underneath Gr on Ir(111) is comprehensively investigated by microscopic, magnetic, and spectroscopic measurements, as well as by density functional theory. Depending on the coverage, the intercalated Eu atoms form either a (2 ×2 ) or a (√{3 }×√{3 }) R 30∘ superstructure with respect to Gr. We investigate the mechanisms of Eu penetration through a nominally closed Gr sheet and measure the electronic structures and magnetic properties of the two intercalation systems. Their electronic structures are rather similar. Compared to Gr on Ir(111), the Gr bands in both systems are essentially rigidly shifted to larger binding energies resulting in n doping. The hybridization of the Ir surface state S1 with Gr states is lifted, and the moiré superperiodic potential is strongly reduced. In contrast, the magnetic behavior of the two intercalation systems differs substantially, as found by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The (2 ×2 ) Eu structure displays plain paramagnetic behavior, whereas for the (√{3 }×√{3 }) R 30∘ structure the large zero-field susceptibility indicates ferromagnetic coupling, despite the absence of hysteresis at 10 K. For the latter structure, a considerable easy-plane magnetic anisotropy is observed and interpreted as shape anisotropy.

  11. Band Structure and Effective Mass in Monolayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ting; Fan, Jun-Wei; Chen, Kuan-Ting; Chang, Shu-Tong; Lin, Chung-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenide is a very promising two-dimensional material for future transistor technology. Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), owing to the unique electronic properties of its atomically thin two-dimensional layered structure, can be made into a high-performance metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor, or MOSFET. In this work, we focus on band structure and carrier mobility calculations for MoS2. We use the tight-binding method to calculate the band structure, including a consideration of the linear combination of different atomic orbitals, the interaction of neighboring atoms, and spin-orbit coupling for different tight-binding matrices. With information about the band structure, we can obtain the density of states, the effective mass, and other physical quantities. Carrier mobility using the Kubo-Greenwood formula is calculated based on the tight-binding band structure. PMID:26726660

  12. Bistatic scattering from a contaminated sea surface observed in C, X, and Ku bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, H.; Khenchaf, A.; Comblet, F.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the work presented in this paper focuses on the study and analysis of variations of the bistatic electromagnetic signature of the sea surface contaminated by pollutants. Therefore, we will start the numerical analyses of the pollutant effect on the geometrical and physical characteristics of sea surface. Then, we will evaluate the electromagnetic (EM) scattering coefficients of the clean and polluted sea surface observed in bistatic configuration by using the numerical Forward-Backward Method (FBM). The obtained numerical results of the electromagnetic scattering coefficients are studied and given as a function of various parameters: sea state, wind velocity, type of pollutant (sea surface polluted by oil emulsion, and sea surface covered by oil layer), incidence and scattering angles, frequencies bands (C, X and Ku) and radar polarization.

  13. Effect of Surface Defect States on Valence Band and Charge Separation and Transfer Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Teng, Yiran; Teng, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Both energy band and charge separation and transfer are the crucial affecting factor for a photochemical reaction. Herein, the BiOCl nanosheets without and with surface bismuth vacancy (BOC, V-BOC) are prepared by a simple hydrothermal method. It is found that the new surface defect states caused by bismuth vacancy have greatly up-shifted the valence band and efficiently enhanced the separation and transfer rates of photogenerated electron and hole. It is amazing that the photocatalytic activity of V-BOC is 13.6 times higher than that of BOC for the degradation methyl orange (MO). We can develop an efficient photocatalyst by the introduction of defects. PMID:27586149

  14. Different spin textures in one-dimensional electronic bands on Si(5 5 3)-Au surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawiec, M.; Kopciuszyński, M.; Zdyb, R.

    2016-06-01

    A doublet of one-dimensional metallic bands on Au-stabilized Si(5 5 3) surface features different splitting due to the spin-orbit interaction. Density functional theory calculations reveal the origin of unequal magnitude of the splitting. Furthermore, different orientations of spin polarizations, almost perpendicular to each other, in both spin-orbit split bands are discovered. These observations are consistent with the Rashba effect and induced electric field in the system with out-of-plane and in-plane components. The results of calculations are confirmed by spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The Si(5 5 3)-Au surface appears as a unique 1D Rashba system.

  15. Effect of Surface Defect States on Valence Band and Charge Separation and Transfer Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Juan; Teng, Yiran; Teng, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Both energy band and charge separation and transfer are the crucial affecting factor for a photochemical reaction. Herein, the BiOCl nanosheets without and with surface bismuth vacancy (BOC, V-BOC) are prepared by a simple hydrothermal method. It is found that the new surface defect states caused by bismuth vacancy have greatly up-shifted the valence band and efficiently enhanced the separation and transfer rates of photogenerated electron and hole. It is amazing that the photocatalytic activity of V-BOC is 13.6 times higher than that of BOC for the degradation methyl orange (MO). We can develop an efficient photocatalyst by the introduction of defects. PMID:27586149

  16. Features of the band structure for semiconducting iron, ruthenium, and osmium monosilicides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaposhnikov, V. L. Migas, D. B.; Borisenko, V. E.; Dorozhkin, N. N.

    2009-02-15

    The pseudopotential method has been used to optimize the crystal lattice and calculate the energy band spectra for iron, ruthenium and, osmium monosilicides. It is found that all these compounds are indirect-gap semiconductors with band gaps of 0.17, 0.22, and 0.50 eV (FeSi, RuSi, and OsSi, respectively). A distinctive feature of their band structure is the 'loop of extrema' both in the valence and conduction bands near the center of the cubic Brillouin zone.

  17. Electronic band structure effects in monolayer, bilayer, and hybrid graphene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Conor

    Since its discovery in 2005, graphene has been the focus of intense theoretical and experimental study owing to its unique two-dimensional band structure and related electronic properties. In this thesis, we explore the electronic properties of graphene structures from several perspectives including the magnetoelectrical transport properties of monolayer graphene, gap engineering and measurements in bilayer graphene, and anomalous quantum oscillation in the monolayer-bilayer graphene hybrids. We also explored the device implications of our findings, and the application of some experimental techniques developed for the graphene work to the study of a complex oxide, Ca3Ru2O7, exhibiting properties of strongly correlated electrons. Graphene's high mobility and ballistic transport over device length scales, make it suitable for numerous applications. However, two big challenges remain in the way: maintaining high mobility in fabricated devices, and engineering a band gap to make graphene compatible with logical electronics and various optical devices. We address the first challenge by experimentally evaluating mobilities in scalable monolayer graphene-based field effect transistors (FETs) and dielectric-covered Hall bars. We find that the mobility is limited in these devices, and is roughly inversely proportional to doping. By considering interaction of graphene's Dirac fermions with local charged impurities at the interface between graphene and the top-gate dielectric, we find that Coulomb scattering is responsible for degraded mobility. Even in the cleanest devices, a band gap is still desirable for electronic applications of graphene. We address this challenge by probing the band structure of bilayer graphene, in which a field-tunable energy band gap has been theoretically proposed. We use planar tunneling spectroscopy of exfoliated bilayer graphene flakes demonstrate both measurement and control of the energy band gap. We find that both the Fermi level and

  18. Surface transport of nutrients from surface broadcast and subsurface-banded broiler litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler chicken litter is commonly used as a fertilizer on pastures and cropland in major broiler-producing states. However, phosphorus (P) loss from fields fertilized with broiler litter contributes to eutrophication and growth of toxic algae in surface waters. Recently, to reduce surface transpo...

  19. Sea surface Ka-band radar cross-section from field observations in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Yury; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Grodsky, Semyon; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    An interest in Ka-band radar backscattering from the ocean surface is growing due to better spatial resolution and more accurate Doppler anomaly estimate. But, available empirical models of Ka-band cross-section are quite scarce and sometime controversial. Here we present multi-year (2009-2015) field measurements of Ka-band co-polarized (VV and HH) sea surface normalized radar cross-section (NRCS) from research platform in the Black sea collected in a wide range of observation and sea state conditions. The data are fitted by polynomial function of incidence angle, azimuth and wind speed with accounting for measured radar antenna pattern. This empirical NRCS is compared with published Ka- and Ku-band data. Our Ka-band NRCS is close to Ku-band, but is 5-7 dB higher than 'pioneer' measurements by Masuko et al. (1986). Following the two-scale Bragg paradigm, the NRCS is split into polarized (Bragg) and non-polarized components and analyzed in terms of polarization ratio (VV/HH) and polarization difference (VV-HH) to estimate wave spectra at the Bragg wave number. Non-polarized component dominates at low incidence angles <30° due to specular reflection from regular surface. At larger incidence angles, the relative non-polarized contribution decreases, but grows again at HH-polarization approaching 0.7-0.8 at 65° for 10 m/s wind speed, suggesting that backscattering from breaking waves dominates HH NRCS at low grazing angles. At high incidence angles (>60°) NRCS azimuth dependency is unimodal (upwind peak) for HH and bimodal (with up- and downwind peaks) for VV polarization. This again can be attributed to different backscattering mechanisms for VV and HH polarizations. With decreasing of incidence angle, up- to downwind ratio tends to 1, and under light wind conditions (4-6 m/s) can be less than 1. The same situation is observed for polarization difference, which reflects Bragg backscattering properties only. This effect can be explained by enhanced roughness on

  20. The electronic band structure of GaBiAs/GaAs layers: Influence of strain and band anti-crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batool, Z.; Hild, K.; Hosea, T. J. C.; Lu, X.; Tiedje, T.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2012-06-01

    The GaBixAs1-x bismide III-V semiconductor system remains a relatively underexplored alloy particularly with regards to its detailed electronic band structure. Of particular importance to understanding the physics of this system is how the bandgap energy Eg and spin-orbit splitting energy Δo vary relative to one another as a function of Bi content, since in this alloy it becomes possible for Δo to exceed Eg for higher Bi fractions, which occurrence would have important implications for minimising non-radiative Auger recombination losses in such structures. However, this situation had not so far been realised in this system. Here, we study a set of epitaxial layers of GaBixAs1-x (2.3% ≤ x ≤ 10.4%), of thickness 30-40 nm, grown compressively strained onto GaAs (100) substrates. Using room temperature photomodulated reflectance, we observe a reduction in Eg, together with an increase in Δo, with increasing Bi content. In these strained samples, it is found that the transition energy between the conduction and heavy-hole valence band edges is equal with that between the heavy-hole and spin-orbit split-off valence band edges at ˜9.0 ± 0.2% Bi. Furthermore, we observe that the strained valence band heavy-hole/light-hole splitting increases with Bi fraction at a rate of ˜15 (±1) meV/Bi%, from which we are able to deduce the shear deformation potential. By application of an iterative strain theory, we decouple the strain effects from our experimental measurements and deduce Eg and Δo of free standing GaBiAs; we find that Δo indeed does come into resonance with Eg at ˜10.5 ± 0.2% Bi. We also conclude that the conduction/valence band alignment of dilute-Bi GaBiAs on GaAs is most likely to be type-I.

  1. S-band accelerating structures for the PAL-XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heung-Soo; Park, Young Jung; Joo, Young-Do; Heo, Hoon; Heo, Jinyul; Kim, Sang-Hee; Park, Soung-Soo; Hwang, Woon Ha; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kim, Kwang-woo; Ko, In-Soo; Oh, Kyoung-Min; Noh, Sung-Joo; Bak, Yong Hwan; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    One hundred seventy-two accelerating structures are required for the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray free-electron laser's (PAL-XFEL's) 10-GeV main linear accelerator. So far, we have purchased 80 structures from Mitsubishi Heavy Industry (MHI), which have quasi-symmetric couplers in the accelerating structure to reduce the quadruple and the sextuple components of the electric field in the coupling cavity. High-power tests have been conducted for the first structure of the MHI structure, and Research Instruments (RI) has developed a 3-m long accelerating structure that has an operating frequency of 2856 MHz and in/out couplers of quasi-symmetric racetrack shape for the PAL-XFEL linear accelerator. This structure also has been tested by PAL and RI in the Pohang accelerator laboratory (PAL) to check the maximum available electric field gradient. We will describe the test results of these structures and the current status for the fabrication of the other accelerating structures in this paper.

  2. Band alignment of vanadium oxide as an interlayer in a hafnium oxide-silicon gate stack structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chiyu; Kaur, Manpuneet; Tang, Fu; Liu, Xin; Smith, David J.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2012-10-01

    Vanadium oxide (VO2) is a narrow band gap material (Eg = 0.7 eV) with a thermally induced insulator-metal phase transition at ˜343 K and evidence of an electric field induced transition at T < 343 K. To explore the electronic properties of VO2, a sandwich structure was prepared with a 2 nm VO2 layer embedded between an oxidized Si(100) surface and a 2 nm hafnium oxide (HfO2) layer. The layer structure was confirmed with high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The electronic properties were characterized with x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, and the band alignment was deduced on both n-type and p-type Si substrates. The valence band offset between VO2 and SiO2 is measured to be 4.0 eV. The valence band offset between HfO2 and VO2 is measured to be ˜3.4 eV. The band relation developed from these results demonstrates the potential for charge storage and switching for the embedded VO2 layer.

  3. Band structure engineering through orbital interaction for enhanced thermoelectric power factor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hong; Sun, Wenhao; Ceder, Gerbrand; Armiento, Rickard; Lazic, Predrag

    2014-02-24

    Band structure engineering for specific electronic or optical properties is essential for the further development of many important technologies including thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, and microelectronics. In this work, we report orbital interaction as a powerful tool to finetune the band structure and the transport properties of charge carriers in bulk crystalline semiconductors. The proposed mechanism of orbital interaction on band structure is demonstrated for IV-VI thermoelectric semiconductors. For IV-VI materials, we find that the convergence of multiple carrier pockets not only displays a strong correlation with the s-p and spin-orbit coupling but also coincides with the enhancement of power factor. Our results suggest a useful path to engineer the band structure and an enticing solid-solution design principle to enhance thermoelectric performance.

  4. Sea Surface Wind Field by X-Band TerraSAR-X and Tandem-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Susanne; Li, Xiaoming; Ren, Yongzheng; He, Mingxia

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we present the newly developed Geophysical Model Function (GMF), denoted XMOD2, to retrieve the sea surface wind field from X-band TerraSAR-X/Tandem-X (TS-X/TD-X) data. In contrary to the previous XMOD1, XMOD2 is based on a nonlinear GMF, and moreover it also depicts the difference between upwind and downwind of the sea surface backscatter. By exploiting 371 collocations, the retrieved TS-X/TD-X sea surface wind speed by XMOD2 agrees well with in situ buoy measurements with a bias of 0.39 m/s, an RMSE of 1.52 m/s and a scatter index (SI) of 16.1%. To evaluate the sea surface wind field retrieved from X-band SAR, we conducted a joint campaign in the South China Sea in August, 2011. Examples of sea surface wind field retrieved from the TS-X/TD-X data acquired in the campaign are shown for demonstration.

  5. Valence Band Structure of Highly Efficient p-type Thermoelectric PbTe-PbS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworski, C. M.; Nielsen, Mechele; Wang, Hsin; Girard, Steven N.; Cai, Wei; Porter, Wallace D; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Heremans, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    New experimental evidence is given relevant to the temperature-dependence of valence band structure of PbTe and PbTe1-xSx alloys (0.04 x 0.12), and its effect on the thermoelectric figure of merit zT. The x = 0.08 sample has zT ~ 1.55 at 773K. The magnetic field dependence of the high-temperature Hall resistivity of heavily p-type (> 1019 cm-3) Na-doped PbTe1-xSx reveals the presence of high-mobility electrons. This put in question prior analyses of the Hall coefficient and the conclusion that PbTe would be an indirect gap semiconductor at temperatures where its zT is optimal. Possible origins for these electrons are discussed: they can be induced by photoconductivity, or by the topology of the Fermi surface when the L and -bands merge. Negative values for the low-temperature thermopower are also observed. Our data show that PbTe continues to be a direct gap semiconductor at temperatures where the zT and S2 of p-type PbTe are optimal e.g. 700-900K. The previously suggested temperature induced rapid rise in energy of the heavy hole LVB relative to the light hole UVB is not supported by the experimental data.

  6. Formation of Metal-Semiconductor Interfaces on Mbe-Grown Gallium ARSENIDE(100): Surface Photovoltage, Chemistry and Band Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Duli

    1992-01-01

    The chemical, structural and electronic properties of the metal-GaAs interfaces formed on the polar (100) surface are studied using high resolution core level photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The clean (4 x 2)-c(8 x 2) reconstructed GaAs(100) surface, prepared by molecular beam epitaxy and subsequent thermal decapping of an As protective layer, is characterized carefully. Ga 3d and As 3d core levels are analyzed using test square curve fitting. Two Ga surface components are resolved while only one surface component is necessary for As. The assignment of these surface components to different surface atomic arrangements is discussed. The surface Fermi level position with respect to the valence band maximum is also investigated as a function of decapping temperature. Metal (In, Ga, Au)/GaAs(100) interfaces, formed at both room (RT) and low temperature (LT), are studied. The morphology of these interfaces resembles that of metal/GaAs(110) interfaces formed at LT, in that the deposited metal atoms reside at the surface as isolated adatoms rather than as clusters at submonolayer coverage. Metal clustering is only important at coverages higher than a few monolayers and is more prominent at RT than at LT. The GaAs(100) band bending is studied as a function of metal coverage and deposition temperature. At submonolayer metal coverages, In and Ga both cause reduced band bending (~ 0.2eV) on n-type GaAs, a phenomenon similar to the Fermi level overshoot observed at LT-formed metal/p-GaAs(110) interfaces and indicative of formation of adatom-induced donor levels in the upper part of the band gap. With Au, In and Ga, the Fermi level is pinned at 0.4eV, 0.6eV and 0.68eV above the valence band maximum respectively, in good agreement with the results obtained at metal/GaAs(110) interfaces. This contradicts recent claims of near-Schottky limit for these interfaces. Evidence of correlation between pinning and overlayer metallization is

  7. Band structure and thermopower of doped YCuO2

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, David J

    2008-01-01

    First-principles calculations and Boltzmann transport theory are used to analyze the thermopower and related properties of p-type delafossite structure YCuO{sub 2}. We find that the electrical transport properties are only mildly anisotropic in spite of the layered crystal structure and that this compound has high thermopowers indicative of a material that may be a good thermoelectric.

  8. Band edge emission enhancement by quadrupole surface plasmon-exciton coupling using direct-contact Ag/ZnO nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yashu; He, Xu; Li, Jing; Yin, Jun; Li, Kongyi; Yue, Chuang; Wu, Zhiming; Wu, Suntao; Kang, Junyong

    2013-01-21

    Periodic Ag nanoball (NB) arrays on ZnO hollow nanosphere (HNS) supporting structures were fabricated in a large area by a laser irradiation method. The optimized laser power and spherical supporting structure of ZnO with a certain size and separation were employed to aggregate a sputtering-deposited Ag nano-film into an ordered, large-area, and two dimensional Ag NB array. A significant band edge (BE) emission enhancement of ZnO HNSs was achieved on this Ag NB/ZnO HNS hybrid structure and the mechanism was revealed by further experimental and theoretical analyses. With successfully fabricating the direct-contact structure of a Ag NB on the top of each ZnO HNS, the highly localized quadrupole mode surface plasmon resonance (SPR), realized on the metal NBs in the ultraviolet region, can effectively improve the BE emission of ZnO through strong coupling with the excitons of ZnO. Compared with the dipole mode SPR, the quadrupole mode SPR is insensitive to the metal nanoparticle's size and has a resonance frequency in the BE region of the wide band gap materials, hence, it can be potentially applied in related optoelectronic devices. PMID:23196786

  9. Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.-W.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.H.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F.; Sonenshein, R.

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric processing of JERS-1 L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired over south Florida during 1993-1996 reveals detectable surface changes in the Everglades wetlands. Although our study is limited to south Florida it has implication for other large-scale wetlands, because south Florida wetlands have diverse vegetation types and both managed and natural flow environments. Our analysis reveals that interferometric coherence level is sensitive to wetland vegetation type and to the interferogram time span. Interferograms with time spans less than six months maintain phase observations for all wetland types, allowing characterization of water level changes in different wetland environments. The most noticeable changes occur between the managed and the natural flow wetlands. In the managed wetlands, fringes are organized, follow patterns related to some of the managed water control structures and have high fringe-rate. In the natural flow areas, fringes are irregular and have a low fringe-rate. The high fringe rate in managed areas reflects dynamic water topography caused by high flow rate due to gate operation. Although this organized fringe pattern is not characteristic of most large-scale wetlands, the high level of water level change enables accurate estimation of the wetland InSAR technique, which lies in the range of 5-10??cm. The irregular and low rate fringe pattern in the natural flow area reflects uninterrupted flow that diffuses water efficiently and evenly. Most of the interferograms in the natural flow area show an elongated fringe located along the transitional zone between salt- and fresh-water wetlands, reflecting water level changes due to ocean tides. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Theoretical Analysis on the Band Structure Variance of the Electron Doped 1111 Iron-based Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Usui, H.; Iimura, S.; Sato, Y.; Matsuishi, S.; Hosono, H.; Kuroki, K.

    We perform first principles band calculation of electron doped iron-based superconductors adopting the virtual crystal approximation. We find that when electrons are doped by element substitution in the blocking layer, the band structure near the Fermi level is affected due to the increase of the positive charge in the layer. On the other hand, when Fe in the conducting layer is substituted by Co, the band structure is barely affected. This difference should be a key factor in understanding the phase diagram of the heavily doped electron doped systems LnFeAsO1-xHx.

  11. Impact of surface roughness on L-band emissivity of the sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernecki, M.; Kaleschke, L.; Hendricks, S.; Søbjærg, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    In March 2014 a joint experiment IRO2/SMOSice was carried out in the Barents Sea. R/V Lance equipped with meteorological instruments, electromagnetic sea ice thickness probe and engine monitoring instruments, was performing a series of tests in different ice conditions in order to validate the ice route optimization (IRO) system, advising on his route through pack ice. In parallel cal/val activities for sea ice thickness product obtained from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission) L-band radiometer were carried out. Apart from helicopter towing the EMbird thickness probe, Polar 5 aircraft was serving the area during the experiment with L-band radiometer EMIRAD2 and Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) as primary instruments. Sea ice Thickness algorithm using SMOS brightness temperature developed at University of Hamburg, provides daily maps of thin sea ice (up to 0.5-1 m) in polar regions with resolution of 35-50 km. So far the retrieval method was not taking into account surface roughness, assuming that sea ice is a specular surface. Roughness is a stochastic process that can be characterized by standard deviation of surface height σ and by shape of the autocorrelation function R to estimate it's vertical and horizontal scales respectively. Interactions of electromagnetic radiation with the surface of the medium are dependent on R and σ and they scales with respect to the incident wavelength. During SMOSice the radiometer was observing sea ice surface at two incidence angles 0 and 40 degrees and simultaneously the surface elevation was scanned with ALS with ground resolution of ~ 0.25 m. This configuration allowed us to calculate σ and R from power spectral densities of surface elevation profiles and quantify the effect of surface roughness on the emissivity of the sea ice. First results indicate that Gaussian autocorrelation function is suitable for deformed ice, for other ice types exponential function is the best fit.

  12. Surface electronic structure of polar NiO thin film grown on Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayanta; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.

    2015-06-01

    The growth and structure of NiO thin films on top of Ag(111) substrate were studied where the formation of faceted surface was confirmed by Low Energy Electron Diffraction. The electronic structure of polar NiO(111) surface has been probed using photoemission techniques. The core energy levels and the valence band electronic structure were excited by x-ray and ultraviolet photons respectively. The modifications in physical structure and valence band electronic structure of the film under vacuum annealing have also been enlightened.

  13. Surface electronic structure of polar NiO thin film grown on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayanta; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.

    2015-06-24

    The growth and structure of NiO thin films on top of Ag(111) substrate were studied where the formation of faceted surface was confirmed by Low Energy Electron Diffraction. The electronic structure of polar NiO(111) surface has been probed using photoemission techniques. The core energy levels and the valence band electronic structure were excited by x-ray and ultraviolet photons respectively. The modifications in physical structure and valence band electronic structure of the film under vacuum annealing have also been enlightened.

  14. Brain Surface Conformal Parameterization Using Riemann Surface Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yalin; Lui, Lok Ming; Gu, Xianfeng; Hayashi, Kiralee M.; Chan, Tony F.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2011-01-01

    In medical imaging, parameterized 3-D surface models are useful for anatomical modeling and visualization, statistical comparisons of anatomy, and surface-based registration and signal processing. Here we introduce a parameterization method based on Riemann surface structure, which uses a special curvilinear net structure (conformal net) to partition the surface into a set of patches that can each be conformally mapped to a parallelogram. The resulting surface subdivision and the parameterizations of the components are intrinsic and stable (their solutions tend to be smooth functions and the boundary conditions of the Dirichlet problem can be enforced). Conformal parameterization also helps transform partial differential equations (PDEs) that may be defined on 3-D brain surface manifolds to modified PDEs on a two-dimensional parameter domain. Since the Jacobian matrix of a conformal parameterization is diagonal, the modified PDE on the parameter domain is readily solved. To illustrate our techniques, we computed parameterizations for several types of anatomical surfaces in 3-D magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampi, and lateral ventricles. For surfaces that are topologically homeomorphic to each other and have similar geometrical structures, we show that the parameterization results are consistent and the subdivided surfaces can be matched to each other. Finally, we present an automatic sulcal landmark location algorithm by solving PDEs on cortical surfaces. The landmark detection results are used as constraints for building conformal maps between surfaces that also match explicitly defined landmarks. PMID:17679336

  15. Spatially resolved methane band photometry of Jupiter. III - Cloud vertical structures for several axisymmetric bands and the Great Red Spot

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.A.; Tomasko, M.G.

    1980-02-01

    The paper presents cloud structure models for Jupiter's Great Red Spot, Equatorial and North Tropical Zones, North and South Temperate Zones, and North and South Polar Regions. The models are based on images of Jupiter in three methane bands and nearby continuum radiative transfer calculations include multiple scattering and absorption from three aerosol layers. The model results include the transition in the upper-cloud altitude to 3 km lower altitude from the tropical zones to temperate zones and polar regions, a N/S asymmetry in cloud thickness in the tropical and temperature zones, and the presence of aerosols up to about 0.3 bar in the Great Red Spot and Equatorial Zone. It is concluded that polarization data are sensitive to aerosols in and above the upper cloud layer but insensitive to deeper cloud structure.

  16. Spatially resolved methane band photometry of Jupiter. III - Cloud vertical structures for several axisymmetric bands and the Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. A.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents cloud structure models for Jupiter's Great Red Spot, Equatorial and North Tropical Zones, North and South Temperate Zones, and North and South Polar Regions. The models are based on images of Jupiter in three methane bands and nearby continuum; radiative transfer calculations include multiple scattering and absorption from three aerosol layers. The model results include the transition in the upper-cloud altitude to 3 km lower altitude from the tropical zones to temperate zones and polar regions, a N/S asymmetry in cloud thickness in the tropical and temperature zones, and the presence of aerosols up to about 0.3 bar in the Great Red Spot and Equatorial Zone. It is concluded that polarization data are sensitive to aerosols in and above the upper cloud layer but insensitive to deeper cloud structure.

  17. Functional topography of band 3: specific structural alteration linked to function aberrations in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.M.B.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Lawrence, C.

    1988-01-01

    Band 3 is the major anion transport polypeptide of erythrocytes. It appears to be the binding site of several glycolytic enzymes. Structurally, band 3 is the major protein spanning the erythrocyte membrane and connects the plasma membrane to band 2.1, which binds to the cytoskeleton. In the present study, the authors report an alteration of band 3 molecule that is associated with the following changes: erythrocyte shape change from discoid to thorny cells (acanthocytes), restriction of rotational diffusion of band 3 in the membrane, increase in anion transport, and decrease in the number of high-affinity ankyrin-binding sites. Changes in erythrocyte IgG binding, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fluorescence polarization (indicative of membrane fluidity), and other membrane proteins as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were not detected. Cells containing the altered band 3 polypeptide were obtained from individuals with abnormal erythrocyte morphology. Two-dimensional peptide maps revealed differences in the M/sub r/ 17,000 anion transport segment of band 3 consistent with additions of tyrosines or tyrosine-containing peptides. The data suggest that (i) this alteration of band 3 does not result in accelerated aging as does cleavage and (ii) structural changes in the anion transport region result in alterations in anion transport.

  18. Fine structure of the red luminescence band in undoped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Usikov, A.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.

    2014-01-20

    Many point defects in GaN responsible for broad photoluminescence (PL) bands remain unidentified. Their presence in thick GaN layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) detrimentally affects the material quality and may hinder the use of GaN in high-power electronic devices. One of the main PL bands in HVPE-grown GaN is the red luminescence (RL) band with a maximum at 1.8 eV. We observed the fine structure of this band with a zero-phonon line (ZPL) at 2.36 eV, which may help to identify the related defect. The shift of the ZPL with excitation intensity and the temperature-related transformation of the RL band fine structure indicate that the RL band is caused by transitions from a shallow donor (at low temperature) or from the conduction band (above 50 K) to an unknown deep acceptor having an energy level 1.130 eV above the valence band.

  19. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  20. Micro-metric electronic patterning of a topological band structure using a photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Mark; Frantzeskakis, Emmanouil; de Jong, Nick; Huang, Yingkai; Wu, Dong; Pan, Yu; de Visser, Anne; van Heumen, Erik; van Bay, Tran; Zwartsenberg, Berend; Pronk, Pieter; Varier Ramankutty, Shyama; Tytarenko, Alona; Xu, Nan; Plumb, Nick; Shi, Ming; Radovic, Milan; Varkhalov, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    The only states crossing EF in ideal, 3D TIs are topological surface states. Single crystals of Bi2Se3andBi2Te3 are too defective to exhibit bulk-insulating behaviour, and ARPES shows topologically trivial 2DEGs at EF in the surface region due to downward band bending. Ternary & quaternary alloys of Bi /Te /Se /Sb hold promise for obtaining bulk-insulating crystals. Here we report ARPES data from quaternary, bulk-insulating, Bi-based TIs. Shortly after cleavage in UHV, downward band bending pulls the bulk conduction band below EF, once again frustrating the ``topological only'' ambition for the Fermi surface. However, there is light at the end of the tunnel: we show that a super-band-gap photon beam generates a surface photovoltage sufficient to flatten the bands, thereby recovering the ideal, ``topological only'' situation. In our bulk-insulating quaternary TIs, this effect is local in nature, and permits the writing of arbitrary, micron-sized patterns in the topological energy landscape at the surface. Support from FOM, NWO and the EU is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

    2012-12-11

    Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

  2. Potential energy surface and vibrational band origins of the triatomic lithium cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searles, Debra J.; Dunne, Simon J.; von Nagy-Felsobuki, Ellak I.

    The 104 point CISD Li +3 potential energy surface and its analytical representation is reported. The calculations predict the minimum energy geometry to be an equilateral triangle of side RLiLi = 3.0 Å and of energy - 22.20506 E h. A fifth-order Morse—Dunham type analytical force field is used in the Carney—Porter normal co-ordinate vibrational Hamiltonian, the corresponding eigenvalue problem being solved variationally using a 560 configurational finite-element basis set. The predicted assignment of the vibrational band origins is in accord with that reported for H +3. Moreover, for 6Li +3 and 7Li +3 the lowest i.r. accessible band origin is the overlineν0,1,±1 predicted to be at 243.6 and 226.0 cm -1 respectively.

  3. Polar semiconductor heterojunction structure energy band diagram considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shuxun; Wen, Cheng P.; Wang, Maojun; Hao, Yilong

    2016-03-01

    The unique nature of built-in electric field induced positive/negative charge pairs of polar semiconductor heterojunction structure has led to a more realistic device model for hexagonal III-nitride HEMT. In this modeling approach, the distribution of charge carriers is dictated by the electrostatic potential profile instead of Femi statistics. The proposed device model is found suitable to explain peculiar properties of GaN HEMT structures, including: (1) Discrepancy in measured conventional linear transmission line model (LTLM) sheet resistance and contactless sheet resistance of GaN HEMT with thin barrier layer. (2) Below bandgap radiation from forward biased Nickel Schottky barrier diode on GaN HEMT structure. (3) GaN HEMT barrier layer doping has negligible effect on transistor channel sheet charge density.

  4. Electronic band structure and effective mass parameters of Ge1-xSnx alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu Low, Kain; Yang, Yue; Han, Genquan; Fan, Weijun; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2012-11-01

    This work investigates the electronic band structures of bulk Ge1-xSnx alloys using the empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) for Sn composition x varying from 0 to 0.2. The adjustable form factors of EPM were tuned in order to reproduce the band features that agree well with the reported experimental data. Based on the adjusted pseudopotential form factors, the band structures of Ge1-xSnx alloys were calculated along high symmetry lines in the Brillouin zone. The effective masses at the band edges were extracted by using a parabolic line fit. The bowing parameters of hole and electron effective masses were then derived by fitting the effective mass at different Sn compositions by a quadratic polynomial. The hole and electron effective mass were examined for bulk Ge1-xSnx alloys along specific directions or orientations on various crystal planes. In addition, employing the effective-mass Hamiltonian for diamond semiconductor, band edge dispersion at the Γ-point calculated by 8-band k.p. method was fitted to that obtained from EPM approach. The Luttinger-like parameters were also derived for Ge1-xSnx alloys. They were obtained by adjusting the effective-mass parameters of k.p method to fit the k.p band structure to that of the EPM. These effective masses and derived Luttinger parameters are useful for the design of optical and electronic devices based on Ge1-xSnx alloys.

  5. Electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction evidence for two Z-band structural states.

    PubMed

    Perz-Edwards, Robert J; Reedy, Michael K

    2011-08-01

    In vertebrate muscles, Z-bands connect adjacent sarcomeres, incorporate several cell signaling proteins, and may act as strain sensors. Previous electron microscopy (EM) showed Z-bands reversibly switch between a relaxed, "small-square" structure, and an active, "basketweave" structure, but the mechanism of this transition is unknown. Here, we found the ratio of small-square to basketweave in relaxed rabbit psoas muscle varied with temperature, osmotic pressure, or ionic strength, independent of activation. By EM, the A-band and both Z-band lattice spacings varied with temperature and pressure, not ionic strength; however, the basketweave spacing was consistently 10% larger than small-square. We next sought evidence for the two Z-band structures in unfixed muscles using x-ray diffraction, which indicated two Z-reflections whose intensity ratios and spacings correspond closely to the EM measurements for small-square and basketweave if the EM spacings are adjusted for 20% shrinkage due to EM processing. We conclude that the two Z-reflections arise from the small-square and basketweave forms of the Z-band as seen by EM. Regarding the mechanism of transition during activation, the effects of Ca(2+) in the presence of force inhibitors suggested that the interconversion of Z-band forms was correlated with tropomyosin movement on actin. PMID:21806939

  6. Evidence of ion intercalation mediated band structure modification and opto-ionic coupling in lithium niobite

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, Joshua C.; Tellekamp, M. Brooks; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2015-01-21

    The theoretically suggested band structure of the novel p-type semiconductor lithium niobite (LiNbO{sub 2}), the direct coupling of photons to ion motion, and optically induced band structure modifications are investigated by temperature dependent photoluminescence. LiNbO{sub 2} has previously been used as a memristor material but is shown here to be useful as a sensor owing to the electrical, optical, and chemical ease of lithium removal and insertion. Despite the high concentration of vacancies present in lithium niobite due to the intentional removal of lithium atoms, strong photoluminescence spectra are observed even at room temperature that experimentally confirm the suggested band structure implying transitions from a flat conduction band to a degenerate valence band. Removal of small amounts of lithium significantly modifies the photoluminescence spectra including additional larger than stoichiometric-band gap features. Sufficient removal of lithium results in the elimination of the photoluminescence response supporting the predicted transition from a direct to indirect band gap semiconductor. In addition, non-thermal coupling between the incident laser and lithium ions is observed and results in modulation of the electrical impedance.

  7. An open-structure sound insulator against low-frequency and wide-band acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui; Li, Xiao-juan; Ding, Jin

    2015-10-01

    To block sound, i.e., the vibration of air, most insulators are based on sealed structures and prevent the flow of the air. In this research, an acoustic metamaterial adopting side structures, loops, and labyrinths, arranged along a main tube, is presented. By combining the accurately designed side structures, an extremely wide forbidden band with a low cut-off frequency of 80 Hz is produced, which demonstrates a powerful low-frequency and wide-band sound insulation ability. Moreover, by virtue of the bypass arrangement, the metamaterial is based on an open structure, and thus air flow is allowed while acoustic waves can be insulated.

  8. Structure and properties of solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Difficulties in experimental studies of crystalline surfaces are related to the fact that surface atoms have an intrinsic tendency to react with their environment. A second problem is connected with the effective thickness of surfaces, which ranges from one to several atom layers. The phenomenology of surface interactions with gases are considered, taking into account physical adsorption, chemisorption, and the oxidation of surfaces. Studies of the surface structure are discussed, giving attention to field emission microscopy, field-ion microscopy, electron diffraction techniques, Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, ion microprobe methods, and low-energy backscattering spectroscopy. Investigations of semiconductor surfaces are also described.

  9. Density Banding in Coral Skeletons: A Biotic Response to Sea Surface Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C. A.; Oehlert, A. M.; Piggot, A. M.; Yau, P. M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2008-12-01

    Density bands in the CaCO3 (aragonite) skeleton of scleractinian corals are commonly used as chronometers, where crystalline couplets of high and low density bands represent the span of one year. This provides a sensitive reconstructive tool for paleothermometry, paleoclimatology and paleoecology. However, the detailed mechanisms controlling aragonite nucleation and crystallization events and the rate of skeletal growth remain uncertain. The organic matrix, composed of macromolecules secreted by the calicoblastic ectoderm, is closely associated with skeletal precipitation and is itself incorporated into the skeleton. We postulate that density banding is primarily controlled by changes in the rate of aragonite crystal precipitation mediated by the coral holobiont response to changes in sea surface temperature (SST). To test this hypothesis, data were collected from coral skeleton-tissue biopsies (2.5 cm in diameter) extracted from four species of Montastraea growing on the fringing reef tract of Curacao, Netherlands Antilles (annual mean variation in SST is 29° C in mid-September to 26° C in late February). Samples were collected in the following three contextual modes: 1) at two sites (Water Plant and Playa Kalki) along a lateral 25 km spatial transect; 2) across a vertical bathymetric gradient from 5 to 15 m water depth at each site; and 3) at strategic time periods spanning the 3° C annual variations in SST. Preliminary results indicate that skeletal density banding is also expressed in the organic matrix, permitting biochemical characterization and correlation of the organic matrix banding to the skeletal banding. In addition, both surficial and ectodermal mucins were characterized in terms of total protein content, abundance and location of their anionic, cationic, and neutral macromolecular constituents. Furthermore, the ratio of mucocytes in the oral ectoderm to gastrodermal symbiotic zooxanthellae has permitted estimates of seasonal carbon allocation by

  10. Analysis of multi-band pyrometry for emissivity and temperature measurements of gray surfaces at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, António

    2016-05-01

    A multi-band pyrometry model is developed to evaluate the potential of measuring temperature and emissivity of assumably gray target surfaces at 300 K. Twelve wavelength bands between 2 and 60 μm are selected to define the spectral characteristics of the pyrometers. The pyrometers are surrounded by an enclosure with known background temperature. Multi-band pyrometry modeling results in an overdetermined system of equations, in which the solution for temperature and emissivity is obtained through an optimization procedure that minimizes the sum of the squared residuals of each system equation. The Monte Carlo technique is applied to estimate the uncertainties of temperature and emissivity, resulting from the propagation of the uncertainties of the pyrometers. Maximum reduction in temperature uncertainty is obtained from dual-band to tri-band systems, a small reduction is obtained from tri-band to quad-band, with a negligible reduction above quad-band systems (a reduction between 6.5% and 12.9% is obtained from dual-band to quad-band systems). However, increasing the number of bands does not always reduce uncertainty, and uncertainty reduction depends on the specific band arrangement, indicating the importance of choosing the most appropriate multi-band spectral arrangement if uncertainty is to be reduced. A reduction in emissivity uncertainty is achieved when the number of spectral bands is increased (a reduction between 6.3% and 12.1% is obtained from dual-band to penta-band systems). Besides, emissivity uncertainty increases for pyrometers with high wavelength spectral arrangements. Temperature and emissivity uncertainties are strongly dependent on the difference between target and background temperatures: uncertainties are low when the background temperature is far from the target temperature, tending to very high values as the background temperature approaches the target temperature.

  11. Investigation of the vertical structure of clouds over the Western Ghats, India using X-band and Ka-band Doppler radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subrata Kumar

    Investigation of the vertical structure of clouds over the Western Ghats, India using X-band and Ka-band Doppler radar observations Subrata Kumar Das*, S. M. Deshpande, K. Chakravarty and M. C. R. Kalapureddy Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, India ABSTRACT The Western Ghats (WGs) located parallel to the west coast of India receives a huge amount of rainfall during the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) in which topography plays a huge role in it. To understand the dynamics and microphysics of monsoon precipitating clouds over the WGs, a High Altitude Cloud Physics Laboratory (HACPL) has been setup at Mahabaleshwar (17.92 oN, 73.6 oE, ~1.4 km AMSL) in 2012. As part of this laboratory, a mobile X-band (9.5 GHz) and Ka-band (35.29 GHz) dual-polarization Doppler weather radar system is installed at Mandhardev (18.04 oN, 73.87 oE, ~1.3 km AMSL, at 26 km radial distance from the HACPL). The X-band radar shows the dominant cloud movement is from the western side of the WGs to the eastern side, crossing the HACPL and the radar site. The cloud occurrence statistics show a sudden reduction within a distance of ~30 km on the eastern side of WGs indicates the possibility of a rain shadow area. Further, we investigate the vertical structure of cloud over the HACPL, and identified four cloud modes viz., shallow cumulus mode, congestus mode, deep convective mode, and overshooting convection mode. The frequency distribution of cloud-cell base height (CBH) and cloud-cell top height (CTH) shows most of the clouds with base below 2.5 km and tops usually not exceeding 9 km. This indicates the dominance of warm-rain process in the WGs region. The positive relationships between surface rainfall rates and CTH and 0oC isotherm level have observed. Details will be presented in the upcoming symposium.

  12. Fine-structure enhancement — assessment of a simple method to resolve overlapping bands in spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Andreas

    2000-05-01

    A simple mathematical procedure — fine-structure enhancement — has been assessed on its ability to resolve overlapping bands in spectra. Its advantages and limitations have been explored using synthetic and experimental spectra. Fine-structure enhancement involves smoothing the original spectrum, multiplying the smoothed spectrum with a weighting factor and subtracting this spectrum from the original spectrum. As a result, the fine-structure of the original spectrum is enhanced in the processed spectrum and bands that overlap in the original spectrum appear as distinct bands in the processed spectrum. To be resolved by fine-structure enhancement, Lorentzian lines have to be separated by more than their quarter width at half maximum, Gaussian lines by more than their half width at half maximum. A comparison of fine-structure enhancement and Fourier self-deconvolution shows that Fourier self-deconvolution has in theory a higher potential to resolve overlapping bands. However, this depends crucially on the correct choice of the parameters. In practice, when parameters commonly used are chosen for Fourier self-deconvolution, fine-structure enhancement leads to similar results. This is demonstrated at the example of the infrared absorbance spectrum of the protein papain, where the amide I band components could be resolved similarly with both methods. Thus, fine-structure enhancement seems to be a simple alternative to Fourier self-deconvolution that does not require specialised software.

  13. Numerical investigation of a microwave-band surface plasmon excited on an overdense plasma cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Ouyang, Ji-Ting

    2016-05-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method was employed to investigate the surface plasmon (SP) of the microwave band excited on an overdense plasma cylinder with various geometric scales. The extinction efficiency was calculated to determine the resonant frequency of the SP. A sequence of angular eigenmodes was observed via field distribution. The effect of plasma frequency and collision rate on the SP was also investigated. The results show that an SP on the cylinder surface can be treated as a standing wave pattern of two surface waves propagating in opposite directions. When the SP is formed around the plasma cylinder, the scatter field can be enhanced significantly. The solid plasma cylinder can be replaced by a hollow one without significant change of the SP’s features, as long as its layer width well exceeds the skin depth.

  14. Experimental observation of locally-resonant and Bragg band gaps for surface guided waves in a phononic crystal of pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achaoui, Younes; Khelif, Abdelkrim; Benchabane, Sarah; Robert, Laurent; Laude, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    We report on the experimental study of the propagation of surface guided waves in a periodic arrangement of pillars on a semi-infinite medium. Samples composed of nickel pillars grown on a lithium niobate substrate were prepared and wide bandwidth transducers were used for the electrical generation of surface elastic waves. We identify a complete band gap for surface guided waves appearing at frequencies markedly lower than the Bragg band gap. Using optical measurements of the surface vibrations and by comparison with a finite element model, we argue that the low frequency band gap arises because of local resonances in the pillars. When resonance is reached, the acoustic energy is confined inside the pillars and transmission through the array is strongly reduced. At higher frequencies and inside the Bragg band gap, the incident surface elastic waves are almost completely reflected and the observed exponential decay of the transmission is similar to the case of phononic crystals made of holes in a substrate.

  15. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin

    2011-09-01

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  16. On a Surface Structure Constraint in Hungarian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szamosi, Michael

    It is possible to apply the concept of surface-structure constraint to a particular area of Hungarian syntax. A surface-structure constraint, according to David Perlmutter, can be seen as a template which serves as a filter at some level after the transformational component. In the case of Hungarian cooccurrence of noun phrases and verbs in a…

  17. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Christopher B; Rau, Dr. Donald

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water.

  18. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A.

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  19. Superlattice band structure: New and simple energy quantification condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiz, F.

    2014-10-01

    Assuming an approximated effective mass and using Bastard's boundary conditions, a simple method is used to calculate the subband structure for periodic semiconducting heterostructures. Our method consists to derive and solve the energy quantification condition (EQC), this is a simple real equation, composed of trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, and does not need any programming effort or sophistic machine to solve it. For less than ten wells heterostructures, we have derived and simplified the energy quantification conditions. The subband is build point by point; each point presents an energy level. Our simple energy quantification condition is used to calculate the subband structure of the GaAs/Ga0.5Al0.5As heterostructures, and build its subband point by point for 4 and 20 wells. Our finding shows a good agreement with previously published results.

  20. Band structure of solids from clusters SCF potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Nour, S.; Chermette, H.

    1995-01-05

    The possibilities and limits of the molecular orbital theory to deal with the problem of determining electronic structure of solids have been explored. A cluster model based on the charge neutrality in the solid has been used in test calculations on some III-V semiconductors and have given quite satisfactory results. Recommendations are given to widen the field of applications of this procedure. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Relationships between magnetic foot points and G-band bright structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, R.; Tsuneta, S.; Kitakoshi, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Bonet, J. A.; Vargas Domínguez, S.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. H. M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Ebisuzaki, T.

    2007-09-01

    Aims:Magnetic elements are thought to be described by flux tube models, and are well reproduced by MHD simulations. However, these simulations are only partially constrained by observations. We observationally investigate the relationship between G-band bright points and magnetic structures to clarify conditions, which make magnetic structures bright in G-band. Methods: The G-band filtergrams together with magnetograms and dopplergrams were taken for a plage region covered by abnormal granules as well as ubiquitous G-band bright points, using the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) under very good seeing conditions. Results: High magnetic flux density regions are not necessarily associated with G-band bright points. We refer to the observed extended areas with high magnetic flux density as magnetic islands to separate them from magnetic elements. We discover that G-band bright points tend to be located near the boundary of such magnetic islands. The concentration of G-band bright points decreases with inward distance from the boundary of the magnetic islands. Moreover, G-band bright points are preferentially located where magnetic flux density is higher, given the same distance from the boundary. There are some bright points located far inside the magnetic islands. Such bright points have higher minimum magnetic flux density at the larger inward distance from the boundary. Convective velocity is apparently reduced for such high magnetic flux density regions regardless of whether they are populated by G-band bright points or not. The magnetic islands are surrounded by downflows. Conclusions: These results suggest that high magnetic flux density, as well as efficient heat transport from the sides or beneath, are required to make magnetic elements bright in G-band.

  2. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-01

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ∼ 7~\\text{eV} ) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν ≳ 400~\\text{eV} ) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of \\text{Ce}M\\text{I}{{\\text{n}}5} (M=\\text{Rh} , \\text{Ir} , and \\text{Co} ) and \\text{YbR}{{\\text{h}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UFeG}{{\\text{a}}5} , their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all \\text{U}~5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UP}{{\\text{d}}3} and \\text{U}{{\\text{O}}2} are essentially explained by the localized model that treats \\text{U}~5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion \\text{U} -based compounds such as the hidden-order compound \\text{UR}{{\\text{u}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} , their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures

  3. Surface crystallography and electronic structure of potassium yttrium tungstate

    SciTech Connect

    Atuchin, V. V.; Pokrovsky, L. D.; Khyzhun, O. Yu.; Sinelnichenko, A. K.; Ramana, C. V.

    2008-08-01

    Structural and electronic characteristics of KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} (KYW) (010) crystal surfaces have been studied using reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that the crystal structure and chemical composition of the mechanically polished pristine surface is stoichiometrically well maintained as expected for KYW crystals. Combined measurements of RHEED and XPS as a function of 1.5 keV Ar{sup +} ion irradiation of the KYW (010) surfaces indicate amorphization, partial loss of potassium atoms, and partial transformation of chemical valence state of tungsten from W{sup 6+} to a lower valence state, W{sup 0} state predominantly, which induces electronic states at the top of valence band.

  4. Electronic absorption band broadening and surface roughening of phthalocyanine double layers by saturated solvent vapor treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinhyun; Yim, Sanggyu

    2012-10-15

    Variations in the electronic absorption (EA) and surface morphology of three types of phthalocyanine (Pc) thin film systems, i.e. copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) single layer, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) single layer, and ZnPc on CuPc (CuPc/ZnPc) double layer film, treated with saturated acetone vapor were investigated. For the treated CuPc single layer film, the surface roughness slightly increased and bundles of nanorods were formed, while the EA varied little. In contrast, for the ZnPc single layer film, the relatively high solubility of ZnPc led to a considerable shift in the absorption bands as well as a large increase in the surface roughness and formation of long and wide nano-beams, indicating a part of the ZnPc molecules dissolved in acetone, which altered their molecular stacking. For the CuPc/ZnPc film, the saturated acetone vapor treatment resulted in morphological changes in mainly the upper ZnPc layer due to the significantly low solubility of the underlying CuPc layer. The treatment also broadened the EA band, which involved a combination of unchanged CuPc and changed ZnPc absorption.

  5. Structure sensitive bands in the vibrational spectra of metal complexes of tetraphenylporphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshio, Hiroki; Ama, Tomoharu; Watanabe, Takeshi; Kincaid, James; Nakamoto, Kazuo

    The i.r. and RR spectra of twenty Fe(TPP)LL' type complexes have been measured to locate structure-sensitive bands. In i.r. spectra, band I (1350-1330 cm -1) and band III (469-432 cm -1) are spin-state sensitive whereas band II (806-790 cm -1) is oxidation-state sensitive and slightly spin-state sensitive in the Fe(II) state. To examine the nature of these bands, the i.r. spectra of Co(TPP), (Fe(TPP)) 2O and their d8 and d20 analogs have been measured, and empirical assignments proposed. In RR spectra, band C (1545-1498 cm -1, ap) and band D (1565-1540 cm -1, p) are spin-state sensitive whereas band E (391-376 cm -1, p) is sensitive to both spin and oxidation states. These results on RR spectra are in good agreement with those of previous workers.

  6. Electronic structure and band alignment at an epitaxial spinel/perovskite heterojunction.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Wei; Xiao, Haiyan; Meyer, Harry M; Liang, Xuelei; Nguyen, N V; Weber, William J; Biegalski, Michael D

    2014-08-27

    The electronic properties of solid-solid interfaces play critical roles in a variety of technological applications. Recent advances of film epitaxy and characterization techniques have demonstrated a wealth of exotic phenomena at interfaces of oxide materials, which are critically dependent on the alignment of their energy bands across the interface. Here we report a combined photoemission and electrical investigation of the electronic structures across a prototypical spinel/perovskite heterojunction. Energy-level band alignment at an epitaxial Co3O4/SrTiO3(001) heterointerface indicates a chemically abrupt, type I heterojunction without detectable band bending at both the film and substrate. The unexpected band alignment for this typical p-type semiconductor on SrTiO3 is attributed to its intrinsic d-d interband excitation, which significantly narrows the fundamental band gap between the top of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band. The formation of the type I heterojunction with a flat-band state results in a simultaneous confinement of both electrons and holes inside the Co3O4 layer, thus rendering the epitaxial Co3O4/SrTiO3(001) heterostructure to be a very promising material for high-efficiency luminescence and optoelectronic device applications. PMID:25075939

  7. Band structure of silicene in the tight binding approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Gert, A. V. Nestoklon, M. O.; Yassievich, I. N.

    2015-07-15

    The electronic structure of silicene is simulated by the tight binding method with the basis sp{sup 3}d{sup 5}s*. The results are in good agreement with ab initio calculations. The effective Hamiltonian of silicene in the vicinity of the Dirac point is constructed by the method of invariants. Silicon atoms in silicene are located in two parallel planes displaced perpendicularly to each other by Δ{sub z}; the energy spectrum essentially depends on this displacement. Using the tight binding technique, the coefficients of the effective Hamiltonian are determined for various values of Δ{sub z}.

  8. Measurement of the surface wavelength distribution of narrow-band radiation by a colorimetric method

    SciTech Connect

    Kraiskii, A V; Mironova, T V; Sultanov, T T

    2010-09-10

    A method is suggested for determining the wavelength of narrow-band light from a digital photograph of a radiating surface. The digital camera used should be appropriately calibrated. The accuracy of the wavelength measurement is better than 1 nm. The method was tested on the yellow doublet of mercury spectrum and on the adjacent continuum of the incandescent lamp radiation spectrum. By means of the method suggested the homogeneity of holographic sensor swelling was studied in stationary and transient cases. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  9. Electronic- and band-structure evolution in low-doped (Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrubchak, O.; Gluba, L.; Żuk, J.; Sadowski, J.; MAX-Lab, Lund University, 22100 Lund ; Krzyżanowska, H.; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 6506 Stevenson Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37325 ; Domagala, J. Z.; Andrearczyk, T.; Wosinski, T.

    2013-08-07

    Modulation photoreflectance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been applied to study the electronic- and band-structure evolution in (Ga,Mn)As epitaxial layers with increasing Mn doping in the range of low Mn content, up to 1.2%. Structural and magnetic properties of the layers were characterized with high-resolution X-ray diffractometry and SQUID magnetometery, respectively. The revealed results of decrease in the band-gap-transition energy with increasing Mn content in very low-doped (Ga,Mn)As layers with n-type conductivity are interpreted as a result of merging the Mn-related impurity band with the host GaAs valence band. On the other hand, an increase in the band-gap-transition energy with increasing Mn content in (Ga,Mn)As layers with higher Mn content and p-type conductivity indicates the Moss-Burstein shift of the absorption edge due to the Fermi level location within the valence band, determined by the free-hole concentration. The experimental results are consistent with the valence-band origin of mobile holes mediating ferromagnetic ordering in the (Ga,Mn)As diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor.

  10. Quasiparticle band structure of the almost-gapless transition-metal-based Heusler semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, M.; Şaşıoǧlu, E.; Galanakis, I.; Friedrich, C.; Blügel, S.

    2016-05-01

    Transition-metal-based Heusler semiconductors are promising materials for a variety of applications ranging from spintronics to thermoelectricity. Employing the G W approximation within the framework of the FLAPW method, we study the quasiparticle band structure of a number of such compounds being almost gapless semiconductors. We find that in contrast to the s p -electron based semiconductors such as Si and GaAs, in these systems, the many-body corrections have a minimal effect on the electronic band structure and the energy band gap increases by less than 0.2 eV, which makes the starting point density functional theory (DFT) a good approximation for the description of electronic and optical properties of these materials. Furthermore, the band gap can be tuned either by the variation of the lattice parameter or by the substitution of the s p -chemical element.

  11. Surface states and electronic structure of polar and nonpolar InN - An in situ photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhardt, A.; Krischok, S.; Himmerlich, M.

    2013-06-10

    Valence band structure and surface states of InN with (0001), (000-1), (1-100), and (11-20) orientation were investigated in situ after growth using photoelectron spectroscopy. Depending on surface orientation, different occupied surface states are identified and differentiated from bulk contributions. For N-polar, m-plane, and a-plane InN, the surface states are located at the valence band maximum, while In-polar InN features surface states close to the Fermi level. The surface band alignment correlates with the position of surface states. For InN(0001), a much larger surface downward band bending is observed compared to N-polar, m-plane, and a-plane InN, where almost flat band conditions occur.

  12. Engineering the electronic structure and band gap of boron nitride nanoribbon via external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chegel, Raad

    2016-06-01

    By using the third nearest neighbor modified tight binding (3NN-TB) method, the electronic structure and band gap of BNNRs under transverse electric fields are explored. The band gap of the BNNRs has a decreasing with increasing the intensity of the applied electric field, independent on the ribbon edge types. Furthermore, an analytic model for the dependence of the band gap in armchair and zigzag BNNRs on the electric field is proposed. The reduction of E g is similar for some N a armchair and N z zigzag BNNRs independent of their edges.

  13. Band-Structure Engineering of Gold Atomic Wires on Silicon by Controlled Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Won Hoon; Kang, Pil Gyu; Ryang, Kyung Deuk; Yeom, Han Woong

    2008-03-01

    We report on the systematic tuning of the electronic band structure of atomic wires by controlling the density of impurity atoms. The atomic wires are self-assembled on Si(111) by substitutional gold adsorbates and extra silicon atoms are deposited as the impurity dopants. The one-dimensional electronic band of gold atomic wires, measured by angle-resolved photoemission, changes from a fully metallic to semiconducting one with its band gap increasing above 0.3 eV along with an energy shift as a linear function of the Si dopant density. The gap opening mechanism is suggested to be related to the ordering of the impurities.

  14. Two-zone heterogeneous structure within shear bands of a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yang; Yao, Kefu; Liu, Xue; Li, Mo

    2013-10-21

    Shear bands, the main plastic strain carrier in metallic glasses, are severely deformed regions often considered as disordered and featureless. Here we report the observations of a sandwich-like heterogeneous structure inside shear bands in Pd{sub 40.5}Ni{sub 40.5}P{sub 19} metallic glass sample after plastic deformation by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results suggest a two-step plastic deformation mechanism with corresponding microstructure evolution at atomic scale, which may intimately connected to the stability of the shear band propagation and the overall plastic deformability.

  15. Promoting Photochemical Water Oxidation with Metallic Band Structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongfei; Moré, René; Grundmann, Henrik; Cui, Chunhua; Erni, Rolf; Patzke, Greta R

    2016-02-10

    The development of economic water oxidation catalysts is a key step toward large-scale water splitting. However, their current exploration remains empirical to a large extent. Elucidating the correlations between electronic properties and catalytic activity is crucial for deriving general and straightforward catalyst design principles. Herein, strongly correlated electronic systems with abundant and easily tunable electronic properties, namely La(1-x)Sr(x)BO3 perovskites and La(2-x)Sr(x)BO4 layered perovskites (B = Fe, Co, Ni, or Mn), were employed as model systems to identify favorable electronic structures for water oxidation. We established a direct correlation between the enhancement of catalytic activity and the insulator to metal transition through tuning the electronic properties of the target perovskite families via the La(3+)/Sr(2+) ratio. Their improved photochemical water oxidation performance was clearly linked to the increasingly metallic character. These electronic structure-activity relations provide a promising guideline for constructing efficient water oxidation catalysts. PMID:26771537

  16. Energy band alignment and electronic states of amorphous carbon surfaces in vacuo and in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, Miguel A.; Määttä, Jukka; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Laurila, Tomi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain the energy band positions of amorphous carbon (a-C) surfaces in vacuum and in aqueous environment. The calculations are performed using a combination of (i) classical molecular dynamics (MD), (ii) Kohn-Sham density functional theory with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional, and (iii) the screened-exchange hybrid functional of Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE). PBE allows an accurate generation of a-C and the evaluation of the local electrostatic potential in the a-C/water system, HSE yields an improved description of energetic positions which is critical in this case, and classical MD enables a computationally affordable description of water. Our explicit calculation shows that, both in vacuo and in aqueous environment, the a-C electronic states available in the region comprised between the H2/H2O and O2/H2O levels of water correspond to both occupied and unoccupied states within the a-C pseudogap region. These are localized states associated to sp2 sites in a-C. The band realignment induces a shift of approximately 300 meV of the a-C energy band positions with respect to the redox levels of water.

  17. Surface-plasmon enhanced photodetection at communication band based on hot electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui E-mail: xfli@suda.edu.cn; Wu, Shaolong; Deng, Jiajia; Li, Xiaofeng E-mail: xfli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-08-14

    Surface plasmons can squeeze light into a deep-subwavelength space and generate abundant hot electrons in the nearby metallic regions, enabling a new paradigm of photoconversion by the way of hot electron collection. Unlike the visible spectral range concerned in previous literatures, we focus on the communication band and design the infrared hot-electron photodetectors with plasmonic metal-insulator-metal configuration by using full-wave finite-element method. Titanium dioxide-silver Schottky interface is employed to boost the low-energy infrared photodetection. The photodetection sensitivity is strongly improved by enhancing the plasmonic excitation from a rationally engineered metallic grating, which enables a strong unidirectional photocurrent. With a five-step electrical simulation, the optimized device exhibits an unbiased responsivity of ∼0.1 mA/W and an ultra-narrow response band (FWHM = 4.66 meV), which promises to be a candidate as the compact photodetector operating in communication band.

  18. Energy band alignment and electronic states of amorphous carbon surfaces in vacuo and in aqueous environment

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, Miguel A.; Määttä, Jukka; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Laurila, Tomi

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we obtain the energy band positions of amorphous carbon (a–C) surfaces in vacuum and in aqueous environment. The calculations are performed using a combination of (i) classical molecular dynamics (MD), (ii) Kohn-Sham density functional theory with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional, and (iii) the screened-exchange hybrid functional of Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE). PBE allows an accurate generation of a-C and the evaluation of the local electrostatic potential in the a-C/water system, HSE yields an improved description of energetic positions which is critical in this case, and classical MD enables a computationally affordable description of water. Our explicit calculation shows that, both in vacuo and in aqueous environment, the a-C electronic states available in the region comprised between the H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O levels of water correspond to both occupied and unoccupied states within the a-C pseudogap region. These are localized states associated to sp{sup 2} sites in a-C. The band realignment induces a shift of approximately 300 meV of the a-C energy band positions with respect to the redox levels of water.

  19. Detailed structure of the outer disk around HD 169142 with polarized light in H-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Munetake; Morita, Ayaka; Fukagawa, Misato; Muto, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Hashimoto, Jun; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiko K.; Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Grady, Carol A.; Sitko, Michael L.; Akiyama, Eiji; Currie, Thayne; Follette, Katherine B.; Mayama, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; McElwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-10-01

    Coronagraphic imagery of the circumstellar disk around HD 169142 in H-band polarized intensity (PI) with Subaru/HiCIAO is presented. The emission scattered by dust particles at the disk surface in 0{^''.}2 ≤ r ≤ 1{^''.}2, or 29 ≤ r ≤ 174 au, is successfully detected. The azimuthally averaged radial profile of the PI shows a double power-law distribution, in which the PIs in r = 29-52 au and r = 81.2-145 au respectively show r-3 dependence. These two power-law regions are connected smoothly with a transition zone (TZ), exhibiting an apparent gap in r = 40-70 au. The PI in the inner power-law region shows a deep minimum whose location seems to coincide with the point source at λ = 7 mm. This can be regarded as another sign of a protoplanet in the TZ. The observed radial profile of the PI is reproduced by a minimally flaring disk with an irregular surface density distribution, an irregular temperature distribution, or with a combination of both. The depletion factor of surface density in the inner power-law region (r < 50 au) is derived to be ≥ 0.16 from a simple model calculation. The obtained PI image also shows small-scale asymmetries in the outer power-law region. Possible origins for these asymmetries include corrugation of the scattering surface in the outer region, and a shadowing effect by a puffed-up structure in the inner power-law region.

  20. Band structure analysis of (1 × 2)-H/Pd(110)-pr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, I. G.

    2013-09-01

    A novel method of band structure analysis based on the atomic orbital (AO) coefficients in LCAO-DFT has been applied to the (1 × 2)-H/Pd(110)-pr system. The analysis has revealed symmetry-dependent Pd 4d band splitting due to H ligand effects; ensemble effects due to the (1 × 2) Pd reconstruction are shown to be relatively minor.

  1. Observation of Nonlinear Looped Band Structure of Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Elizabeth; Koller, Silvio; Brown, Roger; Wyllie, Robert; Wilson, Ryan; Porto, Trey

    2016-05-01

    We study experimentally the stability of excited, interacting states of bosons in a double-well optical lattice in regimes where the nonlinear interactions are expected to induce ``swallow-tail'' looped band structure. By carefully preparing different initial coherent states and observing their subsequent decay, we observe distinct decay rates, which provide direct evidence for multi-valued band structure. The double well lattice both stabilizes the looped band structure and allows for dynamic preparation of different initial states, including states within the loop structure. We confirm our state preparation procedure with dynamic Gross-Pitaevskii calculations. The excited loop states are found to be more stable than dynamically unstable ground states, but decay faster than expected based on a mean-field stability calculation, indicating the importance of correlations beyond a mean-field description. Now at Georgia Tech Research Institute.

  2. Predicted band structures of III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Pryor, Craig E.

    2010-04-15

    While non-nitride III-V semiconductors typically have a zinc-blende structure, they may also form wurtzite crystals under pressure or when grown as nanowhiskers. This makes electronic structure calculation difficult since the band structures of wurtzite III-V semiconductors are poorly characterized. We have calculated the electronic band structure for nine III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase using transferable empirical pseudopotentials including spin-orbit coupling. We find that all the materials have direct gaps. Our results differ significantly from earlier ab initio calculations, and where experimental results are available (InP, InAs, and GaAs) our calculated band gaps are in good agreement. We tabulate energies, effective masses, and linear and cubic Dresselhaus zero-field spin-splitting coefficients for the zone-center states. The large zero-field spin-splitting coefficients we find may facilitate the development of spin-based devices.

  3. Polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric, twisted-band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardaś, Tomasz M.; Jagodnicka, Anna; Wasylczyk, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    We propose a concept for light polarization management: polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric microstructures. Numerical simulations of light propagation show that with an appropriately configured array of twisted bands, such structures may exhibit zero birefringence and at the same time diffract two circular polarizations with different efficiencies. Non-birefringent structures as thin as 3 μm have a significant difference in diffraction efficiency for left- and right-hand circular polarizations. We identify the structural parameters of such twisted-band matrices for optimum performance as circular polarizers.

  4. Polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric, twisted-band structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kardaś, Tomasz M.; Jagodnicka, Anna; Wasylczyk, Piotr

    2015-11-23

    We propose a concept for light polarization management: polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric microstructures. Numerical simulations of light propagation show that with an appropriately configured array of twisted bands, such structures may exhibit zero birefringence and at the same time diffract two circular polarizations with different efficiencies. Non-birefringent structures as thin as 3 μm have a significant difference in diffraction efficiency for left- and right-hand circular polarizations. We identify the structural parameters of such twisted-band matrices for optimum performance as circular polarizers.

  5. Research on the large band gaps in multilayer radial phononic crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nansha; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study the band gaps (BGs) of new proposed radial phononic crystal (RPC) structure composed of multilayer sections. The band structure, transmission spectra and eigenmode displacement fields of the multilayer RPC are calculated by using finite element method (FEM). Due to the vibration coupling effects between thin circular plate and intermediate mass, the RPC structure can exhibit large BGs, which can be effectively shifted by changing the different geometry values. This study shows that multilayer RPC can unfold larger and lower BGs than traditional phononic crystals (PCs) and RPC can be composed of single material.

  6. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann Y.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quad-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well- managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. Prior to its application for soil moisture inversion, a good agreement was found between the single-scattering IEM simulations and the L band measurements of SIR-C and AIRSAR over a wide range of soil moisture and surface roughness conditions. The sensitivity of soil moisture variation to the co-polarized signals were then examined under the consideration of the calibration accuracy of various components of SAR measurements. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  7. Near surface flow structure over a dimpled surface with blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchetta, Colby; Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean

    2015-11-01

    The combined effects of surface roughness with flow injection are of particular interest in understanding the flow over ablative heat-shields, a common form of thermal protection system (TPS) used for atmospheric entry. Stereoscopic, time-resolved particle image velocimetry was used to investigate the near-surface flow over a surface geometry consisting of hexagonal dimples, typical of a TPS. Of particular interest are the modifications made to the flow structures generated by the dimpled elements caused by flow injection through the surface. Without flow injection, inclined flow structures are generated periodically at the upstream edge of the dimples and convected downstream. This behavior is coupled with fluid becoming entrained inside the dimples, recirculating and ejecting away from the surface. When flow injection occurs through the surface, this process occupies a larger region of the flow, extending further from the surface, with a corresponding increase in the size of the convecting structures and increase in turbulent kinetic energy. These features persist over the range of Reynolds numbers investigated, with increasing Reynolds number resulting in increased turbulence and a corresponding broadening of the region of the flow influenced by the surface. This research is supported by NASA Award NNX13AN04A.

  8. The electronic structures of vanadate salts: Cation substitution as a tool for band gap manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgos, Michelle R.; Paraskos, Alexandra M.; Stoltzfus, Matthew W.; Yarnell, Samantha C.; Woodward, Patrick M.

    2009-07-01

    The electronic structures of six ternary metal oxides containing isolated vanadate ions, Ba 3(VO 4) 2, Pb 3(VO 4) 2, YVO 4, BiVO 4, CeVO 4 and Ag 3VO 4 were studied using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations. While the electronic structure near the Fermi level originates largely from the molecular orbitals of the vanadate ion, both experiment and theory show that the cation can strongly influence these electronic states. The observation that Ba 3(VO 4) 2 and YVO 4 have similar band gaps, both 3.8 eV, shows that cations with a noble gas configuration have little impact on the electronic structure. Band structure calculations support this hypothesis. In Pb 3(VO 4) 2 and BiVO 4 the band gap is reduced by 0.9-1.0 eV through interactions of (a) the filled cation 6 s orbitals with nonbonding O 2 p states at the top of the valence band, and (b) overlap of empty 6 p orbitals with antibonding V 3 d-O 2 p states at the bottom of the conduction band. In Ag 3VO 4 mixing between filled Ag 4 d and O 2 p states destabilizes states at the top of the valence band leading to a large decrease in the band gap ( Eg=2.2 eV). In CeVO 4 excitations from partially filled 4 f orbitals into the conduction band lower the effective band gap to 1.8 eV. In the Ce 1-xBi xVO 4 (0≤ x≤0.5) and Ce 1-xY xVO 4 ( x=0.1, 0.2) solid solutions the band gap narrows slightly when Bi 3+ or Y 3+ are introduced. The nonlinear response of the band gap to changes in composition is a result of the localized nature of the Ce 4 f orbitals.

  9. Band structure and dispersion engineering of strongly coupled plasmon-phonon-polaritons in graphene-integrated structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Zhan, Tianrong; Zhu, Alexander Y; Yi, Fei; Shi, Wangzhou

    2016-01-25

    We theoretically investigate the polaritonic band structure and dispersion properties of graphene using transfer matrix methods, with strongly coupled graphene plasmons (GPs) and molecular infrared vibrations as a representative example. Two common geometrical configurations are considered: graphene coupled subwavelength dielectric grating (GSWDG) and graphene nanoribbons (GNR). By exploiting the dispersion and the band structure, we show the possibility of tailoring desired polaritonic behavior in each of the two configurations. We compare the strength of coupling occurring in both structures and find that the interaction is stronger in GNR than that of GSWDG structure as a result of the stronger field confinement of the edge modes. The band structure and dispersion analysis not only sheds light on the physics of the hybridized polariton formation but also offers insight into tailoring the optical response of graphene light-matter interactions for numerous applications, such as biomolecular sensing and detection. PMID:26832528

  10. Filling-Enforced Gaplessness in Band Structures of the 230 Space Groups.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Haruki; Po, Hoi Chun; Zaletel, Michael P; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2016-08-26

    Nonsymmorphic symmetries like screws and glides produce electron band touchings, obstructing the formation of a band insulator and leading, instead, to metals or nodal semimetals even when the number of electrons in the unit cell is an even integer. Here, we calculate the electron fillings compatible with being a band insulator for all 230 space groups, for noninteracting electrons with time-reversal symmetry. Our bounds are tight-that is, we can rigorously eliminate band insulators at any forbidden filling and produce explicit models for all allowed fillings-and stronger than those recently established for interacting systems. These results provide simple criteria that should help guide the search for topological semimetals and, also, have implications for both the nature and stability of the resulting nodal Fermi surfaces. PMID:27610868

  11. On the relationship between enamel band complexity and occlusal surface area in Equids (Mammalia, Perissodactyla).

    PubMed

    Famoso, Nicholas A; Davis, Edward Byrd

    2016-01-01

    Enamel patterns on the occlusal surfaces of equid teeth are asserted to have tribal-level differences. The most notable example compares the Equini and Hipparionini, where Equini have higher crowned teeth with less enamel-band complexity and less total occlusal enamel than Hipparionini. Whereas previous work has successfully quantified differences in enamel band shape by dividing the length of enamel band by the square root of the occlusal surface area (Occlusal Enamel Index, OEI), it was clear that OEI only partially removes the effect of body size. Because enamel band length scales allometrically, body size still has an influence on OEI, with larger individuals having relatively longer enamel bands than smaller individuals. Fractal dimensionality (D) can be scaled to any level, so we have used it to quantify occlusal enamel complexity in a way that allows us to get at an accurate representation of the relationship between complexity and body size. To test the hypothesis of tribal-level complexity differences between Equini and Hipparionini, we digitally traced a sample of 98 teeth, one tooth per individual; 31 Hipparionini and 67 Equini. We restricted our sampling to the P3-M2 to reduce the effect of tooth position. After calculating the D of these teeth with the fractal box method which uses the number of boxes of various sizes to calculate the D of a line, we performed a t-test on the individual values of D for each specimen, comparing the means between the two tribes, and a phylogenetically informed generalized least squares regression (PGLS) for each tribe with occlusal surface area as the independent variable and D as the dependent variable. The slopes of both PGLS analyses were compared using a t-test to determine if the same linear relationship existed between the two tribes. The t-test between tribes was significant (p < 0.0001), suggesting different D populations for each lineage. The PGLS for Hipparionini was a positive but not significant (p = 0

  12. On the relationship between enamel band complexity and occlusal surface area in Equids (Mammalia, Perissodactyla)

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Edward Byrd

    2016-01-01

    Enamel patterns on the occlusal surfaces of equid teeth are asserted to have tribal-level differences. The most notable example compares the Equini and Hipparionini, where Equini have higher crowned teeth with less enamel-band complexity and less total occlusal enamel than Hipparionini. Whereas previous work has successfully quantified differences in enamel band shape by dividing the length of enamel band by the square root of the occlusal surface area (Occlusal Enamel Index, OEI), it was clear that OEI only partially removes the effect of body size. Because enamel band length scales allometrically, body size still has an influence on OEI, with larger individuals having relatively longer enamel bands than smaller individuals. Fractal dimensionality (D) can be scaled to any level, so we have used it to quantify occlusal enamel complexity in a way that allows us to get at an accurate representation of the relationship between complexity and body size. To test the hypothesis of tribal-level complexity differences between Equini and Hipparionini, we digitally traced a sample of 98 teeth, one tooth per individual; 31 Hipparionini and 67 Equini. We restricted our sampling to the P3-M2 to reduce the effect of tooth position. After calculating the D of these teeth with the fractal box method which uses the number of boxes of various sizes to calculate the D of a line, we performed a t-test on the individual values of D for each specimen, comparing the means between the two tribes, and a phylogenetically informed generalized least squares regression (PGLS) for each tribe with occlusal surface area as the independent variable and D as the dependent variable. The slopes of both PGLS analyses were compared using a t-test to determine if the same linear relationship existed between the two tribes. The t-test between tribes was significant (p < 0.0001), suggesting different D populations for each lineage. The PGLS for Hipparionini was a positive but not significant (p = 0

  13. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  14. Antireflection-structured surfaces for mid-infrared entrance windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubreuil, Didier; Harvey, Erol C.; Pigot, Claude; Rizvi, Nadeem H.

    1998-08-01

    SubWavelength Structured Surfaces (SWS), by synthesizing effective index of refraction, offer an attractive way to mimic antireflective coating effects. It is of particular interest for some IR materials of high index of refraction such as CdTe or KRS-5. These material are often used for entrance window in cryogenic IR instrument in the 20 microns band. For these materials, multilayer antireflective coatings provide limited performances in transmission, while expected performances of SWS can be very high even for a wavelength range covering both the N and Q atmospheric windows, from 7 microns to 28 microns. The SWS simulates a gradient index layer. Its main parameters are its pitch and its depth. The pitches required depend on the IR material index. For CdTe and KRS5, they are around 3 microns to work in N-band and Q-band and around 6 microns to work only on Q- band, and the depth required is around 10 microns to work till 28 microns. We have tried a new approach to realize these structures by using excimer laser ablation technique. We describe the used technique and our results for different materials such as CdTe, KRS5, CsBr and CsI. Antireflection structured surfaces on CdTe could offer an increase in transmission better than 25 percent at 24 microns. We measured a transmission efficiency of near 96 percent between 23 micrometers and 35 micrometers on KRS-5, and more than 95 percent between 18.5 micrometers and 35.5 micrometers on CsI.

  15. H-tailored surface conductivity in narrow band gap In(AsN)

    SciTech Connect

    Velichko, A. V. E-mail: anton.velychko@nottingham.ac.uk; Patanè, A. E-mail: anton.velychko@nottingham.ac.uk; Makarovsky, O.; Capizzi, M.; Polimeni, A.; Sandall, I. C.; Tan, C. H.; Giubertoni, D.; Krier, A.; Zhuang, Q.

    2015-01-12

    We show that the n-type conductivity of the narrow band gap In(AsN) alloy can be increased within a thin (∼100 nm) channel below the surface by the controlled incorporation of H-atoms. This channel has a large electron sheet density of ∼10{sup 18 }m{sup −2} and a high electron mobility (μ > 0.1 m{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1} at low and room temperature). For a fixed dose of impinging H-atoms, its width decreases with the increase in concentration of N-atoms that act as H-traps thus forming N-H donor complexes near the surface.

  16. The interaction of platinum with GaP(110): band bending and surface photovoltage effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, D. A.; Chen, T. P.; Chassé, Th.; Horn, K.

    The study of metals deposited on semiconductor surfaces is important to determine the chemical and electronic properties of these interfaces. In the present study, the formation of Pt sbnd GaP(110) interfaces at 150 and 300 K was monitored by core and valence level photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. Detailed analysis of band-bending reveals a strong surface photovoltage (SPV) effect, even at the higher temperature. The measured barrier height (φ bn = 1.5eV) is similar to values for chemically very different metal contacts on n-GaP(110). The temperature, metal coverage and photon flux dependence of the SPV is determined and interpreted in terms of calculations which consider the relevant current transport mechanism across the developing interface.

  17. Electron emission from conduction band of heavily phosphorus doped diamond negative electron affinity surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Mimura, Hidenori; Okano, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen (H)-terminated surfaces of diamond have attracted significant attention due to their negative electron affinity (NEA), suggesting high-efficiency electron emitters. Combined with n-type doping technique using phosphorus (P) as donors, the unique NEA surface makes diamond a promising candidate for vacuum cold-cathode applications. However, high-electric fields are needed for the electron emission from the n-type doped diamond with NEA. Here we have clarified the electron emission mechanism of field emission from P-doped diamond having NEA utilizing combined ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy/field emission spectroscopy (UPS/FES). An UP spectrum has confirmed the NEA of H-terminated (1 1 1) surface of P-doped diamond. Despite the NEA, electron emission occurs only when electric field at the surface exceeds 4.2  ×  106 V cm-1. Further analysis by UPS/FES has revealed that the emitted energy level is shifted, indicating that the electron emission mechanism of n-type diamond having NEA surface does not follow a standard field emission theory, but is dominated by potential barrier formed within the diamond due to upward band bending. The reduction of internal barrier is the key to achieve high-efficiency electron emitters using P-doped diamond with NEA, of which application ranges from high-resolution electron spectroscopy to novel vacuum nanoelectronics devices.

  18. LIMEX '87 ice surface characteristics - Implications for C-band SAR backscatter signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.

    1989-01-01

    Ice surface characterization data collected in 1987, during the Labrador Sea Ice Margin Experiment, are analyzed to estimate the changes in snow and ice properties at the onset of melt. Surface measurements were made from an ice research vessel on several days (some of which had coincident remote-sensing flights) at a number of locations in the marginal ice zone. These data are used as input parameters in a simple scattering model to simulate the effects of variations in material properties upon C-band scattering signatures. Snow moisture and large-scale surface roughness are demonstrated to have the largest effect upon HH polarization scattering cross-section sigma(HH)(O) and large differences are predicted between undeformed floe surfaces and deformed or undulating rough ice surfaces. Using a parametric approach, an approximate picture of rough and smooth ice signatures and their relative contrast are provided. The models reproduce a trend observed in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of increasing backscatter contrast between deformed and underformed ice over an early period of warning: such observations are consistent with the results of analysis of SAR images to date. The model also reproduces a calibrated SAR-derived signature with a reasonable degree of accuracy.

  19. L-Band Brightness Temperature Variations at Dome C and Snow Metamorphism at the Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Dinnat, Emmanuel; Picard, Ghislain; Champollion, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic Plateau is a promising site to monitor microwave radiometers' drift, and to inter-calibrate microwave radiometers, especially 1.4 GigaHertz (L-band) radiometers on board the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), and AquariusSAC-D missions. The Plateau is a thick ice cover, thermally stable in depth, with large dimensions, and relatively low heterogeneities. In addition, its high latitude location in the Southern Hemisphere enables frequent observations by polar-orbiting satellites, and no contaminations by radio frequency interference. At Dome C (75S, 123E), on the Antarctic Plateau, the substantial amount of in-situ snow measurements available allows us to interpret variations in space-borne microwave brightness temperature (TB) (e.g. Macelloni et al., 2007, 2013, Brucker et al., 2011, Champollion et al., 2013). However, to analyze the observations from the Aquarius radiometers, whose sensitivity is 0.15 K, the stability of the snow layers near the surface that are most susceptible to rapidly change needs to be precisely assessed. This study focuses on the spatial and temporal variations of the Aquarius TB over the Antarctic Plateau, and at Dome C in particular, to highlight the impact of snow surface metamorphism on the TB observations at L-band.

  20. Effect of clustering on the surface plasmon band in thin films of metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Rui M. S.; Borges, Joel; Peres, Filipa C. R.; Pereira, Paulo A. S.; Smirnov, Georgi V.; Vaz, Filipe; Cavaleiro, Albano; Vasilevskiy, Mikhail I.

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the optical response of ensembles of polarizable metallic nanoparticles (NPs) that form (1) submonolayer films of particles adsorbed on a dielectric substrate, considered as two-dimensional (2-D) systems, and (2) thin three-dimensional (3-D) films, where NPs are embedded in a dielectric matrix. For system (1), the effect of NPs' distance to the substrate is taken into account. In both cases, we find that short-range clustering leads to a broadening and a spectral shift of the absorption band related to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in individual NPs. We show that the clustering can help in achieving spectrally broad SPR bands, especially if NPs aggregate into fractal clusters, which can be interesting for some applications such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering. In particular, submonolayer films on NPs generated using the diffusion-limited aggregation algorithm produce sizable and spectrally broad absorption, which can be tuned to the visible range by choosing an appropriate capping and/or substrate material. Calculated results for thin 3-D films are compared with experimental data obtained for Au/TiO2 nanocomposite layers produced by reactive cosputtering.

  1. Band structure of a three-dimensional topological insulator quantum wire in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe; Jiang, Liwei; Zheng, Yisong

    2016-07-01

    By means of a numerical diagonalization approach, we calculate the electronic structure of a three-dimensional topological insulator (3DTI) quantum wire (QW) in the presence of a magnetic field. The QW can be viewed as a 3DTI film with lateral surfaces, when its rectangular cross section has a large aspect ratio. Our calculation indicates that nonchiral edge states emerge because of the confined states at the lateral surfaces. These states completely cover the valence band region among the Landau levels, which reasonably account for the absence of the ν <-1 quantum Hall effect in the relevant experimental works. In an ultrathin 3DTI film, inversion between the electron-type and hole-type bands occurs, which leads to the so-called pseudo-spin Hall effect. In a 3DTI QW with a square cross section, a tilting magnetic field can establish well-defined Landau levels in all four surfaces. In such a case, the quantum Hall edge states are localized at the square corners, characterized by the linearly crossing one-dimensional band profile. And they can be shifted between the adjacent corners by simply rotating the magnetic field.

  2. Band structure of a three-dimensional topological insulator quantum wire in the presence of a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Jiang, Liwei; Zheng, Yisong

    2016-07-13

    By means of a numerical diagonalization approach, we calculate the electronic structure of a three-dimensional topological insulator (3DTI) quantum wire (QW) in the presence of a magnetic field. The QW can be viewed as a 3DTI film with lateral surfaces, when its rectangular cross section has a large aspect ratio. Our calculation indicates that nonchiral edge states emerge because of the confined states at the lateral surfaces. These states completely cover the valence band region among the Landau levels, which reasonably account for the absence of the [Formula: see text] quantum Hall effect in the relevant experimental works. In an ultrathin 3DTI film, inversion between the electron-type and hole-type bands occurs, which leads to the so-called pseudo-spin Hall effect. In a 3DTI QW with a square cross section, a tilting magnetic field can establish well-defined Landau levels in all four surfaces. In such a case, the quantum Hall edge states are localized at the square corners, characterized by the linearly crossing one-dimensional band profile. And they can be shifted between the adjacent corners by simply rotating the magnetic field. PMID:27195483

  3. UWB Band-notched Adjustable Antenna Using Concentric Split-ring Slots Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Hong, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a kind of concentric split-ring slots structure is utilized to design a novel triple-band-notched UWB antenna. Firstly, a concentric split-ring slots structure that has a higher VSWR than that of a single slot at notch frequency is presented. What's more, the structure is very simple and feasible to obtain notched-band at different frequency by adjustment of the length of slot. Secondly, a triple-band-notched antenna, whose notched bands are at 3.52-3.81 GHz for WiMAX and 5.03-5.42 GHz and 5.73-56.17 GHz for WLAN, is designed by using this structure. At last, a compact size of 24 × 30 mm2 of the proposed antenna has been fabricated and measured and it is shown that the proposed antenna has a broadband matched impedance (3.05-14 GHz, VSWR < 2), relatively stable gain and good omnidirectional radiation patterns at low bands.

  4. Electron-Phonon Renormalization of Electronic Band Structures of C Allotropes and BN Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutchton, Roxanne M.; Marchbanks, Christopher; Wu, Zhigang

    The effect of lattice vibration on electronic band structures has been mostly neglected in first-principles calculations because the electron-phonon (e-ph) renormalization of quasi-particle energies is often small (< 100 meV). However, in certain materials, such as diamond, the electron-phonon coupling reduces the band gap by nearly 0.5 eV, which is comparable to the many-body corrections of the electronic band structures calculated using the density functional theory (DFT). In this work, we compared two implementations of the Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the EPW code and the ABINIT package respectively. Our computations of Si and diamond demonstrate that the ABINIT implementation converges much faster. Using this method, the e-ph renormalizations of electronic structures of three C allotropes (diamond, graphite, graphene) and four BN polymorphs (zincblend, wurtzite, mono-layer, and layered-hexagonal) were calculated. Our results suggest that (1) all of the zero-point renormalizations of band gaps in these materials, except for graphene, are larger than 100 meV, and (2) there are large variations in e-ph renormalization of band gaps due to differences in crystal structure. This work was supported by a U.S. DOE Early Career Award (Grant No. DE-SC0006433). Computations were carried out at the Golden Energy Computing Organization at CSM and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  5. Band structures of nonmagnetic transition-metal oxides: PdO and PtO

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, K.C. ); Carlsson, A.E. )

    1992-08-15

    The electronic band structures of PdO and PtO are calculated using the augmented-spherical-wave method and the local-density approximation. Our results are consistent with the widely held view of these materials as conventional band insulators with the crystal-field splitting of metal {ital d} states primarily responsible for gap formation. A significant role for correlation effects as well cannot be ruled out. The predicted valence-band structure for PdO agrees well with published photoemission data. The electronic structure of PtO is qualitatively similar. In both cases the calculated gap is direct and occurs at the {ital M} point of the Brillouin zone. The magnitude of the gap is found to be larger in PtO, which we attribute to the more relativistic nature of Pt compared to Pd.

  6. Ab initio theory for ultrafast magnetization dynamics with a dynamic band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, B. Y.; Haag, M.; Fähnle, M.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-induced modifications of magnetic materials on very small spatial dimensions and ultrashort timescales are a promising field for novel storage and spintronic devices. Therefore, the contribution of electron-electron spin-flip scattering to the ultrafast demagnetization of ferromagnets after an ultrashort laser excitation is investigated. In this work, the dynamical change of the band structure resulting from the change of the magnetization in time is taken into account on an ab initio level. We find a large influence of the dynamical band structure on the magnetization dynamics and we illustrate the thermalization and relaxation process after laser irradiation. Treating the dynamical band structure yields a demagnetization comparable to the experimental one.

  7. Valence-band electronic structure evolution of graphene oxide upon thermal annealing for optoelectronics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamaguchi, Hisato; Ogawa, Shuichi; Watanabe, Daiki; Hozumi, Hideaki; Gao, Yongqian; Eda, Goki; Mattevi, Cecilia; Fujita, Takeshi; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Ishizuka, Shinji; et al

    2016-04-08

    We report valence band electronic structure evolution of graphene oxide (GO) upon its thermal reduction. Degree of oxygen functionalization was controlled by annealing temperatures, and an electronic structure evolution was monitored using real-time ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. We observed a drastic increase in density of states around the Fermi level upon thermal annealing at ~600 °C. The result indicates that while there is an apparent band gap for GO prior to a thermal reduction, the gap closes after an annealing around that temperature. This trend of band gap closure was correlated with electrical, chemical, and structural properties to determine a setmore » of GO material properties that is optimal for optoelectronics. The results revealed that annealing at a temperature of ~500 °C leads to the desired properties, demonstrated by a uniform and an order of magnitude enhanced photocurrent map of an individual GO sheet compared to as-synthesized counterpart.« less

  8. Band structure tunability in MoS2 under interlayer compression: A DFT and GW study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo, C.; Rangel, T.; Romero, A. H.; Gonze, X.; Rignanese, G.-M.

    2013-06-01

    The electronic band structures of MoS2 monolayer and 2H1 bulk polytype are studied within density-functional theory (DFT) and many-body perturbation theory (GW approximation). Interlayer van der Waals (vdW) interactions, responsible for bulk binding, are calculated with the postprocessing Wannier functions method. From both fat bands and Wannier functions analysis, it is shown that the transition from a direct band gap in the monolayer to an indirect band gap in bilayer or bulk systems is triggered by medium- to short-range electronic interactions between adjacent layers, which arise at the equilibrium interlayer distance determined by the balance between vdW attraction and exchange repulsion. The semiconductor-to-semimetal (S-SM) transition is found from both theoretical methods: around c=10.7 Å and c=9.9 Å for DFT and GW, respectively. A metallic transition is also observed for the interlayer distance c=9.7 Å. Dirac conelike band structures and linear bands near Fermi level are found for shorter c lattice parameter values. The VdW correction to total energy was used to estimate the pressure at which S-SM transition takes place from a fitting to a model equation of state.

  9. Electronic band structure and optical properties of the cubic, Sc, Y and La hydride systems

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations are used to interpret the optical spectra of the cubic Sc, Y and La hydride systems. Self-consistent band calculations of ScH/sub 2/ and YH/sub 2/ were carried out. The respective joint densities of states are computed and compared to the dielectric functions determined from the optical measurements. Additional calculations were performed in which the Fermi level or band gap energies are rigidly shifted by a small energy increment. These calculations are then used to simulate the derivative structure in thermomodulation spectra and relate the origin of experimental interband features to the calculated energy bands. While good systematic agreement is obtained for several spectral features, the origin of low-energy interband transitions in YH/sub 2/ cannot be explained by these calculated bands. A lattice-size-dependent premature occupation of octahedral sites by hydrogen atoms in the fcc metal lattice is suggested to account for this discrepancy. Various non-self-consistent calculations are used to examine the effect of such a premature occupation. Measurements of the optical absorptivity of LaH/sub x/ with 1.6 < x < 2.9 are presented which, as expected, indicate a more premature occupation of the octahedral sites in the larger LaH/sub 2/ lattice. These experimental results also suggest that, in contrast to recent calculations, LaH/sub 3/ is a small-band-gap semiconductor.

  10. Band Structure of Helimagnons in MnSi Resolved by Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugler, M.; Brandl, G.; Waizner, J.; Janoschek, M.; Georgii, R.; Bauer, A.; Seemann, K.; Rosch, A.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.; Garst, M.

    2015-08-01

    A magnetic helix realizes a one-dimensional magnetic crystal with a period given by the pitch length λh . Its spin-wave excitations—the helimagnons—experience Bragg scattering off this periodicity, leading to gaps in the spectrum that inhibit their propagation along the pitch direction. Using high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering, the resulting band structure of helimagnons was resolved by preparing a single crystal of MnSi in a single magnetic-helix domain. At least five helimagnon bands could be identified that cover the crossover from flat bands at low energies with helimagnons basically localized along the pitch direction to dispersing bands at higher energies. In the low-energy limit, we find the helimagnon spectrum to be determined by a universal, parameter-free theory. Taking into account corrections to this low-energy theory, quantitative agreement is obtained in the entire energy range studied with the help of a single fitting parameter.

  11. Advancing contact angles on large structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Yumiko; Itakura, Yoshinori; Gobo, Junichi; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    To understand wetting phenomena on complex surfaces, simple modeling experiments in two-dimension system would be one of the most efficient approaches. We develop a new experimental method for wetting dynamics using a large pseudo two- dimensional droplet. This method is useful to examine theoretical studies developed in two dimensional systems. In this study, we examine a pinning and depinning phenomena on millimeter-size structured surface to explain the origin of contact angle hysteresis. Contact lines of the droplet are pinned and deppined at the edge of surface texture. The contact lines can move when the contact angle is equal to the Young's contact angle which are determined by the balance of the surface and interfacial tension immediate vicinity of the contact lines, which is different from the Wenzel's low. Our approach enables to realize a macroscopic modelling experiment of wetting on complex surfaces, which opens a path to design functional surfaces with chemical and physical structure.

  12. Enlarged band gap and electron switch in graphene-based step-barrier structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Tao Ye, Cheng-Zhi; Li, Wen

    2013-11-04

    We study the transmission through a step-barrier in gapped graphene and propose a method to enlarge the band gap. The step-barrier structure consists of two or more barriers with different strengths. It is found that the band gap could be effectively enlarged and controlled by adjusting the barrier strengths in the light of the mass term. Klein tunneling at oblique incidence is suppressed due to the asymmetry of step-barrier, contrary to the cases in single-barrier and superlattices. Furthermore, a tunable conductance channel could be opened up in the conductance gap, suggesting an application of the structure as an electron switch.

  13. Structural studies and band gap tuning of Cr doped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Srinet, Gunjan Kumar, Ravindra Sajal, Vivek

    2014-04-24

    Structural and optical properties of Cr doped ZnO nanoparticles prepared by the thermal decomposition method are presented. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the substitution of Cr on Zn sites without changing the wurtzite structure of ZnO. Modified form of W-H equations was used to calculate various physical parameters and their variation with Cr doping is discussed. Significant red shift was observed in band gap, i.e., a band gap tuning is achieved by Cr doping which could eventually be useful for optoelectronic applications.

  14. Effective parameters in beam acoustic metamaterials based on energy band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong; Hou, Mingming; Kuan, Lu; Shen, Li

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to calculate the effective material parameters of beam acoustic metamaterials. The effective material parameters of a periodic beam are calculated as an example. The dispersion relations and energy band structures of this beam are calculated. Subsequently, the effective material parameters of the beam are investigated by using the energy band structures. Then, the modal analysis and transmission properties of the beams with finite cells are simulated in order to confirm the correctness of effective approximation. The results show that the periodic beam can be equivalent to the homogeneous beam with dynamic effective material parameters in passband.

  15. Complex band structure with ultrasoft pseudopotentials: fcc Ni and Ni nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smogunov, Alexander; Dal Corso, Andrea; Tosatti, Erio

    2003-06-01

    We generalize to magnetic transition metals the approach proposed by Choi and Ihm for calculating the complex band structure of periodic systems, a key ingredient for future calculations of conductivity of an open quantum system within the Landauer-Buttiker theory. The method is implemented with ultrasoft pseudopotentials and plane wave basis set in a DFT-LSDA ab initio scheme. As a first example, we present the complex band structure of bulk fcc Ni (which constitutes the tips of a Ni nanocontact) and monatomic Ni wire (the junction between two tips). Based on our results, we anticipate some features of the spin-dependent conductance in a Ni nanocontact.

  16. Elimination of surface band bending on N-polar InN with thin GaN capping

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmík, J. Haščík, Š.; Kučera, M.; Kúdela, R.; Dobročka, E.; Adikimenakis, A.; Mičušík, M.; Gregor, M.; Plecenik, A.; Georgakilas, A.

    2015-11-09

    0.5–1 μm thick InN (0001) films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy with N- or In-polarity are investigated for the presence of native oxide, surface energy band bending, and effects introduced by 2 to 4 monolayers of GaN capping. Ex situ angle-resolved x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy is used to construct near-surface (GaN)/InN energy profiles, which is combined with deconvolution of In3d signal to trace the presence of InN native oxide for different types of polarity and capping. Downwards surface energy band bending was observed on bare samples with native oxide, regardless of the polarity. It was found that the In-polar InN surface is most readily oxidized, however, with only slightly less band bending if compared with the N-polar sample. On the other hand, InN surface oxidation was effectively mitigated by GaN capping. Still, as confirmed by ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy and by energy band diagram calculations, thin GaN cap layer may provide negative piezoelectric polarization charge at the GaN/InN hetero-interface of the N-polar sample, in addition to the passivation effect. These effects raised the band diagram up by about 0.65 eV, reaching a flat-band profile.

  17. Structural, electronic structure, and band alignment properties at epitaxial NiO/Al2O3 heterojunction evaluated from synchrotron based X-ray techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. D.; Nand, Mangla; Das, Arijeet; Ajimsha, R. S.; Upadhyay, Anuj; Kamparath, Rajiv; Shukla, D. K.; Mukherjee, C.; Misra, P.; Rai, S. K.; Sinha, A. K.; Jha, S. N.; Phase, D. M.; Ganguli, Tapas

    2016-04-01

    The valence band offset value of 2.3 ± 0.2 eV at epitaxial NiO/Al2O3 heterojunction is determined from photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. Pulsed laser deposited thin film of NiO on Al2O3 substrate is epitaxially grown along [111] direction with two domain structures, which are in-plane rotated by 60° with respect to each other. Observation of Pendellosung oscillations around Bragg peak confirms high interfacial and crystalline quality of NiO layer deposited on Al2O3 substrate. Surface related feature in Ni 2p3/2 core level spectra along with oxygen K-edge soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicates that the initial growth of NiO on Al2O3 substrate is in the form of islands, which merge to form NiO layer for the larger coverage. The value of conduction band offset is also evaluated from the measured values of band gaps of NiO and Al2O3 layers. A type-I band alignment at NiO and Al2O3 heterojunction is also obtained. The determined values of band offsets can be useful in heterojunction based light emitting devices.

  18. Band structure engineering and thermoelectric properties of charge-compensated filled skutterudites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R.; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L.; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-12

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content,more » we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively.« less

  19. High binding energy band structure of Bi-2212 as measured by ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, K.; Graf, J.; Gweon, G.-H.; Zhou, S. Y.; Sahrakorpi, S.; Lindroos, M.; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.; Eisaki, H.; Sasagawa, T.; Takagi, H.; Uchida, S.; Lanzara, A.

    2006-03-01

    The study of the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has so far focused on the states near the Fermi level, believed to be fundamental for most of the properties of cuprates. However, it is well known that in doped Mott insulators the low and high energy physics are strongly coupled one to the other. Therefore, to gain insight on the real physics of cuprates a full characterization of the electronic band structure up to energies of the order of the lower Hubbard band and beyond is needed. Here we report a detailed, doping dependent study of the band structure of Bi2212 superconductors at energies of the order of 1-2 eV. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of local density approximation (LDA) based computations, where the presence of the ``spaghetti'' of Cu-O and O-bands is predicted. Comparison between computed and measured bands provides insight into many-body renormalization effects.

  20. Band structure engineering and thermoelectric properties of charge-compensated filled skutterudites

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R.; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L.; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-12

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content, we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively.

  1. Band Structure Engineering and Thermoelectric Properties of Charge-Compensated Filled Skutterudites

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R.; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L.; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content, we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively. PMID:26456013

  2. Band Structure Engineering and Thermoelectric Properties of Charge-Compensated Filled Skutterudites.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content, we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively. PMID:26456013

  3. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann; ONeill, Peggy; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quasi-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well-managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  4. Correlating simulated surface marks with near-surface tornado structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Michael I.

    Tornadoes often leave behind patterns of debris deposition, or "surface marks", which provide a direct signature of their near surface winds. The intent of this thesis is to investigate what can be learned about near-surface tornado structure and intensity through the properties of surface marks generated by simulated, debris-laden tornadoes. Earlier work showed through numerical simulations that the tornado's structure and intensity is highly sensitive to properties of the near-surface flow and can change rapidly in time for some conditions. The strongest winds often occur within tens of meters of the surface where the threat to human life and property is highest, and factors such as massive debris loadings and asymmetry of the main vortex have proven to be critical complications in some regimes. However, studying this portion of the flow in the field is problematic; while Doppler radar provides the best tornado wind field measurements, it cannot probe below about 20 m, and interpretation of Doppler data requires assumptions about tornado symmetry, steadiness in time, and correlation between scatterer and air velocities that are more uncertain near the surface. As early as 1967, Fujita proposed estimating tornado wind speeds from analysis of aerial photography and ground documentation of surface marks. A handful of studies followed but were limited by difficulties in interpreting physical origins of the marks, and little scientific attention has been paid to them since. Here, Fujita's original idea is revisited in the context of three-dimensional, large-eddy simulations of tornadoes with fully-coupled debris. In this thesis, the origins of the most prominent simulated marks are determined and compared with historical interpretations of real marks. The earlier hypothesis that cycloidal surface marks were directly correlated with the paths of individual vortices (either the main vortex or its secondary vortices, when present) is unsupported by the simulation results

  5. Impact of [110]/(001) uniaxial stress on valence band structure and hole effective mass of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianli, Ma; Heming, Zhang; Jianjun, Song; Guanyu, Wang; Xiaoyan, Wang; Xiaobo, Xu

    2011-02-01

    The valence band structure and hole effective mass of silicon under a uniaxial stress in (001) surface along the [110] direction were detailedly investigated in the framework of the k · p theory. The results demonstrated that the splitting energy between the top band and the second band for uniaxial compressive stress is bigger than that of the tensile one at the same stress magnitude, and of all common used crystallographic direction, such as [110], [001], [1¯10] and [100], the effective mass for the top band along [110] crystallographic direction is lower under uniaxial compressive stress compared with other stresses and crystallographic directions configurations. In view of suppressing the scattering and reducing the effective mass, the [110] crystallographic direction is most favorable to be used as transport direction of the charge carrier to enhancement mobility when a uniaxial compressive stress along [110] direction is applied. The obtained results can provide a theory reference for the design and the selective of optimum stress and crystallorgraphic direction configuration of uniaxial strained silicon devices.

  6. Band stop vibration suppression using a passive X-shape structured lever-type isolation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunchuan; Jing, Xingjian; Chen, Zhaobo

    2016-02-01

    In the paper, band-stop vibration suppression property using a novel X-shape structured lever-type isolation system is studied. The geometrical nonlinear property of an X-shape supporting structure is used to improve the band-stop characteristics in the low frequency range of the lever-type vibration isolator. With the dynamics modeling of this hybrid structural system, it is shown that the proposed hybrid vibration system has very beneficial nonlinear stiffness and damping properties which are helpful to achieve much wider stop bandwidth. Theoretical results demonstrate that the anti-resonant frequencies, width and magnitude of the stop band can all be flexibly designed with structural parameters, and the parameters of the X-shape supporting structure are very critical for designing the band-stop frequency to achieve excellent low-frequency isolation performance. The results in the study provide a new approach to the design of the passive vibration suppression system in the low frequency region.

  7. Complete multipactor suppression in an X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, C.; Gold, S. H.; Fischer, Richard; Gai, W.

    2016-05-01

    Multipactor is a major issue limiting the gradient of rf-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures. Theoretical models have predicted that an axial magnetic field applied to DLA structures may completely block the multipactor discharge. However, previous attempts to demonstrate this magnetic field effect in an X-band traveling-wave DLA structure were inconclusive, due to the axial variation of the applied magnetic field, and showed only partial suppression of the multipactor loading [Jing et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 213503 (2013)]. The present experiment has been performed under improved conditions with a uniform axial magnetic field extending along the length of an X-band standing-wave DLA structure. Multipactor loading began to be continuously reduced starting from 3.5 kG applied magnetic field and was completely suppressed at ˜8 kG. Dependence of multipactor suppression on the rf gradient inside the DLA structure was also measured.

  8. Band gap structures in two-dimensional super porous phononic crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Sun, Xiu-zhan; Chen, Shao-ting

    2013-02-01

    As one kind of new linear cellular alloys (LCAs), Kagome honeycombs, which are constituted by triangular and hexagonal cells, attract great attention due to the excellent performance compared to the ordinary ones. Instead of mechanical investigation, the in-plane elastic wave dispersion in Kagome structures are analyzed in this paper aiming to the multi-functional application of the materials. Firstly, the band structures in the common two-dimensional (2D) porous phononic structures (triangular or hexagonal honeycombs) are discussed. Then, based on these results, the wave dispersion in Kagome honeycombs is given. Through the component cell porosity controlling, the effects of component cells on the whole responses of the structures are investigated. The intrinsic relation between the component cell porosity and the critical porosity of Kagome honeycombs is established. These results will provide an important guidance in the band structure design of super porous phononic crystals. PMID:23089223

  9. 30 CFR 75.1708-1 - Surface structures; fireproof construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface structures; fireproof construction. 75... Surface structures; fireproof construction. Structures of fireproof construction is interpreted to mean structures with fireproof exterior surfaces....

  10. 30 CFR 75.1708-1 - Surface structures; fireproof construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface structures; fireproof construction. 75... Surface structures; fireproof construction. Structures of fireproof construction is interpreted to mean structures with fireproof exterior surfaces....

  11. 30 CFR 75.1708-1 - Surface structures; fireproof construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface structures; fireproof construction. 75... Surface structures; fireproof construction. Structures of fireproof construction is interpreted to mean structures with fireproof exterior surfaces....

  12. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jerome Sutherland

    2001-05-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.

  13. Damping Effect Studies for X-band Normal Conducting High Gradient Standing Wave Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, S.; Li, Z.; Tantawi, S.G.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Wang, J.; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    The Multi-TeV colliders should have the capability to accelerate low emittance beam with high rf efficiency, X-band normal conducting high gradient accelerating structure is one of the promising candidate. However, the long range transverse wake field which can cause beam emittance dilution is one of the critical issues. We examined effectiveness of dipole mode damping in three kinds of X-band, {pi}-mode standing wave structures at 11.424GHz with no detuning considered. They represent three damping schemes: damping with cylindrical iris slot, damping with choke cavity and damping with waveguide coupler. We try to reduce external Q factor below 20 in the first two dipole bands, which usually have very high (R{sub T}/Q){sub T}. The effect of damping on the acceleration mode is also discussed.

  14. Mini-Dirac cones in the band structure of a copper intercalated epitaxial graphene superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forti, S.; Stöhr, A.; Zakharov, A. A.; Coletti, C.; Emtsev, K. V.; Starke, U.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic band structure of an epitaxial graphene superlattice, generated by intercalating a monolayer of Cu atoms, is directly imaged by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The 3.2 nm lateral period of the superlattice is induced by a varying registry between the graphene honeycomb and the Cu atoms as imposed by the heteroepitaxial interface Cu/SiC. The carbon atoms experience a lateral potential across the supercell of an estimated value of about 65 meV. The potential leads to strong energy renormalization in the band structure of the graphene layer and the emergence of mini-Dirac cones. The mini-cones’ band velocity is reduced to about half of graphene's Fermi velocity. Notably, the ordering of the interfacial Cu atoms can be reversibly blocked by mild annealing. The superlattice indeed disappears at ∼220 °C.

  15. Correlation between surface chemistry, density, and band gap in nanocrystalline WO3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Vemuri, R S; Engelhard, M H; Ramana, C V

    2012-03-01

    Nanocrystalline WO(3) thin films were produced by sputter-deposition by varying the ratio of argon to oxygen in the reactive gas mixture during deposition. The surface chemistry, physical characteristics, and optical properties of nanocrystalline WO(3) films were evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), and spectrophotometric measurements. The effect of ultramicrostructure was significant on the optical properties of WO(3) films. The XPS analyses indicate the formation of stoichiometric WO(3) with tungsten existing in fully oxidized valence state (W(6+)). However, WO(3) films grown at high oxygen concentration (>60%) in the sputtering gas mixture were over stoichiometric with excess oxygen. XRR simulations based on isotropic WO(3) film-SiO(2) interface-Si substrate modeling indicate that the density of WO(3) films is sensitive to the oxygen content in the sputtering gas. The spectral transmission of the films increased with increasing oxygen. The band gap of these films increases from 2.78 to 3.25 eV with increasing oxygen. A direct correlation between the film density and band gap in nanocrystalline WO(3) films is established on the basis of the observed results. PMID:22332637

  16. Correlation between surface chemistry, density and band gap in nanocrystalline WO3 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vemuri, Venkata Rama Ses; Engelhard, Mark H.; Ramana, C.V.

    2012-03-01

    Nanocrystalline WO3 thin films were produced by sputter-deposition by varying the ratio of argon to oxygen in the reactive gas mixture during deposition. The surface chemistry, physical characteristics, and optical properties of nanocrystalline WO3 films were evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), and spectrophotometric measurements. The effect of ultra-microstructure was significant on the optical properties of WO3 films. The XPS analyses indicate the formation of stoichiometric WO3 with tungsten existing in fully oxidized valence state (W6+). However, WO3 films grown at high oxygen concentration (>60%) in the sputtering gas mixture were over stoichiometric with excess oxygen. XRR simulations, which are based on isotropic WO3 film - SiO2 interface - Si substrate model, indicate that the density of WO3 films is sensitive to the oxygen content in the sputtering gas. The spectral transmission of the films increased with the increasing oxygen. The band gap of these films increases from 2.78 eV to 3.25 eV with increasing oxygen. A direct correlation between the film-density and band gap in nanocrystalline WO3 films is established based on the observed results.

  17. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    PubMed Central

    Zribi, Mehrez; Pardé, Mickael; Boutin, Jacquline; Fanise, Pascal; Hauser, Daniele; Dechambre, Monique; Kerr, Yann; Leduc-Leballeur, Marion; Reverdin, Gilles; Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten; Albergel, Clement; Calvet, Jean Christophe; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Rius, Antonio; Tenerelli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The “Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies” (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed on board a dedicated French ATR42 research aircraft, in conjunction with other airborne instruments (C-Band scatterometer—STORM, the GOLD-RTR GPS system, the infrared CIMEL radiometer and a visible wavelength camera). Following initial laboratory qualifications, three airborne campaigns involving 21 flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight horizontal flights, circular flights, wing and nose wags over the ocean. Analysis of the first two campaigns in 2007 and 2008 leads us to improve the CAROLS radiometer regarding isolation between channels and filter bandwidth. After implementation of these improvements, results show that the instrument is conforming to specification and is a useful tool for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite validation as well as for specific studies on surface soil moisture or ocean salinity. PMID:22346599

  18. Fully opposite spin polarization of electron and hole bands in DyN and related band structures of GdN and HoN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheiwchanchamnangij, Tawinan; Lambrecht, Walter R. L.

    2015-07-01

    Using quasiparticle self-consistent G W calculations, we show that DyN has an unusual nearly zero indirect gap semimetallic band structure in which the states near the valence band maximum are fully minority spin polarized at Γ while the states near the conduction band minimum (at X ) have fully majority spin character. This arises due to a strong hybridization of one of the minority spin f states of dysprosium with the N-2 p bands. The reason why only one of the f bands hybridizes is explained using symmetry arguments. We show that in HoN, this hybridization is already strongly reduced because of the deeper Ho-4 f minority spin states.

  19. Longitudinal surface structures (flowstripes) on Antarctic glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, N. F.; Gudmundsson, G. H.

    2012-03-01

    Longitudinal surface structures ("flowstripes") are common on many glaciers but their origin and significance are poorly understood. In this paper we present observations of the development of these longitudinal structures from four different Antarctic glacier systems; the Lambert Glacier/Amery Ice Shelf area, the Taylor and Ferrar Glaciers in the Ross Sea sector, Crane and Jorum Glaciers (ice-shelf tributary glaciers) on the Antarctic Peninsula, and the onset zone of a tributary to the Recovery Glacier Ice Stream in the Filchner Ice Shelf area. Mapping from optical satellite images demonstrates that longitudinal surface structures develop in two main situations: (1) as relatively wide flow stripes within glacier flow units and (2) as relatively narrow flow stripes where there is convergent flow around nunataks or at glacier confluence zones. Our observations indicate that the confluence features are narrower, sharper, and more clearly defined features. They are characterised by linear troughs or depressions on the ice surface and are much more common than the former type. Longitudinal surface structures within glacier flow units have previously been explained as the surface expression of localised bed perturbations but a universal explanation for those forming at glacier confluences is lacking. Here we propose that these features are formed at zones of ice acceleration and extensional flow at glacier confluences. We provide a schematic model for the development of longitudinal surface structures based on extensional flow that can explain their ridge and trough morphology as well as their down-ice persistence.

  20. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement of water as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate common features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water. PMID:22125414

  1. Electronic structure descriptor for the discovery of narrow-band red-emitting phosphors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Zhenbin; Chu, Iek -Heng; Zhou, Fei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-05-09

    Narrow-band red-emitting phosphors are a critical component of phosphor-converted light-emitting diodes for highly efficient illumination-grade lighting. In this work, we report the discovery of a quantitative descriptor for narrow-band Eu2+-activated emission identified through a comparison of the electronic structures of known narrow-band and broad-band phosphors. We find that a narrow emission bandwidth is characterized by a large splitting of more than 0.1 eV between the two highest Eu2+ 4f7 bands. By incorporating this descriptor in a high-throughput first-principles screening of 2259 nitride compounds, we identify five promising new nitride hosts for Eu2+-activated red-emitting phosphors that are predicted to exhibit goodmore » chemical stability, thermal quenching resistance, and quantum efficiency, as well as narrow-band emission. Lastly, our findings provide important insights into the emission characteristics of rare-earth activators in phosphor hosts and a general strategy to the discovery of phosphors with a desired emission peak and bandwidth.« less

  2. Band gap structure modification of amorphous anodic Al oxide film by Ti-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Canulescu, S. Schou, J.; Rechendorff, K.; Pleth Nielsen, L.; Borca, C. N.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Bordo, K.; Ambat, R.

    2014-03-24

    The band structure of pure and Ti-alloyed anodic aluminum oxide has been examined as a function of Ti concentration varying from 2 to 20 at. %. The band gap energy of Ti-alloyed anodic Al oxide decreases with increasing Ti concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that Ti atoms are not located in a TiO{sub 2} unit in the oxide layer, but rather in a mixed Ti-Al oxide layer. The optical band gap energy of the anodic oxide layers was determined by vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy in the energy range from 4.1 to 9.2 eV (300–135 nm). The results indicate that amorphous anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a direct band gap of 7.3 eV, which is about ∼1.4 eV lower than its crystalline counterpart (single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Upon Ti-alloying, extra bands appear within the band gap of amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, mainly caused by Ti 3d orbitals localized at the Ti site.

  3. Interacting quasi-band theory for electronic states in compound semiconductor alloys: Wurtzite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Ayaka; Oda, Masato; Shinozuka, Yuzo

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on the electronic states of compound semiconductor alloys of wurtzite structure calculated by the recently proposed interacting quasi-band (IQB) theory combined with empirical sp3 tight-binding models. Solving derived quasi-Hamiltonian 24 × 24 matrix that is characterized by the crystal parameters of the constituents facilitates the calculation of the conduction and valence bands of wurtzite alloys for arbitrary concentrations under a unified scheme. The theory is applied to III–V and II–VI wurtzite alloys: cation-substituted Al1‑ x Ga x N and Ga1‑ x In x N and anion-substituted CdS1‑ x Se x and ZnO1‑ x S x . The obtained results agree well with the experimental data, and are discussed in terms of mutual mixing between the quasi-localized states (QLS) and quasi-average bands (QAB): the latter bands are approximately given by the virtual crystal approximation (VCA). The changes in the valence and conduction bands, and the origin of the band gap bowing are discussed on the basis of mixing character.

  4. Photodissociation of ozone in the Hartley band: Potential energy surfaces, nonadiabatic couplings, and singlet/triplet branching ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinke, R.; McBane, G. C.

    2010-01-01

    The lowest five A1' states of ozone, involved in the photodissociation with UV light, are analyzed on the basis of multireference configuration interaction electronic structure calculations with emphasis on the various avoided crossings in different regions of coordinate space. Global diabatic potential energy surfaces are constructed for the lowest four states termed X, A, B, and R. In addition, the off-diagonal potentials that couple the initially excited state B with states R and A are constructed to reflect results from additional electronic structure calculations, including the calculation of nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The A/X and A/R couplings are also considered, although in a less ambitious manner. The photodissociation dynamics are studied by means of trajectory surface hopping (TSH) calculations with the branching ratio between the singlet, O(D1)+O2(Δ1g), and triplet, O(P3)+O2(Σ3g-), channels being the main focus. The semiclassical branching ratio agrees well with quantum mechanical results except for wavelengths close to the threshold of the singlet channel. The calculated O(D1) quantum yield is approximately 0.90-0.95 across the main part of the Hartley band, in good agreement with experimental data. TSH calculations including all four states show that transitions B→A are relatively unimportant and subsequent transitions A→X/R to the triplet channel are negligible.

  5. Improving Ku-band Scatterometer Ocean Surface Wind Direction Retrievals in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, R. C.; Zhang, J.; Black, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are regions of very strong rain and very high winds, both of which present major challenges to surface wind vector retrieval from Ku-band scatterometers. Wind speed and wind direction retrievals can incur severe errors in regions of high rain rates. One particular signature of rain contamination is wind directions in the across-swath direction, which often leads to displaced circulation centers. Recently, Stiles et al. (2014) developed a method for retrieving QuikSCAT tropical cyclone wind speeds using a neural network approach that was tuned using H*WIND surface wind analyses and passive microwave-estimated rain rates from satellites. We are developing a scene-wide methodology by which a set of dynamically-consistent wind directions can be estimated from these wind speeds. The method is based on an iterative use of a tropical cyclone-specific sea-level pressure retrieval technique that we developed. The sea-level pressure analysis uses a boundary layer model that includes the dynamical shallowing of the tropical cyclone boundary layer toward the storm center, a roll-off in surface drag at high wind speeds, and, storm motion-corrected nonlinear mean flow advection effects. Scene-wide consistency is enforced by the integral nature (with respect to the surface wind vector field) of the derived surface pressure pattern and a constraint that the geostrophic contribution to the total flow is non-divergent. We are currently developing methods to evaluate the retrieved wind directions based on HRD aircraft observations and a limited-domain wind vector partitioning of the retrieved wind vectors into irrotational, non-divergent, and, background flow deformation contributions.

  6. Evidence of reduced surface electron-phonon scattering in the conduction band of Bi2Se3 by nonequilibrium ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepaldi, A.; Cilento, F.; Ressel, B.; Cacho, C.; Johannsen, J. C.; Zacchigna, M.; Berger, H.; Bugnon, Ph.; Grazioli, C.; Turcu, I. C. E.; Springate, E.; Kern, K.; Grioni, M.; Parmigiani, F.

    2013-09-01

    The nature of the Dirac quasiparticles in topological insulators calls for a direct investigation of the electron-phonon scattering at the surface. By comparing time-resolved ARPES measurements of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with different probing depths, we show that the relaxation dynamics of the electronic temperature of the conduction band is much slower at the surface than in the bulk. This observation suggests that surface phonons are less effective in cooling the electron gas in the conduction band.

  7. Structure and Evolution of Convection Band Occurred over the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Lee, T.

    2011-12-01

    A significant portion of the annual precipitation on the Korean peninsula is produced by heavy precipitation systems (HPSs) during summer. HPSs over the Korean peninsula could be classified into four major types (convection bands, cloud clusters, isolated thunderstorms, and squall lines) by phenomenological analysis. Among four major types of HPSs, convection bands (CBs) tend to concentrate a large amount of rainfall over limited area due to their quasi-stationary behavior for several hours. Convective cells embedded in CB move along the band and new cells are continuously formed in the upstream of the band. In this study, the structure and evolution of CB have been investigated using NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Thirty CB cases occurred during 2000-2010 were selected to conduct composite analysis. We obtained several profiles which represent northern area (NA), southern area (SA), and upstream area (UA) of CB by composite analysis. Modest band-perpendicular wind component (5 m s-1) is found in the level of 925-1000 hPa in SA, while band-perpendicular wind component of NA is nearly zero. Additionally, equivalent potential temperature in the lower-troposphere of SA is about 10 K larger than that of NA. Low-level band-perpendicular wind component of SA seems to play an important role in the development of CB by providing the environment for large-scale convergence and transporting warm and moist air from southern area of CB. Band-parallel wind component is predominant in the middle- and lower-troposphere. On the basis of the results of composite analysis, ideal simulation for the evolution of CB was set up. The analysis for the evolution of CB is in progress.

  8. Control of valence and conduction band energies in layered transition metal phosphates via surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Levi C; Kolb, Brian; Kolpak, Alexie M

    2016-05-18

    Layered transition metal phosphates and phosphites (TMPs) are a class of materials composed of layers of 2D sheets bound together via van der Waals interactions and/or hydrogen bonds. Explored primarily for use in proton transfer, their unique chemical tunability also makes TMPs of interest for forming large-scale hybrid materials. Further, unlike many layered materials, TMPs can readily be solution exfoliated to form single 2D sheets or bilayers, making them exciting candidates for a variety of applications. However, the electronic properties of TMPs have largely been unstudied to date. In this work, we use first-principles computations to investigate the atomic and electronic structure of TMPs with a variety of stoichiometries. We demonstrate that there exists a strong linear relationship between the band gap and the ionic radius of the transition metal cation in these materials, and show that this relationship, which opens opportunities for engineering new compositions with a wide range of band gaps, arises from constraints imposed by the phosphorus-oxygen bond geometry. In addition, we find that the energies of the valence and conduction band edges can be systematically tuned over a range of ∼3 eV via modification of the functional group extending from the phosphorus. Based on the Hammett constant of this functional group, we identify a simple, predictive relationship for the ionization potential and electron affinity of layered TMPs. Our results thus provide guidelines for systematic design of TMP-derived functional materials, which may enable new approaches for optimizing charge transfer in electronics, photovoltaics, electrocatalysts, and other applications. PMID:27157509

  9. Thermal-induced surface plasmon band shift of gold nanoparticle monolayer: morphology and refractive index sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemin; Zhang, Junhu; Wang, Huan; Hao, Yudong; Zhang, Xun; Wang, Tieqiang; Wang, Yunan; Zhao, Ran; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2010-11-19

    In this paper, thermal-induced behaviors of a gold nanoparticle monolayer on glass slides are investigated. First, through horizontal lifting, gold nanoparticle monolayers are transferred from a water/hexane interface to glass slides. Then thermal treatment is carried out in air, after which an apparent color change of the obtained samples is noticed, depending on the annealing temperature, reflecting a shift of the surface plasmon band (SPB). Depending on the trend of SPB shift, the overall thermal process is divided into three stages. In the first stage, SPB shows a redshift trend with concomitant band broadening. Further increase of the annealing temperature in the second stage results in an increase of interparticle distance. Thus an apparent decrease in absorbance takes place with SPB shift to shorter wavelengths. In the third stage, the SPB redshifts again. Bulk refractive index sensitivity (RIS) measurements are taken by immersing the obtained samples in solutions of various refractive indices and a linear dependence of RIS(λ) and RIS(ext) on refractive index is concluded. In particular, the influences of parameters such as particle sizes, location of SPB, substrate effect and morphology effect on RIS are discussed in detail. The corresponding performance of each sample as a localized surface plasmon resonance-based sensor is evaluated by a figure of merit (FOM) represented as FOM(λ) and FOM(ext). It is found that the optimum annealing temperature is 500 °C. In terms of nanoparticle sizes, samples with a 35 nm gold nanoparticle monolayer perform better than those with 15 nm. The current strategy is simple and facile to achieve fine control of the SPB, in which large-size precision instruments or complex chemosynthesis are unnecessary. Therefore, this method has not only significance for theory but also usefulness in practical applications. PMID:20972320

  10. Thermal-induced surface plasmon band shift of gold nanoparticle monolayer: morphology and refractive index sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuemin; Zhang, Junhu; Wang, Huan; Hao, Yudong; Zhang, Xun; Wang, Tieqiang; Wang, Yunan; Zhao, Ran; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, thermal-induced behaviors of a gold nanoparticle monolayer on glass slides are investigated. First, through horizontal lifting, gold nanoparticle monolayers are transferred from a water/hexane interface to glass slides. Then thermal treatment is carried out in air, after which an apparent color change of the obtained samples is noticed, depending on the annealing temperature, reflecting a shift of the surface plasmon band (SPB). Depending on the trend of SPB shift, the overall thermal process is divided into three stages. In the first stage, SPB shows a redshift trend with concomitant band broadening. Further increase of the annealing temperature in the second stage results in an increase of interparticle distance. Thus an apparent decrease in absorbance takes place with SPB shift to shorter wavelengths. In the third stage, the SPB redshifts again. Bulk refractive index sensitivity (RIS) measurements are taken by immersing the obtained samples in solutions of various refractive indices and a linear dependence of RISλ and RISext on refractive index is concluded. In particular, the influences of parameters such as particle sizes, location of SPB, substrate effect and morphology effect on RIS are discussed in detail. The corresponding performance of each sample as a localized surface plasmon resonance-based sensor is evaluated by a figure of merit (FOM) represented as FOMλ and FOMext. It is found that the optimum annealing temperature is 500 °C. In terms of nanoparticle sizes, samples with a 35 nm gold nanoparticle monolayer perform better than those with 15 nm. The current strategy is simple and facile to achieve fine control of the SPB, in which large-size precision instruments or complex chemosynthesis are unnecessary. Therefore, this method has not only significance for theory but also usefulness in practical applications.

  11. Three-Dimensional Structure of Vertebrate Muscle Z-Band: The Small-Square Lattice Z-Band in Rat Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Morris, Edward P.; Luther, Pradeep K.

    2015-01-01

    The Z-band in vertebrate striated muscle crosslinks actin filaments of opposite polarity from adjoining sarcomeres and transmits tension along myofibrils during muscular contraction. It is also the location of a number of proteins involved in signalling and myofibrillogenesis; mutations in these proteins lead to myopathies. Understanding the high-resolution structure of the Z-band will help us understand its role in muscle contraction and the role of these proteins in the function of muscle. The appearance of the Z-band in transverse-section electron micrographs typically resembles a small-square lattice or a basketweave appearance. In longitudinal sections, the Z-band width varies more with muscle type than species: slow skeletal and cardiac muscles have wider Z-bands than fast skeletal muscles. As the Z-band is periodic, Fourier methods have previously been used for three-dimensional structural analysis. To cope with variations in the periodic structure of the Z-band, we have used subtomogram averaging of tomograms of rat cardiac muscle in which subtomograms are extracted and compared and similar ones are averaged. We show that the Z-band comprises four to six layers of links, presumably α-actinin, linking antiparallel overlapping ends of the actin filaments from the adjoining sarcomeres. The reconstruction shows that the terminal 5–7 nm of the actin filaments within the Z-band is devoid of any α-actinin links and is likely to be the location of capping protein CapZ. PMID:26362007

  12. Three-Dimensional Structure of Vertebrate Muscle Z-Band: The Small-Square Lattice Z-Band in Rat Cardiac Muscle.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Morris, Edward P; Luther, Pradeep K

    2015-11-01

    The Z-band in vertebrate striated muscle crosslinks actin filaments of opposite polarity from adjoining sarcomeres and transmits tension along myofibrils during muscular contraction. It is also the location of a number of proteins involved in signalling and myofibrillogenesis; mutations in these proteins lead to myopathies. Understanding the high-resolution structure of the Z-band will help us understand its role in muscle contraction and the role of these proteins in the function of muscle. The appearance of the Z-band in transverse-section electron micrographs typically resembles a small-square lattice or a basketweave appearance. In longitudinal sections, the Z-band width varies more with muscle type than species: slow skeletal and cardiac muscles have wider Z-bands than fast skeletal muscles. As the Z-band is periodic, Fourier methods have previously been used for three-dimensional structural analysis. To cope with variations in the periodic structure of the Z-band, we have used subtomogram averaging of tomograms of rat cardiac muscle in which subtomograms are extracted and compared and similar ones are averaged. We show that the Z-band comprises four to six layers of links, presumably α-actinin, linking antiparallel overlapping ends of the actin filaments from the adjoining sarcomeres. The reconstruction shows that the terminal 5-7nm of the actin filaments within the Z-band is devoid of any α-actinin links and is likely to be the location of capping protein CapZ. PMID:26362007

  13. k.p Parameters with Accuracy Control from Preexistent First-Principles Band Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipahi, Guilherme; Bastos, Carlos M. O.; Sabino, Fernando P.; Faria Junior, Paulo E.; de Campos, Tiago; da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    The k.p method is a successful approach to obtain band structure, optical and transport properties of semiconductors. It overtakes the ab initio methods in confined systems due to its low computational cost since it is a continuum method that does not require all the atoms' orbital information. From an effective one-electron Hamiltonian, the k.p matrix representation can be calculated using perturbation theory and the parameters identified by symmetry arguments. The parameters determination, however, needs a complementary approach. In this paper, we developed a general method to extract the k.p parameters from preexistent band structures of bulk materials that is not limited by the crystal symmetry or by the model. To demonstrate our approach, we applied it to zinc blende GaAs band structure calculated by hybrid density functional theory within the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof functional (DFT-HSE), for the usual 8 ×8 k.p Hamiltonian. Our parameters reproduced the DFT-HSE band structure with great accuracy up to 20% of the first Brillouin zone (FBZ). Furthermore, for fitting regions ranging from 7-20% of FBZ, the parameters lie inside the range of values reported by the most reliable studies in the literature. The authors acknowledge financial support from the Brazilian agencies CNPq (Grant #246549/2012-2) and FAPESP (Grants #2011/19333-4, #2012/05618-0 and #2013/23393-8).

  14. Impact of the valence band structure of Cu2O on excitonic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweiner, Frank; Main, Jörg; Feldmaier, Matthias; Wunner, Günter; Uihlein, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    We present a method to calculate the excitonic spectra of all direct semiconductors with a complex valence band structure. The Schrödinger equation is solved using a complete basis set with Coulomb-Sturmian functions. This method also allows for the computation of oscillator strengths. Here we apply this method to investigate the impact of the valence band structure of cuprous oxide (Cu2O ) on the yellow exciton spectrum. Results differ from those of J. Thewes et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 027402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.027402]; the differences are discussed and explained. The difference between the second and third Luttinger parameter can be determined by comparisons with experiments; however, the evaluation of all three Luttinger parameters is not uniquely possible. Our results are consistent with band structure calculations. Considering also a finite momentum ℏ K of the center of mass, we show that the large K -dependent line splitting observed for the 1 S exciton state by G. Dasbach et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 107401 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.91.107401] is not related to an exchange interaction but rather to the complex valence band structure of Cu2O .

  15. Band structure analysis of an analytically solvable Hill equation with continuous potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, G. V.; Sprung, D. W. L.

    2015-03-01

    This paper concerns analytically solvable cases of Hill’s equation containing a continuously differentiable periodic potential. We outline a procedure for constructing the Floquet-Bloch fundamental system, and analyze the band structure of the system. The similarities to, and differences from, the cases of a piecewise constant periodic potential and the Mathieu potential, are illuminated.

  16. Doping and strain dependence of the electronic band structure in Ge and GeSn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chi; Gallagher, James; Senaratne, Charutha; Brown, Christopher; Fernando, Nalin; Zollner, Stefan; Kouvetakis, John; Menendez, Jose

    2015-03-01

    A systematic study of the effect of dopants and strain on the electronic structure of Ge and GeSn alloys is presented. Samples were grown by UHV-CVD on Ge-buffered Si using Ge3H8 and SnD4 as the sources of Ge and Sn, and B2H6/P(GeH3)3 as dopants. High-energy critical points in the joint-density of electronic states were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry, which yields detailed information on the strain and doping dependence of the so-called E1, E1 +Δ1 , E0' and E2 transitions. The corresponding dependencies of the lowest direct band gap E0 and the fundamental indirect band gap Eindwere studied via room-T photoluminescence spectroscopy. Of particular interest for this work were the determination of deformation potentials, band gap renormalization effects, Burstein-Moss shifts due to the presence of carriers at band minima, and the dependence of other critical point parameters, such as amplitudes and phase angles, on the doping concentration. The selective blocking of transitions due to high doping makes it possible to investigate the precise k-space location of critical points. These studies are complemented with detailed band-structure calculations within a full-zone k-dot- p approach. Supported by AFOSR under DOD AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0208 and DOD AFOSR FA9550-13-1-0022.

  17. Valley-dependent band structure and valley polarization in periodically modulated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei-Tao

    2016-08-01

    The valley-dependent energy band and transport property of graphene under a periodic magnetic-strained field are studied, where the time-reversal symmetry is broken and the valley degeneracy is lifted. The considered superlattice is composed of two different barriers, providing more degrees of freedom for engineering the electronic structure. The electrons near the K and K' valleys are dominated by different effective superlattices. It is found that the energy bands for both valleys are symmetric with respect to ky=-(AM+ξ AS) /4 under the symmetric superlattices. More finite-energy Dirac points, more prominent collimation behavior, and new crossing points are found for K' valley. The degenerate miniband near the K valley splits into two subminibands and produces a new band gap under the asymmetric superlattices. The velocity for the K' valley is greatly renormalized compared with the K valley, and so we can achieve a finite velocity for the K valley while the velocity for the K' valley is zero. Especially, the miniband and band gap could be manipulated independently, leading to an increase of the conductance. The characteristics of the band structure are reflected in the transmission spectra. The Dirac points and the crossing points appear as pronounced peaks in transmission. A remarkable valley polarization is obtained which is robust to the disorder and can be controlled by the strain, the period, and the voltage.

  18. Design of UWB monopole antenna with dual notched bands using one modified electromagnetic-bandgap structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Xu, Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG) structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR < 2 over UWB 3.1-10.6 GHz, except for the rejected bands of the world interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) and the wireless local area network (WLAN) at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively. PMID:24170984

  19. Design of UWB Monopole Antenna with Dual Notched Bands Using One Modified Electromagnetic-Bandgap Structure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG) structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR < 2 over UWB 3.1–10.6 GHz, except for the rejected bands of the world interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) and the wireless local area network (WLAN) at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively. PMID:24170984

  20. Tuning the band structures of single walled silicon carbide nanotubes with uniaxial strain: a first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Xiao, H. Y.; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2008-05-09

    Electronic band structures of single-walled silicon carbide nanotubes are studied under uniaxial strain using first principles calculations. The band structure can be tuned by mechanical strain in a wide energy range. The band gap decreases with uniaxial tensile strain, but initially increases with uniaxial compressive strain and then decreases with further increases in compressive strain. These results may provide a way to tune the electronic structures of silicon carbide nanotubes, which may have promising applications in building nanodevices.

  1. Effects of strain on the band structure of group-III nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qimin; Rinke, Patrick; Janotti, Anderson; Scheffler, Matthias; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2014-09-01

    We present a systematic study of strain effects on the electronic band structure of the group-III-nitrides (AlN, GaN and InN) in the wurtzite phase. The calculations are based on density functional theory with band-gap-corrected approaches including the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functional (HSE) and quasiparticle G0W0 methods. We study strain effects under realistic strain conditions, hydrostatic pressure, and biaxial stress. The strain-induced modification of the band structures is found to be nonlinear; transition energies and crystal-field splittings show a strong nonlinear behavior under biaxial stress. For the linear regime around the experimental lattice parameters, we present a complete set of deformation potentials (acz, act, D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, D6) that allows us to predict the band positions of group-III nitrides and their alloys (InGaN and AlGaN) under realistic strain conditions. The benchmarking G0W0 results for GaN agree well with the HSE data and indicate that HSE provides an appropriate description for the band structures of nitrides. We present a systematic study of strain effects on the electronic band structure of the group-III nitrides (AlN, GaN, and InN). We quantify the nonlinearity of strain effects by introducing a set of bowing parameters. We apply the calculated deformation potentials to the prediction of strain effects on transition energies and valence-band structures of InGaN alloys and quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaN, in various orientations (including c-plane, m-plane, and semipolar). The calculated band gap bowing parameters, including the strain effect for c-plane InGaN, agree well with the results obtained by hybrid functional alloy calculations. For semipolar InGaN QWs grown in (202¯1), (303¯1), and (303¯1¯) orientations, our calculated deformation potentials have provided results for polarization ratios in good agreement with the experimental observations, providing further confidence in the accuracy of our values.

  2. Infrared detectors and lasers operating in the 3-12 μm range using band-gap engineered structures with type II band-gap alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Venkataraman; Little, John W.; Tober, Richard L.

    2006-02-01

    The Type II broken band-gap alignment in semiconductor structures wherein the conduction band minimum is in one semiconductor (e.g., InAs) and the valence band maximum is in another (e.g., GaInSb) offers certain unique advantages which can be utilized to realize band-gap engineered novel quantum electro-optic devices such as lasers and detectors. The advantages of the type II structures include reduced Auger recombination, extending the effective band-gap energy of materials wherein type I band-gap alignment would give rise to difficulties such as miscibility gap. In this paper we describe the work carried out at the Army Research Laboratory on type II semiconductor quantum electro-optic devices such as IR lasers and detectors operating in the 3-12 μm range. Specifically we will cover the progress made in GaSb based type II strained layer superlattice IR detectors and Interband Cascade IR Lasers. We will also present our recent work in self-assembled quantum dots which have type II band-gap alignment with the matrix material in which the dots are embedded.

  3. Ferromagnetism and the electronic band structure in (Ga,Mn)(Bi,As) epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrubchak, O.; Sadowski, J.; Domagala, J. Z.; Andrearczyk, T.; Wosinski, T.

    2014-08-18

    Impact of Bi incorporation into (Ga,Mn)As layers on their electronic- and band-structures as well as their magnetic and structural properties has been studied. Homogenous (Ga,Mn)(Bi,As) layers of high structural perfection have been grown by the low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Post-growth annealing treatment of the layers results in an improvement of their structural and magnetic properties and an increase in the hole concentration in the layers. The modulation photoreflectance spectroscopy results are consistent with the valence-band model of hole-mediated ferromagnetism in the layers. This material combines the properties of (Ga,Mn)As and Ga(Bi,As) ternary compounds and offers the possibility of tuning its electrical and magnetic properties by controlling the alloy composition.

  4. Nonlinear optical response of semiconductor-nanocrystals-embedded photonic band gap structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chen; Zhang, Huichao; Tang, Luping; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Lv, Changgui; Cui, Yiping; Zhang, Jiayu

    2014-04-28

    Colloidal CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals (NCs), which were dispersed in SiO{sub 2} sol, were utilized to fabricate a SiO{sub 2}:NCs/TiO{sub 2} all-dielectric photonic band gap (PBG) structure. The third-order nonlinear refractive index (n{sub 2}) of the PBG structure was nearly triple of that of the SiO{sub 2}:NCs film due to the local field enhancement in the PBG structure. The photoinduced change in refractive index (Δn) could shift the PBG band edge, so the PBG structure would show significant transmission modification, whose transmission change was ∼17 folds of that of the SiO{sub 2}:NCs film. Under excitation of a 30 GW/cm{sup 2} femtosecond laser beam, a transmission decrease of 80% was realized.

  5. Electronic band structures and photovoltaic properties of MWO{sub 4} (M=Zn, Mg, Ca, Sr) compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong Wook; Cho, In-Sun; Shin, Seong Sik; Lee, Sangwook; Noh, Tae Hoon; Kim, Dong Hoe; Jung, Hyun Suk; Hong, Kug Sun

    2011-08-15

    Divalent metal tungstates, MWO{sub 4}, with wolframite (M=Zn and Mg) and scheelite (M=Ca and Sr) structures were prepared using a conventional solid state reaction method. Their electronic band structures were investigated by a combination of electronic band structure calculations and electrochemical measurements. From these investigations, it was found that the band structures (i.e. band positions and band gaps) of the divalent metal tungstates were significantly influenced by their crystal structural environments, such as the W-O bond length. Their photovoltaic properties were evaluated by applying to the working electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells. The dye-sensitized solar cells employing the wolframite-structured metal tungstates (ZnWO{sub 4} and MgWO{sub 4}) exhibited better performance than those using the scheelite-structured metal tungstates (CaWO{sub 4} and SrWO{sub 4}), which was attributed to their enhanced electron transfer resulting from their appropriate band positions. - Graphical abstract: The electronic band structures of divalent metal tungstates are described from the combination of experimental results and theoretical calculations, and their electronic structure-dependent photovoltaic performances are also studied. Highlights: > MWO{sub 4} compounds with wolframite (M=Zn and Mg) and scheelite structure (M=Ca and Sr) were prepared. > Their electronic band structures were investigated by the calculations and the measurements. > Their photovoltaic properties were determined by the crystal and electronic structures.

  6. Real-space finite-difference calculation method of generalized Bloch wave functions and complex band structures with reduced computational cost.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Hirose, Kikuji; Blügel, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    Generalized Bloch wave functions of bulk structures, which are composed of not only propagating waves but also decaying and growing evanescent waves, are known to be essential for defining the open boundary conditions in the calculations of the electronic surface states and scattering wave functions of surface and junction structures. Electronic complex band structures being derived from the generalized Bloch wave functions are also essential for studying bound states of the surface and junction structures, which do not appear in conventional band structures. We present a novel calculation method to obtain the generalized Bloch wave functions of periodic bulk structures by solving a generalized eigenvalue problem, whose dimension is drastically reduced in comparison with the conventional generalized eigenvalue problem derived by Fujimoto and Hirose [Phys. Rev. B 67, 195315 (2003)]. The generalized eigenvalue problem derived in this work is even mathematically equivalent to the conventional one, and, thus, we reduce computational cost for solving the eigenvalue problem considerably without any approximation and losing the strictness of the formulations. To exhibit the performance of the present method, we demonstrate practical calculations of electronic complex band structures and electron transport properties of Al and Cu nanoscale systems. Moreover, employing atom-structured electrodes and jellium-approximated ones for both of the Al and Si monatomic chains, we investigate how much the electron transport properties are unphysically affected by the jellium parts. PMID:25122409

  7. Surface chemical reactivity of ultrathin Pd(111) films on Ru(0001): Importance of orbital symmetry in the application of the d-band model

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Xiangshi; Cooper, Valentino R.; Weitering, Hanno H.; Snijders, Paul C.

    2015-09-22

    The chemical bonding of adsorbate molecules on transition-metal surfaces is strongly influenced by the hybridization between the molecular orbitals and the metal d-band. The strength of this interaction is often correlated with the location of the metal d-band center relative to the Fermi level. Here, we exploit finite size effects in the electronic structure of ultrathin Pd(111) films grown on Ru(0001) to tune their reactivity by changing the film thickness one atom layer at a time, while keeping all other variables unchanged. Interestingly, while bulk Pd(111) is reactive toward oxygen, Pd(111) films below five monolayers are surprisingly inert. This observation is fully in line with the d-band model prediction when applied to the orbitals involved in the bonding. The shift of the d-band center with film thickness is primarily attributed to shifts in the partial density of states associated with the 4dxz and 4dyz orbitals. This study provides an in-depth look into the orbital specific contributions to the surface chemical reactivity, providing new insights that could be useful in surface catalysis.

  8. Surface chemical reactivity of ultrathin Pd(111) films on Ru(0001): Importance of orbital symmetry in the application of the d-band model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yin, Xiangshi; Cooper, Valentino R.; Weitering, Hanno H.; Snijders, Paul C.

    2015-09-22

    The chemical bonding of adsorbate molecules on transition-metal surfaces is strongly influenced by the hybridization between the molecular orbitals and the metal d-band. The strength of this interaction is often correlated with the location of the metal d-band center relative to the Fermi level. Here, we exploit finite size effects in the electronic structure of ultrathin Pd(111) films grown on Ru(0001) to tune their reactivity by changing the film thickness one atom layer at a time, while keeping all other variables unchanged. Interestingly, while bulk Pd(111) is reactive toward oxygen, Pd(111) films below five monolayers are surprisingly inert. This observationmore » is fully in line with the d-band model prediction when applied to the orbitals involved in the bonding. The shift of the d-band center with film thickness is primarily attributed to shifts in the partial density of states associated with the 4dxz and 4dyz orbitals. This study provides an in-depth look into the orbital specific contributions to the surface chemical reactivity, providing new insights that could be useful in surface catalysis.« less

  9. Electronic structure of the side surface of Bi2 Se 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Chang-Youn; Han, Jinhee; Lee, Hyungjun; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the electronic band structure of a side surface geometry, other than the conventional [111] surface, of the topological insulator Bi 2 Se 3 using the first-principles pseudopotential calculations. As Bi 2 Se 3 is known to be a strong topological insulator, it is expected that an arbitrary surface would have the topological surface state characterized by Dirac-cone-like band dispersion and spin-momentum coupling. Here we indeed obtain surface states with linear band dispersion around the Gamma point, but with a strong anisotropy with different group velocities along different k-directions. Low energy effective hamiltonian is proposed, and physical implications of the anisotropic Dirac fermions are also discussed. This work was supported by NRF of Korea (Grant No. 2009-0081204) and KISTI Supercomputing Center (Project No. KSC-2008-S02-0004).

  10. Influence of leaching on surface composition, microstructure, and valence band of single grain icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, M.; Yadav, T. P.; Fournée, V.; Ledieu, J.; McGrath, R.; Sharma, H. R.

    2015-03-01

    The use of quasicrystals as precursors to catalysts for the steam reforming of methanol is potentially one of the most important applications of these new materials. To develop application as a technology requires a detailed understanding of the microscopic behavior of the catalyst. Here, we report the effect of leaching treatments on the surface microstructure, chemical composition, and valence band of the icosahedral (i-) Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal in an attempt to prepare a model catalyst. The high symmetry fivefold surface of a single grain i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal was leached with NaOH solution for varying times, and the resulting surface was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The leaching treatments preferentially remove Al producing a capping layer consisting of Fe and Cu oxides. The subsurface layer contains elemental Fe and Cu in addition to the oxides. The quasicrystalline bulk structure beneath remains unchanged. The subsurface gradually becomes Fe3O4 rich with increasing leaching time. The surface after leaching exhibits micron sized dodecahedral cavities due to preferential leaching along the fivefold axis. Nanoparticles of the transition metals and their oxides are precipitated on the surface after leaching. The size of the nanoparticles is estimated by high resolution transmission microscopy to be 5-20 nm, which is in agreement with the AFM results. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) confirms the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. SAED further reveals the formation of an interface between the high atomic density lattice planes of nanoparticles and the quasicrystal. These results provide an important insight into the preparation of model catalysts of nanoparticles for steam reforming of methanol.

  11. Influence of leaching on surface composition, microstructure, and valence band of single grain icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, M.; McGrath, R.; Sharma, H. R.; Yadav, T. P.; Fournée, V.; Ledieu, J.

    2015-03-07

    The use of quasicrystals as precursors to catalysts for the steam reforming of methanol is potentially one of the most important applications of these new materials. To develop application as a technology requires a detailed understanding of the microscopic behavior of the catalyst. Here, we report the effect of leaching treatments on the surface microstructure, chemical composition, and valence band of the icosahedral (i-) Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal in an attempt to prepare a model catalyst. The high symmetry fivefold surface of a single grain i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal was leached with NaOH solution for varying times, and the resulting surface was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The leaching treatments preferentially remove Al producing a capping layer consisting of Fe and Cu oxides. The subsurface layer contains elemental Fe and Cu in addition to the oxides. The quasicrystalline bulk structure beneath remains unchanged. The subsurface gradually becomes Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} rich with increasing leaching time. The surface after leaching exhibits micron sized dodecahedral cavities due to preferential leaching along the fivefold axis. Nanoparticles of the transition metals and their oxides are precipitated on the surface after leaching. The size of the nanoparticles is estimated by high resolution transmission microscopy to be 5-20 nm, which is in agreement with the AFM results. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) confirms the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. SAED further reveals the formation of an interface between the high atomic density lattice planes of nanoparticles and the quasicrystal. These results provide an important insight into the preparation of model catalysts of nanoparticles for steam reforming of methanol.

  12. B4N and Fe3BN nitrides bands structure and theoretical determination of bulk modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, A. V.

    2007-06-01

    With the evolution of material science there was some technological evolution as well as the need of finding new links which could be applied to diverse areas of knowledge. Thus, in this article, we study nitrides bands structures which contain boron, in two different stoichiometries Fe3BN and B4N. The choice of these compounds is meant to plan new links and to understand nitrides fundamental state properties facing these new crystalline structures. In order to resolve the compound band structure we used the method of linear Muffin Tin orbital (LMTO), with atomic sphere approximation (ASA). By using this method we obtained the energy of formation as a function of the lattice parameter as one of the results. We find the equilibrium lattice parameter of 6.9755 a.u., for the Fe3BN nitride, and in B4N, we have 6.8589 a.u. We also discuss in this article the charge transference between sites and the influence of pressure on the compound properties, as well as the Bulk modulus that is 239.82 GPa for Fe3BN and 105.48 GPa for B4N. We show the behaviour of the density of states (DOS) of the new band structure found for the proposed crystalline structure Fe3BN, in which the B atom replace the Fe atom in the corner of the structure γ‧- Fe4N.

  13. Crystal Structure and Band Gap Engineering in Polyoxometalate-Based Inorganic-Organic Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumyabrata; Sarkar, Sumanta; Pan, Jaysree; Waghmare, Umesh V; Dhanya, R; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Peter, Sebastian C

    2016-04-01

    We have demonstrated engineering of the electronic band gap of the hybrid materials based on POMs (polyoxometalates), by controlling its structural complexity through variation in the conditions of synthesis. The pH- and temperature-dependent studies give a clear insight into how these experimental factors affect the overall hybrid structure and its properties. Our structural manipulations have been successful in effectively tuning the optical band gap and electronic band structure of this kind of hybrids, which can find many applications in the field of photovoltaic and semiconducting devices. We have also addressed a common crystallographic disorder observed in Keggin-ion (one type of heteropolyoxometalate [POMs])-based hybrid materials. Through a combination of crystallographic, spectroscopic, and theoretical analysis of four new POM-based hybrids synthesized with tactically varied reaction conditions, we trace the origin and nature of the disorder associated with it and the subtle local structural coordination involved in its core picture. While the crystallography yields a centrosymmetric structure with planar coordination of Si, our analysis with XPS, IR, and Raman spectroscopy reveals a tetrahedral coordination with broken inversion symmetry, corroborated by first-principles calculations. PMID:26986739

  14. Topological band order, structural, electronic and optical properties of XPdBi (X = Lu, Sc) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimani, M.; Nourbakhsh, Z.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the structural, electronic and optical properties of LuPdBi and ScPdBi compounds are investigated using the density functional theory by WIEN2K package within the generalized gradient approximation, local density approximation, Engel-Vosco generalized gradient approximations and modified Becke-Johnson potential approaches. The topological phases and band orders of these compounds are studied. The effect of pressure on band inversion strength, electron density of states and the linear coefficient of the electronic specific heat of these compounds is investigated. Furthermore, the effect of pressure on real and imaginary parts of dielectric function, absorption and reflectivity coefficients of these compounds is studied.

  15. Investigation of band structure of {sup 103,105}Rh using microscopic computational technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun

    2015-08-28

    The high-spin structure in {sup 61}Cu nucleus is studied in terms of effective two body interaction. In order to take into account the deformed BCS basis, the basis states are expanded in terms of the core eigenfunctions. Yrast band with some other bands havew been obtained and back-bending in moment of inertia has also been calculated and compared with the available experimental data for {sup 61}Cu nucleus. On comparing the available experimental as well as other theoretical data, it is found that the treatment with PSM provides a satisfactory explanation of the available data.

  16. Structural characteristic correlated to the electronic band gap in Mo S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Shengqi; Park, Changyong; Shen, Guoyin

    2016-07-01

    The structural evolution with pressure in bulk Mo S2 has been investigated by high-pressure x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. We found that the out-of-plane S-Mo-S bond angle θ increases and that in in-plane angle ϕ decreases linearly with increasing pressure across the known semiconducting-to-metal phase transition, whereas the Mo-S bond length and the S-Mo-S trilayer thickness display only little change. Extrapolating the experimental result along the in-plane lattice parameter with pressure, both S-Mo-S bond angles trend to those found in monolayer Mo S2 , which manifests as a structural characteristic closely correlating the electronic band gap of Mo S2 to its physical forms and phases, e.g., monolayer as direct band gap semiconductor, multilayer or bulk as indirect band gap semiconductor, and high-pressure (>19 GPa ) bulk form as metal. Combined with the effects of bond strength and van der Waals interlayer interactions, the structural correlations between the characteristic bond angle and electronic band gaps are readily extendible to other transition metal dichalcogenide systems (M X2 , where M =Mo , W and X =S , Se, Te).

  17. Measurement and Analysis of Narrow-Band Surface Acoustic Waves in Ceramic Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, T. L.; Basu, S. N.; Sarin, V. K.; Murray, T. W.

    2008-02-01

    A laser-based ultrasonic system is used to measure the mechanical properties and thickness of mullite environmental barrier coatings deposited on SiC substrates. Narrow-band surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are generated with an amplitude modulated laser source, and a photorefractive crystal based interferometer coupled to a lock-in amplifier is used to detect the resulting surface displacement. The complex displacement field is mapped over a source-to-receiver distance of approximately 500 μm in order to extract the wavelength of the SAW at a given excitation frequency, from which the phase velocity is determined. Dispersion curves measured over a frequency range of 100-180 MHz are used to extract mean values for the elastic modulus and thickness of the coating over the measurement region. These values are compared to the mean elastic modulus and thickness of the coating measured using nanoindentation and optical microscopy, respectively. It is shown that porosity in the substrate can have a significant impact on the experimental results, particularly over short measurement distances. Experiments on SiC with 1-4% porosity show a linear increase of the mean SAW velocity with decreasing porosity. Additionally, measurements made on a sample with a given bulk porosity indicate that the SAW velocity varies locally, leading to additional error in the measurement of coating properties. This error can be reduced through spatially averaging the velocity measurements.

  18. G0W0 band structure of CdWO4.

    PubMed

    Laasner, Raul

    2014-03-26

    The full quasiparticle band structure of CdWO4 is calculated within the single-shot GW (G0W0) approximation using maximally localized Wannier functions, which allows one to assess the validity of the commonly used scissor operator. Calculations are performed using the Godby-Needs plasmon pole model and the accurate contour deformation technique. It is shown that while the two methods yield identical band gap energies, the low-lying states are given inaccurately by the plasmon pole model. We report a band gap energy of 4.94 eV, including spin-orbit interaction at the DFT-LDA (density functional theory-local density approximation) level. Quasiparticle renormalization in CdWO4 is shown to be correlated with localization distance. Electron and hole effective masses are calculated at the DFT and G0W0 levels. PMID:24599225

  19. Band gap and electronic structure of MgSiN{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, J. B. Råsander, M.; McGilvery, C. M.; Moram, M. A.; Palgrave, R.

    2014-09-15

    Density functional theory calculations and electron energy loss spectroscopy indicate that the electronic structure of ordered orthorhombic MgSiN{sub 2} is similar to that of wurtzite AlN. A band gap of 5.7 eV was calculated for both MgSiN{sub 2} (indirect) and AlN (direct) using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof approximation. Correction with respect to the experimental room-temperature band gap of AlN indicates that the true band gap of MgSiN{sub 2} is 6.2 eV. MgSiN{sub 2} has an additional direct gap of 6.3 eV at the Γ point.

  20. Exploring the Electronic Band Structure of Organometal Halide Perovskite via Photoluminescence Anisotropy of Individual Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Täuber, Daniela; Dobrovolsky, Alexander; Camacho, Rafael; Scheblykin, Ivan G

    2016-08-10

    Understanding electronic processes in organometal halide perovskites, flourishing photovoltaic, and emitting materials requires unraveling the origin of their electronic transitions. Light polarization studies can provide important information regarding transition dipole moment orientations. Investigating individual methylammonium lead triiodide perovskite nanocrystals enabled us to detect the polarization of photoluminescence intensity and photoluminescence excitation, hidden in bulk samples by ensemble averaging. Polarization properties of the crystals were correlated with their photoluminescence spectra and electron microscopy images. We propose that distortion of PbI6 octahedra leads to peculiarities of the electronic band structure close to the band-edge. Namely, the lowest band transition possesses a transition dipole moment along the apical Pb-I-Pb bond resulting in polarized photoluminescence. Excitation of photoluminescence above the bandgap is unpolarized because it involves molecular orbitals delocalized both in the apical and equatorial directions of the perovskite octahedron. Trap-assisted emission at 77 K, rather surprisingly, was polarized similar to the bandgap emission. PMID:27462927

  1. Excitation, Ionization, and Desorption: How Sub-band gap Photons Modify the Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisanutto, P. E.; Sushko, Petr V.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2009-01-29

    Nanoparticles of wide-band-gap materials MgO and CaO, subjected to low-intensity ultraviolet irradiation with 266 nm (4.66 eV) photons, emit hyperthermal oxygen atoms with kinetic energies up to ~ 0.4 eV. We use ab initio embedded cluster methods to study theoretically a variety of elementary photoinduced processes at both ideal and defect-containing surfaces of these nanoparticles and develop a mechanism for the desorption process. The proposed mechanism includes multiple local photoexcitations resulting in sequential formation of localized excitons, their ionization, and further excitations. It is suggested that judicious choice of sub-band-gap photon energies can be used to selectively modify surfaces of nanomaterials.

  2. Stable porous crystalline silicon with nanotubular structure: A predicted allotrope with direct band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chi-Pui; Cao, Jie; Xiong, Shi-Jie

    2015-06-01

    On basis of the first principle calculation we show that a crystalline structure of silicon, as a novel allotrope with nanotubular holes along two perpendicular directions, is stable. The calculations on geometrical and electronic properties reveal that this allotrope possesses a direct band gap wider by 0.5 eV than the indirect one of silicon with diamond structure. The crystal belongs to I41/AMD space group, showing anisotropic optical properties and Young modulus. The bulk modulus is 64.4 GPa and the density is 1.9 g/cm3, lower than that of the diamond silicon due to the presence of nanotubular holes. It is hopeful that the allotrope may widely expand applications of silicon in many fields due to its direct band gap and specific nanotubular structure.

  3. Giant magnetoresistance and band structure of topological semimetal RhSb3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Limin; Nakajima, Y.; Wang, Renxiong; Yong, Jie; Paglione, J.

    2015-03-01

    Recently materials with skutterudite structure such as CoSb3 were predicted to provide a promising platform for the realization of new topological materials such as topological insulators and Dirac-Weyl semimetals. Here we report a detailed study of the electronic structure and magnetotransport properties of high quality RhSb3 single crystals. First-principles electronic structure calculations reveal a highly dispersive band with Sb-p and Rh-3d weight that shows apparent band inversion. Inclusion of spin-orbit coupling leaves the Fermi level pinned to a doublet, indicating a topological semimetal. Our synthesized high-quality single crystals show typical metallic behavior but with very small residual resistivity ratio, a sign of semimetal behavior, in zero field. We will present magnetotrasport data that exhibits a very large magnetoresistance that hints of a very sensitive evolution of electronic properties and Dirac-like spectrum.

  4. Sonic Stop-Bands for Periodic Arrays of Metallic Rods: Honeycomb Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, M. S.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    1998-12-01

    Extensive band structures have been computed for periodic arrays (in the honeycomb structure) of rigid metallic rods in air. Multiple complete acoustic stop bands have been obtained within which sound and vibrations are forbidden. These gaps start opening up for a filling fractionf≥8% and tend to increase with the filling fraction, exhibiting a maximum at the close-packing. A tandem structure has also been proposed that allows an ultrawideband filter for environmental or industrial noise to be achieved in the desired frequency range. This work is motivated by the recent experimental observation of sound attenuation on the sculpture by Eusebio Sempere, exhibited at the Juian March Foundation in Madrid [21] and complements the corresponding theoretical work [22, 23].

  5. Bloch mode synthesis: Ultrafast methodology for elastic band-structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krattiger, Dimitri; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2014-12-01

    We present a methodology for fast band-structure calculations that is generally applicable to problems of elastic wave propagation in periodic media. The methodology, called Bloch mode synthesis, represents an extension of component mode synthesis, a set of substructuring techniques originally developed for structural dynamics analysis. In Bloch mode synthesis, the unit cell is divided into interior and boundary degrees-of-freedom, which are described, respectively, by a set of normal modes and a set of constraint modes. A combination of these mode sets then forms a reduced basis for the band structure eigenvalue problem. The reduction is demonstrated on a phononic-crystal model and a locally resonant elastic-metamaterial model and is shown to accurately predict the frequencies and Bloch mode shapes with a dramatic decrease in computation time in excess of two orders of magnitude.

  6. Spatially resolved methane band photometry of Saturn. II - Cloud structure models at four latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Saturn's cloud vertical structures in the Equatorial Zone, South Equatorial Belt, and North and South Temperate Regions near + or - 30 deg latitudes are determined by means of an analysis of spatially resolved reflectivity measurements in the 6190, 7250, and 8996 A methane bands. Radiative transfer models are computed for a structure whose parameters are the methane column abundance in an aerosol-free layer at the top of the atmosphere, and the specific abundance of methane in a semiinfinite homogeneous gas-and-cloud mixture deep in the atmosphere. The structure for the South Equatorial Belt resembles that for the North Temperate Region. The level where unit cloud optical depth occurs in the South Temperate Region is deeper than the corresponding level at other latitudes. The differences between model parameters derived by means of different absorption bands are discussed.

  7. Ground-based testing of the dynamics of flexible space structures using band mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. F.; Chew, Meng-Sang

    1991-01-01

    A suspension system based on a band mechanism is studied to provide the free-free conditions for ground based validation testing of flexible space structures. The band mechanism consists of a noncircular disk with a convex profile, preloaded by torsional springs at its center of rotation so that static equilibrium of the test structure is maintained at any vertical location; the gravitational force will be directly counteracted during dynamic testing of the space structure. This noncircular disk within the suspension system can be configured to remain unchanged for test articles with the different weights as long as the torsional spring is replaced to maintain the originally designed frequency ratio of W/k sub s. Simulations of test articles which are modeled as lumped parameter as well as continuous parameter systems, are also presented.

  8. Light scattering from cylindrical structures on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Taubenblatt, M A

    1990-03-01

    Light scattering from a dielectric cylindrical structure on a surface by a plane wave with field vector along the cylinder axis is calculated with a modification of the coupled-dipole method. The interaction matrix is calculated with the use of both the direct contribution of a polarization current filament and its reflection from the surface. The reflected cylindrical waves are computed with the use of the Sommerfeld-type integral expression. Light scattering from structures of arbitrary cross section and the size of the order of a wavelength can be quickly determined with this method. PMID:19759774

  9. Structure of the doublet bands in doubly odd nuclei: The case of {sup 128}Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Ganev, H. G.; Brant, S.

    2010-09-15

    The structure of the {Delta}J=1 doublet bands in {sup 128}Cs is investigated within the framework of the interacting vector boson-fermion model. A new, purely collective interpretation of these bands is given on the basis of the used boson-fermion dynamical symmetry of the model. The energy levels of the doublet bands as well as the absolute B(E2) and B(M1) transition probabilities between the states of both yrast and yrare bands are described quite well. The observed odd-even staggering of both B(M1) and B(E2) values is reproduced by the introduction of an appropriate interaction term of quadrupole type, which produces such a staggering effect in the transition strengths. The calculations show that the appearance of doublet bands in certain odd-odd nuclei could be a consequence of the realization of a larger dynamical symmetry based on the noncompact supersymmetry group OSp(2{Omega}/12,R).

  10. Engineered band structure for an enhanced performance on quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Bin Bin; Wang, Ye Feng; Wei, Dong; Cui, Bin; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Jing Hui

    2016-06-01

    A photon-to-current efficiency of 2.93% is received for the Mn-doped CdS (MCdS)-quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) using Mn:ZnO (MZnO) nanowire as photoanode. Hydrothermal synthesized MZnO are spin-coated on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass with P25 paste to serve as photoanode after calcinations. MCdS was deposited on the MZnO film by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method. The long lived excitation energy state of Mn2+ is located inside the conduction band in the wide bandgap ZnO and under the conduction band of CdS, which increases the energetic overlap of donor and acceptor states, reducing the "loss-in-potential," inhibiting charge recombination, and accelerating electron injection. The engineered band structure is well reflected by the electrochemical band detected using cyclic voltammetry. Cell performances are evidenced by current density-voltage (J-V) traces, diffuse reflectance spectra, transient PL spectroscopy, and incident photon to current conversion efficiency characterizations. Further coating of CdSe on MZnO/MCdS electrode expands the light absorption band of the sensitizer, an efficiency of 4.94% is received for QDSSCs.

  11. A ppM-focused klystron at X-band with a travelling-wave output structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1994-10-01

    We have developed algorithms for designing disk-loaded travelling-wave output structures for X-band klystrons to be used in the SLAC NLC. We use either a four- or five-cell structure in a {pi}/2 mode. The disk radii are tapered to produce an approximately constant gradient. The matching calculation is not performed on the tapered structure, but rather on a coupler whose input and output cells are the same as the final cell of the tapered structure, and whose interior cells are the same as the penultimate cell in the tapered structure. 2-D calculations using CONDOR model the waveguide as a radial transmission line of adjustable impedance. 3-D calculations with MAFIA model the actual rectangular waveguide and coupling slot. A good match is obtained by adjusting the impedance of the final cell. In 3D, this requires varying both the radius of the cell and the width of the aperture. When the output cell with the best match is inserted in the tapered structure, we obtain excellent cold-test agreement between the 2-D and 3-D models. We use hot-test simulations with CONDOR to design a structure with maximum efficiency and minimum surface fields. We have designed circuits at 11.424 GHz for different perveances. At 440 kV, microperveance 1.2, we calculated 81 MW, 53 percent efficiency, with peak surface field 76 MV/m. A microperveance 0.6 design was done using a ppM stack for focusing. At 470 kV, 193 amps, we calculated 58.7 MW, 64.7 percent efficiency, peak surface field 62.3 MV/m. At 500 kV, 212 amps, we calculated 67.1 MW, 63.3 percent efficiency, peak surface field 66.0 MV/m.

  12. Determination of the valence band structure of an alkali phosphorus oxynitride glass: A synchrotron XPS study on LiPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwöbel, André; Precht, Ruben; Motzko, Markus; Carrillo Solano, Mercedes A.; Calvet, Wolfram; Hausbrand, René; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2014-12-01

    Lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) is a solid state electrolyte commonly used in thin film batteries (TFBs). Advanced TFBs face the issue of detrimental electrode-electrolyte interlayer formation, related to the electronic structure of the interface. In this contribution, we study the valence band structure of LiPON using resonant photoemission and synchrotron photoemission with variable excitation energies. The identification of different valence band features is done according to the known valence band features of meta- and orthophosphates. Additionally we compare our results with partial density of states simulations from literature. We find that the valence band structure is similar to the known metaphosphates with an additional contribution of nitrogen states at the top of the valence band. From the results we conclude that synchrotron X-ray photoemission (XPS) is a useful tool to study the valence band structure of nitridated alkali phosphate glasses.

  13. Electrochemical studies of the effects of the size, ligand and composition on the band structures of CdSe, CdTe and their alloy nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinjin; Yang, Wanting; Li, Yunchao; Fan, Louzhen; Li, Yongfang

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we have elucidated the fundamental principle of employing CV to investigate the band structures of semiconductor nanocrystals (SNCs), and have also built up an optimal protocol for performing such investigation. By utilizing this protocol, we are able to obtain well-defined and characteristic electrochemical redox signals of SNCs, which allows us to intensively explore the influences of the particle size, the surface ligand and particle composition on the band structures of CdSe, CdTe and their alloy nanocrystals. The size-, ligand- and composition-dependent band structures of CdSe and CdTe nanocrystals (NCs) have therefore been mapped out, respectively, which are generally consistent with the previous theoretical and experimental reports. We believe that the optimal protocol and the original results regarding electrochemical characterization of SNCs demonstrated in this paper will definitely benefit the better understanding, modulation and application of the unique electronic and optical properties of SNCs. PMID:24468655

  14. Multi-use applications of dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging for detecting obscured structural defects

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.

    1994-05-01

    Precise dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging provides a useful diagnostic tool for wide-area detection of defects from corrosion damage in metal airframes, heat damage in composite structures and structural damage in concrete bridge decks. We use DBIR image ratios to enhance surface temperature contrast, remove surface emissivity noise and increase signal-to-clutter ratios. We clarify interpretation of hidden defect sites by distinguishing temperature differences at defect sites from emissivity differences at clutter sites. This reduces the probability of false calls associated with misinterpreted image data. For airframe inspections, we map flash-heated defects in metal structures. The surface temperature rise above ambient at corrosion-thinned sites correlates with the percentage of material loss from corrosion thinning. For flash-heated composite structures, we measure the temperature-time history which relates to the depth and extent of heat damage. In preparation for bridge deck inspections, we map the natural day and night temperature variations at known concrete slab delamination sites which heat and coot at different rates than their surroundings. The above-ambient daytime and below-ambient nightime delamination site temperature differences correlate with the volume of replaced concrete at the delamination sites.

  15. Surface Relief and Internal Structure in Fatigued Stainless Sanicro 25 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polák, Jaroslav; Mazánová, Veronika; Kuběna, Ivo; Heczko, Milan; Man, Jiří

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution images of persistent slip markings developed on the surface of Sanicro 25 stainless steel during cyclic loading obtained from the FIB-produced surface lamella in TEM simultaneously with the underlying dislocation structure are reported. Extrusions, intrusions, incipient cracks, and the dislocation arrangement corresponding to the bands of intensive cyclic slip are documented and discussed in relation to the models of surface relief formation in cyclic loading.

  16. Banded structures in electron pitch angle diffusion coefficients from resonant wave-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Khazanov, G. V.; Avanov, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    Electron pitch angle (Dαα) and momentum (Dpp) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L = 4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies ≤10 keV. Landau (n = 0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n = ±1, ±2, … ±5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (α) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n = +1 and n = +2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n = +2. However, the banded structures in Dαα and Dpp coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n = +2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The Dpp diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than Dαα coefficients. For chorus waves, Dpp coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than Dαα coefficients for the case n ≠ 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of Dpp coefficient are generally larger than the values of Dαα coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89° and harmonic resonances n = +1, +2, and +3, whereas for whistler mode waves, the frequencies have been calculated for angle 10° and Landau

  17. Photodissociation of water in the first absorption band: A prototype for dissociation on a repulsive potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, V.; Staemmler, V.; Vander Wal, R.L.; Crim, F.F.

    1992-04-16

    The photodissociation of water in the first absorption band, H{sub 2}O(X) + {Dirac_h}{omega} {yields} H{sub 2}O(A{sup 1}B{sub 1}) {yields} H({sup 2}S) + OH({sup 2}II), is a prototype of fast and direct bond rupture in an excited electronic state. It has been investigated from several perspectives-absorption spectrum, final state distributions of the products, dissociation of vibrationally excited states, isotope effects, and emission spectroscopy. The availability of a calculated potential energy surface for the A state, including all three internal degrees of freedom, allows comparison of all experimental data with the results of rigorous quantum mechanical calculations without any fitting parameters or simplifying model assumptions. As the result of the confluence of ab initio electronic structure theory, dynamical theory, and experiment, water is probably the best studied and best understood polyatomic photodissociation system. In this article we review the joint experimental and theoretical advances which make water a unique system for studying molecular dynamics in excited electronic states. We focus our attention especially on the interrelation between the various perspectives and the correlation with the characteristic features of the upper-state potential energy surface. 80 refs., 14 figs.

  18. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin–orbit coupling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin–orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed.

  19. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin-orbit coupling effects.

    PubMed

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin-orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed. PMID:27367475

  20. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jungwirth, T.; Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Zemek, J.; Marti, X.; Horodyska, P.; Nemec, P.; Holy, V.; Maca, F.; Shick, A. B.; Masek, J.; Kuzel, P.; Nemec, I.; Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2011-01-15

    Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

  1. The Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: UAVSAR's Single-pass Ka-Band Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Sadowy, G.; Wu, X.; Carswell, J.; Fisher, C.; Michel, T.; Lou, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year (IPY) activities. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A): a 35.6 GHz single-pass interferometer. Although the technique of using radar interferometry for mapping terrain has been demonstrated before, this is the first such application at millimeter-wave frequencies. The proof-of-concept demonstration was achieved by interfacing Ka-band RF and antenna hardware with the Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The GLISTIN-A was implemented as a custom installation of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Gulfstream III. Instrument performance indicates swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. Processing challenges were encountered in achieving the accuracy requirements on several fronts including, aircraft motion sensitivity, multipath and systematic drifts. However, through a combination of processor optimization, a modified phase-screen and motion-compensation implementations were able to minimize the impact of these systematic error sources. We will present results from the IPY data collections including system performance evaluations and imagery. This includes a large area digital elevation model (DEM) collected over Jakobshavn glacier as an illustrative science data product. Further, by intercomparison with the NASA Wallops Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and calibration targets we quantify the interferometric penetration bias of the Ka-band returns into the snow cover. Following the success of the IPY campaign, we are funded under the Earth Science Techonology Office (ESTO) Airborne Innovative Technology Transition (AITT) program to transition GLISTIN-A to a permanently-available pod-only system compatible with unpressurized operation. In addition

  2. Spherical silicon-shell photonic band gap structures fabricated by laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Yang, Z. Y.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-02-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition was applied in fabricating three-dimensional (3D) spherical-shell photonic band gap (PBG) structures by depositing silicon shells covering silica particles, which had been self-assembled into 3D colloidal crystals. The colloidal crystals of self-assembled silica particles were formed on silicon substrates using the isothermal heating evaporation approach. A continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (1064nm wavelength) was used to deposit silicon shells by thermally decomposing disilane gas. Periodic silicon-shell/silica-particle PBG structures were obtained. By removing the silica particles enclosed in the silicon shells using hydrofluoric acid, hollow spherical silicon-shell arrays were produced. This technique is capable of fabricating structures with complete photonic band gaps, which is predicted by simulations with the plane wave method. The techniques developed in this study have the potential to flexibly engineer the positions of the PBGs by varying both the silica particle size and the silicon-shell thickness. Ellipsometry was used to investigate the specific photonic band gaps for both structures.

  3. Structural vs electronic origin of renormalized band widths in TTF-TCNQ: An angular dependent NEXAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, M.; Meyer, J.; Hoinkis, M.; Glawion, S.; Blaha, P.; Gavrila, G.; Jacobsen, C. S.; Claessen, R.

    2007-12-01

    We have performed angle-dependent near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the Auger electron yield mode on the correlated quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) in order to determine the orientation of the molecules in the topmost surface layer. We find that the tilt angles of the molecules with respect to the one-dimensional axis are essentially the same as in the bulk. Thus, we can rule out surface relaxation as the origin of the renormalized band widths which were inferred from the analysis of photoemission data within the one-dimensional Hubbard model. Thereby, recent theoretical results are corroborated which invoke long-range Coulomb repulsion as alternative explanation to understand the spectral dispersions of TTF-TCNQ quantitatively within an extended Hubbard model.

  4. Structural vs electronic origin of renormalized band widths in TTF-TCNQ: An angular dependent NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Sing, M.; Meyer, J.; Glawion, S.; Claessen, R.; Hoinkis, M.; Blaha, P.; Gavrila, G.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2007-12-15

    We have performed angle-dependent near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the Auger electron yield mode on the correlated quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) in order to determine the orientation of the molecules in the topmost surface layer. We find that the tilt angles of the molecules with respect to the one-dimensional axis are essentially the same as in the bulk. Thus, we can rule out surface relaxation as the origin of the renormalized band widths which were inferred from the analysis of photoemission data within the one-dimensional Hubbard model. Thereby, recent theoretical results are corroborated which invoke long-range Coulomb repulsion as alternative explanation to understand the spectral dispersions of TTF-TCNQ quantitatively within an extended Hubbard model.

  5. Structural phase transition in IrTe2: A combined study of optical spectroscopy and band structure calculations

    PubMed Central

    Fang, A. F.; Xu, G.; Dong, T.; Zheng, P.; Wang, N. L.

    2013-01-01

    Ir1−xPtxTe2 is an interesting system showing competing phenomenon between structural instability and superconductivity. Due to the large atomic numbers of Ir and Te, the spin-orbital coupling is expected to be strong in the system which may lead to nonconventional superconductivity. We grew single crystal samples of this system and investigated their electronic properties. In particular, we performed optical spectroscopic measurements, in combination with density function calculations, on the undoped compound IrTe2 in an effort to elucidate the origin of the structural phase transition at 280 K. The measurement revealed a dramatic reconstruction of band structure and a significant reduction of conducting carriers below the phase transition. We elaborate that the transition is not driven by the density wave type instability but caused by the crystal field effect which further splits/separates the energy levels of Te (px, py) and Te pz bands. PMID:23362455

  6. Spectral and polarization structure of field-induced photonic bands in cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Geivandov, A. R.; Kasyanova, I. V.; Palto, V. S.

    2015-09-01

    Transmission of planar layers of cholesteric liquid crystals is studied in pulsed electric fields perpendicular to the helix axis at normal incidence of both linearly polarized and unpolarized light. Spectral and light polarization properties of the primary photonic band and the field-induced bands up to fourth order of Bragg selective reflection are studied in detail. In our experiments we have achieved an electric field strength several times higher than the theoretical values corresponding to the critical field of full helix unwinding. However, the experiments show that despite the high strength of the electric field applied the helix does not unwind, but strongly deforms, keeping its initial spatial period. Strong helix deformation results in distinct spectral band splitting, as well as very high field-induced selective reflectance that can be applied in lasers and other optoelectronic devices. Peculiarities of inducing and splitting the bands are discussed in terms of the scattering coefficient approach. All observed effects are confirmed by numerical simulations. The simulations also show that liquid crystal surface anchoring is not the factor that prevents the helix unwinding. Thus, the currently acknowledged concept of continuous helix unwinding in the electric field should be reconsidered.

  7. Structural Coloration of Colloidal Fiber by Photonic Band Gap and Resonant Mie Scattering.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Zhou, Ning; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-07-01

    Because structural color is fadeless and dye-free, structurally colored materials have attracted great attention in a wide variety of research fields. In this work, we report the use of a novel structural coloration strategy applied to the fabrication of colorful colloidal fibers. The nanostructured fibers with tunable structural colors were massively produced by colloidal electrospinning. Experimental results and theoretical modeling reveal that the homogeneous and noniridescent structural colors of the electrospun fibers are caused by two phenomena: reflection due to the band gap of photonic structure and Mie scattering of the colloidal spheres. Our unprecedented findings show promise in paving way for the development of revolutionary dye-free technology for the coloration of various fibers. PMID:26066732

  8. Precisely determined the surface displacement by the ionospheric mitigation using the L-band SAR Interferometry over Mt.Baekdu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won-Jin; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Park, Sun-Cheon; Lee, Duk Kee

    2016-04-01

    Mt. Baekdu (Changbaishan in Chinese) is located on the border between China and North Korea. It has recently attracted the attention of volcanic unrest during 2002-2005. Many researchers have applied geophysical approaches to detect magma system of beneath Mt.Baekdu such as leveling, Global Positioning System (GPS), gases analysis, seismic analysis, etc. Among them, deformation measuring instruments are important tool to evaluate for volcanism. In contrast to GPS or other deformation measuring instruments, Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has provided high resolution of 2-D surface displacement from remote sensed data. However, Mt. Baekdu area has disturbed by decorrelation on interferogram because of wide vegetation coverage. To overcome this limitation, L-band system of long wavelength is more effective to detect surface deformation. In spite of this advantage, L-band can surfer from more severe ionospheric phase distortions than X- or C- band system because ionospheric phase distortions are inverse proportion to the radar frequency. Recently, Multiple Aperture Interferometry (MAI) based ionospheric phase distortions mitigation method have proposed and investigated. We have applied this technique to the Mt.Baekdu area to measure surface deformation precisely using L-band Advanced Land Observing Satellite-1(ALOS-1) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar(PALSAR) data acquiring from 2006 to 2011.

  9. Rotational Structure of the Ir/fir Bands of Small Pahs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirali, O.; Gruet, S.; Vervloet, M.; Goubet, M.; Huet, T. R.; Georges, R.; Soulard, P.; Asselin, P.

    2013-06-01

    Accurate spectroscopic measurements in the laboratory of PAH molecules are required to better understand their excitation/relaxation processes which could be responsible for the Unidentified Infrared Bands observed in various objects in space. In particular very few is known concerning the rotational structure of the IR/FIR bands of PAHs. We used the high resolution Fourier Transform interferometer of the AILES beamline of synchrotron SOLEIL to record the rotationally resolved spectra of several IR/FIR vibrational modes of naphthalene (C_{10}H_{8}) and its derivatives: quinoline (C_9H_7N), isoquinoline (C_9H_7N), azulene (C_{10}H_{8}), quinoxaline (C_8H_6N_2), quinazoline (C_8H_6N_2). Firstly, the intense band associated with the ν_{46} CH bending out of plane mode of naphthalene recorded under jet conditions (Jet-AILES experiment developed on the AILES beamline by the IPR-LADIR-PhLAM consortium) revealed transitions involving low J and Ka rotational quantum numbers. These new data permitted to accurately fit the ground state rotational constants and to improve the ν_{46} band constants. As a second step, we performed the rotational analysis of the low frequency ν_{47} and ν_{48} bands of naphthalene recorded at room-temperature in the long absorption pathlength cell from ISMO. As a last step, the high resolution spectra of several bands of azulene, quinoline, isoquinoline and quinoxaline were recorded at room temperature and analyzed using the same procedure. All the rotational constants fitted in the present work were compared to the results of anharmonic DFT calculations realized at various levels of accuracy. S. Albert, et al.; Faraday Discussions, 150, 51 (2011)

  10. Control of Spin Wave Band Structure and Propagation in Two-Dimensional Magnonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sietsema, Glade; Flatté, Michael E.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the properties of spin waves in two-dimensional magnonic crystals consisting of a magnetic material arranged in a lattice of cylinders and embedded in a second magnetic material. Dispersion curves, linewidths, and spin wave propagation patterns were obtained from the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation using the plane wave expansion method. We have examined how these results are affected by various parameters including the shape of the cylinders, the lattice structure, the material properties, and the spin-orbit interaction. Adjusting these values can open or close band gaps and drastically shift the frequency range of the band structure. The spin wave propagation patterns were found to exhibit high directionality dependent on the excitation frequency and can also be modified with the aforementioned parameters. This work was supported in part by DARPA/MESO and by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  11. Band structures of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in one-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanyao; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Kao, Yee-Mou; Jiang, Tsin-Fu

    2008-08-01

    We derive the effective Gross-Pitaevskii equation for a cigar-shaped dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in one-dimensional lattices and investigate the band structures numerically. Due to the anisotropic and the long-ranged dipole-dipole interaction in addition to the known contact interaction, we elucidate the possibility of modifying the band structures by changing the alignment of the dipoles with the axial direction. With the considerations of the transverse parts and the practical physical parameters of a cigar-shaped trap, we show the possibility to stabilize an attractive condensate simply by adjusting the orientation angle of dipoles. Some interesting Bloch waves at several particle current densities are identified for possible experimental observations.

  12. Band gap and chemically ordered domain structure of a graphene analogue BCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venu, K.; Kanuri, S.; Raidongia, K.; Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Waghmare, U. V.; Datta, R.

    2010-12-01

    Chemically synthesized few layer graphene analogues of B xC yN z are characterized by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) to determine the local phase, electronic structure and band gap. HREELS band gap studies of a B xC yN z composition reveal absorption edges at 2.08, 3.43 and 6.01 eV, indicating that the B xC yN z structure may consist of domains of different compositions. The K-absorption edge energy position of the individual elements in B xC yN z is determined and compared with h-BN and graphite. An understanding of these experimental findings is developed with complementary first-principles based calculations of the various ordered configurations of B xC yN z.

  13. Band structure and optical properties of amber studied by first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhi-Fan; Zhou, Rong-Feng

    2013-03-01

    The band structure and density of states of amber is studied by the first principles calculation based on density of functional theory. The complex structure of amber has 214 atoms and the band gap is 5.0 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The optical properties' results show that the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.65 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is at 172 nm and another higher peak is at 136 nm. These convince that the amber would have a pretty sheen and that amber is a good and suitable crystal for jewelry and ornaments.

  14. Influence of structural parameters on tunable photonic band gaps modulated by liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Aiqin; Zheng, Jihong; Jiang, Yanmeng; Zhou, Zengjun; Tang, Pingyu; Zhuang, Songlin

    2011-10-01

    Tunable photonic crystals (PCs), which are infiltrated with nematic liquid crystals (LCs), tune photonic band gap (PBG) by rotating directors of LCs when applied with the external electrical field. Using the plane wave expansion method, we simulated the PBG structure of two-dimensional tunable PCs with a triangular lattice of circular column, square column and hexagon column, respectively. When PCs are composed of LCs and different substrate materials such as germanium (Ge) and silicon (Si), the influence of structural parameters including column shape and packing ration on PBG is discussed separately. Numerical simulations show that absolute PBG can't be found at any conditions, however large tuning range of polarized wave can be achieved by rotating directors of LCs. The simulation results provide theoretical guidance for the fabrication of field-sensitive polarizer with big tunable band range.

  15. Efficient quasiparticle band-structure calculations for cubic and noncubic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzien, B.; Cappellini, G.; Bechstedt, F.

    1995-05-15

    An efficient method developed for the calculation of quasiparticle corrections to density-functional-theory--local-density-approximation (DFT-LDA) band structures of diamond and zinc-blende materials is generalized for crystals with other cubic, hexagonal, tetragonal, and orthorhombic Bravais lattices. Local-field effects are considered in the framework of a LDA-like approximation. The dynamical screening is treated by expanding the self-energy linearly in energy. The anisotropy of the inverse dielectric matrix is taken into account. The singularity of the Coulomb potential in the screened-exchange part of the electronic self-energy is treated using auxiliary functions of the appropriate symmetry. An application to the electronic quasiparticle band structure of wurtzite 2{ital H}-SiC is presented within the approach of norm-conserving, nonlocal, fully separable pseudopotentials and a plane-wave expansion of the wave functions for the underlying DFT-LDA.

  16. Review and prospects of magnonic crystals and devices with reprogrammable band structure.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, M; Grundler, D

    2014-03-26

    Research efforts addressing spin waves (magnons) in microand nanostructured ferromagnetic materials have increased tremendously in recent years. Corresponding experimental and theoretical work in magnonics faces significant challenges in that spinwave dispersion relations are highly anisotropic and different magnetic states might be realized via, for example, the magnetic field history. At the same time, these features offer novel opportunities for wave control in solids going beyond photonics and plasmonics. In this topical review we address materials with a periodic modulation of magnetic parameters that give rise to artificially tailored band structures and allow unprecedented control of spin waves. In particular, we discuss recent achievements and perspectives of reconfigurable magnonic devices for which band structures can be reprogrammed during operation. Such characteristics might be useful for multifunctional microwave and logic devices operating over a broad frequency regime on either the macroor nanoscale. PMID:24599025

  17. Observation of wakefields in a beam-driven photonic band gap accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Power, J. G.; Jing, C.; Gao, F.; Antipov, S.; Xu, P.; Zheng, S.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Gai, W.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs LLC; Tsinghua Univ.

    2009-12-01

    Wakefield excitation has been experimentally studied in a three-cell X-band standing wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure. Major monopole (TM{sub 01}- and TM{sub 02}-like) and dipole (TM{sub 11}- and TM{sub 12}-like) modes were identified and characterized by precisely controlling the position of beam injection. The quality factor Q of the dipole modes was measured to be {approx}10 times smaller than that of the accelerating mode. A charge sweep, up to 80 nC, has been performed, equivalent to {approx} 30 MV/m accelerating field on axis. A variable delay low charge witness bunch following a high charge drive bunch was used to calibrate the gradient in the PBG structure by measuring its maximum energy gain and loss. Experimental results agree well with numerical simulations.

  18. Effective band structure of Ru-doped BaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reticcioli, M.; Profeta, G.; Franchini, C.; Continenza, A.

    2016-02-01

    The use of lattice cells in real space that are arbitrarily larger than the primitive one, is nowadays more and more often required by ab initio calculations to study disorder, vacancy or doping effects in real materials. This leads, however, to complex band structures which are hard to interpret. Therefore an unfolding procedure is sought for in order to obtain useful data, directly comparable with experimental results, such as angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements. Here, we present an extension of the unfolding procedure recently implemented in the VASP code, which includes a projection scheme that leads to a full reconstruction of the primitive space. As a test case, we apply this newly implemented scheme to the Ru-doped BaFe2As2 superconducting compound. The results provide a clear description of the effective electronic band structure in the conventional Brillouin zone, highlighting the crucial role played by doping in this compound.

  19. Ultrafast band-structure variations induced by fast Au ions in BeO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiwietz, G.; Czerski, K.; Grande, P. L.; Koteski, V.; Staufenbiel, F.

    2011-05-01

    Auger-electron spectra associated with Be atoms in the pure metal lattice and in an oxide have been investigated for 1.8 MeV/u 129Au 41+ ions and 2.7 keV primary electrons. The excitation and local energy transfer by such fast primary particles in solids is dominated by electronic processes. The electron-induced spectrum is compared to calculated band-structure results and it is relatively well understood. For the heavy-ion case, however, we observe a significant variation of the Auger electron spectrum, related to a variation of the electronic band structure. This spectrum points to a formation of a metal-like meta-stable electronic density of states.

  20. Observations of LHR noise with banded structure by the sounding rocket S29 barium-GEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koskinen, H. E. J.; Holmgren, G.; Kintner, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The measurement of electrostatic noise near the lower hybrid frequency made by the sounding rocket S29 barium-GEOS is reported. The noise is related to the spin of the rocket and reaches well below the local lower hybrid resonance frequency. Above the altitude of 300 km the noise shows banded structure roughly organized by the hydrogen cyclotron frequency. Simultaneously with the banded structure a signal near the hydrogen cyclotron frequency is detected. This signal is also spin modulated. The character of the noise strongly suggests that it is locally generated by the rocket payload disturbing the plasma. If this interpretation is correct, plasma wave experiments on other spacecrafts are expected to observe similar phenomena.

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy beneath southern Africa from very broad-band surface-wave dispersion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Joanne M.-C.; Lebedev, Sergei

    2012-10-01

    Seismic anisotropy within the lithosphere of cratons preserves an important record of their ancient assembly. In southern Africa, anisotropy across the Archean Kaapvaal Craton and Limpopo Belt has been detected previously by observations of SKS-wave splitting. Because SKS-splitting measurements lack vertical resolution, however, the depth distribution of anisotropy has remained uncertain. End-member interpretations invoked the dominance of either anisotropy in the lithosphere (due to the fabric formed by deformation in Archean or Palaeoproterozoic orogenies) or that in the asthenosphere (due to the fabric formed by the recent plate motion), each with significant geodynamic implications. To determine the distribution of anisotropy with depth, we measured phase velocities of seismic surface waves between stations of the Southern African Seismic Experiment. We applied two complementary measurement approaches, very broad-band cross-correlation and multimode waveform inversion. Robust, Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves were derived for four different subregions of the Archean southern Africa in a period range from 5 s to 250-400 s (Rayleigh) and 5 s to 100-250 s (Love), depending on the region. Rayleigh-wave anisotropy was determined in each region at periods from 5 s to 150-200 s, sampling from the upper crust down to the asthenosphere. The jackknife method was used to estimate uncertainties, and the F-test to verify the statistical significance of anisotropy. We detected strong anisotropy with a N-S fast-propagation azimuth in the upper crust of the Limpopo Belt. We attribute it to aligned cracks, formed by the regional, E-W extensional stress associated with the southward propagation of the East African Rift. Our results show that it is possible to estimate regional stress from short-period, surface wave anisotropy, measured in this study using broad-band array recordings of teleseismic surface waves. Rayleigh-wave anisotropy at 70-120 s periods shows that

  2. Retrieving sea surface salinity with multiangular L-band brightness temperatures: Improvement by spatiotemporal averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, A.; Vall-Llossera, M.; Batres, L.; Torres, F.; Duffo, N.; Corbella, I.

    2005-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission was selected in May 1999 by the European Space Agency to provide global and frequent soil moisture and sea surface salinity maps. SMOS' single payload is Microwave Imaging Radiometer by Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS), an L band two-dimensional aperture synthesis interferometric radiometer with multiangular observation capabilities. Most geophysical parameter retrieval errors studies have assumed the independence of measurements both in time and space so that the standard deviation of the retrieval errors decreases with the inverse of square root of the number of measurements being averaged. This assumption is especially critical in the case of sea surface salinity (SSS), where spatiotemporal averaging is required to achieve the ultimate goal of 0.1 psu error. This work presents a detailed study of the SSS error reduction by spatiotemporal averaging, using the SMOS end-to-end performance simulator (SEPS), including thermal noise, all instrumental error sources, current error correction and image reconstruction algorithms, and correction of atmospheric and sky noises. The most important error sources are the biases that appear in the brightness temperature images. Three different sources of biases have been identified: errors in the noise injection radiometers, Sun contributions to the antenna temperature, and imaging under aliasing conditions. A calibration technique has been devised to correct these biases prior to the SSS retrieval at each satellite overpass. Simulation results show a retrieved salinity error of 0.2 psu in warm open ocean, and up to 0.7 psu at high latitudes and near the coast, where the external calibration method presents more difficulties.

  3. Analysis of tunable photonic band structure in an extrinsic plasma photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Tzu-Chyang; Yang, Chih-Chiang; Hsieh, Pei-Hung; Chang, Tsung-Wen; Wu, Chien-Jang

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we theoretically investigate the tunable photonic band structure (PBS) for an extrinsic plasma photonic crystal (PPC). The extrinsic PPC is made of a bulk cold plasma layer which is influenced by an externally periodic static magnetic field. The PBS can be tuned by the variation of the magnitude of externally applied magnetic field. In addition, we also show that the PBS can be changed as a function of the electron density as well as the thickness variation.

  4. Temperature dependence of the InGaPN conduction band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K. I.; Wang, T. S.; Hwang, J. S.

    2008-03-01

    Material properties of III-N-V alloys, such as GaAsN, InGaAsN, and InGaPN, have been intensively studied, because a small amount of nitrogen (N) incorporation results in very large bandgap bowing and dramatic change in the band structure.^1,2 Recently, temperature dependence of the parameters, i.e. the localized states energy EN introduced by an isolated N and the interaction potential V, of the band anticrossing (BAC) model in GaAsN epilayers has been reported.^3 These properties have never been studied for InGaPN. In this work, temperature-dependent photoreflectance (PR) measurements are employed to characterize the conduction band structure of In0.54Ga0.46P1-yNy (y = 0 and 0.02) grown on GaAs substrates. The band gap and the upper subband E+ are observed in InGaPN as predicted by the BAC model. To investigate the energetic positions of the features in the PR spectra, a Kramers-Kronig analysis is proposed. Based on these PR data and the BAC model, we find EN=2.054 eV and V=1.513 eV at 293 K. With decreasing temperature, the energy of EN shifts significantly to higher energies. Simultaneously, the interaction potential V between the N states and the host conduction band also rises to higher values. The thermal shifts of EN and V are dEN/dT -0.43 meV/K and dV/dT -0.67 meV/K, respectively. 1.APL 88, 031907 (2006). 2.APL 89, 192116 (2006). 3.APL 89, 202105 (2006).

  5. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, C; Zhang, H; Cao, Q P; Wang, X D; Zhang, D X; Ramamurty, U; Jiang, J Z

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and "liquid-like" regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested. PMID:27480496

  6. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, C.; Zhang, H.; Cao, Q. P.; Wang, X. D.; Zhang, D. X.; Ramamurty, U.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and “liquid-like” regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested. PMID:27480496

  7. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, C.; Zhang, H.; Cao, Q. P.; Wang, X. D.; Zhang, D. X.; Ramamurty, U.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and “liquid-like” regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested.

  8. Efficient evaluation of epitaxial MoS2 on sapphire by direct band structure imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hokwon; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Fregnaux, Mathieu; Benayad, Anass; Kung, Yen-Cheng; Kis, Andras; Renault, Olivier; Lanes Group, Epfl Team; Leti, Cea Team

    The electronic band structure evaluation of two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides is critical as the band structure can be greatly influenced by the film thickness, strain, and substrate. Here, we performed a direct measurement of the band structure of as-grown monolayer MoS2 on single crystalline sapphire by reciprocal-space photoelectron emission microscopy with a conventional laboratory ultra-violet He I light source. Arrays of gold electrodes were deposited onto the sample in order to avoid charging effects due to the insulating substrate. This allowed the high resolution mapping (ΔE = 0.2 eV Δk = 0.05 Å-1) of the valence states in momentum space down to 7 eV below the Fermi level. The high degree of the epitaxial alignment of the single crystalline MoS2 nuclei was verified by the direct momentum space imaging over a large area containing multiple nuclei. The derived values of the hole effective mass were 2.41 +/-0.05 m0 and 0.81 +/-0.05 m0, respectively at Γ and K points, consistent with the theoretical values of the freestanding monolayer MoS2 reported in the literature. HK acknowledges the french CEA Basic Technological Research program (RTB) for funding.

  9. Robust topology optimization of three-dimensional photonic-crystal band-gap structures.

    PubMed

    Men, H; Lee, K Y K; Freund, R M; Peraire, J; Johnson, S G

    2014-09-22

    We perform full 3D topology optimization (in which "every voxel" of the unit cell is a degree of freedom) of photonic-crystal structures in order to find optimal omnidirectional band gaps for various symmetry groups, including fcc (including diamond), bcc, and simple-cubic lattices. Even without imposing the constraints of any fabrication process, the resulting optimal gaps are only slightly larger than previous hand designs, suggesting that current photonic crystals are nearly optimal in this respect. However, optimization can discover new structures, e.g. a new fcc structure with the same symmetry but slightly larger gap than the well known inverse opal, which may offer new degrees of freedom to future fabrication technologies. Furthermore, our band-gap optimization is an illustration of a computational approach to 3D dispersion engineering which is applicable to many other problems in optics, based on a novel semidefinite-program formulation for nonconvex eigenvalue optimization combined with other techniques such as a simple approach to impose symmetry constraints. We also demonstrate a technique for robust topology optimization, in which some uncertainty is included in each voxel and we optimize the worst-case gap, and we show that the resulting band gaps have increased robustness to systematic fabrication errors. PMID:25321732

  10. Robust topology optimization of three-dimensional photonic-crystal band-gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, H.; Lee, K. Y. K.; Freund, R. M.; Peraire, J.; Johnson, S. G.

    2014-09-01

    We perform full 3D topology optimization (in which "every voxel" of the unit cell is a degree of freedom) of photonic-crystal structures in order to find optimal omnidirectional band gaps for various symmetry groups, including fcc (including diamond), bcc, and simple-cubic lattices. Even without imposing the constraints of any fabrication process, the resulting optimal gaps are only slightly larger than previous hand designs, suggesting that current photonic crystals are nearly optimal in this respect. However, optimization can discover new structures, e.g. a new fcc structure with the same symmetry but slightly larger gap than the well known inverse opal, which may offer new degrees of freedom to future fabrication technologies. Furthermore, our band-gap optimization is an illustration of a computational approach to 3D dispersion engineering which is applicable to many other problems in optics, based on a novel semidefinite-program formulation for nonconvex eigenvalue optimization combined with other techniques such as a simple approach to impose symmetry constraints. We also demonstrate a technique for \\emph{robust} topology optimization, in which some uncertainty is included in each voxel and we optimize the worst-case gap, and we show that the resulting band gaps have increased robustness to systematic fabrication errors.

  11. Surface structure of γ-Fe2O3(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowker, Michael; Hutchings, Graham; Davies, Philip R.; Edwards, Dyfan; Davies, Robert; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2012-11-01

    The surface structure of γ-Fe2O3(111) has been investigated with a range of surface techniques. Two different surface structures were discovered depending upon surface preparation techniques. Sputtering followed by annealing in vacuum produced a reduced surface characterised by a (2 × 2) LEED pattern, whereas sputtering followed by annealing in 1 × 10- 6 mbar oxygen produced a surface characterised by a (√3 × √3)-R30° LEED pattern. The latter appears to be a very low conductivity surface, whereas the former has the band gap expected for maghemite (~ 2.0 eV). We propose that the reduced surface is a magnetite-like layer, whereas the oxidised surface is an Fe2O3-like layer.

  12. Dual structure infrared surface combustion burner

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.R.; Burlingame, N.H.

    1989-12-26

    This patent describes an improvement in a surface combustion radiant heat burner comprising an inlet plenum for receiving fuel and oxidant gas mixtures from at least one supply inlet and a burner body secured in communication with the inlet plenum. The burner body having an inlet side facing the plenum and an outlet side defining a radiating surface. It comprises: the burner body comprising a first layer of porous ceramic material adjacent the inlet side and a second layer of porous ceramic material adjacent the outlet side defining the radiating surface, the first layer of porous ceramic material having a thickness of at least about 0.90:01 inch and a fine interconnected porous structure with a mean pore diameter ranging from 0.00004 inch to 0.10 inch, the second layer of porous ceramic material having a thickness of at least about 0.05 inch and a coarse interconnected porous structure with a mean diameter ranging from 0.05 to 0.40 inch, and at least the outer surfaces of the first porous layer and substantially all surfaces of the second porous layer being provided with a fully dense ceramic coating.

  13. Quasiparticle band structures and thermoelectric transport properties of p-type SnSe

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Guangsha; Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2015-02-14

    We used density functional and many-body perturbation theory to calculate the quasiparticle band structures and electronic transport parameters of p-type SnSe both for the low-temperature Pnma and high-temperature Cmcm phases. The Pnma phase has an indirect band gap of 0.829 eV, while the Cmcm has a direct band gap of 0.464 eV. Both phases exhibit multiple local band extrema within an energy range comparable to the thermal energy of carriers from the global extrema. We calculated the electronic transport coefficients as a function of doping concentration and temperature for single-crystal and polycrystalline materials to understand the previous experimental measurements. The electronic transport coefficients are highly anisotropic and are strongly affected by bipolar transport effects at high temperature. Our results indicate that SnSe exhibits optimal thermoelectric performance at high temperature when doped in the 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} range.

  14. Temperature-dependent band structure of Hg1-xZnxTe-CdTe superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manassès, J.; Guldner, Y.; Vieren, J. P.; Voos, M.; Faurie, J. P.

    1991-12-01

    We present transport and far-infrared magneto-optical measurements in narrow-band-gap n-type Hg1-xZnxTe-CdTe superlattices. Hall and conductivity data obtained over a broad temperature range (1.5-300 K) show that these superlattices are semimetallic at low temperature and are degenerate intrinsic semiconductors for T>100 K, which constitutes an interesting situation in semiconductor-superlattice physics. The analysis of the data gives the Fermi energy as well as the temperature-dependent band gap, in good agreement with the calculated band structure, which predicts a semimetal-semiconductor transition induced by temperature in these heterostructures. We have measured the electron cyclotron resonances as a function of temperature with the magnetic field B applied parallel and perpendicular to the growth axis. The observed magneto-optical intraband transitions are in very satisfactory agreement with the calculated Landau levels and the Fermi energy. We show that the semimetal-semiconductor transition is characterized by an important reduction of the cyclotron mass measured with B perpendicular to the superlattice growth axis. The large variation of the conduction-band anisotropy calculated near the transition accounts for this effect.

  15. Band Structure of Helimagnons in MnSi Resolved by Inelastic Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Kugler, M; Brandl, G; Waizner, J; Janoschek, M; Georgii, R; Bauer, A; Seemann, K; Rosch, A; Pfleiderer, C; Böni, P; Garst, M

    2015-08-28

    A magnetic helix realizes a one-dimensional magnetic crystal with a period given by the pitch length λh. Its spin-wave excitations-the helimagnons-experience Bragg scattering off this periodicity, leading to gaps in the spectrum that inhibit their propagation along the pitch direction. Using high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering, the resulting band structure of helimagnons was resolved by preparing a single crystal of MnSi in a single magnetic-helix domain. At least five helimagnon bands could be identified that cover the crossover from flat bands at low energies with helimagnons basically localized along the pitch direction to dispersing bands at higher energies. In the low-energy limit, we find the helimagnon spectrum to be determined by a universal, parameter-free theory. Taking into account corrections to this low-energy theory, quantitative agreement is obtained in the entire energy range studied with the help of a single fitting parameter. PMID:26371678

  16. Measurement of valence band structure in boron-zinc-oxide films by making use of ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Kwon, Gi C.; Choi, Eun H.

    2011-12-26

    Measurement of valence band structure in the boron-zinc oxide (BZO) films was developed using the secondary electron emission due to the Auger neutralization of ions. The energy distribution profile of the electrons emitted from boron-zinc-oxide films was measured and rescaled so that Auger self-convolution arose; thus, revealing the detailed structure of the valence band and suggesting that a high concentration of boron impurity in BZO films may enhance the transition of electrons and holes through the band gap from the valence to the conduction band in zinc oxide crystals; thereby improving the conductivity of the film.

  17. Janus kinases and focal adhesion kinases play in the 4.1 band: a superfamily of band 4.1 domains important for cell structure and signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Girault, J. A.; Labesse, G.; Mornon, J. P.; Callebaut, I.

    1998-01-01

    The band 4.1 domain was first identified in the red blood cell protein band 4.1, and subsequently in ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM proteins) and other proteins, including tumor suppressor merlin/schwannomin, talin, unconventional myosins VIIa and X, and protein tyrosine phosphatases. Recently, the presence of a structurally related domain has been demonstrated in the N-terminal region of two groups of tyrosine kinases: the focal adhesion kinases (FAK) and the Janus kinases (JAK). Additional proteins containing the 4.1/JEF (JAK, ERM, FAK) domain include plant kinesin-like calmodulin-binding proteins (KCBP) and a number of uncharacterized open reading frames identified by systematic DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences suggests that band 4.1/JEF domains can be grouped in several families that have probably diverged early during evolution. Hydrophobic cluster analysis indicates that the band 4.1/JEF domains might consist of a duplicated module of approximately 140 residues and a central hinge region. A conserved property of the domain is its capacity to bind to the membrane-proximal region of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of proteins with a single transmembrane segment. Many proteins with band 4.1/JEF domains undergo regulated intra- or intermolecular homotypic interactions. Additional properties common to band 4.1/JEF domains of several proteins are binding of phosphoinositides and regulation by GTPases of the Rho family. Many proteins with band 4. 1/JEF domains are associated with the actin-based cytoskeleton and are enriched at points of contact with other cells or the extracellular matrix, from which they can exert control over cell growth. Thus, proteins with band 4.1/JEF domain are at the crossroads between cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction in multicellular organisms. Their importance is underlined by the variety of diseases that can result from their mutations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:9990861

  18. Structurally tuned iridescent surfaces inspired by nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deparis, Olivier; Rassart, Marie; Vandenbem, Cédric; Welch, Victoria; Pol Vigneron, Jean; Lucas, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    Iridescent surfaces exhibit vivid colours which change with the angle of incidence or viewing due to optical wave interference in the multilayer structure present at the wavelength scale underneath the surface. In nature, one can find examples of iridescent Coleoptera for which the hue changes either greatly or slightly with the angle. Because these species typically make these structures from a single biological material (usually chitin) and air or water as the low refractive index component, they have evolved by adjusting the layer thicknesses in order to display quite different iridescent aspects. Taking inspiration from this proven strategy, we have designed and fabricated periodic TiO2/SiO2 multilayer films in order to demonstrate the concept of structurally tuned iridescent surfaces. Titanium or silicon oxide layers were deposited on a glass substrate using dc reactive or RF magnetron sputtering techniques, respectively. Two structures were designed for which the period and the TiO2/SiO2 layer thickness ratio were varied in such a way that the films displayed radically different iridescent aspects: a reddish-to-greenish changing hue and a stable bluish hue. The fabricated samples were characterized through specular reflectance/transmittance measurements. Modelling of transmittance spectra using standard multilayer film theory confirmed the high quality of the twelve-period Bragg reflectors. The chromaticity coordinates, which were calculated from measured reflectance spectra taken at different angles, were in accordance with theoretical predictions.

  19. Photonic Crystal and Photonic Band-Gap Structures for Light Extraction and Emission Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Rue, Richard M.

    Research into photonic crystal (PhC) and photonic band-gap (PBG) structures has been motivated, from the start, by their possible use in controlling, modifying and enhancing the light emission process from high refractive index solid materials. This chapter considers the possible role of such structures when incorporated into semiconductor diode based light-emitting devices. Both light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers will be considered. In order to provide a proper framework for discussion and analysis, space is devoted to the historical development of III-V semiconductor based LEDs — and to competing alternative approaches that have been demonstrated for enhanced light extraction. The possible advantages of photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) structures over regularly periodic photon crystal structures for advanced LED designs are also considered. Photonic crystal structures potentially provide major enhancements in the performance of laser diodes (LDs) — and progress towards this performance enhancement will be reviewed.

  20. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. Wemore » conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.« less

  1. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Arsenyev, Sergey A; Buechler, Cynthia E; Edwards, Randall L; Romero, William P; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G; Wisniewski, Eric E; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-12

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test. PMID:26918995

  2. Inferring Land Surface Model Parameters for the Assimilation of Satellite-Based L-Band Brightness Temperature Observations into a Soil Moisture Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission provides global measurements of L-band brightness temperatures at horizontal and vertical polarization and a variety of incidence angles that are sensitive to moisture and temperature conditions in the top few centimeters of the soil. These L-band observations can therefore be assimilated into a land surface model to obtain surface and root zone soil moisture estimates. As part of the observation operator, such an assimilation system requires a radiative transfer model (RTM) that converts geophysical fields (including soil moisture and soil temperature) into modeled L-band brightness temperatures. At the global scale, the RTM parameters and the climatological soil moisture conditions are still poorly known. Using look-up tables from the literature to estimate the RTM parameters usually results in modeled L-band brightness temperatures that are strongly biased against the SMOS observations, with biases varying regionally and seasonally. Such biases must be addressed within the land data assimilation system. In this presentation, the estimation of the RTM parameters is discussed for the NASA GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, which is based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the Catchment land surface model. In the GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, soil moisture and brightness temperature biases are addressed in three stages. First, the global soil properties and soil hydraulic parameters that are used in the Catchment model were revised to minimize the bias in the modeled soil moisture, as verified against available in situ soil moisture measurements. Second, key parameters of the "tau-omega" RTM were calibrated prior to data assimilation using an objective function that minimizes the climatological differences between the modeled L-band brightness temperatures and the corresponding SMOS observations. Calibrated parameters include soil roughness parameters, vegetation structure parameters

  3. Fracture Induced Sub-Band Absorption as a Precursor to Optical Damage on Fused Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Suratwala, T I; Shen, N; Laurence, T A; Steele, W A; Menapace, J; Feit, M D; Wong, L L

    2010-03-05

    The optical damage threshold of indentation induced flaws on fused silica surfaces was explored. Mechanical flaws were characterized by laser damaged testing, SEM, optical, and photoluminescence microscopy. Localized polishing, chemical etching, and the control of indentation morphology were used to isolate the structural features which limit optical damage. A thin defect layer on fracture surfaces, including those smaller than the wavelength of visible light, was found to be the dominant source of laser damage initiation during illumination with 355nm, 3ns laser pulses. Little evidence was found that either displaced or densified material or fluence intensification plays a significant role in optical damage at fluences >35J/cm{sup 2}. Elimination of the defect layer was shown to increase the overall damage performance of fused silica optics.

  4. Surface leakage reduction in narrow band gap type-II antimonide-based superlattice photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Edward Kwei-wei; Hoffman, Darin; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Delaunay, Pierre-Yves; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2009-02-02

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) dry etching rendered structural and electrical enhancements on type-II antimonide-based superlattices compared to those delineated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) with a regenerative chemical wet etch. The surface resistivity of 4x10{sup 5} {omega} cm is evidence of the surface quality achieved with ICP etching and polyimide passivation. By only modifying the etching technique in the fabrication steps, the ICP-etched devices with a 9.3 {mu}m cutoff wavelength revealed a diffusion-limited dark current density of 4.1x10{sup -6} A/cm{sup 2} and a maximum differential resistance at zero bias in excess of 5300 {omega} cm{sup 2} at 77 K, which are an order of magnitude better in comparison to the ECR-etched devices.

  5. Broad-band ambient noise surface wave tomography: Technique development and application across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensen, Gregory David

    2007-05-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that surface wave signals can be extracted from high-quality empirical Green functions (EGF) obtained through cross-correlation of long ambient noise timeseries. Early work showed that Rayleigh wave components of EGFs could be created in a narrow period band under certain background noise characteristics. Such Rayleigh wave signals were used to develop shear wave tomography models of several geographic regions with unprecedented high resolution. However, questions remained regarding the robustness of these signals and their range of applicability. My work focuses on two problems. The first is researching the best method for computing, measuring and selecting high-quality EGFs. The second is to use this new technique to create a three-dimensional (3D) velocity model of the continental United States. Testing a variety of temporal and spectral normalization techniques yields an optimal method of creating EGFs. These signals are evaluated for robustness in a variety of noise environments effectively broadening the bandwidth from 7.5-20 s period to 6-100 s period. An automated dispersion measurement technique is presented as well as a preferred method of measurement selection and certain "best practices" are proposed for future study. Applying this method across the continental United States I develop Rayleigh and Love wave group and phase speed dispersion maps from 8-70 s period. The resulting set of dispersion maps possesses unprecedented high resolution and bandwidth for continental scale surface wave investigations and unites diverse tectonic regions into a coherent model. I invert the dispersion maps for a 3D shear velocity model with resolution from the surface to 150 km depth using a two-step procedure. First is a linearized inversion for the best fitting velocity model. Second is a Monte-Carlo re-sampling to develop an ensemble of models of sufficient quality and to generate uncertainty estimates at all points. The resulting

  6. The Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: UAVSAR's Single-pass Ka-Band Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Wu, X.; Michel, T.; Muellerschoen, R.; Carswell, J.; Fisher, C.; Miller, T.; Milligan, L.; Sadowy, G.; Sanchez-Barbetty, M.; Lou, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year (IPY) activities. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A): a 35.6 GHz single-pass interferometer. The proof-of-concept demonstration was achieved by interfacing Ka-band RF and antenna hardware with the Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The GLISTIN-A was implemented as a custom installation of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Gulfstream III. Instrument performance indicated swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. Following the success of the IPY campaign, the Earth Science Techonology Office (ESTO) Airborne Innovative Technology Transition (AITT) program funded the upgrade of GLISTIN-A to a permanently-available pod-only system compatible with unpressurized operation. The AITT made three fundamental upgrades to improve system performance: 1. State-of-the-art solid-state power amplifiers (80W peak) were integrated directly on the antenna panel reducing front-end losses; 2. A ping-pong capability was incorporated to effectively double the baseline thereby improving height measurement precision by a factor of two; and 3. A high-fidelity calibration loop was implemented which is critical for routine processing. Upon completion of our engineering flights in February 2013, GLISTIN-A flew a brief campaign to Alaska (4/24-4/27/13). The purpose was to fully demonstrate GLISTIN-A's ability to generate high-precision, high resolution maps of ice surface topography with swaths in excess of 10km. Furthermore, the question of the utility of GLISTIN-A for sea-ice mapping, tracking and inventory has received a great deal of interest. To address this GLISTIN-A collected data over sea-ice in the Beaufort sea including an underflight of CryoSAT II. Note that there are

  7. Band effects on inelastic scattering of low-energy ions from metallic and ionic surfaces: A formalism beyond the adiabatic molecular-orbitals calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Evelina A.; Goldberg, E. C.

    1998-03-01

    Charge exchange and inelastic excitation processes have been analyzed in the scattering of low-energy He+ from metallic and ionic surfaces. An Anderson-like Hamiltonian is proposed, where the parameters are defined taking into account the electronic band structure of the surface as well as the atomic nature of the interaction between the projectile and the target atoms. The time-dependent collisional process is solved by using a Green-function formalism, which allows us to calculate not only the charge-state probabilities but also the one-electron interband excitations in the solid. Competitive effects of the hybridizations among the localized state at the projectile site and the localized and extended surface states are contemplated. In this way we can explain the observed energy dependences of the neutralization probability, as well as the occurrence of energy-loss processes due to the excitation of valence and core surface electrons induced by the collision.

  8. Quasiparticle band structure for the Hubbard systems: Application to. alpha. -CeAl sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Quintana, J.; Lopez-Aguilar, F. ); Balle, S. ); Salvador, R. Supercomputer Computations Research Institute, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4052 )

    1990-04-01

    A self-energy formalism for determining the quasiparticle band structure of the Hubbard systems is deduced. The self-energy is obtained from the dynamically screened Coulomb interaction whose bare value is the correlation energy {ital U}. A method for integrating the Schroedingerlike equation with the self-energy operator is given. The method is applied to the cubic Laves phase of {alpha}-CeAl{sub 2} because it is a clear Hubbard system with a very complex electronic structure and, moreover, this system provides us with sufficient experimental data for testing our method.

  9. Band structure and density of States effects in co-based magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    LeClair, P; Kohlhepp, J T; van De Vin, C H; Wieldraaijer, H; Swagten, H J M; de Jonge, W J M; Davis, A H; MacLaren, J M; Moodera, J S; Jansen, R

    2002-03-11

    Utilizing Co/Al(2)O(3)/Co magnetic tunnel junctions with Co electrodes of different crystalline phases, a clear relationship between electrode crystal structure and junction transport properties is presented. For junctions with one fcc(111) textured and one polycrystalline (polyphase and polydirectional) Co electrode, a strong asymmetry is observed in the magnetotransport properties, while when both electrodes are polycrystalline the magnetotransport is essentially symmetric. These observations are successfully explained within a model based on ballistic tunneling between the calculated band structures (density of states) of fcc-Co and hcp-Co. PMID:11909383

  10. Structure and method for controlling band offset and alignment at a crystalline oxide-on-semiconductor interface

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    2003-11-25

    A crystalline oxide-on-semiconductor structure and a process for constructing the structure involves a substrate of silicon, germanium or a silicon-germanium alloy and an epitaxial thin film overlying the surface of the substrate wherein the thin film consists of a first epitaxial stratum of single atomic plane layers of an alkaline earth oxide designated generally as (AO).sub.n and a second stratum of single unit cell layers of an oxide material designated as (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m so that the multilayer film arranged upon the substrate surface is designated (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m wherein n is an integer repeat of single atomic plane layers of the alkaline earth oxide AO and m is an integer repeat of single unit cell layers of the A'BO.sub.3 oxide material. Within the multilayer film, the values of n and m have been selected to provide the structure with a desired electrical structure at the substrate/thin film interface that can be optimized to control band offset and alignment.

  11. Superhydrophobic Behavior on Nano-structured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    Superhydrophobic behavior is observed in natural occurrences and has been thoroughly studied over the past few years. Water repellant properties on uniform arrays of vertically aligned nano-cones were investigated to determine the highest achievable contact angle (a measure of water drop repellency), which is measured from the reference plane on which the water drop sits to the tangent line of the point at which the drop makes contact with the reference plane. At low aspect ratios (height vs. width of the nano-cones), surface tension pulls the water into the nano-cone array, resulting in a wetted surface. Higher aspect ratios reverse the effect of the surface tension, resulting in a larger contact angle that causes water drops to roll off the surface. Fiber drawing, bundling, and redrawing are used to produce the structured array glass composite surface. Triple-drawn fibers are fused together, annealed, and sliced into thin wafers. The surface of the composite glass is etched to form nano-cones through a differential etching process and then coated with a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Cone aspect ratios can be varied through changes in the chemistry and concentration of the etching acid solution. Superhydrophobic behavior occurs at contact angles >150 and it is predicted and measured that optimal behavior is achieved when the aspect ratio is 4:1, which displays contact angles >=175 .

  12. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed.

  13. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed. PMID:26729220

  14. Electronic band structure and momentum dependence of the superconducting gap in Ca1-xNaxFe2As2 from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushinsky, D. V.; Zabolotnyy, V. B.; Harnagea, L.; Yaresko, A. N.; Thirupathaiah, S.; Kordyuk, A. A.; Maletz, J.; Aswartham, S.; Wurmehl, S.; Rienks, E.; Follath, R.; Büchner, B.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2013-03-01

    Electronic structure of newly synthesized single crystals of calcium iron arsenide doped with sodium with Tc ranging from 33 to 14 K has been determined by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The measured band dispersion is in general agreement with theoretical calculations, nonetheless implies absence of Fermi-surface nesting at an antiferromagnetic vector. A clearly developing below Tc strongly band-dependant superconducting gap has been revealed for samples with various doping levels. The BCS ratio for optimal doping, 2Δ/kBTc=5.5, is substantially smaller than the numbers observed for related compounds.

  15. Multiple-grid frequency-selective surfaces as periodically loaded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orta, R.; Tascone, R.; Zich, R.

    1988-04-01

    An novel approach to the analysis of multiple-grid frequency-selective surfaces (FSS) is presented. In this case, the multiple grid FSS is thought of as a periodically loaded structure where the unit cell consists of a grid with its adjacent layers. The Bloch wave passband and stopband are used to create the transmission and reflection bands.

  16. Do adhesive systems leave resin coats on the surfaces of the metal matrix bands? An adhesive remnant characterization.

    PubMed

    Arhun, Neslihan; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak

    2013-01-01

    Reestablishing proximal contacts with composite resins may prove challenging since the applied adhesives may lead to resin coating that produces additional thickness. The aim of this study was to investigate the surface of metal matrix bands after application of adhesive systems and blowing or wiping off the adhesive before polymerization. Seventeen groups of matrix bands were prepared. The remnant particles were characterized by energy dispersive spectrum and scanning electron microscopy. Total etch and two-step self-etch adhesives did not leave any resin residues by wiping and blowing off. All-in-one adhesive revealed resin residues despite wiping off. Prime and Bond NT did not leave any remnant with compomer. Clinicians must be made aware of the consequences of possible adhesive remnants on matrix bands that may lead to a defective definitive restoration. The adhesive resin used for Class II restorations may leave resin coats on metal matrix bands after polymerization, resulting in additional thickness on the metal matrix bands and poor quality of the proximal surface of the definitive restoration when the adhesive system is incorporated in the restoration. PMID:23484179

  17. Surface passivation of a photonic crystal band-edge laser by atomic layer deposition of SiO2 and its application for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Hyungrae; Lee, Jeongkug; Jordan, Luke R.; Lee, Si Hoon; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Hyo Jin; Park, Juhun; Hong, Seunghun; Jeon, Heonsu

    2015-02-01

    We report on the conformal surface passivation of photonic crystal (PC) laser devices with an ultrathin dielectric layer. Air-bridge-type Γ-point band-edge lasers (BELs) are fabricated by forming a honeycomb lattice two-dimensional PC structure into an InGaAsP multiple-quantum-well epilayer. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is employed for conformal deposition of a few-nanometer-thick SiO2 layer over the entire device surface, not only on the top and bottom surfaces of the air-bridge membrane but also on the air-hole sidewalls. Despite its extreme thinness, the ALD passivation layer is found to protect the InGaAsP BEL devices from harsh chemicals. In addition, the ALD-SiO2 is compatible with the silane-based surface chemistry, which allows us to use ALD-passivated BEL devices as label-free biosensors. The standard streptavidin-biotin interaction shifts the BEL lasing wavelength by ~1 nm for the dipole-like Γ-point band-edge mode. A sharp lasing line (<0.2 nm, full width at half-maximum) and a large refractive index sensitivity (~163 nm per RIU) produce a figure of merit as high as ~800 for our BEL biosensor, which is at least an order of magnitude higher than those of more common biosensors that rely on a broad resonance peak, showing that our nanolaser structures are suitable for highly sensitive biosensor applications.

  18. Quasi-particle band structure of potassium-doped few-layer black phosphorus with GW approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Gyu; Baik, Seung Su; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    We calculate the quasi-particle band structure of pristine and potassium-doped black phosphorus (BP) by using the GW approximation. We obtain band gaps of pristine bulk and few-layer BP and compare them with the result of the density functional calculations and experimental measurements. For potassium-doped cases, we calculate the electronic band structure of potassium-doped few-layer BPs with various doping densities. We obtain the critical doping density for the band-gap closing, and the energy-band dispersions when the band gap is inverted. We discuss Dirac semimetal properties of doped few-layer BPs obtained by the GW approximation. This work was supported by NRF of Korea (Grant No. 2011-0018306) and KISTI supercomputing center (Project No. KSC-2015-C3-039).

  19. Crustal Structure Beneath Taiwan Using Frequency-band Inversion of Receiver Function Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomfohrde, D. A.; Nowack, R. L.

    Receiver function analysis is used to determine local crustal structure beneath Taiwan. We have performed preliminary data processing and polarization analysis for the selection of stations and events and to increase overall data quality. Receiver function analysis is then applied to data from the Taiwan Seismic Network to obtain radial and transverse receiver functions. Due to the limited azimuthal coverage, only the radial receiver functions are analyzed in terms of horizontally layered crustal structure for each station. In order to improve convergence of the receiver function inversion, frequency-band inversion (FBI) is implemented, in which an iterative inversion procedure with sequentially higher low-pass corner frequencies is used to stabilize the waveform inversion. Frequency-band inversion is applied to receiver functions at six stations of the Taiwan Seismic Network. Initial 20-layer crustal models are inverted for using prior tomographic results for the initial models. The resulting 20-1ayer models are then simplified to 4 to 5 layer models and input into an alternating depth and velocity frequency-band inversion. For the six stations investigated, the resulting simplified models provide an average estimate of 38 km for the Moho thickness surrounding the Central Range of Taiwan. Also, the individual station estimates compare well with the recent tomographic model of and the refraction results of Rau and Wu (1995) and the refraction results of Ma and Song (1997).

  20. Synthesis, structure and band gap energy of covalently linked cluster-assembled materials.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sukhendu; Reber, Arthur C; Qian, Meichun; Liu, Ran; Saavedra, Hector M; Sen, Saikat; Weiss, Paul S; Khanna, Shiv N; Sen, Ayusman

    2012-10-28

    We have synthesized a series of cluster assembled materials in which the building blocks are As(7)(3-) clusters linked by group 12 metals, Zn, Cd and Hg, to investigate the effect of covalent linkers on the band gap energy. The synthesized assemblies include zero dimensional assemblies of [Zn(As(7))(2)](4-), [Cd(As(7))(2)](4-), [Hg(2)(As(7))(2)](4-), and [HgAsAs(14)](3-) in which the clusters are separated by cryptated counterions, and assemblies in which [Zn(As(7))(2)](4-), [Cd(As(7))(2)](4-) are linked by free alkali atoms into unusual three-dimensional structures. These covalently linked cluster-assembled materials have been characterized by elemental analysis, EDX and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal structure analysis revealed that in the case of Zn and Cd, the two As(7)(3-) units are linked by the metal ion, while in the case of Hg, two As(7)(3-) units are linked by either Hg-Hg or Hg-As dimers. Optical measurements indicate that the band gap energy ranges from 1.62 eV to 2.21 eV. A theoretical description based on cluster orbital theory is used to provide a microscopic understanding of the electronic character of the composite building blocks and the observed variations in the band gap energy. PMID:22940817