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Sample records for surface change detection

  1. Detection of light transformations and concomitant changes in surface albedo

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Holly E.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2010-01-01

    We report two experiments demonstrating that (1) observers are sensitive to information about changes in the light field not captured by local scene statistics and that (2) they can use this information to enhance detection of changes in surface albedo. Observers viewed scenes consisting of matte surfaces at many orientations illuminated by a collimated light source. All surfaces were achromatic, all lights neutral. In the first experiment, observers attempted to discriminate small changes in direction of the collimated light source (light transformations) from matched changes in the albedos of all surfaces (non-light transformations). Light changes and non-light changes shared the same local scene statistics and edge ratios, but the latter were not consistent with any change in direction to the collimated source. We found that observers could discriminate light changes as small as 5 degrees with sensitivity d′ > 1 and accurately judge the direction of change. In a second experiment, we measured observers' ability to detect a change in the surface albedo of an isolated surface patch during either a light change or a surface change. Observers were more accurate in detecting isolated albedo changes during light changes. Measures of sensitivity d′ were more than twice as great. PMID:20884599

  2. Automated Detection of Changes on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, A.; Gibbens, M.

    2005-08-01

    Although the Moon is considered to be geologically dormant, surface altering events visible to orbiting spacecraft must still occur, albeit infrequently e.g. fresh impact craters detected from Apollo imagery. Given a surface area of 3.8E7 km2 and the 40 year time frame spanning Lunar Orbiter to SMART-1 missions, it is likely that 10's-100's of surface changes measurable in the > 50m scale range may be detected by automatically comparing temporal images of the same areas under similar (< 5 deg difference) incidence and emission angles. Automated tie-pointing and image footprint overlap detection developed from Clementine stereo research can be used to select suitable overlapping temporal image pairs of a given area. These can then be automatically registered/warped together, photometrically calibrated to each other and subtracted to leave a difference image. Differences that exceed 3 standard deviations across the image can then be compared to the most recent mosaics of optical maturity in order to confirm whether a suspected area of change is aligned with fresh non-spaceweathered parts of the surface. Knowledge that could be gained from such a study could include: 1) confirmation of cratering rate assumptions that were made from the Apollo ALSEP seismometers, 2) identification of surface disturbances by ejecta from impacts detected by Apollo seismometer, or Earth based telescopic impact flash observations; these can then be used to help relate estimated impact energy to crater size, 3) the areal extent of dust transport from impact ejecta, landslides, or other suspected mechanisms such as residual outgassing or electrostaic levitation of dust. All three of these have important implications for future surface based exploration in identifying sites of interest that can be either monitored over time to study the progression of space weathering, or for studying freshly excavated underlying geology.

  3. Surface Change Detection Using Large Footprint Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Hofton, Michelle A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Laser altimeters provide a precise and accurate method for mapping topography at fine horizontal and vertical scales. A laser altimeter provides range by measuring the roundtrip flight time of a short pulse of laser light from the laser altimeter instrument to the target surface. The range is then combined with laser beam pointing knowledge and absolute position knowledge to provide an absolute measurement of the surface topography. Newer generations of laser altimeters measure the range by recording the shape and time of the outgoing and received laser pulses. The shape of the return pulse can also provide unique information about the vertical structure of material such as vegetation within each laser footprint. Distortion of the return pulse is caused by the time-distributed reflections adding together and representing the vertical distribution of surfaces within the footprint. Larger footprints (10 - 100m in diameter) can support numerous target surfaces and thus provide the potential for producing complex return pulses. Interpreting the return pulse from laser altimeters has evolved from simple timing between thresholds, range-walk corrections, constant-fraction discriminators, and multi-stop time interval units to actual recording of the time varying return pulse intensity - the return waveform. Interpreting the waveform can be as simple as digitally thresholding the return pulse, calculating a centroid, to fitting one or more gaussian pulse-shapes to the signal. What we present here is a new technique for using the raw recorded return pulse as a raw observation to detect centimeter-level vertical topographic change using large footprint airborne and spaceborne laser altimetry. We use the correlation of waveforms from coincident footprints as an indication of the similarity in structure of the waveforms from epoch to epoch, and assume that low correlation is an indicator of vertical structure or elevation change. Thus, using vertically and horizontally

  4. Protein Binding for Detection of Small Changes on Nanoparticle Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shang; Huang, Yu-ming M.; Chang, Chia-en A.; Zhong, Wenwan

    2014-01-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles is closely associated with the physicochemical properties of particles, in particular, their surface property. We synthesized two batches of polyacrylic acid-coated nanoparticles under almost identical conditions except for heating duration and found differences in the head-group structure of the polyacrylic acid. The structure change was confirmed by NMR and MS. The two batches of particles had varied binding affinities to a selected group of proteins. Computational work confirmed that the head group of the polymer on the surface of a nanoparticle could directly interact with a protein, and small structural changes in the head group were sufficient to result in a significant difference in the free energy of binding. Our results demonstrate that protein adsorption is so sensitive to the surface property of particles that it can reveal even small variations in the structure of a nanoparticle surface ligand, and should be useful for quick assessment of nanoparticle properties. PMID:24482794

  5. Detecting climate forcing and feedback signals in surface climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to the build-up of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous feedback processes which can introduce strong, regionalized asymmetries to the overall warming trend. These processes alter the surface energy budget, and thus affect the surface air temperature, which is one of the primary measures of how the climate is changing. However, the degree to which a given forcing or feedback process alters surface temperatures is contingent on the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere which is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, which can lead to a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. Therefore, if a climate forcing or feedback is acting across a wide range of conditions of the boundary layer, then this non-linear response of the surface climate to perturbations in the forcing must be accounted for in order to correctly assess the effect of the forcing on the surface climatology.

  6. Detecting changes in surface moisture and water table position with spectral changes in surface vegetation in northern peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meingast, Karl M.

    Due to warmer and drier conditions, wildland fire has been increasing in extent into peatland ecosystems during recent decades. As such, there is an increasing need for broadly applicable tools to detect surface peat moisture, in order to ascertain the susceptibility of peat burning, and the vulnerability of deep peat consumption in the event of a wildfire. In this thesis, a field portable spectroradiometer was used to measure surface reflectance of two Sphagnum moss dominated peatlands. Relationships were developed correlating spectral indices to surface moisture as well as water table position. Spectral convolutions were also applied to the high resolution spectra to represent spectral sensitivity of earth observing sensors. Band ratios previously used to monitor surface moisture with these sensors were assessed. Strong relationships to surface moisture and water table position are evident for both the narrowband indices as well as broadened indices. This study also found a dependence of certain spectral relationships on changes in vegetation cover by leveraging an experimental vegetation manipulation. Results indicate broadened indices employing the 1450-1650 nm region may be less stable under changing vegetation cover than those located in the 1200 nm region.

  7. Intra-rainfall soil surface change detection using close-range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; James, Michael R.; McShane, Gareth; Quinton, John N.; Strauss, Peter

    2015-04-01

    During precipitation events, the physical properties of soil surfaces change significantly. Such changes influence a large range of processes, e.g. surface runoff, soil erosion, water infiltration, soil-atmosphere interactions and plant growth. It has been proven that successive precipitation events change soil surfaces, but detailed studies on soil surface change within a single rainfall event do, to the best of our knowledge, not exist, due to a lack of suitable methods. However, recent developments in the use of photogrammetry are becoming a common tool in geoscience and can be utilized in soil surface detection. New concepts, developments in hardware and software allow a quick and user friendly calculation of surface models with close-range imagery and processing based on structure from motion (SfM) approaches. In this study we tested the potential of close range photogrammetry for detecting changes in soil surface topography within an artificial rainfall event. We used a photogrammetric approach to capture multiple images of the soil surface on two different soil types (loamy and sandy soil) under laboratory conditions while they were exposed to a 60 minute duration 47(60) mm hr-1 intensity rainfall event from a gravity driven rainfall simulator. The photographs were processed using Photoscan to produce point clouds which were then interpolated to produce DEM surfaces. Of the 126 surfaces produced during the rainfall event 125 were usable and able to demonstrate changes with a resolution of <1 mm in the z dimension and with a xy resolution of <0.5 mm. We demonstrate the potential of photogrammetry for surface detection within a precipitation event. The use of close-range photogrammetry opens new possibilities to monitor soil surfaces and could be developed for a range of other applications. Our results have the potential to lead to better understanding of infiltration, runoff, nutrient transport and soil erosion processes within precipitation event.

  8. Seasonal Change Detection and Attribution of Surface Temperature changes over Interior Peninsular Region of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanayak, Sonali; Nagesh Kumar, Dasika

    2015-04-01

    A good number of studies have investigated recent trends in the observed and simulated hydrometeorological variables across the world. It has been challenging for the research community to address whether the significant change in climate over the course of 2nd half of 20th century is caused either due to natural or manmade effects. Although evidences for an anthropogenic contribution to climatic trends have been accumulated rapidly worldwide, for India these are scarce. Hence the formal efforts have been undertaken to distinguish whether the recent changes in seasonal temperature over India occurred due to natural internal variation of climate system or human influence using rigorous detection and attribution (D&A) procedure. The surface temperature is the most widely cited indicator of climate fluctuation. Hence maximum and minimum temperatures (Tmax & Tmin) which are among the six most commonly used variables for impact assessment studies are analyzed here. Seasonal divisions are based on conventional meteorological seasons: January-February (winter); March-May (pre monsoon); June-September (monsoon); October-December (post monsoon). Time span considered for this study is 1950-2005. Climate Research Unit (Version 3.21) gridded monthly temperature datasets are considered as observed data. Initially TFPW-MK (Trend Free Pre Whitening Mann Kendall) test is used to search the significant trends in the four seasons over all India. Temporal change detection analysis in evapotranspiration (which is one of the key processes in hydrological cycle) is essential for progress in water resources planning and management. Hence along with Tmax and Tmin, potential evapotranspiration (PET) has also been analyzed for the similar conditions. Significant upward trends in Tmax, Tmin and PET are observed over most of the grid points in Interior Peninsula (IP) region over India. Significant correlation was obtained between PET and Tmax compared to PET and Tmin. Trends in Tmin clearly

  9. Detection of impervious surface change with multitemporal Landsat images in an urban-rural frontier

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dengsheng; Moran, Emilio; Hetrick, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Mapping and monitoring impervious surface dynamic change in a complex urban-rural frontier with medium or coarse spatial resolution images is a challenge due to the mixed pixel problem and the spectral confusion between impervious surfaces and other non-vegetation land covers. This research selected Lucas do Rio Verde County in Mato Grosso State, Brazil as a case study to improve impervious surface estimation performance by the integrated use of Landsat and QuickBird images and to monitor impervious surface change by analyzing the normalized multitemporal Landsat-derived fractional impervious surfaces. This research demonstrates the importance of two step calibrations. The first step is to calibrate the Landsat-derived fraction impervious surface values through the established regression model based on the QuickBird-derived impervious surface image in 2008. The second step is to conduct the normalization between the calibrated 2008 impervious surface image with other dates of impervious surface images. This research indicates that the per-pixel based method overestimates the impervious surface area in the urban-rural frontier by 50-60%. In order to accurately estimate impervious surface area, it is necessary to map the fractional impervious surface image and further calibrate the estimates with high spatial resolution images. Also normalization of the multitemporal fractional impervious surface images is needed to reduce the impacts from different environmental conditions, in order to effectively detect the impervious surface dynamic change in a complex urban-rural frontier. The procedure developed in this paper for mapping and monitoring impervious surface area is especially valuable in urban-rural frontiers where multitemporal Landsat images are difficult to be used for accurately extracting impervious surface features based on traditional per-pixel based classification methods as they cannot effectively handle the mixed pixel problem. PMID:21552379

  10. Detecting changes in surface water area of Lake Kyoga sub-basin using remotely sensed imagery in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsubuga, F. W. N.; Botai, Joel O.; Olwoch, Jane M.; Rautenbach, C. J. deW; Kalumba, Ahmed M.; Tsela, Philemon; Adeola, Abiodun M.; Sentongo, Ausi A.; Mearns, Kevin F.

    2015-09-01

    Detection of changes in Earth surface features, for example lakes, is important for understanding the relationships between human and natural phenomena in order to manage better the increasingly scarce natural resources. This work presents a procedure of using modified normalised difference water index (MNDWI) to detect fluctuations of lake surface water area and relate it to a changing climate. The study used radiometrically and geometrically rectified Landsat images for 1986, 1995 and 2010 encompassing the Kyoga Basin lakes of Uganda, in order to investigate the changes in surface water area between the respective years. The standard precipitation index (SPI) and drought severity index (DSI) are applied to show the relationship between variability of surface water area and climate parameters. The present analysis reveals that surface water area fluctuation is linked to rainfall variability. In particular, Lake Kyoga sub-basin lakes experienced an increase in surface water area in 2010 compared to 1986. This work has important implications to water resources management for Lake Kyoga and could be vital to water resource managers across Ugandan lakes.

  11. Glacier melting and precipitation trends detected by surface area changes in Himalayan ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Franco; Thakuri, Sudeep; Guyennon, Nicolas; Viviano, Gaetano; Tartari, Gianni

    2016-07-01

    Climatic time series for high-elevation Himalayan regions are decidedly scarce. Although glacier shrinkage is now sufficiently well described, the changes in precipitation and temperature at these elevations are less clear. This contribution shows that the surface area variations of unconnected glacial ponds, i.e. ponds not directly connected to glacier ice, but that may have a glacier located in their hydrological basin, can be considered as suitable proxies for detecting past changes in the main hydrological components of the water balance. On the south side of Mt Everest, glacier melt and precipitation have been found to be the main drivers of unconnected pond surface area changes (detected mainly with Landsat imagery). In general, unconnected ponds have decreased significantly by approximately 10 ± 5 % in terms of surface area over the last 50 years (1963-2013 period) in the study region. Here, an increase in precipitation occurred until the mid-1990s followed by a decrease until recent years. Until the 1990s, glacier melt was constant. An increase occurred in the early 2000s, while a declining trend in maximum temperature has caused a reduction in the glacier melt during recent years.

  12. Quantitative ultrasound imaging detects degenerative changes in articular cartilage surface and subchondral bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarakkala, Simo; Laasanen, Mikko S.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha

    2006-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that quantitative ultrasound imaging could sensitively diagnose degeneration of the articular surface and changes in the subchondral bone during the development of osteoarthrosis (OA). We have recently introduced a new parameter, ultrasound roughness index (URI), for the quantification of cartilage surface roughness, and successfully tested it with normal and experimentally degraded articular surfaces. In this in vitro study, the applicability of URI was tested in bovine cartilage samples with spontaneously developed tissue degeneration. Simultaneously, we studied the sensitivity of quantitative ultrasound imaging to detect degenerative changes in the cartilage-bone interface. For reference, histological degenerative grade of the cartilage samples was determined. Mechanical reference measurements were also conducted. Cartilage surface roughness (URI) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in histologically degenerated samples with inferior mechanical properties. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface was also significantly (p < 0.05) increased in degenerated samples. Furthermore, it was quantitatively confirmed that ultrasound attenuation in the overlying cartilage significantly affects the measured ultrasound reflection values from the cartilage-bone interface. To conclude, the combined ultrasound measurement of the cartilage surface roughness and ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface complement each other, and may together enable more sensitive and quantitative diagnosis of early OA or follow up after surgical cartilage repair.

  13. Quantitative ultrasound imaging detects degenerative changes in articular cartilage surface and subchondral bone.

    PubMed

    Saarakkala, Simo; Laasanen, Mikko S; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2006-10-21

    Previous studies have suggested that quantitative ultrasound imaging could sensitively diagnose degeneration of the articular surface and changes in the subchondral bone during the development of osteoarthrosis (OA). We have recently introduced a new parameter, ultrasound roughness index (URI), for the quantification of cartilage surface roughness, and successfully tested it with normal and experimentally degraded articular surfaces. In this in vitro study, the applicability of URI was tested in bovine cartilage samples with spontaneously developed tissue degeneration. Simultaneously, we studied the sensitivity of quantitative ultrasound imaging to detect degenerative changes in the cartilage-bone interface. For reference, histological degenerative grade of the cartilage samples was determined. Mechanical reference measurements were also conducted. Cartilage surface roughness (URI) was significantly (p<0.05) higher in histologically degenerated samples with inferior mechanical properties. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface was also significantly (p<0.05) increased in degenerated samples. Furthermore, it was quantitatively confirmed that ultrasound attenuation in the overlying cartilage significantly affects the measured ultrasound reflection values from the cartilage-bone interface. To conclude, the combined ultrasound measurement of the cartilage surface roughness and ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface complement each other, and may together enable more sensitive and quantitative diagnosis of early OA or follow up after surgical cartilage repair. PMID:17019042

  14. Using UAV data for soil surface change detection at a loess field plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltner, Anette; Baumgart, Philipp

    2014-05-01

    Application of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) denotes an increasing interest in geosciences due to major developments within the last years. Today, UAV are economical, reliable and flexible in usage. They provide a non-invasive method to measure the soil surface and its changes - e.g. due to erosion - with high resolution. Advances in digital photogrammetry and computer vision allow for fast and dense digital surface reconstruction from overlapping images. The study site is located in the Saxonian loess (Germany). The area is fragile due to erodible soils and intense agricultural utilisation. Hence, detectable soil surface changes are expected. The size of the field plot is 20 x 30 meters and the period of investigation lasts from October 2012 till July 2013 at which four surveys were performed. The UAV deployed in this study is equipped with a compact camera which is attached to an active stabilising camera mount. In addition, the micro drone integrates GPS and IMU that enables autonomous surveys with programmed flight patterns. About 100 photos are needed to cover the study site at a minimal flying height of eight metres and 65%/80% image overlap. For multi-temporal comparison a stable local reference system is established. Total station control of the signalised ground control points confirms two mm accuracy for the study period. To estimate the accuracy of the digital surface models (DSM) derived from the UAV images a comparison to DSM from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is conducted. The standard deviation of differences amounts five millimetres. To analyse surface changes methods from image processing are applied to the DSM. Erosion rills could be extracted for quantitative and qualitative consideration. Furthermore, volumetric changes are measured. First results indicate levelling processes during the winter season and reveal rill and inter-rill erosion during spring and summer season.

  15. Near surface temperature changes over India - a detection and attribution study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, Dileepkumar; AchutaRao, Krishna

    2016-04-01

    The IPCC Fifth Assessment Report concluded, "More than half of the observed increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) from 1951 to 2010 is very likely due to the observed anthropogenic increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations." Detecting and attributing the changes over regional scales can provide more relevant information to policymakers at the national level but the low signal-to-noise ratios at smaller spatial scales make this a harder problem. In this study, we analyze annual and seasonal mean changes in minimum (Tmin), maximum (Tmax), and mean (Tmean) temperatures over 7 homogeneous temperature zones of India using models from the CMIP5 database and multiple observational datasets (CRU-3.22, and IITM). We perform Detection and Attribution (D&A) analysis using fingerprint methods by defining a signal that concisely express both spatial and temporal changes found in the model runs with the CMIP5 individual forcing runs; greenhouse (historicalGHG), natural (historicalNat), anthropogenic (historicalAnthro), and anthropogenic aerosols (historicalAA). We use three different combinations of individual forcing patterns (2-pattern, 3-pattern and 5-pattern cases) in our analysis to quantify the contributions resulting from individual forcings. Results indicate warming attributable in most regions to anthropogenic forcings and Greenhouse gases with a negligible contribution from natural forcings using the 2- and 3-pattern analyses for the 1901-2005 and 1956-2005 time periods. The results are sensitive to observational data set used, as these tend to differ at the regional level.

  16. Detection of Changes on and below the Surface in Epithelium Mucosal Tissue Structure using Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taslidere, Ezgi

    The aim of this work is to answer the question of whether it is possible to detect changes on and below the surface in epithelium tissue structure using light reflected from the tissue over an area (2-D scan) illuminated by an optical sensor (fiber) emitting light at either one wavelength or with white light. Towards that end we model the 2-D reflected scans using a Stochastic Decomposition Method (SDM). The emphasis in this work is on the novelty of the proposed model and its theoretical pinning and foundation. The model is biologically motivated by the stochastic textural nature of the tissue. We model the textural content (which relates to tissue morphology) that manifests itself in the 2-D scans. Unlike previous works that analyze the scattered signal at one spot at various wavelengths, our method statistically analyzes 2-D scans of light scattering data over an area, and extracts from the data features (SDM parameters) that change with changes in the tissue morphology. The examination of an area rather than a spot not only leads to a more reliable calculation of the extracted parameters using single techniques (e.g. nuclear size distribution), but it also leads to the computation of additional information embedded in the spatial texture that our decomposition technique arrives at by modeling the hidden correlations that are obtained only by interrogating a wide sample area. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt at modeling the scattered light over an area using a stochastic decomposition model that allows for the assessment of correlation and textural characteristics that otherwise could not be revealed when the analysis of the scattering signal is a function of wavelength or angle. We also come up with a segmentation technique to raise a flag on the fly when a transition occurs between different mucosal architectures on the surface. The segmentation is based on a novel difference metric for detecting an abrupt change in the parameters

  17. Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.-W.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.H.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F.; Sonenshein, R.

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric processing of JERS-1 L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired over south Florida during 1993-1996 reveals detectable surface changes in the Everglades wetlands. Although our study is limited to south Florida it has implication for other large-scale wetlands, because south Florida wetlands have diverse vegetation types and both managed and natural flow environments. Our analysis reveals that interferometric coherence level is sensitive to wetland vegetation type and to the interferogram time span. Interferograms with time spans less than six months maintain phase observations for all wetland types, allowing characterization of water level changes in different wetland environments. The most noticeable changes occur between the managed and the natural flow wetlands. In the managed wetlands, fringes are organized, follow patterns related to some of the managed water control structures and have high fringe-rate. In the natural flow areas, fringes are irregular and have a low fringe-rate. The high fringe rate in managed areas reflects dynamic water topography caused by high flow rate due to gate operation. Although this organized fringe pattern is not characteristic of most large-scale wetlands, the high level of water level change enables accurate estimation of the wetland InSAR technique, which lies in the range of 5-10??cm. The irregular and low rate fringe pattern in the natural flow area reflects uninterrupted flow that diffuses water efficiently and evenly. Most of the interferograms in the natural flow area show an elongated fringe located along the transitional zone between salt- and fresh-water wetlands, reflecting water level changes due to ocean tides. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydrography change detection: the usefulness of surface channels derived From LiDAR DEMs for updating mapped hydrography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppenga, Sandra K.; Gesch, Dean B.; Worstell, Bruce B.

    2013-01-01

    The 1:24,000-scale high-resolution National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) mapped hydrography flow lines require regular updating because land surface conditions that affect surface channel drainage change over time. Historically, NHD flow lines were created by digitizing surface water information from aerial photography and paper maps. Using these same methods to update nationwide NHD flow lines is costly and inefficient; furthermore, these methods result in hydrography that lacks the horizontal and vertical accuracy needed for fully integrated datasets useful for mapping and scientific investigations. Effective methods for improving mapped hydrography employ change detection analysis of surface channels derived from light detection and ranging (LiDAR) digital elevation models (DEMs) and NHD flow lines. In this article, we describe the usefulness of surface channels derived from LiDAR DEMs for hydrography change detection to derive spatially accurate and time-relevant mapped hydrography. The methods employ analyses of horizontal and vertical differences between LiDAR-derived surface channels and NHD flow lines to define candidate locations of hydrography change. These methods alleviate the need to analyze and update the nationwide NHD for time relevant hydrography, and provide an avenue for updating the dataset where change has occurred.

  19. Detecting surface changes of slope to channel coupling in an alpine catchment using terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascher, Eric; Sass, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the evolution and functions of a river system and interpreting the morphology and the dynamics of the channel is a key factor in fluvial geomorphology. For this purpose it is essential to analyse the processes of sediment input and output within and between river reaches and to detect the various forms of storage types on hillslopes and in the channel network. From these processes catchment scale sediment fluxes are derived and result in sediment budgets showing the amount and motion of sediment through the system. Sediment connectivity is a highly important characteristic of catchments when sediment transfer processes are studied. In this context, connectivity controls the sediment fluxes throughout the landscape which means the transfer of sediment from sediment sources to sinks and particularly the potential of a particle to move through the system. This study focuses on slope to channel coupling in the Johnsbach Valley, a typical, non-glaciated alpine catchment in the eastern Austrian Alps. The valley covers an area of 65 km² with altitudes ranging from 584 m a.s.l. at the outlet to 2369 m a.s.l. (Hochtor). The valley is drained by the Johnsbach River which originates in a crystalline bedrock dominated part of the catchment. After approximately 10 km of the distance downstream the lithology changes to calcareous bedrock. In this part of the Johnsbach Valley most of the sediment contributing areas are situated. To detect slope to channel coupling surface changes were measured and mass balances were quantified by terrestrial laser scanning using a RIEGL LMS-Z620. Four field sites were chosen were side channels are directly connected to the main fluvial system. Additionally two field sites show sediment movement in between the side channels. Field campaigns were carried out in September and October of 2013 as well as in April, July, August and October of 2014. First results show that sediment contribution from the side channels and erosion of

  20. Effects of the atmosphere on the detection of surface changes from Landsat multispectral scanner data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otterman, Joseph; Robinove, Charles J.

    1981-01-01

    These effects on the monitoring of surface changes by the use of Landsat MSS data are discussed in terms of departures of the actual atmosphere at the time of a satellite passage from a ‘minima’ atmosphere having no aerosols and characterized by gaseous absorption corresponding to minimal water vapour amounts.

  1. Can an influence of changing aerosol emissions be detected in the pattern of surface temperature change between 1970 and 2000?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekman, Annica; Anna, Lewinschal; Hamish, Struthers

    2013-04-01

    Since the 1970's, there has been a rapid change in the magnitude and spatial distribution of anthropogenic aerosol particle and precursor emissions in the world with a significant decrease over e.g. Europe and North America and a substantial increase over large parts of Asia. During the same time period, there has been a significant increase in global greenhouse gas concentrations. In the present study, the global climate model CAM-Oslo is used to examine if the shift in aerosol emissions between 1970 and present day results in a clear fingerprint in the modeled atmospheric circulation, precipitation and temperature change patterns. CAM-Oslo includes a comprehensive module of the atmospheric aerosol cycle as well as descriptions of the direct and indirect effects of aerosol particles on radiation, cloud reflectivity and precipitation. We also examine if the temperature response pattern differs when aerosol effects are considered separately or simultaneously with a change in greenhouse gas concentration. To evaluate the simulations, we make use of observations and re-analysis data of surface temperature, precipitation and 300 hPa geopotential. We investigate if the modeled results correspond better or worse with the observations when aerosol and greenhouse effects are included or excluded. For a few selected regions, we also examine more closely the underlying processes that determine the surface temperature anomaly pattern and if the importance of different processes change when greenhouse effects and aerosol effects are considered separately or simultaneously.

  2. A new Global Observational Dataset for Detecting Changes in Surface Winds and Storm Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardulli, L.; Wentz, F. J.

    2006-12-01

    Remote Sensing Systems just released a new version of the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data products. SSM/I is an intercalibrated and unified dataset of continuous satellite observations of surface wind speed, cloud liquid water, water vapor, and rain rate over the global oceans since 1987. In the new Version 6, all six SSM/Is (F08, F10, F11, F13, F14, and F15) have been carefully intercalibrated and a spurious decadal scale trend in wind speed has been corrected. This will now allow investigators to confidently use the SSM/I products for detailed analysis of atmospheric variability at interannual and decadal time scales. Unlike ship data, this satellite dataset provides, for the first time, 19 years of reliable spatially and temporally continuous observations of surface winds (and other cloud-related variables) over the global oceans at 25 km resolution. Here we show global trend maps of surface wind speeds, and analyze in detail patterns in the Atlantic and Pacific extratropical regions. Investigation of changes in storm location is attempted with the aide of rain and cloud liquid water data. A comparison of similar studies we performed using winds from NCEP-NCAR and ERA40 reanalyses, and COADS observations is also addressed.

  3. A novel approach for change detection from ICESat satellite laser altimetry - spatial and temporal pattern of Greenland Ice Sheet surface changes, 2003-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csatho, B.; Schenk, T.; Babonis, G.; Nagarajan, S.; Krabill, W.

    2009-04-01

    The main objective of the ICESat satellite laser altimetry mission is to determine the mass balance of polar ice sheets and their contributions to current sea level changes. By measuring surface topography, ICESat also provides important boundary conditions for ice sheet and atmospheric modeling. To quantify surface elevation changes, to investigate their causes, and to improve predictive ice sheet models, accurate elevation changes on a seasonal, annual and inter-annual basis at scales of drainage basins and outlet glaciers are essential. Determining the spatial and temporal distribution of surface changes from repeat satellite laser altimetry remains a challenging problem, mainly because the footprints of repeat missions do not precisely overlap. We have developed a new method that is based on fitting analytical functions to laser points within repeat tracks or cross-over areas for estimating the ice sheet surface topography. The mathematical model of the change detection algorithm is based on the assumption that for a small surface area, e.g. 1 km by 1 km, only the absolute elevation changes over time but not the shape of the surface patch. Therefore, laser points of all time epochs of a small surface patch contribute to the shape parameters, and the laser points of each time period determine the absolute elevation of the surface patch at that period. The least squares adjustment delivers the surface elevation changes together with statistical information that is extremely helpful in judging how significant the elevation changes and the derived volume changes are. We demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach by reconstructing surface and volume changes of the Jakobshavn drainage basin in west Greenland. The accuracy of the surface change estimates derived from repeat ICESat measurements is verified by using NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) airborne laser altimetry. We then combine repeat ICESat and ATM laser altimetry and stereo satellite

  4. Land Surface Phenologies in the North American Great Plains: Detecting Climate Change Amidst Climate Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henebry, G. M.; Goodin, D. G.

    2004-12-01

    The continental climate of the North American Great Plains is characterized by high interannual variability in growing season weather. Local averages of temperature and precipitation are not very helpful for predicting expected growing season conditions for vegetation production. We examined the temperature and precipitation records from a network of 'sentinel' weather stations across Kansas, Nebraska, and South Dakota. We assigned these stations into one or more of Wendland and Bryson's airstream regions (ASRs). For each station for each year, we calculated the day of year that the accumulated growing degree-days using a base of 0 oC reaches particular thermal thresholds. We call these Threshold Arrival Dates (TADs). Within each ASR we analyzed the station time series of TADs for two thermal thresholds--at the beginning and at the middle of the growing season for C4 grasses--using 30 year moving averages and Mann-Kendall trend tests. We found that the interannual variation of the onset of the growing season for C4 has increased over the period of record and especially in the last 30 years. At the same time, the central tendencies of the TADs have not changed significantly over the period of record. We also analyzed the TAD series using frequency domain analyses to identify characteristic periodicities. The spectral densities of the TADs point to possible linkages with climate modes. Finally, using the NASA Pathfinder AVHRR Land NDVI dataset, we demonstrate how to interpret the land surface phenologies revealed by synoptic sensors within the broader context of the regions' climatic envelopes.

  5. On-the-fly detection of changes on and below the surface in epithelium mucosal tissue architecture from scattered light.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Fernand S; Taslidere, Ezgi; Murthy, Sreekant

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we present a technique to raise a flag on the fly when a transition occurs between different mucosal architectures on or below the surface. The segmentation is based on a novel difference metric for detecting an abrupt change in the parameters extracted from a Stochastic Decomposition Method (SDM) that models the scattered light reflected from the mucosal tissue structure over an area (2-D scan) illuminated by an optical sensor (fiber) emitting light at either one wavelength or with white light. This work has the potential to enhance the endoscopist's ability to locate and identify abnormal mucosal architectures in particular when the disease is developing below the surface and hence becoming hidden during colonoscopy or endoscopic examination. It also has also potential in helping deciding as to when and where to take biopsies; steps that should lead to improvement in the diagnostic yield. PMID:20648519

  6. IDENTIFYING RECENT SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES USING A NORMALIZED DIFFERENCE VEGETATION INDEX (NDVI) CHANGE DETECTION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory



    Coal mining is a major resource extraction activity on the Appalachian Mountains. The increased size and frequency of a specific type of surface mining, known as mountain top removal-valley fill, has in recent years raised various environmental concerns. During mountainto...

  7. Detecting Unidentified Changes

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Piers D. L.; Webb, Margaret E.

    2014-01-01

    Does becoming aware of a change to a purely visual stimulus necessarily cause the observer to be able to identify or localise the change or can change detection occur in the absence of identification or localisation? Several theories of visual awareness stress that we are aware of more than just the few objects to which we attend. In particular, it is clear that to some extent we are also aware of the global properties of the scene, such as the mean luminance or the distribution of spatial frequencies. It follows that we may be able to detect a change to a visual scene by detecting a change to one or more of these global properties. However, detecting a change to global property may not supply us with enough information to accurately identify or localise which object in the scene has been changed. Thus, it may be possible to reliably detect the occurrence of changes without being able to identify or localise what has changed. Previous attempts to show that this can occur with natural images have produced mixed results. Here we use a novel analysis technique to provide additional evidence that changes can be detected in natural images without also being identified or localised. It is likely that this occurs by the observers monitoring the global properties of the scene. PMID:24454727

  8. A novel fluorescent sensor protein for detecting changes in airway surface liquid glucose concentration

    PubMed Central

    Helassa, Nordine; Garnett, James P.; Farrant, Matthew; Khan, Faaizah; Pickup, John C.; Hahn, Klaus M.; MacNevin, Christopher J.; Tarran, Robert; Baines, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Both lung disease and elevation of blood glucose are associated with increased glucose concentration (from 0.4 to ~4.0 mM) in the airway surface liquid (ASL). This perturbation of ASL glucose makes the airway more susceptible to infection by respiratory pathogens. ASL is minute (~1 μl/cm2) and the measurement of glucose concentration in the small volume ASL is extremely difficult. Therefore, we sought to develop a fluorescent biosensor with sufficient sensitivity to determine glucose concentrations in ASL in situ. We coupled a range of environmentally sensitive fluorophores to mutated forms of a glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP) including H152C and H152C/A213R and determined their equilibrium binding properties. Of these, GBP H152C/A213R–BADAN (Kd 0.86 ± 0.01 mM, Fmax/F0 3.6) was optimal for glucose sensing and in ASL increased fluorescence when basolateral glucose concentration was raised from 1 to 20 mM. Moreover, interpolation of the data showed that the glucose concentration in ASL was increased, with results similar to that using glucose oxidase analysis. The fluorescence of GBP H152C/A213R–BADAN in native ASL from human airway epithelial cultures in situ was significantly increased over time when basolateral glucose was increased from 5 to 20 mM. Overall our data indicate that this GBP is a useful tool to monitor glucose homoeostasis in the lung. PMID:25220254

  9. A novel fluorescent sensor protein for detecting changes in airway surface liquid glucose concentration.

    PubMed

    Helassa, Nordine; Garnett, James P; Farrant, Matthew; Khan, Faaizah; Pickup, John C; Hahn, Klaus M; MacNevin, Christopher J; Tarran, Robert; Baines, Deborah L

    2014-12-01

    Both lung disease and elevation of blood glucose are associated with increased glucose concentration (from 0.4 to ~4.0 mM) in the airway surface liquid (ASL). This perturbation of ASL glucose makes the airway more susceptible to infection by respiratory pathogens. ASL is minute (~1 μl/cm(2)) and the measurement of glucose concentration in the small volume ASL is extremely difficult. Therefore, we sought to develop a fluorescent biosensor with sufficient sensitivity to determine glucose concentrations in ASL in situ. We coupled a range of environmentally sensitive fluorophores to mutated forms of a glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP) including H152C and H152C/A213R and determined their equilibrium binding properties. Of these, GBP H152C/A213R-BADAN (Kd 0.86 ± 0.01 mM, Fmax/F0 3.6) was optimal for glucose sensing and in ASL increased fluorescence when basolateral glucose concentration was raised from 1 to 20 mM. Moreover, interpolation of the data showed that the glucose concentration in ASL was increased, with results similar to that using glucose oxidase analysis. The fluorescence of GBP H152C/A213R-BADAN in native ASL from human airway epithelial cultures in situ was significantly increased over time when basolateral glucose was increased from 5 to 20 mM. Overall our data indicate that this GBP is a useful tool to monitor glucose homoeostasis in the lung. PMID:25220254

  10. Surface-crack detection by microwave methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinstein, L.; Hruby, R.

    1967-01-01

    Microwave surface-crack detection system examines metallic surfaces with a noncontacting probe. The change in the microwave signal reflected from the surface under investigation is an indication of the existence of surface flaws. This technique can detect flaws and scratches as small as 100 microinches.

  11. Trajectory based detection of forest-change impacts on surface soil moisture at a basin scale [Poyang Lake Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huihui; Liu, Yuanbo

    2014-06-01

    Surface soil moisture plays a critical role in hydrological processes, but varies with both natural and anthropogenic influences. Land cover change unavoidably alters surface property and subsequent soil moisture, and its contribution is yet hard to isolate from the mixed influences. In combination with trajectory analysis, this paper proposes a novel approach for detection of forest-change impacts on surface soil moisture variation with an examination over the Poyang Lake Basin, China from 2003 to 2009. Soil moisture in permanent forest trajectory represents a synthetic result of natural influences and serves as a reference for isolating soil moisture alternation due to land cover change at a basin scale. Our results showed that soil moisture decreased in all forest trajectories, while the absolute decrease was lower for permanent forest trajectory (2.53%) than the whole basin (2.61%), afforestation trajectories (2.70%) and deforestation trajectories (2.81%). Moreover, afforestation has a high capacity to hold more soil moisture, but may take more than 6 years to reach its maximum capacity. Soil moisture increased from 14.09% to 14.94% for the afforestation trajectories with tree aging from 1 to 6 years. Finally, land cover change may affect soil moisture alternation toward different transformation directions. Absolute soil moisture decreases by 0.08% for the whole basin, 0.17% for afforestation and 0.28% for deforestation trajectories, accounting for 3.13%, 6.47% and 10.07% of the total decrease in soil moisture. More specifically, the transformation from woody Savannas, cropland and other lands to forest generated absolute soil moisture deceases of 0.20%, -0.08% and 0.27%, accounting for 7.26%, -3.52% and 9.57% of the decreases. On the other hand, the reverse transformation generated soil moisture deceases of 0.29%, 0.21% and 0.35%, accounting for 10.43%, 7.69% and 12.14% of the total decrease. Our findings should be valuable for evaluating the impacts of land

  12. Updating the 2001 National Land Cover Database Impervious Surface Products to 2006 using Landsat Imagery Change Detection Methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Homer, C.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype method was developed to update the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2001 to a nominal date of 2006. NLCD 2001 is widely used as a baseline for national land cover and impervious cover conditions. To enable the updating of this database in an optimal manner, methods are designed to be accomplished by individual Landsat scene. Using conservative change thresholds based on land cover classes, areas of change and no-change were segregated from change vectors calculated from normalized Landsat scenes from 2001 and 2006. By sampling from NLCD 2001 impervious surface in unchanged areas, impervious surface predictions were estimated for changed areas within an urban extent defined by a companion land cover classification. Methods were developed and tested for national application across six study sites containing a variety of urban impervious surface. Results show the vast majority of impervious surface change associated with urban development was captured, with overall RMSE from 6.86 to 13.12% for these areas. Changes of urban development density were also evaluated by characterizing the categories of change by percentile for impervious surface. This prototype method provides a relatively low cost, flexible approach to generate updated impervious surface using NLCD 2001 as the baseline. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Anticipating land surface change

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, Richard; Dugmore, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The interplay of human actions and natural processes over varied spatial and temporal scales can result in abrupt transitions between contrasting land surface states. Understanding these transitions is a key goal of sustainability science because they can represent abrupt losses of natural capital. This paper recognizes flickering between alternate land surface states in advance of threshold change and critical slowing down in advance of both threshold changes and noncritical transformation. The early warning signals we observe are rises in autocorrelation, variance, and skewness within millimeter-resolution thickness measurements of tephra layers deposited in A.D. 2010 and A.D. 2011. These signals reflect changing patterns of surface vegetation, which are known to provide early warning signals of critical transformations. They were observed toward migrating soil erosion fronts, cryoturbation limits, and expanding deflation zones, thus providing potential early warning signals of land surface change. The record of the spatial patterning of vegetation contained in contemporary tephra layers shows how proximity to land surface change could be assessed in the widespread regions affected by shallow layers of volcanic fallout (those that can be subsumed within the existing vegetation cover). This insight shows how we could use tephra layers in the stratigraphic record to identify “near misses,” close encounters with thresholds that did not lead to tipping points, and thus provide additional tools for archaeology, sustainability science, and contemporary land management. PMID:23530230

  14. Changes on Titan's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, A.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Coustenis, A.; Malaska, M. J.; Sotin, C.; Rodriguez, S.; Janssen, M. A.; Drossart, P.; Lawrence, K. J.; Matsoukas, C. K.; Hirtzig, M.; Le Mouelic, S.; Jaumann, R.; Brown, R. H.; Bratsolis, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and the Titan Radar Mapper have investigated Titan's surface since 2004, unveiling a complex, dynamic and Earth-like surface. Understanding the distribution and interplay of geologic processes is important for constraining models of its interior, surface-atmospheric interactions, and climate evolution. We focus on understanding the origin of the major geomorphological units identified by Lopes et al. (2010, 2015) [1,2], Malaska et al. (2015) [3] and regions we studied in Solomonidou et al. (2014; 2015) [4,5]. Here, we investigate the nature of: Undifferentiated Plains, Hummocky/Mountainous terrains, candidate cryovolcanic sites, Labyrinth, and Dunes in terms of surface albedo behavior and spectral evolution with time to identify possible changes. Using a radiative transfer code, we find that temporal variations of surface albedo occur for some areas. Tui Regio and Sotra Patera, both candidate cryovolcanic regions, change with time, becoming darker and brighter respectively in surface albedo. In contrast, we find that the Undifferentiated Plains and the suggested evaporitic areas [6] in the equatorial regions do not present any significant changes. We are able to report the differences and similarities among the various regions and provide constraints on their chemical composition and specific processes of origin. Our results support the hypothesis that both endogenic and exogenic processes have played important roles in shaping Titan's geologic evolution. Such a variety of geologic processes and their relationship to the methane cycle make Titan important for astrobiology and habitability studies and particularly significant in solar system studies. [1] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, 205, 540-588, 2010; [2] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: JGR, 118, 416-435, 2013; [3] Malaska, M., et al : Icarus, submitted, 2015;[4] Solomonidou et al.: JGR, 119, 1729-1747, 2014; [5] Solomonidou, A., et al.: In press, 2015; [6] Barnes

  15. SAR change detection MTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Steven; Lemanski, Christopher; Nichols, Howard; Owirka, Gregory; Minardi, Michael; Hale, Todd

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines the theory, application, and results of using single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data with Moving Reference Processing (MRP) to focus and geolocate moving targets. Moving targets within a standard SAR imaging scene are defocused, displaced, or completely missing in the final image. Building on previous research at AFRL, the SAR-MRP method focuses and geolocates moving targets by reprocessing the SAR data to focus the movers rather than the stationary clutter. SAR change detection is used so that target detection and focusing is performed more robustly. In the cases where moving target returns possess the same range versus slow-time histories, a geolocation ambiguity results. This ambiguity can be resolved in a number of ways. This paper concludes by applying the SAR-MRP method to high-frequency radar measurements from persistent continuous-dwell SAR observations of a moving target.

  16. Detection of surface changes of materials caused by intense irradiation with laser-plasma EUV source utilizing scattered or luminescent radiation excited with the EUV pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Rakowski, R.; Szczurek, M.

    2008-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is absorbed in a thin surface layer of any material. Irradiation of material samples with intense EUV pulses may cause different surface changes. Some of them, especially connected with material desorption, can be clearly visible using an optical or electron microscope. Other changes concerning crystal structure or chemical composition may not be visible under the microscope. They can however be detected using the EUV radiation itself. In this paper a new method of measurement of surface changes by irradiation with a laser-plasma EUV source is presented. The radiation was collected and focused on a material surface using a specially designed multifoil collector. Radiation scattered or excited in the material was detected with the use of a Wolter-type mirror coupled to a back-illuminated CCD camera. Depending on material samples, images with different intensity distributions were registered. For some samples, the intensity distributions of the images obtained before and after irradiation were slightly different. The intensity differences in such cases allowed us to obtain differential images. The appearance of such images was assumed to be evidence of surface changes.

  17. Change Detection: Training and Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, John G.; Neider, Mark B.; Simons, Daniel J.; McCarley, Jason S.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2013-01-01

    Observers often fail to notice even dramatic changes to their environment, a phenomenon known as change blindness. If training could enhance change detection performance in general, then it might help to remedy some real-world consequences of change blindness (e.g. failing to detect hazards while driving). We examined whether adaptive training on a simple change detection task could improve the ability to detect changes in untrained tasks for young and older adults. Consistent with an effective training procedure, both young and older adults were better able to detect changes to trained objects following training. However, neither group showed differential improvement on untrained change detection tasks when compared to active control groups. Change detection training led to improvements on the trained task but did not generalize to other change detection tasks. PMID:23840775

  18. Change detection in underwater imagery.

    PubMed

    Seemakurthy, Karthik; Rajagopalan, A N

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we deal with the problem of change detection in an underwater scenario given an unblurred-blurred image pair of a planar scene taken at different times. The blur is primarily due to the dynamic nature of the water surface and its nature is space-invariant in the presence of cyclic water flows. Exploiting the sparsity of the induced blur as well as the occlusions, we propose a distort-difference pipeline that employs an alternating minimization framework to perform change detection in the presence of geometric distortions (skew) as well as photometric degradations (blur and global illumination variations). The method can effectively yield both sharp and blurred occluder maps. Using synthetic as well as real data, we demonstrate how the proposed technique advances the state of the art. PMID:26974899

  19. The Impact of Natural Hydrologic Variability on the Accuracy of Remote Sensing Pond Surface Area Change Detection Studies Within the Canadian Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrott, J. A.; Macrae, M. L.; Duguay, C. R.

    2009-12-01

    Within the sub-arctic environment, shallow ponds occupy 15-50% of the landscape and strongly contribute to regional hydrological and energy budgets. Given the unique hydrological environment in which they reside, ponds may be good indicators of regional environmental or climatic change. Therefore, accurately delineating and detecting surface area changes within these shallow water features is crucial when understanding the regional impacts of shifting climatic conditions. Recent remote sensing studies have revealed disparate results related to the long-term sustainability of sub-arctic shallow water features. However, many of these studies have not considered the impact of naturally induced hydrologic variability on the accuracy of change detection results. The overall objective of this study was to determine the impact of various environmentally driven hydrologic fluctuations on the ability for remotely sensed images to accurately capture pond surface area and detect change within the sub-arctic. Specifically, this study aimed to determine the influence of (a) inter-seasonal water balance fluctuations (b) antecedent precipitation prior to image acquisition and (c) anomalous annual climate (drought) on the quality of remote sensing studies focused on detecting long-term pond surface area change within the Hudson Bay Lowlands, near Churchill. The objectives were addressed using a combination of methods including climate data, field research, simple water balance modeling and remote sensing imagery. Specifically, a subset of 37 ponds, ranging in size from 918m2 to 34,624m2, were digitized and compared in order to detect surface area change linked to inter-seasonal hydrologic variability (two 1956 air photos), varying antecedent rainfall prior to acquisition dates (2000 and 2001 Landsat 7 images) and normal verses drought conditions (2000 Landsat 7 and 2006 SPOT images). Results from the imagery analyses were linked to climate data and a simple water balance model

  20. Land-cover change detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Xuexia; Giri, Chandra; Vogelmann, James

    2012-01-01

    Land cover is the biophysical material on the surface of the earth. Land-cover types include grass, shrubs, trees, barren, water, and man-made features. Land cover changes continuously.  The rate of change can be either dramatic and abrupt, such as the changes caused by logging, hurricanes and fire, or subtle and gradual, such as regeneration of forests and damage caused by insects (Verbesselt et al., 2001).  Previous studies have shown that land cover has changed dramatically during the past sevearal centuries and that these changes have severely affected our ecosystems (Foody, 2010; Lambin et al., 2001). Lambin and Strahlers (1994b) summarized five types of cause for land-cover changes: (1) long-term natural changes in climate conditions, (2) geomorphological and ecological processes, (3) human-induced alterations of vegetation cover and landscapes, (4) interannual climate variability, and (5) human-induced greenhouse effect.  Tools and techniques are needed to detect, describe, and predict these changes to facilitate sustainable management of natural resources.

  1. The Development of Change Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, David I.; Burack, Jacob A.; Miller, Danny; Joseph, Shari; Enns, James T.

    2006-01-01

    Changes to a scene often go unnoticed if the objects of the change are unattended, making change detection an index of where attention is focused during scene perception. We measured change detection in school-age children and young adults by repeatedly alternating two versions of an image. To provide an age-fair assessment we used a bimanual…

  2. Detection of changes of the surface morphology of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko - Implications for the erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, Philippe; Groussin, Olivier; El-Maarry, M. R.; Faury, Guillaume; Auger, Anne-Thérèse

    2016-07-01

    Search for morphological changes at the surface of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67/P C-G) since its perihelion passage in August 2015 has been a major objective of the OSIRIS team in order to understand the erosion processes. At time of writing, the changes detected so far at a distance of 48 km (that is a pixel scale of 90 cm for the OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera) are subtle even in regions which were the most exposed to solar illumination around perihelion time: Imhotep, Khonsu and Khepry. In this presentation, we will concentrate on the Khepry region where several changes of different kinds have been positively detected: disappearance of several bright spots, localized receding of a large part (roughly 40 x 130 m) of the surface by approximately 12 m (that could result from either erosion or localized collapse), and appearance of several new boulders. As the Rosetta-comet distance will keep decreasing, we hope to report further changes at the COSPAR conference. We will finally confront quantitative estimates of the putative eroded mass with independent evidences coming from in-situ as well as remote-sensing observations carried over several past apparitions.

  3. Multisensor Fusion for Change Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, T.; Csatho, B.

    2005-12-01

    with detecting surface elevation changes on the Byrd Glacier, Antarctica, with aerial imagery from 1980s and ICESat laser altimetry data from 2003-05. Change detection from such disparate data sets is an intricate fusion problem, beginning with sensor alignment, and on to reasoning with spatial information as to where changes occurred and to what extent.

  4. Detecting and Predicting Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott D.; Steyvers, Mark

    2009-01-01

    When required to predict sequential events, such as random coin tosses or basketball free throws, people reliably use inappropriate strategies, such as inferring temporal structure when none is present. We investigate the ability of observers to predict sequential events in dynamically changing environments, where there is an opportunity to detect…

  5. Detection of surface elevation changes using an unmanned aerial vehicle on the debris-free Storbreen glacier in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaijenbrink, Philip; Andreassen, Liss; Immerzeel, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the application of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has great potential to investigate the dynamic behavior of glaciers. The studies have successfully deployed UAVs over generally contrast-rich surfaces of debris-covered glaciers and highly crevassed bare ice glaciers. In this study, the potential of UAVs in glaciology is further exploited, as we use a fixed-wing UAV over the largely snow-covered Storbreen glacier in Norway in September 2015. The acquired UAV-imagery was processed into accurate digital elevation models and image mosaics using a Structure from Motion workflow. Georeferencing of the data was obtained by ingesting ground control points into the workflow that were accurately measured with a differential global navigation satellite system (DGNSS). Geodetic accuracy was determined by comparison with DGNSS surface profiles and stake positions that were measured on the same day. The processed data were compared with a LIDAR survey and airborne imagery acquisition from September and October 2009 to examine mass loss patterns and glacier retreat. Results show that the UAV is capable of producing high-quality elevation models and image mosaics for the low-contrast snow-covered Storbreen at unprecedented detail. The accuracy of the output product is lower when compared to contrast-rich debris-covered glaciers, but still considerably more accurate than spaceborne data products. Comparison with LIDAR data shows a spatially heterogeneous downwasting pattern of about 0.75 m a‑1 over 2009-2015 for the upper part of Storbreen. The lower part exhibits considerably more downwasting in the range of 0.9-2.1 m a‑1. We conclude that UAVs can be valuable for surveys of snow-covered glaciers to provide sufficient accurate elevation models and image mosaics, and we recommend the use of UAVs for the routine monitoring of benchmark glaciers such as Storbreen.

  6. Io Surface Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This montage compares similar sides of Io photographed by the Galileo spacecraft in October 1999 (left) and the New Horizons spacecraft on February 27, 2007. The New Horizons image was taken with its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles).

    Most features on Io have changed little in the seven-plus years between these images, despite continued intense volcanic activity. The largest visible feature is the dark oval composed of deposits from the Pele volcano, nearly 1,200 kilometers (750 miles) across its longest dimension. At high northern latitudes, the volcano Dazhbog is prominent as a dark spot in the New Horizons image, near the edge of the disk at the 11 o'clock position. This volcano is much less conspicuous in the Galileo image. This darkening happened after this 1999 Galileo image but before Galileo took its last images of Io in 2001.

    A more recent change, discovered by New Horizons, can be seen in the southern hemisphere (circled). A new volcanic eruption near 55 degrees south, 290 degrees west has created a roughly circular deposit nearly 500 kilometers (300 miles) in diameter that was not seen by Galileo. Other New Horizons images show that the plume that created this deposit is still active.

    The New Horizons image is centered at Io coordinates 8 degrees south, 269 degrees west.

  7. Detecting contamination on a metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. M.; Marcus, H. L.; Smith, T.

    1977-01-01

    Thin layers of contaminant on metal surface are detected by measuring surface-potential difference between reference electrode and surface of interest. Procedure does not require mechanical contact with surface under examination.

  8. Computational stoning method for surface defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ninshu; Zhu, Xinhai

    2013-12-01

    Surface defects on outer panels of automotive bodies must be controlled in order to improve the surface quality. The detection and quantitative evaluation of surface defects are quite difficult because the deflection of surface defects is very small. One of detecting methods for surface defects used in factories is a stoning method in which a stone block is moved on the surface of a stamped panel. The computational stoning method was developed to detect surface low defect by authors based on a geometry contact algorithm between a stone block and a stamped panel. If the surface is convex, the stone block always contacts with the convex surface of a stamped panel and the contact gap between them is zero. If there is a surface low, the stone block does not contact to the surface and the contact gap can be computed based on contact algorithm. The convex surface defect can also be detected by applying computational stoning method to the back surface of a stamped panel. By performing two way stoning computations from both the normal surface and the back surface, not only the depth of surface low defect but also the height of convex surface defect can be detected. The surface low defect and convex surface defect can also be detected through multi-directions. Surface defects on the handle emboss of outer panels were accurately detected using the computational stoning method and compared with the real shape. A very good accuracy was obtained.

  9. lidar change detection using building models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Angela M.; Runyon, Scott C.; Jalobeanu, Andre; Esterline, Chelsea H.; Kruse, Fred A.

    2014-06-01

    Terrestrial LiDAR scans of building models collected with a FARO Focus3D and a RIEGL VZ-400 were used to investigate point-to-point and model-to-model LiDAR change detection. LiDAR data were scaled, decimated, and georegistered to mimic real world airborne collects. Two physical building models were used to explore various aspects of the change detection process. The first model was a 1:250-scale representation of the Naval Postgraduate School campus in Monterey, CA, constructed from Lego blocks and scanned in a laboratory setting using both the FARO and RIEGL. The second model at 1:8-scale consisted of large cardboard boxes placed outdoors and scanned from rooftops of adjacent buildings using the RIEGL. A point-to-point change detection scheme was applied directly to the point-cloud datasets. In the model-to-model change detection scheme, changes were detected by comparing Digital Surface Models (DSMs). The use of physical models allowed analysis of effects of changes in scanner and scanning geometry, and performance of the change detection methods on different types of changes, including building collapse or subsistence, construction, and shifts in location. Results indicate that at low false-alarm rates, the point-to-point method slightly outperforms the model-to-model method. The point-to-point method is less sensitive to misregistration errors in the data. Best results are obtained when the baseline and change datasets are collected using the same LiDAR system and collection geometry.

  10. Sensor for detection of liquid spills on surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Brent C.; Gayle, Tom M.

    1989-01-01

    A surface liquid detector is disclosed for detecting liquids spilled on surfaces such as floors. A temperature-sensitive thermistor probe is used in a bridge circuit to detect the change in resistance in the thermistor due to the change in thermal conductivity that occurs when a liquid contacts the probe. The device is characterized by the ability to detect either conductive or nonconductive liquids, such as water or oil spills.

  11. Sensor for detection of liquid spills on surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Brent C.; Gayle, Tom M.

    1989-07-04

    A surface liquid detector is disclosed for detecting liquids spilled on surfaces such as floors. A temperature-sensitive thermistor probe is used in a bridge circuit to detect the change in resistance in the thermistor due to the change in thermal conductivity that occurs when a liquid contacts the probe. The device is characterized by the ability to detect either conductive or nonconductive liquids, such as water or oil spills.

  12. Detecting change as it occurs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radok, Uwe; Brown, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    Traditionally climate changes have been detected from long series of observations and long after they have happened. Our 'inverse sequential' procedure, for detecting change as soon as it occurs, describes the existing or most recent data by their frequency distribution. Its parameter(s) are estimated both from the existing set of observations and from the same set augmented by 1,2,....j new observations. Individual-value probability products ('likelihoods') are used to form ratios which yield two probabilities for erroneously accepting the existing parameter(s) as valid for the augmented data set, and vice versa. A genuine parameter change is signaled when these probabilities (or a more stable compound probability) show a progressive decrease. New parameter values can then be estimated from the new observations alone using standard statistical techniques. The inverse sequential procedure will be illustrated for global annual mean temperatures (assumed normally distributed), and for annual numbers of North Atlantic hurricanes (assumed to represent Poisson distributions). The procedure was developed, but not yet tested, for linear or exponential trends, and for chi-squared means or degrees of freedom, a special measure of autocorrelation.

  13. On Radar Resolution in Coherent Change Detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Bickel, Douglas L.

    2015-11-01

    It is commonly observed that resolution plays a role in coherent change detection. Although this is the case, the relationship of the resolution in coherent change detection is not yet defined . In this document, we present an analytical method of evaluating this relationship using detection theory. Specifically we examine the effect of resolution on receiver operating characteristic curves for coherent change detection.

  14. Surface Changes in Chryse Planitia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    At the conclusion of the Viking Continuation Mission (May to November, 1978), all four cameras on the Viking Landers - two on each spacecraft - continued to function normally. During the two and one-half years since the landers touched down on Mars, images totaled 2,255 for Viking Lander 1 and 2,016 for Viking Lander 2. The surface around the landers was completely photographed by the end of 1976; subsequent images acquired during 1977-1978 have concentrated on searching for changes in the scene - changes which can be used to infer both the types of erosive processes which modify the landscape around the landers and the rates at which these processes may occur. The major surface changes have included the water-ice snow seen by Lander 2 during the winter at Utopia Planitia, and a thin dust layer deposited at both sites during the dust storms of 1977. The most recently identified change occurred at Chryse Planitia between VL-1 sols 767 (Sept. 16, 1978) and 771 (Sept. 20, 1978) as seen in the lower photo. Picture at top, selected to show similar lighting conditions, was taken during sol 25 (August 15, 1976). The change (A) appears as a small circle-like formation on the side of a drift in the lee, or downwind, side of Whale Rock. This is believed to have been a small-scale landslide of an unstable dust layer which had accumulated behind the rock. Interpretation of this feature would be difficult without an earlier change (B) near Big Joe, a slump which occurred between sols 74 and 183. The new slump is approximately 25- 35 meters from the lander, and just under a meter across. The slumping probably was initiated by the daily heating and cooling of the surface by solar radiation. More importantly, it is now believed that, based on the repeated occurrence of such slumping features, a dust layer which overlies the surface may in fact be redistributed fairly regularly during periods of high wind activity. There are no obvious indications of fossil slump features

  15. Surface property detection apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Sorensen, Neil R.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting, determining, and imaging surface resistance corrosion, thin film growth, and oxide formation on the surface of conductors or other electrical surface modification. The invention comprises a modified confocal resonator structure with the sample remote from the radiating mirror. Surface resistance is determined by analyzing and imaging reflected microwaves; imaging reveals anomalies due to surface impurities, non-stoichiometry, and the like, in the surface of the superconductor, conductor, dielectric, or semiconductor.

  16. Surface property detection apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1995-08-08

    Apparatus and method for detecting, determining, and imaging surface resistance corrosion, thin film growth, and oxide formation on the surface of conductors or other electrical surface modification. The invention comprises a modified confocal resonator structure with the sample remote from the radiating mirror. Surface resistance is determined by analyzing and imaging reflected microwaves; imaging reveals anomalies due to surface impurities, non-stoichiometry, and the like, in the surface of the superconductor, conductor, dielectric, or semiconductor. 4 figs.

  17. Recent Surface Changes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P. E.; Mukherjee, P.

    2010-12-01

    The MARCI camera on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has now been making global observations of the Martian surface for over two Martian years with better spatial resolution and better spectral definition than earlier visible imaging systems. These observations extend the record of continuous global monitoring of the planet's surface that dates from the arrival of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) in 1999. The orbital images show a dynamic and rapidly changing pattern of bright and dark regions generated by erosion and deposition of sediments by the Martian winds. Previous analyses of the MGS MOC images (Geissler et al., AGU 2009) showed that the temporal behavior of surface albedo varied with geographic location on the planet, with some regions exhibiting gradual changes, while others showed episodic changes that typically took place during the perihelion season, and still other regions such as Solis that appeared to change on a quasi-continuous basis. These observations help to explain the significant changes observed on a decadal time scale between the era of the Viking Orbiters and the arrival of MGS (Geissler, 2005, 1029/2004JE2345). The MARCI data so far confirm many of the conclusions drawn from the MOC record up to the end of 2006. Over the most recent two Martian years, dramatic changes continued in the Solis Lacus region south of the Vallis Marineris. Another episodic wind event stripped away bright dust and darkened the area west of Syrtis Major. New dust accumulations were deposited in the southern mid-latitudes west of Hellas. Most interesting is the gradual advance of many albedo boundaries in the tropical latitudes of Mars. In several locations, dark terrain appears to be encroaching on formerly bright terrain as bright dust is stripped away from the region. MOC and MARCI observations show that these albedo boundaries are moving at speeds of up to tens of kilometers per Martian year. At sites such as Hyblaeus (west of Elysium), the Southern Tropical Dark Band

  18. Detectable Warning Surfaces at Curb Ramps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauger, J. S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Four tests evaluated the need for and effectiveness of detectable warning surfaces at curb ramps for pedestrians with blindness. Results found that the effectiveness of the detectable warning surfaces depended on other aspects of the design of the intersections and on factors such as the density of traffic and the traveler's skills. (CR)

  19. Surface Detection in a STXM Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Behyan, S.; Haines, B.; Urquhart, S. G.; Karanukaran, C.; Wang, J.; Obst, M.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2011-09-09

    We have modified scanning transmission x-ray microscopes (STXM) at the Canadian Light Source and the Advanced Light Source with total electron yield (TEY) detection (TEY-STXM). This provides improved surface-sensitive detection, simultaneous with existing bulk-sensitive transmission detection in the STXM microscopes. We have explored sample-current and channeltron-based electron yield detection. Both approaches provide improved surface sensitive imaging and spectroscopy, although channeltron-based detection is superior. TEY-STXM provides surface sensitive imaging of ultrathin films such as phase-separated Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer films, as well as differentiation of surface and bulk oxides of patterned metallic thin films. This paper will outline the experimental challenges of this method and the opportunities for correlative surface and bulk measurements of complex samples.

  20. Spatio-Temporal Sensitivity of MODIS Land Surface Temperature Anomalies Indicates High Potential for Large-Scale Land Cover Change Detection in Permafrost Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muster, S.; Langer, M.; Abnizova, A.; Young, K. L.; Boike, J.

    2014-12-01

    The accelerated warming Arctic climate may alter the surface energy balance locally and regionally of which a changing land surface temperature (LST) is a key indicator. Modelling current and anticipated changes of the surface energy balance requires an understanding of the spatio-temporal interactions between LST and land cover. This paper investigated the accuracy of MODIS LST V5 1 km level 3 product and its spatio-temporal sensitivity to land cover properties in a Canadian High Arctic permafrost landscape. Land cover ranged from fully vegetated moss/segde grass tundra to sparsely vegetated bare soil and barren areas. Daily mean MODIS LST were compared to in-situ radiometer measurements over wet tundra for three summers and two winters in 2008, 2009, and 2010. MODIS LST showed an accuracy of 1.8°C and a RMSE of 3.8°C in the total observation period including both summer and winter. Agreement was lowest during summer 2009 and freeze-back periods which were associated with prevailing overcast conditions. A multi-year anomaly analysis revealed robust spatio-temporal patterns taking into account the found uncertainty and different atmospheric conditions. Summer periods with regional mean LST larger than 5°C showed highest spatial diversity with four distinct anomaly classes. Dry ridge areas heated up most whereas wetland areas and dry barren surfaces with high albedo were coolest. Mean inter-annual differences of LST anomalies for different land cover classes were less than 1°C. However, spatial pattern showed fewer positive anomalies in 2010 suggesting differences in surface moisture due to inter­annual differences in the amount of end-of-winter snow. Presented summer LST anomalies might serve as a baseline against which to evaluate past and future changes in land surface properties with regard to the surface energy balance. Sub-temporal heterogeneity due to snow or ice on/off as well as the effect of subpixel water bodies has to be taken into account. A multi

  1. Spectral methods to detect surface mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Edwin M.; Schatten Silvious, Miranda

    2008-04-01

    Over the past five years, advances have been made in the spectral detection of surface mines under minefield detection programs at the U. S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD). The problem of detecting surface land mines ranges from the relatively simple, the detection of large anti-vehicle mines on bare soil, to the very difficult, the detection of anti-personnel mines in thick vegetation. While spatial and spectral approaches can be applied to the detection of surface mines, spatial-only detection requires many pixels-on-target such that the mine is actually imaged and shape-based features can be exploited. This method is unreliable in vegetated areas because only part of the mine may be exposed, while spectral detection is possible without the mine being resolved. At NVESD, hyperspectral and multi-spectral sensors throughout the reflection and thermal spectral regimes have been applied to the mine detection problem. Data has been collected on mines in forest and desert regions and algorithms have been developed both to detect the mines as anomalies and to detect the mines based on their spectral signature. In addition to the detection of individual mines, algorithms have been developed to exploit the similarities of mines in a minefield to improve their detection probability. In this paper, the types of spectral data collected over the past five years will be summarized along with the advances in algorithm development.

  2. Changes in the Extent of Surface Mining and Reclamation in the Central Appalachians Detected Using a 1976-2006 Landsat Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Philip A.; Helmers, David P.; Kingdon, Clayton C.; McNeil, Brenden E.; de Beurs, Kirsten M.; Eshleman, Keith N.

    2009-01-01

    Surface mining and reclamation is the dominant driver of land cover land use change (LCLUC) in the Central Appalachian Mountain region of the Eastern U.S. Accurate quantification of the extent of mining activities is important for assessing how this LCLUC affects ecosystem services such as aesthetics, biodiversity, and mitigation of flooding.We used Landsat imagery from 1976, 1987, 1999 and 2006 to map the extent of surface mines and mine reclamation for eight large watersheds in the Central Appalachian region of West Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. We employed standard image processing techniques in conjunction with a temporal decision tree and GIS maps of mine permits and wetlands to map active and reclaimed mines and track changes through time. For the entire study area, active surface mine extent was highest in 1976, prior to implementation of the Surface Mine Control and Reclamation Act in 1977, with 1.76% of the study area in active mines, declining to 0.44% in 2006. The most extensively mined watershed, Georges Creek in Maryland, was 5.45% active mines in 1976, declining to 1.83% in 2006. For the entire study area, the area of reclaimed mines increased from 1.35% to 4.99% from 1976 to 2006, and from 4.71% to 15.42% in Georges Creek. Land cover conversion to mines and then reclaimed mines after 1976 was almost exclusively from forest. Accuracy levels for mined and reclaimed cover was above 85% for all time periods, and was generally above 80% for mapping active and reclaimed mines separately, especially for the later time periods in which good accuracy assessment data were available. Among other implications, the mapped patterns of LCLUC are likely to significantly affect watershed hydrology, as mined and reclaimed areas have lower infiltration capacity and thus more rapid runoff than unmined forest watersheds, leading to greater potential for extreme flooding during heavy rainfall events.

  3. Detection limits of confocal surface plasmon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pechprasarn, Suejit; Somekh, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies rigorous diffraction theory to evaluate the minimum mass sensitivity of a confocal optical microscope designed to excite and detect surface plasmons operating on a planar metallic substrate. The diffraction model is compared with an intuitive ray picture which gives remarkably similar predictions. The combination of focusing the surface plasmons and accurate phase measurement mean that under favorable but achievable conditions detection of small numbers of molecules is possible, however, we argue that reliable detection of single molecules will benefit from the use of structured surfaces. System configurations needed to optimize performance are discussed. PMID:24940537

  4. UAS-Borne Photogrammetry for Surface Topographic Characterization: A Ground-Truth Baseline for Future Change Detection and Refinement of Scaled Remotely-Sensed Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppersmith, R.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Sussman, A. J.; Vigil, S.; Dzur, R.; Norskog, K.; Kelley, R.; Miller, L.

    2015-12-01

    While long-term objectives of monitoring and verification regimes include remote characterization and discrimination of surficial geologic and topographic features at sites of interest, ground truth data is required to advance development of remote sensing techniques. Increasingly, it is desirable for these ground-based or ground-proximal characterization methodologies to be as nimble, efficient, non-invasive, and non-destructive as their higher-altitude airborne counterparts while ideally providing superior resolution. For this study, the area of interest is an alluvial site at the Nevada National Security Site intended for use in the Source Physics Experiment's (Snelson et al., 2013) second phase. Ground-truth surface topographic characterization was performed using a DJI Inspire 1 unmanned aerial system (UAS), at very low altitude (< 5-30m AGL). 2D photographs captured by the standard UAS camera payload were imported into Agisoft Photoscan to create three-dimensional point clouds. Within the area of interest, careful installation of surveyed ground control fiducial markers supplied necessary targets for field collection, and information for model georectification. The resulting model includes a Digital Elevation Model derived from 2D imagery. It is anticipated that this flexible and versatile characterization process will provide point cloud data resolution equivalent to a purely ground-based LiDAR scanning deployment (e.g., 1-2cm horizontal and vertical resolution; e.g., Sussman et al., 2012; Schultz-Fellenz et al., 2013). In addition to drastically increasing time efficiency in the field, the UAS method also allows for more complete coverage of the study area when compared to ground-based LiDAR. Comparison and integration of these data with conventionally-acquired airborne LiDAR data from a higher-altitude (~ 450m) platform will aid significantly in the refinement of technologies and detection capabilities of remote optical systems to identify and detect

  5. Nationwide Hybrid Change Detection of Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hron, V.; Halounova, L.

    2016-06-01

    The Fundamental Base of Geographic Data of the Czech Republic (hereinafter FBGD) is a national 2D geodatabase at a 1:10,000 scale with more than 100 geographic objects. This paper describes the design of the permanent updating mechanism of buildings in FBGD. The proposed procedure belongs to the category of hybrid change detection (HCD) techniques which combine pixel-based and object-based evaluation. The main sources of information for HCD are cadastral information and bi-temporal vertical digital aerial photographs. These photographs have great information potential because they contain multispectral, position and also elevation information. Elevation information represents a digital surface model (DSM) which can be obtained using the image matching technique. Pixel-based evaluation of bi-temporal DSMs enables fast localization of places with potential building changes. These coarse results are subsequently classified through the object-based image analysis (OBIA) using spectral, textural and contextual features and GIS tools. The advantage of the two-stage evaluation is the pre-selection of locations where image segmentation (a computationally demanding part of OBIA) is performed. It is not necessary to apply image segmentation to the entire scene, but only to the surroundings of detected changes, which contributes to significantly faster processing and lower hardware requirements. The created technology is based on open-source software solutions that allow easy portability on multiple computers and parallelization of processing. This leads to significant savings of financial resources which can be expended on the further development of FBGD.

  6. Airborne hyperspectral detection of small changes.

    PubMed

    Eismann, Michael T; Meola, Joseph; Stocker, Alan D; Beaven, Scott G; Schaum, Alan P

    2008-10-01

    Hyperspectral change detection offers a promising approach to detect objects and features of remotely sensed areas that are too difficult to find in single images, such as slight changes in land cover and the insertion, deletion, or movement of small objects, by exploiting subtle differences in the imagery over time. Methods for performing such change detection, however, must effectively maintain invariance to typically larger image-to-image changes in illumination and environmental conditions, as well as misregistration and viewing differences between image observations, while remaining sensitive to small differences in scene content. Previous research has established predictive algorithms to overcome such natural changes between images, and these approaches have recently been extended to deal with space-varying changes. The challenges to effective change detection, however, are often exacerbated in an airborne imaging geometry because of the limitations in control over flight conditions and geometry, and some of the recent change detection algorithms have not been demonstrated in an airborne setting. We describe the airborne implementation and relative performance of such methods. We specifically attempt to characterize the effects of spatial misregistration on change detection performance, the efficacy of class-conditional predictors in an airborne setting, and extensions to the change detection approach, including physically motivated shadow transition classifiers and matched change filtering based on in-scene atmospheric normalization. PMID:18830283

  7. Anomalous change detection in imagery

    DOEpatents

    Theiler, James P.; Perkins, Simon J.

    2011-05-31

    A distribution-based anomaly detection platform is described that identifies a non-flat background that is specified in terms of the distribution of the data. A resampling approach is also disclosed employing scrambled resampling of the original data with one class specified by the data and the other by the explicit distribution, and solving using binary classification.

  8. Renewable Surface Biosensors with Optical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.

    2001-04-30

    One major challenge in the development of biosensors is the limited lifetime of a chemically selective surface that includes biomolecules. Renewable surface biosensors address this issue by using fresh aliquots of derivatized microbeads for each analysis. The analyte detection can then occur on the microbeads, or downstream from the microbeads. In this paper, we will describe two types of renewable surface biosensors. The first renewable biosensor system includes on-column optical detection for monitoring the binding of biomolecules onto protein or DNA-derivatized Sepharose beads. The second renewable biosensor system includes detection downstream from the microparticles and is based on the use of derivatized magnetic particles for selective binding. The magnetic particles are fluidically captured and released in a sequential injection system to allow the automation of an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay.

  9. Renewable Surface Biosensors With Optical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.

    2001-12-01

    One major challenge in the development of biosensors is the limited lifetime of a chemically selective surface that includes biomolecules. Renewable surface biosensors address this issue by using fresh aliquots of derivatized microbeads for each analysis. The analyte detection can then occur on the microbeads, or downstream from the microbeads. In this paper, we will describe two types of renewable surface biosensors. The first renewable biosensor system includes on-column optical detection for monitoring the binding of biomolecules onto protein or DNA-derivatized Sepharose beads. The second renewable biosensor system includes detection downstream from the microparticles and is based on the use of derivatized magnetic particles for selective binding. The magnetic particles are fluidically captured and released in a sequential injection system to allow the automation of an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay.

  10. Image Change Detection via Ensemble Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Benjamin W; Vatsavai, Raju

    2013-01-01

    The concept of geographic change detection is relevant in many areas. Changes in geography can reveal much information about a particular location. For example, analysis of changes in geography can identify regions of population growth, change in land use, and potential environmental disturbance. A common way to perform change detection is to use a simple method such as differencing to detect regions of change. Though these techniques are simple, often the application of these techniques is very limited. Recently, use of machine learning methods such as neural networks for change detection has been explored with great success. In this work, we explore the use of ensemble learning methodologies for detecting changes in bitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Ensemble learning uses a collection of weak machine learning classifiers to create a stronger classifier which has higher accuracy than the individual classifiers in the ensemble. The strength of the ensemble lies in the fact that the individual classifiers in the ensemble create a mixture of experts in which the final classification made by the ensemble classifier is calculated from the outputs of the individual classifiers. Our methodology leverages this aspect of ensemble learning by training collections of weak decision tree based classifiers to identify regions of change in SAR images collected of a region in the Staten Island, New York area during Hurricane Sandy. Preliminary studies show that the ensemble method has approximately 11.5% higher change detection accuracy than an individual classifier.

  11. Surface Ionization Gas Detection at SnO2 Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenkow, A.; Oberhüttinger, C.; Habauzit, A.; Kessler, M.; Göbel, J.; Müller, G.

    2009-05-01

    In surface ionization (SI) gas detection adsorbed analyte molecules are converted into ionic species at a heated solid surface and extracted into free space by an oppositely biased counter electrode. In the present work we consider the formation of positive and negative analyte gas ions at SnO2 surfaces. We find that SI leads to positive ion formation only, with the SI efficiency scaling with the ionization energy of the analyte gas molecules. Aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with amine functional groups exhibit particularly high SI efficiencies.

  12. Seasonal Changes in Titan's Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Nixon, Conor A.; Cottini, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    Cassini's extended mission has provided the opportunity to search for seasonal variations on Titan. In particular, surface temperatures are expected to have shifted significantly in latitude during the completed portion of the mission. Spectra recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) during the nominal mission (2004-08) and the Equinox mission. (2008-10) have already shown changes in temperature. CIRS has detected a seasonal shift in the latitudinal distribution of surface brightness temperatures by comparing zonal averages from two time segments, one period in late northern winter centered on L(sub s) approximately 335 deg and a second period centered on the equinox (L(sub s) approximately 0 deg.). The earlier period had a meridional distribution similar to that previously reported: 93.5 K at the equator, 91.7 K at 85 S and 899 K at 85 N. The newly measured distribution near equinox shows a cooling in the south and a warming in the north, both by about 0.5 K. We estimate that. the centroid of the distribution moved from approximately 16 S to 7 S between the two periods. This gives a seasonal lag behind insolation of delta L(sub s) approximately 13 deg. The CIRS equinox results are consistent with those of Voyager IRIS, which encountered Titan in November 1980, just following the previous northern equinox (L(sub s) = 10 deg.). When compared with predictions from general circulation models, seasonal variations of surface temperature can help constrain the identification of surface materials. Our measurements most closely match the case of a porous ice regolith treated by Tokano, but with some apparent differences between the northern and southern hemispheres. CIRS will extend its study of seasonal variations in surface temperature on Titan as Cassini continues through northern spring.

  13. Detecting Concentration Changes with Cooperative Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Stefano; Celani, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Cells constantly need to monitor the state of the environment to detect changes and timely respond. The detection of concentration changes of a ligand by a set of receptors can be cast as a problem of hypothesis testing, and the cell viewed as a Neyman-Pearson detector. Within this framework, we investigate the role of receptor cooperativity in improving the cell's ability to detect changes. We find that cooperativity decreases the probability of missing an occurred change. This becomes especially beneficial when difficult detections have to be made. Concerning the influence of cooperativity on how fast a desired detection power is achieved, we find in general that there is an optimal value at finite levels of cooperation, even though easy discrimination tasks can be performed more rapidly by noncooperative receptors.

  14. Indigenous people's detection of rapid ecological change.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Shankar; Lauer, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    When sudden catastrophic events occur, it becomes critical for coastal communities to detect and respond to environmental transformations because failure to do so may undermine overall ecosystem resilience and threaten people's livelihoods. We therefore asked how capable of detecting rapid ecological change following massive environmental disruptions local, indigenous people are. We assessed the direction and periodicity of experimental learning of people in the Western Solomon Islands after a tsunami in 2007. We compared the results of marine science surveys with local ecological knowledge of the benthos across 3 affected villages and 3 periods before and after the tsunami. We sought to determine how people recognize biophysical changes in the environment before and after catastrophic events such as earthquakes and tsunamis and whether people have the ability to detect ecological changes over short time scales or need longer time scales to recognize changes. Indigenous people were able to detect changes in the benthos over time. Detection levels differed between marine science surveys and local ecological knowledge sources over time, but overall patterns of statistically significant detection of change were evident for various habitats. Our findings have implications for marine conservation, coastal management policies, and disaster-relief efforts because when people are able to detect ecological changes, this, in turn, affects how they exploit and manage their marine resources. PMID:24528101

  15. A sequential framework for image change detection.

    PubMed

    Lingg, Andrew J; Zelnio, Edmund; Garber, Fred; Rigling, Brian D

    2014-05-01

    We present a sequential framework for change detection. This framework allows us to use multiple images from reference and mission passes of a scene of interest in order to improve detection performance. It includes a change statistic that is easily updated when additional data becomes available. Detection performance using this statistic is predictable when the reference and image data are drawn from known distributions. We verify our performance prediction by simulation. Additionally, we show that detection performance improves with additional measurements on a set of synthetic aperture radar images and a set of visible images with unknown probability distributions. PMID:24818249

  16. Airborne change detection system for the detection of route mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzelli, Thomas P.; Jackson, Larry; Yeshnik, Mark; Petty, Thomas E.

    2003-09-01

    The US Army is interested in technologies that will enable it to maintain the free flow of traffic along routes such as Main Supply Routes (MSRs). Mines emplaced in the road by enemy forces under cover of darkness represent a major threat to maintaining a rapid Operational Tempo (OPTEMPO) along such routes. One technique that shows promise for detecting enemy mining activity is Airborne Change Detection, which allows an operator to detect suspicious day-to-day changes in and around the road that may be indicative of enemy mining. This paper presents an Airborne Change Detection that is currently under development at the US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD). The system has been tested using a longwave infrared (LWIR) sensor on a vertical take-off and landing unmanned aerial vehicle (VTOL UAV) and a midwave infrared (MWIR) sensor on a fixed wing aircraft. The system is described and results of the various tests conducted to date are presented.

  17. Change Detection via Morphological Comparative Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizilter, Y. V.; Rubis, A. Y.; Zheltov, S. Y.; Vygolov, O. V.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose the new change detection technique based on morphological comparative filtering. This technique generalizes the morphological image analysis scheme proposed by Pytiev. A new class of comparative filters based on guided contrasting is developed. Comparative filtering based on diffusion morphology is implemented too. The change detection pipeline contains: comparative filtering on image pyramid, calculation of morphological difference map, binarization, extraction of change proposals and testing change proposals using local morphological correlation coefficient. Experimental results demonstrate the applicability of proposed approach.

  18. Change Detection Experiments Using Low Cost UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Michael J.; Vranas, Thomas L.; Motter, Mark; Hines, Glenn D.; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the progress in the development of a low-cost change-detection system. This system is being developed to provide users with the ability to use a low-cost unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and image processing system that can detect changes in specific fixed ground locations using video provided by an autonomous UAV. The results of field experiments conducted with the US Army at Ft. A.P.Hill are presented.

  19. Change detection using the synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranney, Kenneth; Nguyen, Lam; Ressler, Marc; Stanton, Brian; Wong, David; Koenig, Francois; Tran, Chi; Kirose, Getachew; Martone, Anthony; Smith, Greg; Sichina, Jeff; Kappra, Karl

    2008-04-01

    Change detection provides a powerful tool for detecting the introduction of weapons or hazardous materials into an area under surveillance, as demonstrated in past work carried out at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL). This earlier work demonstrated the potential for detecting recently emplaced surface landmines using an X-Band, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor. Recent experiments conducted at ARL have extended these change detection results to imagery collected by the synthetic impulse reconstruction (SIRE) radar - a lower-frequency system developed at ARL. In this paper we describe the algorithms adopted for this change detection experiment and present results obtained by applying these algorithms to the SIRE data set. Results indicate the potential for utilizing systems such as the SIRE as surveillance tools.

  20. Change Point Detection in Correlation Networks

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Ian; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    Many systems of interacting elements can be conceptualized as networks, where network nodes represent the elements and network ties represent interactions between the elements. In systems where the underlying network evolves, it is useful to determine the points in time where the network structure changes significantly as these may correspond to functional change points. We propose a method for detecting change points in correlation networks that, unlike previous change point detection methods designed for time series data, requires minimal distributional assumptions. We investigate the difficulty of change point detection near the boundaries of the time series in correlation networks and study the power of our method and competing methods through simulation. We also show the generalizable nature of the method by applying it to stock price data as well as fMRI data. PMID:26739105

  1. Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1981-01-01

    A sensor for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

  2. Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1980-02-26

    A sensor is described for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device that comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

  3. Detecting Residues On Grit-Blasted Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, H. L.; Zook, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    Addition of fluorescent or iridescent material to plastic grit particles proposed for detection of grit residues after grit-blast cleaning. Residual films visible by observing grit-blasted surfaces under infrared or ultraviolet light. Plastic grit contains fluorescent or iridescent additive in core and coating. Wherever grit material becomes embedded, additive makes it visible under infrared or ultraviolet light. Applicable to other grit materials, for example fluorescent or iridescent materials added to particles of glass, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, or zirconium silicate.

  4. Hard-surface contamination detection exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Kawa, S.

    1991-12-31

    The purpose of this thesis is to create a practical exercise which demonstrates the techniques used by Health Physicists to detect surface contamination, including both instrumentation and smear survey techniques. By understanding the basic principles of the most commonly found instruments the intent is that a new Health Physics graduate can correctly choose, and apply an instrument to their detection situation. The exercise is also intended to acquaint students with the very basic principles of smear techniques. Smear surveys are probably the most universally applied technique in this industry, however, very little literature exists on the subject. The techniques are usually taught, on-the-job and by demonstration. By their seeing and participating in this presentation, it is intended that Health Physics students can accelerate their first few weeks at their new careers, and enable them to recognize common mistakes. Health Physicists are expected to have knowledge of the basic practices of their profession. This exercise will allow Health Physics students to become familiar with the use of hand-held detection devices and the technique of smear surveys. Adequate measurement and recording of surface contamination information is necessary to: meet licensing requirements; protect the health and safety of the workers; maintain accurate records in the case of litigation or dose reconstruction; and maintain high levels of professional competency. This exercise will assist students in obtaining the skills necessary to adequately measure and record levels of surface contamination. 41 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Flat Surface Damage Detection System (FSDDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Lewis, Mark; Gibson, Tracy; Lane, John; Medelius, Pedro; Snyder, Sarah; Ciarlariello, Dan; Parks, Steve; Carrejo, Danny; Rojdev, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    The Flat Surface Damage Detection system (FSDDS} is a sensory system that is capable of detecting impact damages to surfaces utilizing a novel sensor system. This system will provide the ability to monitor the integrity of an inflatable habitat during in situ system health monitoring. The system consists of three main custom designed subsystems: the multi-layer sensing panel, the embedded monitoring system, and the graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI LABVIEW software uses a custom developed damage detection algorithm to determine the damage location based on the sequence of broken sensing lines. It estimates the damage size, the maximum depth, and plots the damage location on a graph. Successfully demonstrated as a stand alone technology during 2011 D-RATS. Software modification also allowed for communication with HDU avionics crew display which was demonstrated remotely (KSC to JSC} during 2012 integration testing. Integrated FSDDS system and stand alone multi-panel systems were demonstrated remotely and at JSC, Mission Operations Test using Space Network Research Federation (SNRF} network in 2012. FY13, FSDDS multi-panel integration with JSC and SNRF network Technology can allow for integration with other complementary damage detection systems.

  6. Radar detection of surface oil accumulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Oneill, P.; Wilson, M.

    1980-01-01

    The United States Coast Guard is developing AIREYE, an all weather, day/night airborne surveillance system, for installation aboard future medium range surveillance aircraft. As part of this program, a series of controlled tests were conducted off southern California to evaluate the oil slick detection capabilities of two Motorola developed, side looking radars. The systems, a real aperture AN/APS-94D and a synthetic aperture coherent on receive (COR) were flown over the Santa Barbara Channel on May 19, 1976. Targets imaged during the coincident overflights included natural oil seepage, simulated oil spills, oil production platforms, piers, mooring buoys, commercial boats and barges at other targets. Based on an analysis of imagery from the coincident radar runs, COR provides better detection of natural and man made oil slicks, whereas the AN/APS-94D consistently exhibited higher surface target detection results. This and other tests have shown that active microwave systems have considerable potential for aiding in the detection and analysis of surface oil accumulations.

  7. The impact of misregistration on change detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townshend, John R. G.; Justice, Christopher O.; Gurney, Charlotte; Mcmanus, James

    1992-01-01

    The impact of images misregistration on the detection of changes in land cover was studied using spatially degraded Landsat MSS images. Emphasis is placed on simulated images of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) at spatial resolutions of 250 and 500 m. It is pointed out that there is the need to achieve high values of registration accuracy. The evidence from simulations suggests that misregistrations can have a marked effect on the ability of remotely sensed data to detect changes in land cover. Even subpixel misregistrations can have a major impact, and the most marked proportional changes will tend to occur at the finest misregistrations.

  8. Line matching for automatic change detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhollande, Jérôme; Monnin, David; Gond, Laetitia; Cudel, Christophe; Kohler, Sophie; Dieterlen, Alain

    2012-06-01

    During foreign operations, Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) are one of major threats that soldiers may unfortunately encounter along itineraries. Based on a vehicle-mounted camera, we propose an original approach by image comparison to detect signicant changes on these roads. The classic 2D-image registration techniques do not take into account parallax phenomena. The consequence is that the misregistration errors could be detected as changes. According to stereovision principles, our automatic method compares intensity proles along corresponding epipolar lines by extrema matching. An adaptive space warping compensates scale dierence in 3D-scene. When the signals are matched, the signal dierence highlights changes which are marked in current video.

  9. Image change detection algorithms: a systematic survey.

    PubMed

    Radke, Richard J; Andra, Srinivas; Al-Kofahi, Omar; Roysam, Badrinath

    2005-03-01

    Detecting regions of change in multiple images of the same scene taken at different times is of widespread interest due to a large number of applications in diverse disciplines, including remote sensing, surveillance, medical diagnosis and treatment, civil infrastructure, and underwater sensing. This paper presents a systematic survey of the common processing steps and core decision rules in modern change detection algorithms, including significance and hypothesis testing, predictive models, the shading model, and background modeling. We also discuss important preprocessing methods, approaches to enforcing the consistency of the change mask, and principles for evaluating and comparing the performance of change detection algorithms. It is hoped that our classification of algorithms into a relatively small number of categories will provide useful guidance to the algorithm designer. PMID:15762326

  10. Automated change detection for synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G-Michael, Tesfaye; Marchand, Bradley; Tucker, J. D.; Sternlicht, Daniel D.; Marston, Timothy M.; Azimi-Sadjadi, Mahmood R.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, an automated change detection technique is presented that compares new and historical seafloor images created with sidescan synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) for changes occurring over time. The method consists of a four stage process: a coarse navigational alignment; fine-scale co-registration using the scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm to match features between overlapping images; sub-pixel co-registration to improves phase coherence; and finally, change detection utilizing canonical correlation analysis (CCA). The method was tested using data collected with a high-frequency SAS in a sandy shallow-water environment. By using precise co-registration tools and change detection algorithms, it is shown that the coherent nature of the SAS data can be exploited and utilized in this environment over time scales ranging from hours through several days.

  11. Priming effects under correct change detection and change blindness.

    PubMed

    Caudek, Corrado; Domini, Fulvio

    2013-03-01

    In three experiments, we investigated the priming effects induced by an image change on a successive animate/inanimate decision task. We studied both perceptual (Experiments 1 and 2) and conceptual (Experiment 3) priming effects, under correct change detection and change blindness (CB). Under correct change detection, we found larger positive priming effects on congruent trials for probes representing animate entities than for probes representing artifactual objects. Under CB, we found performance impairment relative to a "no-change" baseline condition. This inhibition effect induced by CB was modulated by the semantic congruency between the changed item and the probe in the case of probe images, but not for probe words. We discuss our results in the context of the literature on the negative priming effect. PMID:22964454

  12. Surface detection, meshing and analysis during large molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, L M; Rudd, R E

    2005-08-01

    New techniques are presented for the detection and analysis of surfaces and interfaces in atomistic simulations of solids. Atomistic and other particle-based simulations have no inherent notion of a surface, only atomic positions and interactions. The algorithms we introduce here provide an unambiguous means to determine which atoms constitute the surface, and the list of surface atoms and a tessellation (meshing) of the surface are determined simultaneously. The algorithms have been implemented and demonstrated to run automatically (on the fly) in a large-scale parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code on a supercomputer. We demonstrate the validity of the method in three applications in which the surfaces and interfaces evolve: void surfaces in ductile fracture, the surface morphology due to significant plastic deformation of a nanoscale metal plate, and the interfaces (grain boundaries) and void surfaces in a nanoscale polycrystalline system undergoing ductile failure. The technique is found to be quite robust, even when the topology of the surfaces changes as in the case of void coalescence where two surfaces merge into one. It is found to add negligible computational overhead to an MD code, and is much less expensive than other techniques such as the solvent-accessible surface.

  13. System and process for detecting and monitoring surface defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Mark K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A system and process for detecting and monitoring defects in large surfaces such as the field joints of the container segments of a space shuttle booster motor. Beams of semi-collimated light from three non-parallel fiber optic light panels are directed at a region of the surface at non-normal angles of expected incidence. A video camera gathers some portion of the light that is reflected at an angle other than the angle of expected reflectance, and generates signals which are analyzed to discern defects in the surface. The analysis may be performed by visual inspection of an image on a video monitor, or by inspection of filtered or otherwise processed images. In one alternative embodiment, successive predetermined regions of the surface are aligned with the light source before illumination, thereby permitting efficient detection of defects in a large surface. Such alignment is performed by using a line scan gauge to sense the light which passes through an aperture in the surface. In another embodiment a digital map of the surface is created, thereby permitting the maintenance of records detailing changes in the location or size of defects as the container segment is refurbished and re-used. The defect detection apparatus may also be advantageously mounted on a fixture which engages the edge of a container segment.

  14. NOVELTY DETECTION UNDER CHANGING ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    H. SOHN; K. WORDER; C. R. FARRAR

    2001-04-01

    The primary objective of novelty detection is to examine a system's dynamic response to determine if the system significantly deviates from an initial baseline condition. In reality, the system is often subject to changing environmental and operation conditions that affect its dynamic characteristics. Such variations include changes in loading, boundary conditions, temperature, and moisture. Most damage diagnosis techniques, however, generally neglect the effects of these changing ambient conditions. Here, a novelty detection technique is developed explicitly taking into account these natural variations of the system in order to minimize false positive indications of true system changes. Auto-associative neural networks are employed to discriminate system changes of interest such as structural deterioration and damage from the natural variations of the system.

  15. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Foy, Bernard R; Wohlberg, Brendt E; Scovel, James C

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  16. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  17. Enhanced climate change and its detection over the Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, J.C.; Flato, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Results from an ensemble of climate change experiments with increasing greenhouse gas and aerosols using the Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis Coupled Climate Model are presented with a focus on surface quantities over the Rocky Mountains. There is a marked elevation dependency of the simulated surface screen temperature increase over the Rocky Mountains in the winter and spring seasons, with more pronounced changes at higher elevations. The elevation signal is linked to a rise in the snow line in the winter and spring seasons, which amplifies the surface warming via the snow-albedo feedback. Analysis of the winter surface energy budget shows that large changes in the solar component of the radiative input are the direct consequence of surface albedo changes caused by decreasing snow cover. Although the warming signal is enhanced at higher elevations, a two-way analysis of variance reveals that the elevation effect has no potential for early climate change detection. In the early stages of surface warming the elevation effect is masked by relatively large noise, so that the signal-to-noise ratio over the Rocky Mountains is no larger than elsewhere. Only after significant continental-scale warming does the local Rocky Mountain signal begin to dominate the pattern of climate change over western North America (and presumably also the surrounding ecosystems and hydrological networks).

  18. Landsat change detection can aid in water quality monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H. C.; Steele, K. F.; Waite, W. P.; Shinn, M. R.

    1977-01-01

    Comparison between Landsat-1 and -2 imagery of Arkansas provided evidence of significant land use changes during the 1972-75 time period. Analysis of Arkansas historical water quality information has shown conclusively that whereas point source pollution generally can be detected by use of water quality data collected by state and federal agencies, sampling methodologies for nonpoint source contamination attributable to surface runoff are totally inadequate. The expensive undertaking of monitoring all nonpoint sources for numerous watersheds can be lessened by implementing Landsat change detection analyses.

  19. Detection of abrupt changes in dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willsky, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the basic ideas associated with the detection of abrupt changes in dynamic systems are presented. Multiple filter-based techniques and residual-based method and the multiple model and generalized likelihood ratio methods are considered. Issues such as the effect of unknown onset time on algorithm complexity and structure and robustness to model uncertainty are discussed.

  20. Detecting Landscape Change: The View from Above

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Jess

    2008-01-01

    This article will demonstrate an approach for discovering and assessing local landscape change through the use of remotely sensed images. A brief introduction to remotely sensed imagery is followed by a discussion of relevant ways to introduce this technology into the college science classroom. The Map Detective activity demonstrates the…

  1. ULTRASONIC DETECTION OF SURFACE-BREAKING RAILHEAD DEFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R. S.; Fan, Y.; Dixon, S.; Papaelias, M.; Davis, C. L.; Roberts, C.

    2008-02-28

    We recently presented measurements of defects on the railhead, using a novel pitch-catch ultrasonic system comprising of two electro-magnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) generating and detecting Rayleigh waves. Current systems used on the UK rail network for detecting surface breaking defects are limited in speed (<30 mph) and accuracy (depths >5 mm). The non-contact EMAT system has the potential to operate at higher line speed, improving network inspection coverage. The current system detects signals and performs an FFT in less than 1 ms, and changes in the detected signal amplitude and frequency content are used to characterise defects. A new set of simulated defects on sections of rail have been produced, including half-face slots machined normal to the railhead surface, clusters of angled slots, and pocket defects more typical of real defects. The smallest pocket defects are difficult to detect, with changes in signal amplitude and cut-off falling close to the noise level. However, at chosen higher frequencies a drop in FFT magnitude indicates the presence of a defect, and this indicator can be logically combined with amplitude and cut-off measurements to provide a more reliable result. Preparation for testing on a rotating rail rig at high speeds is ongoing.

  2. Automatic change detection using mobile laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebel, M.; Hammer, M.; Gordon, M.; Arens, M.

    2014-10-01

    Automatic change detection in 3D environments requires the comparison of multi-temporal data. By comparing current data with past data of the same area, changes can be automatically detected and identified. Volumetric changes in the scene hint at suspicious activities like the movement of military vehicles, the application of camouflage nets, or the placement of IEDs, etc. In contrast to broad research activities in remote sensing with optical cameras, this paper addresses the topic using 3D data acquired by mobile laser scanning (MLS). We present a framework for immediate comparison of current MLS data to given 3D reference data. Our method extends the concept of occupancy grids known from robot mapping, which incorporates the sensor positions in the processing of the 3D point clouds. This allows extracting the information that is included in the data acquisition geometry. For each single range measurement, it becomes apparent that an object reflects laser pulses in the measured range distance, i.e., space is occupied at that 3D position. In addition, it is obvious that space is empty along the line of sight between sensor and the reflecting object. Everywhere else, the occupancy of space remains unknown. This approach handles occlusions and changes implicitly, such that the latter are identifiable by conflicts of empty space and occupied space. The presented concept of change detection has been successfully validated in experiments with recorded MLS data streams. Results are shown for test sites at which MLS data were acquired at different time intervals.

  3. Olfactory processing: detection of rapid changes.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Krone, Franziska; Walker, Susannah; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Changes in the olfactory environment have a rather poor chance of being detected. Aim of the present study was to determine, whether the same (cued) or different (uncued) odors can generally be detected at short inter stimulus intervals (ISI) below 2.5 s. Furthermore we investigated, whether inhibition of return, an attentional phenomenon facilitating the detection of new stimuli at longer ISI, is present in the domain of olfaction. Thirteen normosmic people (3 men, 10 women; age range 19-27 years; mean age 23 years) participated. Stimulation was performed using air-dilution olfactometry with 2 odors: phenylethylalcohol and hydrogen disulfide. Reaction time to target stimuli was assessed in cued and uncued conditions at ISIs of 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 s. There was a significant main effect of ISI, indicating that odors presented only 1 s apart are missed frequently. Uncued presentation facilitated detection at short ISIs, implying that changes of the olfactory environment are detected better than presentation of the same odor again. Effects in relation to "olfactory inhibition of return," on the other hand, are not supported by our results. This suggests that attention works different for the olfactory system compared with the visual and auditory systems. PMID:25911421

  4. Optical and SAR data integration for automatic change pattern detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, B.; Susaki, J.

    2014-09-01

    Automatic change pattern mapping in urban and sub-urban area is important but challenging due to the diversity of urban land use pattern. With multi-sensor imagery, it is possible to generate multidimensional unique information of Earth surface features that allow developing a relationship between a response of each feature to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and optical sensors to track the change automatically. Thus, a SAR and optical data integration framework for change detection and a relationship for automatic change pattern detection were developed. It was carried out in three steps: (i) Computation of indicators from SAR and optical images, namely: normalized difference ratio (NDR) from multi-temporal SAR images and the normalized difference vegetation index difference (NDVI) from multi-temporal optical images, (ii) computing the change magnitude image from NDR and ΔNDVI and delineating the change area and (iii) the development of an empirical relationship, for automatic change pattern detection. The experiment was carried out in an outskirts part of Ho Chi Minh City, one of the fastest growing cities in the world. The empirical relationship between the response of surface feature to optical and SAR imagery has successfully delineated six changed classes in a very complex urban sprawl area that was otherwise impossible with multi-spectral imagery. The improvement of the change detection results by making use of the unique information on both sensors, optical and SAR, is also noticeable with a visual inspection and the kappa index was increased by 0.13 (0.75 to 0.88) in comparison to only optical images.

  5. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Matsekh, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  6. Automatic Identification of Changes on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speyerer, Emerson; Wagner, Robert; Robinson, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Since June 2009, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has maintained a stable polar orbit enabling the twin Narrow Angle Cameras (NACs) to acquire high-resolution observations of the lunar surface (pixel scale of 0.25 to 2 m/pixel). This orbital configuration facilitates occasional repeat coverage with similar lighting geometries. These before and after observations, referred to in this study as temporal pairs, enable the identification of changes to the surface based on applying a series of change detection techniques. Manual inspection of the temporal pairs by LROC team members resulted in the discovery of hundreds of new changes across the lunar surface [1]. However, this manual process is time consuming (2-4 hours per temporal pair) and each analyst must apply their own judgment on whether they have discovered a real change or an artifact in the image pair. Thus far, the LROC team has identified 650 surface changes as well as 19 resolved craters using the manual approach. Leveraging image processing techniques developed by the LROC team, we started automatically scanning and identifying these changes. The new automated algorithm locates changes based on albedo variations and changes in surface texture. The program provides a list of potential new features for later manual inspection and classification (disturbance lacking resolvable crater or crater with a rim diameter of X meters). This new approach eliminates the human inspector from scanning up to 5.22*109 pixels in each temporal pair and instead provides cropped cutouts with the detected changes centered in the thumbnail image. The LROC NACs have already collected thousands of temporal pair observations and will continue to do so over the remaining extended mission. Highest fidelity change detection comes from temporal pairs with nearly identical lighting geometries. In the next two years, the progression of the LRO orbit with respect to beta angle will enable direct illumination matches (<2 degrees

  7. Determining surface elevation change of small ice caps on Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, D. P.; Schenk, A.; Csatho, B. M.; Nagarajan, S.; Briner, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Among the hundreds of small ice caps that dot the periphery of the Greenland ice sheet, several (such as Sukkertoppen, North Ice Cap, and Flade Isbrink) have been flown multiple times by the NASA Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM). Although highly resolved, these flights cover only a small portion of each ice cap surface. In this work we introduce ICESat as a complementary sensor to estimate surface elevation change over a larger area. Surface Elevation Reconstruction and Change detection (SERAC) is a method that has been successfully applied to several cases where fusion of multisensory data is required to reconstruct surface topography. The method is based on fitting analytical functions to laser points within repeat tracks or cross-over areas and provides high resolution, precise changes in surface topography along with a rigorous error estimate of the reconstructed elevation changes. In this study we apply SERAC to precisely reconstruct surface change for multiple ice caps using ATM and ICESat data through multiple time epochs. Small ice caps that surround the Greenland ice sheet reside at relatively low elevation and respond quickly to climate forcing. Moreover, dynamic thinning processes are comparatively limited in the ice caps when compared to the ice sheet proper. Small ice caps and alpine glaciers and expected to provide the largest contribution to eustatic sea-level rise over the coming century. There is therefore an urgent need to develop and maintain an inventory of small ice cap mass balance, especially those that surround the large ice sheets.

  8. Enhancing implicit change detection through action.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Philip; Tuennermann, Jan; Roker-Knight, Nancy; Winter, Dorina; Scharlau, Ingrid; Bridgeman, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Implicit change detection demonstrates how the visual system can benefit from stored information that is not immediately available to conscious awareness. We investigated the role of motor action in this context. In the first two experiments, using a one-shot implicit change-detection paradigm, participants responded to unperceived changes either with an action (jabbing the screen at the guessed location of a change) or with words (verbal report), and sat either 60 cm or 300 cm (with a laser pointer) away from the display. Our observers guessed the locations of changes at a reachable distance better with an action than with a verbal judgment. At 300 cm, beyond reach, the motor advantage disappeared. In experiment 3, this advantage was also unavailable when participants sat at a reachable distance but responded with hand-held laser pointers near their bodies. We conclude that a motor system specialized for real-time visually guided behavior has access to additional visual information. Importantly, this system is not activated by merely executing an action (experiment 2) or presenting stimuli in one's near space (experiment 3). It is activated only when both conditions are fulfilled, which implies that it is the actual contact that matters to the visual system. PMID:21180353

  9. Detecting changes during pregnancy with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargis, Elizabeth; Robertson, Kesha; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Reese, Jeff; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    Preterm labor is the second leading cause of neonatal mortality and leads to a myriad of complications like delayed development and cerebral palsy. Currently, there is no way to accurately predict preterm labor, making its prevention and treatment virtually impossible. While there are some at-risk patients, over half of all preterm births do not fall into any high-risk category. This study seeks to predict and prevent preterm labor by using Raman spectroscopy to detect changes in the cervix during pregnancy. Since Raman spectroscopy has been used to detect cancers in vivo in organs like the cervix and skin, it follows that spectra will change over the course of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that fluorescence decreased during pregnancy and increased during post-partum exams to pre-pregnancy levels. We believe significant changes will occur in the Raman spectra obtained during the course of pregnancy. In this study, Raman spectra from the cervix of pregnant mice and women will be acquired. Specific changes that occur due to cervical softening or changes in hormonal levels will be observed to understand the likelihood that a female mouse or a woman will enter labor.

  10. Detecting hydrological changes through conceptual model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Caracciolo, Domenico; Pumo, Dario; Francipane, Antonio; Valerio Noto, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    Natural changes and human modifications in hydrological systems coevolve and interact in a coupled and interlinked way. If, on one hand, climatic changes are stochastic, non-steady, and affect the hydrological systems, on the other hand, human-induced changes due to over-exploitation of soils and water resources modifies the natural landscape, water fluxes and its partitioning. Indeed, the traditional assumption of static systems in hydrological analysis, which has been adopted for long time, fails whenever transient climatic conditions and/or land use changes occur. Time series analysis is a way to explore environmental changes together with societal changes; unfortunately, the not distinguishability between causes restrict the scope of this method. In order to overcome this limitation, it is possible to couple time series analysis with an opportune hydrological model, such as a conceptual hydrological model, which offers a schematization of complex dynamics acting within a basin. Assuming that model parameters represent morphological basin characteristics and that calibration is a way to detect hydrological signature at a specific moment, it is possible to argue that calibrating the model over different time windows could be a method for detecting potential hydrological changes. In order to test the capabilities of a conceptual model in detecting hydrological changes, this work presents different "in silico" experiments. A synthetic-basin is forced with an ensemble of possible future scenarios generated with a stochastic weather generator able to simulate steady and non-steady climatic conditions. The experiments refer to Mediterranean climate, which is characterized by marked seasonality, and consider the outcomes of the IPCC 5th report for describing climate evolution in the next century. In particular, in order to generate future climate change scenarios, a stochastic downscaling in space and time is carried out using realizations of an ensemble of General

  11. Abandoned Mine Detection in Western Pennsylvania Using Surface Wave Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B.

    2015-12-01

    Abandoned mines throughout the Appalachian region of the United States have been recognized as problematic. Resource extraction from these mines has long ceased and few, if any, documents pertaining to these operations exist. Over time support structures internal to the mines may collapse and lead to subsidence, potentially damaging surface structures. A non-invasive, surface deployed seismic method to detect undisclosed, abandoned near-surface mines would be beneficial as a first step to remediation. The use of seismic surface waves to analyze the upper several tens of meters of the subsurface has become an important technique for near-surface investigations and may provide a method for detection of near-surface, abandoned mine shafts. While there are many undocumented abandoned mines throughout the Appalachians one known example exists within Butler County, Pennsylvania. Although little is known about the overall operation there is limited documentation which provides information as to the location of the mine tunnels. Currently there is no recognized surface subsidence associated with the mine however documents indicate that the abandoned mining operations have an estimated depth ranging from twenty to fifty feet. To assist with acquisition a seismic land streamer was constructed. Use of a land streamer increases the speed, ease and efficiency required to perform a seismic survey. Additionally the land streamer allows for the acquisition of seismic surface waves which were analyzed using the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method. Data were acquired by conducting multiple, adjacent surveys perpendicular to the suspected location of abandoned mine tunnels. Throughout the survey area to a depth of approximately 15 meters, shear wave velocities range between approximately 200-1200 m/s. Based upon shear wave velocity changes within the profile anomalies have been identified corresponding to the contrast between the suspected mined, and unmined, areas.

  12. Ischemia detection from morphological QRS angle changes.

    PubMed

    Romero, Daniel; Martínez, Juan Pablo; Laguna, Pablo; Pueyo, Esther

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an ischemia detector is presented based on the analysis of QRS-derived angles. The detector has been developed by modeling ischemic effects on the QRS angles as a gradual change with a certain transition time and assuming a Laplacian additive modeling error contaminating the angle series. Both standard and non-standard leads were used for analysis. Non-standard leads were obtained by applying the PCA technique over specific lead subsets to represent different potential locations of the ischemic zone. The performance of the proposed detector was tested over a population of 79 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in one of the major coronary arteries (LAD (n  =  25), RCA (n  =  16) and LCX (n  =  38)). The best detection performance, obtained for standard ECG leads, was achieved in the LAD group with values of sensitivity and specificity of [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], followed by the RCA group with [Formula: see text], Sp  =  94.4 and the LCX group with [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], notably outperforming detection based on the ST series in all cases, with the same detector structure. The timing of the detected ischemic events ranged from 30 s up to 150 s (mean  =  66.8 s) following the start of occlusion. We conclude that changes in the QRS angles can be used to detect acute myocardial ischemia. PMID:27243441

  13. Scene change detection based on multimodal integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yingying; Zhou, Dongru

    2003-09-01

    Scene change detection is an essential step to automatic and content-based video indexing, retrieval and browsing. In this paper, a robust scene change detection and classification approach is presented, which analyzes audio, visual and textual sources and accounts for their inter-relations and coincidence to semantically identify and classify video scenes. Audio analysis focuses on the segmentation of audio stream into four types of semantic data such as silence, speech, music and environmental sound. Further processing on speech segments aims at locating speaker changes. Video analysis partitions visual stream into shots. Text analysis can provide a supplemental source of clues for scene classification and indexing information. We integrate the video and audio analysis results to identify video scenes and use the text information detected by the video OCR technology or derived from transcripts available to refine scene classification. Results from single source segmentation are in some cases suboptimal. By combining visual, aural features adn the accessorial text information, the scence extraction accuracy is enhanced, and more semantic segmentations are developed. Experimental results are proven to rather promising.

  14. Seabed change detection in challenging environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Cameron A.; Sternlicht, Daniel D.

    2011-06-01

    Automatic Change Detection (ACD) compares new and stored terrain images for alerting to changes occurring over time. These techniques, long used in airborne radar, are just beginning to be applied to sidescan sonar. Under the right conditions ACD by image correlation-comparing multi-temporal image data at the pixel or parcel level-can be used to detect new objects on the seafloor. Synthetic aperture sonars (SAS)-coherent sensors that produce fine-scale, range-independent resolution seafloor images-are well suited for this approach; however, dynamic seabed environments can introduce "clutter" to the process. This paper explores an ACD method that uses salience mapping in a global-to-local analysis architecture. In this method, termed Temporally Invariant Saliency (TIS), variance ratios of median-filtered repeat-pass images are used to detect new objects, while deemphasizing modest environmental or radiometric-induced changes in the background. Successful tests with repeat-pass data from two SAS systems mounted on autonomous undersea vehicles (AUV) demonstrate the feasibility of the technique.

  15. GISS Analysis of Surface Temperature Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J.; Ruedy, R.; Glascoe, J.; Sato, M.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the current GISS analysis of surface temperature change based primarily on meteorological station measurements. The global surface temperature in 1998 was the warmest in the period of instrumental data. The rate of temperature change is higher in the past 25 years than at any previous time in the period of instrumental data. The warmth of 1998 is too large and pervasive to be fully accounted for by the recent El Nino, suggesting that global temperature may have moved to a higher level, analogous to the increase that occurred in the late 1970s. The warming in the United States over the past 50 years is smaller than in most of the world, and over that period there is a slight cooling trend in the Eastern United States and the neighboring Atlantic ocean. The spatial and temporal patterns of the temperature change suggest that more than one mechanism is involved in this regional cooling.

  16. Detecting regional patterns of changing CO2 flux in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Parazoo, Nicholas C; Commane, Roisin; Wofsy, Steven C; Koven, Charles D; Sweeney, Colm; Lawrence, David M; Lindaas, Jakob; Chang, Rachel Y-W; Miller, Charles E

    2016-07-12

    With rapid changes in climate and the seasonal amplitude of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Arctic, it is critical that we detect and quantify the underlying processes controlling the changing amplitude of CO2 to better predict carbon cycle feedbacks in the Arctic climate system. We use satellite and airborne observations of atmospheric CO2 with climatically forced CO2 flux simulations to assess the detectability of Alaskan carbon cycle signals as future warming evolves. We find that current satellite remote sensing technologies can detect changing uptake accurately during the growing season but lack sufficient cold season coverage and near-surface sensitivity to constrain annual carbon balance changes at regional scale. Airborne strategies that target regular vertical profile measurements within continental interiors are more sensitive to regional flux deeper into the cold season but currently lack sufficient spatial coverage throughout the entire cold season. Thus, the current CO2 observing network is unlikely to detect potentially large CO2 sources associated with deep permafrost thaw and cold season respiration expected over the next 50 y. Although continuity of current observations is vital, strategies and technologies focused on cold season measurements (active remote sensing, aircraft, and tall towers) and systematic sampling of vertical profiles across continental interiors over the full annual cycle are required to detect the onset of carbon release from thawing permafrost. PMID:27354511

  17. Detecting regional patterns of changing CO2 flux in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazoo, Nicholas C.; Commane, Roisin; Wofsy, Steven C.; Koven, Charles D.; Sweeney, Colm; Lawrence, David M.; Lindaas, Jakob; Chang, Rachel Y.-W.; Miller, Charles E.

    2016-07-01

    With rapid changes in climate and the seasonal amplitude of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Arctic, it is critical that we detect and quantify the underlying processes controlling the changing amplitude of CO2 to better predict carbon cycle feedbacks in the Arctic climate system. We use satellite and airborne observations of atmospheric CO2 with climatically forced CO2 flux simulations to assess the detectability of Alaskan carbon cycle signals as future warming evolves. We find that current satellite remote sensing technologies can detect changing uptake accurately during the growing season but lack sufficient cold season coverage and near-surface sensitivity to constrain annual carbon balance changes at regional scale. Airborne strategies that target regular vertical profile measurements within continental interiors are more sensitive to regional flux deeper into the cold season but currently lack sufficient spatial coverage throughout the entire cold season. Thus, the current CO2 observing network is unlikely to detect potentially large CO2 sources associated with deep permafrost thaw and cold season respiration expected over the next 50 y. Although continuity of current observations is vital, strategies and technologies focused on cold season measurements (active remote sensing, aircraft, and tall towers) and systematic sampling of vertical profiles across continental interiors over the full annual cycle are required to detect the onset of carbon release from thawing permafrost.

  18. Time series change detection: Algorithms for land cover change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriah, Shyam

    can be used for decision making and policy planning purposes. In particular, previous change detection studies have primarily relied on examining differences between two or more satellite images acquired on different dates. Thus, a technological solution that detects global land cover change using high temporal resolution time series data will represent a paradigm-shift in the field of land cover change studies. To realize these ambitious goals, a number of computational challenges in spatio-temporal data mining need to be addressed. Specifically, analysis and discovery approaches need to be cognizant of climate and ecosystem data characteristics such as seasonality, non-stationarity/inter-region variability, multi-scale nature, spatio-temporal autocorrelation, high-dimensionality and massive data size. This dissertation, a step in that direction, translates earth science challenges to computer science problems, and provides computational solutions to address these problems. In particular, three key technical capabilities are developed: (1) Algorithms for time series change detection that are effective and can scale up to handle the large size of earth science data; (2) Change detection algorithms that can handle large numbers of missing and noisy values present in satellite data sets; and (3) Spatio-temporal analysis techniques to identify the scale and scope of disturbance events.

  19. Lithium Wall Conditioning And Surface Dust Detection On NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C H; Bell, M G; Friesen, F.Q.L.; Heim, B; Jaworski, M A; Kugel, H; Maingi, R; Rais, B; Taylor, C N

    2011-05-23

    Lithium evaporation onto NSTX plasma facing components (PFC) has resulted in improved energy confinement, and reductions in the number and amplitude of edge-localized modes (ELMs) up to the point of complete ELM suppression. The associated PFC surface chemistry has been investigated with a novel plasma material interface probe connected to an in-vacuo surface analysis station. Analysis has demonstrated that binding of D atoms to the polycrystalline graphite material of the PFCs is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular deuterium atoms become weakly bonded near lithium atoms themselves bound to either oxygen or the carbon from the underlying material. Surface dust inside NSTX has been detected in real-time using a highly sensitive electrostatic dust detector. In a separate experiment, electrostatic removal of dust via three concentric spiral-shaped electrodes covered by a dielectric and driven by a high voltage 3-phase waveform was evaluated for potential application to fusion reactors

  20. Enamel surface changes caused by hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Takao; Hanabusa, Masao; Hosoya, Noriyasu; Chiba, Toshie; Yoshida, Takumasa; Morito, Akiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced inside the mouth are a well-known cause of halitosis. Recent studies have suggested that VSCs modify the pathology of periodontitis by encouraging the migration of bacterial toxins associated with increased permeability of gingival epithelia, and enhancing the production of matrix metalloproteinases in gingival connective tissue. Nonetheless, the effects on the enamel of direct exposure to VSCs within the oral cavity remain unclear. In the present study, we observed the effects of VSCs in the form of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on enamel surfaces and determined their effects on restorations. Materials and Methods: Extracted human tooth and bovine tooth samples were divided into the H2S experimental side and the control side. We observed the effects of H2S on enamel surfaces using electron microscopy and conducted a shear test. Results: We found that exposure to H2S obscured the enamel surface's crystal structure. The surface also exhibited coarseness and reticular changes. Shear testing did not reveal any differences in bond strength. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that H2S occurring inside the mouth causes changes to the crystal structure of the enamel surface that can lead to tooth wear, but that it does not diminish the effects of dental bonding in adhesive restorations. PMID:26752833

  1. Evaluation of change detection techniques for monitoring coastal zone environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weismiller, R. A. (Principal Investigator); Kristof, S. J.; Scholz, D. K.; Anuta, P. E.; Momin, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Four change detection techniques were designed and implemented for evaluation: (1) post classification comparison change detection, (2) delta data change detection, (3) spectral/temporal change classification, and (4) layered spectral/temporal change classification. The post classification comparison technique reliably identified areas of change and was used as the standard for qualitatively evaluating the other three techniques. The layered spectral/temporal change classification and the delta data change detection results generally agreed with the post classification comparison technique results; however, many small areas of change were not identified. Major discrepancies existed between the post classification comparison and spectral/temporal change detection results.

  2. Immunohistochemical Detection of Changes in Tumor Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, James Carlin, Sean; Burke, Sean A.; Wen Bixiu; Yang, Kwang Mo; Ling, C. Clifton

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Although hypoxia is a known prognostic factor, its effect will be modified by the rate of reoxygenation and the extent to which the cells are acutely hypoxic. We tested the ability of exogenous and endogenous markers to detect reoxygenation in a xenograft model. Our technique might be applicable to stored patient samples. Methods and Materials: The human colorectal carcinoma line, HT29, was grown in nude mice. Changes in tumor hypoxia were examined by injection of pimonidazole, followed 24 hours later by EF5. Cryosections were stained for these markers and for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} (HIF1{alpha}). Tumor hypoxia was artificially manipulated by carbogen exposure. Results: In unstressed tumors, all four markers showed very similar spatial distributions. After carbogen treatment, pimonidazole and EF5 could detect decreased hypoxia. HIF1{alpha} staining was also decreased relative to CAIX, although the effect was less pronounced than for EF5. Control tumors displayed small regions that had undergone spontaneous changes in tumor hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole relative to EF5; most of these changes were reflected by CAIX and HIF1{alpha}. Conclusion: HIF1{alpha} can be compared with either CAIX or a previously administered nitroimidazole to provide an estimate of reoxygenation.

  3. Lake Chapala change detection using time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Caloca, Alejandra; Tapia-Silva, Felipe-Omar; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2008-10-01

    The Lake Chapala is the largest natural lake in Mexico. It presents a hydrological imbalance problem caused by diminishing intakes from the Lerma River, pollution from said volumes, native vegetation and solid waste. This article presents a study that allows us to determine with high precision the extent of the affectation in both extension and volume reduction of the Lake Chapala in the period going from 1990 to 2007. Through satellite images this above-mentioned period was monitored. Image segmentation was achieved through a Markov Random Field model, extending the application towards edge detection. This allows adequately defining the lake's limits as well as determining new zones within the lake, both changes pertaining the Lake Chapala. Detected changes are related to a hydrological balance study based on measuring variables such as storage volumes, evapotranspiration and water balance. Results show that the changes in the Lake Chapala establish frail conditions which pose a future risk situation. Rehabilitation of the lake requires a hydrologic balance in its banks and aquifers.

  4. Immunohistochemical Detection of Changes in Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James; Carlin, Sean; Burke, Sean A.; Wen, Bixiu; Yang, Kwang Mo; Ling, C Clifton

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Although hypoxia is a known prognostic factor, its impact will be modified by the rate of reoxygenation and the extent to which cells are acutely hypoxic. We tested the ability of exogenous and endogenous markers to detect reoxygenation in a xenograft model. Our technique may be applicable to stored patient samples. Methods and Materials The human colorectal carcinoma line, HT29 was grown in nude mice. Changes in tumor hypoxia were examined by injection of pimonidazole followed 24 hours later by EF5. Cryosections were stained for these markers and for CAIX and HIF1α. Tumor hypoxia was artificially manipulated by carbogen exposure. Results In unstressed tumors, all four markers showed very similar spatial distributions. After carbogen treatment, pimonidazole and EF5 could detect decreased hypoxia. HIF1α staining was also decreased relative to CAIX, though the effect was less pronounced than for EF5. Control tumors displayed small regions that had undergone spontaneous changes in tumor hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole relative to EF5; most of these changes were reflected by CAIX and HIF1α Conclusions HIF1α can be compared to either CAIX or a previously administered nitroimidazole to provide an estimate of reoxygenation. PMID:19251089

  5. Automatic road surface defect detection from grayscale images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanta, Sindhu; Birken, Ralf; Dy, Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    Video health monitoring of large road networks requires the repeated collection of surface images to detect the defects and their changes over time. Vehicle mounted video equipment can easily collect the data, but the amount of data that can be collected in a single day prohibits interactive or semi-automated processing schemes as they would also not be cost-effective. A new approach that is fully automated to detect road surface defects from large amounts of highresolution grayscale images is presented. The images are collected with a vehicle-mounted rear-facing 5MP video camera complemented by GPS based positioning information. Our algorithm starts by correcting the images for radial and angular distortion to get a bird's-eye view image. This results in images with known dimensions (consistent in width per pixel) which allow data to be accurately placed on geo-referenced maps. Each of the pixels in the image is labeled as crack or non-crack using a Markov Random Field (MRF) approach. The data used for testing and training are disjoint sets of images collected from the streets of Boston, MA, USA. We compare our road surface defect detection results with other techniques/algorithms described in the literature for accuracy and robustness.

  6. Imaging, object detection, and change detection with a polarized multistatic GPR array

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W.

    2015-07-21

    A polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection factoring in the orientation of an object relative to the orientation of transceivers. The polarized detection system may operate on one of several modes of operation based on whether the imaging, object detection, or change detection is performed separately for each transceiver orientation. In combined change mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines changes across polarizations. In combined object mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging and object detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines objects across polarizations and performs change detection on the result. In combined image mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines images across polarizations and performs object detection followed by change detection on the result.

  7. Refractive index change detection based on porous silicon microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weirong; Jia, Zhenhong; Li, Peng; Lv, Guodong; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-05-01

    By combining photolithography with the electrochemical anodization method, a microarray device of porous silicon (PS) photonic crystal was fabricated on the crystalline silicon substrate. The optical properties of the microarray were analyzed with the transfer matrix method. The relationship between refractive index and reflectivity of each array element of the microarray at 633 nm was also studied, and the array surface reflectivity changes were observed through digital imaging. By means of the reflectivity measurement method, reflectivity changes below 10-3 can be observed based on PS microarray. The results of this study can be applied to the detection of biosensor arrays.

  8. Laser-based structural sensing and surface damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guldur, Burcu

    this research is to combine useful information extracted from laser scanner data with color information, which provides information in the fourth dimension that enables detection of damage types such as cracks, corrosion, and related surface defects that are generally difficult to detect using only laser scanner data; moreover, the color information also helps to track volumetric changes on structures such as spalling. Although using images with varying resolution to detect cracks is an extensively researched topic, damage detection using laser scanners with and without color images is a new research area that holds many opportunities for enhancing the current practice of visual inspections. The aim is to combine the best features of laser scans and images to create an automatic and effective surface damage detection method, which will reduce the need for skilled labor during visual inspections and allow automatic documentation of related information. This work enables developing surface damage detection strategies that integrate existing condition rating criteria for a wide range damage types that are collected under three main categories: small deformations already existing on the structure (cracks); damage types that induce larger deformations, but where the initial topology of the structure has not changed appreciably (e.g., bent members); and large deformations where localized changes in the topology of the structure have occurred (e.g., rupture, discontinuities and spalling). The effectiveness of the developed damage detection algorithms are validated by comparing the detection results with the measurements taken from test specimens and test-bed bridges.

  9. SAR change detection based on intensity and texture changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Maoguo; Li, Yu; Jiao, Licheng; Jia, Meng; Su, Linzhi

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a novel change detection approach is proposed for multitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The approach is based on two difference images, which are constructed through intensity and texture information, respectively. In the extraction of the texture differences, robust principal component analysis technique is used to separate irrelevant and noisy elements from Gabor responses. Then graph cuts are improved by a novel energy function based on multivariate generalized Gaussian model for more accurately fitting. The effectiveness of the proposed method is proved by the experiment results obtained on several real SAR images data sets.

  10. Explosives detection and identification using surface plasmon-coupled emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ja, Shiou-Jyh

    2012-06-01

    To fight against the explosives-related threats in defense and homeland security applications, a smarter sensing device that not only detects but differentiates multiple true threats from false positives caused by environmental interferents is essential. A new optical detection system is proposed to address these issues by using the temporal and spectroscopic information generated by the surface plasmon coupling emission (SPCE) effect. Innovative SPCE optics have been designed using Zemax software to project the fluorescence signal into clear "rainbow rings" on a CCD with subnanometer wavelength resolution. The spectroscopic change of the fluorescence signal and the time history of such changes due to the presence of a certain explosive analyte are unique and can be used to identify explosives. Thanks to high optical efficiency, reporter depositions as small as 160-μm in diameter can generate a sufficient signal, allowing a dense array of different reporters to be interrogated with wavelength multiplexing and detect a wide range of explosives. We have demonstrated detection and classification of explosives, such as TNT, NT, NM, RDX, PETN, and AN, with two sensing materials in a prototype.

  11. Seasonal Changes in Surface Temperatures on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    The surface brightness temperatures on Titan have been measured by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard Cassini during the period spanning late northern winter through vernal equinox. CIRS observes radiance from the surface through a spectral window at 19 microns where the atmosphere has an opacity minimum [I]. CIRS is now seeing a shift in the latitudinal distribution of temperatures froth a distinctly warmer south to a more symmetrical north -south pattern, similar to that found by Voyager IRIS [2,3] at the time of the previous vernal equinox. Near the equator the temperatures remain close to the 93.7 K value found at the surface by Huygens [4]. From the equator to the poles the temperature gradients are 2-3 K. When compared with predictions froth general circulation models [5] the measured temperatures and their seasonal changes constrain the possible types of surface material. As Cassini continues through Titan's northern spring CiRS will extend its, global coverage to took for correlations between surface temperatures and albedo and to search for diurnal temperature variations

  12. Automatic recognition of landslides based on change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Hua, Houqiang

    2009-07-01

    After Wenchuan earthquake disaster, landslide disaster becomes a common concern, and remote sensing becomes more and more important in the application of landslide monitoring. Now, the method of interpretation and recognition for landslides using remote sensing is visual interpretation mostly. Automatic recognition of landslide is a new and difficult but significative job. For the purpose of seeking a more effective method to recognize landslide automatically, this project analyzes the current methods for the recognition of landslide disasters, and their applicability to the practice of landslide monitoring. Landslide is a phenomenon and disaster triggered by natural and artificial reasons that a part of slope comprised of rock, soil and other fragmental materials slide alone a certain weak structural surface under the gravitation. Consequently, according to the geo-science principle of landslide, there is an obvious change in the sliding region between the pre-landslide and post-landslide, and it can be described in remote sensing imagery, so we develop the new approach to identify landslides, which uses change detection based on texture analysis in multi-temporal imageries. Preprocessing the remote sensing data including the following aspects of image enhancement and filtering, smoothing and cutting, image mosaics, registration and merge, geometric correction and radiation calibration, this paper does change detection base on texture characteristics in multi-temporal images to recognize landslide automatically. After change detection of multi-temporal remote sensing images based on texture analysis, if there is no change in remote sensing image, the image detected is relatively homogeneous, the image detected shows some clustering characteristics; if there is part change in image, the image detected will show two or more clustering centers; if there is complete change in remote sensing image, the image detected will show disorderly and unsystematic. At last, this

  13. GISS Analysis of Surface Temperature Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J.; Ruedy, R.; Glascoe, J.; Sato, M.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the current GISS analysis of surface temperature change for the period 1880-1999 based primarily on meteorological station measurements. The global surface temperature in 1998 was the warmest in the period of instrumental data. The rate of temperature change was higher in the past 25 years than at any previous time in the period of instrumental data. The warmth of 1998 was too large and pervasive to be fully accounted for by the recent El Nino. Despite cooling in the first half of 1999, we suggest that the mean global temperature, averaged over 2-3 years, has moved to a higher level, analogous to the increase that occurred in the late 1970s. Warming in the United States over the past 50 years has been smaller than in most of the world, and over that period there was a slight cooling trend in the Eastern United States and the neighboring Atlantic Ocean. The spatial and temporal patterns of the temperature change suggest that more than one mechanism was involved in this regional cooling. The cooling trend in the United States, which began after the 1930s and is associated with ocean temperature change patterns, began to reverse after 1979. We suggest that further warming in the United States to a level rivaling the 1930s is likely in the next decade, but reliable prediction requires better understanding of decadal oscillations of ocean temperature.

  14. Multi-Dimensional Damage Detection for Surfaces and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Lewis, Mark; Roberson, Luke; Medelius, Pedro; Gibson, Tracy; Parks, Steen; Snyder, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Current designs for inflatable or semi-rigidized structures for habitats and space applications use a multiple-layer construction, alternating thin layers with thicker, stronger layers, which produces a layered composite structure that is much better at resisting damage. Even though such composite structures or layered systems are robust, they can still be susceptible to penetration damage. The ability to detect damage to surfaces of inflatable or semi-rigid habitat structures is of great interest to NASA. Damage caused by impacts of foreign objects such as micrometeorites can rupture the shell of these structures, causing loss of critical hardware and/or the life of the crew. While not all impacts will have a catastrophic result, it will be very important to identify and locate areas of the exterior shell that have been damaged by impacts so that repairs (or other provisions) can be made to reduce the probability of shell wall rupture. This disclosure describes a system that will provide real-time data regarding the health of the inflatable shell or rigidized structures, and information related to the location and depth of impact damage. The innovation described here is a method of determining the size, location, and direction of damage in a multilayered structure. In the multi-dimensional damage detection system, layers of two-dimensional thin film detection layers are used to form a layered composite, with non-detection layers separating the detection layers. The non-detection layers may be either thicker or thinner than the detection layers. The thin-film damage detection layers are thin films of materials with a conductive grid or striped pattern. The conductive pattern may be applied by several methods, including printing, plating, sputtering, photolithography, and etching, and can include as many detection layers that are necessary for the structure construction or to afford the detection detail level required. The damage is detected using a detector or

  15. Surface Deformation and Gravity Changes from Surface and Internal Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.; Fang, Ming

    2002-01-01

    Air and space borne remote sensing have made it possible to monitor the mass and energy transport at various scales within the cryosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere system. The recent surface mass balance (the rate of net gain of snow and ice at a geographic point) map for the Antarctic ice sheet is constructed by interpolating sparse in situ observations (about 1,800 points) with empirically calibrated satellite data of passive back emission of microwaves. The digital elevation model obtained from satellite radar altimetry is used to improve the delineation of the ice flow drainage basins. As important as these results are, the uncertainty remains up to about 2 mm/yr of eustatic sea level change with the net imbalance. In other words, we are still unable to determine even the sign of the contribution of the Antarctic ice sheet to contemporary sea level change. The problem is more likely with the discharge rather than accumulation.

  16. Detecting past changes of effective population size

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Natacha; Chevalet, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and predicting population abundance is a major challenge confronting scientists. Several genetic models have been developed using microsatellite markers to estimate the present and ancestral effective population sizes. However, to get an overview on the evolution of population requires that past fluctuation of population size be traceable. To address the question, we developed a new model estimating the past changes of effective population size from microsatellite by resolving coalescence theory and using approximate likelihoods in a Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach. The efficiency of the model and its sensitivity to gene flow and to assumptions on the mutational process were checked using simulated data and analysis. The model was found especially useful to provide evidence of transient changes of population size in the past. The times at which some past demographic events cannot be detected because they are too ancient and the risk that gene flow may suggest the false detection of a bottleneck are discussed considering the distribution of coalescence times. The method was applied on real data sets from several Atlantic salmon populations. The method called VarEff (Variation of Effective size) was implemented in the R package VarEff and is made available at https://qgsp.jouy.inra.fr and at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/VarEff. PMID:25067949

  17. The failure to detect tactile change: a tactile analogue of visual change blindness.

    PubMed

    Gallace, Alberto; Tan, Hong Z; Spence, Charles

    2006-04-01

    A large body of empirical research now shows that people are surprisingly poor at detecting significant changes in visually presented scenes. This phenomenon is known as change blindness in vision. A similar phenomenon occurs in audition, but to date no such effect has been documented in touch. In the present study, we explored the ability of people to detect changes introduced between two consecutively presented vibrotactile patterns presented over the body surface. The patterns consisted of two or three vibrotactile stimuli presented for 200 msec. The position of one of the vibrotactile stimuli composing the display was repeatedly changed (alternating between two different positions) on 50% of the trials, but the same pattern was presented repeatedly on the remaining trials. Three conditions were investigated: No interval between the patterns, an empty interval between the patterns, and a masked interval between the patterns. Change detection was near perfect in the no-interval block. Performance deteriorated somewhat in the empty-interval block, but by far the worst change detection performance occurred in the masked-interval block. These results demonstrate that "change blindness" can also affect tactile perception. PMID:16892998

  18. Point pattern match-based change detection in a constellation of previously detected objects

    DOEpatents

    Paglieroni, David W.

    2016-06-07

    A method and system is provided that applies attribute- and topology-based change detection to objects that were detected on previous scans of a medium. The attributes capture properties or characteristics of the previously detected objects, such as location, time of detection, detection strength, size, elongation, orientation, etc. The locations define a three-dimensional network topology forming a constellation of previously detected objects. The change detection system stores attributes of the previously detected objects in a constellation database. The change detection system detects changes by comparing the attributes and topological consistency of newly detected objects encountered during a new scan of the medium to previously detected objects in the constellation database. The change detection system may receive the attributes of the newly detected objects as the objects are detected by an object detection system in real time.

  19. Climate change signal analysis for Northeast Asian surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Hyeong; Kim, Byungsoo; Sohn, Keon-Tae; Kown, Won-Tae; Min, Seung-Ki

    2005-03-01

    Climate change detection, attribution, and prediction were studied for the surface temperature in the Northeast Asian region using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and three coupled-model simulations from ECHAM4/OPYC3, HadCM3, and CCCma GCMs (Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis general circulation model). The Bayesian fingerprint approach was used to perform the detection and attribution test for the anthropogenic climate change signal associated with changes in anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) and sulfate aerosol (SO{4/2-}) concentrations for the Northeast Asian temperature. It was shown that there was a weak anthropogenic climate change signal in the Northeast Asian temperature change. The relative contribution of CO2 and SO{4/2-} effects to total temperature change in Northeast Asia was quantified from ECHAM4/OPYC3 and CCCma GCM simulations using analysis of variance. For the observed temperature change for the period of 1959 1998, the CO2 effect contributed 10% 21% of the total variance and the direct cooling effect of SO{4/2-} played a less important role (0% 7%) than the CO2 effect. The prediction of surface temperature change was estimated from the second CO2+SO{4/2-} scenario run of ECHAM4/OPYC3 which has the least error in the simulation of the present-day temperature field near the Korean Peninsula. The result shows that the area-mean surface temperature near the Korean Peninsula will increase by about 1.1° by the 2040s relative to the 1990s.

  20. Groundwater storage change detection using micro-gravimetric technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Diasty, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, new perspectives and developments in applying a ground-based micro-gravimetric method to detect groundwater storage change in Waterloo Moraine are investigated. Four epochs of gravity survey were conducted using absolute gravimeter (FG5), two relative gravity meters (CG5) and two geodetic global positioning systems (GPS) in the Waterloo Moraine in May and August of 2010 and 2011, respectively. Data were processed using the parametric least-squares method and integrated with geological and hydrological studies. The gravity differences between May and August for 2010 and 2011 epochs were inverted to provide the estimated total water storage changes. Changes in soil water content obtained from land surface models of Ecological Assimilation of Land and Climate Observations (EALCO) and the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) program were employed to estimate the groundwater storage change. The ratios between the estimated groundwater storage changes and measured water table changes (specific yields) were determined at a local monitoring well located in the survey area. The results showed that the estimates of specific yields between May and August of 2010 and 2011 were consistent at a significant confidence level and are also within the range of the specific yield from geological and hydrological studies. Therefore, the micro-gravimetric (absolute and relative gravity meters) technology has demonstrated the great potential in detecting groundwater storage change and specific yield for local scale aquifers such as Waterloo Moraine.

  1. Detectability of Potentially Entrained Microorganisms at the Surface of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    New spectral measurements of bacteria taken at cryogenic temperatures provide insights on the surface composition of Europa as well as the detectability of microbes on the surface. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. SEASONAL CHANGES IN TITAN'S SURFACE TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Romani, P. N.; Hesman, B. E.; Carlson, R. C.; Gorius, N. J. P.; Coustenis, A.; Tokano, T.

    2011-08-10

    Seasonal changes in Titan's surface brightness temperatures have been observed by Cassini in the thermal infrared. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer measured surface radiances at 19 {mu}m in two time periods: one in late northern winter (LNW; L{sub s} = 335 deg.) and another centered on northern spring equinox (NSE; L{sub s} = 0 deg.). In both periods we constructed pole-to-pole maps of zonally averaged brightness temperatures corrected for effects of the atmosphere. Between LNW and NSE a shift occurred in the temperature distribution, characterized by a warming of {approx}0.5 K in the north and a cooling by about the same amount in the south. At equinox the polar surface temperatures were both near 91 K and the equator was at 93.4 K. We measured a seasonal lag of {Delta}L{sub S} {approx} 9{sup 0} in the meridional surface temperature distribution, consistent with the post-equinox results of Voyager 1 as well as with predictions from general circulation modeling. A slightly elevated temperature is observed at 65{sup 0} S in the relatively cloud-free zone between the mid-latitude and southern cloud regions.

  3. Seasonal Changes in Titan's Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennins, Donald E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Romani, P. N.; Hesman, B. E.; Carlson, R. C.; Gorius, N. J. P.; Coustenis, A.; Tokano, T.

    2011-01-01

    Seasonal changes in Titan's surface brightness temperatures have been observed by Cassini in the thermal infrared. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) measured surface radiances at 19 micron in two time periods: one in late northern winter (Ls = 335d eg) and another centered on northern spring equinox (Ls = 0 deg). In both periods we constructed pole-to-pole maps of zonally averaged brightness temperatures corrected for effects of the atmosphere. Between late northern winter and northern spring equinox a shift occurred in the temperature distribution, characterized by a warming of approximately 0.5 K in the north and a cooling by about the same amount in the south. At equinox the polar surface temperatures were both near 91 K and the equator was 93.4 K. We measured a seasonal lag of delta Ls approximately 9 in the meridional surface temperature distribution, consistent with the post-equinox results of Voyager 1 as well as with predictions from general circulation modeling. A slightly elevated temperature is observed at 65 deg S in the relatively cloud-free zone between the mid-latitude and southern cloud regions.

  4. Probing Interfacial Processes on Graphene Surface by Mass Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2013-03-01

    In this work we studied the mass density of graphene, probed interfacial processes on graphene surface and examined the formation of graphene oxide by mass detection. The graphene layers were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method on copper foils and transfer-printed on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The mass density of single layer graphene was measured by investigating the mechanical resonance of the QCM. Moreover, we extended the developed technique to probe the binding dynamics of proteins on the surface of graphene, were able to obtain nonspecific binding constant of BSA protein of graphene surface in aqueous solution. The time trace of resonance signal showed that the BSA molecules rapidly saturated by filling the available binding sites on graphene surface. Furthermore, we monitored oxidation of graphene surface under oxygen plasma by tracing the changes of interfacial mass of the graphene controlled by the shifts in Raman spectra. Three regimes were observed the formation of graphene oxide which increases the interfacial mass, the release of carbon dioxide and the removal of small graphene/graphene oxide flakes. Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) grant no. 110T304, 109T209, Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant (IRG) grant no 256458, Turkish Academy of Science (TUBA-Gebip).

  5. Surface Electronic Spectra Detected by Atomic Desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Henyk, Matthias; Hess, Wayne P.; Sushko, Petr V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2003-10-10

    Using continuously tunable laser excitation of KI we measure the velocity profiles and the yield of desorbing hyperthermal iodine atoms as a function of photon energy. Based on the theoretical model of desorption we demonstrate that these spectra display a signature of a surface exciton and constitute a new sensitive method of surface specific desorption spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that creation of surface excitions can be a much more general phenomenon than was previously thought based on extant spectroscopic measurements.

  6. Census cities experiment in urban change detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, J. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Work continues on mapping of 1970 urban land use from 1970 census contemporaneous aircraft photography. In addition, change detection analysis from 1972 aircraft photography is underway for several urban test sites. Land use maps, mosaics, and census overlays for the two largest urban test sites are nearing publication readiness. Preliminary examinations of ERTS-1 imagery of San Francisco Bay have been conducted which show that tracts of land of more than 10 acres in size which are undergoing development in an urban setting can be identified. In addition, each spectral band is being evaluated as to its utility for urban analyses. It has been found that MSS infrared band 7 helps to differentiate intra-urban land use details not found in other MSS bands or in the RBV coverage of the same scene. Good quality false CIR composites have been generated from 9 x 9 inch positive MSS bands using the Diazo process.

  7. Detection and Attribution of Regional Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, G; Mirin, A

    2007-01-19

    We developed a high resolution global coupled modeling capability to perform breakthrough studies of the regional climate change. The atmospheric component in our simulation uses a 1{sup o} latitude x 1.25{sup o} longitude grid which is the finest resolution ever used for the NCAR coupled climate model CCSM3. Substantial testing and slight retuning was required to get an acceptable control simulation. The major accomplishment is the validation of this new high resolution configuration of CCSM3. There are major improvements in our simulation of the surface wind stress and sea ice thickness distribution in the Arctic. Surface wind stress and ocean circulation in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current are also improved. Our results demonstrate that the FV version of the CCSM coupled model is a state of the art climate model whose simulation capabilities are in the class of those used for IPCC assessments. We have also provided 1000 years of model data to Scripps Institution of Oceanography to estimate the natural variability of stream flow in California. In the future, our global model simulations will provide boundary data to high-resolution mesoscale model that will be used at LLNL. The mesoscale model would dynamically downscale the GCM climate to regional scale on climate time scales.

  8. Attribute and topology based change detection in a constellation of previously detected objects

    DOEpatents

    Paglieroni, David W.; Beer, Reginald N.

    2016-01-19

    A system that applies attribute and topology based change detection to networks of objects that were detected on previous scans of a structure, roadway, or area of interest. The attributes capture properties or characteristics of the previously detected objects, such as location, time of detection, size, elongation, orientation, etc. The topology of the network of previously detected objects is maintained in a constellation database that stores attributes of previously detected objects and implicitly captures the geometrical structure of the network. A change detection system detects change by comparing the attributes and topology of new objects detected on the latest scan to the constellation database of previously detected objects.

  9. Change Detection Based on Persistent Scatterer Interferometry - a New Method of Monitoring Building Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. H.; Kenduiywo, B. K.; Soergel, U.

    2016-06-01

    Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) is a technique to detect a network of extracted persistent scatterer (PS) points which feature temporal phase stability and strong radar signal throughout time-series of SAR images. The small surface deformations on such PS points are estimated. PSI particularly works well in monitoring human settlements because regular substructures of man-made objects give rise to large number of PS points. If such structures and/or substructures substantially alter or even vanish due to big change like construction, their PS points are discarded without additional explorations during standard PSI procedure. Such rejected points are called big change (BC) points. On the other hand, incoherent change detection (ICD) relies on local comparison of multi-temporal images (e.g. image difference, image ratio) to highlight scene modifications of larger size rather than detail level. However, image noise inevitably degrades ICD accuracy. We propose a change detection approach based on PSI to synergize benefits of PSI and ICD. PS points are extracted by PSI procedure. A local change index is introduced to quantify probability of a big change for each point. We propose an automatic thresholding method adopting change index to extract BC points along with a clue of the period they emerge. In the end, PS ad BC points are integrated into a change detection image. Our method is tested at a site located around north of Berlin main station where steady, demolished, and erected building substructures are successfully detected. The results are consistent with ground truth derived from time-series of aerial images provided by Google Earth. In addition, we apply our technique for traffic infrastructure, business district, and sports playground monitoring.

  10. Piezoelectric theory of detection of surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinski, M.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a developed theory of computations and analysis of piezoelectric photothermal amplitude and phase spectra of semiconductors with surface defects states on one or both surfaces of the sample exhibiting energies in the energy gap region of a semiconductor. The theory comprises considerations of the front and rear experimental configurations. The presented theory is the extension of the Jackson Amer model for the case of many optically generated and spatially separated heat sources.

  11. Ensembles of detectors for online detection of transient changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemov, Alexey; Burnaev, Evgeny

    2015-12-01

    Classical change-point detection procedures assume a change-point model to be known and a change consisting in establishing a new observations regime, i.e. the change lasts infinitely long. These modeling assumptions contradicts applied problems statements. Therefore, even theoretically optimal statistics in practice very often fail when detecting transient changes online. In this work in order to overcome limitations of classical change-point detection procedures we consider approaches to constructing ensembles of change-point detectors, i.e. algorithms that use many detectors to reliably identify a change-point. We propose a learning paradigm and specific implementations of ensembles for change detection of short-term (transient) changes in observed time series. We demonstrate by means of numerical experiments that the performance of an ensemble is superior to that of the conventional change-point detection procedures.

  12. CONTAMINANT DETECTION ON POULTRY CARCASS SURFACES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A real-time imaging system has been developed to detect fecal contaminants on poultry carcasses. The system, which will require two to three multispectral cameras to fully image the outside of a poultry carcass, has shown promise in early trials. The system was developed from spectroscopic first p...

  13. LIC for Surface Flow Feature Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David L.; Bryson, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Line Integral Convolution (LIC) algorithm has received a lot of attention and interest. Yet, only a few of the current LIC related algorithms deal specifically with color textures for automatic detection of flow features. This paper provides an overview of research in this area.

  14. Eye Movements and Display Change Detection during Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slattery, Timothy J.; Angele, Bernhard; Rayner, Keith

    2011-01-01

    In the boundary change paradigm (Rayner, 1975), when a reader's eyes cross an invisible boundary location, a preview word is replaced by a target word. Readers are generally unaware of such changes due to saccadic suppression. However, some readers detect changes on a few trials and a small percentage of them detect many changes. Two experiments…

  15. Surface Temperatures on Titan; Changes During the Cassini Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Cottini, Valeria; Nixon, Conor A.

    2010-01-01

    Surface brightness temperatures on Titan measured by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard Cassini span the period from late northern winter to early spring. The CIRS observations cover all latitudes and can be used to study meridional changes with season. CIRS previously reported surface temperatures from 2004-2008 which were 93.7 K at the equator with decreases of 2 K toward the south pole and 3 K toward the north pole'. From a comparison of the equinox period with the earlier data, CIRS can now detect a seasonal shift in the latitudinal distribution of temperatures. Around the time of the equinox the meridional distribution was more symmetric about the equator than had been found earlier in the mission. The equatorial surface temperatures remained close to 94 K, but in the south the temperatures had decreased by about 0.5 K and in the north had increased by about 0.5 K. The CIRS equinox results are similar to what was seen near the previous vernal equinox by Voyager IRIS Z. The observed surface temperatures can help constrain the type of surface material by comparison with predictions from general circulation models. Of the three cases treated by Tokano t , our measurements most closely match a porous-ice regolith. As Cassini continues through Titan's northern spring CIRS will extend its temporal and spatial coverage and will continue to search for seasonal variations in surface temperature.

  16. Surface Functionalized Graphene Biosensor on Sapphire for Cancer Cell Detection.

    PubMed

    Joe, Daniel J; Hwang, Jeonghyun; Johnson, Christelle; Cha, Ho-Young; Lee, Jo-Won; Shen, Xiling; Spencer, Michael G; Tiwari, Sandip; Kim, Moonkyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has several unique physical, optical and electrical properties such as a two-dimensional (2D) planar structure, high optical transparency and high carrier mobility at room temperature. These make graphene interesting for electrical biosensing. Using a catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, graphene film is grown on a sapphire substrate. There is a single or a few sheets as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Electrical graphene biosensors are fabricated to detect large-sized biological analytes such as cancer cells. Human colorectal carcinoma cells are sensed by the resistance change of an active bio-functionalized graphene device as the cells are captured by the immobilized antibody surface. The functionalized sensors show an increase in resistance as large as ~20% of the baseline with a small number of adhered cells. This study suggests that the bio-functionalized electrical graphene sensors on sapphire, which is a highly transparent material, can potentially detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and monitor cellular electrical behavior while being compatible with fluorescence-based optical-detection bioassays. PMID:27398439

  17. Onboard Data Processor for Change-Detection Radar Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Yunling; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chien, Steve A.; Saatchi, Sasan S.; Clark, Duane

    2008-01-01

    A computer system denoted a change-detection onboard processor (CDOP) is being developed as a means of processing the digitized output of a synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) apparatus aboard an aircraft or spacecraft to generate images showing changes that have occurred in the terrain below between repeat passes of the aircraft or spacecraft over the terrain. When fully developed, the CDOP is intended to be capable of generating SAR images and/or SAR differential interferograms in nearly real time. The CDOP is expected to be especially useful for understanding some large-scale natural phenomena and/or mitigating natural hazards: For example, it could be used for near-real-time observation of surface changes caused by floods, landslides, forest fires, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, glaciers, and sea ice movements. It could also be used to observe such longer-term surface changes as those associated with growth of vegetation (relevant to estimation of wildfire fuel loads). The CDOP is, essentially, an interferometric SAR processor designed to operate aboard a radar platform.

  18. Volumetric Forest Change Detection Through Vhr Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, Devrim; Stylianidis, Efstratios; Smagas, Konstantinos; Hofer, Martin; Poli, Daniela; Gruen, Armin; Sanchez Martin, Victor; Altan, Orhan; Walli, Andreas; Jimeno, Elisa; Garcia, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Quick and economical ways of detecting of planimetric and volumetric changes of forest areas are in high demand. A research platform, called FORSAT (A satellite processing platform for high resolution forest assessment), was developed for the extraction of 3D geometric information from VHR (very-high resolution) imagery from satellite optical sensors and automatic change detection. This 3D forest information solution was developed during a Eurostars project. FORSAT includes two main units. The first one is dedicated to the geometric and radiometric processing of satellite optical imagery and 2D/3D information extraction. This includes: image radiometric pre-processing, image and ground point measurement, improvement of geometric sensor orientation, quasiepipolar image generation for stereo measurements, digital surface model (DSM) extraction by using a precise and robust image matching approach specially designed for VHR satellite imagery, generation of orthoimages, and 3D measurements in single images using mono-plotting and in stereo images as well as triplets. FORSAT supports most of the VHR optically imagery commonly used for civil applications: IKONOS, OrbView - 3, SPOT - 5 HRS, SPOT - 5 HRG, QuickBird, GeoEye-1, WorldView-1/2, Pléiades 1A/1B, SPOT 6/7, and sensors of similar type to be expected in the future. The second unit of FORSAT is dedicated to 3D surface comparison for change detection. It allows users to import digital elevation models (DEMs), align them using an advanced 3D surface matching approach and calculate the 3D differences and volume changes between epochs. To this end our 3D surface matching method LS3D is being used. FORSAT is a single source and flexible forest information solution with a very competitive price/quality ratio, allowing expert and non-expert remote sensing users to monitor forests in three and four dimensions from VHR optical imagery for many forest information needs. The capacity and benefits of FORSAT have been tested in

  19. Surface Changes on Io during the Galileo Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P.; McEwen, A.; Phillips, C.; Keszthelyi, L.; Spencer, J.

    2003-04-01

    A careful survey of Galileo SSI global monitoring images revealed more than 80 apparent surface changes that took place on Io during the 5 year period of observation, ranging from giant plume deposits to subtle changes in the color or albedo of patera surfaces. Explosive volcanic activity was discovered at four previously unrecognized centers: an un-named patera to the south of Karei that produced a Pele-sized red ring, a patera to the west of Zal that produced a small circular bright deposit, a large orange ring detected near the north pole of Io, and a small bright ring near Io's south pole. Only a handful of Io's many active volcanoes produced large scale explosive eruptions, and several of these erupted repeatedly, leaving at least 83% of Io's surface unaltered throughout the Galileo mission. Most of the hot spots detected from SSI, NIMS and groundbased thermal observations caused no noticeable surface changes greater than 10 km in extent over the five year period. Surface changes were found at every location where active plumes were identified, including Acala which was never seen in sunlight and was only detected through auroral emissions during eclipse. Two types of plumes are distinguished on the basis of the size and color of their deposits, confirming post-Voyager suggestions by McEwen and Soderblom (1983). Smaller plumes produce near-circular rings typically 150 to 200 km in radius that are white or yellow in color unless contaminated with silicates, and frequently coat their surroundings with frosts of fine-grained SO2. The larger plumes are much less numerous, limited to a half dozen examples, and produce oval, orange or red, sulfur- rich rings with maximum radii in the north-south direction that are typically in the range from 500 to 550 km. Both types of plumes can be either episodic or quasi-continuous over a five year period. Repeated eruptions of the smaller SO2-rich plumes likely contribute significantly to Io's resurfacing rate, whereas dust

  20. Surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, Paul; McEwen, Alfred; Phillips, Cynthia; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Spencer, John

    2004-05-01

    A careful survey of Galileo SSI global monitoring images revealed more than 80 apparent surface changes that took place on Io during the 5 year period of observation, ranging from giant plume deposits to subtle changes in the color or albedo of patera surfaces. Explosive volcanic activity was discovered at four previously unrecognized centers: an unnamed patera to the south of Karei that produced a Pele-sized red ring, a patera to the west of Zal that produced a small circular bright deposit, a large orange ring detected near the north pole of Io, and a small bright ring near Io's south pole. Only a handful of Io's many active volcanoes produced large scale explosive eruptions, and several of these erupted repeatedly, leaving at least 83% of Io's surface unaltered throughout the Galileo mission. Most of the hot spots detected from SSI, NIMS and ground-based thermal observations caused no noticeable surface changes greater than 10 km in extent over the five year period. Surface changes were found at every location where active plumes were identified, including Acala which was never seen in sunlight and was only detected through auroral emissions during eclipse. Two types of plumes are distinguished on the basis of the size and color of their deposits, confirming post-Voyager suggestions by McEwen and Soderblom [Icarus 55 (1983) 191]. Smaller plumes produce near-circular rings typically 150-200 km in radius that are white or yellow in color unless contaminated with silicates, and frequently coat their surroundings with frosts of fine-grained SO 2. The larger plumes are much less numerous, limited to a half dozen examples, and produce oval, orange or red, sulfur-rich rings with maximum radii in the north-south direction that are typically in the range from 500 to 550 km. Both types of plumes can be either episodic or quasi-continuous over a five year period. Repeated eruptions of the smaller SO 2-rich plumes likely contribute significantly to Io's resurfacing rate

  1. Surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.; McEwen, A.; Phillips, C.; Keszthelyi, L.; Spencer, J.

    2004-01-01

    A careful survey of Galileo SSI global monitoring images revealed more than 80 apparent surface changes that took place on Io during the 5 year period of observation, ranging from giant plume deposits to subtle changes in the color or albedo of Patera surfaces. Explosive volcanic activity was discovered at four previously unrecognized centers: an unnamed patera to the south of Karei that produced a Pele-sized red ring, a patera to the west of Zal that produced a small circular bright deposit, a large orange ring detected near the north pole of Io, and a small bright ring near Io's south pole. Only a handful of Io's many active volcanoes produced large scale explosive eruptions, and several of these erupted repeatedly, leaving at least 83% of Io's surface unaltered throughout the Galileo mission. Most of the hot spots detected from SSI, NIMS and ground-based thermal observations caused no noticeable surface changes greater than 10 km in extent over the five year period. Surface changes were found at every location where active plumes were identified, including Acala which was never seen in sunlight and was only detected through auroral emissions during eclipse. Two types of plumes are distinguished on the basis of the size and color of their deposits, confirming post-Voyager suggestions by McEwen and Soderblom [Icarus 55 (1983) 191]. Smaller plumes produce near-circular rings typically 150-200 km in radius that are white or yellow in color unless contaminated with silicates, and frequently coat their surroundings with frosts of fine-grained SO2. The larger plumes are much less numerous, limited to a half dozen examples, and produce oval, orange or red, sulfur-rich rings with maximum radii in the north-south direction that are typically in the range from 500 to 550 km. Both types of plumes can be either episodic or quasi-continuous over a five year period. Repeated eruptions of the smaller SO2-rich plumes likely contribute significantly to Io's resurfacing rate

  2. Evaluation of change detection techniques for monitoring coastal zone environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weismiller, R. A.; Kristof, S. J.; Scholz, D. K.; Anuta, P. E.; Momin, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    Development of satisfactory techniques for detecting change in coastal zone environments is required before operational monitoring procedures can be established. In an effort to meet this need a study was directed toward developing and evaluating different types of change detection techniques, based upon computer aided analysis of LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS) data, to monitor these environments. The Matagorda Bay estuarine system along the Texas coast was selected as the study area. Four change detection techniques were designed and implemented for evaluation: (1) post classification comparison change detection, (2) delta data change detection, (3) spectral/temporal change classification, and (4) layered spectral/temporal change classification. Each of the four techniques was used to analyze a LANDSAT MSS temporal data set to detect areas of change of the Matagorda Bay region.

  3. Object-Oriented Change Detection Based on Multi-Scale Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yonghong; Zhou, Mingting; Jinshan, Ye

    2016-06-01

    The change detection of remote sensing images means analysing the change information quantitatively and recognizing the change types of the surface coverage data in different time phases. With the appearance of high resolution remote sensing image, object-oriented change detection method arises at this historic moment. In this paper, we research multi-scale approach for high resolution images, which includes multi-scale segmentation, multi-scale feature selection and multi-scale classification. Experimental results show that this method has a stronger advantage than the traditional single-scale method of high resolution remote sensing image change detection.

  4. Detecting surface faults on solar mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argoud, M. J.; Shumate, M. S.; Walker, W. L.; Zanteson, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two quality control tests determine reflectivity and curvature faults of concave solar mirrors. Curvature defects in solar mirrors are easily revealed by photographing mirror surface. Calibrated aperture placed in front of camera lens admits rays reflecting only from acceptable areas of mirror, blocking out diverging rays reflected from defective areas. Defects can pinpoint problems that may exist in production. Same photograph can be obtained using calibrated disk instead of aperture, except that, this time, only defective areas would be exposed.

  5. Detection of temporal changes in earthquake rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touati, S.

    2012-12-01

    Many statistical analyses of earthquake rates and time-dependent forecasting of future rates involve the detection of changes in the basic rate of events, independent of the fluctuations caused by aftershock sequences. We examine some of the statistical techniques for inferring these changes, using both real and synthetic earthquake data to check the statistical significance of these inferences. One common method is to use the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) to choose between a single model and a double model with a changepoint; this criterion evaluates the strength of the fit and incorporates a penalty for the extra parameters. We test this method on many realisations of the ETAS model, with and without changepoints present, to see how often it chooses the correct model. A more rigorous method is to calculate the Bayesian evidence, or marginal likelihood, for each model and then compare these. The evidence is essentially the likelihood of the model integrated over the whole of the model space, giving a measure of how likely the data is for that model. It does not rely on estimation of best-fit parameters, making it a better comparator than the AIC; Occam's razor also arises naturally in this process due to the fact that more complex models tend to be able to explain a larger range of observations, and therefore the relative likelihood of any particular observations will be smaller than for a simpler model. Evidence can be calculated using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques. We compare these two approaches on synthetic data. We also look at the 1997-98 Colfiorito sequence in Umbria-Marche, Italy, using maximum likelihood to fit the ETAS model and then simulating the ETAS model to create synthetic versions of the catalogue for comparison. We simulate using ensembles of parameter values sampled from the posterior for each parameter, with the largest events artificially inserted, to compare the resultant event rates, inter-event time distributions and other

  6. A modified approach for change detection using change vector analysis in posterior probability space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzouzi, S. A.; Vidal, A.; Bentounes, H. A.

    2015-04-01

    The multispectral and multitemporal data coming from satellites allow us to extract valuable spatiotemporal change. Consequently, Earth surface change detection analysis has been used in the past to monitor land cover changes caused by different reasons. Several techniques have been used for that purpose and change vector analysis (CVA) has been frequently employed to carry out automatic spatiotemporal information extraction. This work describes a modified methodology based on Supervised Change Vector Analysis in Posterior probability Space (SCVAPS) with the final aim of obtaining a change detection map in Blida, Algeria. The proposed technique is a Modified version of Supervised Change Vector Analysis Posterior probability Space (MSCVAPS) and it is applied at the same region that the original technique studied in the literature. The classical Maximum Likelihood classifier is the selected method for supervised classification since it provides good properties in the posterior probability map. An improved method for threshold determination based on Double Flexible Pace Search (DFPS) is proposed in this work and it is employed to obtain the most adequate threshold value. Then, the MSCVAPS approach is evaluated by two cases study of the land cover change detection in the region of Blida, Algeria, and in the region of Shunyi District, Beijing, China, using a pair of Landsat Thematic Mapper images and pair of Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper images, respectively. The final evaluation is given by the overall accuracy of changed and unchanged pixels and the kappa coefficient. The results show that the modified approach gives excellent results using the same area of study that was selected in the literature.

  7. Beam distortion detection and deflectometry measurements of gigahertz surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Higuet, Julien; Valier-Brasier, Tony; Dehoux, Thomas; Audoin, Bertrand

    2011-11-01

    Gigahertz acoustic waves propagating on the surface of a metal halfspace are detected using different all-optical detection schemes, namely, deflectometry and beam distortion detection techniques. Both techniques are implemented by slightly modifying a conventional reflectometric setup. They are then based on the measurement of the reflectivity change but unlike reflectometric measurements, they give access to the sample surface displacement. A semi-analytical model, taking into account optical, thermal, and mechanical processes responsible for acoustic waves generation, allows analyzing the physical content of the detected waveforms. PMID:22129002

  8. First-Trimester Detection of Surface Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Rousian, Melek; Koning, Anton H. J.; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Eggink, Alex J.; Cornette, Jérôme M. J.; Schoonderwaldt, Ernst M.; Husen-Ebbinge, Margreet; Teunissen, Katinka K.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Exalto, Niek

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to determine the diagnostic performance of 3-dimensional virtual reality ultrasound (3D_VR_US) and conventional 2- and 3-dimensional ultrasound (2D/3D_US) for first-trimester detection of structural abnormalities. Forty-eight first trimester cases (gold standard available, 22 normal, 26 abnormal) were evaluated offline using both techniques by 5 experienced, blinded sonographers. In each case, we analyzed whether each organ category was correctly indicated as normal or abnormal and whether the specific diagnosis was correctly made. Sensitivity in terms of normal or abnormal was comparable for both techniques (P = .24). The general sensitivity for specific diagnoses was 62.6% using 3D_VR_US and 52.2% using 2D/3D_US (P = .075). The 3D_VR_US more often correctly diagnosed skeleton/limb malformations (36.7% vs 10%; P = .013). Mean evaluation time in 3D_VR_US was 4:24 minutes and in 2D/3D_US 2:53 minutes (P < .001). General diagnostic performance of 3D_VR_US and 2D/3D_US apparently is comparable. Malformations of skeleton and limbs are more often detected using 3D_VR_US. Evaluation time is longer in 3D_VR_US. PMID:24440996

  9. Surface Inspection Tool for Optical Detection of Surface Defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark; Youngquist, Robert; Dyer, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter windows were damaged both by micrometeor impacts and by handling, and required careful inspection before they could be reused. The launch commit criteria required that no defect be deeper than a critical depth. The shuttle program used a refocus microscope to perform a quick pass/fail determination, and then followed up with mold impressions to better quantify any defect. However, the refocus microscope is slow and tedious to use due to its limited field of view, only focusing on one small area of glass at a time. Additionally, the unit is bulky and unable to be used in areas with tight access, such as defects near the window frame or on the glass inside the Orbiter due to interference with the dashboard. The surface inspection tool is a low-profile handheld instrument that provides two digital video images on a computer for monitoring surface defects. The first image is a wide-angle view to assist the user in locating defects. The second provides an enlarged view of a defect centered in the window of the first image. The focus is adjustable for each of the images. However, the enlarged view was designed to have a focal plane with a short depth. This allows the user to get a feel for the depth of different parts of the defect under inspection as the focus control is varied. A light source is also provided to illuminate the defect, precluding the need for separate lighting tools. The software provides many controls to adjust image quality, along with the ability to zoom digitally the images and to capture and store them for later processing.

  10. Methods and systems for detection of ice formation on surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Wang, Wubao (Inventor); Sztul, Henry (Inventor); Budansky, Yury (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A system for detecting ice formation on metal, painted metal and other material surfaces can include a transparent window having an exterior surface upon which ice can form; a light source and optics configured and arranged to illuminate the exterior surface of the window from behind the exterior surface; and a detector and optics configured and arranged to receive light backscattered by the exterior surface and any ice disposed on the exterior surface and determine the thickness of the ice layer. For example, the system can be used with aircraft by placing one or more windows in the wings of the aircraft. The system is used for a novel optical method for real-time on-board detection and warning of ice formation on surfaces of airplanes, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and other vehicles and stationary structures to improve their safety and operation.

  11. Detecting holocene changes in thermohaline circulation.

    PubMed

    Keigwin, L D; Boyle, E A

    2000-02-15

    Throughout the last glacial cycle, reorganizations of deep ocean water masses were coincident with rapid millennial-scale changes in climate. Climate changes have been less severe during the present interglacial, but evidence for concurrent deep ocean circulation change is ambiguous. PMID:10677463

  12. Cosmic dust detection with large surface piezoceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weishaupt, U.

    1986-01-01

    Piezoelectric transducers mounted on targets made out of metal plates or plastic foils have been used in many former space missions to detect impacting dust particles and to determine some of their parameters (e.g., momentum). The proposed detector is based on a large disc made out of piezoceramic material. Dust particles impacting on the detector will cause electrical charge pulses due to the piezoelectric nature of the target material. These charge pulses are measured on the electrodes of the disc and transformed with a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) to voltage pulses. Counting the number of pulses leads to the dust-flux impacting on the detector. Additionally the amplitude and the rise time of the pulse slopes are determinated to evaluate the momentum and the size of the dust particles. Due to the high charge production rate per force unit of piezoceramics and momentum transfer without loss the sensivity of this acoustic sensor is very high. A method to derive size and momentum from the rising slope of an acoustic signal is described.

  13. Change detection on a hunch: pre-attentive vision allows "sensing" of unique feature changes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Felix; Busch, Niko A

    2015-11-01

    Studies on change detection and change blindness have investigated the nature of visual representations by testing the conditions under which observers are able to detect when an object in a complex scene changes from one moment to the next. Several authors have proposed that change detection can occur without identification of the changing object, but the perceptual processes underlying this phenomenon are currently unknown. We hypothesized that change detection without localization or identification occurs when the change happens outside the focus of attention. Such changes would usually go entirely unnoticed, unless the change brings about a modification of one of the feature maps representing the scene. Thus, the appearance or disappearance of a unique feature might be registered even in the absence of focused attention and without feature binding, allowing for change detection, but not localization or identification. We tested this hypothesis in three experiments, in which changes either involved colors that were already present elsewhere in the display or entirely unique colors. Observers detected whether any change had occurred and then localized or identified the change. Change detection without localization occurred almost exclusively when changes involved a unique color. Moreover, change detection without localization for unique feature changes was independent of the number of objects in the display and independent of change identification. These findings suggest that pre-attentive registration of a change on a feature map can give rise to a conscious experience even when feature binding has failed: that something has changed without knowing what or where. PMID:26353860

  14. Laser spectrum detection methods for substance of Mars surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Xue, Bin; Zhao, Yi-yi

    2014-11-01

    The chemical element and mineral rock's abundance and distribution are the basic material of planetary geology evolution research [1], hence preterit detection for composition of Mars surface substance contains both elements sorts and mineral ingredients. This article introduced new ways to detect Mars elements and mineral components, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman Spectroscopy (RS) which have distinct advantages, such as work over a long distance, detect rapidly, accuratly and nondestructively. LIBS and RS both use laser excitation to shoot the substance of Mars exciting new wavelengths. The techniques of LIBS and RS in laboratory are mature, besides the technique of LIBS is being used in MSL (Chemcam) now and RS will be used in ExoMars. Comparing LIBS and RS's detection results with XRF and APXS, Mossbauer spectrometer, these existed Mars surface material detection instruments,and the Infrared spectrometer, Mid-IR, they have more accurate detection results. So LIBS and RS are competent for Mars surface substance detection instead of X-ray spectrometer and Mossbauer spectrometer which were already used in 'Viking 1' and 'Opportunity'. Only accurate detection results about Mars surface substance can lead to scientist's right analysis in inversing geological evolution of the planet.

  15. Visible Hyperspectral Imaging for Standoff Detection of Explosives on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Mendoza, Albert; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2010-11-01

    There is an ever-increasing need to be able to detect the presence of explosives, preferably from standoff distances. This paper presents an application of visible hyperspectral imaging using anomaly, polarization and spectral identification approaches for the standoff detection (13 meters) of nitroaromatic explosives on realistic painted surfaces based upon the colorimetric differences between tetryl and TNT which are enhanced by solar irradiation.

  16. Detection of multiscale pockets on protein surfaces using mathematical morphology.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Takeshi

    2010-04-01

    Detection of pockets on protein surfaces is an important step toward finding the binding sites of small molecules. In a previous study, we defined a pocket as a space into which a small spherical probe can enter, but a large probe cannot. The radius of the large probes corresponds to the shallowness of pockets. We showed that each type of binding molecule has a characteristic shallowness distribution. In this study, we introduced fundamental changes to our previous algorithm by using a 3D grid representation of proteins and probes, and the theory of mathematical morphology. We invented an efficient algorithm for calculating deep and shallow pockets (multiscale pockets) simultaneously, using several different sizes of spherical probes (multiscale probes). We implemented our algorithm as a new program, ghecom (grid-based HECOMi finder). The statistics of calculated pockets for the structural dataset showed that our program had a higher performance of detecting binding pockets, than four other popular pocket-finding programs proposed previously. The ghecom also calculates the shallowness of binding ligands, R(inaccess) (minimum radius of inaccessible spherical probes) that can be obtained from the multiscale molecular volume. We showed that each part of the binding molecule had a bias toward a specific range of shallowness. These findings will be useful for predicting the types of molecules that will be most likely to bind putative binding pockets, as well as the configurations of binding molecules. The program ghecom is available through the Web server (http://biunit.naist.jp/ghecom). PMID:19938154

  17. A micromachined surface acoustic wave sensor for detecting inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Hersam, M.; Ross, C.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors must be specifically designed for each application because many variables directly affect the acoustic wave velocity. In the present work, the authors have designed, fabricated, and tested an SAW sensor for detection of metastable states of He. The sensor consists of two sets of micromachined interdigitated transducers (IDTs) and delay lines fabricated by photolithography on a single Y-cut LiNbO{sub 3} substrate oriented for Z-propagation of the SAWs. One set is used as a reference and the other set employs a delay line coated with a titanium-based thin film sensitive to electrical conductivity changes when exposed to metastable states of He. The reference sensor is used to obtain a true frequency translation in relation to a voltage controlled oscillator. An operating frequency of 109 MHz has been used, and the IDT finger width is 8 {micro}m. Variation in electrical conductivity of the thin film at the delay line due to exposure to He is detected as a frequency shift in the assembly, which is then used as a measure of the amount of metastable He exposed to the sensing film on the SAW delay line. A variation in the He pressure versus frequency shifts indicates the extent of the metastable He interaction.

  18. Localized surface plasmon resonance mercury detection system and methods

    DOEpatents

    James, Jay; Lucas, Donald; Crosby, Jeffrey Scott; Koshland, Catherine P.

    2016-03-22

    A mercury detection system that includes a flow cell having a mercury sensor, a light source and a light detector is provided. The mercury sensor includes a transparent substrate and a submonolayer of mercury absorbing nanoparticles, e.g., gold nanoparticles, on a surface of the substrate. Methods of determining whether mercury is present in a sample using the mercury sensors are also provided. The subject mercury detection systems and methods find use in a variety of different applications, including mercury detecting applications.

  19. Passive standoff detection of chemical warfare agents on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Thériault, Jean-Marc; Puckrin, Eldon; Hancock, Jim; Lecavalier, Pierre; Lepage, Carmela Jackson; Jensen, James O

    2004-11-01

    Results are presented on the passive standoff detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) liquid agents on surfaces by the Fourier-transform IR radiometry. This study was performed during surface contamination trials at Defence Research and Development Canada-Suffield in September 2002. The goal was to verify that passive long-wave IR spectrometric sensors can potentially remotely detect surfaces contaminated with CW agents. The passive sensor, the Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, was used in the trial to obtain laboratory and field measurements of CW liquid agents, HD and VX. The agents were applied to high-reflectivity surfaces of aluminum, low-reflectivity surfaces of Mylar, and several other materials including an armored personnel carrier. The field measurements were obtained at a standoff distance of 60 m from the target surfaces. Results indicate that liquid contaminant agents deposited on high-reflectivity surfaces can be detected, identified, and possibly quantified with passive sensors. For low-reflectivity surfaces the presence of the contaminants can usually be detected; however, their identification based on simple correlations with the absorption spectrum of the pure contaminant is not possible. PMID:15540446

  20. Passive Standoff Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thériault, Jean-Marc; Puckrin, Eldon; Hancock, Jim; Lecavalier, Pierre; Lepage, Carmela Jackson; Jensen, James O.

    2004-11-01

    Results are presented on the passive standoff detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) liquid agents on surfaces by the Fourier-transform IR radiometry. This study was performed during surface contamination trials at Defence Research and Development Canada-Suffield in September 2002. The goal was to verify that passive long-wave IR spectrometric sensors can potentially remotely detect surfaces contaminated with CW agents. The passive sensor, the Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, was used in the trial to obtain laboratory and field measurements of CW liquid agents, HD and VX. The agents were applied to high-reflectivity surfaces of aluminum, low-reflectivity surfaces of Mylar, and several other materials including an armored personnel carrier. The field measurements were obtained at a standoff distance of 60 m from the target surfaces. Results indicate that liquid contaminant agents deposited on high-reflectivity surfaces can be detected, identified, and possibly quantified with passive sensors. For low-reflectivity surfaces the presence of the contaminants can usually be detected; however, their identification based on simple correlations with the absorption spectrum of the pure contaminant is not possible.

  1. A Terrestrial Surface Climate Data Record for Global Change Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermote, E.; Justice, C. O.; Claverie, M.; Csiszar, I. A.; Meyer, D. J.; Myneni, R.; Baret, F.; Masuoka, E.; Wolfe, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents results from a project to produce, validate and distribute a global land surface Climate Data Record (CDR) using a combination of mature and tested algorithms and the best available polar orbiting satellite data from the past to the present (1981-2012), which can be extendable into the JPSS era. The data record consists of one fundamental climate data record (FCDR), the surface reflectance product. Two Thematic CDRs (TCDRs) are also be derived from the FCDR, the normalized difference vegetation index (VI) and LAI/fAPAR. These two products are used extensively for climate change research and are listed as Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). In addition, these products are used in a number of applications of long-term societal benefit. The two TCDRs are used to assess the performance of the FCDR through a rigorous validation program and will provide feedback on the requirements for the Surface Reflectance FCDR. We will focus in this presentation on the progress made so far, the discussion of the performance of version 3.0 of the product and the subsequent improvements and schedule for release of version 4.0. We will also present in detail the mechanisms for product generation, distribution, quality control, uncertainties assessment for this Terrestrial Climate Data Record. We will finally present practical applications of this dataset to forest cover change detection over the long term as well as drought monitoring in the context of agricultural production and food security.

  2. Change Detection Module for New Orleans City of USA Using

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dharmendra

    accuracy. The New Orleans city of USA is taken as study area because this is reported that this city is shrinking. RADARSAT SLC (Single look complex) images acquired from January 2002 to March 2007 were obtained for the study area. Image pairs with perpendicular baselines less than 100 km are chosen. Selection of suitable image pairs is crucial since baseline distance between them affects the altitude ambiguity in resultant change detection map. Coherence is computed for the image pairs. If the coherence is greater than 0.25, such image pairs are considered for further analysis. Three pass differential InSAR is used for the analysis of change detection. Images 1 and 2 of the study area with lesser temporal span (minimum of 24 day interval) is chosen to make a digital elevation model and then images 1 and 3 of the same area with one year of temporal span is chosen to make an interferogram. The topographic phase estimated with images 1 and 2 is then subtracted to make a differential interferogram showing change from image 2 to 3. Image pairs with approximately one month temporal span, are considered for generating interferogram. Changes occurred in every one year is measured by subtracting topographic phase of the year corresponding to master image, from interferogram. From the change detection map obtained from both methods show that areas of larger changes are identified near Lake Borgne, and in the boundaries of Mississippi river. Lake Borgne is reported to be identified as an area of major land subsidence as found by other studies also. On comparing our result with this interferometric study, it is found that both are showing some common regions with high changes near water bodies. Surface deformation can be monitored quantitatively in the scale of mm with the help of temporal analysis of D-InSAR.

  3. A Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a prior surface reflectance database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lin; Wei, Jing; Wang, Jian; Mi, Xueting; Guo, Yamin; Lv, Yang; Yang, Yikun; Gan, Ping; Zhou, Xueying; Jia, Chen; Tian, Xinpeng

    2016-06-01

    Conventional cloud detection methods are easily affected by mixed pixels, complex surface structures, and atmospheric factors, resulting in poor cloud detection results. To minimize these problems, a new Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a priori surface reflectance database is proposed in this paper. A monthly surface reflectance database is constructed using long-time-sequenced MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface reflectance product (MOD09A1) to provide the surface reflectance of the underlying surfaces. The relationships between the apparent reflectance changes and the surface reflectance are simulated under different observation and atmospheric conditions with the 6S (Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum) model, and the dynamic threshold cloud detection models are developed. Two typical remote sensing data with important application significance and different sensor parameters, MODIS and Landsat 8, are selected for cloud detection experiments. The results were validated against the visual interpretation of clouds and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation cloud measurements. The results showed that the UDTCDA can obtain a high precision in cloud detection, correctly identifying cloudy pixels and clear-sky pixels at rates greater than 80% with error rate and missing rate of less than 20%. The UDTCDA cloud product overall shows less estimation uncertainty than the current MODIS cloud mask products. Moreover, the UDTCDA can effectively reduce the effects of atmospheric factors and mixed pixels and can be applied to different satellite sensors to realize long-term, large-scale cloud detection operations.

  4. Geocentric position preliminary detection from the extreme ultraviolet images of Chang'E-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chen; Ping, Jinsong; Wang, Mingyuan; Li, Wenxiao

    2015-08-01

    An Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Camera was installed onboard the Chinese lunar surface landing mission, the Chang'E-3 lander, as a useful method to observe the Earth plasmasphere. This EUV optical payload obtained more than 600 moon-based Earth plasmasphere images since December 14, 2013. However, due to errors of unknown size and origin in the platform attitude control of the lander and in the EUV telescope pointing control during the mission operating periods, the geocentric coordinates in these EUV images are not fixed in the same position of CCD pixel. Before adequately calibrating, these positioning offsets will introduce extra errors into the analysis of the plasmaspheric structure. With only a little insufficient telemetry information, an effective calibrating method of circle-based differential algorithm is suggested and demonstrated, for automatically and precisely detecting the geocentric position in each EUV image of Chang'E-3 mission. In each EUV image, the tested method uses the outline of a circle as the basic unit to capture the contour for the bright region based on the spectral characteristic. Then, the center of the extracted circle is adopted as the geocentric position for the image. The preliminary analysis shows that this method can effectively detect the geocentric position being always consistent with the recognition result by the basic hand labor method. It is found that the radius of the circles varies from month to month from December, 2013 to May, 2014. The monthly averages of radius show relative notable positive correlation and negative correlation with the changes of both Zenith angle of the Earth at the landing area of Chang'E-3 lander, and the Earth-moon distance, respectively. This method and results here will benefit the Chang'E-3 EUV study.

  5. An example of fingerprint detection of greenhouse climate changes

    SciTech Connect

    Karoly, D.J.; Cohen, J.A.; Meehl, G.A.

    1994-07-01

    As an example of the technique of fingerprint detection of greenhouse climate change, a multivariate signal or fingerprint of the enhanced greenhouse effect is defined using the zonal mean atmospheric temperature change as a function of height and latitude between equilibrium climate model simulations with control and doubled CO{sub 2} concentrations. This signal is compared with observed atmospheric temperature variations over the period 1963 to 1988 from radiosonde-based global analyses. There is a signiificant increase of this greenhouse signal in the observational data over this period. These results must be treated with caution. Upper air data are available for a short period only, possibly, to be able to resolve any real greenhouse climate change. The greenhouse fingerprint used in this study may not be unique to the enhanced greenhouse effect and may be due to other forcing mechanisms. However, it is shown that the patterns of atmospheric temperature change associated with uniform global increases of sea surface temperature, with El Nino-Southern Oscillation events and with decreases of stratospheric ozone concentrations individually are different from the greenhouse fingerprint used here. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Occupancy change detection system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, David J; Few, Douglas A

    2009-09-01

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

  7. Water-surface object detection and classification using imaging polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harchanko, John S.; Chenault, David B.

    2005-08-01

    Data from a recent "first-look" at using Long Wave InfraRed Imaging Polarimetry (LWIR-IP) to detect surface swimmers is presented and discussed. A significant increase in detection SNR over conventional IR imaging techniques was discovered. The physical phenomena that produces the increased SNR is discussed along with data that shows range effects and their degradation on the SNR. Most significantly, a method to classify the detected object using the same dataset is discussed. Augmenting current swimmer detection systems using this technique will likely significantly decrease the false alarm rates of the system, thus saving manpower resources and preserving force readiness.

  8. Design of a surface-scanning coil detector for direct bacteria detection on food surfaces using a magnetoelastic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yating; Wikle, Howard C.; Wang, Zhenyu; Horikawa, Shin; Best, Steve; Cheng, Zhongyang; Dyer, Dave F.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2013-09-01

    The real-time, in-situ bacteria detection on food surfaces was achieved by using a magnetoelastic biosensor combined with a surface-scanning coil detector. This paper focuses on the coil design for signal optimization. The coil was used to excite the sensor's vibration and detect its resonant frequency signal. The vibrating sensor creates a magnetic flux change around the coil, which then produces a mutual inductance. In order to enhance the signal amplitude, a theory of the sensor's mutual inductance with the measurement coil is proposed. Both theoretical calculations and experimental data showed that the working length of the coil has a significant effect on the signal amplitude. For a 1 mm-long sensor, a coil with a working length of 1.3 mm showed the best signal amplitude. The real-time detection of Salmonella bacteria on a fresh food surface was demonstrated using this new technology.

  9. Detection of ocean color changes from high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovis, W. A.; Forman, M. L.; Blaine, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    The detection of ocean color changes, thought to be due to chlorophyll concentrations and gelbstoffe variations, is attempted from high altitude (11.3km) and low altitude (0.3km). The atmospheric back scattering is shown to reduce contrast, but not sufficiently to obscure color change detection at high altitudes.

  10. The detection of intestinal spike activity on surface electroenterograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye-Lin, Y.; Garcia-Casado, J.; Martinez-de-Juan, J. L.; Prats-Boluda, G.; Ponce, J. L.

    2010-02-01

    Myoelectrical recording could provide an alternative technique for assessing intestinal motility, which is a topic of great interest in gastroenterology since many gastrointestinal disorders are associated with intestinal dysmotility. The pacemaker activity (slow wave, SW) of the electroenterogram (EEnG) has been detected in abdominal surface recordings, although the activity related to bowel contractions (spike bursts, SB) has to date only been detected in experimental models with artificially favored electrical conductivity. The aim of the present work was to assess the possibility of detecting SB activity in abdominal surface recordings under physiological conditions. For this purpose, 11 recording sessions of simultaneous internal and external myolectrical signals were conducted on conscious dogs. Signal analysis was carried out in the spectral domain. The results show that in periods of intestinal contractile activity, high-frequency components of EEnG signals can be detected on the abdominal surface in addition to SW activity. The energy between 2 and 20 Hz of the surface myoelectrical recording presented good correlation with the internal intestinal motility index (0.64 ± 0.10 for channel 1 and 0.57 ± 0.11 for channel 2). This suggests that SB activity can also be detected in canine surface EEnG recording.

  11. Thermal Infrared Spectral Band Detection Limits for Unidentified Surface Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, Laurel E.; Herr, Kenneth C.; Salisbury, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra recorded by airborne or satellite spectrometers can be searched for spectral features to determine the composition of rocks on planetary surfaces. Surface materials are identified by detections of characteristic spectral bands. We show how to define whether to accept an observed spectral feature as a detection when the target material is unknown. We also use remotely sensed spectra measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System to illustrate the importance of instrument parameters and surface properties on band detection limits and how the variation in signal-to-noise ratio with wavelength affects the bands that are most detectable for a given instrument. The spectrometer's sampling interval, spectral resolution, signal-to-noise ratio as a function of wavelength, and the sample's surface properties influence whether the instrument can detect a spectral feature exhibited by a material. As an example, in the 6-13 micrometer wavelength region, massive carbonates exhibit two bands: a very strong, broad feature at approximately 6.5 micrometers and a less intense, sharper band at approximately 11.25 micrometers. Although the 6.5-micrometer band is stronger and broader in laboratory-measured spectra, the 11.25-micrometer band will cause a more detectable feature in TES spectra.

  12. Comparing Several Algorithms for Change Detection of Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, F.; Zhang, S.; Chang, L.

    2015-12-01

    As "the kidneys of the landscape" and "ecological supermarkets", wetland plays an important role in ecological equilibrium and environmental protection.Therefore, it is of great significance to understand the dynamic changes of the wetland. Nowadays, many index and many methods have been used in dynamic Monitoring of Wetland. However, there are no single method and no single index are adapted to detect dynamic change of wetland all over the world. In this paper, three digital change detection algorithms are applied to 2005 and 2010 Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images of a portion of the Northeast China to detect wetland dynamic between the two dates. The change vector analysis method (CVA) uses 6 bands of TM images to detect wetland dynamic. The tassled cap transformation is used to create three change images (change in brightness, greenness, and wetness). A new method--- Comprehensive Change Detection Method (CCDM) is introduced to detect forest dynamic change. The CCDM integrates spectral-based change detection algorithms including a Multi-Index Integrated Change Analysis (MIICA) model and a novel change model called Zone, which extracts change information from two Landsat image pairs. The MIICA model is the core module of the change detection strategy and uses four spectral indices (differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR), differenced Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (dNDVI), the Change Vector (CV) and a new index called the Relative Change Vector Maximum (RCVMAX)) to obtain the changes that occurred between two image dates. The CCDM also includes a knowledge-based system, which uses critical information on historical and current land cover conditions and trends and the likelihood of land cover change, to combine the changes from MIICA and Zone. Related test proved that CCDM method is simple, easy to operate, widely applicable, and capable of capturing a variety of natural and anthropogenic disturbances potentially associated with land cover changes on

  13. Surface contamination and changes of mechanical damping in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Will Marlin

    Small changes in the pore fluid chemistry of Berea sandstone cause significant changes in mechanical damping. A method of detecting contaminants in porous rocks is under ongoing development. Here I report several laboratory measurements done in support of this development, including that of a large difference in mechanical damping between clean and chemically treated Berea sandstone. I develop a model of a surface-chemistry related damping mechanism, and qualitatively compare results from calculations to experimental results. I rule out other damping mechanisms, and conclude that the observed damping is due to surface chemistry effects (contact angle hysteresis). To help verify experimental results, an anelastic structure with calculable damping properties was built. Damping of this structure was measured by the same method used for damping measurements on Berea sandstone. Results from these measurements show good agreement to the calculated response of the structure in the frequency range 0.03--1 Hz.* *This dissertation includes a CD that is compound (contains both a paper copy and a D as part of the dissertation. The CD requires the following applications: Adobe Acrobat.

  14. FUNCTIONALIZED LATERAL SURFACE COATED LASERS FOR CHEM-BIO DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, L L; Bond, T C; Cole, G D; Behymer, E M

    2007-07-05

    We present a class of compact, monolithic, photonic sensors consisting of multiple section edge emitting lasers with functionalized lateral surface coatings for low level detection of chemical or biological agents. Specifically, we discuss 8 {micro}m x 250 {micro}m Pd-coated H{sub 2} sensors and configurations to reduce the minimum detection limit from 138ppm for passive sensors to 1ppm for active sensors. Compared with conventional optical H{sub 2} sensors that use fiber gratings, surface plasmon resonances, or surface reflectance, our sensors offer the advantages of smaller size, wider dynamic range, monolithic integration of laser source and detector, and 2-D scalability to arrays of sensors that are functionalized to detect different agents.

  15. Real-time 3D change detection of IEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wathen, Mitch; Link, Norah; Iles, Peter; Jinkerson, John; Mrstik, Paul; Kusevic, Kresimir; Kovats, David

    2012-06-01

    Road-side bombs are a real and continuing threat to soldiers in theater. CAE USA recently developed a prototype Volume based Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance (VISR) sensor platform for IED detection. This vehicle-mounted, prototype sensor system uses a high data rate LiDAR (1.33 million range measurements per second) to generate a 3D mapping of roadways. The mapped data is used as a reference to generate real-time change detection on future trips on the same roadways. The prototype VISR system is briefly described. The focus of this paper is the methodology used to process the 3D LiDAR data, in real-time, to detect small changes on and near the roadway ahead of a vehicle traveling at moderate speeds with sufficient warning to stop the vehicle at a safe distance from the threat. The system relies on accurate navigation equipment to geo-reference the reference run and the change-detection run. Since it was recognized early in the project that detection of small changes could not be achieved with accurate navigation solutions alone, a scene alignment algorithm was developed to register the reference run with the change detection run prior to applying the change detection algorithm. Good success was achieved in simultaneous real time processing of scene alignment plus change detection.

  16. Changing Emulsion Dynamics with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Peichun Amy; Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob; Chen, Haosheng

    2015-11-01

    We elucidate the effect of heterogeneous surface wettability on the morphology and dynamics of microfluidic emulsions, generated by a co-flowing device. We first design a useful methodology of modifying a micro-capillary with desired heterogeneous wettability, such as alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Subsequently, the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion in the micro-capillary are investigated. Our experimental data reveal a universal critical time scale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain intact, whereas below this time-scale emulsions become adhesive or inverse. A simple model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition. These results show a control of emulsion dynamics by tuning the droplet size and the Capillary number, the ratio of viscous to surface effects, with heterogeneous surface wettability.

  17. Seasonal changes in Titan's weather and surface features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, E. P.; Perry, J. E.; McEwen, A. S.; Barbara, J.; Del Genio, A.; West, R. A.; Hayes, A.; Schaller, E.

    2010-04-01

    Since Cassini's arrival at Saturn, the Titan's season has progressed from southern summer to just past the southern autumnal equinox (the equivalent of 12 January to 26 March), and accompanying changes in meteorology have been observed. Through 2004, large convective cloud systems were common over Titan's South Pole (e.g., Schaller et al., 2006); since 2005 such storms have been less common. Elongated streaks of clouds have been observed consistently at mid-southern latitudes, and became common at high northern latitudes in 2007. Only recently have clouds been detected at mid-northern latitudes. Changes have also been observed in surface features at high southern latitudes. A large dark area appeared between July 2004 and June 2005 (Turtle et al., 2009), and may have subsequently faded. Recent observations of Ontario Lacus suggest that its shoreline may have receded (e.g., Hayes et al., 2009). No changes have been observed to date in lakes and seas at high northern latitudes. Intriguingly, Cassini RADAR observations of Titan's South Pole reveal far fewer lakes than have been identified in the north (Stofan et al., 2007) and fewer than suggested by the number of dark features observed by ISS in this area (Turtle et al., 2009). This apparent discrepancy may indicate that not all of the dark south-polar features identified by ISS are filled with liquid. Alternatively, some lakes may be ephemeral: differences may be the result of precipitation and ponding of liquid methane and subsequent evaporation or infiltration thereof (Turtle et al., 2009) in the time between observations: ISS in mid-2004 and mid-2005 (equivalent of ~12 and ~25 January) and the RADAR observations starting in late 2007 (equivalent of ~28 February). We will present observations of Titan's meteorology and surface features, documenting seasonal changes and their implications for Titan's active methane cycle and atmospheric circulation.

  18. Simulation framework for spatio-spectral anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Harvey, Neal R; Porter, Reid B; Wohlberg, Brendt E

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a simulation framework for anomalous change detection that considers both the spatial and spectral aspects of the imagery. A purely spectral framework has previously been introduced, but the extension to spatio-spectral requires attention to a variety of new issues, and requires more careful modeling of the anomalous changes. Using this extended framework, they evaluate the utility of spatial image processing operators to enhance change detection sensitivity in (simulated) remote sensing imagery.

  19. Visible hyperspectral imaging for standoff detection of explosives on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Mendoza, Albert; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2010-10-01

    There is an ever-increasing need to be able to detect the presence of explosives, preferably from standoff distances of tens of meters. This paper presents an application of visible hyperspectral imaging using anomaly, polarization, and spectral identification approaches for the standoff detection (13 meters) of nitroaromatic explosives on realistic painted surfaces based upon the colorimetric differences between tetryl and TNT which are enhanced by solar irradiation.

  20. Proximal and point detection of contaminated surfaces using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason A.; Christesen, Steven D.; Tripathi, Ashish; Emmons, Erik D.; Wilcox, Phillip G.; Emge, Darren K.; Pardoe, Ian J.; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-11-01

    We are actively investigating the use of Raman spectroscopy for proximal standoff detection of chemicals and explosive materials on surfaces. These studies include Raman Chemical Imaging of contaminated fingerprints for forensic attribution and the assessments of commercial handheld or portable Raman instruments operating with near-infrared (IR) as well as ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation specifically developed for on-the-move reconnaissance of chemical contamination. As part of these efforts, we have measured the Raman cross sections of chemical agents, toxic industrial chemicals, and explosives from the UV to NIR. We have also measured and modeled the effect interrogation angle has on the Raman return from droplets on man-made surfaces. Realistic droplet distributions have been modeled and tested against variations in surface scan patterns and laser spot size for determining the optimum scan characteristics for detection of relevant surface contamination.

  1. Nanostructured Surfaces and Detection Instrumentation for Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhery, Vikram; George, Sherine; Lu, Meng; Pokhriyal, Anusha; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Photonic crystal (PC) surfaces have been demonstrated as a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics and life science research. PCs can be engineered to support optical resonances at specific wavelengths at which strong electromagnetic fields are utilized to enhance the intensity of surface-bound fluorophore excitation. Meanwhile, the leaky resonant modes of PCs can be used to direct emitted photons within a narrow range of angles for more efficient collection by a fluorescence detection system. The multiplicative effects of enhanced excitation combined with enhanced photon extraction combine to provide improved signal-to-noise ratios for detection of fluorescent emitters, which in turn can be used to reduce the limits of detection of low concentration analytes, such as disease biomarker proteins. Fabrication of PCs using inexpensive manufacturing methods and materials that include replica molding on plastic, nano-imprint lithography on quartz substrates result in devices that are practical for single-use disposable applications. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity fluorescence detection in the context of molecular diagnosis and gene expression analysis though the use of PC surfaces. Recent efforts to improve the design and fabrication of PCs and their associated detection instrumentation are summarized, including the use of PCs coupled with Fabry-Perot cavities and external cavity lasers. PMID:23624689

  2. Optimizing surface acoustic wave sensors for trace chemical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, G.C.; Kottenstette, R.J.; Heller, E.J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes several recent advances for fabricating coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors for applications requiring trace chemical detection. Specifically, we have demonstrated that high surface area microporous oxides can provide 100-fold improvements in SAW sensor responses compared with more typical polymeric coatings. In addition, we fabricated GaAs SAW devices with frequencies up to 500 MHz to provide greater sensitivity and an ideal substrate for integration with high-frequency electronics.

  3. Long-term change detection from historical photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, T.; Schenk, T.

    2006-12-01

    There is an increasing awareness in the science community about the potential of utilizing old photography and derived products together with new data for change detection and for extending the timeline as far back as possible. For example recent observations have revealed dramatic changes in the behavior of many ice streams and outlet glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica, ranging from complete shutdown of ice streams to manifold increases in velocity. Most observations are typically from the comparatively short time period since the beginning of the civilian satellite imagery (1980s), with most quantitative measurements starting only 10-15 years ago. To evaluate whether ongoing observed changes are climatically significant, changes must be determined over longer time frames. Earlier terrestrial and aerial photography and maps indeed exist and the objective of the project to disseminate these historical data and to develop techniques and tools for combining (fusing) old and new data in order to compile long-term time series of changes in the polar regions, for example in ice extent, velocity and surface elevations. The presentation focuses on new methodologies and interdisciplinary approaches that greatly facilitate the use of old photography for quantitative studies in the polar regions. An absolute prerequisite for the successful use of old photography is a rigorous registration, either with other sensory input data or with respect to 3D reference systems. Recent advances in digital photogrammetry allow registration with linear features, such as lines, curves and free-form lines without the need for identifying identical points. The concept of sensor invariant features was developed to register such disparate data sets as aerial imagery and 3D laser point clouds, originating from satellite laser altimetry or airborne laser scanning systems. Examples illustrating these concepts are shown from the Transantarctic Mountains, including the registration of aerial

  4. Temporal morphological changes at the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groussin, Olivier; Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Keller, H. U.

    2015-11-01

    A key scientific question, to understand how comets work and whether they still contain pristine materials at or near their surface, is to understand how the nucleus is changing with time and to which extent activity modifies its surface. Rosetta, which has been orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014, offers a unique opportunity to tackle this fundamental question. Here, we report on temporal morphological changes detected on the surface of the nucleus of comet 67P by the OSIRIS cameras. Changes have been detected in several regions and in particular in the Imhotep region, where they are visible in the form of roundish features that are growing in size from a given location in a preferential direction. Terrains bluer than the surroundings appear during changes, suggesting the presence of (water) ice exposed on the surface.

  5. Surface classification and detection of latent fingerprints based on 3D surface texture parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruhn, Stefan; Fischer, Robert; Vielhauer, Claus

    2012-06-01

    In the field of latent fingerprint detection in crime scene forensics the classification of surfaces has importance. A new method for the scientific analysis of image based information for forensic science was investigated in the last years. Our image acquisition based on a sensor using Chromatic White Light (CWL) with a lateral resolution up to 2 μm. The used FRT-MicroProf 200 CWL 600 measurement device is able to capture high-resolution intensity and topography images in an optical and contact-less way. In prior work, we have suggested to use 2D surface texture parameters to classify various materials, which was a novel approach in the field of criminalistic forensic using knowledge from surface appearance and a chromatic white light sensor. A meaningful and useful classification of different crime scene specific surfaces is not existent. In this work, we want to extend such considerations by the usage of fourteen 3D surface parameters, called 'Birmingham 14'. In our experiment we define these surface texture parameters and use them to classify ten different materials in this test set-up and create specific material classes. Further it is shown in first experiments, that some surface texture parameters are sensitive to separate fingerprints from carrier surfaces. So far, the use of surface roughness is mainly known within the framework of material quality control. The analysis and classification of the captured 3D-topography images from crime scenes is important for the adaptive preprocessing depending on the surface texture. The adaptive preprocessing in dependency of surface classification is necessary for precise detection because of the wide variety of surface textures. We perform a preliminary study in usage of these 3D surface texture parameters as feature for the fingerprint detection. In combination with a reference sample we show that surface texture parameters can be an indication for a fingerprint and can be a feature in latent fingerprint detection.

  6. Characterization and Detection of Uranyl Ion Sorption on Silver Surfaces using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, Scott T; Wells, Sabrina M; Sepaniak, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The study of the chemical behavior of uranyl species and its rapid detection is of primary environmental and non-proliferation concern. Herein we report on a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of uranyl ion (UO22+) sorption onto the thermally vapor deposited silver particle surface. The ability of vibrational spectroscopy to characterize surface phenomenon and the remarkable sensitivity of the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) have been introduced as an appropriate combination for the surface characterization and detection of UO22+ onto the silver surface. The appearance of symmetric stretching frequency of UO22+ around 700 cm-1 and the disappearance of the 854 cm-1 band is attributed to the development of a chemical bond between silver surface and uranyl species. The effects of temperature, solute-surface interaction time, and pH have been studied using silver modified polypropylene filter (PPF) substrates. Results show that under appropriate conditions, the concentration of uranyl ion as low as 20 ng/mL can be easily detected using the discussed SERS approach without any surface modification of silver nanoparticles. Moreover, an alteranative SERS approach of uranyl detection is demonstrated using nano-lithographically fabricated SERS substrates.

  7. Surface-bonded fiber optic Sagnac sensors for ultrasound detection.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Seong; Lee, Seung Seok; Kim, Young Gil

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes a fiber optic sensor suitable for remote sensing and multi-point detection of ultrasound. This ultrasound sensor is based on the surface-bonded fiber optic Sagnac interferometer with the output fringe visibility of 1; it consists of a laser source, an ordinary single mode fiber delay line, a fiber coupler, a phase modulator and polarization controllers. For the validation of the sensor, surface acoustic waves and Lamb waves are excited by illuminating a steel specimen with an array of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser-generated line sources and the measurement of laser-generated ultrasonic waves are performed on the specimen surface using the surface-mounting fiber optic Sagnac sensor. The surface-bonded fiber optic sensor developed in this study has a simple configuration for detection of ultrasonic waves. Effectiveness of surface-bonded fiber optic Sagnac sensors for remote sensing of ultrasound and in situ monitoring of structures is investigated. The capability of multi-point detection of ultrasound by this Sagnac sensor is also discussed. PMID:15047393

  8. Standoff detection of explosive residues on unknown surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Neste, C. W.; Liu, Xunchen; Gupta, Manisha; Kim, Seonghwan; Tsui, Ying; Thundat, T.

    2012-06-01

    Standoff identification of explosive residues may offer early warnings to many hazards plaguing present and future military operations. The greatest challenge is posed by the need for molecular recognition of trace explosive compounds on real-world surfaces. Most techniques that offer eye-safe, long-range detection fail when unknown surfaces with no prior knowledge of the surface spectral properties are interrogated. Inhomogeneity in the surface concentration and optical absorption from background molecules can introduce significant reproducibility challenges for reliable detection when surface residue concentrations are below tens of micrograms per square centimeter. Here we present a coupled standoff technique that allows identification of explosive residues concentrations in the sub microgram per square centimeter range on real-world surfaces. Our technique is a variation of standoff photoacoustic spectroscopy merged with ultraviolet chemical photodecomposition for selective identification of explosives. We demonstrate the detection of standard military grade explosives including RDX, PETN, and TNT along with a couple of common compounds such as diesel and sugar. We obtain identification at several hundred nanograms per centimeter square at a distance of four meters.

  9. The application of the detection filter to aircraft control surface and actuator failure detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnice, W. F.; Wagner, E.; Motyka, P.; Hall, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The performance of the detection filter in detecting and isolating aircraft control surface and actuator failures is evaluated. The basic detection filter theory assumption of no direct input-output coupling is violated in this application due to the use of acceleration measurements for detecting and isolating failures. With this coupling, residuals produced by control surface failures may only be constrained to a known plane rather than to a single direction. A detection filter design with such planar failure signatures is presented, with the design issues briefly addressed. In addition, a modification to constrain the residual to a single known direction even with direct input-output coupling is also presented. Both the detection filter and the modification are tested using a nonlinear aircraft simulation. While no thresholds were selected, both filters demonstrated an ability to detect control surface and actuator failures. Failure isolation may be a problem if there are several control surfaces which produce similar effects on the aircraft. In addition, the detection filter was sensitive to wind turbulence and modeling errors.

  10. A Sensor System for Detection of Hull Surface Defects

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Pedro; Iborra, Andrés; Fernández, Carlos; Sánchez, Pedro; Suardíaz, Juan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor system for detecting defects in ship hull surfaces. The sensor was developed to enable a robotic system to perform grit blasting operations on ship hulls. To achieve this, the proposed sensor system captures images with the help of a camera and processes them in real time using a new defect detection method based on thresholding techniques. What makes this method different is its efficiency in the automatic detection of defects from images recorded in variable lighting conditions. The sensor system was tested under real conditions at a Spanish shipyard, with excellent results. PMID:22163590

  11. Improved change detection with local co-registration adjustments

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt E; Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a simple approach for compensating for residual misregistration error on the performance of anomalous change detection algorithms. Using real data with a simulation framework for anomalous change and with a real anomalous change, we illustrate the approach and investigate its effectiveness.

  12. Vegetation change detection based on image fusion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yonghong; Liu, Yueyan; Yu, Hui; Li, Deren

    2005-10-01

    The change detection of land use and land cover has always been the focus of remotely sensed study and application. Based on techniques of image fusion, a new approach of detecting vegetation change according to vector of brightness index (BI) and perpendicular vegetation index (PVI) extracted from multi-temporal remotely sensed imagery is proposed. The procedure is introduced. Firstly, the Landsat eTM+ imagery is geometrically corrected and registered. Secondly, band 2,3,4 and panchromatic images of Landsat eTM+ are fused by a trous wavelet fusion, and bands 1,2,3 of SPOT are registered to the fused images. Thirdly, brightness index and perpendicular vegetation index are respectively extracted from SPOT images and fused images. Finally, change vectors are obtained and used to detect vegetation change. The testing results show that the approach of detecting vegetation change is very efficient.

  13. Seasonal Surface Temperature Changes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Cottini, Valeria; Nixon, Conor A.; Coustenis, Athena; Tokano, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini has been measuring surface brightness temperatures on Titan since 2004 (Jennings et al. 2011; Cottini et al. 2012; Tan et al. 2015). Radiation from the surface reaches space through a window of minimum opacity in Titan’s atmosphere near 19 microns wavelength. We mapped surface temperatures in five time periods, each about 2 years, centered on solar longitudes Ls = 313°, 335°, 0°, 28° and 53° degrees. Using zonally-averaged spectra binned in 10-degree latitude intervals, we clearly see the seasonal progression of the pole-to-pole temperature distribution. Whereas peak temperatures in the vicinity of the Equator have been close to 94 K throughout the Cassini mission, early in the mission temperatures at the North Pole were as low as 90 K and at the South Pole were 92 K. Late in the mission the pattern has reversed: 92 K in the north and 90 K in the south. Over 2005 to 2014 the peak temperature moved in latitude from about 15 S to 15 N. We estimate a seasonal lag of 0.2 Titan month. In 2010 the temperature distribution was approximately symmetric north and south, agreeing with Voyager 1 from one Titan year earlier. The surface temperatures follow closely the predictions of Tokano (2005). Our measurements may indicate a lower thermal inertia in the south than in the north.Jennings, D.E. et al., ApJ Lett. 737, L15 (2011)Cottini, V. et al., 2012. Planet. Space Sci. 60, 62 (2012)Tan, S. P. et al., Icarus 250, 64 (2015)Tokano, T., Icarus 204, 619 (2005)

  14. A decision surface-based taxonomy of detection statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffard, François

    2012-09-01

    Current and past literature on the topic of detection statistics - in particular those used in hyperspectral target detection - can be intimidating for newcomers, especially given the huge number of detection tests described in the literature. Detection tests for hyperspectral measurements, such as those generated by dispersive or Fourier transform spectrometers used in remote sensing of atmospheric contaminants, are of paramount importance if any level of analysis automation is to be achieved. The detection statistics used in hyperspectral target detection are generally borrowed and adapted from other fields such as radar signal processing or acoustics. Consequently, although remarkable efforts have been made to clarify and categorize the vast number of available detection tests, understanding their differences, similarities, limits and other intricacies is still an exacting journey. Reasons for this state of affairs include heterogeneous nomenclature and mathematical notation, probably due to the multiple origins of hyperspectral target detection formalisms. Attempts at sorting out detection statistics using ambiguously defined properties may also cause more harm than good. Ultimately, a detection statistic is entirely characterized by its decision boundary. Thus, we propose to catalogue detection statistics according to the shape of their decision surfaces, which greatly simplifies this taxonomy exercise. We make a distinction between the topology resulting from the mathematical formulation of the statistic and mere parameters that adjust the boundary's precise shape, position and orientation. Using this simple approach, similarities between various common detection statistics are found, limit cases are reduced to simpler statistics, and a general understanding of the available detection tests and their properties becomes much easier to achieve.

  15. Land Cover Change Detection Using Saliency Andwavelet Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haopeng; Jiang, Zhiguo; Cheng, Yan

    2016-06-01

    How to obtain accurate difference map remains an open challenge in change detection. To tackle this problem, we propose a change detection method based on saliency detection and wavelet transformation. We do frequency-tuned saliency detection in initial difference image (IDI) obtained by logarithm ratio to get a salient difference image (SDI). Then, we calculate local entropy of SDI to obtain an entropic salient difference image (ESDI). The final difference image (FDI) is the wavelet fusion of IDI and ESDI, and Otsu thresholding is used to extract difference map from FDI. Experimental results validate the effectiveness and feasibility.

  16. Relative Saliency in Change Signals Affects Perceptual Comparison and Decision Processes in Change Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2011-01-01

    Change detection requires perceptual comparison and decision processes on different features of multiattribute objects. How relative salience between two feature-changes influences the processes has not been addressed. This study used the systems factorial technology to investigate the processes when detecting changes in a Gabor patch with visual…

  17. Detecting data and schema changes in scientific documents

    SciTech Connect

    Adiwijaya, I; Critchlow, T; Musick, R

    1999-06-08

    Data stored in a data warehouse must be kept consistent and up-to-date with the underlying information sources. By providing the capability to identify, categorize and detect changes in these sources, only the modified data needs to be transferred and entered into the warehouse. Another alternative, periodically reloading from scratch, is obviously inefficient. When the schema of an information source changes, all components that interact with, or make use of, data originating from that source must be updated to conform to the new schema. In this paper, the authors present an approach to detecting data and schema changes in scientific documents. Scientific data is of particular interest because it is normally stored as semi-structured documents, and it incurs frequent schema updates. They address the change detection problem by detecting data and schema changes between two versions of the same semi-structured document. This paper presents a graph representation of semi-structured documents and their schema before describing their approach to detecting changes while parsing the document. It also discusses how analysis of a collection of schema changes obtained from comparing several individual can be used to detect complex schema changes.

  18. Detecting changes in the spatial distribution of nitrate contamination in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Z.-J.; Hallberg, G.R.; Zimmerman, D.L.; Libra, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Many studies of ground water pollution in general and nitrate contamination in particular have often relied on a one-time investigation, tracking of individual wells, or aggregate summaries. Studies of changes in spatial distribution of contaminants over time are lacking. This paper presents a method to compare spatial distributions for possible changes over time. The large-scale spatial distribution at a given time can be considered as a surface over the area (a trend surface). The changes in spatial distribution from period to period can be revealed by the differences in the shape and/or height of surfaces. If such a surface is described by a polynomial function, changes in surfaces can be detected by testing statistically for differences in their corresponding polynomial functions. This method was applied to nitrate concentration in a population of wells in an agricultural drainage basin in Iowa, sampled in three different years. For the period of 1981-1992, the large-scale spatial distribution of nitrate concentration did not show significant change in the shape of spatial surfaces; while the magnitude of nitrate concentration in the basin, or height of the computed surfaces showed significant fluctuations. The change in magnitude of nitrate concentration is closely related to climatic variations, especially in precipitation. The lack of change in the shape of spatial surfaces means that either the influence of land use/nitrogen management was overshadowed by climatic influence, or the changes in land use/management occurred in a random fashion.

  19. Monolayer detection on flat metal surface via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Chen, Jiao; He, Haibing; Zhang, Rongping; Chen, Wei; Lu, Xiaolin; Wang, Xinping; Xue, Gi

    2012-01-01

    Monolayer detection on metal surface requires ultra high sensitivity. Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy (SFG) and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) are regarded as two powerful techniques with submolecular sensitivity to detect adsorbents on metal surface. However, in some cases it's still challenge to characterize molecules or groups with relatively high intramolecular symmetry, such as 4-Nitrothiophenol (4NTP), on flat metal surface even combining these two techniques. Basically, this is due to that 4NTP with para-substituted phenol groups is SFG insensitive while flat metal surface is unfavorable to yield strong SERS enhancement. In this concern, a simple and efficient method, silver mirror method, was employed to facilitate the detection of 4NTP SAM on flat gold surface. Silver nanopheres with diameters around 300 nm was fabricated through silver mirror reaction and in situ formed milky overlayer on top of 4NTP SAM adsorbed on gold surface. Significant enhancement on SERS signal can be achieved with such special assembly structure of the "metal-molecule-metal" system. Generally, the silver mirror method provided a complementary approach to facilitate the spectroscopic applications of molecule level detection on various metal surfaces in situ. PMID:22523987

  20. Asphaltene detection using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    PubMed

    Alabi, O O; Edilbi, A N F; Brolly, C; Muirhead, D; Parnell, J; Stacey, R; Bowden, S A

    2015-04-28

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy using a gold substrate and excitation at 514 nm can detect sub parts per million quantities of asphaltene and thereby petroleum. This simple format and sensitivity make it transformative for applications including sample triage, flow assurance, environmental protection and analysis of unique one of a kind materials. PMID:25812164

  1. Updating National Topographic Data Base Using Change Detection Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keinan, E.; Felus, Y. A.; Tal, Y.; Zilberstien, O.; Elihai, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The traditional method for updating a topographic database on a national scale is a complex process that requires human resources, time and the development of specialized procedures. In many National Mapping and Cadaster Agencies (NMCA), the updating cycle takes a few years. Today, the reality is dynamic and the changes occur every day, therefore, the users expect that the existing database will portray the current reality. Global mapping projects which are based on community volunteers, such as OSM, update their database every day based on crowdsourcing. In order to fulfil user's requirements for rapid updating, a new methodology that maps major interest areas while preserving associated decoding information, should be developed. Until recently, automated processes did not yield satisfactory results, and a typically process included comparing images from different periods. The success rates in identifying the objects were low, and most were accompanied by a high percentage of false alarms. As a result, the automatic process required significant editorial work that made it uneconomical. In the recent years, the development of technologies in mapping, advancement in image processing algorithms and computer vision, together with the development of digital aerial cameras with NIR band and Very High Resolution satellites, allow the implementation of a cost effective automated process. The automatic process is based on high-resolution Digital Surface Model analysis, Multi Spectral (MS) classification, MS segmentation, object analysis and shape forming algorithms. This article reviews the results of a novel change detection methodology as a first step for updating NTDB in the Survey of Israel.

  2. Method and device for detection of surface discontinuities or defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, L. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Surface discontinuities of defects such as cracks and orifices are detected by applying a penetrating fluid, preferably a liquid, to a test surface so as to cause the liquid to penetrate any minute cracks or opening in the surface, removing the excess liquid from the surface, and leaving a residual in the discontinuities, cavities, or in the subsurface materials. A sheet of porous material impregnated with a sensitizing medium which will react with vapors of the residual liquid to form a visible pattern is applied to the test surface. The residual liquid trapped in the discontinuities, cavities, or subsurface material is vaporized, and, as the vapors contact the sensitizing medium on the sheet, a pattern corresponding to the discontinuity is formed on the sheet material and the penetrant completely removed from the sample.

  3. Detection of ethyl glucuronide in blood spotted on different surfaces.

    PubMed

    Winkler, M; Kaufmann, E; Thoma, D; Thierauf, A; Weinmann, W; Skopp, G; Alt, A

    2011-07-15

    This study aims to show that sensitive detection of ethyl glucuronide in dried blood spotted onto various surfaces after a period of 24h is feasible. At present, there is insufficient information how tightly ethyl glucuronide (EtG) binds to various materials and how easily it can be eluted. 4ml aliquots of blood samples obtained from seven volunteers after consumption of alcoholic beverages were applied to six different surfaces. After drying and a 24h-storage at 20±2°C the samples were re-dissolved in water, and EtG was subsequently analyzed by a LC-MS Paul-type ion trap. A comparison was made between dried and corresponding fluid samples. EtG was detectable in all subjects' samples following consumption of alcohol. EtG was also detectable after a storage time of four weeks at 4°C in whole blood that had been preserved with EDTA. EtG was detectable in all samples dried on different surfaces and its concentration remained relatively constant irrespective of the particular condition of the material. Detection of EtG in blood spots from the scene may indicate recent alcohol consumption in cases where collection of blood remained undone or could not be performed. PMID:21641739

  4. Monitoring surface albedo change with Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1977-01-01

    A pronounced decrease of the surface albedo (reflectivity) has been observed in an area in the Northern Sinai, fenced-in in the summer of 1974. Analysis of the Landsat Multispectral Scanner System digital data from an April 1977 pass indicates a reduction in the albedo in the exclosure by 13%, as compared to the outside, which continues to be subjected to overgrazing and anthropogenic pressures. The reduction of reflectivity is approximately the same in all the spectral bands, and is therefore attributable to accumulation of dead plants and plant debris, and not directly to live vegetation.

  5. Classification of change detection and change blindness from near-infrared spectroscopy signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hirokazu; Katura, Takusige

    2011-08-01

    Using a machine-learning classification algorithm applied to near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals, we classify a success (change detection) or a failure (change blindness) in detecting visual changes for a change-detection task. Five subjects perform a change-detection task, and their brain activities are continuously monitored. A support-vector-machine algorithm is applied to classify the change-detection and change-blindness trials, and correct classification probability of 70-90% is obtained for four subjects. Two types of temporal shapes in classification probabilities are found: one exhibiting a maximum value after the task is completed (postdictive type), and another exhibiting a maximum value during the task (predictive type). As for the postdictive type, the classification probability begins to increase immediately after the task completion and reaches its maximum in about the time scale of neuronal hemodynamic response, reflecting a subjective report of change detection. As for the predictive type, the classification probability shows an increase at the task initiation and is maximal while subjects are performing the task, predicting the task performance in detecting a change. We conclude that decoding change detection and change blindness from NIRS signal is possible and argue some future applications toward brain-machine interfaces.

  6. Seasonal changes in Titan's meteorology and surface features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, Elizabeth; Perry, Jason; McEwen, Alfred; Barbara, John; Del Genio, Anthony; West, Robert; Hayes, Alex; Schaller, Emily

    2010-05-01

    Since Cassini's arrival at Saturn in July 2004, the seasons on Titan have progressed from southern summer to just past the southern autumnal equinox (to date, the equivalent of 12 January to 26 March), and accompanying changes in cloud distribution and activity have been observed by Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS). Through 2004, large convective cloud systems were common over Titan's South Pole (e.g., Schaller et al., 2006; Porco et al., 2005). However, since 2005 such storms have been less common. Elongated streaks of clouds (several hundred km long) have been observed consistently at mid-southern latitudes, and became common at high northern latitudes starting in 2007. Only recently have such clouds been detected at mid-northern latitudes. ISS has also observed changes in surface features at high southern latitudes. A new large dark area appeared between July 2004 and June 2005 (Turtle et al., 2009), and may have subsequently faded. Recent observations of Ontario Lacus suggest that its shoreline may have receded as well (e.g., Hayes et al., 2009). Such changes are interpreted to be the result of precipitation and ponding of liquid methane and the subsequent evaporation thereof (Turtle et al., 2009). No changes have been observed to date in the lakes and seas at high northern latitudes. Intriguingly, Cassini RADAR observations of areas near Titan's south pole (Lunine et al., 2008) reveal far fewer lakes than have been identified at high northern latitudes (Stofan et al., 2007) and fewer than suggested by the number of dark features observed by ISS in this area (Turtle et al., 2009). This apparent discrepancy may simply be a result of the fact that not all of the dark south-polar features identified by ISS are filled with liquid. However, another possible explanation is that some lakes are ephemeral and have disappeared as a result of a combination of evaporation and infiltration into the subsurface in the time that elapsed between the observations by ISS

  7. Universal scene change detection on MPEG-coded data domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Ujihara, Kiyono; Yoneyama, Akio

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we propose scene decomposition algorithm from MPEG compressed video data. As a preprocessing for scene decomposition, partial reconstruction methods of DC image for P- and B-pictures as well as I-pictures directly from MPEG bitstream are used. As for detection algorithms, we have exploited several methods for detection of abrupt scene change, dissolve and wipe transitions using comparison of DC images between frames and coding information such as motion vectors. It is also proposed the method for exclusion of undesired detection such as flashlight in order to enhance scene change detection accuracy. It is shown that more than 95 percent of decomposition accuracy has been obtained in the experiment using more than one hour TV program. It is also found that in the proposed algorithm scene change detection can be performed more than 5 times faster than normal playback speed using 130MIPS workstation.

  8. Ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection in common fluids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shikuan; Dai, Xianming; Stogin, Birgitt Boschitsch; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Detecting target analytes with high specificity and sensitivity in any fluid is of fundamental importance to analytical science and technology. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has proven to be capable of detecting single molecules with high specificity, but achieving single-molecule sensitivity in any highly diluted solutions remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate a universal platform that allows for the enrichment and delivery of analytes into the SERS-sensitive sites in both aqueous and nonaqueous fluids, and its subsequent quantitative detection of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) down to ∼75 fM level (10−15 mol⋅L−1). Our platform, termed slippery liquid-infused porous surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SLIPSERS), is based on a slippery, omniphobic substrate that enables the complete concentration of analytes and SERS substrates (e.g., Au nanoparticles) within an evaporating liquid droplet. Combining our SLIPSERS platform with a SERS mapping technique, we have systematically quantified the probability, p(c), of detecting R6G molecules at concentrations c ranging from 750 fM (p > 90%) down to 75 aM (10−18 mol⋅L−1) levels (p ≤ 1.4%). The ability to detect analytes down to attomolar level is the lowest limit of detection for any SERS-based detection reported thus far. We have shown that analytes present in liquid, solid, or air phases can be extracted using a suitable liquid solvent and subsequently detected through SLIPSERS. Based on this platform, we have further demonstrated ultrasensitive detection of chemical and biological molecules as well as environmental contaminants within a broad range of common fluids for potential applications related to analytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and national security. PMID:26719413

  9. Ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection in common fluids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shikuan; Dai, Xianming; Stogin, Birgitt Boschitsch; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2016-01-12

    Detecting target analytes with high specificity and sensitivity in any fluid is of fundamental importance to analytical science and technology. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has proven to be capable of detecting single molecules with high specificity, but achieving single-molecule sensitivity in any highly diluted solutions remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate a universal platform that allows for the enrichment and delivery of analytes into the SERS-sensitive sites in both aqueous and nonaqueous fluids, and its subsequent quantitative detection of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) down to ∼75 fM level (10(-15) mol⋅L(-1)). Our platform, termed slippery liquid-infused porous surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SLIPSERS), is based on a slippery, omniphobic substrate that enables the complete concentration of analytes and SERS substrates (e.g., Au nanoparticles) within an evaporating liquid droplet. Combining our SLIPSERS platform with a SERS mapping technique, we have systematically quantified the probability, p(c), of detecting R6G molecules at concentrations c ranging from 750 fM (p > 90%) down to 75 aM (10(-18) mol⋅L(-1)) levels (p ≤ 1.4%). The ability to detect analytes down to attomolar level is the lowest limit of detection for any SERS-based detection reported thus far. We have shown that analytes present in liquid, solid, or air phases can be extracted using a suitable liquid solvent and subsequently detected through SLIPSERS. Based on this platform, we have further demonstrated ultrasensitive detection of chemical and biological molecules as well as environmental contaminants within a broad range of common fluids for potential applications related to analytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and national security. PMID:26719413

  10. Improving the estimation of historical marine surface temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carella, Giulia; Kent, Elizabeth C.; Berry, David I.

    2015-04-01

    Global Surface Temperature (GST) is one of the main indicators of climate change and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) forms its marine component. Historical SST observations extend back more than 150 years and are used for monitoring climate change and variability over the oceans, for validation of climate models and to provide boundary conditions for atmospheric models. SST observations from ships form our longest instrumental record of surface marine temperature change, but over the years different methods of measuring SST have been used, each of which potentially has different biases. Changes in technology and observational practice can be rapid and undocumented: generally, it is assumed that almost all SST data collected before the 1940s were derived from bucket samples although the measurement practice is almost never known in detail. Especially prior to the 1940s where buckets measurements prevailed, SST biases are expected to be large, namely comparable to the climatic increase in the GST over the past two centuries. Currently, SST datasets use bias models representing only large-scale effects, based on 5˚ area average monthly climatological environmental conditions or on large-scale variations in air-sea temperature difference, which is also uncertain. There are major differences between the bias adjustment fields used to date, which limits our confidence in global and regional estimates of historical SST as well as in long term trends, which are expected to be controlled by uncertainty in systematic biases. The main barrier to finer-scale adjustments of SST is that information about measurement methods and ambient environmental conditions is usually insufficient. As a result, many reports cannot be confidently assigned to a particular vessel and hence, cautiously, to the same measurement methodology. Here we present a new approach to the quantification of SST biases that can be applied on a ship-by-ship basis. These ship dependent adjustments are expected to

  11. Method to detect environmental change for an arid land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Miyamoto, J.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ishiyama, T.

    A method to detect natural environmental change for an arid land is developed based on 17 bands Visible NIR SWIR and Thermal IR ASTER Advanced SpaceborneThermal Emission and Reflection radiometer aboard Terra and in situ ground truth survey in Taklimakan Desert The method first extracts an area of macroscopic change then detailed or microscopic changes are detected Although the procedure is described in two steps the actual precessing is performed automatically and nearly simultaneously The method is named as ECD Environmental Change Automatic Discrimination model method for the sake of convenience

  12. Detection of Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climatic Change

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

    1998-05-26

    The objective of this report is to assemble and analyze instrumental climate data and to develop and apply climate models as a basis for (1) detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and (2) validation of General Circulation Models.

  13. Fast Change Point Detection for Electricity Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Berkeley, UC; Gu, William; Choi, Jaesik; Gu, Ming; Simon, Horst; Wu, Kesheng

    2013-08-25

    Electricity is a vital part of our daily life; therefore it is important to avoid irregularities such as the California Electricity Crisis of 2000 and 2001. In this work, we seek to predict anomalies using advanced machine learning algorithms. These algorithms are effective, but computationally expensive, especially if we plan to apply them on hourly electricity market data covering a number of years. To address this challenge, we significantly accelerate the computation of the Gaussian Process (GP) for time series data. In the context of a Change Point Detection (CPD) algorithm, we reduce its computational complexity from O($n^{5}$) to O($n^{2}$). Our efficient algorithm makes it possible to compute the Change Points using the hourly price data from the California Electricity Crisis. By comparing the detected Change Points with known events, we show that the Change Point Detection algorithm is indeed effective in detecting signals preceding major events.

  14. On the pilot's behavior of detecting a system parameter change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morizumi, N.; Kimura, H.

    1986-01-01

    The reaction of a human pilot, engaged in compensatory control, to a sudden change in the controlled element's characteristics is described. Taking the case where the change manifests itself as a variance change of the monitored signal, it is shown that the detection time, defined to be the time elapsed until the pilot detects the change, is related to the monitored signal and its derivative. Then, the detection behavior is modeled by an optimal controller, an optimal estimator, and a variance-ratio test mechanism that is performed for the monitored signal and its derivative. Results of a digital simulation show that the pilot's detection behavior can be well represented by the model proposed here.

  15. Surface plasmon resonance for detecting clenbuterol: Influence of monolayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suherman; Morita, Kinichi; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance sensor equipped with a fabricated immunosensor chip is used for detecting clenbuterol in this study. Since clenbuterol is a small analyte, indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay is employed. For fabricating the immunosurface, the Au-chip was functionalized by succinimidyl-terminated alkanethiol, and the terminal N-hydroxysuccinimide group of the self-assembled monolayer was either replaced with clenbuterol or blocked with ethanolamine. Scanning tunneling microscope experiments and electrochemical measurements depicted the domain structures of the succinimide group of succinimidyl-terminated propanethiol monolayer. The surface concentration and the orientation of succinimide group was significantly dependent on the concentration of dithiobis(succinimidyl) propionate (DSP) used in fabricating the monolayer. Furthermore, the structure of monolayer significantly influenced both the surface concentration and the orientation of clenbuterol on the sensor surface. Consequently, high coverage and standing-up configuration of clenbuterol showed high affinity for clenbuterol antibody. However, high affinity constant exhibited by the sensor surface was coupled with a low sensitivity. By contrast, lowest concentration of DSP solution (0.1 mM) used in fabricating the immunosurface showed a detection sensitivity of 3 ppt - the highest reported sensitivity for clenbuterol. For regeneration the immunosurface, 0.1 M NaOH was used and the same sensor surface could be reused for performing >100 rapid immunoreaction.

  16. A SAR ATR algorithm based on coherent change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Harmony, D.W.

    2000-12-01

    This report discusses an automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithm for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery that is based on coherent change detection techniques. The algorithm relies on templates created from training data to identify targets. Objects are identified or rejected as targets by comparing their SAR signatures with templates using the same complex correlation scheme developed for coherent change detection. Preliminary results are presented in addition to future recommendations.

  17. Real-time SAR change-detection using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Christopher J.; White, Richard G.

    1990-11-01

    This paper describes the techniques evolved at RSRE for the production of undistorted, focused synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, target detection using a neural network method and the automatic detection of changes between pairs of SAR images. All these processes are achievable in a single pipelined process operating on an input data rate in excess of 10 Mbytes/second.

  18. Application of SAR data to monitoring earth surface changes and displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkura, H.

    Surface changes and displacement caused by earthquake and volcanic activities can be detected by satellite radar interferometric technology using L-band JERS-1 SAR images. For the detection of the coseismic deformation of the Hyogoken-nanbu earthquake, interferometric analysis shows 0.6 meter surface displacement along the radar line-of-sight direction around Kobe City and 1.1 meter displacement in Awaji Island where epicenter is located. For the detection of volcanic body deformation in Iwo-jima, the analysis shows concentric circular subsiding displacement that agrees with the results of ground measurement.

  19. Method for detecting surface motions and mapping small terrestrial or planetary surface deformations with synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, Andrew K. (Inventor); Goldstein, Richard M. (Inventor); Zebker, Howard A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A technique based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry is used to measure very small (1 cm or less) surface deformations with good resolution (10 m) over large areas (50 km). It can be used for accurate measurements of many geophysical phenomena, including swelling and buckling in fault zones, residual, vertical and lateral displacements from seismic events, and prevolcanic swelling. Two SAR images are made of a scene by two spaced antennas and a difference interferogram of the scene is made. After unwrapping phases of pixels of the difference interferogram, surface motion or deformation changes of the surface are observed. A second interferogram of the same scene is made from a different pair of images, at least one of which is made after some elapsed time. The second interferogram is then compared with the first interferogram to detect changes in line of sight position of pixels. By resolving line of sight observations into their vector components in other sets of interferograms along at least one other direction, lateral motions may be recovered in their entirety. Since in general, the SAR images are made from flight tracks that are separated, it is not possible to distinguish surface changes from the parallax caused by topography. However, a third image may be used to remove the topography and leave only the surface changes.

  20. Imaging Catalytic Surfaces by Multiplexed Capillary Electrophoresis With Absorption Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Christodoulou

    2002-08-27

    A new technique for in situ imaging and screening heterogeneous catalysts by using multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with absorption detection was developed. By bundling the inlets of a large number of capillaries, an imaging probe can be created that can be used to sample products formed directly from a catalytic surface with high spatial resolution. In this work, they used surfaces made of platinum, iron or gold wires as model catalytic surfaces for imaging. Various shapes were recorded including squares and triangles. Model catalytic surfaces consisting of both iron and platinum wires in the shape of a cross were also imaged successfully. Each of the two wires produced a different electrochemical product that was separated by capillary electrophoresis. Based on the collected data they were able to distinguish the products from each wire in the reconstructed image.

  1. Observing ground surface change series at active volcanoes in Indonesia using backscattering intensity of SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saepuloh, Asep; Trianaputri, Mila Olivia

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia contains 27 active volcanoes passing the West through the East part. Therefore, Indonesia is the most hazard front due to the volcanic activities. To obtain the new precursory signals leading to the eruptions, we applied remote sensing technique to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung and Kelud volcanoes. Sinabung volcano is located at Karo Region, North Sumatra Province. This volcano is a strato volcano type which is re-activated in August 2010. The eruption continues to the later years by ejecting volcanic products such as lava, pyroclastic flow, and ash fall deposits. This study is targeted to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung volcano since 2007 to 2011. In addition, we also compared the summit ground surface changes after the eruptions of Kelud volcano in 2007. Kelud volcano is also strato volcano type which is located at East Java, Indonesia. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remotely sensed technology makes possible to observe rapidly a wide ground surface changes related to ground surface roughness. Detection series were performed by extracting the backscattering intensity of the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). The intensity values were then calculated using a Normalized Radar Cross-Section (NRCS). Based on surface roughness criterion at the summit of Sinabung volcano, we could observe the ground surface changes prior to the early eruption in August 2010. The continuous increment of NRCS values showed clearly at window size 3×3 pixel of the summit of Sinabung volcano. The same phenomenon was also detected at the summit of Kelud volcano after the 2007 eruptions. The detected ground surface changes were validated using optical Landsat-8, backscattering intensity ratio for volcanic products detection, and radial component of a tilt-meter data.

  2. 3D surface configuration modulates 2D symmetry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Sio, Lok-Teng

    2015-02-01

    We investigated whether three-dimensional (3D) information in a scene can affect symmetry detection. The stimuli were random dot patterns with 15% dot density. We measured the coherence threshold, or the proportion of dots that were the mirror reflection of the other dots in the other half of the image about a central vertical axis, at 75% accuracy with a 2AFC paradigm under various 3D configurations produced by the disparity between the left and right eye images. The results showed that symmetry detection was difficult when the corresponding dots across the symmetry axis were on different frontoparallel or inclined planes. However, this effect was not due to a difference in distance, as the observers could detect symmetry on a slanted surface, where the depth of the two sides of the symmetric axis was different. The threshold was reduced for a hinge configuration where the join of two slanted surfaces coincided with the axis of symmetry. Our result suggests that the detection of two-dimensional (2D) symmetry patterns is subject to the 3D configuration of the scene; and that coplanarity across the symmetry axis and consistency between the 2D pattern and 3D structure are important factors for symmetry detection. PMID:25536469

  3. Vegetation cover change detection in Chamela-Cuixamala, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Barreda Bautista, Betsabé; López-Caloca, Alejandra A.

    2009-09-01

    In Mexico, and everywhere else, the ecosystems are constantly changing either by natural factors or anthropogenic activity. Remote sensing has been a key tool to monitoring these changes throughout history and also to understanding the ecological dynamics. Hence, sustainable development plans have been created in order to improve the decisionmaking process; thus, this paper analyses deforestation impact in a very important natural resourcing area in Mexico, considering land cover changes. The study area is located in the coast of Jalisco, Mexico, where deforestation and fragmentation as well as high speed touristic development have been the causes of enormous biodiversity losses; the Chamela-Cuixamala Biosphere Reserve is located within this area. It has great species richness and vast endemism. The exploitation of this biome is widespread all over the country and it has already had an impact in the reserve. The change detection multi-temporal study uses Landsat satellite imagery during the 1970-2003 time period. Thus, the objective of change detection analysis is to detect and localize environmental changes through time. The change detection method consists in producing an image of change likelihood (by post-classification, multivariate alteration detection) and thresholding it in order to produce the change map. Experimental results confirmed that the patterns of land use and land cover changes have increased significantly over the last decade. This study also analyzes the deforestation impact on biodiversity. The analysis validation was carried out using field and statistic data. Spatial-temporal changing range enables the analysis of the structural and dynamic effects on the ecosystem and it enhances better decision-making and public environmental policies to decrease or eliminate deforestation, the creation of natural protected areas as a biodiversity conservation method, and counteracting the global warming phenomena.

  4. A Hopfield neural network for image change detection.

    PubMed

    Pajares, Gonzalo

    2006-09-01

    This paper outlines an optimization relaxation approach based on the analog Hopfield neural network (HNN) for solving the image change detection problem between two images. A difference image is obtained by subtracting pixel by pixel both images. The network topology is built so that each pixel in the difference image is a node in the network. Each node is characterized by its state, which determines if a pixel has changed. An energy function is derived, so that the network converges to stable states. The analog Hopfield's model allows each node to take on analog state values. Unlike most widely used approaches, where binary labels (changed/unchanged) are assigned to each pixel, the analog property provides the strength of the change. The main contribution of this paper is reflected in the customization of the analog Hopfield neural network to derive an automatic image change detection approach. When a pixel is being processed, some existing image change detection procedures consider only interpixel relations on its neighborhood. The main drawback of such approaches is the labeling of this pixel as changed or unchanged according to the information supplied by its neighbors, where its own information is ignored. The Hopfield model overcomes this drawback and for each pixel allows a tradeoff between the influence of its neighborhood and its own criterion. This is mapped under the energy function to be minimized. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated by comparative analysis against some existing image change detection methods. PMID:17001985

  5. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER&WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements.

  6. Analytical assays based on detecting conformational changes of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Zocchi, Giovanni

    2006-03-13

    One common strategy for the detection of biomolecules is labeling either the target itself or an antibody that binds to it. Herein, a different approach, based on detecting the conformational change of a probe molecule induced by binding of the target is discussed. That is, what is being detected is not the presence of the target or the probe, but the conformational change of the probe. Recently, a single-molecule sensor has been developed that exploits this mechanism to detect hybridization of a single DNA oligomer to a DNA probe, as well as specific binding of a single protein to a DNA probe. Biomolecular recognition often involves large conformational changes of the molecules involved, and therefore this strategy may be applicable to other assays. PMID:16514690

  7. Detection and Attribution of Anthropogenic Climate Change Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Neofotis, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Human-influenced climate change is an observed phenomenon affecting physical and biological systems across the globe. The majority of observed impacts are related to temperature changes and are located in the northern high- and midlatitudes. However, new evidence is emerging that demonstrates that impacts are related to precipitation changes as well as temperature, and that climate change is impacting systems and sectors beyond the Northern Hemisphere. In this paper, we highlight some of this new evidence-focusing on regions and sectors that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC AR4) noted as under-represented-in the context of observed climate change impacts, direct and indirect drivers of change (including carbon dioxide itself), and methods of detection. We also present methods and studies attributing observed impacts to anthropogenic forcing. We argue that the expansion of methods of detection (in terms of a broader array of climate variables and data sources, inclusion of the major modes of climate variability, and incorporation of other drivers of change) is key to discerning the climate sensitivities of sectors and systems in regions where the impacts of climate change currently remain elusive. Attributing such changes to human forcing of the climate system, where possible, is important for development of effective mitigation and adaptation. Current challenges in documenting adaptation and the role of indigenous knowledge in detection and attribution are described.

  8. Detection of surface glow related to spacecraft glow phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Cohen, S. A.; Manos, D. M.; Motley, R. W.; Ono, M.

    1986-01-01

    A source of low energy neutral atoms and molecules has been developed by using a biased limiter to scrape off and reflect neutralized ions from a toroidal plasma. Beams of nitrogen and nitrogen-oxygen mixtures with energies of 1 to 15 eV and fluxes greater than about 10 to the 14 per centimeter per second were directed onto target surfaces consisting of Z-302 and Z-306 paints. With the nitrogen beams, a glow due to beam-surface interactions was successfully detected. In addition, a volume glow effect due to beam-gas interactions was observed which may play a role in spacecraft glow.

  9. Application of the Nimbus 5 ESMR to rainfall detection over land surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneely, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The ability of the Nimbus 5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) to detect rainfall over land surfaces was evaluated. The ESMR brightness temperatures (Tb sub B) were compared with rainfall reports from climatological stations for a limited number of rain events over portions of the U.S. The greatly varying emissivity of land surfaces precludes detection of actively raining areas. Theoretical calculations using a ten-layer atmospheric model showed this to be an expected result. Detection of rain which had fallen was deemed feasible over certain types of land surfaces by comparing the Tb sub B fields before and after the rain fell. This procedure is reliable only over relatively smooth terrain having a substantial fraction of bare soil, such as exists in major agricultural regions during the dormant or early growing seasons. Soil moisture budgets were computed at selected sites to show how the observed emissivity responded to changes in the moisture content of the upper soil zone.

  10. Finite element simulation for damage detection of surface rust in steel rebars using elastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qixiang; Yu, Tzuyang

    2016-04-01

    Steel rebar corrosion reduces the integrity and service life of reinforced concrete (RC) structures and causes their gradual and sudden failures. Early stage detection of steel rebar corrosion can improve the efficiency of routine maintenance and prevent sudden failures from happening. In this paper, detecting the presence of surface rust in steel rebars is investigated by the finite element method (FEM) using surface-generated elastic waves. Simulated wave propagation mimics the sensing scheme of a fiber optic acoustic generator mounted on the surface of steel rebars. Formation of surface rust in steel rebars is modeled by changing material's property at local elements. In this paper, various locations of a fiber optic acoustic transducer and a receiver were considered. Megahertz elastic waves were used and different sizes of surface rust were applied. Transient responses of surface displacement and pressure were studied. It is found that surface rust is most detectable when the rust location is between the transducer and the receiver. Displacement response of intact steel rebar is needed in order to obtain background-subtracted response with a better signal-to-noise ratio. When the size of surface rust increases, reduced amplitude in displacement was obtained by the receiver.