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Sample records for surface solar irradiance

  1. Open Surface Solar Irradiance Observations - A Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, Lionel; Nüst, Daniel; Jirka, Simon; Maso, Joan; Ranchin, Thierry; Wald, Lucien

    2015-04-01

    The newly started project ConnectinGEO funded by the European Commission aims at improving the understanding on which environmental observations are currently available in Europe and subsequently providing an informational basis to close gaps in diverse observation networks. The project complements supporting actions and networking activities with practical challenges to test and improve the procedures and methods for identifying observation data gaps, and to ensure viability in real world scenarios. We present a challenge on future concepts for building a data sharing portal for the solar energy industry as well as the state of the art in the domain. Decision makers and project developers of solar power plants have identified the Surface Solar Irradiance (SSI) and its components as an important factor for their business development. SSI observations are crucial in the process of selecting suitable locations for building new plants. Since in-situ pyranometric stations form a sparse network, the search for locations starts with global satellite data and is followed by the deployment of in-situ sensors in selected areas for at least one year. To form a convincing picture, answers must be sought in the conjunction of these EO systems, and although companies collecting SSI observations are willing to share this information, the means to exchange in-situ measurements across companies and between stakeholders in the market are still missing. We present a solution for interoperable exchange of SSI data comprising in-situ time-series observations as well as sensor descriptions based on practical experiences from other domains. More concretely, we will apply concepts and implementations of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The work is based on an existing spatial data infrastructure (SDI), which currently comprises metadata, maps and coverage data, but no in-situ observations yet. This catalogue is already registered in the

  2. The incident solar irradiance at the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Tran, AN; Collins, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    Computations have been performed of the incident spectral irradiance at the sea surface using LOWTRAN-7 as the basis to describe the incident scalar and vector irradiance in terms of the true solar zenith angle and the nominal visibility in the atmosphere. These computations have been used to describe the contributions to the incident irradiance from the direct and the sky components of the total irradiance and the average cosine of the sky component as a measure of the radiance distribution of the sky for varying atmospheric conditions. Comparisons of the computations from LOWTRAN-7 have been made with the results from other models, and with data obtained from field measurements, and excellent agreement has been obtained for the daily profiles of the vector and scalar irradiance at the surface. These computations have been used to provide a description of the irradiance at the sea surface for use in the analysis of remotely sensed data based on information on the radiative transfer through the atmosphere above the sea surface.

  3. Surface solar irradiance from SCIAMACHY measurements: algorithm and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Stammes, P.; Mueller, R.

    2011-02-01

    Broadband surface solar irradiances (SSI) are, for the first time, derived from SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY) satellite measurements. The retrieval algorithm, called FRESCO (Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from Oxygen A band) SSI, is similar to the Heliosat method. In contrast to the standard Heliosat method, the cloud index is replaced by the effective cloud fraction derived from the FRESCO cloud algorithm. The MAGIC (Mesoscale Atmospheric Global Irradiance Code) algorithm is used to calculate clear-sky SSI. The SCIAMACHY SSI product is validated against the globally distributed BSRN (Baseline Surface Radiation Network) measurements and compared with the ISCCP-FD (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Flux Dataset) surface shortwave downwelling fluxes (SDF). For one year of data in 2008, the mean difference between the instantaneous SCIAMACHY SSI and the hourly mean BSRN global irradiances is -4 W m-2(-1%) with a standard deviation of 101 W m-2 (20%). The mean difference between the globally monthly mean SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF is less than -12 W m-2 (-2%) for every month in 2006 and the standard deviation is 62 W m-2 (12%). The correlation coefficient is 0.93 between SCIAMACHY SSI and BSRN global irradiances and is greater than 0.96 between SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF. The evaluation results suggest that the SCIAMACHY SSI product achieves similar mean bias error and root mean square error as the surface solar irradiances derived from polar orbiting satellites with higher spatial resolution.

  4. Surface solar irradiance from SCIAMACHY measurements: algorithm and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Stammes, P.; Mueller, R.

    2011-05-01

    Broadband surface solar irradiances (SSI) are, for the first time, derived from SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY) satellite measurements. The retrieval algorithm, called FRESCO (Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band) SSI, is similar to the Heliosat method. In contrast to the standard Heliosat method, the cloud index is replaced by the effective cloud fraction derived from the FRESCO cloud algorithm. The MAGIC (Mesoscale Atmospheric Global Irradiance Code) algorithm is used to calculate clear-sky SSI. The SCIAMACHY SSI product is validated against globally distributed BSRN (Baseline Surface Radiation Network) measurements and compared with ISCCP-FD (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Flux Dataset) surface shortwave downwelling fluxes (SDF). For one year of data in 2008, the mean difference between the instantaneous SCIAMACHY SSI and the hourly mean BSRN global irradiances is -4 W m-2 (-1 %) with a standard deviation of 101 W m-2 (20 %). The mean difference between the globally monthly mean SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF is less than -12 W m-2 (-2 %) for every month in 2006 and the standard deviation is 62 W m-2 (12 %). The correlation coefficient is 0.93 between SCIAMACHY SSI and BSRN global irradiances and is greater than 0.96 between SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF. The evaluation results suggest that the SCIAMACHY SSI product achieves similar mean bias error and root mean square error as the surface solar irradiances derived from polar orbiting satellites with higher spatial resolution.

  5. Real Solar Irradiance Data for Planetary Surface Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G.; Harder, J.; McCord, T.

    2008-12-01

    The precise determination of the solar irradiance (or extraterrestrial spectrum - ETS) is of primary importance for converting space-borne remote sensing radiance data to accurate reflectance values necessary for geological interpretations of planetary surfaces. Historically, the ETS has been determined from either calculating an emitted spectrum based on the Sun's composition, or modeling and removing atmospheric interferences on a solar spectrum obtained by telescopic observations, aircraft, and/or ground measurements. However, modeling an atmosphere is incredibly complex. A solar spectrum thus measured is replete with absorptions caused by molecular vibrations of atmospheric gases and scattering by particulates at wavelengths that would otherwise be diagnostic of petrological or atmospherical properties. An ETS calculated from these measurements must make some general assumptions about atmospheric conditions at the time of acquisition in order to compensate for their effects. However, variations in local pressures, humidity, and particulate compositions present a many-bodied problem that preclude a truly accurate model. Nevertheless, these model spectra are the basis for the ETS used for atmospheric and planetary surface studies. The Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) onboard the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) provides a better alternative to theoretically-derived ETS by directly measuring the solar irradiance, outside the Earth's atmosphere. For almost six years, SIM has been taking daily measurements of the ETS at wavelengths between 200 and 2400 nm. This spectral range covers most absorption bands diagnostic of mafic mineralogy, thus making SIM's data ideal for terrestrial planetary mapping. Furthermore, SIM's daily measurements allow for enhanced meteorologic studies of other planetary atmospheres. SIM's spectral resolution and signal to noise ratio meet or exceed the sensitivity of current spectrometer detectors.

  6. Spatial and temporal variability of global surface solar irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, James K. B.; Rossow, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to a fast scheme for computing surface solar irradiance using data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Daily mean solar irradiances from the fast scheme reproduce the detailed global results from full radiative transfer model calculations to within 6 and 10 W/sq m over the ocean and land, respectively. Comparison of calculated monthly mean results using 5 m of ISCCP data (July 1983-July 1984) with climatology from the 1970s at six temperature-latitude ocean weather stations shows agreement within published estimates of interannual variability of monthly means at the individual stations. A further test against a 17-day time series at a continental site, where ground and satellite data were spatially and temporally coincident, showed an accuracy of better than 9 W/sq m on a daily basis and less than 4 percent bias in the 17-day mean. Frequently used bulk formulas for solar irradiance are also evaluated in each of these tests.

  7. Numerical modeling of solar irradiance on earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera, E.; Gutierez, L.; Da Silva, L.; Miranda, E.

    2016-05-01

    Modeling studies and estimation of solar radiation in base area, touch from the problems of estimating equation of time, distance equation solar space, solar declination, calculation of surface irradiance, considering that there are a lot of studies you reported the inability of these theoretical equations to be accurate estimates of radiation, many authors have proceeded to make corrections through calibrations with Pyranometers field (solarimeters) or the use of satellites, this being very poor technique last because there a differentiation between radiation and radiant kinetic effects. Because of the above and considering that there is a weather station properly calibrated ground in the Susques Salar in the Jujuy Province, Republic of Argentina, proceeded to make the following modeling of the variable in question, it proceeded to perform the following process: 1. Theoretical Modeling, 2. graphic study of the theoretical and actual data, 3. Adjust primary calibration data through data segmentation on an hourly basis, through horizontal and adding asymptotic constant, 4. Analysis of scatter plot and contrast series. Based on the above steps, the modeling data obtained: Step One: Theoretical data were generated, Step Two: The theoretical data moved 5 hours, Step Three: an asymptote of all negative emissivity values applied, Solve Excel algorithm was applied to least squares minimization between actual and modeled values, obtaining new values of asymptotes with the corresponding theoretical reformulation of data. Add a constant value by month, over time range set (4:00 pm to 6:00 pm). Step Four: The modeling equation coefficients had monthly correlation between actual and theoretical data ranging from 0.7 to 0.9.

  8. Global surface solar irradiance product derived from SCIAMACHY FRESCO cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Stammes, Piet; Müller, Richard

    The FRESCO cloud retrieval algorithm has been developed as a simple but fast and efficient algorithm for GOME and SCIAMACHY (Koelemeijer et al., 2001; Fournier et al., 2006; Wang et al., 2008). FRESCO employs the O2 A band at 760 nm to retrieve the effective cloud fraction and cloud pressure using a simple Lambertian cloud model. The effective cloud fraction is a combination of geometric cloud fraction and cloud optical thickness, which yield the same reflectance at the top of the atmosphere as the cloud in the scene. It is well-known that clouds reduce the surface solar irradiance. Therefore the all-sky irradiance can be derived from the clear-sky irradiance with a scaling factor related to the cloud index. The cloud index is very similar to the effective cloud fraction by definition. The MAGIC (Mesoscale Atmospheric Global Irradiance Code) software converts the cloud index to the surface solar irradiance using the Heliosat method (Mueller et al. 2009). The MAGIC algorithm is also used by the CM-SAF surface solar irradiance product for clear sky cases. We applied the MAGIC software to FRESCO effective cloud fraction with slight modifications. In this presentation we will show the FRESCO-SSI monthly mean product and the comparison with the BSRN global irradiance data at Cabauw, the Netherlands and surface solar irradiance measurement at Tibetan plateau in China.

  9. Temporal Variability of Surface Solar Irradiance as a Function of Satellite-retrieved Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkelman, L. M.; Sengupta, M.; Habte, A.

    2014-12-01

    Studies of the impact of renewables on the electrical transmission grid are needed as power production from renewable energy resources increases. These studies require estimates of high temporal and spatial resolution power output under various scenarios. Satellite-based solar resource estimates are the best source of long-term irradiance data but are generally of lower temporal and spatial resolution than needed and thus require downscaling. Likewise, weather forecast models cannot provide high spatial or temporal irradiance predictions. Downscaling requires information about solar irradiance variability in both space and time, which is primarily a function of cloud properties. In this study, we analyze the relationships between the temporal variability of surface solar irradiance and satellite-based cloud properties. One-minute resolution surface solar irradiance data were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) network. These sites are distributed across the United States to cover a range of meteorological conditions. Cloud information at a nominal 4 km resolution and half hour intervals was retrieved from NOAA's Geostationary Operation Environmental Satellites (GOES). The retrieved cloud properties were then used to select and composite irradiance data from the measurement sites in order to identify the cloud properties that exert the strongest control over short-term irradiance variability. The irradiance variability was characterized using statistics of both the irradiances themselves and of irradiance differences computed for short time scales (minutes). The relationships derived using this method will be presented, comparing and contrasting the statistics computed for the different cloud properties. The implications for downscaling irradiance from satellites or forecast models will also be discussed.

  10. A technique for global monitoring of net solar irradiance at the ocean surface. II - Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertock, Beth; Frouin, Robert; Gautier, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    The generation and validation of the first satellite-based long-term record of surface solar irradiance over the global oceans are addressed. The record is generated using Nimbus-7 earth radiation budget (ERB) wide-field-of-view plentary-albedo data as input to a numerical algorithm designed and implemented based on radiative transfer theory. The mean monthly values of net surface solar irradiance are computed on a 9-deg latitude-longitude spatial grid for November 1978-October 1985. The new data set is validated in comparisons with short-term, regional, high-resolution, satellite-based records. The ERB-based values of net surface solar irradiance are compared with corresponding values based on radiance measurements taken by the Visible-Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer aboard GOES series satellites. Errors in the new data set are estimated to lie between 10 and 20 W/sq m on monthly time scales.

  11. Distribution of solar irradiance on inclined surfaces caused by moving clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomson, Teolan

    2016-05-01

    The distribution of solar irradiance in shadows of discrete (broken) clouds differs from the distribution calculated for inclined surfaces on the basis of traditional transposition models and changes fast. This phenomenon is studied in this paper. For calculations of dynamic distributions of irradiance on inclined surfaces, a formal point source of direct radiation near the real position of the sun is defined as the source of the "imaginable radiation." This notion is used to create a one-dimensional (1D) simulation model, which allows the fast-changing distribution of irradiance to be calculated. In general, the coincidence of calculated and measured irradiance on inclined surfaces is good. The paper also shows how the current value of the diffuse component of solar radiation can be derived from measurements of total radiation in four differently tilted planes.

  12. A new method for assessing surface solar irradiance: Heliosat-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z.; Oumbe, A.; Blanc, P.; Lefèvre, M.; Wald, L.; Schroedter-Homscheidt, M.; Gesell, G.

    2012-04-01

    Downwelling shortwave irradiance at surface (SSI) is more and more often assessed by means of satellite-derived estimates of optical properties of the atmosphere. Performances are judged satisfactory for the time being but there is an increasing need for the assessment of the direct and diffuse components of the SSI. MINES ParisTech and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) are currently developing the Heliosat-4 method to assess the SSI and its components in a more accurate way than current practices. This method is composed by two parts: a clear sky module based on the radiative transfer model libRadtran, and a cloud-ground module using two-stream and delta-Eddington approximations for clouds and a database of ground albedo. Advanced products derived from geostationary satellites and recent Earth Observation missions are the inputs of the Heliosat-4 method. Such products are: cloud optical depth, cloud phase, cloud type and cloud coverage from APOLLO of DLR, aerosol optical depth, aerosol type, water vapor in clear-sky, ozone from MACC products (FP7), and ground albedo from MODIS of NASA. In this communication, we briefly present Heliosat-4 and focus on its performances. The results of Heliosat-4 for the period 2004-2010 will be compared to the measurements made in five stations within the Baseline Surface Radiation Network. Extensive statistic analysis as well as case studies are performed in order to better understand Heliosat-4 and have an in-depth view of the performance of Heliosat-4, to understand its advantages comparing to existing methods and to identify its defaults for future improvements. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement no. 218793 (MACC project) and no. 283576 (MACC-II project).

  13. Simulation Study of Effects of Solar Irradiance and Sea Surface Temperature on Monsoons and Global Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Mehta, V.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A recent version of the GEOS 2 GCM was used to isolate the roles of the annual cycles of solar irradiation and/or sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) on the simulated circulation and rainfall. Four 4-year long integrations were generated with the GCM. The first integration, called Control Case, used daily-interpolated SSTs from a 30 year monthly SST climatology that was obtained from the analyzed SST-data, while the solar irradiation at the top of the atmosphere was calculated normally at hourly intervals. The next two cases prescribed the SSTs or the incoming solar irradiance at the top of the atmosphere at their annual mean values, respectively while everything else was kept the same as in the Control Case. In this way the influence of the annual cycles of both external forcings was isolated.

  14. Measurements of solar ultraviolet irradiance with respect to the human body surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stick, Carsten; Harms, Volker; Pielke, Liane

    1994-07-01

    Solar UV irradiance is measured in Westerland, Germany (54.9 degree(s) N, 8.3 degree(s) E) in the immediate vicinity of the North Sea shoreline. Measurements have been done since July 1993, focussing on the biologically effective UV radiation and the human body geometry. A grid double monochromator radiometer (DM 150, Bentham Instruments Comp., Reading, England) is used to measure the spectral resolution of 1 nm. Weighting the spectral irradiance by the action spectrum for the erythema is more appropriate for determining the biological effectiveness than simply dividing the UV radiation into the UV-A and UV-B wavebands. The erythemal irradiance shows a close relation to the sun angle during the course of a day. The exposure times, calculated from the irradiance and the minimal erythemal doses, suggest that people might underestimate the risk of getting sunburnt before noon. Diffuse radiation scattered from the sky contribute about 70% of the erythemal irradiance at a 45 degree(s) sun angle. A receiver oriented directly to the sun, i.e. 45 degree(s) inclined, receives an additional 30% of the erythemal irradiance measured by a horizontally adjusted cosine response sensor. The relative irradiance of curved surfaces like the skin is determined by UV- B-sensitive paper placed around a cylinder. This device detected UV radiation reflected by the sea, which hardly is measured by horizontally adjusted receivers.

  15. Dependence of Lunar Surface Charging on Solar Wind Plasma Conditions and Solar Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Burchill, J. K.; Collier, M. R.; Zimmerman, M. I.; Vondrak, R. R.; Delory, G. T.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    The surface of the Moon is electrically charged by exposure to solar radiation on its dayside, as well as by the continuous flux of charged particles from the various plasma environments that surround it. An electric potential develops between the lunar surface and ambient plasma, which manifests itself in a near-surface plasma sheath with a scale height of order the Debye length. This study investigates surface charging on the lunar dayside and near-terminator regions in the solar wind, for which the dominant current sources are usually from the pohotoemission of electrons, J(sub p), and the collection of plasma electrons J(sub e) and ions J(sub i). These currents are dependent on the following six parameters: plasma concentration n(sub 0), electron temperature T(sub e), ion temperature T(sub i), bulk flow velocity V, photoemission current at normal incidence J(sub P0), and photo electron temperature T(sub p). Using a numerical model, derived from a set of eleven basic assumptions, the influence of these six parameters on surface charging - characterized by the equilibrium surface potential, Debye length, and surface electric field - is investigated as a function of solar zenith angle. Overall, T(sub e) is the most important parameter, especially near the terminator, while J(sub P0) and T(sub p) dominate over most of the dayside.

  16. Solar Irradiance Changes And Photobiological Effects At Earth's Surface Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian; Neale, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth for decades. Although there is some direct biological damage on the surface from redistributed radiation several studies have indicated that the greatest long term threat is from ozone depletion and subsequent heightened solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It is known that organisms exposed to this irradiation experience harmful effects such as sunburn and even direct damage to DNA, proteins, or other cellular structures. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In the present work, we employed a radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light). Using biological weighting functions we have considered a wide range of effects, including: erythema and skin cancer in humans; inhibition of photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum sp. and dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans inhibition of carbon fixation in Antarctic phytoplankton; inhibition of growth of oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Otana) seedlings; and cataracts. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in

  17. Solar total irradiance variations and the global sea surface temperature record

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, G.C. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder )

    1991-02-20

    The record of globally averaged sea surface temperature (SST) over the past 130 years shows a highly significant correlation with the envelope of the 11-year cycle of solar activity over the same period. This correlation could be explained by a variation in the sun's total irradiance (the solar constant) that is in phase with the solar-cycle envelope, supporting and updating an earlier conclusion by Eddy (1976) that such variations could have played a major role in climate change over the past millennium. Measurements of the total irradiance from spacecraft, rockets, and balloons over the past 25 years have provided evidence of long-term variations and have been used to develop a simple linear relationship between irradiance and the envelope of the sunspot cycle. This relationship has been used to force a one-dimensional model of the thermal structure of the ocean, consisting of a 100-m mixed layer coupled to a deep ocean and including a thermohaline circulation. The model was started in the mid-seventeenth century, at the time of the Maunder Minimum of solar activity, and mixed-layer temperatures were calculated at 6-month intervals up to the present. The total range of irradiance values during the period was about 1%, and the total range of SST was about 1C. Cool periods, when temperatures were about 0.5C below present-day values, were found in the early decades of both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The results can be taken as indicating that solar variability has been an important contributor to global climate variations in recent decades. The growing atmospheric burden of greenhouse gases may well have played an important role in the immediate past.

  18. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Neale, Patrick J; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-03-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA-damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in very limited geographical areas; instead we found a net increase for most of the modeled time-space region. This result has implications for proposed climate changes associated with ionizing radiation events. PMID:25692406

  19. Dependence of lunar surface charging on solar wind plasma conditions and solar irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Burchill, J. K.; Collier, M. R.; Zimmerman, M. I.; Vondrak, R. R.; Delory, G. T.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    The surface of the Moon is electrically charged by exposure to solar radiation on its dayside, as well as by the continuous flux of charged particles from the various plasma environments that surround it. An electric potential develops between the lunar surface and ambient plasma, which manifests itself in a near-surface plasma sheath with a scale height of order the Debye length. This study investigates surface charging on the lunar dayside and near-terminator regions in the solar wind, for which the dominant current sources are usually from the photoemission of electrons Jp, and the collection of plasma electrons Je, and ions Ji. These currents are dependent on the following six parameters: plasma concentration n0, electron temperature Te, ion temperature Ti, bulk flow velocity V, photoemission current at normal incidence JP0, and photoelectron temperature Tp. Using a numerical model, derived from a set of eleven basic assumptions, the influence of these six parameters on surface charging - characterized by the equilibrium surface potential, Debye length, and surface electric field - is investigated as a function of solar zenith angle. Overall, Te is the most important parameter, especially near the terminator, while JP0 and Tp dominate over most of the dayside. In contrast, V and Ti are found to be the least effective parameters. Typically, lunar surface charging in the solar wind can be reduced to a two-current problem: on the dayside in sunlight, Jp+Je=0, since ∣ Jp∣ ≫ ∣ Je∣ ≫ ∣ Ji∣ , while near the terminator in shadow, Je+Ji=0. However, situations can arise that result in a truly three-current problem with some important consequences; e.g., very cold Te and/or very fast V can result in ∣ Jp∣ ≫ ∣ Je∣ ≈ ∣ Ji∣ on the dayside. The influence of surface charging pervades the environments of the Moon and other airless bodies, and the investigation presented here provides insights into the physical processes involved, as well as being

  20. Evaporation and solar irradiance as regulators of sea surface temperature in annual and interannual changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Zhang, Anzhen; Bishop, James K. B.

    1994-01-01

    Seven years of net surface solar irradiance (S) derived from cloud information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and 4 years of surface latent heat flux (E) derived from the observations of the special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) were used to examine the relation between surface heat fluxes and sea surface temperature (T(sub s)) in their global geographical distribution, seasonal cycle, and interannual variation. The relations of seasonal changes imply that evaporation cooling is significant over most of the ocean and that solar heating is the main drive for the change of T(sub s) away from the equatorial wave guide where ocean dynamics may be more important. However, T(sub s) is not the most direct and significant factor in the seasonal changes of S and E over most of the ocean; the solar incident angle may be more important to S, and wind speed and air humidity are found to correlate better with E. Significant local correlations between anomalies of T(sub s) and S and between anomalies of T(sub s) and E are found in the central equatorial Pacific; both types of correlation are negative. The influence of ocean dynamics in changing T(sub s) in the tropical ocean cannot be ignored.

  1. Results of 1 MeV proton irradiation of front and back surfaces of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Kachare, R.; Weizer, V. G.

    1987-01-01

    Several silicon solar cells with and without back surface fields (BSF), having thicknesses of 200 microns and 63 microns were irradiated with 1 MeV protons having fluences between 1 times 10 to the 10th power and 1 times 10 to the 12th power p/square cm. The irradiation was performed using both normal and isotropic incidence on the front as well as back surfaces of the solar cells. The results of the back surface irradiations are analyzed using a model in which irradiation induced defects across the high-low (BSF) junction are considered. It is concluded that degradation of the high-low junction is responsible for the severe performance loss in thinner cells when irradiated from the rear.

  2. A simple analytical formula to compute clear sky total and photosynthetically available solar irradiance at the ocean surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Lingner, David W.; Gautier, Catherine; Baker, Karen S.; Smith, Ray C.

    1989-01-01

    A simple but accurate analytical formula was developed for computing the total and the photosynthetically available solar irradiances at the ocean surface under clear skies, which takes into account the processes of scattering by molecules and aerosols within the atmosphere and of absorption by the water vapor, ozone, and aerosols. These processes are parameterized as a function of solar zenith angle, aerosol type, atmospheric visibility, and vertically integrated water-vapor and ozone amounts. Comparisons of the calculated and measured total and photosynthetically available solar irradiances for several experiments in tropical and mid-latitude ocean regions show 39 and 14 Wm/sq m rms errors (6.5 and 4.7 percent of the average measured values) on an hourly time scale, respectively. The proposed forumula is unique in its ability to predict surface solar irradiance in the photosynthetically active spectral interval.

  3. The Variability of Solar Spectral Irradiance and Solar Surface Indices Through the Solar Activity Cycles 21-23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz Goker, Umit

    2016-07-01

    A study of variations of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the wavelength ranges 121.5 nm-300.5 nm for the period 1981-2009 is presented. We used various data for ultraviolet (UV) spectral lines and international sunspot number (ISSN) from interactive data centers as SME (NSSDC), UARS (GDAAC), SORCE (LISIRD) and SIDC, respectively. We developed a special software for extracting the data and reduced this data by using the MATLAB. In this respect, we revealed negative correlations of intensities of UV (289.5 nm-300.5 nm) emission lines originating in the solar chromosphere with the ISSN index during the unusually prolonged minimum between the solar cycles (SCs) 23 and 24. We also compared our results with the ground-based telescopes as Solar Irradiance Platform, Stanford Data (SFO), Kodaikanal Data (KKL) and NGDC Homepage (Rome and Learmonth Solar Observatories). We studied the variations of total solar irradiance (TSI), magnetic field, sunspots/sunspot groups, Ca II K-flux, faculae and plage areas data with these ground-based telescopes, respectively. We reduced the selected data using the Phyton programming language and plot with the IDL programme. Therefore, we found that there was a decrease in the area of bright faculae and chromospheric plages while the percentage of dark faculae and plage decrease, as well. However, these decreases mainly occurred in small sunspots, contrary to this, these terms in large sunspot groups were comparable to previous SCs or even larger. Nevertheless, negative correlations between ISSN and SSI data indicate that these emissions are in close connection with the classes of sunspots/sunspot groups and "PLAGE" regions. Finally, we applied the time series of the chemical elements correspond to the wavelengths 121.5 nm-300.5 nm and compared with the ISSN data. We found an unexpected increasing in the 298.5 nm for the Fe II element. The variability of Fe II (298.5 nm) is in close connection with the plage regions and the sizes of the

  4. Satellite-derived photosynthetically available and total solar irradiance at the surface during FIFE's intensive field campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Mcpherson, J.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite-derived photosynthetically available and total solar irradiance at the surface during First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment's (FIFE) intensive field compaigns are addressed. Graphs showing photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) vs. Julian Day and insolation vs. Julian Day are included.

  5. Usability of a Fourier transform spectroradiometer for absolute surface spectral solar UV irradiance measurements.

    PubMed

    Meindl, Peter; Wähmer, Martin; Monte, Christian

    2014-10-20

    The suitability of a commercially available Fourier transform spectrometer equipped with a fiber-coupled global entrance optic as a reference spectroradiometer for the measurement of spectral solar ultraviolet irradiance at ground level has been investigated. The instrument has been characterized with respect to the wavelength uncertainty, and a calibration of the spectral irradiance responsivity has been performed by using the calculable irradiance of a high temperature black-body radiator and by using a secondary irradiance standard lamp. The relative standard uncertainty of solar irradiance measurements in the wavelength range from 310 nm to 400 nm with this spectroradiometer, based on the described methodology, is 1.6% for solar zenith angles of less than 60°. PMID:25401540

  6. Midwestern streamflow, precipitation, and atmospheric vorticity influenced by Pacific sea-surface temperatures and total solar-irradiance variations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    A solar effect on streamflow in the Midwestern United States is described and supported in a six-step physical connection between total solar irradiance (TSI), tropical sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), extratropical SSTs, jet-stream vorticity, surface-layer vorticity, precipitation, and streamflow. Variations in the correlations among the individual steps indicate that the solar/hydroclimatic mechanism is complex and has a time element (lag) that may not be constant. Correct phasing, supported by consistent spectral peaks between 0.092 and 0.096 cycles per year in all data sets within the mechanism is strong evidence for its existence. A significant correlation exists between total solar irradiance and the 3-year moving average of annual streamflow for Iowa (R = 0.67) and for the Mississippi River at St Louis, Missouri (R = 0.60), during the period 1950-2000. Published in 2005 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Assessing Surface Solar Irradiance in French Guiana using the Heliosat-II method and GOES images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarelo, T.; Marie-Joseph, I.; Primerose, A.; Dolique, F.; Seyler, F.; Linguet, L.

    2014-12-01

    French Guiana is an overseas department administratively attached to France, located in the northeast of South America between Brazil and Surinam. French Guiana's distance from France (more than 8000 km) leads to varied needs, especially in energy supply. A promising solution for solar mapping of French Guiana lies in the use of satellite images as the few ground radiometric stations (6 stations) are not sufficient to create a solar mapping of French Guiana. In this work, we assess the use of the Heliosat-II method with GOES satellite images in order to develop a dynamic solar map in French Guiana. To estimate Surface Solar Irradiance (SSI) over French Guiana, the original Heliosat-II method developed for operation with METEOSAT images has been modified to be used with GOES satellite images. Modifications include a change in calibration and in the calculation of the cloud albedo. Cloud albedos were retrieved using several strategies proposed by the literature: the maximum monthly value of the apparent albedo values (ρc max), the 95th percentile of the apparent albedo values (ρc Q95) or a pixel-by-pixel formula (ρc Rig). ). By using these three different methods, SSI was calculated over French Guiana. SSI estimated with ρc max as the cloud albedo gives the best results, with an overall MBE lesser than 5% and a Correlation Coefficient greater than 0.9, for a RMSE of 25% . These results show that the use of the Heliosat-II method with GOES images provide accurate SSI estimates in French Guiana.

  8. Solar Irradiance: Observations, Proxies, and Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lean, J.

    2013-12-01

    Solar irradiance has been measured from space for more than thirty years. Variations in total (spectrally integrated) solar irradiance associated with the Sun's 11-year activity cycle and 27-day rotation are now well characterized. But the magnitude, and even the sign, of spectral irradiance changes at near ultraviolet, visible and near infrared wavelengths, remain uncertain on time scales longer than a few months. Drifts in the calibration of the instruments that measure solar irradiance and incomplete understanding of the causes of irradiance variations preclude specification of multi-decadal solar irradiance variations with any confidence, including whether, or not, irradiance levels were lower during the 2008-2009 anomalously low solar activity minimum than in prior minima. The ultimate cause of solar irradiance variations is the Sun's changing activity, driven by a sub-surface dynamo that generates magnetic features called sunspots and faculae, which respectively deplete and enhance the net radiative output. Solar activity also alters parameters that have been measured from the ground for longer periods and with greater stability than the solar irradiance datasets. The longest and most stable such record is the Sun's irradiance at 10.7 cm in the radio spectrum, which is used frequently as a proxy indicator of solar irradiance variability. Models have been developed that relate the solar irradiance changes - both total and spectral - evident in extant databases to proxies chosen to best represent the sunspot darkening and facular brightening influences. The proxy models are then used to reconstruct solar irradiance variations at all wavelengths on multi-decadal time scales, for input to climate and atmospheric model simulations that seek to quantity the Sun's contribution to Earth's changing environment. This talk provides an overview of solar total and spectral irradiance observations and their relevant proxies, describes the formulation and construction of

  9. A LUT-based approach to estimate surface solar irradiance by combining MODIS and MTSAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guanghui; Ma, Mingguo; Liang, Shunlin; Liu, Shaomin; Li, Xin

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, a new satellite-derived approach for obtaining instantaneous surface solar irradiance (SSI) by combining Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multifunctional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) data is presented and validated using one year pyranometer measurements from five stations in northern China. The approach is based on look-up tables created via comprehensive radiative transfer modeling to achieve high accuracy and high computational efficiency. The synergy of the multispectral sensor MODIS and the high-temporal-resolution geostationary satellite MTSAT enables the adequate use of multisource remote sensing information to determine the atmosphere and surface states, and thereby complements shortcomings of their own. Here we use MTSAT data to capture the changes of cloud fields in the atmosphere and use MODIS products to obtain the dynamic aerosol loading, water vapor content, surface reflectance, and other information. Meanwhile, on the basis of instantaneous retrieval results, the calculation of hourly average SSI is also explored. The preliminary validation demonstrates that both instantaneous and hourly SSIs can be produced accurately over northern China using this approach, and the retrieval quality of hourly SSI data is slightly better than that of instantaneous SSI data. However, in mountainous areas the results need further refinement.

  10. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  11. Updates to ISO 21348 (determining solar irradiances)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    2012-07-01

    The ISO 21348 (Determining Solar Irradiances) International Standard is going through a document update. A consensus solar spectrum, solar indices/proxies descriptions, solar model descriptions, and solar measurement descriptions are among the Annexes that are proposed to the standard. These topics will be reviewed and described. The International Standards Organization (ISO) published IS 21348 in 2007 after 7 years of development by the international scientific community. In ISO, documents are reviewed on a regular basis and reaffirmed, updated, or deleted according to the votes of national delegations represented in ISO. IS 21348 provides guidelines for specifying the process of determining solar irradiances. Solar irradiances are reported through products such as measurement sets, reference spectra, empirical models, theoretical models and solar irradiance proxies or indices. These products are used in scientific and engineering applications to characterize within the natural space environment solar irradiances that are relevant to space systems and materials. Examples of applications using input solar irradiance energy include the determination of atmospheric densities for spacecraft orbit determination, attitude control and re-entry calculations, as well as for debris mitigation and collision avoidance activity. Direct and indirect pressure from solar irradiance upon spacecraft surfaces also affects attitude control separately from atmospheric density effects. Solar irradiances are used to provide inputs for a) calculations of ionospheric parameters, b) photon-induced radiation effects, and c) radiative transfer modeling of planetary atmospheres. Input solar irradiance energy is used to characterize material properties related to spacecraft thermal control, including surface temperatures, reflectivity, absorption and degradation. Solar energy applications requiring a standard process for determining solar irradiance energy include i) solar cell power

  12. Multi-waveband solar irradiance on tree-shaded vertical and horizontal surfaces: cloud-free and partly cloudy skies.

    PubMed

    Grant, R H; Heisler, G M

    2001-01-01

    Irradiance measurements of short wave (SW), photosynthetically active (PAR), ultraviolet-A (UVA) and ultraviolet-B (UVB) solar radiations were made on horizontal and vertical surfaces in the shade of trees under cloud-free and partly cloudy skies. All measurements were referenced to the irradiance of a horizontal surface above the canopy. For horizontal shaded surfaces under cloud-free skies, the values of the ratio (Rh) of below- to above-canopy horizontal irradiance were similar for the UVA and UVB wavebands and for the SW and PAR wavebands. However, Rh for the UV wavebands differed from that for the PAR and SW wavebands. Overall, values of Rh in the shade typically varied as PAR < SW < UVA < UVB. The irradiance ratios for vertical surface in the shade typically varied as UVB > UVA = SW > PAR. In absolute terms, UVB irradiance (Ih) on tree-shaded horizontal surfaces increased relative to a cloud-free sky when a translucent cirroform cloud was in front of the sun, but decreased when the cloud was in a region of sky away from the sun. Translucent cirroform cloud cover also tended to decrease the UVB irradiance (Iv) for a shaded vertical surface (either facing the sun or south) relative to that under cloud-free skies, regardless of where the clouds were in the sky. In all other wavebands the shaded Ih and Iv increased under translucent cirroform cloud cover relative to cloud-free skies, regardless of where the clouds were in the sky. PMID:11202362

  13. An efficient physically based parameterization to derive surface solar irradiance based on satellite atmospheric products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jun; Tang, Wenjun; Yang, Kun; Lu, Ning; Niu, Xiaolei; Liang, Shunlin

    2015-05-01

    Surface solar irradiance (SSI) is required in a wide range of scientific researches and practical applications. Many parameterization schemes are developed to estimate it using routinely measured meteorological variables, since SSI is directly measured at a very limited number of stations. Even so, meteorological stations are still sparse, especially in remote areas. Remote sensing can be used to map spatiotemporally continuous SSI. Considering the huge amount of satellite data, coarse-resolution SSI has been estimated for reducing the computational burden when the estimation is based on a complex radiative transfer model. On the other hand, many empirical relationships are used to enhance the retrieval efficiency, but the accuracy cannot be guaranteed out of regions where they are locally calibrated. In this study, an efficient physically based parameterization is proposed to balance computational efficiency and retrieval accuracy for SSI estimation. In this parameterization, the transmittances for gases, aerosols, and clouds are all handled in full band form and the multiple reflections between the atmosphere and surface are explicitly taken into account. The newly proposed parameterization is applied to estimate SSI with both Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) atmospheric and land products as inputs. These retrievals are validated against in situ measurements at the Surface Radiation Budget Network and at the North China Plain on an instantaneous basis, and moreover, they are validated and compared with Global Energy and Water Exchanges-Surface Radiation Budget and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project-flux data SSI estimates at radiation stations of China Meteorological Administration on a daily mean basis. The estimation results indicates that the newly proposed SSI estimation scheme can effectively retrieve SSI based on MODIS products with mean root-mean-square errors of about 100 Wm- 1 and 35 Wm- 1 on an instantaneous and daily

  14. Impact of differences in the solar irradiance spectrum on surface reflectance retrieval with different radiative transfer codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staenz, K.; Williams, D. J.; Fedosejevs, G.; Teillet, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    Surface reflectance retrieval from imaging spectrometer data as acquired with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) has become important for quantitative analysis. In order to calculate surface reflectance from remotely measured radiance, radiative transfer codes such as 5S and MODTRAN2 play an increasing role for removal of scattering and absorption effects of the atmosphere. Accurate knowledge of the exo-atmospheric solar irradiance (E(sub 0)) spectrum at the spectral resolution of the sensor is important for this purpose. The present study investigates the impact of differences in the solar irradiance function, as implemented in a modified version of 5S (M5S), 6S, and MODTRAN2, and as proposed by Green and Gao, on the surface reflectance retrieved from AVIRIS data. Reflectance measured in situ is used as a basis of comparison.

  15. Formation of chlorinated intermediate from bisphenol A in surface saline water under simulated solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Zhao, Huimin; Quan, Xie; Zhang, Yaobin; Chen, Shuo

    2009-10-15

    Chlorinated organic compounds are generally of great concern, but many uncertainties exist regarding how they are generated. To illustrate the possibility of photochemical formation of organochlorine compounds in natural water, the phototransformation of bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous saline solution containing Fe(lll) and fulvic acid (FA), and in coastal seawater under simulated solar light irradiation was investigated. 2-(3-Chloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propane (3-CIBPA) and 2,2-bis(3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenyl) propane (3,3-diCIBPA) were the main chlorinated derivatives during the processes. Laser flash photolysis (LFP) and electron spin resonance (ESR) results indicated that the chlorination of BPA was most likely due to the formation of Cl2(*-) radical as a consequence of Fe(III) irradiation, yielding Cl* and OH* radical species and finally forming Cl2(*-) radical upon further reaction with chloride. The formation of Fe(III)-FA complex, which is a normal coexistence configuration of Fe(III) and FA in natural water, promoted the BPA chlorination through producing more Cl2(*-) radical. Moreover, FA had two opposite effects: forming Fe(III)-FA complex to enhance Cl2(*-) formation and competing radicals with BPA, which resulted in different overall effects at different concentrations: BPA chlorination was enhanced with the increasing of FA concentration ([FA]) when [FA] < 3.2 mg L(-1); when the concentration of FA was as high as 10 mg L(-1), it slowed down obviously. The described BPA photochlorination process took place from pH 6.3 to 8.5 and increased with the increasing of chloride concentration, indicating it could occur universally in natural saline surface water. These results propose a natural photochemical source for organochlorine compounds. PMID:19921883

  16. Solar irradiance short wave radiation users guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinolich, Paul; Arnone, Robert A.

    1995-05-01

    Solar irradiance for short wave radiation (400-700 nm) at the sea surface can be calculated using inputs obtained from satellite systems and model estimates. The short wave solar irradiance is important for estimating the surface heating that occurs in the near surface and estimating the available irradiance for biological growth in the upper ocean. The variability of the solar irradiance is believed to have significant influence on the global carbon cycle. This users guide provides an understanding of the models and operational procedures for using the software and understanding the results.

  17. Long-term patterns of solar irradiance forcing in model experiments and proxy based surface temperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waple, A. M.; Mann, M. E.; Bradley, R. S.

    2002-02-01

    Comparisons are made of long-term empirical and model-estimated patterns of solar irradiance forcing during a 200-year period (1650-1850), which precedes any apparent anthropogenic influence on climate. This interval encompasses a considerable range (approximately 4 W/m2) of estimated variation in solar output, including the "Maunder" and "Dalton" Minima of solar irradiance, and an intervening interval of relatively high values of irradiance, but does not encroach into the industrial era wherein it is difficult to separate solar and anthropogenic influences. Particular emphasis is placed on comparing empirical and modeled patterns of forced surface temperature variation. The empirical patterns bear a greater similarity to the pattern of forced response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (AOGCM) than with an independent model simulation result using an ocean with specified heat transport, both in terms of the spatial pattern of response and implied global mean sensitivity to forcing. Heightened sensitivity in the western Pacific warm pool apparent in the empirical response pattern, is not observed in the forced response of the coupled model. It is possible that this pattern is the result of feedback processes not currently reproduced in course-resolution coupled models. The greatest empirical response is found at the multidecadal-to-century (> 40 year period) time scale, for which the forcing is dominated by the roughly 90-year Gleissberg Cycle of irradiance. This indicates a global-mean sensitivity (approximately 0.3 K/W/m2), which is close to the coupled model result (approximately 0.4 K/W/m2). At decadal time scales (8-25 year period), for which the forcing is dominated by the 11-year and 22-year period solar cycles), the temperature sensitivity is moderately reduced, and its spatial pattern of response is dominated by an apparent resonance with known decadal modes of climate variability.

  18. Correlations of solar cycle 22 UV irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, L.; Brueckner, G.; Crane, P.; Prinz, D.; Herring, L.

    1997-01-01

    The solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance monitor (SUSIM) onboard the upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS) is an absolutely calibrated UV spectrometer which has measured the solar spectral irradiance over the wavelengths 115 nm to 410 nm since October 1991. This data set now extends for about six years from near the peak of solar cycle 22, through its minimum, to the initial rise associated with solar cycle 23. Generally, the time series of UV spectral irradiances obtained shows behavior similar to that of other solar activity indices. The conditions on the sun, which can in result in dominant 13.5-day periodicity, are analyzed and illustrated. It is found that any combination of presence or absence of dominant 13.5-day in UV irradiance and solar wind velocity is possible depending entirely on the particular surface distribution and orientation of solar active regions.

  19. Solar spectral irradiance and total solar irradiance at a solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevolenskaya, E. E.; Shapovalov, S. N.; Kostuchenko, I. G.

    2014-12-01

    Results are presented for a wavelet analysis of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the ultraviolet to infrared range and total solar irradiance (TSI). The study is based on data collected by the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment ( SORCE) satellite from March 10, 2007 to January 23, 2010. Cross-wavelet analysis finds relationships of varying degrees of tightness between SSI, TSI, and magnetic flux in a sunspot zone on the surface rotation timescales of solar activity complexes. Wavelet coherence shows how magnetic flux variations within a latitudinal sunspot zone are related with spectral irradiance variations. For example, variations in ultraviolet radiation at UV 200.5 nm are in phase with those of the magnetic flux associated with solar activity complexes. However, there is an unusual interval UV 310 to 380 nm, in which coherent structures disappear and UV radiation variations do not follow the changes in the magnetic flux.

  20. Assessment of performances of sun zenith angle and altitude parameterisations of atmospheric radiative transfer for spectral surface downwelling solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, L.; Blanc, Ph.

    2010-09-01

    Satellite-derived assessments of surface downwelling solar irradiance are more and more used by engineering companies in solar energy. Performances are judged satisfactory for the time being. Nevertheless, requests for more accuracy are increasing, in particular in the spectral definition and in the decomposition of the global radiation into direct and diffuse radiations. One approach to reach this goal is to improve both the modelling of the radiative transfer and the quality of the inputs describing the optical state. Within their joint project Heliosat-4, DLR and MINES ParisTech have adopted this approach to create advanced databases of solar irradiance succeeding to the current ones HelioClim and SolEMi. Regarding the model, we have opted for libRadtran, a well-known model of proven quality. As many similar models, running libRadtran is very time-consuming when it comes to process millions or more pixels or grid cells. This is incompatible with real-time operational process. One may adopt the abacus approach, or look-up tables, to overcome the problem. The model is run for a limited number of cases, covering the whole range of values taken by the various inputs of the model. Abaci are such constructed. For each real case, the irradiance value is computed by interpolating within the abaci. In this way, real-time can be envisioned. Nevertheless, the computation of the abaci themselves requires large computing capabilities. In addition, searching the abaci to find the values to interpolate can be time-consuming as the abaci are very large: several millions of values in total. Moreover, it raises the extrapolation problem of parameter out-of-range during the utilisation of the abaci. Parameterisation, when possible, is a means to reduce the amount of computations to be made and subsequently, the computation effort to create the abaci, the size of the abaci, the extrapolation and the searching time. It describes in analytical manner and with a few parameters the

  1. The Next Spaceflight Solar Irradiance Sensor: TSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Greg; Pilewskie, Peter; Richard, Erik

    2016-05-01

    The Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) will continue measurements of the solar irradiance with improved accuracies and stabilities over extant spaceflight instruments. The two TSIS solar-observing instruments include the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) for measuring total- and spectral- solar-irradiance, respectively. The former provides the net energy powering the Earth’s climate system while the latter helps attribute where that energy is absorbed by the Earth’s atmosphere and surface. Both spaceflight instruments are assembled and being prepared for integration on the International Space Station. With operations commencing in late 2017, the TSIS is intended to overlap with NASA’s ongoing SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) mission, which launched in 2003 and contains the first versions of both the TIM and SIM instruments, as well as with the TSI Calibration Transfer Experiment (TCTE), which began total solar irradiance measurements in 2013. We summarize the TSIS’s instrument improvements and intended solar-irradiance measurements.

  2. Estimation of atmospheric turbidity and surface radiative parameters using broadband clear sky solar irradiance models in Rio de Janeiro-Brasil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, José L.; Karam, Hugo A.; Marques Filho, Edson P.; Pereira Filho, Augusto J.

    2016-02-01

    The main goal of this paper is to estimate a set of optimal seasonal, daily, and hourly values of atmospheric turbidity and surface radiative parameters Ångström's turbidity coefficient ( β), Ångström's wavelength exponent ( α), aerosol single scattering albedo ( ω o ), forward scatterance ( F c ) and average surface albedo ( ρ g ), using the Brute Force multidimensional minimization method to minimize the difference between measured and simulated solar irradiance components, expressed as cost functions. In order to simulate the components of short-wave solar irradiance (direct, diffuse and global) for clear sky conditions, incidents on a horizontal surface in the Metropolitan Area of Rio de Janeiro (MARJ), Brazil (22° 51' 27″ S, 43° 13' 58″ W), we use two parameterized broadband solar irradiance models, called CPCR2 and Iqbal C, based on synoptic information. The meteorological variables such as precipitable water ( u w ) and ozone concentration ( u o ) required by the broadband solar models were obtained from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on Terra and Aqua NASA platforms. For the implementation and validation processes, we use global and diffuse solar irradiance data measured by the radiometric platform of LabMiM, located in the north area of the MARJ. The data were measured between the years 2010 and 2012 at 1-min intervals. The performance of solar irradiance models using optimal parameters was evaluated with several quantitative statistical indicators and a subset of measured solar irradiance data. Some daily results for Ångström's wavelength exponent α were compared with Ångström's parameter (440-870 nm) values obtained by aerosol robotic network (AERONET) for 11 days, showing an acceptable level of agreement. Results for Ångström's turbidity coefficient β, associated with the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere, show a seasonal pattern according with increased precipitation during summer months (December

  3. Toward Improved Solar Irradiance Forecasts: Derivation of Downwelling Surface Shortwave Radiation in Arizona from Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Holmgren, William F.; Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A.

    2016-05-01

    Over the past few decades, substantial progress has been made in the retrieval of surface shortwave radiation from satellite measurements for the Earth's energy budget as well as solar energy applications. We present a new algorithm to derive the downwelling surface shortwave radiation for the Southwestern US using geostationary satellite products. A look-up table generated by the Goddard Space Flight Center Radiative Transfer Model is employed to derive the shortwave radiation at the ground by comparing observed and modeled top of atmosphere shortwave albedo. The algorithm was compared to ground observation stations at three locations, such as the University of Arizona, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and Desert Rock, NV. For all sky conditions, the average values of root-mean-square error between the instantaneous estimates and in situ measurements ranged from 84.2 to 89.4 W m-2 and were 30 W m-2 when evaluated on daily time scales. The error statistics were considerably better for clear sky than for cloudy sky. The average values of instantaneous root-mean-square error for the clear-sky conditions range from 39.4 to 43.7 W m-2, while average root-mean-square error for the cloudy-sky conditions is between 137.0 and 141.2 W m-2.

  4. Toward Improved Solar Irradiance Forecasts: Derivation of Downwelling Surface Shortwave Radiation in Arizona from Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Holmgren, William F.; Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A.

    2016-07-01

    Over the past few decades, substantial progress has been made in the retrieval of surface shortwave radiation from satellite measurements for the Earth's energy budget as well as solar energy applications. We present a new algorithm to derive the downwelling surface shortwave radiation for the Southwestern US using geostationary satellite products. A look-up table generated by the Goddard Space Flight Center Radiative Transfer Model is employed to derive the shortwave radiation at the ground by comparing observed and modeled top of atmosphere shortwave albedo. The algorithm was compared to ground observation stations at three locations, such as the University of Arizona, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and Desert Rock, NV. For all sky conditions, the average values of root-mean-square error between the instantaneous estimates and in situ measurements ranged from 84.2 to 89.4 W m-2 and were 30 W m-2 when evaluated on daily time scales. The error statistics were considerably better for clear sky than for cloudy sky. The average values of instantaneous root-mean-square error for the clear-sky conditions range from 39.4 to 43.7 W m-2, while average root-mean-square error for the cloudy-sky conditions is between 137.0 and 141.2 W m-2.

  5. Modeling Lunar Borehole Temperature in order to Reconstruct Historical Total Solar Irradiance and Estimate Surface Temperature in Permanently Shadowed Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R. F.; Miyahara, H.; Ohmura, A.

    2007-12-01

    The Moon is an ideal place to reconstruct historical total solar irradiance (TSI). With undisturbed lunar surface albedo and the very low thermal diffusivity of lunar regolith, changes in solar input lead to changes in lunar surface temperature that diffuse downward to be recorded in the temperature profile in the near-surface layer. Using regolith thermal properties from Apollo, we model the heat transfer in the regolith layer, and compare modeled surface temperature to Apollo observations to check model performance. Using as alternative input scenarios two reconstructed TSI time series from 1610 to 2000 (Lean, 2000; Wang, Lean, and Sheeley 2005), we conclude that the two scenarios can be distinguished by detectable differences in regolith temperature, with the peak difference of about 10 mK occuring at a depth of about 10 m (Miyahara et al., 2007). The possibility that water ice exists in permanently shadowed areas near the lunar poles (Nozette et al., 1997; Spudis et al, 1998), makes it of interest to estimate surface temperature in such dark regions. "Turning off" the Sun in our time dependent model, we found it would take several hundred years for the surface temperature to drop from ~~100K immediately after sunset down to a nearly constant equilibrium temperature of about 24~~38 K, with the range determined by the range of possible input from Earth, from 0 W/m2 without Earth visible, up to about 0.1 W/m2 at maximum Earth phase. A simple equilibrium model (e.g., Huang 2007) is inappropriate to relate the Apollo-observed nighttime temperature to Earth's radiation budget, given the long multi- centennial time scale needed for equilibration of the lunar surface layer after sunset. Although our results provide the key mechanisms for reconstructing historical TSI, further research is required to account for topography of lunar surfaces, and new measurements of regolith thermal properties will also be needed once a new base of operations is

  6. Analysis of the total solar irradiance composite and their contribution to global mean air surface temperature rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2008-12-01

    Herein I discuss and propose updated satellite composites of the total solar irradiance covering the period 1978-2008. The composites are compiled from measurements made with the three ACRIM experiments. Measurements from the NIMBUS7/ERB, the ERBS/ERBE satellite experiments and a total solar irradiance proxy reconstruction are used to fill the gap from June 1989 to October 1991 between ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 experiments. The result of the analysis does suggests that the total solar irradiance did increase from 1980 to 2002. The climate implications of the alternative satellite composites are discussed by using a phenomenological climate model which depends on two characteristics time response at tau1 =0.4 year and tau2=8-12 years, as determined phenomenologically [Scafetta, JGR 2008]. Reconstructions of total solar irradiance signature on climate during the last four centuries are discussed. The solar variability appears to have significantly contributed to climate change during the last four centuries, including the last century. Indirectly, the model suggests that the preindustrial climate experienced a large variability which is incompatible with an Hockey Stick temperature graph.

  7. Modeling Solar Lyman Alpha Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Rottman, G. J.; Willson, R. C.; Donnelly, R. F.; London, J.

    1990-01-01

    Solar Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analyses. Models developed with multiple linear regression analysis, including daily values and 81-day running means of solar indices, predict reasonably well both the short- and long-term variations observed in Lyman alpha. It is shown that the full disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm offers the best proxy for Lyman alpha, and that the total irradiance corrected for sunspot effect also has a high correlation with Lyman alpha.

  8. Electron irradiation of modern solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.

    1977-01-01

    A number of modern solar cell types representing 1976 technology (as well as some older types) were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons (and a limited number with 2 MeV electrons and 10 MeV protons). After irradiation, the cells were annealed, with I-V curves measured under AMO at 30 C. The purpose was to provide data to be incorporated in the revision of the solar cell radiation handbook. Cell resistivities ranged from 2 to 20 ohm-cm, and cell thickness from 0.05 to 0.46 mm. Cell types examined were conventional, shallow junction, back surface field (BSF), textured, and textured with BSF.

  9. Evaporation and Solar Irradiance as Regulators of Sea Surface Temparature in Annual and Interrannual Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    1994-01-01

    After numerical studies showed that global climate is sensitive to small changes in sea surface temperature (Ts), considerabel effort has been devoted to examine the role of surface fluxes in changing upper ocean heat balance and Ts, particularly in the tropical Pacific where interannual signals, such as El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), have major economic and ecological impacts.

  10. Comparison of ocean surface solar irradiance in the GLA General Circulation Model and satellite-based calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertock, Beth; Sud, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    A global, 7-year satellite-based record of ocean surface solar irradiance (SSI) is used to assess the realism of ocean SSI simulated by the nine-layer Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) General Circulation Model (GCM). January and July climatologies of net SSI produced by the model are compared with corresponding satellite climatologies for the world oceans between 54 deg N and 54 deg S. This comparison of climatologies indicates areas of strengths and weaknesses in the GCM treatment of cloud-radiation interactions, the major source of model uncertainty. Realism of ocean SSI is also important for applications such as incorporating the GLA GCM into a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM. The results show that the GLA GCM simulates too much SSI in the extratropics and too little in the tropics, especially in the summer hemisphere. These discrepancies reach magnitudes of 60 W/sq m and more. The discrepancies are particularly large in the July case off the western coast of North America. Positive and negative discrepancies in SSI are shown to be consistent with discrepancies in planetary albedo.

  11. Comparison of ocean surface solar irradiance in the GLA General Circulation Model and satellite-based calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chertock, B. ); Sud, Y.C. )

    1993-03-01

    A global, 7-year satellite-based record of ocean surface solar irradiance (SSI) is used to assess the realism of ocean SSI simulated by the nine-layer Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) General Circulation Model (GCM). January and July climatologies of net SSI produced by the model are compared with corresponding satellite climatologies for the world oceans between 54[degrees]N and 54[degrees]S. This comparison of climatologies indicates areas of strengths and weaknesses in the GCM treatment of cloud-radiation interactions, the major source of model uncertainty. Realism of ocean SSI is also important for applications such as incorporating the GLA GCM into a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM. The results show that the GLA GCM simulates too much SSI in the extratropics and too little in the tropics, especially in the summer hemisphere. These discrepancies reach magnitudes of 60 W m[sup [minus]2] and more. The discrepancies are particularly large in the July case off the western coast of North America. In this region of persistent marine stratus, the GCM climatological values exceed the satellite climatological values by as much as 131 W m[sup [minus]2]. Positive and negative discrepancies in SSI are shown to be consistent with discrepancies in planetary albedo.

  12. Total Solar Irradiance Variability: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit M.

    1996-01-01

    Observations of total solar irradiance from space within the last two decaades convinced the skeptics that total irradiance varies over a wide range of periodicities: from minutes to the 11-year solar activity cycle. Analyses based on these space-borne observations have demonstrated that the irradiance variations are directly related to changes at the photosphere and the solar interior.

  13. Irradiation chemistry in the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael E.

    2014-11-01

    The dark, reddish tinged surfaces of icy bodies in the outer solar are usually attributed to the long term irradiation of simple hydrocarbons such as methane leading to the loss of hydrogen and the production of long carbon chains. While methane is stable and detected on the most massive bodies in the Kuiper belt, evidence of active irradiation chemistry is scant except for the presence of ethane on methane-rich Makemake and possible detections of ethane on more methane-poor Pluto and Quaoar. We have obtained deep high signal-to-noise spectra of Makemake from 1.5 to 2.5 microns in an attempt to trace the radiation chemistry in the outer solar system beyond the initial ethane formation. We present the first astrophysical detections of solid ethylene, acetylene, and possibly propane -- all expected products of the continued irradiation of methane, and use these species to map the chemical pathway from methane to long-chain hydrocarbons.

  14. Towards a new aerosol climatology to improve the SPECMAGIC algorithm to retrieve surface solar irradiation from MVIRI and SEVIRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träger-Chatterjee, Christine; Müller, Richard W.; Trentmann, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    The Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) provides long-term climate datasets of surface solar radiation for more than 30 years retrieved from MVIRI and SEVIRI instruments on board the METEOSAT first and second generation satellites, respectively. The surface solar radiation is retrieved using the SPECMAGIC algorithm. The SPECMAGIC method is composed of the Heliosat approach to calculate the cloud transmission and a clear sky model. The Heliosat approach as well as the SPECMAGIC method will be described in the presentation "The SPECMAGIC algorithm for the retrieval of spectrally resolved surface radiation, overview and applications" by R. Müller in this session. The clear sky model SPECMAGIC consists of look-up tables calculated with the radiative transfer model libradtran for the consideration of aerosol as well as water vapour and ozone. The effect of four different state of the art aerosol data sources on the accuracy of surface solar radiation derived with SPECMAGIC is evaluated. The respective results are compared with calculations assuming constant aerosol (0.15) and zero optical depth. The SPECMAGIC calculations using the different aerosol information are compared to measurements of stations of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). The results indicate that in regions with a low frequency of clouds and enhanced variability of aerosol optical depth the climatologies investigated lead to large underestimations of the surface solar radiation, indicating that high aerosol optical depth provided by these climatologies are overestimated. As a consequence the best performing aerosol climatology investigated is modified in such a way very high AODs are cut down, which leads to promising results in the surface solar radiation retrieval.

  15. Variability of solar ultraviolet irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.; Donnelly, R. F.; Hudson, H. S.; Rottman, G. J.; Willson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    A model of solar Lyman alpha irradiance developed by multiple linear regression analysis, including the daily values and 81-day running means of the full disk equivalent width of the Helium line at 1083 nm, predicts reasonably well both the short- and long-term variations observed in Lyman alpha. In contrast, Lyman alpha models calculated from the 10.7-cm radio flux overestimate the observed variations in the rising portion and maximum period of solar cycle, and underestimates them during solar minimum. Models are shown of Lyman alpha based on the He-line equivalent width and 10.7-cm radio flux for those time intervals when no satellite observations exist, namely back to 1974 and after April 1989, when the measurements of the Solar Mesosphere Satellite were terminated.

  16. Evolution Character Analysis of Total Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N. B.

    2013-05-01

    The significant periods of total solar irradiance are 35 days and 26 days in solar cycle 23 and 24, respectively. It is inferred that the solar quasi-rotation periods are 35 days and 26 days in solar cycle 23 and 24, respectively. The value of total solar irradiance in solar cycle 24 minimum should be close to the value of Maunder minimum. On short time scales, sunspots should be the main reason to cause variations of total solar irradiance on the scale of one solar rotation cycle to several months, but not the unique one, and the variations of total solar irradiance are notrelated with the Mg II index on the scale of a few days to one solar rotation cycle.

  17. Future Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Rottman, G.; Woods, T.; Lawrence, G.; Harder, J.; McClintock, W.; Kopp, G.

    2003-01-01

    Required solar irradiance measurements for climate studies include those now being made by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) onboard the SORCE satellite, part of the Earth Observing System fleet of NASA satellites. Equivalent or better measures of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Spectral Solar Irradiance (SSI, 200 to 2000 nm) are planned for the post-2010 satellites of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System ("OESS). The design life of SORCE is 5 years, so a "Solar Irradiance Gap Filler" EOS mission is being planned for launch in the 2007 time frame, to include the same TSI and SSI measurements. Besides avoiding any gap, overlap of the data sources is also necessary for determination of possible multi-decadal trends in solar irradiance. We discuss these requirements and the impacts of data gaps, and data overlaps, that may occur in the monitoring of the critical solar radiative forcing.

  18. Thematic Mapper bandpass solar exoatmospheric irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, B. L.; Barker, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    Based on solar irradiance data published by Neckel and Labs (1984) and Iqbal (1983), the solar exoatmospheric irradiances for Thematic Mapper (TM) bands 1, 2, 3, and 4 have been calculated. Results vary by up to 1 percent from previous published values, which were based on the earlier data of Neckel and Labs. For TM bands 5 and 7, integrated solar exoatmospheric irradiances have also been recalculated using solar irradiance data published by Labs and Neckel (1968), Arvesen et al. (1969), and Iqbal (1983). These irradiances vary by up to 6 percent from previously published results, which were based on data published by Thekaekara (1972).

  19. A database of multi-year (2004-2010) quality-assured surface solar hourly irradiation measurements for the Egyptian territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korany, M.; Boraiy, M.; Eissa, Y.; Aoun, Y.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Alfaro, S. C.; Blanc, P.; El-Metwally, M.; Ghedira, H.; Hungershoefer, K.; Wald, L.

    2015-09-01

    A database containing the global and diffuse components of the surface solar hourly irradiation measured from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010 at eight stations of the Egyptian Meteorological Authority is presented. For three of these sites (Cairo, Aswan, and El-Farafra), the direct component is also available. In addition, a series of meteorological variables including surface pressure, relative humidity, temperature, wind speed and direction... is provided at the same hourly resolution at all stations. The details of the experimental sites and instruments used for the acquisition are given. Special attention is paid to the quality of the data and the procedure applied to flag suspicious or erroneous measurements is described in details. Between 88 and 99 % of the daytime measurements are validated by this quality control. Except at Barrani where the number is lower (13 500), between 20 000 and 29 000 measurements of global and diffuse hourly irradiation are available at all sites for the 7-year period. Similarly, from 9000 to 13 000 measurements of direct hourly irradiation values are provided for the three sites where this component is measured. With its high temporal resolution this consistent irradiation and meteorological database constitutes a reliable source to estimate the potential of solar energy in Egypt. It is also adapted to the study of high-frequency atmospheric processes such as the impact of aerosols on atmospheric radiative transfer. In the next future, it is planned to complete regularly the present 2004-2010 database, which has been placed on the PANGAEA repository (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.848804) and contains the individual meteorological and irradiation data files of the 8 stations.

  20. A database of multi-year (2004-2010) quality-assured surface solar hourly irradiation measurements for the Egyptian territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korany, Mohamed; Boraiy, Mohamed; Eissa, Yehia; Aoun, Youva; Abdel Wahab, Magdy M.; Alfaro, Stéphane C.; Blanc, Philippe; El-Metwally, Mossad; Ghedira, Hosni; Hungershoefer, Katja; Wald, Lucien

    2016-03-01

    A database containing the global and diffuse components of the surface solar hourly irradiation measured from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010 at eight stations of the Egyptian Meteorological Authority is presented. For three of these sites (Cairo, Aswan and El-Farafra), the direct component is also available. In addition, a series of meteorological variables including surface pressure, relative humidity, temperature, wind speed and direction is provided at the same hourly resolution at all stations. The details of the experimental sites and instruments used for the acquisition are given. Special attention is paid to the quality of the data and the procedure applied to flag suspicious or erroneous measurements is described in detail. Between 88 and 99 % of the daytime measurements are validated by this quality control. Except at Barrani where the number is lower (13 500), between 20 000 and 29 000 measurements of global and diffuse hourly irradiation are available at all sites for the 7-year period. Similarly, from 9000 to 13 000 measurements of direct hourly irradiation values are provided for the three sites where this component is measured. With its high temporal resolution this consistent irradiation and meteorological database constitutes a reliable source to estimate the potential of solar energy in Egypt. It is also adapted to the study of high-frequency atmospheric processes such as the impact of aerosols on atmospheric radiative transfer. It is planned to update regularly the current 2004-2010 database, which has been placed on the PANGAEA repository (doi: 10.1594/PANGAEA.848804) and contains the individual meteorological and irradiation data files of the eight stations.

  1. Toward Improved Solar Irradiance Forecasts: Comparison of Downwelling Surface Shortwave Radiation in Arizona Derived from Satellite with the Gridded Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Holmgren, William F.; Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A.

    2016-05-01

    The downwelling surface shortwave radiation derived from geostationary satellite imagery was compared with the available datasets for the Southwestern United States. The averaged root mean square errors for our instantaneous estimates ranged from 95.0 to 122.7 W m-2, which is lower than those derived from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) products were used to compare the hourly mean solar insolation. The three hourly mean downwelling surface shortwave radiation was evaluated by comparing the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) products. Our estimates show the better performance than MERRA, NARR and CERES datasets because of coarse resolution that limits determining the solar dimming due to small clouds.

  2. Toward Improved Solar Irradiance Forecasts: Comparison of Downwelling Surface Shortwave Radiation in Arizona Derived from Satellite with the Gridded Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Holmgren, William F.; Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A.

    2016-08-01

    The downwelling surface shortwave radiation derived from geostationary satellite imagery was compared with the available datasets for the Southwestern United States. The averaged root mean square errors for our instantaneous estimates ranged from 95.0 to 122.7 W m-2, which is lower than those derived from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) products were used to compare the hourly mean solar insolation. The three hourly mean downwelling surface shortwave radiation was evaluated by comparing the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) products. Our estimates show the better performance than MERRA, NARR and CERES datasets because of coarse resolution that limits determining the solar dimming due to small clouds.

  3. Solar variability in irradiance and oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jeff R.

    1995-01-01

    The signature of the solar cycle appears in helioseismic frequencies and splittings. It is known that the changing outer superadiabatic region of the sun is responsible for this. The deeper solar-cycle mechanism from the surface changes, and, in particular, how magnetic fields perturb the global modes, the solar irradiance and the luminosity, is discussed. The irradiance and helioseismic changes are described. The interpretation of seismic and photometric data is discussed, considering current one-dimensional models and phenomenology. It is discussed how the long term solar-cycle luminosity effect could be caused by changes occurring near the base of the convection zone (CZ). It is shown that a thin toroidal flux sheath at the top of the radiative zone changed the thermal stratification immediately below the CZ over a solar-cycle timescale in two ways: the temperature of the magnetized fluid becomes hotter than the surrounding fluid, and the temperature gradient steepens above the magnetized region. The testing of CZ dynamics and extension of numerical experiments to global scales are considered.

  4. Structural changes of surfaces of spacecraft solar array protective glasses being irradiated by 20-keV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanshin, R. H.; Novikov, L. S.

    2016-05-01

    When irradiating K-208 and CMG glasses by 20-keV electrons with flux densities of 1010 < φe < 2 × 1011 cm-2 s-1 in vacuum 10-4 Pa, electrostatic discharges accompanied by plasma emission and destruction of glass surfaces were observed. Examination of glasses by atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed significant difference in structural changes of surfaces of K-208 and CMG samples irradiated by equal flux densities within the range from 2.0 × 1010 to 9.0 × 1010 cm-2 s-1 that can be explained by different mechanisms of removal of charge accumulated in glasses. Surface discharges generating channels on surfaces of K-208 and CMG glasses appear when φ ⩾ 7.4 × 1010 cm-2 s-1 and φ ⩾ 8.7 × 1010 cm-2 s-1 respectively. In average, if radiation conditions are the same and φ ⩾ 1.4 × 1011 cm-2 s-1, the channels are 1.5 times deeper in K-208 than in CMG.

  5. Studying Solar Irradiance Variability with Wavelet Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigouroux, Anne; Pap, Judit

    1995-01-01

    The detection of variations in solar irradiance by satellite-based experiments during the last 17 years stimulated modelling efforts to help to identify their causes and to provide estimates for irradiance data when no satellite observations exist.

  6. Long-Term Solar Irradiance Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the solar energy throughout the solar spectrum and understanding its variability provide important information about the physical processes and structural changes in the solar interior and in the solar atmosphere...The aim of this paper is to discuss the solar-cycle-related long-term changes in solar total and UV irradiances. The spaceborne irradiance observations are compared to ground-based indices of solar magnetic activity, such as the Photometric Sunspot Index, full disk magnetic flux, and the Mt. Wilson Magnetic Plage Strength Index.

  7. Solar spectral irradiance model validation using Solar Spectral Irradiance and Solar Radius measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, Gérard; Zhu, Ping; Shapiro, Alexander; Sofia, Sabatino; Tagirov, Rinat; Van Ruymbeke, Michel; Schmutz, Werner

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the reliable solar spectral irradiance (SSI) data for solar and climate physics is now well acknowledged. In particular, the irradiance time series are necessary for most of the current studies concerning climate evolution. However, space instruments are vulnerable to the degradation due to the environment while ground based measurements are limited in wavelength range and need atmospheric effects corrections. This is why SSI modeling is necessary to understand the mechanism of the solar irradiance variability and to provide long and uninterrupted irradiance records to climate and Earth atmosphere scientists. Here we present COSI (COde for Solar Irradiance) model of the SSI variability. The COSI model is based on the Non local thermodynamic Equilibrium Spectral SYnthesis Code (NESSY). We validate NESSY by two independent datasets: - The SSI at solar minimum occurring in 2008, - The radius variation with wavelength and absolute values determined from PREMOS and BOS instruments onboard the PICARD spacecraft. Comparisons between modeling and measured SSI will be shown. However, since SSI measurements have an accuracy estimated between 2 to 3%, the comparison with the solar radius data provides a very important additional constrains on model. For that, 17 partial solar occultations by the Moon are used providing solar radii clearly showing the dependence of the solar radius with wavelength. These results are compared with the NESSY predictions. The agreement between NESSY and observations is within the model and measurements accuracy.

  8. Space-based Observations of the Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.

    2015-08-01

    Solar photon radiation is the dominant energy input to the Earth system, and this energy determines the temperature, structure, and dynamics of the atmosphere, warms the Earth surface, and sustains life. Observations of true solar variability became possible only after attaining access to space, so the observational record of the solar irradiance for sun-climate studies extends back only about 40 years. The total solar irradiance (TSI) and solar spectral irradiance (SSI) observations will be presented along with the discussion of the solar variability during the past four decades. The solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from minutes to hours for solar eruptive events (flares), days to months for active region evolution and solar rotation (~27 days), and years to decades over the solar activity cycle (~11 years). The amount of solar variability is highly dependent on wavelength and ranges from orders of magnitude for the X-ray to 10-60% for part of the ultraviolet to only 0.1% for the visible and infrared. The accuracy and precision of the solar irradiance measurements have steadily improved with each new generation of instrumentation and with new laboratory (pre-flight) calibration facilities.

  9. Computation of glint, glare, and solar irradiance distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Khalsa, Siri Sahib Singh

    2015-08-11

    Described herein are technologies pertaining to computing the solar irradiance distribution on a surface of a receiver in a concentrating solar power system or glint/glare emitted from a reflective entity. At least one camera captures images of the Sun and the entity of interest, wherein the images have pluralities of pixels having respective pluralities of intensity values. Based upon the intensity values of the pixels in the respective images, the solar irradiance distribution on the surface of the entity or glint/glare corresponding to the entity is computed.

  10. Magnitudes and timescales of total solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Greg

    2016-07-01

    The Sun's net radiative output varies on timescales of minutes to gigayears. Direct measurements of the total solar irradiance (TSI) show changes in the spatially- and spectrally-integrated radiant energy on timescales as short as minutes to as long as a solar cycle. Variations of ~0.01% over a few minutes are caused by the ever-present superposition of convection and oscillations with very large solar flares on rare occasion causing slightly-larger measurable signals. On timescales of days to weeks, changing photospheric magnetic activity affects solar brightness at the ~0.1% level. The 11-year solar cycle shows variations of comparable magnitude with irradiances peaking near solar maximum. Secular variations are more difficult to discern, being limited by instrument stability and the relatively short duration of the space-borne record. Historical reconstructions of the Sun's irradiance based on indicators of solar-surface magnetic activity, such as sunspots, faculae, and cosmogenic isotope records, suggest solar brightness changes over decades to millennia, although the magnitudes of these variations have high uncertainties due to the indirect historical records on which they rely. Stellar evolution affects yet longer timescales and is responsible for the greatest solar variabilities. In this manuscript I summarize the Sun's variability magnitudes over different temporal regimes and discuss the irradiance record's relevance for solar and climate studies as well as for detections of exo-solar planets transiting Sun-like stars.

  11. A reconstruction of solar irradiance using a flux transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi Espuig, Maria; Jiang, Jie; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami

    2013-04-01

    Reconstructions of solar irradiance into the past are of considerable interest for studies of solar influence on climate. Models based on the assumption that irradiance changes are caused by the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field have been the most successful in reproducing the measured irradiance variations. Our SATIRE-S model is one of these. It uses solar full-disc magnetograms as an input, and these are available for less than four decades. Thus, to reconstruct the irradiance back to times when no observed magnetograms are available, we combine the SATIRE-S model with synthetic magnetograms, produced using a surface flux transport model. The model is fed with daily, observed or modelled statistically, records of sunspot positions, areas, and tilt angles. To describe the secular change in the irradiance, we used the concept of overlapping ephemeral region cycles. With this technique TSI can be reconstructed back to 1610.

  12. Modelling total solar irradiance using a flux transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi Espuig, Maria; Jiang, Jie; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami

    2014-05-01

    Reconstructions of solar irradiance into the past are of considerable interest for studies of solar influence on climate. Models based on the assumption that irradiance changes are caused by the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field have been the most successful in reproducing the measured irradiance variations. Our SATIRE-S model is one of these. It uses solar full-disc magnetograms as an input, and these are available for less than four decades. Thus, to reconstruct the irradiance back to times when no observed magnetograms are available, we combine the SATIRE-S model with synthetic magnetograms, produced using a surface flux transport model. The model is fed with daily, observed or modelled statistically, records of sunspot positions, areas, and tilt angles. To describe the secular change in the irradiance, we used the concept of overlapping ephemeral region cycles. With this technique TSI can be reconstructed back to 1700.

  13. Solar irradiance measurements - Minimum through maximum solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. B., III; Gibson, M. A.; Shivakumar, N.; Wilson, R.; Kyle, H. L.; Mecherikunnel, A. T.

    1991-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the NOAA-9 spacecraft solar monitors were used to measure the total solar irradiance during the period October 1984 to December 1989. Decreasing trends in the irradiance measurements were observed as sunspot activity decreased to minimum levels in 1986; after 1986, increasing trends were observed as sunspot activity increased. The magnitude of the irradiance variability was found to be approximately 0.1 percent between sunspot minimum and maximum (late 1989). When compared with the 1984 to 1989 indices of solar magnetic activity, the irradiance trends appear to be in phase with the 11-year sunspot cycle. Both irradiance series yielded 1,365/sq Wm as the mean value of the solar irradiance, normalized to the mean earth/sun distance. The monitors are electrical substitution, active-cavity radiometers with estimated measurement precisions and accuracies of less than 0.02 and 0.2 percent, respectively.

  14. Evidence for Trends, and Lack Thereof, in Surface Solar Irradiance as Seen in Calibration-error-free Records of Cloud Shortwave Transmission for the Past Three Decades at Five Globally Diverse Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, E. G.

    2004-05-01

    Prior to the mid 1970's there did not exist a method of making observations of solar irradiance to an absolute accuracy better than a few percent. Until the mid 1980s, even that low level of accuracy was only achievable through extraordinary effort because commercial pyranometers are known to drift in sensitivity by up to several percent per year under some conditions. To maintain a stable measurement it is necessary to physically relate routine field measurements to international reference standards using transfer standards. Prior to the early 1980s many of these transfer standards were of less than desirable stability, especially in some countries, and while at the same time international reference standards were just undergoing development. Since the early 1990's considerable effort has gone into maintaining the absolute accuracy of ground-based solar irradiance observations. A brief review of this documented history will be presented for background along with the long-term variability in a number of surface irradiance records. To further analyze long-term observational records extending back into the period of dubious calibration pedigree, rationing or differencing methods are often utilized where the parameter of interest is the short term change in radiation, often over diurnal cycles or between periods of clear and cloudy skies. These short term changes can be expressed in percent or as the ratio of the irradiance and hence only the linearity and zero of the irradiance sensor are required to be known and not sensor's correspondence to an absolute irradiance scale. In this manner, conditions that contribute to affecting the amount of solar irradiance reaching the ground can be monitored over the long term. Using this general differencing procedure, we have examined the long-term changes in clear sky and cloudy sky irradiance relative to closely associated reference irradiances thereby having a tool to continuously monitor the solar transmission of clouds or

  15. Reconstructions of solar irradiance on centennial time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Dasi Espuig, Maria; Kok Leng, Yeo

    Solar irradiance is the main external source of energy to Earth's climate system. The record of direct measurements covering less than 40 years is too short to study solar influence on Earth's climate, which calls for reconstructions of solar irradiance into the past with the help of appropriate models. An obvious requirement to a competitive model is its ability to reproduce observed irradiance changes, and a successful example of such a model is presented by the SATIRE family of models. As most state-of-the-art models, SATIRE assumes that irradiance changes on time scales longer than approximately a day are caused by the evolving distribution of dark and bright magnetic features on the solar surface. The surface coverage by such features as a function of time is derived from solar observations. The choice of these depends on the time scale in question. Most accurate is the version of the model that employs full-disc spatially-resolved solar magnetograms and reproduces over 90% of the measured irradiance variation, including the overall decreasing trend in the total solar irradiance over the last four cycles. Since such magnetograms are only available for about four decades, reconstructions on time scales of centuries have to rely on disc-integrated proxies of solar magnetic activity, such as sunspot areas and numbers. Employing a surface flux transport model and sunspot observations as input, we have being able to produce synthetic magnetograms since 1700. This improves the temporal resolution of the irradiance reconstructions on centennial time scales. The most critical aspect of such reconstructions remains the uncertainty in the magnitude of the secular change.

  16. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  17. TSIS: The Total Solar Irradiance Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparn, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J.; Kopp, G.; Richard, E.; Fontenla, J.; Woods, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Total Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is a dual-instrument package that will acquire solar irradiance in the next decade on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). Originally de-manifested during the 2006 NPOESS restructuring, TSIS was restored following a decision by the NPOESS Executive Committee earlier this year because of its critical role in determining the natural forcings of the climate system and the high priority given it by the 2007 Earth Science Decadal Survey. TSIS is comprised of the Total Irradiance Monitor, or TIM, which measures the total solar irradiance (TSI) that is incident at the boundaries of the atmosphere; and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor, or SIM, which measures solar spectral irradiance (SSI) from 200 nm to 2400 nm (96 percent of the TSI). The TSIS TIM and SIM are heritage instruments to those currently flying on the NASA Solar Irradiance and Climate Experiment (SORCE). Both were selected as part of the TSIS because of their unprecedented measurement accuracy and stability, and because both measurements are essential to constraining the energy input to the climate system and interpreting the response of climate to external forcing. This paper will describe those attributes of TSIS which uniquely define its capability to continue the 30-year record of TSI and to extend the new 5-year record of SSI. The role of the solar irradiance data record in the present climate state, as well as in past and future climate change, will also be presented.

  18. Reconstruction of solar UV irradiance since 1974

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Wenzler, T.; Podlipnik, B.

    2009-09-01

    Variations of the solar UV irradiance are an important driver of chemical and physical processes in the Earth's upper atmosphere and may also influence global climate. Here we reconstruct solar UV irradiance in the range 115-400 nm over the period 1974-2007 by making use of the recently developed empirical extension of the Spectral And Total Irradiance Reconstruction (SATIRE) models employing Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) data. The evolution of the solar photospheric magnetic flux, which is a central input to the model, is described by the magnetograms and continuum images recorded at the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory between 1974 and 2003 and by the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on SOHO since 1996. The reconstruction extends the available observational record by 1.5 solar cycles. The reconstructed Ly-α irradiance agrees well with the composite time series by Woods et al. (2000). The amplitude of the irradiance variations grows with decreasing wavelength and in the wavelength regions of special interest for studies of the Earth's climate (Ly-α and oxygen absorption continuum and bands between 130 and 350 nm) is 1-2 orders of magnitude stronger than in the visible or if integrated over all wavelengths (total solar irradiance).

  19. Variability of Solar Irradiances Using Wavelet Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William D.

    2007-01-01

    We have used wavelets to analyze the sunspot number, F10.7 (the solar irradiance at a wavelength of approx.10.7 cm), and Ap (a geomagnetic activity index). Three different wavelets are compared, showing how each selects either temporal or scale resolution. Our goal is an envelope of solar activity that better bounds the large amplitude fluctuations form solar minimum to maximum. We show how the 11-year cycle does not disappear at solar minimum, that minimum is only the other part of the solar cycle. Power in the fluctuations of solar-activity-related indices may peak during solar maximum but the solar cycle itself is always present. The Ap index has a peak after solar maximum that appears to be better correlated with the current solar cycle than with the following cycle.

  20. A reconstruction of solar irradiance using a flux transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi Espuig, Maria; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Jiang, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Solar irradiance is one of the important drivers of the Earth's global climate, but it has only been measured for the past 33 years. Its reconstructions are therefore crucial to study longer term variations relevant to climate timescales. Most successful in reproducing the measured irradiance variations have being the models that are based on the assumption that irradiance changes are caused by the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field. Our SATIRE-S model is one of these, which uses solar full-disc magnetograms as an input, and these are available for less than four decades. To reconstruct the irradiance back to times when no observed magnetograms are available, we combine the SATIRE-S model with synthetic magnetograms, produced using a surface flux transport model. The model is fed with daily, observed or modelled statistically, records of sunspot positions, areas, and tilt angles. The concept of overlapping ephemeral region cycles is used to describe the secular change in the irradiance.

  1. Principal Component Analysis of Arctic Solar Irradiance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbette, Maura; Pilewskie, Peter; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During the FIRE (First ISCPP Regional Experiment) Arctic Cloud Experiment and coincident SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) campaign, detailed moderate resolution solar spectral measurements were made to study the radiative energy budget of the coupled Arctic Ocean - Atmosphere system. The NASA Ames Solar Spectral Flux Radiometers (SSFRs) were deployed on the NASA ER-2 and at the SHEBA ice camp. Using the SSFRs we acquired continuous solar spectral irradiance (380-2200 nm) throughout the atmospheric column. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to characterize the several tens of thousands of retrieved SSFR spectra and to determine the number of independent pieces of information that exist in the visible to near-infrared solar irradiance spectra. It was found in both the upwelling and downwelling cases that almost 100% of the spectral information (irradiance retrieved from 1820 wavelength channels) was contained in the first six extracted principal components. The majority of the variability in the Arctic downwelling solar irradiance spectra was explained by a few fundamental components including infrared absorption, scattering, water vapor and ozone. PCA analysis of the SSFR upwelling Arctic irradiance spectra successfully separated surface ice and snow reflection from overlying cloud into distinct components.

  2. Solar total irradiance in cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Schmutz, W.

    2011-05-01

    Context. The most recent minimum of solar activity was deeper and longer than the previous two minima as indicated by different proxies of solar activity. This is also true for the total solar irradiance (TSI) according to the PMOD composite. Aims: The apparently unusual behaviour of the TSI has been interpreted as evidence against solar surface magnetism as the main driver of the secular change in the TSI. We test claims that the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field does not reproduce the observed TSI in cycle 23. Methods: We use sensitive, 60-min averaged MDI magnetograms and quasi-simultaneous continuum images as an input to our SATIRE-S model and calculate the TSI variation over cycle 23, sampled roughly every two weeks. The computed TSI is then compared with the PMOD composite of TSI measurements and with the data from two individual instruments, SORCE/TIM and UARS/ACRIM II, that monitored the TSI during the declining phase of cycle 23 and over the previous minimum in 1996, respectively. Results: Excellent agreement is found between the trends shown by the model and almost all sets of measurements. The only exception is the early, i.e. 1996 to 1998, PMOD data. Whereas the agreement between the model and the PMOD composite over the period 1999-2009 is almost perfect, the modelled TSI shows a steeper increase between 1996 and 1999 than implied by the PMOD composite. On the other hand, the steeper trend in the model agrees remarkably well with the ACRIM II data. A closer look at the VIRGO data, which are the basis of the PMOD composite after 1996, reveals that only one of the two VIRGO instruments, the PMO6V, shows the shallower trend present in the composite, whereas the DIARAD measurements indicate a steeper trend. Conclusions: Based on these results, we conclude that (1) the sensitivity changes of the PMO6V radiometers within VIRGO during the first two years have very likely not been correctly evaluated; and that (2) the TSI variations over cycle 23

  3. Rotational Variability in Ultraviolet Solar Spectral Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, M. A.; Richard, E. C.; Harder, J. W.; Thuillier, G. O.

    2011-12-01

    There are currently many observations and models of the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) in the ultraviolet (UV). The models and the observations are often in agreement, but sometimes have significant differences. Using the decline of solar cycle 23 and the rise of solar cycle 24 as a test case, we will investigate the systematic differences between the short term SSI variation observed by satellite instruments and the predictions of proxy models.

  4. Solar EUV irradiance for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viereck, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar EUV irradiance is an important driver of space weather models. Large changes in EUV and x-ray irradiances create large variability in the ionosphere and thermosphere. Proxies such as the F10.7 cm radio flux, have provided reasonable estimates of the EUV flux but as the space weather models become more accurate and the demands of the customers become more stringent, proxies are no longer adequate. Furthermore, proxies are often provided only on a daily basis and shorter time scales are becoming important. Also, there is a growing need for multi-day forecasts of solar EUV irradiance to drive space weather forecast models. In this presentation we will describe the needs and requirements for solar EUV irradiance information from the space weather modeler's perspective. We will then translate these requirements into solar observational requirements such as spectral resolution and irradiance accuracy. We will also describe the activities at NOAA to provide long-term solar EUV irradiance observations and derived products that are needed for real-time space weather modeling.

  5. Solar Irradiance Models and Measurements: A Comparison in the 220-240 nm wavelength band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Yvonne C.; Ball, Will T.; Krivova, Natalie A.

    2012-07-01

    Solar irradiance models that assume solar irradiance variations to be due to changes in the solar surface magnetic flux have been successfully used to reconstruct total solar irradiance on rotational as well as cyclical and secular time scales. Modelling spectral solar irradiance is not yet as advanced, and also suffers from a lack of comparison data, in particular on solar cycle time scales. Here, we compare solar irradiance in the 220-240 nm band as modelled with SATIRE-S and measured by different instruments on the UARS and SORCE satellites. We find good agreement between the model and measurements on rotational time scales. The long-term trends, however, show significant differences. Both SORCE instruments, in particular, show a much steeper gradient over the decaying part of cycle 23 than the modelled irradiance or that measured by UARS/SUSIM.

  6. Models of Solar Irradiance Variability and the Instrumental Temperature Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, S. L.; Ghil, M.; Ide, K.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of decade-to-century (Dec-Cen) variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) on global mean surface temperature Ts during the pre-Pinatubo instrumental era (1854-1991) are studied by using two different proxies for TSI and a simplified version of the IPCC climate model.

  7. Nanostructured Solar Irradiation Control Materials for Solar Energy Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jinho; Marshall, I. A.; Torrico, M. N.; Taylor, C. R.; Ely, Jeffry; Henderson, Angel Z.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Gibbons, L. J.; Park, C.; Lowther, S. E.; Lillehei, P. T.; Bryant, R. G.

    2012-01-01

    Tailoring the solar absorptivity (alpha(sub s)) and thermal emissivity (epsilon(sub T)) of materials constitutes an innovative approach to solar energy control and energy conversion. Numerous ceramic and metallic materials are currently available for solar absorbance/thermal emittance control. However, conventional metal oxides and dielectric/metal/dielectric multi-coatings have limited utility due to residual shear stresses resulting from the different coefficient of thermal expansion of the layered materials. This research presents an alternate approach based on nanoparticle-filled polymers to afford mechanically durable solar-absorptive and thermally-emissive polymer nanocomposites. The alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) were measured with various nano inclusions, such as carbon nanophase particles (CNPs), at different concentrations. Research has shown that adding only 5 wt% CNPs increased the alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) by a factor of about 47 and 2, respectively, compared to the pristine polymer. The effect of solar irradiation control of the nanocomposite on solar energy conversion was studied. The solar irradiation control coatings increased the power generation of solar thermoelectric cells by more than 380% compared to that of a control power cell without solar irradiation control coatings.

  8. Solar Irradiance Observations during Solar Cycles 22 and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, O. R.; de Toma, G.; Chapman, G. A.; Walton, S. R.; Preminger, D. G.; Cookson, A. M.; Harvey, K. L.; Livingston, W. C.

    2002-05-01

    We present a study of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) variations during solar cycles 22 and 23 from 1986 to the present. We will review the recent measurements of solar magnetism, solar activity, and radiative variability from both ground-based and space observatories and compare TSI observations with empirical models of solar irradiance variability based on facular and sunspot observations. To estimate facular/plage and sunspot contribution to TSI we use the photometric indices derived from the SFO full-disk solar images from 1988 to the present in the CaIIK line at 393.4nm and in the red continuum at 672.3 nm. In these indices, each solar structure is included with its measured contrast and area. We also use the MgII core-to-wing index from space observatories as an alternative index for plages and network. Comparison of the rising and maximum phases of the two solar cycles, shows that cycle 23 is magnetically weaker with sunspot and facular area almost a factor of two lower than in solar cycle 22. However, analysis of multi-wavelength observations indicate that different wavelengths respond differently to the decreased magnetic activity during solar cycle 23.

  9. The solar irradiance: observations and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, Gaël; Schmutz, Werner; Shapiro, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) and its variability is an essential parameter for space weather and space climate studies. Many observations of the SSI have been performed in a recent past, but the level of confidence is rather low when considering long time scales, since space instruments are often suffering from degradation problems. Many SSI models have been also developed, and some of them are excellent inputs for many space climate models. We will then review the different data sets available of the SSI for the short term time-scales as well as for the long term, including both observations and models. We will also emphasize about our new irradiance model, COSIR for Code of Solar Irradiance Reconstruction, which is successful at reproducing the solar rotational modulation as seen in the PREMOS, Virgo and SORCE data.

  10. Solar total and spectral irradiance reconstruction over last 9000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chi-Ju; Usoskin, Ilya; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.

    2016-07-01

    Although the mechanisms of solar influence on Earth climate system are not yet fully understood, solar total and spectral irradiance are considered to be among the main determinants. Solar total irradiance is the total flux of solar radiative energy entering Earth's climate system, whereas the spectral irradiance describes this energy is distributed over the spectrum. Solar irradiance in the UV band is of special importance since it governs chemical processes in the middle and upper atmosphere. On timescales of the 11-year solar cycle and shorter, solar irradiance is measured by space-based instruments while models are needed to reconstruct solar irradiance on longer timescale. The SATIRE-M model (Spectral And Total Irradiance Reconstruction over millennia) is employed in this study to reconstruct solar irradiance from decadal radionuclide isotope data such as 14C and 10Be stored in tree rings and ice cores, respectively. A reconstruction over the last 9000 years will be presented.

  11. 1/f noise in the UV solar spectral irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotsos, Costas A.; Melnikova, Irina; Efstathiou, Maria N.; Tzanis, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The investigation of the intrinsic properties of the solar spectral irradiance as a function of the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength is attempted by exploiting rare observations performed at the Villard St. Pancrace station of the Lille University of Sciences and Technology ranging from 278 to 400 nm with a step of 0.05 nm every half an hour from nearly sunrise to sunset. To achieve this goal, the modern method of the detrended fluctuation analysis was applied on the solar spectral irradiance values versus wavelength. This analysis revealed that the solar incident flux at the top of the atmosphere and the solar spectral irradiance at the ground during two overcast sky days fluctuate with the UV wavelength exhibiting persistent long-range power-law behavior. More interestingly, the exponent of the power-law relationship between the fluctuations of the solar spectral irradiance versus UV wavelength at both the top of the atmosphere and the ground is consistently close to unity (of 1/f-type) throughout the day. This 1/f behavior has been detected in many complex dynamical systems, but despite much effort to derive a theory for its widespread occurrence in nature, it remains unexplained so far. According to the above-mentioned findings we speculate that the 1/f property of the incident solar UV flux at the top of the atmosphere could probably drive both the 1/f behavior depicted in the atmospheric components and the solar UV irradiance at the Earth's surface. The latter could influence the UV-sensitive biological ecosystems, giving rise to a 1/f-type variability in the biosphere, which has already been proven by recent observational data. We finally propose that Wien approximation could be multiplied by a 1/f function of wavelength (e.g., of the type of the fractional Brownian motion) in order to reproduce the aforementioned 1/f feature of the solar UV flux.

  12. Total Irradiance Monitor Observations of Total Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, G.

    2007-12-01

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) is the most recent instrument launched to measure total solar irradiance (TSI) from space. This electrical substitution radiometer has on-orbit degradation tracking to provide very stable long- term measurements of the net solar radiation incident on the Earth, and the instrument continues the 29-year record of this natural driver of Earth climate. Currently flying on the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), the TIM has been providing stable, low-noise, and accurate measurements of TSI since early 2003. The TIM will next be flying on NASA's Glory climate mission and is one instrument of the Total Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) selected to continue this important climate record well into the future. The SORCE/TIM has created renewed interest in the TSI absolute value and has acquired the first measurements of the total radiant energy released by large solar flares. Improvements in ground-based calibrations starting with the Glory/TIM will establish traceability linking current to upcoming measurements, solidifying the existing TSI climate data record in the undesirable event of a future data gap.

  13. SOLAR/SOLSPEC ultraviolet solar spectral irradiance variability since 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc; Bolsee, David; Hauchecorne, Alain; Meftah, Mustapha; Bekki, Slimane; Pereira, Nuno

    2016-07-01

    The SOLAR/SOLSPEC experiment measures the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from the Space Station since April 2008. Measurements are carried between 166 nm and 3088 nm by three double-monochromators. SSI, particularly in the ultraviolet, is a key input to determine the dynamics and coupling of Earth's atmosphere in response to solar and terrestrial inputs. In-flight operations and performances of the instrument, including corrections, will be presented for the 8 years of the mission. After an accurate calibration following recent special on-orbit new operations, we present the variability measured in the UV by SOLAR/SOLSPEC. The accuracy of these measurements will be discussed.

  14. Ionospheric Change and Solar EUV Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; David, M.; Jensen, J. B.; Schunk, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    The ionosphere has been quantitatively monitored for the past six solar cycles. The past few years of observations are showing trends that differ from the prior cycles! Our good statistical relationships between the solar radio flux index at 10.7 cm, the solar EUV Irradiance, and the ionospheric F-layer peak density are showing indications of divergence! Present day discussion of the Sun-Earth entering a Dalton Minimum would suggest change is occurring in the Sun, as the driver, followed by the Earth, as the receptor. The dayside ionosphere is driven by the solar EUV Irradiance. But different components of this spectrum affect the ionospheric layers differently. For a first time the continuous high cadence EUV spectra from the SDO EVE instrument enable ionospheric scientists the opportunity to evaluate solar EUV variability as a driver of ionospheric variability. A definitive understanding of which spectral components are responsible for the E- and F-layers of the ionosphere will enable assessments of how over 50 years of ionospheric observations, the solar EUV Irradiance has changed. If indeed the evidence suggesting the Sun-Earth system is entering a Dalton Minimum periods is correct, then the comprehensive EVE solar EUV Irradiance data base combined with the ongoing ionospheric data bases will provide a most fortuitous fiduciary reference baseline for Sun-Earth dependencies. Using the EVE EUV Irradiances, a physics based ionospheric model (TDIM), and 50 plus years of ionospheric observation from Wallops Island (Virginia) the above Sun-Earth ionospheric relationship will be reported on.

  15. A New Look at Solar Irradiance Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, Peter

    2012-08-01

    We compare total solar irradiance (TSI) and ultraviolet ( F uv) irradiance variation reconstructed using Ca K facular areas since 1915, with previous values based on less direct proxies. Our annual means for 1925 - 1945 reach values 30 - 50 % higher than those presently used in IPCC climate studies. A high facula/sunspot area ratio in spot cycles 16 and 17 seems to be responsible. New evidence from solar photometry increases the likelihood of greater seventeenth century solar dimming than expected from the disappearance of magnetic active regions alone. But the large additional brightening in the early twentieth century claimed from some recent models requires complete disappearance of the magnetic network. The network is clearly visible in Ca K spectroheliograms obtained since the 1890s, so these models cannot be correct. Changes in photospheric effective temperature invoked in other models would be powerfully damped by the thermal inertia of the convection zone. Thus, there is presently no support for twentieth century irradiance variation besides that arising from active regions. The mid-twentieth century irradiance peak arising from these active regions extends 20 years beyond the early 1940s peak in global temperature. This failure of correlation, together with the low amplitude of TSI variation and the relatively weak effect of Fuv driving on tropospheric temperature, limits the role of solar irradiance variation in twentieth century global warming.

  16. Solar Irradiance and Thermospheric Airglow Rocket Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Stanley C.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes work done in support of the Solar Irradiance and Thermospheric Air-glow Rocket Experiments at the University of Colorado for NASA grant NAG5-5021 under the direction of Dr. Stanley C. Solomon. (The overall rocket program is directed by Dr. Thomas N. Woods, formerly at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and now also at the University of Colorado, for NASA grant NAG5-5141.) Grant NAG5-5021 provided assistance to the overall program through analysis of airglow and solar data, support of two graduate students, laboratory technical services, and field support. The general goals of the rocket program were to measure the solar extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance, measure the terrestrial far-ultraviolet airglow, and analyze their relationship at various levels of solar activity, including near solar minimum. These have been met, as shown below. In addition, we have used the attenuation of solar radiation as the rocket descends through the thermosphere to measure density changes. This work demonstrates the maturity of the observational and modeling methods connecting energetic solar photon fluxes and airglow emissions through the processes of photoionization and photoelectron production and loss. Without a simultaneous photoelectron measurement, some aspects of this relationship remain obscure, and there are still questions pertaining to cascade contributions to molecular and atomic airglow emissions. However, by removing the solar irradiance as an "adjustable parameter" in the analysis, significant progress has been made toward understanding the relationship of far-ultraviolet airglow emissions to the solar and atmospheric conditions that control them.

  17. Quality assessment of solar UV irradiance measured with array spectroradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, Luca; Gröbner, Julian; Hülsen, Gregor; Bachmann, Luciano; Blumthaler, Mario; Dubard, Jimmy; Khazova, Marina; Kift, Richard; Hoogendijk, Kees; Serrano, Antonio; Smedley, Andrew; Vilaplana, José-Manuel

    2016-04-01

    The reliable quantification of ultraviolet (UV) radiation at the earth's surface requires accurate measurements of spectral global solar UV irradiance in order to determine the UV exposure to human skin and to understand long-term trends in this parameter. Array spectroradiometers (ASRMs) are small, light, robust and cost-effective instruments, and are increasingly used for spectral irradiance measurements. Within the European EMRP ENV03 project "Solar UV", new devices, guidelines and characterization methods have been developed to improve solar UV measurements with ASRMs, and support to the end user community has been provided. In order to assess the quality of 14 end user ASRMs, a solar UV intercomparison was held on the measurement platform of the World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC) in Davos, Switzerland, from 10 to 17 July 2014. The results of the blind intercomparison revealed that ASRMs, currently used for solar UV measurements, show a large variation in the quality of their solar UV measurements. Most of the instruments overestimate the erythema-weighted UV index - in particular at large solar zenith angles - due to stray light contribution in the UV-B range. The spectral analysis of global solar UV irradiance further supported the finding that the uncertainties in the UV-B range are very large due to stray light contribution in this wavelength range. In summary, the UV index may be detected by some commercially available ASRMs within 5 % compared to the world reference spectroradiometer, if well characterized and calibrated, but only for a limited range of solar zenith angles. Generally, the tested instruments are not yet suitable for solar UV measurements for the entire range between 290 and 400 nm under all atmospheric conditions.

  18. Quality assessment of solar UV irradiance measured with array spectroradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, L.; Gröbner, J.; Hülsen, G.; Bachmann, L.; Blumthaler, M.; Dubard, J.; Khazova, M.; Kift, R.; Hoogendijk, K.; Serrano, A.; Smedley, A. R. D.; Vilaplana, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    The reliable quantification of ultraviolet (UV) radiation at the Earth's surface requires accurate measurements of spectral global solar UV irradiance in order to determine the UV exposure to human skin and to understand long-term trends in this parameter. Array spectroradiometers are small, light, robust and cost effective instruments and are increasingly used for spectral irradiance measurements. Within the European EMRP-ENV03 project "Solar UV", new devices, guidelines, and characterization methods have been developed to improve solar UV measurements with array spectroradiometers and support to the end-user community has been provided. In order to assess the quality of 14 end-user array spectroradiometers, a solar UV intercomparison was held on the measurement platform of the World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC) in Davos, Switzerland, from 10 to 17 July 2014. The results of the intercomparison revealed that array spectroradiometers, currently used for solar UV measurements, show a large variation in the quality of their solar UV measurements. Most of the instruments overestimate the erythema weighted UV index - in particular at low solar zenith angles - due to stray light contribution in the UV-B range. The spectral analysis of global solar UV irradiance further supported the finding that the uncertainties in the UV-B range are very large due to stray light contribution in this wavelength range. In summary, the UV index may be detected by some commercially available array spectroradiometer within 5 % compared to the world reference spectroradiometer, if well characterized and calibrated, but only for a limited range or solar zenith angle. Generally, the tested instruments are not yet suitable for solar UV measurements for the entire range between 290 to 400 nm under all atmospheric conditions.

  19. Modeling monthly mean variation of the solar global irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindel, J. M.; Polo, J.; Zarzalejo, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    The monthly mean variation of the solar global reaching the Earth's surface has been characterized at a global level by a regression model. This model considers the monthly variation itself (to different horizons and even the maximum annual variation) as the study variable, and it is applied without using data corresponding to measured meteorological variable. Two explicative variables have been used, the variation of the extraterrestrial irradiation and the variation of the clear sky global horizontal irradiation. The work has been carried out from datasets including average global daily solar irradiation for each month of the year measured on the ground. The model quality has been proven to be very dependent of the temporal variation considered, in such a way that higher variations, that is to say, higher distances between months, lead to an improvement in the model outcomes.

  20. Solar cycle variation in UV solar spectral irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng Yeo, Kok; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.

    2015-08-01

    Solar spectral irradiance, SSI, in the UV has been measured from space, almost without interruption, since 1978. This is accompanied by the development of models aimed at reconstructing SSI by relating its variability to solar magnetic activity. The various satellite records and model reconstructions differ significantly in terms of the variation over the solar cycle, with the consequence that their application to climate models yield qualitatively different results. Here, we highlight the key discrepancies between available records and reconstructions, and discuss the possible underlying causes.

  1. Spectral solar irradiance before and during a Harmattan dust spell

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyefa, Z.D.; Holmgren, B.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of the ground-level spectral distributions of the direct, diffuse and global solar irradiance between 300 and 1100 nm were made at Akure (7.15{degree}N, 5.5{degree}E), Nigeria, in December 1991 before and during a Harmattan dust spell employing a spectroradiometer (LICOR LI-1800) with 6 nm resolution. The direct spectral solar irradiance which was initially reduced before the dust storm was further attenuated by about 50% after the spell. Estimated values of the Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} indicated an increase of about 146% of this parameter while the Angstrom wavelength-exponent {alpha} decreased by about 65% within the 2-day study period. The spectral diffuse-to-direct and diffuse-to-global ratios suggest that the main cause of the significant reduction in solar irradiance at the surface was the scattering by the aerosol which led to an increase in the diffuse component. The global irradiance though reduced, was less sensitive to changing Harmattan conditions. It is recommended that solar energy devices that use radiation from Sun and sky be used under fluctuating Harmattan conditions. There are some deviations from the Angstrom formula under very turbid Harmattan conditions which could be explained by the relative increase of the particle sizes. 31 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Forecasting solar extreme and far ultraviolet irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henney, C. J.; Hock, R. A.; Schooley, A. K.; Toussaint, W. A.; White, S. M.; Arge, C. N.

    2015-03-01

    A new method is presented to forecast the solar irradiance of selected wavelength ranges within the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and far ultraviolet (FUV) bands. The technique is similar to a method recently published by Henney et al. (2012) to predict solar 10.7 cm (2.8 GHz) radio flux, abbreviated F10.7, utilizing advanced predictions of the global solar magnetic field generated by a flux transport model. In this and the previous study, we find good correlation between the absolute value of the observed photospheric magnetic field and selected EUV/FUV spectral bands. By evolving solar magnetic maps forward 1 to 7 days with a flux transport model, estimations of the Earth side solar magnetic field distribution are generated and used to forecast irradiance. For example, Pearson correlation coefficient values of 0.99, 0.99, and 0.98 are found for 1 day, 3 day, and 7 day predictions, respectively, of the EUV band from 29 to 32 nm. In the FUV, for example, the 160 to 165 nm spectral band, correlation values of 0.98, 0.97, and 0.96 are found for 1 day, 3 day, and 7 day predictions, respectively. In the previous study, the observed F10.7 signal is found to correlate well with strong magnetic field (i.e., sunspot) regions. Here we find that solar EUV and FUV signals are significantly correlated with the weaker magnetic fields associated with plage regions, suggesting that solar magnetic indices may provide an improved indicator (relative to the widely used F10.7 signal) of EUV and FUV nonflaring irradiance variability as input to ionospheric and thermospheric models.

  3. Contributions of the Solar Ultraviolet Irradiance to the Total Solar Irradiance During Large Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, T. N.; Kopp, G.

    2005-12-01

    The TIMED satellite was launched in December 2001 and the SORCE satellite was launched in January 2003. Since then the solar activity has evolved from solar maximum conditions to moderately low activity in 2005. The XUV Photometer System (XPS), aboard both TIMED and SORCE, is measuring the solar soft X-ray (XUV) irradiance shortward of 34 nm with 7-10 nm spectral resolution and the bright hydrogen emission at 121.5 nm. The XPS instrument is best known for observing over 200 flares during the TIMED mission with its 3% solar observing duty cycle and over 800 flares during the SORCE mission with its 70% duty cycle. The XUV radiation, being mostly from coronal emissions, varies more than other wavelengths in the solar spectrum during a flare event, with each flare lasting from minutes to hours. The XPS measurements indicate variations by a factor of 50 for the largest flares during the October-November 2003 solar storm period and that the XUV variations can be as much as 20% of the total flare energy as determined from the total solar irradiance (TSI) measurements by the SORCE Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM). The flare variations of the solar XUV irradiance and TSI will be discussed in the context of the TIMED and SORCE missions and their relationship to the GOES X-ray flare measurements.

  4. Modeled soft X-ray solar irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    Solar soft X-rays have historically been inaccurately modeled in both relative variations and absolute magnitudes by empirical solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance models. This is a result of the use of a limited number of rocket data sets which were primarily associated with the calibration of the AE-E satellite EUV data set. In this work, the EUV91 solar EUV irradiance model has been upgraded to improve the accuracy of the 3.0 to 5.0 nm relative irradiance variations. The absolute magnitude estimate of the flux in this wavelength range has also been revised upwards. The upgrade was accomplished by first digitizing the SOLRAD 11 satellite 4.4 to 6.0 nm measured energy flux data set, then extracting and extrapolating a derived 3.0 to 5.0 nm photon flux from these data, and finally by performing a correlation between these derived data and the daily and 81-day mean 10.7 cm radio flux emission using a multiple linear regression technique. A correlation coefficient of greater than 0.9 was obtained between the dependent and independent data sets. The derived and modeled 3.0 to 5.0 nm flux varies by more than an order of magnitude over a solar cycle, ranging from a flux below 1 x 10(exp 8) to a flux greater than 1 x 10(exp 9) photons per sq cm per sec. Solar rotational (27-day) variations in the flux magnitude are a factor of 2. The derived and modeled irradiance absolute values are an order of magnitude greater than previous values from rocket data sets related to the calibration of the AE-E satellite.

  5. Solar Ultraviolet Irradiance Variability During the Decline of Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, M. A.; McClintock, W. E.; Woods, T. N.; Harder, J. W.; Richard, E. C.

    2010-12-01

    Observations from the SOLar-STellar Irradiance Comparision Experiment (SOLSTICE) on the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) began in 2003 and continue through the present. This time period includes the decline of solar cycle 23 through solar minimum. SOLSTICE measures solar irradiance from 115 nm to 300 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.1 nm. The variability seen by SORCE SOLSTICE is greater than the variability recorded by the instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite(UARS). This poster will describe the magnitude and uncertainty of solar irradiance variability in the ultraviolet part of the spectrum during the SORCE mission with comparisons to irradiance models based on UARS measurements.

  6. The effects of sunspots on solar irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Silva, S.; Woodard, M.; Willson, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the darkness of a sunspot on the visible hemisphere of the sun will reduce the solar irradiance on the earth. Approaches are discussed for obtaining a crude estimate of the irradiance deficit produced by sunspots and of the total luminosity reduction for the whole global population of sunspots. Attention is given to a photometric sunspot index, a global measure of spot flux deficit, and models for the compensating flux excess. A model is shown for extrapolating visible-hemisphere spot areas to the invisible hemisphere. As an illustration, this extrapolation is used to calculate a very simple model for the reradiation necessary to balance the flux deficit.

  7. Properties of solar gravity mode signals in total irradiance observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, R.J.; Chen, J.; Hill, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Further evidence has been found that a significant fraction of the gravity mode power density in the total irradiance observations appears in sidebands of classified eigenfrequencies. These sidebands whose amplitudes vary from year to year are interpreted as harmonics of the rotational frequencies of the nonuniform solar surface. These findings are for non axisymmetric modes and corroborate the findings of Kroll, Hill and Chen for axisymmetric modes. It is demonstrated the the generation of the sidebands lifts the usual restriction on the parity of the eigenfunctions for modes detectable in total irradiance observations. 14 refs.

  8. Estimating Ultraviolet Solar Irradiance from Total Solar Irradiance: A Nine City Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Eugene

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents new empirical equations that estimate hourly solar ultraviolet irradiance from the measured total solar irradiance and the solar zenith angle. These equations are based on data taken in 4 US cities (San Antonio, TX, Atlanta, GA, Albany, NY and Fairbanks, AK). Data taken in all 4 of these US cities utilized Eppley model PSP and TUVR radiometers. The response of the TUVR is dominated by UVA, but also includes some of the UVB region of the spectrum. The empirical equations based on the US data are compared with previously published equations based on data measured in 4 cities in Spain and one city in northern China. In all nine cities, the UV fraction of the total solar irradiance increases from about 4% under cloud free conditions to about 8% under heavily overcast conditions.

  9. Evolution of the solar irradiance during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, L. E. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Krivova, N. A.; Usoskin, I.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Long-term records of solar radiative output are vital for understanding solar variability and past climate change. Measurements of solar irradiance are available for only the last three decades, which calls for reconstructions of this quantity over longer time scales using suitable models. Aims: We present a physically consistent reconstruction of the total solar irradiance for the Holocene. Methods: We extend the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) models to estimate the evolution of the total (and partly spectral) solar irradiance over the Holocene. The basic assumption is that the variations of the solar irradiance are due to the evolution of the dark and bright magnetic features on the solar surface. The evolution of the decadally averaged magnetic flux is computed from decadal values of cosmogenic isotope concentrations recorded in natural archives employing a series of physics-based models connecting the processes from the modulation of the cosmic ray flux in the heliosphere to their record in natural archives. We then compute the total solar irradiance (TSI) as a linear combination of the jth and jth + 1 decadal values of the open magnetic flux. In order to evaluate the uncertainties due to the evolution of the Earth's magnetic dipole moment, we employ four reconstructions of the open flux which are based on conceptually different paleomagnetic models. Results: Reconstructions of the TSI over the Holocene, each valid for a different paleomagnetic time series, are presented. Our analysis suggests that major sources of uncertainty in the TSI in this model are the heritage of the uncertainty of the TSI since 1610 reconstructed from sunspot data and the uncertainty of the evolution of the Earth's magnetic dipole moment. The analysis of the distribution functions of the reconstructed irradiance for the last 3000 years, which is the period that the reconstructions overlap, indicates that the estimates based on the virtual axial dipole

  10. Solar Irradiance, Plage and SOHO UV Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Manross, Kevin

    1996-05-01

    Calcium K and H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored using Big Bear Observatory images on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The purpose of the project is to determine the correlation of changing plage area and solar irradiance changes. We also monitor changes in the K2 spec- tral index provided daily from Sacramento Peak. With the recent launching of the SOHO satellite, we are able to monitor the plage in the He II 304 Angstroms UV image. This image is near the top of the chromosphere nar or just under the transition region. The images show limb brightening as expected. Since it is widely believed that short time scale changes in the UV may be the dominant cause for low amplitude solar irradiance changes, the comparison of the "plage" ara in these UV images to those in conventional visible images should prove instructive.

  11. Fall 2010 Total Solar Irradiance Calibration Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; Socker, D. G.; Willson, R. C.; Kopp, G.

    2010-12-01

    As part of a NASA-Sponsored program to understand the differences in Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) results reported by various space-based radiometers, the Naval Research Laboratory is hosting a Total Solar Irradiance Calibration Workshop. This workshop is a follow-on meeting to a similar workshop hosted by the National Institute for Standards and Technology in 2005. These workshops have been attended by many of the PI teams of the past and current TSI measuring instruments. The discussions at these workshops have addressed calibration methods and the numerous instrumental differences that need to be understood in order to bring the complete ensemble of results onto a common scale. In this talk we will present an overview of the NRL Calibration Workshop which will include results of recent calibration studies at various laboratories and have involved several TSI instruments.

  12. Reconstruction of total and spectral solar irradiance in the satellite era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok Leng, Yeo; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami

    2014-05-01

    Total and spectral solar irradiance are key to understanding the influence of the Sun on changes in the Earth's climate, and also represent a useful index of solar activity from the apparent relationship with solar magnetism. We present a SATIRE-S model reconstruction of total and spectral solar irradiance spanning the period of 1974 to 2013. The model ascribes variation in solar irradiance, on timescales greater than a day, to the occurrence and evolution of magnetic structures on the photosphere. This is an update of preceding efforts with the model based on full disc magnetograms from the KPVT and SoHO/MDI. We extended the model to the present with similar observations from SDO/HMI, and cross calibrated the various magnetogram data sets to yield a single, consistent solar irradiance time series. The decadal trend in the PMOD composite record of total solar irradiance is almost exactly reproduced, giving support to solar surface magnetism as a driver of secular variation in solar irradiance. The reconstruction exhibits excellent agreement with various measurements of spectral solar irradiance (R2 ≠³ 0.9) but diverge significantly from the observations from SORCE/SIM, adding to existing evidence that SIM measurements might contain unresolved instrumental trends.

  13. Electron irradiation of tandem junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.; Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical behavior of 100 micron thick tandem junction solar cells manufactured by Texas Instruments was studied as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence, photon irradiation, and 60 C annealing. These cells are found to degrade rapidly with radiation, the most serious loss occurring in the blue end of the cell's spectral response. No photon degradation was found to occur, but the cells did anneal a small amount at 60 C.

  14. Transformation of surface albedo to surface: Atmosphere surface and irradiance, and their spectral and temporal averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nack, M. L.; Curran, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The dependence of the albedo at the top of a realistic atmosphere upon the surface albedo, solar zenith angle, and cloud optical thickness is examined for the cases of clear sky, total cloud cover, and fractional cloud cover. The radiative transfer calculations of Dave and Braslau (1975) for particular values of surface albedo and solar zenith angle, and a single value of cloud optical thickness are used as the basis of a parametric albedo model. The question of spectral and temporal averages of albedos and reflected irradiances is addressed, and unique weighting functions for the spectral and temporal albedo averages are developed.

  15. Long-term variations in total solar and UV irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.; Floyd, L.; Lee, R. B.; Parker, D.; Puga, L.; Ulrich, R.; Varadi, F.; Viereck, R.

    1997-01-01

    The variations of total solar and UV irradiances during solar cycles 21 and 22 are compared. The total solar irradiance data used were obtained by the SMM/active cavity radiometer irradiance monitoring (ACRIM) 1, upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS)/ACRIM 2 and ERBS experiments. The space-based irradiance observations are compared to the Mount Wilson Magnetic Plage and Photometric Sunspot Index, which is derived from the area and position of sunspots published by the NOAA World Data Center Solar Geophysical Data Catalog. It is found that the variations in solar UV irradiance were similar during the maximum and minimum of solar cycles 21 and 22. The possible reasons for the differences in the irradiance values during the minima of the two solar cylces are discussed.

  16. Total solar irradiance reconstruction using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebabal Yirdaw, Ambelu; Damtie, Baylie; Nigussie, Melessew; Bires, Abiyot; Yizengaw, Endawoke

    2015-08-01

    A feed-forward neural network which can account for nonlinear relationships was used to reconstruct total solar irradiance (TSI). A single layer feed forward neural network with back-propagation algorithm have been implemented for reconstructing daily total solar irradiance from daily photometric sunspot index, and core to wing ratio of Mg II index data. The data year from 1978 to 2013 was used for the training, validation and testing purpose. In order to obtain the optimum neural network for TSI reconstruction, the root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE) and regression coefficient have been taken into account. We have carried out the analysis is made by comparing the reconstructed TSI from neural networks (NNs ) and TSI measurement from satellite. We have found out that the reconstructed TSI and the PMOD composite have the correlation coefficient of about R=0.9307 over the span of the recorded, 1978 to 2013. The NNs model output indicates that reconstructed TSI from solar proxies (photometric index and MgII ) can explain 86.6% of the variance of TSI. Neural network is able to recreate TSI observations on a time scale of a day. This reconstructed TSI using NNs further strengthens the view that surface magnetism indeed plays a dominant role in modulating solar irradiance.

  17. Effect of aerosols on solar UV irradiances during the Photochemical Activity and Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylling, A.; Bais, A. F.; Blumthaler, M.; Schreder, J.; Zerefos, C. S.; Kosmidis, E.

    1998-10-01

    Surface UV irradiances were measured at two different sites in Greece during June 1996 under noncloudy conditions. The measured UV irradiances are simulated by a radiative transfer model using measured ozone density and aerosol optical depth profiles. The absolute difference between model and measurements ranges between -5% and +5% with little dependence on wavelength. The temporal and solar zenith angle dependence in the difference between model and measurement suggests that part of this difference may be explained by assumptions made about the aerosol single-scattering albedo and phase function. Simulated spectra including aerosols are compared with calculated spectra excluding aerosols. It is found that for otherwise similar atmospheric conditions the UVB irradiance is reduced with respect to aerosol free conditions by 5% to 35% depending on the aerosol optical depth and single-scattering albedo. For the campaign period, changes in the aerosol loading gave larger variations in the surface UV irradiances than the changes seen in the ozone column.

  18. Solar Irradiance: Recent Results and Future Research Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.

    2009-05-01

    The solar irradiance, being the radiance integrated over the full disk, is the primary energy input for Earth's environment. Understanding the solar input is key for several terrestrial research topics concerning, to name a few, atmospheric ozone photochemistry, natural forcings on climate change, and improving space weather forecasting. From a solar physics viewpoint, the solar irradiance offers interesting challenges on understanding the sources of the variability of the solar irradiance, which has a strong dependence in wavelength and varies over all time periods from seconds to centuries. Recent solar irradiance results from the TIMED and SORCE satellite missions, such as concerning the current solar cycle minimum, will be presented. In addition, some outstanding questions for solar irradiance research will be addressed within the context of how they can be answered with the new missions, SDO, Glory, and PICARD, that are expected to be launched in late 2009.

  19. Photometric quantities for solar irradiance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preminger, D. G.; Walton, S. R.; Chapman, G. A.

    2002-11-01

    We analyze photometric quantities for the modeling of the total solar irradiance, S. These quantities are derived from full-disk solar images taken at the San Fernando Observatory. We introduce a new quantity, the photometric sum, Σ, which is the sum over an entire image of each pixel's contribution to the irradiance in that image. Σ combines both bright and dark features; and because the sum is over the entire image, it will include low contrast features that cannot be identified directly. Specifically, we examine Σr, Σb, and ΣK, the photometric sums over broadband red, broadband blue, and 1-nm bandpass Ca II K images, respectively. Σr and Σb measure the effects of solar features on the variability in S at two different continuum wavelengths. ΣK measures the variability in spectral lines due to solar features. We find that Σr and Σb have no long-term trend. ΣK, however, varies in phase with the solar cycle. We carry out several multiple linear regressions on the value of S from cycle 22; the best fit uses Σr and ΣK and reproduces the observed composite S with a multiple regression coefficient R = 0.96. We conclude that the long-term change in S over the solar cycle can be accounted for by the variability in the spectral lines as measured by ΣK, assuming no change in the quiet Sun; the contribution of the continuum to the variations in S is only on active region timescales.

  20. Solar Irradiance Data Products at the LASP Interactive Solar IRradiance Datacenter (LISIRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware Dewolfe, A.; Wilson, A.; Lindholm, D. M.; Pankratz, C. K.; Snow, M. A.; Woods, T. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) has developed the LASP Interactive Solar IRradiance Datacenter (LISIRD) to provide access to a comprehensive set of solar irradiance measurements. LISIRD has recently been updated to serve many new datasets and models, including data from SORCE, UARS-SOLSTICE, SME, and TIMED-SEE, and model data from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). The user interface emphasizes web-based interactive visualizations, allowing users to explore and compare this data before downloading it for analysis. The data provided covers a wavelength range from soft X-ray (XUV) at 0.1 nm up to the near infrared (NIR) at 2400 nm, as well as wavelength-independent Total Solar Irradiance (TSI). Combined data from the SORCE, TIMED-SEE, UARS-SOLSTICE, and SME instruments provide continuous coverage from 1981 to the present, while Lyman-alpha measurements, FISM daily data, and TSI models date from the 1940s to the present. LISIRD will also host Glory TSI data as part of the SORCE data system. This poster provides an overview of the LISIRD system, summarizes the data sets currently available, describes future plans and capabilities, and provides details on how to access solar irradiance data through LISIRD’s interfaces.

  1. Variability in solar irradiance observed at two contrasting Antarctic sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, Boyan H.; Láska, Kamil; Vitale, Vito; Lanconelli, Christian; Lupi, Angelo; Mazzola, Mauro; Budíková, Marie

    2016-05-01

    The features of erythemally weighted (EW) and short-wave downwelling (SWD) solar irradiances, observed during the spring-summer months of 2007-2011 at Johann Gregor Mendel (63°48‧S, 57°53‧W, 7 m a.s.l.) and Dome Concordia (75°06‧S, 123°21‧E, 3233 m a.s.l.) stations, placed at the Antarctic coastal region and on the interior plateau respectively, have been analysed and compared to each other. The EW and SWD spectral components have been presented by the corresponding daily integrated values and were examined taking into account the different geographic positions and different environmental conditions at both sites. The results indicate that at Mendel station the surface solar irradiance is strongly affected by the changes in the cloud cover, aerosols and albedo that cause a decrease in EW between 20% and 35%, and from 0% to 50% in SWD component, which contributions are slightly lower than the seasonal SWD variations evaluated to be about 71%. On the contrary, the changes in the cloud cover features at Concordia station produce only a 5% reduction of the solar irradiance, whilst the seasonal oscillations of 94% turn out to be the predominant mode. The present analysis leads to the conclusion that the variations in the ozone column cause an average decrease of about 46% in EW irradiance with respect to the value found in the case of minimum ozone content at each of the stations. In addition, the ratio between EW and SWD spectral components can be used to achieve a realistic assessment of the radiation amplification factor that quantifies the relationship between the atmospheric ozone and the surface UV irradiance.

  2. Multivariate Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Rabbette, M.

    2001-01-01

    Principal component analysis is used to characterize approximately 7000 downwelling solar irradiance spectra retrieved at the Southern Great Plains site during an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) shortwave intensive operating period. This analysis technique has proven to be very effective in reducing a large set of variables into a much smaller set of independent variables while retaining the information content. It is used to determine the minimum number of parameters necessary to characterize atmospheric spectral irradiance or the dimensionality of atmospheric variability. It was found that well over 99% of the spectral information was contained in the first six mutually orthogonal linear combinations of the observed variables (flux at various wavelengths). Rotation of the principal components was effective in separating various components by their independent physical influences. The majority of the variability in the downwelling solar irradiance (380-1000 nm) was explained by the following fundamental atmospheric parameters (in order of their importance): cloud scattering, water vapor absorption, molecular scattering, and ozone absorption. In contrast to what has been proposed as a resolution to a clear-sky absorption anomaly, no unexpected gaseous absorption signature was found in any of the significant components.

  3. Solar Spectral Irradiance Changes during Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T.

    2014-07-01

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ~0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar "continuum." Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar "continuum," the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at λ >~ 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  4. Solar Spectral Irradiance Changes During Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchenko, Sergey; Deland, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by approximately 0.6% +/- 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% +/- 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar "continuum." Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar "continuum," the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at lambda approximately or greater than 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  5. Solar Irradiance Variations on Active Region Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J. (Editor); Chapman, G. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Willson, R. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The variations of the total solar irradiance is an important tool for studying the Sun, thanks to the development of very precise sensors such as the ACRIM instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The largest variations of the total irradiance occur on time scales of a few days are caused by solar active regions, especially sunspots. Efforts were made to describe the active region effects on total and spectral irradiance.

  6. Deriving historical total solar irradiance from lunar borehole temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Hiroko; Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Ohmura, Atsumu

    2008-01-01

    We study the feasibility of deriving historical TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) from lunar borehole temperatures. As the Moon lacks Earth's dynamic features, lunar borehole temperatures are primarily driven by solar forcing. Using Apollo observed lunar regolith properties, we computed present-day lunar regolith temperature profiles for lunar tropical, mid-latitude, and polar regions for two scenarios of solar forcing reconstructed by Lean (2000) and Wang et al. (2005). Results show that these scenarios can be distinguished by small but potentially detectable differences in temperature, on the order of 0.01 K and larger depending on latitude, within ~10 m depth of the Moon's surface. Our results provide a physical basis and guidelines for reconstructing historical TSI from data obtainable in future lunar exploration.

  7. The total and spectral solar irradiance and its possible variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present status of knowledge of the total and spectral irradiance of the sun is briefly reviewed. Currently accepted values of the solar constant and the extraterrestrial solar spectral irradiance are presented along with a discussion of how they were derived. Data on the variability of the solar constant are shown to be conflicting and inconclusive. Some of the alleged sun-weather relationships are cited in support of the need of knowing more precisely the variations in total and spectral solar irradiance. An overview of a solar monitoring program is discussed, with special emphasis on the Solar Energy Monitor in Space experiment which was proposed for several spacecraft missions. It is a combination of a solar constant detector and a prism monochromator. The determination of absolute values and the possible variations of the total and spectral solar irradiance, from measurements outside of the atmosphere is discussed.

  8. Solar irradiance observed from PVO and inferred solar rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Charles L.; Hoegy, Walter R.

    1990-08-01

    Solar irradiance in the extreme ultraviolet flux (EUV) has been monitored for 11 years by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO). Since the experiment moves around the Sun with the orbital rate of Venus rather than that of Earth, the measurement gives us a second viewing location from which to begin unravelling which irradiance variations are intrinsic to the Sun, and which are merely rotational modulations whose periods depend on the motion of the observer. Researchers confirm an earlier detection, made with only 8.6 years of data, that the EUV irradiance is modulated by rotation rates of two families of global oscillation modes. One family is assumed to be r-modes occupying the convective envelope and sharing its rotation, while the other family (g-modes) lies in the radiative interior which as a slower rotation. Measured power in r-modes of low angular harmonic number indicates that the Sun's envelope rotated about 0.7 percent faster near the last solar maximum (1979 thru 1982) than it did during the next rise to maximum (1986 to 1989). No change was seen in the g-mode family of lines, as would be expected from the much greater rotational inertia of the radiative interior.

  9. A new observational solar irradiance composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoell, Micha; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Haberreiter, Margit; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Misios, Stergios; Tourpali, Klairie; Schmutz, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Variations of the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) are an important driver for the chemistry, temperature and dynamics of the Earth's atmosphere and ultimately the Earth's climate. Due to the sparce and scattered SSI data sets it is important to establish tools to derive a consistent SSI dataset, including realistic uncertainties. We present the a new SSI composite based on the face values of SSI observations and applying a probabilistic method that takes into account the uncertainty of the data set scale-wise. We will present the data set and discuss its effects on the Earth's atmosphere in relation to SSI reconstruction models.

  10. Solar Spectral Irradiance as observed by LYRA/PROBA2 and PREMOS/PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; Shapiro, A. I.; Dominique, M.; Kretzschmar, M.; Krivova, N.; Shapiro, A. V.; Schmutz, W.; Schoell, M.; Solanki, S.; Tagirov, R.; Thuillier, G.; Wehrli, C.; Yeo, K. L.

    2012-04-01

    Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance are key input parameters to atmospheric/oceanic and space weather models. Both vary on time-scales ranging from days to millennia, although a complete picture of the solar irradiance variability is still missing. The recent launch of two European missions PROBA-2 with LYRA radiometer onboard and PICARD with PREMOS package onboard provides therefore valuable information and nourishes theoretical models. Both instruments covers the solar spectrum from the EUV to near-infrared. Here we present spectral solar irradiance data from these two recent missions. After a proper correction of the degradation and non-solar signatures, we compare these data with those from the VIRGO/SOHO and SOLSTICE+SIM/SORCE experiments. Both LYRA and PREMOS have also observed several solar eclipses, which allows us to accurately retrieve the center-to-limb variations (CLVs) of the quiet Sun's brightness at the wavelengths of the corresponding channels. CLVs play indeed an important role in modelling of the solar irradiance variability. We show that calculations with the published COde for Solar Irradiance (COSI) yield CLVs that are in good agreement with measurements. Finally we use COSI to model the variability of the irradiance, assuming that the latter is determined by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field as seen with SDO/HMI data. These theoretical results are compared to PREMOS and LYRA measurements.

  11. Solar Simulator Represents the Mars Surface Solar Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Dawson, Stephen F.; Mueller, Robert L.; Mardesich, Nick; Rapp, Donald

    2009-01-01

    A report discusses the development of a Mars surface, laboratory-based solar simulator to create solar cells that can function better on Mars. The Mars Optimized Solar cell Technology (MOST) required defining the surface incident spectrum, developing an appropriate laboratory solar simulator measurement capability, and developing and testing commercial cells modified for the Mars surface spectrum.

  12. Analysis of Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflectance (CSIR) Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, John L.; Harshvardham

    1996-01-01

    Clouds are extremely important with regard to the transfer of solar radiation at the earth's surface. This study investigates Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflection (CSIR) using ground-based pyranometers. CSIR events are short-term increases in solar radiation observed at the surface as a result of reflection off the sides of convective clouds. When sun-cloud observer geometry is favorable, these occurrences produce characteristic spikes in the pyranometer traces and solar irradiance values may exceed expected clear-sky values. Ultraviolet CSIR events were investigated during the summer of 1995 using Yankee Environmental Systems UVA-1 and UVB-1 pyranometers. Observed data were compared to clear-sky curves which were generated using a third degree polynomial best-fit line technique. Periods during which the observed data exceeded this clear-sky curve were identified as CSIR events. The magnitude of a CSIR event was determined by two different quantitative calculations. The MAC (magnitude above clear-sky) is an absolute measure of the difference between the observed and clear-sky irradiances. Maximum MAC values of 3.4 Wm(exp -2) and 0.069 Wm(exp -2) were observed at the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, respectively. The second calculation determined the percentage above clear-sky (PAC) which indicated the relative magnitude of a CSIR event. Maximum UV-A and UV-B PAC magnitudes of 10.1% and 7.8%, respectively, were observed during the study. Also of interest was the duration of the CSIR events which is a function of sun-cloud-sensor geometry and the speed of cloud propagation over the measuring site. In both the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, significant CSIR durations of up to 30 minutes were observed.

  13. Analysis of cumulus solar irradiance reflectance (CSIR) events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, John L.; Harshvardhan

    Clouds are extremely important with regard to the transfer of solar radiation at Earth's surface. This study investigates Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflection (CSIR) using ground-based pyranometers. CSIR events are short-term increases in solar radiation observed at the surface as a result of reflection off the sides of convective clouds. When Sun-cloud observer geometry is favorable, these occurrences produce characteristic spikes in the pyranometer traces and solar irradiance values may exceed expected clear-sky values. Ultraviolet CSIR events were investigated during the summer of 1995 using UVA and UVB pyranometers. Observed data were compared to clear-sky curves which were generated using a third degree polynomial best-fit line technique. Periods during which the observed data exceeded this clear-sky curve were identified as CSIR events. The magnitude of a CSIR event was determined by two different quantitative calculations. The MAC (magnitude above clear-sky) is an absolute measure of the difference between the observed and clear-sky irradiances. Maximum MAC values of 3.4 Win -2 and 0.0169 Wm -2 were observed at the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, respectively. The second calculation determined the percentage above clear-sky (PAC) which indicated the relative magnitude of a CSIR event. Maximum UV-A and UV-B PAC magnitudes of 10.1% and 7.8%, respectively, were observed during the study. Also of interest was the duration of the CSIR events which is a function of Sun-cloud-sensor geometry and the speed of cloud propagation over the measuring site. In both the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, significant CSIR durations of up to 30 minutes were observed. C 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  14. Long-term Solar Irradiance Variability: 1984-1989 Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1990-01-01

    Long-term variability in the total solar irradiance has been observed in the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) solar monitor measurements. The monitors have been used to measure the irradiance from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 spacecraft platforms since October 25, 1984, January 23, 1985, and October 22, 1986, respectively. Before September 1986, the ERBS irradiance values were found to be decreasing -0.03 percent per year. This period was marked by decreasing solar magnetic activity. Between September 1986 and mid-1989, the irradiance values increased approximately 0.1 percent. The latter period was marked by increasing solar activity which was associated with the initiations of the sunspot cycle number 22 and of a new 22-year Hale solar magnetic cycle. Therefore, long-term solar-irradiance variability appears to be correlated directly with solar activity. The maximum smoothed sunspot number occurred during September 1989, according to the Sunspot Index Data Center. Therefore, the recent irradiance increasing trend should disappear during early 1990 and change into a decreasing trend if the observed irradiance variability is correlated more so with the 11-year sunspot cycle than the 22-year Hale cycle. The ERBE irradiance values are presented and compared with sunspot activity for the 1984 to 1989 period. The ERBE values are compared with those available from the Nimbus-7 and Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft experiments.

  15. Application of Singular Spectrum Analysis to Solar Irradiance Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit M.; Varadi, Ferenc

    1995-01-01

    Studies of solar variability improve our knowledge of the internal structure and dynamical processes taking place within the Sun that lead to solar irradiance changes. Becuase of the astrophysical and climatic significance of irradiance variability, considerable effort has been devoted to model and understand its physical origin.

  16. Solar irradiance variations due to active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, L.; Schatten, K.H.; Sofia, S.

    1982-05-15

    We have been able to reproduce the variations of the solar irradiance observed by ACRIM to an accuracy of better than +- 0.4 W m/sup -2/, assuming that during the 6 month observation period in 1980 the solar luminosity was constant. The improvement over previous attempts is primarily due to the inclusion of faculae. The reproduction scheme uses simple geometrical data on spot and facula areas, and conventional parameters for the respective fluxes and angular dependencies. The quality of reproduction is not very sensitive to most of the details of these parameters; nevertheless, there conventional parameters cannot be very different from their actual values in the solar atmosphere. It is interesting that the time average of the integrated excess emission (over directions) of the faculae cancels out the integrated deficit produced by the spots, within an accuracy of about 10%. If this behavior were maintained over longer periods of time, say, on the order of an activity cycle, active regions could be viewed as a kind of lighthouse where the energy deficit near the normal direction, associated with the spots, is primarily reemitted close to the tangential directions by the faculae. The currently available data suggest that energy ''storage'' associated with the redirection of flux near active regions on the Sun is comparable to the lifetime of the faculae.

  17. Reconstruction of spectral solar irradiance since 1700 from simulated magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi-Espuig, M.; Jiang, J.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yeo, K. L.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present a reconstruction of the spectral solar irradiance since 1700 using the SATIRE-T2 (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstructions for the Telescope era version 2) model. This model uses as input magnetograms simulated with a surface flux transport model fed with semi-synthetic records of emerging sunspot groups. Methods: The record of sunspot group areas and positions from the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO) is only available since 1874. We used statistical relationships between the properties of sunspot group emergence, such as the latitude, area, and tilt angle, and the sunspot cycle strength and phase to produce semi-synthetic sunspot group records starting in the year 1700. The semi-synthetic records are fed into a surface flux transport model to obtain daily simulated magnetograms that map the distribution of the magnetic flux in active regions (sunspots and faculae) and their decay products on the solar surface. The magnetic flux emerging in ephemeral regions is accounted for separately based on the concept of extended cycles whose length and amplitude are linked to those of the sunspot cycles through the sunspot number. The magnetic flux in each surface component (sunspots, faculae and network, and ephemeral regions) was used to compute the spectral and total solar irradiance (TSI) between the years 1700 and 2009. This reconstruction is aimed at timescales of months or longer although the model returns daily values. Results: We found that SATIRE-T2, besides reproducing other relevant observations such as the total magnetic flux, reconstructs the TSI on timescales of months or longer in good agreement with the PMOD composite of observations, as well as with the reconstruction starting in 1878 based on the RGO-SOON data. The model predicts an increase in the TSI of 1.2+0.2-0.3 Wm-2 between 1700 and the present. The spectral irradiance reconstruction is in good agreement with the UARS/SUSIM measurements as well as the Lyman-α composite. The

  18. Modelling rotational and cyclical spectral solar irradiance variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Yvonne

    Solar irradiance changes are highly wavelength dependent: solar-cycle variations in the UV can be on the order of tens of percent, while changes in the visible are typically only of the order of one or two permille. With the launch of a number of instruments to measure spectral solar irradiance, we are now for a first time in a good position to explore the changing solar irradiance over a large range of wavelengths and to test our irradiance models as well as some of their underlying assumptions. I will introduce some of the current modelling approaches and present model-data comparisons, using the SATIRE irradiance model and SORCE/SIM measurements as an example. I will conclude by highlighting a number of outstanding questions regarding the modelling of spectral irradiance and current approaches to address these.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Surface Irradiance in the Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobreva, I. D.; Bishop, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Climate-glacier dynamics in the Himalaya are complex. Research indicates extreme local variability in glacier fluctuations and the presence of regional trends. The glaciers in the Karakoram Himalaya depart from world trends of glacier recession, as many are advancing or surging. Nevertheless, glacier sensitivity to climate change has yet to be quantitatively assessed given numerous controlling factors. We attempt to address part of the problem by evaluating the role of topography in explaining variations in surface irradiance. Specifically, we developed a spectral-based topographic solar radiation model that accounts for multi-scale topographic effects. We evaluate surface irradiance simulations over a multitude of glaciers across the Karakoram and Nepalese Himalaya and examine spatio-temporal patterns to determine which alpine glaciers are more susceptible to radiation forcing. Simulation results reveal that many Nepalese glaciers characterized by rapid downwasting, retreat and expanding proglacial lakes, exhibit relatively high-magnitude daily irradiance patterns spatially focused over the terminus region, while other glacier surface areas received less short-wave irradiance. These results were found to be associated with basin-scale relief conditions and topographic shielding. Altitudinal variation in glacier surface irradiance was found to increase during the later portion of the ablation season, as changes in solar geometry produce more cast shadows that protect glaciers given extreme relief. Topographic effects on surface irradiance vary significantly from glacier to glacier, demonstrating the important role of glacier and mountain geodynamics on glacier sensitivity to climate change. Spatial and altitudinal patterns, coupled with information regarding supraglacial debris distribution, depth and ice-flow velocities, may potentially explain glacier sensitivity to climate change and the local variability of glacier fluctuations in the Himalaya.

  20. On the effective solar zenith and azimuth angles to use with measurements of hourly irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, P.; Wald, L.

    2016-02-01

    Several common practices are tested for assessing the effective solar zenith angle that can be associated to each measurement in time-series of in situ or satellite-derived measurements of hourly irradiation on horizontal surface. High quality 1 min measurements of direct irradiation collected by the BSRN stations in Carpentras in France and Payerne in Switzerland, are aggregated to yield time series of hourly direct irradiation on both horizontal and normal planes. Time series of hourly direct horizontal irradiation are reconstructed from those of hourly direct normal irradiation and estimates of the effective solar zenith angle by one of the six practices. Differences between estimated and actual time series of the direct horizontal irradiation indicate the performances of six practices. Several of them yield satisfactory estimates of the effective solar angles. The most accurate results are obtained if the effective angle is computed by two time series of the direct horizontal and normal irradiations that should be observed if the sky were cloud-free. If not possible, then the most accurate results are obtained from using irradiation at the top of atmosphere. Performances show a tendency to decrease during sunrise and sunset hours. The effective solar azimuth angle is computed from the effective solar zenith angle.

  1. Solar spectral irradiance and summary outputs using excel.

    PubMed

    Diffey, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The development of an Excel spreadsheet is described that calculates solar spectral irradiance between 290-3000 nm on an unshaded, horizontal surface under a cloudless sky at sea level, together with summary outputs such as global UV index, illuminance and percentage of energy in different wavebands. A deliberate goal of the project was to adopt the principle of Ockham's razor and to develop a model that is as simple as it can be commensurate with delivering results of adequate accuracy. Consequently, just four inputs are required-geographical latitude, month, day of month and time of day-resulting in a spreadsheet that is easily usable by anyone with an interest in sunlight and solar power irrespective of their background. The accuracy of the calculated data is sufficient for many applications where knowledge of the ultraviolet, visible and infrared levels in sunlight is of interest. PMID:25644778

  2. Interpretation of solar irradiance monitor measurements through analysis of 3D MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Criscuoli, S.; Uitenbroek, H.

    2014-06-20

    Measurements from the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on board the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment mission indicate that solar spectral irradiance at visible and IR wavelengths varies in counter phase with the solar activity cycle. The sign of these variations is not reproduced by most of the irradiance reconstruction techniques based on variations of surface magnetism employed so far, and it is not yet clear whether SIM calibration procedures need to be improved or if instead new physical mechanisms must be invoked to explain such variations. We employ three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar photosphere to investigate the dependence of solar radiance in SIM visible and IR spectral ranges on variations of the filling factor of surface magnetic fields. We find that the contribution of magnetic features to solar radiance is strongly dependent on the location on the disk of the features, which are negative close to disk center and positive toward the limb. If features are homogeneously distributed over a region around the equator (activity belt), then their contribution to irradiance is positive with respect to the contribution of HD snapshots, but decreases with the increase of their magnetic flux for average magnetic flux larger than 50 G in at least two of the visible and IR spectral bands monitored by SIM. Under the assumption that the 50 G snapshots are representative of quiet-Sun regions, we thus find that the Spectral Irradiance can be in counter-phase with the solar magnetic activity cycle.

  3. Long-term variations in total solar irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit M.; Willson, Richard C.; Froelich, Claus; Donnelly, Richard F.; Puga, Larry

    1994-01-01

    For more than a decade total solar irradiance has been monitored simultaneously from space by different satellites. The detection of total solar irradiance variations by satellite-based experiments during the past decade and a half has stimulated modeling efforts to help identify their causes and to provide estimates of irradiance data, using `proxy' indicators of solar activity, for time intervals when no satellite observations exist. In this paper total solar irradiance observed by the Nimbus-7/Earth Radiation Budget (ERB), Solar Maximum Mission (SMM)/Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM) 1, and Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)/ACRIM 2 radiometers is modeled with the Photometric Sunspot Index and the Mg II core-to-wing ratio. Since the formation of the Mg II line is very similar to that of the Ca II K line, the Mg core-to-wing ratio, derived from the irradiance observations of the Nimbus-7 and NOAA9 satellites, is used as a proxy for the bright magnetic elements. It is shown that the observed changes in solar irradiance are underestimated by the proxy models at the time of maximum and during the beginning of the declining portion of solar cycle 22 similar to behavior just before the maximum of solar cycle 21. This disagreement between total irradiance observations and their model estimates is indicative of the fact that the underlying physical mechanism of the changes observed in the solar radiative output is not well-understood. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the proxy data used for irradiance modeling and the resulting limitation of the models should be taken into account, especially when the irradiance models are used for climatic studies.

  4. Solar irradiance change and special longitudes due to r-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Charles L.; Hickey, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Sluggish global oscillations, having a periodicity of months and trapped in the sun's convection zone, modulate the amount of energy reaching earth and seem to impose some large-scale order on the distribution of solar surface features. These recently recognized oscillations (r-modes) increase the predictability of solar changes and may improve understanding of rotation and variability in other stars. Most of the 13 periodicities ranging from 13 to 85 days that are caused by r-modes can be detected in Nimbus 7 observations of solar irradiance during 3 years at solar maximum. These modes may also bear on the classical question of persistent longitudes of high solar activity.

  5. Solar irradiance dictates settlement timing and intensity of marine mussels

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Santos, Isabel; Labarta, Uxío; Álvarez-Salgado, X. Antón; Fernández-Reiriz, Mª José

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the environmental factors driving larval settlement processes is crucial to understand the population dynamics of marine invertebrates. This work aims to go a step ahead and predict larval presence and intensity. For this purpose we consider the influence of solar irradiance, wind regime and continental runoff on the settlement processes. For the first time, we conducted a 5-years weekly monitoring of Mytilus galloprovincialis settlement on artificial suspended substrates, which allowed us to search for interannual variability in the settlement patterns. Comparison between the seasonal pattern of larval settlement and solar irradiance, as well as the well-known effect of solar irradiance on water temperature and food availability, suggest that solar irradiance indirectly influences the settlement process, and support the use of this meteorological variable to predict settlement occurrence. Our results show that solar irradiance allows predicting the beginning and end of the settlement cycle a month in advance: Particularly we have observed that solar irradiance during late winter indirectly drives the timing and intensity of the settlement onset, Finally, a functional generalise additive model, which considers the influence of solar irradiance and continental runoff on the settlement process, provides an accurate prediction of settlement intensity a fortnight in advance. PMID:27384527

  6. Solar irradiance dictates settlement timing and intensity of marine mussels.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Santos, Isabel; Labarta, Uxío; Álvarez-Salgado, X Antón; Fernández-Reiriz, M José

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the environmental factors driving larval settlement processes is crucial to understand the population dynamics of marine invertebrates. This work aims to go a step ahead and predict larval presence and intensity. For this purpose we consider the influence of solar irradiance, wind regime and continental runoff on the settlement processes. For the first time, we conducted a 5-years weekly monitoring of Mytilus galloprovincialis settlement on artificial suspended substrates, which allowed us to search for interannual variability in the settlement patterns. Comparison between the seasonal pattern of larval settlement and solar irradiance, as well as the well-known effect of solar irradiance on water temperature and food availability, suggest that solar irradiance indirectly influences the settlement process, and support the use of this meteorological variable to predict settlement occurrence. Our results show that solar irradiance allows predicting the beginning and end of the settlement cycle a month in advance: Particularly we have observed that solar irradiance during late winter indirectly drives the timing and intensity of the settlement onset, Finally, a functional generalise additive model, which considers the influence of solar irradiance and continental runoff on the settlement process, provides an accurate prediction of settlement intensity a fortnight in advance. PMID:27384527

  7. Solar resource assessment with a solar spectral irradiance meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsiankou, Viktar; Hinzer, Karin; Muron, Aaron; Haysom, Joan; Schriemer, Henry; Myrskog, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    The SSIM prototype was designed at the University of Ottawa as a cost-effective alternative to a field spectrora-diometer. The instrument was installed at the University of Ottawa's CPV testing facility in September, 2013, collecting the environmental and spectral data from October, 2013 to March, 2014. The SSIM's performance was compared against an ASD field spectroradiometer and an Eppley pyrheliometer during a six month study. It was observed that the SSIM can accurately reproduce the solar spectrum and the direct normal irradiance. The mean difference between the SSIM and the Eppley pyrheliometer was within ±1.5% for cloudless periods in October, 2013. However, bandpass filter degradation and moisture ingress limited the long term performance of the device.

  8. The observation of structural defects in neutron-irradiated lithium-doped silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to observe the distribution and morphology of lattice defects introduced into lithium-doped silicon solar cells by neutron irradiation. Upon etching the surface of the solar cells after irradiation, crater-like defects are observed that are thought to be associated with the space charge region around vacancy clusters. Thermal annealing experiments showed that the crater defects were stable in the temperature range 300 to 1200 K in all of the lithium-doped samples. Some annealing of the crater defects was observed to occur in the undoped cells which were irradiated at the lowest doses.

  9. Surface meteorology and Solar Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    The Release 5.1 Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) data contains parameters formulated for assessing and designing renewable energy systems. Parameters fall under 11 categories including: Solar cooking, solar thermal applications, solar geometry, tilted solar panels, energy storage systems, surplus product storage systems, cloud information, temperature, wind, other meteorological factors, and supporting information. This latest release contains new parameters based on recommendations by the renewable energy industry and it is more accurate than previous releases. On-line plotting capabilities allow quick evaluation of potential renewable energy projects for any region of the world. The SSE data set is formulated from NASA satellite- and reanalysis-derived insolation and meteorological data for the 10-year period July 1983 through June 1993. Results are provided for 1 degree latitude by 1 degree longitude grid cells over the globe. Average daily and monthly measurements for 1195 World Radiation Data Centre ground sites are also available. [Mission Objectives] The SSE project contains insolation and meteorology data intended to aid in the development of renewable energy systems. Collaboration between SSE and technology industries such as the Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewables ( HOMER ) may aid in designing electric power systems that employ some combination of wind turbines, photovoltaic panels, or diesel generators to produce electricity. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=1993-06-30] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  10. Long-term downward trend in total solar irradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, R.C.; Hudson, H.S.; Frohlich, C.; Brusa, R.W.

    1986-11-28

    The first 5 years (from 1980 to 1985) of total solar irradiance observations by the first Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM I) experiment on board the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft show a clearly defined downward trends of -0.019% per year. The existence of this trend has been confirmed by the internal self-calibrations of ACRIM I, by independent measurements from sounding rockets and balloons, and by observations from the Nimbus-7 spacecraft. The trend appears to be due to unpredicted variations of solar luminosity on time scales of years, and it may be related to solar cycle magnetic activity.

  11. Long-term downward trend in total solar irradiance.

    PubMed

    Willson, R C; Hudson, H S; Frohlich, C; Brusa, R W

    1986-11-28

    The first 5 years (from 1980 to 1985) of total solar irradiance observations by the first Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM I) experiment on board the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft show a clearly defined downward trend of -0.019% per year. The existence of this trend has been confirmed by the internal self-calibrations of ACRIM I, by independent measurements from sounding rockets and balloons, and by observations from the Nimbus-7 spacecraft. The trend appears to be due to unpredicted variations of solar luminosity on time scales of years, and it may be related to solar cycle magnetic activity. PMID:17778952

  12. Realistic Solar Surface Convection Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, Ake

    2000-01-01

    We perform essentially parameter free simulations with realistic physics of convection near the solar surface. We summarize the physics that is included and compare the simulation results with observations. Excellent agreement is obtained for the depth of the convection zone, the p-mode frequencies, the p-mode excitation rate, the distribution of the emergent continuum intensity, and the profiles of weak photospheric lines. We describe how solar convection is nonlocal. It is driven from a thin surface thermal boundary layer where radiative cooling produces low entropy gas which forms the cores of the downdrafts in which most of the buoyancy work occurs. We show that turbulence and vorticity are mostly confined to the intergranular lanes and underlying downdrafts. Finally, we illustrate our current work on magneto-convection.

  13. Improved radiation resistant properties of electron irradiated c-Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Khuram; Khan, Sohail A.; MatJafri, M. Z.

    2016-08-01

    This work investigates the radiation tolerance of c-Si solar cells under electron energy of 9 MeV with fluence of 5.09×1016 cm-2. The solar cells were fabricated and characterized before and after electron irradiation through current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V), and frequency dependent conductance (Gp) measurements. The results revealed that all the output parameters such as short circuit current (Isc), open circuit voltage (Voc), series resistance (Rs), and efficiency (η) were degraded after electron irradiation. Capacitance-Voltage measurements show that there is a slight decrease in the base carrier concentration (ND), while a small increase in depletion layer width (WD) was due to an increase in the base carrier concentration. Enhancements in the density of interface states (Nss), and trap time constant (τ) have been observed after electron irradiation. The results has revealed that back surface field (BSF) solar cell with front surface passivation (FSP) presented lowest efficiency degradation ratio of 11.3% as compared to 15.3% of the solar cell without FSP. The subsequent annealing of irradiated Si solar cell devices revealed that the Si solar cell with FSP demonstrated high efficiency recovery ratio of 94% as compared to non-FSP solar cell.

  14. Evaluation of CERES surface irradiance products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.; Rose, F. G.; Rutan, D. A.; Doelling, D.; Radkevich, A.; Ham, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the surface radiation budget is important for several reasons. At the global and large temporal scales, it should balance with the sum of surface latent and sensible heat fluxes and ocean heating. At regional scales, it is an indispensable boundary condition for ocean or snow models or any other models that need energy input to the surface. NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project provides surface irradiance data products for a range of temporal and spatial scales computed using a radiative transfer model initialized using satellite-derived cloud and aerosol properties. Other inputs to the radiative transfer model include temperature and humidity profiles from NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office's (GMAO) reanalysis. The CERES team uses more than 80 surface observation sites located over land and ocean to evaluate computed irradiances. When computed monthly 1° by 1° gridded mean downward irradiances are compared with 10 years of observed irradiances, the bias averaged over all land and ocean sites are, respectively, -1.7 Wm-2 and 4.7 Wm-2 for shortwave and -1.0 Wm-2 and -2.0 Wm-2 for longwave. The shortwave agreement is significantly better than other satellite-based surface irradiance products. One of reasons for the better agreement is careful treatment of diurnal cycle of clouds by merging 3-hourly geostationary satellite-derived cloud properties. In addition, computed surface irradiance variability shows a remarkable agreement with observed variability. However, these data sets have their shortcomings. The uncertainty in nighttime surface longwave irradiance over polar regions is larger than that of other regions primarily due to the difficulty of cloud detection and large uncertainties in skin temperature and near-surface temperature and humidity. The large uncertainty in polar region surface irradiances hampers, for example, investigation of surface radiation budget changes in response to changes in sea ice

  15. Long-term reconstructions of total solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Dasi Espuig, Maria

    2012-07-01

    Solar irradiance is the main external driver of the Earth's climate, although its relative contribution compared to other internal and anthropogenic factors is not yet well determined. Variations of total solar irradiance have being measured for over three decades and are relatively well understood. Reconstructions of the irradiance into the past remain, however, rather uncertain. In particular, the magnitude of the secular change is highly debated. The reason is the lack of direct and well-sampled proxies of solar magnetic activity on time scales longer than a few decades. Reconstructions on time scales of centuries rely on sunspot observations available since 1610. Reconstructions on millennial time scales use concentrations of the cosmogenic isotopes in terrestrial archives. We will review long-term reconstructions of the solar irradiance using the SATIRE set of models, compare them with other recent models and discuss the remaining uncertainties.

  16. Atmosphere, Ocean, Land, and Solar Irradiance Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, James; Ahmad, Suraiya

    2003-01-01

    The report present the atmosphere, ocean color, land and solar irradiation data sets. The data presented: total ozone, aerosol, cloud optical and physical parameters, temperature and humidity profiles, radiances, rain fall, drop size distribution.

  17. Analysis of clear hour solar irradiation for seven Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.; Sahami, K.

    1995-12-31

    Hourly global and diffuse irradiation and corresponding surface meteorological data have been analyzed for the seven Canadian stations at Edmonton, Goose Bay, Montreal, Port Hardy, Resolute, Toronto, and Winnipeg. The variation of the most probable clear hour values of clearness index k{sub t}, diffuse index k{sub d}, direct beam index k{sub b}, and Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} with solar elevation, atmospheric precipitable water, and snow depth are obtained. Values of these quantities are presented which are consistent with the attenuation and scattering of solar radiation by the atmosphere which is expected. The most probable values of {beta} tend to be lower than the average values of {beta} recently reported by Gueymard. The data indicate a drift in the calibration of the instruments used for measurements of the irradiation data for the stations at Goose Bay and Resolute. The data for the other five stations indicate that the instrument calibration is maintained over the years of the data. 4 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. The satellite total solar irradiance database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    A precise knowledge of the total solar irradiance (TSI) over time is essential to understanding the physics of solar luminosity variation and its impact on the Earth in the form of climate change. A National Research Council study found that sustained trends as small as 0.25% per century were the most likely forcing for ‘little ice age’ climate minima during the 12th - 19th centuries. Recent phenomenological analyses of TSI observations and proxies indicate that TSI variation is an important climate change forcing on many timescales including the industrial era. The profound sociological and economic implications of understanding the relative climate change contributions of natural and anthropogenic forcings makes it essential that the satellite TSI database be precisely sustained into the foreseeable future. There are currently three satellite TSI monitoring experiments in operation: SOHO/VIRGO, ACRIMSAT/ACRIM3 and SORCE/TIM, in order of deployment (1996, 2000 and 2003, resp.). Results reported on their ‘native scales show the same basic variations in TSI over time, yet some smaller variations detected by ACRIM3 are less well defined or absent in the results of VIRGO and TIM. There is also a scale difference issue: TIM results are 0.35% lower than those of ACRIM3 and VIRGO, outside the ± 0.1% uncertainty bounds predicted for ACRIM3 and VIRGO, and well outside TIM’s ± 0.01% uncertainty design goal. TIM’s failure to achieve 0.01% uncertainty in flight demonstrates that the TSI monitoring paradigm shift of relying on measurement accuracy rather than a redundant/overlap strategy to provide long term traceability cannot be realized with current ‘ambient temperature’ technology. The only viable monitoring approach for the foreseeable future continues to be the redundant/overlap strategy that has provided the 31 year satellite TSI database to date with useful traceability. Intercomparisons of flight experiments at their levels of mutual precision can

  19. On the variation of the Nimbus 7 total solar irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    For the interval December 1978 to April 1991, the value of the mean total solar irradiance, as measured by the Nimbus-7 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment channel 10C, was 1,372.02 Wm(exp -2), having a standard deviation of 0.65 Wm(exp -2), a coefficient of variation (mean divided by the standard deviation) of 0.047 percent, and a normal deviate z (a measure of the randomness of the data) of -8.019 (inferring a highly significant non-random variation in the solar irradiance measurements, presumably related to the action of the solar cycle). Comparison of the 12-month moving average (also called the 13-month running mean) of solar irradiance to those of the usual descriptors of the solar cycle (i.e., sunspot number, 10.7-cm solar radio flux, and total corrected sunspot area) suggests possibly significant temporal differences. For example, solar irradiance is found to have been greatest on or before mid 1979 (leading solar maximum for cycle 21), lowest in early 1987 (lagging solar minimum for cycle 22), and was rising again through late 1990 (thus, lagging solar maximum for cycle 22), having last reported values below those that were seen in 1979 (even though cycles 21 and 22 were of comparable strength). Presuming a genuine correlation between solar irradiance and the solar cycle (in particular, sunspot number) one infers that the correlation is weak (having a coefficient of correlation r less than 0.84) and that major excursions (both as 'excesses' and 'deficits') have occurred (about every 2 to 3 years, perhaps suggesting a pulsating Sun).

  20. White Paper on SBUV/2 Solar Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest; DeLand, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of solar irradiance measurements by the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet, Model 2 (SBUV/2) instruments on NOAA's operational satellites is described. These measurements are necessary accurately monitor the long-term changes in the global column ozone amount, the altitude distribution of ozone in the upper stratosphere, and the degree to which ozone changes are caused by anthropogenic sources. Needed to accomplish these goals are weekly solar irradiance measurements at the operational ozone wavelengths, daily measurements of the Mg II proxy index, instrument-specific Mg II scale factors, and daily measurements of the solar spectral irradiance at photochemically important wavelengths. Two solar measurement schedules are provided: (1) a baseline schedule for all instruments except the NOAA-14 instrument and (2) a modified schedule for the NOAA-14 SBUV/2 instrument. This latter schedule is needed due to the NOAA-14 grating drive problems.

  1. Variations in solar Lyman alpha irradiance on short time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Variations in solar UV irradiance at Lyman alpha are studied on short time scales (from days to months) after removing the long-term changes over the solar cycle. The SME/Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analysis. In order to study the nonlinear effects, Lyman alpha irradiance is modeled with a 5th-degree polynomial as well. It is shown that the full-disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm, which is used as a proxy for the plages and active network, can best reproduce the changes observed in Lyman alpha. Approximately 72 percent of the solar-activity-related changes in Lyman alpha irradiance arise from plages and the network. The network contribution is estimated by the correlation analysis to be about 19 percent. It is shown that significant variability remains in Lyman alpha irradiance, with periods around 300, 27, and 13.5d, which is not explained by the solar activity indices. It is shown that the nonlinear effects cannot account for a significant part of the unexplained variation in Lyman alpha irradiance. Therefore, additional events (e.g., large-scale motions and/or a systematic difference in the area and intensity of the plages and network observed in the lines of Ca-K, He 1083, and Lyman alpha) may explain the discrepancies found between the observed and estimated irradiance values.

  2. Characterization of solar cells for space applications. Volume 12: Electrical characteristics of Solarex BSF, 2-ohm-cm, 50-micron solar cells (1978 pilot line) as a function of intensity, temperature, and irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Beckert, D. M.; Downing, R. G.; Miyahira, T. F.; Weiss, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of Solarex back-surface-field, 2-ohm-cm, 50-micron N/P silicon solar cells are presented in graphical and tabular format as a function of solar illumination intensity, temperature, and irradiation.

  3. Modelling total solar irradiance since 1878 from simulated magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi-Espuig, M.; Jiang, J.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2014-10-01

    Aims: We present a new model of total solar irradiance (TSI) based on magnetograms simulated with a surface flux transport model (SFTM) and the Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstructions (SATIRE) model. Our model provides daily maps of the distribution of the photospheric field and the TSI starting from 1878. Methods: The modelling is done in two main steps. We first calculate the magnetic flux on the solar surface emerging in active and ephemeral regions. The evolution of the magnetic flux in active regions (sunspots and faculae) is computed using a surface flux transport model fed with the observed record of sunspot group areas and positions. The magnetic flux in ephemeral regions is treated separately using the concept of overlapping cycles. We then use a version of the SATIRE model to compute the TSI. The area coverage and the distribution of different magnetic features as a function of time, which are required by SATIRE, are extracted from the simulated magnetograms and the modelled ephemeral region magnetic flux. Previously computed intensity spectra of the various types of magnetic features are employed. Results: Our model reproduces the PMOD composite of TSI measurements starting from 1978 at daily and rotational timescales more accurately than the previous version of the SATIRE model computing TSI over this period of time. The simulated magnetograms provide a more realistic representation of the evolution of the magnetic field on the photosphere and also allow us to make use of information on the spatial distribution of the magnetic fields before the times when observed magnetograms were available. We find that the secular increase in TSI since 1878 is fairly stable to modifications of the treatment of the ephemeral region magnetic flux.

  4. Compact Flyeye concentrator with improved irradiance uniformity on solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zhenfeng; Yu, Feihong

    2013-08-01

    A Flyeye concentrator with improved irradiance distribution on the solar cell in a concentrator photovoltaic system is proposed. This Flyeye concentrator is composed of four surfaces: a refractive surface, mirror surface, freeform surface, and transmissive surface. Based on the principles of geometrical optics, the contours of the proposed Flyeye concentrator are calculated according to Fermat's principle, the edge-ray principle, and the ray reversibility principle without solving partial differential equations or using an optimization algorithm, therefore a slope angle control method is used to construct the freeform surface. The solid model is established by applying a symmetry of revolution around the optical axis. Additionally, the optical performance for the Flyeye concentrator is simulated and analyzed by Monte-Carlo method. Results show that the Flyeye concentrator optical efficiency of >96.2% is achievable with 1333× concentration ratio and ±1.3 deg acceptance angle, and 1.3 low aspect ratio (average thickness to entry aperture diameter ratio). Moreover, comparing the Flyeye concentrator specification to that of the Köhler concentrator and the traditional Fresnel-type concentrator, results indicate that this concentrator has the advantages of improved uniformity, reduced thickness, and increased tolerance to the incident sunlight.

  5. Evaluation of solar irradiance models for climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, William; Yeo, Kok-Leng; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami; Unruh, Yvonne; Morrill, Jeff

    2015-04-01

    Instruments on satellites have been observing both Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Spectral Solar Irradiance (SSI), mainly in the ultraviolet (UV), since 1978. Models were developed to reproduce the observed variability and to compute the variability at wavelengths that were not observed or had an uncertainty too high to determine an accurate rotational or solar cycle variability. However, various models and measurements show different solar cycle SSI variability that lead to different modelled responses of ozone and temperature in the stratosphere, mainly due to the different UV variability in each model, and the global energy balance. The NRLSSI and SATIRE-S models are the most comprehensive reconstructions of solar irradiance variability for the period from 1978 to the present day. But while NRLSSI and SATIRE-S show similar solar cycle variability below 250 nm, between 250 and 400 nm SATIRE-S typically displays 50% larger variability, which is however, still significantly less then suggested by recent SORCE data. Due to large uncertainties and inconsistencies in some observational datasets, it is difficult to determine in a simple way which model is likely to be closer to the true solar variability. We review solar irradiance variability measurements and modelling and employ new analysis that sheds light on the causes of the discrepancies between the two models and with the observations.

  6. Quantifying solar spectral irradiance in aquatic habitats for the assessment of photoenhanced toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, M.G.; Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.; Diamond, S.

    2000-01-01

    The spectra and intensity of solar radiation (solar spectral irradiance [SSI]) was quantified in selected aquatic habitats in the vicinity of an oil field on the California coast. Solar spectral irradiance measurements consisted of spectral scans (280-700 rim) and radiometric measurements of ultraviolet (UV): UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). Solar spectral irradiance measurements were taken at the surface and at various depths in two marsh ponds, a shallow wetland, an estuary lagoon, and the intertidal area of a high-energy sandy beach. Daily fluctuation in SSI showed a general parabolic relationship with time; maximum structure-activity relationship (SAR) was observed at approximate solar noon. Solar spectral irradiance measurements taken at 10-cm depth at approximate solar noon in multiple aquatic habitats exhibited only a twofold variation in visible light and UVA and a 4.5-fold variation in UVB. Visible light ranged from 11,000 to 19,000 ??W/cm2, UVA ranged from 460 to 1,100 ??W/cm2, and UVB ranged from 8.4 to 38 ??W/cm2. In each habitat, the attenuation of light intensity with increasing water depth was differentially affected over specific wavelengths of SSI. The study results allowed the development of environmentally realistic light regimes necessary for photoenhanced toxicity studies.

  7. Quantifying solar spectral irradiance in aquatic habitats for the assessment of photoenhanced toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, M.G.; Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.; Diamond, S.

    2000-04-01

    The spectra and intensity of solar radiation (solar spectral irradiance [SSI]) was quantified in selected aquatic habitats in the vicinity of an oil field on the California coast. Solar spectral irradiance measurements consisted of spectral scans and radiometric measurements of ultraviolet (UV): UVB and UVA. Solar spectral irradiance measurements were taken at the surface and at various depths in two marsh ponds, a shallow wetland, an estuary lagoon, and the intertidal area of a high-energy sandy beach. Daily fluctuation in SSI showed a general parabolic relationship with time; maximum structure-activity relationship (SAR) was observed at approximate solar noon. Solar spectral irradiance measurements taken at 10-cm depth at approximate solar noon in multiple aquatic habitats exhibited only a twofold variation in visible light and UVA and a 4.5-fold variation in UVB. Visible light ranged from 11,000 to 19,000 {micro}W/cm{sup 2}, UVA ranged from 460 to 1,100 {micro}W/cm{sup 2}, and UVB ranged from 8.4 to 38 {micro}W/cm{sup 2}. In each habitat, the attenuation of light intensity with increasing water depth was differentially affected over specific wavelengths of SSI. The study results allowed the development of environmentally realistic light regimes necessary for photoenhanced toxicity studies.

  8. Solar UV Spectral Irradiance Measured by SUSIM During Solar Cycle 22 and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; Floyd, L. E.; McMullin, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the impact of solar variability on terrestrial climate requires detailed knowledge of both solar spectral irradiance (SSI) and total solar irradiance (TSI). Observations of SSI in the ultraviolet (UV) have been made by various space-based missions since 1978. Of these missions, the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) included the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) experiment which measured the UV SSI from 1991 into 2005. In this talk, we present the UV spectral irradiance observations from SUSIM on UARS during solar cycles 22 and 23 along with results of a recent review of the calibration, stability, and in-flight performance. Another more recent mission is the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite which carries the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) and Solar Irradiance Monitor (SIM). Together, the SORCE instruments have measured the UV, Visible, and IR SSI over the period of 2003 to the present. This talk will include a comparison between SUSIM and SORCE during the period of overlapping observations as well as comparisons of UV spectra observed at various times, particularly during the last two solar minima. These comparisons show that the UV observations by SORCE are inconsistent with those measured by SUSIM.

  9. Long-term solar irradiance variability: knowns and unknowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Dasi Espuig, Maria; Leng Yeo, Kok; Wu, Chi-Ju

    2016-07-01

    Long-term reconstructions of solar irradiance variability are crucial to our understanding of solar influence on climate. They are only possible with the help of suitable models, which in turn require a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of this variability. With the advance of such models, also the past reconstructions are becoming more reliable. Nevertheless, the remaining uncertainties spread out when extrapolating back over long periods of time, amplified by the increasingly poorer quality and reliability of the available data that bear information on past solar activity. We will discuss the progress and the reliability of irradiance reconstructions on time scales of decades to millennia.

  10. Comparison of Solar UV Spectral Irradiance from SUSIM and SORCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; Floyd, L.; McMullin, D.

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) is important in determining the impact of solar variability on climate. Observations of UV SSI have been made by the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE), and the Solar Irradiance Monitor (SIM), both on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite. Measurements by SUSIM and SORCE overlapped from 2003 to 2005. SUSIM and SORCE observations represent ˜ 20 years of absolute UV SSI. Unfortunately, significant differences exist between these two data sets. In particular, changes in SORCE UV SSI measurements, gathered at moderate and minimum solar activity, are a factor of two greater than the changes in SUSIM observations over the entire solar cycle. In addition, SORCE UV SSI have a substantially different relationship with the Mg ii index than did earlier UV SSI observations. Acceptance of these new SORCE results impose significant changes on our understanding of UV SSI variation. Alternatively, these differences in UV SSI observations indicate that some or all of these instruments have changes in instrument responsivity that are not fully accounted for by the current calibration. In this study, we compare UV SSI changes from SUSIM with those from SIM and SOLSTICE. The primary results are that (1) long-term observations by SUSIM and SORCE generally do not agree during the overlap period (2003 - 2005), (2) SUSIM observations during this overlap period are consistent with an SSI model based on Mg ii and early SUSIM SSI, and (3) when comparing the spectral irradiance for times of similar solar activity on either side of solar minimum, SUSIM observations show slight differences while the SORCE observations show variations that increase with time between spectra. Based on this work, we conclude that the instrument responsivity for SOLSTICE and SIM need to be reevaluated before these

  11. Solar Spectral Irradiance Observations from the PICARD/PREMOS Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; Schöll, M.; Schmutz, W. K.; Wehrli, C.; Groebner, J.; Haberreiter, M.; Kretzschmar, M.; Shapiro, A.; Thuillier, G. O.; Finsterle, W.; Fox, N.; Hochedez, J. F.; Koller, S.; Meftah, M.; Nyeki, S.; Pfiffner, D.; Roth, H.; Rouze, M.; Spescha, M.; Tagirov, R.; Werner, L.; Wyss, J.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather and space climate studies require accurate Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) observations. The PREcision Monitoring Sensor (PREMOS) instrument aboard the PICARD satellite acquired solar irradiance measurements in specific spectral windows in the UV, visible and near infrared from October 2010 to March 2014. This contribution aims at presenting the Level 3 data, corrected for non solar features as well as for degradation. These level 3 data has been tested over different scientific cases, such as observations during the Venus transit and the presence of the p-mode signature within high-cadence data. The PREMOS Level 3 data have also been compared to others data sets, namely the SOLSTICE and SIM instruments aboard SORCE, for nearly 3 and half years. An excellent correlation has been found for the UV spectral ranges. We have also found a rather good correlation for visible and near-infrared observations for short-term variations, for which an error of about 200 ppm has been estimated within PREMOS visible and near-infrared observations. The PREMOS data could also be used to address several scientific topics, i.e. for validating semi-empirical models of the solar irradiance. We will emphasize about our new irradiance model, COSIR for Code of Solar Irradiance Reconstruction, which is successful at reproducing the solar modulation as seen in the PREMOS, SoHO/Virgo and SORCE data.

  12. Laser Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy: Surface Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Joshua; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip

    2006-03-01

    Experiments in our laboratory incorporate a non-invasive approach to treat superficial tumors in animal models. Based on the concept of Laser Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy, surface irradiation provides good information to compare to invasive alternatives. The procedure involves injecting an immunoadjuvant (Glycated Chitosan) as well as a light absorbing dye (Indocyanine Green) directly into the tumor (5 to 7 mm in diameter). The temperature of the tumor is raised using an infrared diode laser operating at 804 nm, with a silica fiber tip placed a set distance away from the surface of the tumor. We monitor the surface temperature using non-invasive (infrared detector probe) as well as the internal temperature of the tumor using invasive (micro thermocouples) methods. This study aims at the success of the surface irradiation mode to treat solid tumors. * This work is supported by a grant from The National Institute of Health.

  13. Variation in spectral irradiance of the SES solar simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnutt, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    A test to determine the spectral characteristics of the solar simulation produced by the solar environment simulator (SES) comprised a statistical analysis to determine the spectral variance, and its effect on the average absorptivity of surface coatings.

  14. The origin of Total Solar Irradiance variability on timescales less than a day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Krivova, Natalie; Schmutz, Werner; Solanki, Sami K.; Leng Yeo, Kok; Cameron, Robert; Beeck, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) varies on timescales from minutes to decades. It is generally accepted that variability on timescales of a day and longer is dominated by solar surface magnetic fields. For shorter time scales, several additional sources of variability have been proposed, including convection and oscillation. However, available simplified and highly parameterised models could not accurately explain the observed variability in high-cadence TSI records. We employed the high-cadence solar imagery from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance Reconstruction) model of solar irradiance variability to recreate the magnetic component of TSI variability. The recent 3D simulations of solar near-surface convection with MURAM code have been used to calculate the TSI variability caused by convection. This allowed us to determine the threshold timescale between TSI variability caused by the magnetic field and convection. Our model successfully replicates the TSI measurements by the PICARD/PREMOS radiometer which span the period of July 2010 to February 2014 at 2-minute cadence. Hence, we demonstrate that solar magnetism and convection can account for TSI variability at all timescale it has ever been measured (sans the 5-minute component from p-modes).

  15. Forecasting solar irradiation using WRF model and refining statistics for Northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, E. B.; Lima, F. J. L.; Martins, F. R.

    2015-12-01

    Solar energy is referred to as variable generation sources because their electricity production varies based on the availability of sun irradiance. To accommodate this variability, electricity grid operators use a variety of tools to maintain a reliable electricity supply, one of them is to forecast solar irradiation, and to adjust other electricity sources as needed. This work reports an approach to forecast solar irradiation in the Brazilian Northeastern region (NEB) by using statistically post-processing data from mesoscale model outputs. The method assimilates the diversity of climate characteristics occurring in the region presenting the largest solar energy potentials in Brazil. Untreated solar irradiance forecasts for 24h in advance were obtained using the WRF model runs. Cluster analysis technique was employed to find out areas presenting similar climate characteristics and to reduce uncertainties. Comparison analysis between WRF model outputs and site-specific measured data were performed to evaluate the model skill in forecasting the surface solar irradiation. After that, post-processing of WRF outputs using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and multiple regression methods refined the short-term solar irradiation forecasts. A set of pre-selected variables of the WRF model outputs representing the forecasted atmospheric conditions were used as predictors by the ANNs. Several predictors were tested in the adjustment and simulation of the ANNs. We found the best ANNs architecture and a group of 10 predictors, with which more in-depth analyzes were carried out, including performance evaluation for fall and spring of 2011 (rainy and dry season in NEB). The site-specific measured solar radiation data came from 110 stations distributed throughout the NEB. Data for the rainy season were acquired from March to May, and for the dry season from September to November. We concluded that the untreated numerical forecasts of solar irradiation provided by WRF exhibited a

  16. Anomalous effects in silicon solar cell irradiated by 1-MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B. E.

    1989-01-01

    Several silicon solar cells having thicknesses of approximately 63 microns, with and without back-surface fields (BSF), were irradiated with 1-MeV protons having fluences between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 12th sq cm. The irradiations were performed using both normal and isotropic incidence on the rear surfaces of the cells. It was observed that after irradiation with fluences greater than 10 to the 11th protons/sq cm, all BSF cells degraded at a faster rate than cells without BSF. The irradiation results are analyzed using a model in which irradiation-induced defects in the BSF region are taken into account. Tentatively, it is concluded that an increase in defect density due to the formation of aluminum and proton complexes in BSF cells is responsible for the higher-power loss in the BSF cells compared to the non-BSF cells.

  17. Two-parameter model of total solar irradiance variation over the solar cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit M.; Willson, Richard C.; Donnelly, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Total solar irradiance measured by the SMM/ACRIM radiometer is modelled from the Photometric Sunspot Index and the Mg II core-to-wing ratio with multiple regression analysis. Considering that the formation of the Mg II line is very similar to that of the Ca II K line, the Mg II core-to-wing ratio, measured by the Nimbus-7 and NOAA9 satellites, is used as a proxy for the bright magnetic elements, including faculae and the magnetic network. It is shown that the relationship between the variations in total solar irradiance and the above solar activity indices depends upon the phase of the solar cycle. Thus, a better fit between total irradiance and its model estimates can be achieved if the irradiance models are calculated for the declining portion and minimum of solar cycle 21, and the rising portion of solar cycle 22, respectively. There is an indication that during the rising portion of solar cycle 22, similar to the maximum time of solar cycle 21, the modelled total irradiance values underestimate the measured values. This suggests that there is an asymmetry in the long-term total irradiance variability.

  18. Dependence of the spectral surface irradiance on aerosol properties and surface reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Kaufman, Y.; Podolak, M.; Ungar, S.

    1980-01-01

    A reduction in global surface irradiance occurs with increasing aerosol loadings when the aerosols are absorbing. For scattering aerosols, a reduction is pronounced for isotropic scattering (characteristic of small particles) but reduction is not as significant for scattering with a high anisotropy of a large forward peak (characteristic of large particles). This distinction between isotropic and anisotropic scattering becomes small or null over highly reflecting terrain; and for reflectivities higher than 0.5 and solar elevation angles close to the zenith, the global irradiance can be slightly higher for isotropic scattering than in the case of an anisotropy of a forward peak. Under such conditions, which can be encountered in reflective infrared bands over dense vegetation or over sandy deserts (close to noon, in low latitudes) the surface irradiance becomes nearly independent of the aerosol optical thickness.

  19. LISIRD: Where to go for Solar Irradiance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Pankratz, C. K.; Lindholm, D. M.; Snow, M.; Knapp, B.; Woodraska, D.; Templeman, B.; Woods, T.; Eparvier, F.; Fontenla, J.; Harder, J.; Bill, M.

    2008-12-01

    LASP, the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, has been providing web access to solar irradiance measurements, reference spectra, composites and model data covering the solar spectrum from .1 to 2400 nm through LISIRD, the LASP Interactive Solar IRradiance Datacenter. No single instrument can measure the solar spectral irradiance from X-rays to the IR, but the ensemble of LASP instruments can. LISIRD uses a single interface to provide easy, logical access to a variety of mission data, merged in time and wavelength. Daily space weather measurements are available, including total solar irradiance (TSI), Lyman Alpha (121 nm), Magnesium II Index (280 nm), He II (30.4 nm), FE XVI (33.5 nm), and the FUV continuum (145 to 165 nm). More recently, LISIRD has recently added the Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) Solar Irradiance time series, which provides a quiet sun reference spectra for the period of April 10-16 of 2008. LISIRD also recently added a composite solar spectral irradiance product over the range of 120 to 400 nm for the time period from November 8, 1978 to August 1, 2005. This product, created by Mathew Deland at SSAI, merges data from six different satellites into a single SSI product. And, we are currently adding a time series for daily solar spectral irradiance from 1950 to 2006, created by Judith Lean of the Naval Research Lab. This product adjusts observed irradiance for a given wavelength with parameters that represent known sources of variability at that wavelength. LISIRD remains committed to improving data access in a variety of ways. We are planning and developing a means for the broader community of scientists to easily determine data availability for a particular date range without having to know mission or instrument details. Improved data subsetting will allow users to request only the time range or spectra that users need, making data management generally easier. We expect to continue to enhance our data offerings. Future vision for

  20. Advanced solar irradiances applied to satellite and ionospheric operational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Schunk, Robert; Eccles, Vince; Bouwer, Dave

    Satellite and ionospheric operational systems require solar irradiances in a variety of time scales and spectral formats. We describe the development of a system using operational grade solar irradiances that are applied to empirical thermospheric density models and physics-based ionospheric models used by operational systems that require a space weather characterization. The SOLAR2000 (S2K) and SOLARFLARE (SFLR) models developed by Space Environment Technologies (SET) provide solar irradiances from the soft X-rays (XUV) through the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum. The irradiances are provided as integrated indices for the JB2006 empirical atmosphere density models and as line/band spectral irradiances for the physics-based Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM) developed by the Space Environment Corporation (SEC). We describe the integration of these irradiances in historical, current epoch, and forecast modes through the Communication Alert and Prediction System (CAPS). CAPS provides real-time and forecast HF radio availability for global and regional users and global total electron content (TEC) conditions.

  1. A method for estimating direct normal solar irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment

    SciTech Connect

    Janjai, Serm

    2010-09-15

    In order to investigate a potential use of concentrating solar power technologies and select an optimum site for these technologies, it is necessary to obtain information on the geographical distribution of direct normal solar irradiation over an area of interest. In this work, we have developed a method for estimating direct normal irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment. The method starts with the estimation of global irradiation on a horizontal surface from MTSAT-1R satellite data and other ground-based ancillary data. Then a satellite-based diffuse fraction model was developed and used to estimate the diffuse component of the satellite-derived global irradiation. Based on this estimated global and diffuse irradiation and the solar radiation incident angle, the direct normal irradiation was finally calculated. To evaluate its performance, the method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation at seven pyrheliometer stations in Thailand. It was found that values of monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation from the measurements and those estimated from the proposed method are in reasonable agreement, with a root mean square difference of 16% and a mean bias of -1.6%, with respect to mean measured values. After the validation, this method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation over Thailand by using MTSAT-1R satellite data for the period from June 2005 to December 2008. Results from the calculation were displayed as hourly and yearly irradiation maps. These maps reveal that the direct normal irradiation in Thailand was strongly affected by the tropical monsoons and local topography of the country. (author)

  2. Evaluating solar radiation on a tilted surfaces - a study case in Timis (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasar, C.; Prostean, O.; Prostean, G.

    2016-02-01

    In the last years the usage of solar energy has grown considerably in Romania, as well as in Europe, stimulated by various factors as government programs, green pricing policies, decreasing of photovoltaic components cost etc. Also, the rising demand of using Solar Energy Conversion Systems (SECS) is driven by the desire of individuals or companies to obtain energy from a clean renewable source. In many applications, remote consumers far from other energetic grids can use solar systems more cost-effectively than extending the grid to reach the location. Usually the solar energy is measured or forecast on horizontal surface, but in SECS there is needed the total solar radiation incident on the collector surface, that is oriented in a position that maximize the harvested energy. There are many models that convert the solar radiation from horizontal surface to a tilted surface, but they use empirical coefficients and the accuracy is influenced by different facts as geographical location or sky conditions. Such models were used considering measured values for solar radiation on horizontal plane, in the western part of Romania. Hourly values measured for global solar irradiation on the horizontal plane, diffuse solar irradiation on the horizontal plane and reflected solar irradiation by ground are used to compute the total solar radiation incident on different tilted surfaces. The calculated incident radiation is then compared with the real radiation measured on tilted surface in order to evaluate the performance of the considered conversion models.

  3. Vacuum-ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1994-02-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) region were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiment also includes EUV instruments from Boston University, but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR)/University of Colorado's (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 0.25-m Rowland circle EUV spectrograph that has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2-nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. This photodiode system provides a spectral coverage from 0.1 to 80 nm with approximately 15-nm resolution. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. This avalanche photodiode package measures the XUV photon energy, providing a solar spectrum from 50 to 12,400 eV (25 to 0.1 nm) with an energy resolution of about 50 eV. The fourth solar instrument is an XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc sec. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2-nm spectral resolution. The photon-counting CODACON detectors are used for three of these instruments and consist of coded arrays of anodes behind microchannel plates.

  4. Reflected solar radiation from horizontal, vertical and inclined surfaces: ultraviolet and visible spectral and broadband behaviour due to solar zenith angle, orientation and surface type.

    PubMed

    Turner, J; Parisi, A V; Turnbull, D J

    2008-07-24

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation affects human life and UV exposure is a significant everyday factor that individuals must be aware of to ensure minimal damaging biological effects to themselves. UV exposure is affected by many complex factors. Albedo is one factor, involving reflection from flat surfaces. Albedo is defined as the ratio of reflected (upwelling) irradiance to incident (downwelling) irradiance and is generally accepted only for horizontal surfaces. Incident irradiance on a non horizontal surface from a variety of incident angles may cause the reflectivity to change. Assumptions about the reflectivity of a vertical surface are frequently made for a variety of purposes but are rarely quantified. As urban structures are dominated by vertical surfaces, using albedo to estimate influence on UV exposure is limiting when incident (downwelling) irradiance is not normal to the surface. Changes to the incident angle are affected by the solar zenith angle, surface position and orientation and surface type. A new characteristic describing reflection from a surface has been used in this research. The ratio of reflected irradiance (from any surface position of vertical, horizontal or inclined) to global (or downwelling) irradiance (RRG) has been calculated for a variety of metal building surfaces in winter time in the southern hemisphere for both the UV and visible radiation spectrum, with special attention to RRG in the UV spectrum. The results show that the RRG due to a vertical surface can exceed the RRG due to a horizontal surface, at smaller solar zenith angles as well as large solar zenith angles. The RRG shows variability in reflective capacities of surface according to the above mentioned factors and present a more realistic influence on UV exposure than albedo for future investigations. Errors in measuring the RRG at large solar zenith angles are explored, which equally highlights the errors in albedo measurement at large solar zenith angles. PMID:18490174

  5. Spectrum line intensity as a surrogate for solar irradiance variations.

    PubMed

    Livingston, W C; Wallace, L; White, O R

    1988-06-24

    Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM) solar constant measurements from 1980 to 1986 are compared with ground-based, irradiance spectrophotometry of selected Fraunhofer lines. Both data sets were identically sampled and smoothed with an 85-day running mean, and the ACRIM total solar irradiance (S) values were corrected for sunspot blocking (S(c)). The strength of the mid-photospheric manganese 539.4-nanometer line tracks almost perfectly with ACRIM S(e), Other spectral features formed high in the photosphere and chromosphere also track well. These comparisons independently confirm the variability in the ACRIM S(e), signal, indicate that the source of irradiance is faculae, and indicate that ACRIM S(e), follows the 11-year activity cycle. PMID:17842428

  6. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 um and 50 um, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 um to 3 um, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 um to 1 um. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and are calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet are calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 um to 50 um, as a first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degrees to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  7. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.; Konings, J.; Xie, Y.; Dooraghi, M.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 micrometers and 50 micrometers, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 micrometers to 3 micrcometers, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 micrometers to 1 micrometers. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 micrometers to 50 micrometers, as first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degres to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  8. Modeling of the Solar Spectral Irradiance as observed by LYRA/PROBA2 and PREMOS/PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A.; Cessateur, G.; Dominique, M.; Krivova, N. A.; Lachat, D.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W. K.; Shapiro, A. V.; Tagirov, R. V.; Thuillier, G. O.; Wehrli, C.

    2011-12-01

    COSI as a tool for modeling the variability of the irradiance, assuming that the latter is determined by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field. The theoretical results are compared with the PREMOS and LYRA measurements. Finally we show that COSI and other semi-empirical and empirical models allow to reconstruct the entire solar spectrum from the observations in a few passbands. Hence the PREMOS and LYRA measurements can be used as a proxies for the nowcasting of the solar irradiance (UV-visible-IR) with the high cadence rate and spectral resolution.

  9. Solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance: Present, past, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lean, J. L.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Meier, R. R.; Strickland, D. J.; Correira, J. T.; Evans, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    New models of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance variability are constructed in 1 nm bins from 0 to 120 nm using multiple regression of the Mg II and F10.7 solar activity indices with irradiance observations made during the descending phase of cycle 23. The models have been used to reconstruct EUV spectra daily since 1950, annually since 1610, to forecast daily EUV irradiance and to estimate future levels in cycle 24. A two-component model developed by scaling the observed rotational modulation of the two solar indices underestimates the solar cycle changes that the Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) reports at wavelengths shorter than 40 nm and longer than 80 nm. A three-component model implemented by including an additional term derived from the smoothed Mg II index better reproduces the measurements at all wavelengths. The three-component model is consistent with variations in the EUV energy from 0 to 45 nm that produces the far ultraviolet (FUV) terrestrial dayglow observed by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI). However, the spectral structure of this third component is complex, and its origin is uncertain. Analogous two- and three-component models are also developed with absolute scales determined by the NRLEUV2 spectrum of the quiet Sun rather than by the SEE average spectrum. Assessment of the EUV absolute spectrum and variability of the four different models indicate that during solar cycle 23, the EUV irradiance (0 to 120 nm) increased 100 ± 30%, from 2.9 ± 0.2 to 5.8 ± 0.9 mWm-2, and may have been as low as 1.9 ± 0.5 mWm-2 during the 17th-century Maunder Minimum. Near the peak of upcoming solar cycle 24, EUV irradiance is expected to increase 40% to 80% above the 2008 minimum values.

  10. Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment 1. II - Instrument calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Ucker, Gregory J.

    1993-01-01

    The science objective for the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is to accurately measure the full disk solar spectral irradiance in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region over a long time period. The SOLSTICE design was driven by the requirement for long-term, precise solar photometry conducted from space. The SOLSTICE 1 is on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), launched in September 1991 with the possibility for a 10-year operational mission. The in-flight calibration for SOLSTICE to meet its primary objective is the routine measurements of the UV radiation from a set of early-type stars, using the identical optical elements employed for the solar observations. The extensive preflight calibrations of the instrument have yielded a precise characterization of the three SOLSTICE channels. Details of the preflight and in-flight SOLSTICE calibrations are discussed in this paper.

  11. Modeling the spectral solar irradiance in the SOTERIA Project Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Luis Eduardo; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Cessateur, Gaël

    The evolution of the radiative energy input is a key element to understand the variability of the Earth's neutral and ionized atmospheric components. However, reliable observations are limited to the last decades, when observations realized above the Earth's atmosphere became possible. These observations have provide insights about the variability of the spectral solar irradiance on time scales from days to years, but there is still large uncertainties on the evolu-tion on time scales from decades to centuries. Here we discuss the physics-based modeling of the ultraviolet solar irradiance under development in the Solar-Terrestrial Investigations and Archives (SOTERIA) project framework. In addition, we compare the modeled solar emission with variability observed by LYRA instrument onboard of Proba2 spacecraft.

  12. The solar spectral irradiance 1200-3184 a near solar maximum, 15 July 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, G. H.; Rottman, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Full disk solar spectral irradiances near solar maximum were obtained in the spectral range 1200 to 3184 A at a spectral resolution of approximately 1 A from rocket observations above White Sands Missile Range. Comparison with measurements made during solar minimum confirm a large increase at solar maximum in the solar irradiance near 1200 A with no change within the measurement errors near 2000 A. Irradiances in the range 1900 to 2100 A are in excellent agreement with previous measurements, and those in the 2100 to 2500 A range are lower than separate previous results in this range. Agreement is found with previous values 2500 to 2900 A A, and then fall below those values 2900 to 3184 A.

  13. Lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance line profile observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Martin; Machol, Janet; Quemerais, Eric; Curdt, Werner; Kretschmar, Matthieu; Haberreiter, Margit

    2016-04-01

    Solar lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance measurements are available on a daily basis, but only the 1-nm integrated flux is typically published. The International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland has sponsored a team to make higher spectral resolution data available to the community. Using a combination of SORCE/SOLSTICE and SOHO/SUMER observations plus empirical and semi-empirical modeling, we will produce a dataset of the line profile. Our poster will describe progress towards this goal.

  14. Low-Reflectance Surfaces For Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fatemi, Navid; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved method for increasing solar cell efficiency has potential application for space-based and terrestrial solar power systems and optoelectronic devices. Etched low-angle grooves help recover reflected light. Light reflected from v-grooved surface trapped in cover glass and adhesive by total internal reflection. Reflected light redirected onto surface, and greater fraction of incident light absorbed, producing more electrical energy in InP solar photovoltaic cell.

  15. Environmental responses of solar reflective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is undertaken of the environmental responses of solar reflective surfaces, with emphasis on dish-type concentrator surfaces exposed to the conditions of Southern California. A generalized mathematical model for specific solar reflective surfaces can be formulated on the basis of either experimental or assumed site degradation/corrosion data. In addition, the fabrication parameters of a parabolic reflecting surface and its substrate can be used to model combined reflective characteristics for the postulated environmental conditions.

  16. Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, Candace; Wedge, Ronnice; Wu, Dong; Stello, Harry; Robinson, Renee

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the Total and Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is to acquire measurements to determine the direct and indirect effects of solar radiation on climate. TSIS total solar irradiance measurements will extend a 37-year long uninterrupted measurement record of incoming solar radiation, the dominant energy source driving the Earths climate and the most precise indicator of changes in the Suns energy output. TSIS solar spectral irradiance measurements will determine the regions of the Earths multi-layered atmosphere that are affected by solar variability, from which the solar forcing mechanisms causing changes in climate can be quantified. TSIS includes two instruments: the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM), integrated into a single payload. The TSIS TIM and SIM instruments are upgraded versions of the two instruments that are flying on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) mission launched in January 2003. TSIS was originally planned for the nadir-pointing National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) spacecraft. The TSIS instrument passed a Critical Design Review (CDR) for NPOESS in December 2009. In 2010, TSIS was re-planned for the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Polar Free Flyer (PFF). The TSIS TIM, SIM, and associated electronics were built, tested, and successfully completed pre-ship review as of December 2013.In early 2014, NOAA and NASA agreed to fly TSIS on the International Space Station (ISS). In the FY16 Presidents Budget, NASA assumes responsibility for the TSIS mission on ISS. The TSIS project includes requirements, interface, design, build and test of the TSIS payload, including an updated pointing system, for accommodation on the ISS. It takes advantage of the prior development of the TSIS sensors and electronics. The International Space Station (ISS) program contributions include launch services and robotic installation of the TSIS payload

  17. Total solar irradiance reconstruction since 1700 using a flux transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi Espuig, Maria; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Jiang, Jie

    Reconstructions of solar irradiance into the past are crucial for studies of solar influence on climate. Models based on the assumption that irradiance changes are caused by the evolution of the photospheric magnetic fields have been most successful in reproducing the measured irradiance variations. Daily magnetograms, such as those from MDI and HMI, provide the most detailed information on the changing distribution of the photospheric magnetic fields. Since such magnetograms are only available from 1974, we used a surface flux transport model to describe the evolution of the magnetic fields on the solar surface due to the effects of differential rotation, meridional circulation, and turbulent diffusivity, before 1974. In this model, the sources of magnetic flux are the active regions, which are introduced based on sunspot group areas, positions, and tilt angles. The RGO record is, however, only available since 1874. Here we present a model of solar irradiance since 1700, which is based on a semi-synthetic sunspot record. The semi-synthetic record was obtained using statistical relationships between sunspot group properties (areas, positions, tilt angles) derived from the RGO record on one hand, and the cycle strength and phase derived from the sunspot group number (Rg) on the other. These relationships were employed to produce daily records of sunspot group positions, areas, and tilt angles before 1874. The semi-synthetic records were fed into the surface flux transport model to simulate daily magnetograms since 1700. By combining the simulated magnetograms with a SATIRE-type model, we then reconstructed total solar irradiance since 1700.

  18. Solar Spectral Proxy Irradiance from GOES (SSPRING): a model for solar EUV irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, Katherine; Snow, Martin; Viereck, Rodney; Machol, Janet

    2016-02-01

    Several currently operating instruments are able to measure the full EUV spectrum at sufficient wavelength resolution for use in upper-atmosphere modeling, the effects of space weather, and modeling satellite drag. However, no missions are planned at present to succeed the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) missions, which currently provide these data sources. To develop a suitable replacement for these measurements, we use two broadband EUV channels on the NOAA GOES satellites, the magnesium core-to-wing ratio (Mg II index) from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) as well as EUV and Mg II time averages to model the EUV spectrum from 0.1 to 105 nm at 5-nm spectral resolution and daily time resolution. A Levenberg-Marquardt least squares fitting algorithm is used to determine a coefficient matrix that best reproduces a reference data set when multiplied by input data. The coefficient matrix is then applied to model data outside of the fitting interval. Three different fitting intervals are tested, with a variable fitting interval utilizing all days of data before the prediction date producing the best results. The correlation between the model results and the observed spectrum is found to be above 95% for the 0.1-50 nm range, and between 74% and 95% for the 50-105 nm range. We also find a favorable comparison between our results and the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). These results provide a promising potential source for an empirical EUV spectral model after direct EUV measurements are no longer available, and utilize a similar EUV modeling technique as the upcoming GOES-R satellites.

  19. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  20. Rocket measurements of the solar spectral irradiance during solar minimum, 1972-1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottman, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Five sounding rocket experiments conducted between December 1972 and March 1977, a period spanning solar minimum between cycles 20 and 21, provide full disc solar irradiance data in the spectral range 120-190 nm. The five measurements have been combined to give a solar minimum reference table. This spectrum is compared with other measurements obtained during the same time period. A table of intensities for the strong emission lines at wavelengths between 120 and 190 nm is presented.

  1. 1978-1988 Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) Variability Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Priestley, Kory J.; Wilson, Robert S.; Al-Hajjah, Aiman; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Thomas, Susan

    1999-01-01

    Total solar irradiance (TSI), normalized to the mean earth-sun distance, is analyzed to assess long-term solar variability which may affect climate. TSI data sets are reviewed primarily from the 1984-1999 Earth Radiation Budgets Satellite (ERBS), 1978-1993 Nimbus7, 1980-1989 Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), 19911998 Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS), and 1996-1998 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations (VIRGO) Spacecraft missions. The data sets indicate that 1365 W/sq m [Watts per meter square] is the most likely TSI amplitude at minimum solar magnetic activity as indicated by minimum sunspot numbers. The TSI long-term variability component was found to vary with a period of approximately 10 years and with an amplitude of 2 W/sq m. An empirical TSI fit model, based upon 10.7-cm solar radio fluxes and prompt photometric sunspot indices, was used to characterize TSI variability. Comparisons among TSI measurements and empirical fit trends are reviewed as well as inconsistencies among current spacecraft TSI data set trends. The 1996-1998, SOHO/VIRGO measurement indicate stronger TSI increasing trends than those suggested by the corresponding ERBS and UARS measurement and by the empirical model fit. 1978-1999 TSI data sets are analyzed to identify the probable existence of another long-term TSI variability component.

  2. SORCE and Future Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Rottman, G.; Woods, T.; Lawrence, G.; Kopp, G.; Harder, J.; McClintock, W.

    2003-01-01

    With solar activity just passing the maximum of cycle 23, SORCE is beginning a 5 year mission to measure total solar irradiance (TSI) with unprecedented accuracy using phase-sensitive detection, and to measure spectral solar irradiance (SSI) with unprecedented spectral coverage, from 1 to 2000 nm. The new Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) has 4 active cavity radiometers, any one of which can be used as a fixed-temperature reference against any other that is exposed to the Sun via a shutter that cycles at a rate designed to minimize noise at the shutter frequency. The new Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) is a dual Fery prism spectrometer that can employ either prism as a monochromatic source on the other prism, thus monitoring its transmission during the mission lifetime. Either prism can measure SSI from 200 to 2000 nm, employing the same phase-sensitive electrical substitution strategy as TIM. SORCE also carries dual SOLSTICE instruments to cover the spectral range 100-320 nm, similar to the instruments onboard UARS, and also an XUV Photometer System (XPS) similar to that on TIMED. SSI has now been added to TSI as a requirement of EOS and NPOESS, because different spectral components drive different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and stratospheric ozone, IR into tropospheric water vapor and clouds, and Visible into the oceans and biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2011 will continue to monitor these critical solar variables.

  3. Radiation scales on which standard values of the solar constant and solar spectral irradiance are based

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    The question of radiation scales is critically examined. There are two radiation scales which are of fundamental validity and there are several calibration standards and radiation scales which have been set up for practical convenience. The interrelation between these scales is investigated. It is shown that within the limits of accuracy of irradiance measurements in general and solar irradiance measurements in particular, the proposed standard values of the solar constant and solar spectrum should be considered to be on radiation scales of fundamental validity; those based on absolute electrical units and on the thermodynamic Kelvin temperature scale.

  4. Modeling electron density, temperature distribution in the solar corona based on solar surface magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, A.; Rodríguez, J. M.; Vieira, L.; Coelho Stekel, T. R.; Costa, J. E. R.; Pinto, T. S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic fields constitute a natural link between the Sun, the Earth and the Heliosphere in general. The solar dynamo action maintains and strengthens the magnetic field in the solar interior. The structure of the solar corona is mostly determined by the configuration and evolution of the magnetic field. While open magnetic field lines carry plasma into the heliosphere, closed field lines confine plasma. Additionally, key physical processes that impact the evolution of Earth's atmosphere on time-scale from days to millennia, such as the soft X-ray and EUV emission, are also determined by the solar magnetic field. However, observations of the solar spectral irradiance are restricted to the last few solar cycles and are subject to large uncertainties. Here we present a physics-based model to reconstruct in near-real time the evolution of the solar EUV emission based on the configuration of the magnetic field imprinted on the solar surface and assuming that the emission lines are optically thin. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated employing a potential field source surface extrapolation based on the synoptic charts. The coronal plasma temperature and density are described by a hydrostatic model. The emission is estimated to employ the CHIANTI database. The performance of the model is compared to the emission observed by EVE instrument on board SDO spacecraft. The preliminary results and uncertainties are discussed in details. Furthermore, we examine the possibility of delivery the reconstruction of the solar spectral irradiance in near-real time using the infrastructure provided by the Brazilian Space weather program (EMBRACE/INPE). This work is partially supported by CNPq/Brazil under the grant agreement no. 140779/2015-9.

  5. The Measurement of the Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability during the Solar Cycle 24 using SOLAR/SOLSPEC on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolsée, David; Pereira, Nuno; Pandey, Praveen; Cessateur, Gaël; Gillotay, Didier; Foujols, Thomas; Hauchecorne, Alain; Bekki, Slimane; Marchand, Marion; Damé, Luc; Meftah, Mustapha; Bureau, Jerôme

    2016-04-01

    Since April 2008, SOLAR/SOLSPEC measures the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from 166 nm to 3088 nm. The instrument is a part of the Solar Monitoring Observatory (SOLAR) payload, externally mounted on the Columbus module of the International Space Station. As the SSI is a key input for the validation of solar physics models, together with playing a role in the climate system and photochemistry of the Earth atmosphere, SOLAR/SOLSPEC spectral measurements becomes important. In this study, the in-flight operations and performances of the instrument -including the engineering corrections- will be presented for seven years of the SOLAR mission. Following an accurate absolute calibration, the SSI variability in the UV as measured by SOLAR/SOLSPEC in the course of the solar cycle 24 will be presented and compared to other instruments. The accuracy of these measurements will be also discussed here.

  6. Tuning surface porosity on vanadium surface by low energy He+ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, we report on tuning the surface porosity on vanadium surfaces using high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation as function of sample temperature. Polished, mirror-finished vanadium samples were irradiated with 100 eV He+ ions at a constant ion-flux of 7.2 × 1020 ions m-2 s-1 for 1 h duration at constant sample temperatures in the wide range of 823-1173 K. Our results show that the surface porosity of V2O5 (naturally oxidized vanadium porous structure, after taking out from UHV) is strongly correlated to the sample temperature and is highly tunable. In fact, the surface porosity significantly increases with reducing sample temperature and reaches up to ∼87%. Optical reflectivity on these highly porous V2O5 surfaces show ∼0% optical reflectivity at 670 nm wavelength, which is very similar to that of "black metal". Combined with the naturally high melting point of V2O5, this very low optical reflectivity suggests potential application in solar power concentration technology. Additionally, this top-down approach guarantees relatively good contact between the different crystallites and avoids electrical conductivity limitations (if required). Since V2O5 is naturally a potential photocatalytic material, the resulting sub-micron-sized cube-shaped porous structures could be used in solar water splitting for hydrogen production in energy applications.

  7. Development of local atmospheric model for estimating solar irradiance in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeap, E. C.; Lau, A. M. S.; Busu, I.; Kanniah, K. D.; Rasib, A. W.; Kadir, W. H. W.

    2014-02-01

    Incoming solar irradiance covers a wide range of wavelengths with different intensities which drives almost every biological and physical cycle on earth at a selective wavelength. Estimation of the intensities of each wavelength for the solar irradiance on the earth surface provides a better way to understand and predict the radiance energy. It requires that the atmospheric and geometric input and the availability of atmospheric parameter is always the main concern in estimating solar irradiance. In this study, a local static atmospheric model for Peninsular Malaysia was built to provide the atmospheric parameters in the estimation of solar irradiance. Ten years of monthly Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) average data (water vapor, temperature, humidity and pressure profile) of the Peninsular Malaysia was used for the building of the atmospheric model and the atmospheric model were assessed based on the measured meteorological data with RMSE of 4.7% and 0.7k for both humidity and temperature respectively. The atmospheric model were applied on a well-established radiative transfer model namely SMARTS2. Some modifications are required in order to include the atmospheric model into the radiative transfer model. The solar irradiance results were then assessed with measured irradiance data and the results show that both the radiative transfer model and atmospheric model were reliable with RMSE value of 0.5 Wm-2. The atmospheric model was further validated based on the measured meteorological data (temperature and humidity) provided by the Department of Meteorology, Malaysia and high coefficient of determination with R2 value of 0.99 (RMSE value = 4.7%) and 0.90 (RMSE value = 0.7k) were found for both temperature and humidity respectively.

  8. The Impact of Different Absolute Solar Irradiance Values on Current Climate Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David H.; Lean, Judith L.; Jonas, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of the preindustrial and doubled CO2 climates are made with the GISS Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model 3 using two different estimates of the absolute solar irradiance value: a higher value measured by solar radiometers in the 1990s and a lower value measured recently by the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment. Each of the model simulations is adjusted to achieve global energy balance; without this adjustment the difference in irradiance produces a global temperature change of 0.48C, comparable to the cooling estimated for the Maunder Minimum. The results indicate that by altering cloud cover the model properly compensates for the different absolute solar irradiance values on a global level when simulating both preindustrial and doubled CO2 climates. On a regional level, the preindustrial climate simulations and the patterns of change with doubled CO2 concentrations are again remarkably similar, but there are some differences. Using a higher absolute solar irradiance value and the requisite cloud cover affects the model's depictions of high-latitude surface air temperature, sea level pressure, and stratospheric ozone, as well as tropical precipitation. In the climate change experiments it leads to an underestimation of North Atlantic warming, reduced precipitation in the tropical western Pacific, and smaller total ozone growth at high northern latitudes. Although significant, these differences are typically modest compared with the magnitude of the regional changes expected for doubled greenhouse gas concentrations. Nevertheless, the model simulations demonstrate that achieving the highest possible fidelity when simulating regional climate change requires that climate models use as input the most accurate (lower) solar irradiance value.

  9. Annealing characteristics of irradiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payson, J. S.; Abdulaziz, S.; Li, Y.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    It was shown that 1 MeV proton irradiation with fluences of 1.25E14 and 1.25E15/sq cm reduces the normalized I(sub SC) of a-Si:H solar cell. Solar cells recently fabricated showed superior radiation tolerance compared with cells fabricated four years ago; the improvement is probably due to the fact that the new cells are thinner and fabricated from improved materials. Room temperature annealing was observed for the first time in both new and old cells. New cells anneal at a faster rate than old cells for the same fluence. From the annealing work it is apparent that there are at least two types of defects and/or annealing mechanisms. One cell had improved I-V characteristics following irradiation as compared to the virgin cell. The work shows that the photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS) and annealing measurements may be used to predict the qualitative behavior of a-Si:H solar cells. It was anticipated that the modeling work will quantitatively link thin film measurements with solar cell properties. Quantitative predictions of the operation of a-Si:H solar cells in a space environment will require a knowledge of the defect creation mechanisms, defect structures, role of defects on degradation, and defect passivation and annealing mechanisms. The engineering data and knowledge base for justifying space flight testing of a-Si:H alloy based solar cells is being developed.

  10. Solar Cycle Spectral Irradiance Variation and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Swartz, W. H.; Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent measurements from the SIM instrument on the SORCE satellite have been interpreted by Harder et al (Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L07801, doi:10.1029/2008GL036797, 2009) as implying a different spectral irradiance variation over the solar cycle than that put forward by Lean (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 2425-2428, 2000). When we inserted this new wavelength dependent solar cycle variation into our 3D CCM we found a different solar cycle dependence of the ozone concentration as a function of altitude from that we derived using the traditional Lean wavelength dependence. Examination of these results led us to realize that the main issue is the solar cycle variation of radiation at wavelengths less than 240 nm versus the solar cycle variation of radiation at wavelengths between 240 nm and 300 nm. The impact of wavelengths less than 240 nm occurs through photodissociation of O2 leading to the production of ozone. The impact of wavelengths between 240 nm and 300 nm occurs through photodissociation of O3 leading to an increase in O atoms and enhanced ozone destruction. Thus one wavelength region gives an in-phase relationship of ozone with the solar cycle while the other wavelength region gives an out-of-phase relationship of ozone with the solar cycle. We have used the Goddard two-dimensional (2D) photochemistry transport model to examine this relationship in more detail. We calculate the altitude and latitude sensitivity of ozone to changes in the solar UV irradiance as a function of wavelength. These results can be used to construct the ozone response to arbitrary wavelength dependencies of solar UV variation.

  11. Infrared Cavity Radiometer Reflectometry in Support of Total Solar Irradiance Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanssen, L. M.; Zeng, J.; Wilthan, B.; Morrill, J. S.; Kopp, G.

    2011-12-01

    A key component required to achieve a high degree of accuracy in satellite solar irradiance measurements using cavity radiometers, is the characterization of the cavity spectral absorptance over the broad spectral range of the Solar output. This includes the infrared region up to at least 10 μm. In order to accurately measure high levels of absorptance of cavities, NIST has developed a laser and integrating sphere based facility (the Complete Hemispherical Infrared Laser-based Reflectometer (CHILR)). The system is used for both radiometer and blackbody cavity characterization. We report the results of reflectance (1 - absorptance) measurements of radiometer cavities designed for two solar irradiance measurement instruments: 1) the Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM) and 2) the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) instrument on the SORCE and TSIS missions. The measurements were made using the NIST CHILR instrument as well as the Infrared Reference Integrating Sphere (IRIS) for relative spectral reflectance. The IRIS was used to obtain relative spectral reflectance for the TIM cones. The IRIS was also used to obtain the spectral reflectance of other surfaces in the ACRIM instrument that also interact with the incident irradiance and potentially affect the cavity performance. These reflectance results are used to validate previously estimated performance parameters of the two instruments.

  12. Granulation, Irradiance and Diameter Solar Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberto Andrei, Alexandre; Calderari Boscardin, Sergio; Lousada Penna, Jucira; Reis Neto, Eugenio

    2015-08-01

    Though granulation forms the very face of sun’s photosphere, there are no long term registers of it. Observational and computational hardships to define and follow such highly variable “face” have so far prevented the realization of those registers. However, in recent years a large, coherent body of white light images became available. We retrieved white light, full solar disk images from the BBSO, to a total of 1104 treated ones and 1245 treated and compensated for limb darkening ones. The time coverage extends from the year 2000 to 2005, thus covering the rise and fall of the solar cycle 23. For the analysis, only the central 0.35R portion of the Sun was considered. The central portion was then divided into 100 subsectors, to average and discard the deviant results. The analysis goal is to derive the long term behavior of the photosphere granulation, in broad statistical sense. Three statistics were this way calculated: the standard deviation of the counts (that answers to the grains size); the counts difference between the maximum and minimum tenths (that answers to the grains brightness); the degree of the best fit polynomial along lines and columns (that answers to the grains numbers). According to the statistics, there is no significant variation in the number of grains. The grains sizes are the largest by the solar maximum, in excellent agreement with the maximum of the measured diameter. The grains brightness, on the contrary, is minimum at the solar maximum, and again an excellent agreement is verified with the maximum of the measured diameter.

  13. Solar Irradiance Variability and Its Impacts on the Earth Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J. W.; Woods, T. N.

    The Sun plays a vital role in the evolution of the climates of terrestrial planets. Observations of the solar spectrum are now routinely made that span the wavelength range from the X-ray portion of the spectrum (5 nm) into the infrared to about 2400 nm. Over this very broad wavelength range, accounting for about 97% of the total solar irradiance, the intensity varies by more than 6 orders of magnitude, requiring a suite of very different and innovative instruments to determine both the spectral irradiance and its variability. The origins of solar variability are strongly linked to surface magnetic field changes, and analysis of solar images and magnetograms show that the intensity of emitted radiation from solar surface features in active regions has a very strong wavelength and magnetic field strength dependence. These magnetic fields produce observable solar surface features such as sunspots, faculae, and network structures that contribute in different ways to the radiated output. Semi-empirical models of solar spectral irradiance are able to capture much of the Sun's output, but this topic remains an active area of research. Studies of solar structures in both high spectral and spatial resolution are refining this understanding. Advances in Earth observation systems and high-quality three-dimensional chemical climate models provide a sound methodology to study the mechanisms of the interaction between Earth's atmosphere and the incoming solar radiation. Energetic photons have a profound effect on the chemistry and dynamics of the thermosphere and ionosphere, and these processes are now well represented in upper atmospheric models. In the middle and lower atmosphere the effects of solar variability enter the climate system through two nonexclusive pathways referred to as the top-down and bottom-up mechanisms. The top-down mechanism proceeds through the alteration of the photochemical rates that establish the middle atmospheric temperature structure and

  14. Vacuum ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1993-08-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far ultraviolet (FUV) were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiment also includes EUV instruments from Boston University (Supriya Chakrabarti), but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/University of Colorado (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed here. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 1/4 meter Rowland circle EUV spectrograph which has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2 nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon XUV photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. This photodiode system provides a spectral coverage from 0.1 to 80 nm with about 15 nm resolution. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. This avalanche photodiode package measures the XUV photon energy providing a solar spectrum from 50 to 12,400 eV (25 to 0.1 nm) with an energy resolution of about 50 eV. The fourth solar instrument is an XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc-seconds. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2 nm spectral resolution. The photon-counting CODACON detectors are used for three of these instruments and consist of coded arrays of anodes behind microchannel plates. The one-dimensional and two-dimensional CODACON detectors were developed at CU by Dr. George Lawrence. The pre-flight and post-flight photometric calibrations were performed at our calibration laboratory and at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet

  15. Vacuum ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1993-01-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far ultraviolet (FUV) were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiment also includes EUV instruments from Boston University (Supriya Chakrabarti), but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/University of Colorado (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed here. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 1/4 meter Rowland circle EUV spectrograph which has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2 nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon XUV photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. This photodiode system provides a spectral coverage from 0.1 to 80 nm with about 15 nm resolution. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. This avalanche photodiode package measures the XUV photon energy providing a solar spectrum from 50 to 12,400 eV (25 to 0.1 nm) with an energy resolution of about 50 eV. The fourth solar instrument is an XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc-seconds. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2 nm spectral resolution. The photon-counting CODACON detectors are used for three of these instruments and consist of coded arrays of anodes behind microchannel plates. The one-dimensional and two-dimensional CODACON detectors were developed at CU by Dr. George Lawrence. The pre-flight and post-flight photometric calibrations were performed at our calibration laboratory and at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet

  16. Irradiance optimization of outdoor microalgal cultures using solar tracked photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hindersin, Stefan; Leupold, Marco; Kerner, Martin; Hanelt, Dieter

    2013-03-01

    Photosynthetic activity and temperature regulation of microalgal cultures (Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus) under different irradiances controlled by a solar tracker and different cell densities were studied in outdoor flat panel photobioreactors. An automated process control unit regulated light and temperature as well as pH value and nutrient concentration in the culture medium. CO2 was supplied using flue gas from an attached combined block heat and power station. Photosynthetic activity was determined by pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry. Compared to the horizontal irradiance of 55 mol photons m(-2) d(-1) on a clear day, the solar tracked photobioreactors enabled a decrease and increase in the overall light absorption from 19 mol photons m(-2) d(-1) (by rotation out of direct irradiance) to 79 mol photons m(-2) d(-1) (following the position of the sun). At biomass concentrations below 1.1 g cell dry weight (CDW) L(-1), photoinhibition of about 35 % occurred at irradiances of ≥1,000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Using solar tracked photobioreactors, photoinhibition can be reduced and at optimum biomass concentration (≥2.3 g CDW L(-1)), the culture was irradiated up to 2,000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) to overcome light limitation with biomass yields of 0.7 g CDW mol photons(-1) and high photosynthetic activities indicated by an effective quantum yield of 0.68 and a maximum quantum yield of 0.80 (F v/F m). Overheating due to high irradiance was avoided by turning the PBR out of the sun or using a cooling system, which maintained the temperature close to the species-specific temperature optima. PMID:22847362

  17. The Missing Solar Irradiance Spectrum: 1 to 7 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Lewis, M.; David, M.; Schunk, R. W.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    During large X-class flares the Earth's upper atmospheric E-region responds immediately to solar photons in the 1 to 7 nm range. The response can change the E-region density by factors approaching 10, create large changes in conductivity, and plague HF communications. GOES-XRS provide 0.1 to 0.8 nm and a 0.05 to 0.4 nm integral channels; SOHO-SEM provided a 0 to 50 nm irradiance; TIMED and SORCE-XPS diode measurements also integrated down to 0.1 nm; and most recently SDO-EVE provided a 0.1 to 7 nm irradiance. For atmospheric response to solar flares the cadence is also crucial. Both GOES and SDO provided integral measurements at 10 seconds or better. Unfortunately these measurements have failed to capture the 1 to 7 nm spectral changes that occur during flares. It is these spectral changes that create the major impact since the ionization cross-section of the dominant atmospheric species, N2 and O2, both contain step function changes in the cross-sections. Models of the solar irradiance over this critical wavelength regime have suffered from the need to model the spectral variability based on incomplete measurements. The most sophisticated empirical model FISM [Chamberlin et al., 2008] used 1 nm spectral binning and various implementations of the above integral measurements to describe the 1 to 7 nm irradiance. Since excellent solar observations exist at other wavelengths it is possible to construct an empirical model of the solar atmosphere and then use this model to infer the spectral distribution at wavelengths below 5 nm. This differential emission measure approach has been used successfully in other contexts [e.g., Warren, 2005, Chamberlin et al., 2009]. This paper contrasts the broadband versus spectrally resolved descriptions of the incoming irradiance that affects the upper atmospheric E-layer. The results provide a prescription of what wavelength resolution would be needed to adequately measure the incoming solar irradiance in the 1 to 7 nm range.

  18. Photometric measurements of solar irradiance variations due to sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Herzog, A. D.; Laico, D. E.; Lawrence, J. K.; Templer, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    A photometric telescope constructed to obtain photometric sunspot areas and deficits on a daily basis is described. Data from this Cartesian full disk telescope (CFDT) are analyzed with attention given to the period between June 4 and June 17, 1985 because of the availability of overlapping sunspot area and irradiance deficit data from high-resolution digital spectroheliograms made with the San Fernando Observatory 28 cm vacuum solar telescope and spectroheliograph. The CFDT sunspot deficits suggest a substantial irradiance contribution from faculae and active region plage.

  19. Photometric measurements of solar irradiance variations due to sunspots

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, G.A.; Herzog, A.D.; Laico, D.E.; Lawrence, J.K.; Templer, M.S. )

    1989-08-01

    A photometric telescope constructed to obtain photometric sunspot areas and deficits on a daily basis is described. Data from this Cartesian full disk telescope (CFDT) are analyzed with attention given to the period between June 4 and June 17, 1985 because of the availability of overlapping sunspot area and irradiance deficit data from high-resolution digital spectroheliograms made with the San Fernando Observatory 28 cm vacuum solar telescope and spectroheliograph. The CFDT sunspot deficits suggest a substantial irradiance contribution from faculae and active region plage. 23 refs.

  20. Effect of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes of Aeromonas proteolytica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The bacterium Aeromonas proteolytica was selected for studying the effects of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes because it produces an endopeptidase that is capable of degrading proteins and a hemolysin that is active in lysing human erythrocytes. Possible alterations in the rate of enzyme production in response to the test conditions are currently underway and are not available for this preliminary report. Completed viability studies are indicative that little difference exists among the survival curves derived for cells exposed to various components of ultraviolet irradiation in space.

  1. Electron irradiation effects in epitaxial InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsall, N. M.; Robson, N.; Sambell, A. J.; Anspaugh, B.; Cross, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Performance data for InP-based solar cells after irradiation with 1-MeV electrons up to a fluence of 1 x 1016 e/cm2 are presented. Three InP cell structures are considered. Two of these have epitaxially grown active regions, these being a homojunction design and in ITO/InP structure. These are compared with ITO/InP cells without the epitaxial base region. The cell parameter variations, the influence of illumination during irradiation, and the effect on cell spectral response and capacitance measurements are discussed. Substantial performance recovery after thermal annealing at 90 C is reported.

  2. Accuracies of Incoming Radiation: Calibrations of Total Solar Irradiance Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, G.; Harber, D.; Heuerman, K.

    2009-04-01

    All of the energy tracked by the GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment and the driving energy for Earth climate is incident at the top of the Earth's atmosphere as solar radiation. The total solar irradiance (TSI) has been monitored continually for over 30 years from space. Continuity of these measurements has enabled the creation of composite time series from which the radiative forcing inputs to climate models are derived and solar forcing sensitivities are determined. None of the ten spaceborne TSI instruments contributing to the solar climate data record have been calibrated or validated end-to-end for irradiance accuracy under flight-like conditions, and calibration inaccuracies contribute to seemingly large offsets between the TSI values reported by each instrument. The newest of the flight TSI instruments, the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), measures lower solar irradiance than prior instruments. I will review the accuracies of flight TSI instruments, discuss possible causes for the offsets between them, and describe a recently built calibration facility to improve the accuracies of future TSI instruments. The TSI Radiometer Facility (TRF) enables end-to-end comparisons of TSI instruments to a NIST-calibrated cryogenic radiometer. For the first time, TSI instruments can be validated directly against a cryogenic radiometer under flight-like conditions for measuring irradiance (rather than merely optical power) at solar power levels while under vacuum. The TRF not only validates TSI instrument accuracy, but also can help diagnose the causes of offsets between different instruments. This facility recently validated the accuracy of the TIM to be launched this year on NASA's Glory mission, establishing a baseline that can link the Glory/TIM to future TSI instruments via this ground-based comparison. Similar tests on the TRF with a ground-based SORCE/TIM support the lower TSI values measured by the SORCE flight unit. These

  3. Climate response to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and solar irradiance on the time scale of days to weeks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Long; Bala, Govindasamy; Caldeira, Ken

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies show that fast climate response on time scales of less than a month can have important implications for long-term climate change. In this study, we investigate climate response on the time scale of days to weeks to a step-function quadrupling of atmospheric CO2 and contrast this with the response to a 4% increase in solar irradiance. Our simulations show that significant climate effects occur within days of a stepwise increase in both atmospheric CO2 content and solar irradiance. Over ocean, increased atmospheric CO2 warms the lower troposphere more than the surface, increasing atmospheric stability, moistening the boundary layer, and suppressing evaporation and precipitation. In contrast, over ocean, increased solar irradiance warms the lower troposphere to a much lesser extent, causing a much smaller change in evaporation and precipitation. Over land, both increased CO2 and increased solar irradiance cause rapid surface warming that tends to increase both evaporation and precipitation. However, the physiological effect of increased atmospheric CO2 on plant stomata reduces plant transpiration, drying the boundary layer and decreasing precipitation. This effect does not occur with increased solar irradiance. Therefore, differences in climatic effects from CO2 versus solar forcing are manifested within days after the forcing is imposed.

  4. What Causes the Inter-solar-cycle Variation of Total Solar Irradiance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N. B.; Kong, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Physikalisch Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos total solar irradiance (TSI), Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitoring TSI, and Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium TSI are three typical TSI composites. Magnetic Plage Strength Index (MPSI) and Mount Wilson Sunspot Index (MWSI) should indicate the weak and strong magnetic field activity on the solar full disk, respectively. Cross-correlation (CC) analysis of MWSI with three TSI composites shows that TSI should be weakly correlated with MWSI, and not be in phase with MWSI at timescales of solar cycles. The wavelet coherence (WTC) and partial wavelet coherence (PWC) of TSI with MWSI indicate that the inter-solar-cycle variation of TSI is also not related to solar strong magnetic field activity, which is represented by MWSI. However, CC analysis of MPSI with three TSI composites indicates that TSI should be moderately correlated and accurately in phase with MPSI at timescales of solar cycles, and that the statistical significance test indicates that the correlation coefficient of three TSI composites with MPSI is statistically significantly higher than that of three TSI composites with MWSI. Furthermore, the cross wavelet transform (XWT) and WTC of TSI with MPSI show that the TSI is highly related and actually in phase with MPSI at a timescale of a solar cycle as well. Consequently, the CC analysis, XWT, and WTC indicate that the solar weak magnetic activity on the full disk, which is represented by MPSI, dominates the inter-solar-cycle variation of TSI.

  5. Method to Calculate Uncertainty Estimate of Measuring Shortwave Solar Irradiance using Thermopile and Semiconductor Solar Radiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.

    2011-07-01

    The uncertainty of measuring solar irradiance is fundamentally important for solar energy and atmospheric science applications. Without an uncertainty statement, the quality of a result, model, or testing method cannot be quantified, the chain of traceability is broken, and confidence cannot be maintained in the measurement. Measurement results are incomplete and meaningless without a statement of the estimated uncertainty with traceability to the International System of Units (SI) or to another internationally recognized standard. This report explains how to use International Guidelines of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) to calculate such uncertainty. The report also shows that without appropriate corrections to solar measuring instruments (solar radiometers), the uncertainty of measuring shortwave solar irradiance can exceed 4% using present state-of-the-art pyranometers and 2.7% using present state-of-the-art pyrheliometers. Finally, the report demonstrates that by applying the appropriate corrections, uncertainties may be reduced by at least 50%. The uncertainties, with or without the appropriate corrections might not be compatible with the needs of solar energy and atmospheric science applications; yet, this report may shed some light on the sources of uncertainties and the means to reduce overall uncertainty in measuring solar irradiance.

  6. An Improved Total Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, G.

    2011-12-01

    The dominant driver of the Earth's climate system is the Sun, which exceeds all other energy sources combined by a factor of 2500. Small as they are, variations in the enormous amount of energy received from the Sun can have climatic effects on the Earth over annual to millennial time scales. Climate studies rely on recent spaceborne measurements of total solar irradiance (TSI) and estimates of its historical variability to discern natural from anthropogenic climatic influences. Because the Sun is relatively stable, the TSI measurements providing this solar record must be of high accuracy, extremely good stability, and long duration. New instrument calibrations and diagnostics have improved the accuracy of the existing record and future instruments promise further improvements. I will discuss the status of the current solar climate data record based on recent findings, explain the climate-driven solar irradiance measurement requirements, show estimates of solar influences on climate, and give an overview of planned missions to provide this needed record for climate studies.

  7. Some Impacts of Solar Irradiance Variation on Terrestrial Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Stuart D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As chairman of the Special Session addressing the above topic, a brief overview of the problem will be offered, after which 20-minute talks will be given on the determination of solar irradiance variations from space observations (Dr. Judit Pap) and from groundbased measurements of solar magnetic fields (Dr. Harrison Jones). The chairman will then introduce four panel members representing different areas of expertise bearing on the topic. Each panel member will offer a brief 5-minute summary of his views. Panel members are: Chick Keller, Los Alamos National Laboratory; Drew Shindell, Goddard Institute for Space Science, Columbia University; Michael Schlesinger, University of Illinois; Sabatino Sofia, Yale University. General Circulation Models of the terrestrial atmosphere, the possible impact on this atmosphere of large percentage changes in the solar EUV over a solar cycle, and the role of strong magnetic field in the solar convection zone on irradiance variation will all be considered in brief summaries. The chairman will conclude the session by facilitating a discussion between the audience, the main speakers, and the panel members.

  8. Excimer laser irradiation of metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsman, Grant

    In this work a new method of enhancing CO2 laser processing by modifying the radiative properties of a metal surface is studied. In this procedure, an excimer laser (XeCl) or KrF) exposes the metal surface to overlapping pulses of high intensity, 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) W cm(exp -2), and short pulse duration, 30 nsec FWHM (Full Width Half Maximum), to promote structural and chemical change. The major processing effect at these intensities is the production of a surface plasma which can lead to the formation of a laser supported detonation wave (LSD wave). This shock wave can interact with the thin molten layer on the metal surface influencing to a varying degree surface oxidation and roughness features. The possibility of the expulsion, oxidation and redeposition of molten droplets, leading to the formation of micron thick oxide layers, is related to bulk metal properties and the incident laser intensity. A correlation is found between the expulsion of molten droplets and a Reynolds number, showing the interaction is turbulent. The permanent effects of these interactions on metal surfaces are observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transient calorimetric measurements and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Observed surface textures are related to the scanning procedures used to irradiate the metal surface. Fundamental radiative properties of a metal surface, the total hemispherical emissivity, the near-normal spectral absorptivity, and others are examined in this study as they are affected by excimer laser radiation. It is determined that for heavily exposed Al surface, alpha' (10.6 microns) can be increased to values close to unity. Data relating to material removal rates and chemical surface modification for excimer laser radiation is also discussed. The resultant reduction in the near-normal reflectivity solves the fundamental problem of coupling laser radiation into highly reflective and conductive metals such as copper and aluminum. The

  9. Influence of synoptic weather patterns on solar irradiance variability in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parding, Kajsa; Hinkelman, Laura; Liepert, Beate; Ackerman, Thomas; Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Asle Olseth, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Solar radiation is important for many aspects of existence on Earth, including the biosphere, the hydrological cycle, and creatures living on the planet. Previous studies have reported decadal trends in observational records of surface shortwave (SW) irradiance around the world, too strong to be caused by varying solar output. These observed decadal trends have been dubbed "solar dimming and brightening" and are believed to be related to changes in atmospheric aerosols and cloud cover. Because the observed solar variability coincides with qualitative air pollution histories, the dimming and brightening have become almost synonymous with shortwave attenuation by anthropogenic aerosols. However, there are indications that atmospheric circulation patterns have influenced the dimming and brightening in some regions, e.g., Alaska and Scandinavia. In this work, we focus on the role of atmospheric circulation patterns in modifying shortwave irradiance. An examination of European SW irradiance data from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) shows that while there are periods of predominantly decreasing (~1970-1985) and increasing (~1985-2007) SW irradiance, the changes are not spatially uniform within Europe and in a majority of locations not statistically significant. To establish a connection between weather patterns and sunshine, regression models of SW irradiance are fitted using a daily classification of European weather called Grosswetterlagen (GWL). The GWL reconstructions of shortwave irradiance represent the part of the solar variability that is related to large scale weather patterns, which should be effectively separated from the influence of varying anthropogenic aerosol emissions. The correlation (R) between observed and reconstruced SW irradiance is between 0.31 and 0.75, depending on station and season, all statistically significant (p<0.05, estimated with a bootstrap test). In central and eastern parts of Europe, the observed decadal SW variability is

  10. Solar cell having improved back surface reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, A. T.

    1982-10-01

    The operating temperature is reduced and the output of a solar cell is increased by using a solar cell which carries electrodes in a grid finger pattern on its back surface. These electrodes are sintered at the proper temperature to provide good ohmic contact. After sintering, a reflective material is deposited on the back surface by vacuum evaporation. Thus, the application of the back surface reflector is separate from the back contact formation. Back surface reflectors formed in conjunction with separate grid finger configuration back contacts are more effective than those formed by full back metallization of the reflector material.

  11. Accessing Solar Irradiance Data via LISIRD, the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratz, C. K.; Wilson, A.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.; Woods, T. N.; Traver, T.; Woodraska, D.

    2015-12-01

    The LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter, LISIRD, http://lasp.colorado.edu/lisird, allows the science community and the public to explore and access solar irradiance and related data sets using convenient, interactive or scriptable, standards-based interfaces. LISIRD's interactive plotting allows users to investigate and download irradiance data sets from a variety of sources, including space missions, ground observatories, and modeling efforts. LISIRD's programmatic interfaces allow software-level data retrievals and facilitate automation. This presentation will describe the current state of LISIRD, provide details of the data sets it serves, outline data access methods, identify key technologies in-use, and address other related aspects of serving spectral and other time series data. We continue to improve LISIRD by integrating new data sets, and also by advancing its data management and presentation capabilities to meet evolving best practices and community needs. LISIRD is hosted and operated by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, LASP, which has been a leader in Atmospheric and Heliophysics science for over 60 years. LASP makes a variety of space-based measurements of solar irradiance, which provide crucial input for research and modeling in solar-terrestrial interactions, space physics, planetary, atmospheric, and climate sciences. These data sets consist of fundamental measurements, composite data sets, solar indices, space weather products, and models. Current data sets available through LISIRD originate from the SORCE, SDO (EVE), UARS (SOLSTICE), TIMED (SEE), and SME space missions, as well as several other space and ground-based projects. LISIRD leverages several technologies to provide flexible and standards-based access to the data holdings available through LISIRD. This includes internet-accessible interfaces that permit data access in a variety of formats, data subsetting, as well as program-level access from data analysis

  12. Influence of solar UVA on erythemal irradiances.

    PubMed

    Parisi, A V; Turnbull, D J; Kimlin, M G

    2006-06-21

    Many materials in everyday use such as window glass in homes and offices, glass in sunrooms and greenhouses, vehicle glass and some brands of sunscreens act as a barrier to the shorter UVB wavelengths while transmitting some of the longer UVA wavelengths. This paper reports on the erythemal exposures due to the UVA waveband encountered over a 12-month period for a solar zenith angle (SZA) range of 4 degrees to 80 degrees and the resulting times required for an erythemal exposure of one standard erythemal dose (SED) due to the erythemal exposures to the UVA wavelengths. The minimum time for an exposure of one SED due to the UVA wavelengths in winter is approximately double that what it is in summer. The time period of 40 to 60 min was the most frequent length of time for an exposure of one SED with 60 to 80 min the next frequent length of time required for a one SED exposure. PMID:16757874

  13. Effect of front and rear incident proton irradiation on silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, Bruce; Kachare, Ram

    1987-01-01

    Four solar cell types of current manufacture were irradiated through the front and rear surfaces with protons in the energy range between 1 and 10 MeV. The solar cell parameters varied for this study were cell thickness and back surface field (BSF) vs. no BSF. Some cells were irradiated at normal incidence and an equal number were irradiated with simulated isotropic fluences. The solar cell electrical characteristics were measured under simulated AM0 illumination after each fluence. Using the normal incidence data, proton damage coefficients were computed for all four types of cells for both normal and omnidirectional radiation fields. These were found to compare well with the omnidirectional damage coefficients derived directly from the rear-incidence radiation data. Similarly, the rear-incidence omnidirectional radiation data were used to compute appropriate damage coefficients. A method for calculating the effect of a spectrum of energies is derived from these calculations. It is suitable for calculating the degradation of cells in space when they have minimal rear-surface shielding.

  14. Temperature dependence of damage coefficient in electron irradiated solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faith, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of light-generated current vs cell temperature on electron-irradiated n/p silicon solar cells show the temperature coefficient of this current to increase with increasing fluence for both 10-ohm and 20-ohm cells. A relationship between minority-carrier diffusion length and light-generated current was derived by combining measurements of these two parameters: vs fluence at room temperature, and vs cell temperature in cells irradiated to a fluence of 1 x 10 to the 15th power e/sq cm. This relationship was used, together with the light-generated current data, to calculate the temperature dependence of the diffusion-length damage coefficient. The results show a strong decrease in the damage coefficient with increasing temperature in the range experienced by solar panels in synchronous earth orbit.

  15. Total solar irradiance measurements with PREMOS/PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutz, Werner; Fehlmann, André; Finsterle, Wolfgang; Kopp, Greg; Thuillier, Gerard

    2013-05-01

    PREMOS on the French satellite PICARD is the first spaceborne absolute radiometer measuring Total Solar Irradiance that has been irradiance-calibrated in vacuum with SI-traceability. The measurements of PREMOS at first light on July 27, 2010, yield a TSI value of 1360.9±0.4 W/m2 (k=1). This value agrees with the absolute TSI value measured by TIM/SORCE for this date within their combined uncertainties, and it differs by more than ten sigma from the absolute value of other space experiments, e.g. VIRGO/SOHO. The PREMOS measurements thus establish SI-traceability to a solar constant value of 1361 W/m2.

  16. Measurements and modeling of total solar irradiance in X-class solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Christopher Samuel; Chamberlin, Phillip Clyde; Hock, Rachel

    2014-05-20

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) from NASA's SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment can detect changes in the total solar irradiance (TSI) to a precision of 2 ppm, allowing observations of variations due to the largest X-class solar flares for the first time. Presented here is a robust algorithm for determining the radiative output in the TIM TSI measurements, in both the impulsive and gradual phases, for the four solar flares presented in Woods et al., as well as an additional flare measured on 2006 December 6. The radiative outputs for both phases of these five flares are then compared to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiance output from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) in order to derive an empirical relationship between the FISM VUV model and the TIM TSI data output to estimate the TSI radiative output for eight other X-class flares. This model provides the basis for the bolometric energy estimates for the solar flares analyzed in the Emslie et al. study.

  17. Measurements and Modeling of Total Solar Irradiance in X-class Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Chamberlin, Phillip Clyde; Hock, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) from NASA's SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment can detect changes in the total solar irradiance (TSI) to a precision of 2 ppm, allowing observations of variations due to the largest X-class solar flares for the first time. Presented here is a robust algorithm for determining the radiative output in the TIM TSI measurements, in both the impulsive and gradual phases, for the four solar flares presented in Woods et al., as well as an additional flare measured on 2006 December 6. The radiative outputs for both phases of these five flares are then compared to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiance output from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) in order to derive an empirical relationship between the FISM VUV model and the TIM TSI data output to estimate the TSI radiative output for eight other X-class flares. This model provides the basis for the bolometric energy estimates for the solar flares analyzed in the Emslie et al. study.

  18. Fuzzy Sets Theory Applied for Computing Global Solar Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Boata, R.; Paulescu, M.; Tulcan-Paulescu, E.; Gravila, P.

    2011-10-01

    A new model to estimate daily global solar irradiation via air temperature data developed inside Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy approach is reported. A critical assessment of the model performance and limitations is conducted, overall results demonstrating a reasonable level of accuracy. The model uses as input only the daily air temperature extremes, worldwide the most available meteorological parameters, which greatly increases its area of application.

  19. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations in 240 - 1600 nm During the Recent Solar Cycles 21 - 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagaran, J.; Weber, M.; Deland, M. T.; Floyd, L. E.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    Regular solar spectral irradiance (SSI) observations from space that simultaneously cover the UV, visible (vis), and the near-IR (NIR) spectral region began with SCIAMACHY aboard ENVISAT in August 2002. Up to now, these direct observations cover less than a decade. In order for these SSI measurements to be useful in assessing the role of the Sun in climate change, records covering more than an eleven-year solar cycle are required. By using our recently developed empirical SCIA proxy model, we reconstruct daily SSI values over several decades by using solar proxies scaled to short-term SCIAMACHY solar irradiance observations to describe decadal irradiance changes. These calculations are compared to existing solar data: the UV data from SUSIM/UARS, from the DeLand & Cebula satellite composite, and the SIP model (S2K+VUV2002); and UV-vis-IR data from the NRLSSI and SATIRE models, and SIM/SORCE measurements. The mean SSI of the latter models show good agreement (less than 5%) in the vis regions over three decades while larger disagreements (10 - 20%) are found in the UV and IR regions. Between minima and maxima of Solar Cycles 21, 22, and 23, the inferred SSI variability from the SCIA proxy is intermediate between SATIRE and NRLSSI in the UV. While the DeLand & Cebula composite provide the highest variability between solar minimum and maximum, the SIP/Solar2000 and NRLSSI models show minimum variability, which may be due to the use of a single proxy in the modeling of the irradiances. In the vis-IR spectral region, the SCIA proxy model reports lower values in the changes from solar maximum to minimum, which may be attributed to overestimations of the sunspot proxy used in modeling the SCIAMACHY irradiances. The fairly short timeseries of SIM/SORCE shows a steeper decreasing (increasing) trend in the UV (vis) than the other data during the descending phase of Solar Cycle 23. Though considered to be only provisional, the opposite trend seen in the visible SIM data

  20. Absolute Radiometer for Reproducing the Solar Irradiance Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapritskii, V. I.; Pavlovich, M. N.

    1989-01-01

    A high-precision absolute radiometer with a thermally stabilized cavity as receiving element has been designed for use in solar irradiance measurements. The State Special Standard of the Solar Irradiance Unit has been built on the basis of the developed absolute radiometer. The Standard also includes the sun tracking system and the system for automatic thermal stabilization and information processing, comprising a built-in microcalculator which calculates the irradiance according to the input program. During metrological certification of the Standard, main error sources have been analysed and the non-excluded systematic and accidental errors of the irradiance-unit realization have been determined. The total error of the Standard does not exceed 0.3%. Beginning in 1984 the Standard has been taking part in a comparison with the Å 212 pyrheliometer and other Soviet and foreign standards. In 1986 it took part in the international comparison of absolute radiometers and standard pyrheliometers of socialist countries. The results of the comparisons proved the high metrological quality of this Standard based on an absolute radiometer.

  1. Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance and Sun-Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Solar activity is now near its maximum, with events such as the 2001 "Bastille Day Event", a Coronal Mass Ejection which merited a full session at AGUs annual meeting - and two major sunspot groupings earlier this year, with associated variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). We discuss recent satellite measurements of TSI by ACRIM 2 and 3 and Virgo, and new precision observations of TSI and SSI (Solar Spectral Irradiance) expected from the SORCE mission, planned to launch in fall 2002. SSI has been added to TSI as a required EOS and NPOESS measurement because different spectral components provide energy inputs to different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and ozone, IR into lower atmosphere and clouds, and Visible into the biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2010 will continue to monitor both TSI and SSI. We summarize current ideas about the potential impact of solar variability on Earth's climate on time scales from days to decades to centuries.

  2. Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance and Sun-Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Solar activity is now near its maximum, with events such as the 2001 "Bastille Day Event", a Coronal Mass Ejection which merited a full session at AGO'S annual meeting - and two major sunspot groupings earlier this year, with associated variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). We discuss recent satellite measurements of TSI by ACRIM 2 and 3 And Virgo, and new precision observations of TSI and SSI (Solar Spectral Irradiance) expected from the SORCE mission, planned to launch in fall 2002. SSG has been added to TSI as a required EOS and NPOESS measurement because different spectral components provide energy inputs to different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and ozone, IR into lower atmosphere and clouds, and Visible into the biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2010 will continue to monitor both TSI and SSI. We summarize current ideas about the potential impact of solar variability on Earth's climate on time scales from days to decades to centuries.

  3. Does a slowly varying component of solar irradiance exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, P.

    2003-04-01

    Fluctuations of total irradiance, S, caused by sunspots and faculae, are too small (˜0.1%) to force current climate models. Recent reconstructions of S incorporate an additional, slowly varying component, which follows the smoothed spot or group number, or the cycle period. But evidence for this larger (0.2--0.5%) variation, originally based on photometry of sun-like stars, is weakened by recent findings that true solar analog stars are difficult to find. Also, disappearance of the chromospheric network in the early 20th century, implied by these reconstructions, is not observed in archival solar images. I will show some new evidence for an additional component, suggested by the high correlation found between global temperature and the (small-amplitude) variation of S reconstructed using recently digitized facular areas between 1915--1999.The UV irradiance variation modeled from the same data exhibits much lower correlation with global warming, so it is less likely to account for a solar activity signature in 20th century climate. This indirect evidence suggests a mechanism that might amplify the small modulation of S caused specifically by the net effect of bright faculae and dark spots. We now recognize that amplification on multi-decadal time scales could only operate in near- photospheric layers, given the enormous thermal inertia of the deeper solar atmosphere. Also, increasingly tight constraints on such a mechanism are placed by solar photometry and radiometry, by spectro-photometric monitoring of the quiet photospheric effective temperature, and by absence of detectable solar diameter variations. The shrinking set of mechanisms that might satisfy these constraints deserves closer study, and I will discuss some interesting new observational diagnostics, such as bolometric imaging of the photosphere, planned to search for such processes. But at present, little direct evidence exists for a large-amplitude, multi-decadal variation of S (or of UV flux). A

  4. Quantum dot solar cell tolerance to alpha-particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cress, Cory D.; Hubbard, Seth M.; Landi, Brian J.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Wilt, David M.

    2007-10-29

    The effects of alpha-particle irradiation on an InAs quantum dot (QD) array and GaAs-based InAs QD solar cells were investigated. Using photoluminescence (PL) mapping, the PL intensity at 872 and 1120 nm, corresponding to bulk GaAs and InAs QD emissions, respectively, were measured for a five-layer InAs QD array which had a spatially varying total alpha-particle dose. The spectral response and normalized current-voltage parameters of the solar cells, measured as a function of alpha-particle fluence, were used to investigate the change in device performance between GaAs solar cells with and without InAs QDs.

  5. Spectral irradiance curve calculations for any type of solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Merrill, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    A simple procedure is described for calculating the eclipse function (EF), alpha, and hence the spectral irradiance curve (SIC), (1-alpha), for any type of solar eclipse: namely, the occultation (partial/total) eclipse and the transit (partial/annular) eclipse. The SIC (or the EF) gives the variation of the amount (or the loss) of solar radiation of a given wavelength reaching a distant observer for various positions of the moon across the sun. The scheme is based on the theory of light curves of eclipsing binaries, the results of which are tabulated in Merrill's Tables, and is valid for all wavelengths for which the solar limb-darkening obeys the cosine law: J = sub c (1 - X + X cost gamma). As an example of computing the SIC for an occultation eclipse which may be total, the calculations for the March 7, 1970, eclipse are described in detail.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of the total solar irradiance and solar diameter by the PICARD mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, Gérard; Dewitte, Steven; Schmutz, Werner; Picard Team

    2006-01-01

    A mission dedicated to simultaneous measurements of the solar diameter, spectral, and total solar irradiance is presently in development for launch end of the year 2008 on board of a microsatellite under the responsibility of Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales. The payload will consist of an imaging telescope, three filter radiometers with in total twelve channels, and two independent absolute radiometers. The scientific aims are presented as well as the concepts and properties of the instrumentation. This mission is named PICARD after the pioneering work of Jean Picard (1620-1682) who precisely determined the solar diameter during the Maunder minimum.

  7. Measuring solar spectral and angle-of-incidence effects on photovoltaic modules and solar irradiance sensors

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E.

    1997-11-01

    Historically, two time-of-day dependent factors have complicated the characterization of photovoltaic module and array performance; namely, changes in the solar spectrum over the day and optical effects in the module that vary with the solar angle-of-incidence. This paper describes straightforward methods for directly measuring the effects of these two factors. Measured results for commercial modules, as well as for typical solar irradiance sensors (pyranometers) are provided. The empirical relationships obtained from the measurements can be used to improve the methods used for system design, verification of performance after installation, and diagnostic monitoring of performance during operation.

  8. Total solar irradiance record accuracy and recent improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Greg

    The total solar irradiance (TSI) data record includes uninterrupted measurements from over 10 spaceborne instruments spanning the last 31 years. Continuity of on-orbit measurements allows adjustments for instrument offsets to create a TSI composite needed for estimating solar influences on Earth's climate. Because climate sensitivities to solar forcings are determined not only from direct TSI measurements over recent 11-year solar cycles but also from reconstructions of historical solar variability based on the recent measurements, the accuracy of the TSI record is critical. This climate data record currently relies on both instrument stability and measurement continuity, although improvements in absolute accuracy via better instrument calibrations and new test facilities promise to reduce this current reliance on continuity. The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) is striving for improved levels of absolute accuracy, and a new TSI calibration facility is now able to validate the accuracy of modern instruments and diagnose causes of offsets between different TSI instruments. The instrument offsets are due to calibration errors. As of early 2010, none of the on-orbit instruments have been calibrated end-to-end to the needed accuracy levels. The new TSI Radiometer Facility (TRF) built for NASA's Glory mission provides these new calibration capabilities. Via direct optical power comparisons to a NIST-calibrated cryogenic radiometer, this ground-based facility provides calibrations of a TSI instrument much as the instrument is operated in space: under vacuum, at full solar irradiance power levels, and with uniform incoming light for irradiance measurements. Both the PICARD/PREMOS and the upcoming Glory/TIM instruments have been tested in this new facility, helping improve the absolute accuracy of the TSI data record and diagnose the causes of existing instrument offsets. In addition to being benchmarked to this new ground-based reference, the Glory/TIM and the future TSIS

  9. The observation of damage regions produced by neutron irradiation in lithium-doped silicon solar cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Sargent, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study regions of lattice disorder produced in lithium-doped float-zone melted n/p-type silicon solar cells by irradiation with monoenergetic neutrons at doses between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 13th per cu cm. The defect regions were revealed by chemically etching the surface of the solar cells and by observing carbon replicas in an electron microscope. It was found that the defect density increased with increasing irradiation dose and increased lithium content, whereas the average defect diameter was found to decrease. From thermal annealing experiments it was found that in the lithium-doped material the defect structure was stable at temperatures between 300 and 1200 K. This was found to be in contrast to the undoped material where at the lowest doses considerable annealing was observed to occur. These results are discussed in terms of the theoretical predictions and models of defect clusters proposed by Gossick (1959) and Crawford and Cleland (1959).

  10. Charged Particle Alterations of Surfaces in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    The surfaces of 'airless' bodies in the solar system are exposed to the ambient plasma, micrometeorites, and the solar UV. The effects of these space weathering agents on surfaces in the solar system has been studied in this project. In the last three years work was carried out on volatile depletion at Mars, on sputtering of the lunar surface, on absorption by implanted S in vapor-deposited H2O and its relevance to observations of Europa's surface in the UV, and on the spectral changes produced on irradiating SO2 and its possible relevance to Io. In addition, the role of plasma-induced charging of E-ring grains was evaluated because of its relevance to E-ring particle source and the lifetime of the E-ring. Finally, the detection of sputtered material from Dione by the CAPS instrument on CASSINI was evaluated as a tool for analysis of satellite surface composition, and the role of sputtering on the ambient OH in the vicinity of the ice satellites and the E-ring was evaluated.

  11. Nimbus 7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) spectral scan solar irradiance and Earth radiance product user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Barry M.; Cebula, Richard P.; Heath, Donald F.; Fleig, Albert J.

    1988-01-01

    The archived tape products from the spectral scan mode measurements of solar irradiance (SUNC tapes) and Earth radiance (EARTH tapes) by the Solar Backscatter UV (SBUV) instrument aboard Nimbus 7 are described. Incoming radiation from 160 to 400 nm is measured at intervals of 0.2 nm. The scan-to-scan repeatability of the solar irradiance measurements ranges from approximately 0.5 to 1 percent longward of 280 nm, to 2 percent around 210 nm and 4 percent near 175 nm. The repeatability of the Earth radiance values ranges from 2 to 3 percent at longer wavelengths and low zenith angles to 10 percent at shorter wavelengths and high zenith angles. The tape formats are described in detail, including file structure and contents of each type of record. Catalogs of the tapes and the time period covered are provided, along with lists of the days lacking solar irradiance measurements and the days dedicated to Earth radiance measurements. The method for production of the tapes is outlined and quality control measures are described. How radiances and irradiances are derived from the raw counts, the corrections for changes in instrument sensitivity, and related uncertainties are discussed.

  12. Seeing through shadow: Modelling surface irradiance for topographic correction of Landsat ETM+ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulmann, Tobias; Katurji, Marwan; Zawar-Reza, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in remote sensing, retrieving surface properties at high resolutions in complex terrain is a major challenge. Slope and aspect as well as the topography surrounding a target impact surface insolation and lead to variability in calculated surface reflectance even for homogeneous land cover. Retrieval of surface reflectance is particularly problematic in case of topographic shading, where the total irradiation at the surface is a combination of diffuse irradiation and terrain-reflected irradiation from nearby slopes. To facilitate the retrieval of surface reflectance from high-resolution optical remote sensing, we have explored the feasibility of using a three dimensional radiative transfer code to simulate gridded surface irradiance for a ∼ 37km2 area in the New Zealand Southern Alps. We have tested the sensitivity of simulated irradiance and calculated surface reflectance both in- and outside shaded areas to atmospheric aerosol content, surface albedo, atmospheric boundary layer structure and different solar spectra. Retrieved surface reflectance has been shown to be highly sensitive to atmospheric aerosols and surface albedo, particularly for areas shaded by topography. Not considering atmospheric aerosols in topographic correction can increase derived surface reflectance by well over 50%, while terrain-reflected irradiance can contribute 40% to surface reflectance in shaded areas, even for wider valleys. Both factors should therefore be considered in topographic correction of satellite imagery, even for relatively aerosol-free atmospheres and low surface albedo. Topographic correction for the whole scene was performed with the model settings resulting in the smallest RMSD between surface reflectivity in shaded and unshaded areas of similar land cover. Topographic correction based on 3D radiative transfer simulations has proven to effectively remove topographic effects and almost equalise derived mean reflectance in- and outside shaded areas

  13. Detecting surface faults on solar mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argoud, M. J.; Shumate, M. S.; Walker, W. L.; Zanteson, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two quality control tests determine reflectivity and curvature faults of concave solar mirrors. Curvature defects in solar mirrors are easily revealed by photographing mirror surface. Calibrated aperture placed in front of camera lens admits rays reflecting only from acceptable areas of mirror, blocking out diverging rays reflected from defective areas. Defects can pinpoint problems that may exist in production. Same photograph can be obtained using calibrated disk instead of aperture, except that, this time, only defective areas would be exposed.

  14. Aerosols attenuating the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants: The horizontal pathway at surface level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Ramon, Didier; Dubus, Laurent; Bourdil, Charles; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Zaidouni, Taoufik; Formenti, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols attenuate the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants (STP), along two pathways: 1) the atmospheric column pathway, between the top of the atmosphere and the heliostats, resulting in Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) changes; 2) the grazing pathway close to surface level, between the heliostats and the optical receiver. The attenuation along the surface-level grazing pathway has been less studied than the aerosol impact on changes of DNI, while it becomes significant in STP of 100 MW or more. Indeed aerosols mostly lay within the surface atmospheric layer, called the boundary layer, and the attenuation increases with the distance covered by the solar radiation in the boundary layer. In STP of 100 MW or more, the distance between the heliostats and the optical receiver becomes large enough to produce a significant attenuation by aerosols. We used measured aerosol optical thickness and computed boundary layer height to estimate the attenuation of the solar radiation at surface level at Ouarzazate (Morocco). High variabilities in aerosol amount and in vertical layering generated a significant magnitude in the annual cycle and significant inter-annual changes. Indeed the annual mean of the attenuation caused by aerosols over a 1-km heliostat-receiver distance was 3.7% in 2013, and 5.4% in 2014 because of a longest desert dust season. The monthly minimum attenuation of less than 3% was observed in winter and the maximum of more than 7% was observed in summer.

  15. Multijunction Solar Cells Optimized for the Mars Surface Solar Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Fetzer, Chris; Karam, Nasser H.; Stella, Paul; Mardesich, Nick; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an update on the performance of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) which have been continually performing for more than 3 years beyond their original 90-day missions. The paper also gives the latest results on the optimization of a multijunction solar cell that is optimized to give more power on the surface of Mars.

  16. A Proposed Apparatus to Study the Impact of Solar Wind Ions on the Surfaces of Mercury, the Moon, and Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, D. W.; Domingue, D. L.; Miller, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    We propose to construct a unique instrument to study the effects of solar wind ion irradiation on the regolith surfaces of Mercury, the Moon, and asteroids. Our approach will overcome many of the limitations of past work.

  17. UV solar irradiance in observations and the NRLSSI and SATIRE-S models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, K. L.; Ball, W. T.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Unruh, Y. C.; Morrill, J.

    2015-08-01

    Total solar irradiance and UV spectral solar irradiance has been monitored since 1978 through a succession of space missions. This is accompanied by the development of models aimed at replicating solar irradiance by relating the variability to solar magnetic activity. The Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI) and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) models provide the most comprehensive reconstructions of total and spectral solar irradiance over the period of satellite observation currently available. There is persistent controversy between the various measurements and models in terms of the wavelength dependence of the variation over the solar cycle, with repercussions on our understanding of the influence of UV solar irradiance variability on the stratosphere. We review the measurement and modeling of UV solar irradiance variability over the period of satellite observation. The SATIRE-S reconstruction is consistent with spectral solar irradiance observations where they are reliable. It is also supported by an independent, empirical reconstruction of UV spectral solar irradiance based on Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite/Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor measurements from an earlier study. The weaker solar cycle variability produced by NRLSSI between 300 and 400 nm is not evident in any available record. We show that although the method employed to construct NRLSSI is principally sound, reconstructed solar cycle variability is detrimentally affected by the uncertainty in the SSI observations it draws upon in the derivation. Based on our findings, we recommend, when choosing between the two models, the use of SATIRE-S for climate studies.

  18. Development, Production and Validation of the NOAA Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    A new climate data record of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), including source code and supporting documentation is now publicly available as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program. Daily and monthly averaged values of TSI and SSI, with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, are estimated from 1882 to the present with yearly averaged values since 1610, updated quarterly for the foreseeable future. The new Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record, jointly developed by the University of Colorado at Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is constructed from solar irradiance models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions when bright faculae and dark sunspots are present on the solar disk. The magnitudes of the irradiance changes that these features produce are determined from linear regression of the proxy Mg II index and sunspot area indices against the approximately decade-long solar irradiance measurements made by instruments on the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) spacecraft. We describe the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, operational implementation and validation approach. Future efforts to improve the uncertainty estimates of the Solar Irradiance CDR arising from model assumptions, and augmentation of the solar irradiance reconstructions with direct measurements from the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS: launch date, July 2017) are also discussed.

  19. Solar Irradiance Variability: Validation of Satellite-Based Assessment and Prospective Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonnenmacher, L.; Coimbra, C.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the technological advances and recent growth rates in deployment, solar energy will contribute significantly in the prospective global energy system. However, the intermittent output characteristics of solar energy systems pose a major challenge for the integration of this renewable power resource into the existing power grid. The intra-day solar variability causing output ramps is primarily caused by clouds and aerosols interacting with solar radiation passing through the atmosphere. Recent advances proposed different methods to assess and quantify irradiance fluctuations at the earth's surface. While remote sensing models based on satellite imagery can provide variability data for a vast domain, the temporal resolution is low and show a dearth of validation. In contrast to that, the spatial resolution of ground based instrumentation is limited whereas temporal resolution, precision and accuracy is high. Our validation of satellite based assessment of solar variability with ground truth measurements shows that the satellite based methods provide an accurate picture of variability with half hourly temporal resolution. However, half hourly variability values disregard a large portion of amplitude and frequency of solar variability on shorter timescales. This contribution seeks to investigate the characteristics of different measures of solar irradiance variability, evaluates the accuracy of common variability assessment techniques and finally proposes methods to estimate solar variability in different microclimates under different atmospheric conditions with improved accuracy. Our work shows a novel hybrid approach based on a combination of satellite and sky imager observations to scale down variability values from a 30 minute resolution to a significantly shorter timescale. Current research investigates the applicability and universality of a scaling-law with multiple inputs to derive temporal variability characteristics.

  20. Browsing, Understanding, and Accessing Solar Irradiance Data via LISIRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Lindholm, D. M.; Pankratz, C. K.

    2012-12-01

    The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, LASP, has been conducting research in Atmospheric and Space science for over 60 years. In particular, LASP has made a variety of space-based measurements of solar irradiance, which provide crucial input for research and modeling in solar-terrestrial interactions, space physics, planetary, atmospheric, and climate sciences. These data sets are generally time series of measurements, solar indices, and spectra. Unlike many Earth science data sets, they are not geolocated and so cannot be referenced via latitude and longitude coordinates. Thus they are not appropriate for or interoperable with many existing geo scientific data access and analysis tools and need somewhat specialized tools to aid users in their understanding and use. The LASP Solar Irradiance Data Center, LISIRD, http://lasp.colorado.edu/lisird, is designed to allow the science community and the public to explore and access solar irradiance and related data sets. LISIRD's interactive plotting allows users to investigate and download spectral data sets from a variety of missions. We have recently expanded our offerings and now serve TIMED SEE Level 2, Level 3, and Level 4 data sets. We continue to serve SORCE Solar Spectral Irradiance, Total Solar Irradiance, and Magnesium II and well as the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) and other data sets. LISIRD leverages middleware, the LASP Time series Server (LaTiS), that provides access to time series data based on time, wavelength, and parameter. LaTiS can read a wide variety of input formats from both local and remote sources, so many data sets can be served in their native format. It also supports dynamic data reformatting, so users can request the data and times in formats of their choice. LaTiS supports data subsetting so that users may download only regions of interest, and can stream the data directly into a computer program via a RESTful API in an automated fashion. We continue to improve LISIRD not

  1. Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Dodekatos, Georgios; Schünemann, Stefan; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from plasmonic noble metals in combination with semiconductors promises great improvements for visible light-driven photocatalysis, in particular for energy conversion. This review summarizes the basic principles of plasmonic photocatalysis, giving a comprehensive overview about the proposed mechanisms for enhancing the performance of photocatalytically active semiconductors with plasmonic devices and their applications for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. The main focus is on gold and, to a lesser extent, silver nanoparticles in combination with titania as semiconductor and their usage as active plasmonic photocatalysts. Recent advances in water splitting, hydrogen generation with sacrificial organic compounds, and CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons for solar fuel production are highlighted. Finally, further improvements for plasmonic photocatalysts, regarding performance, stability, and economic feasibility, are discussed for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. PMID:26092694

  2. Tests for the properties of solar gravity mode signals in total irradiance observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Ronald J.; Hill, Henry A.; Jian, Chen

    It has been found that a significant fraction of the gravity mode power density in the total irradiance observations appears in sidebands of classified eigenfrequencies. These sidebands are interpreted as harmonics of the rotational frequencies of the solar surface. The power density distributions in the sidebands are consistent with the observed differential rotation of the photosphere and the degree classifications of the respective gravity modes. These findings give further evidence that gravity mode signals are present in the total irradiance observations as well as give an independent check on the gravity mode detections and the l(ital) classifications. The small fraction of the power density remaining at the eigenfrequency of the gravity mode can account for the difficulty that has been experienced in detecting gravity mode signals in total irradiance observations.

  3. A Semantically Enabled Metadata Repository for Solar Irradiance Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Cox, M.; Lindholm, D. M.; Nadiadi, I.; Traver, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, LASP, has been conducting research in Atmospheric and Space science for over 60 years, and providing the associated data products to the public. LASP has a long history, in particular, of making space-based measurements of the solar irradiance, which serves as crucial input to several areas of scientific research, including solar-terrestrial interactions, atmospheric, and climate. LISIRD, the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Data Center, serves these datasets to the public, including solar spectral irradiance (SSI) and total solar irradiance (TSI) data. The LASP extended metadata repository, LEMR, is a database of information about the datasets served by LASP, such as parameters, uncertainties, temporal and spectral ranges, current version, alerts, etc. It serves as the definitive, single source of truth for that information. The database is populated with information garnered via web forms and automated processes. Dataset owners keep the information current and verified for datasets under their purview. This information can be pulled dynamically for many purposes. Web sites such as LISIRD can include this information in web page content as it is rendered, ensuring users get current, accurate information. It can also be pulled to create metadata records in various metadata formats, such as SPASE (for heliophysics) and ISO 19115. Once these records are be made available to the appropriate registries, our data will be discoverable by users coming in via those organizations. The database is implemented as a RDF triplestore, a collection of instances of subject-object-predicate data entities identifiable with a URI. This capability coupled with SPARQL over HTTP read access enables semantic queries over the repository contents. To create the repository we leveraged VIVO, an open source semantic web application, to manage and create new ontologies and populate repository content. A variety of ontologies were used in

  4. Reconstruction of total solar irradiance 1974-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. T.; Unruh, Y. C.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S.; Wenzler, T.; Mortlock, D. J.; Jaffe, A. H.

    2012-05-01

    Context. The study of variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) is important for understanding how the Sun affects the Earth's climate. Aims: Full-disk continuum images and magnetograms are now available for three full solar cycles. We investigate how modelled TSI compares with direct observations by building a consistent modelled TSI dataset. The model, based only on changes in the photospheric magnetic flux can then be tested on rotational, cyclical and secular timescales. Methods: We use Kitt Peak and SoHO/MDI continuum images and magnetograms in the SATIRE-S model to reconstruct TSI over cycles 21-23. To maximise independence from TSI composites, SORCE/TIM TSI data are used to fix the one free parameter of the model. We compare and combine the separate data sources for the model to estimate an uncertainty on the reconstruction and prevent any additional free parameters entering the model. Results: The reconstruction supports the PMOD composite as being the best historical record of TSI observations, although on timescales of the solar rotation the IRMB composite provides somewhat better agreement. Further to this, the model is able to account for 92% of TSI variations from 1978 to 2009 in the PMOD composite and over 96% during cycle 23. The reconstruction also displays an inter-cycle, secular decline of 0.20+0.12-0.09 W m-2 between cycle 23 minima, in agreement with the PMOD composite. Conclusions: SATIRE-S is able to recreate TSI observations on all timescales of a day and longer over 31 years from 1978. This is strong evidence that changes in photospheric magnetic flux alone are responsible for almost all solar irradiance variations over the last three solar cycles.

  5. The influence of mixed and phase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin D.; Vogelmann A.

    2011-10-13

    The influence of mixed-phase stratiform clouds on the surface shortwave irradiance is examined using unique spectral shortwave irradiance measurements made during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. An Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD, Inc.) spectroradiometer measured downwelling spectral irradiance from 350 to 2200 nm in one-minute averages throughout April-May 2008 from the ARM Climate Research Facility's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site at Barrow. This study examines spectral irradiance measurements made under single-layer, overcast cloud decks having geometric thickness < 3000 m. Cloud optical depth is retrieved from irradiance in the interval 1022-1033 nm. The contrasting surface radiative influences of mixed-phase clouds and liquid-water clouds are discerned using irradiances in the 1.6-{micro}m window. Compared with liquid-water clouds, mixed-phase clouds during the Arctic spring cause a greater reduction of shortwave irradiance at the surface. At fixed conservative-scattering optical depth (constant optical depth for wavelengths {lambda} < 1100 nm), the presence of ice water in cloud reduces the near-IR surface irradiance by an additional several watts-per-meter-squared. This additional reduction, or supplemental ice absorption, is typically {approx}5 W m{sup -2} near solar noon over Barrow, and decreases with increasing solar zenith angle. However, for some cloud decks this additional absorption can be as large as 8-10 W m{sup -2}.

  6. Solar irradiance variability: a six-year comparison between SORCE observations and the SATIRE model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. T.; Unruh, Y. C.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S.; Harder, J. W.

    2011-06-01

    Aims: We investigate how well modeled solar irradiances agree with measurements from the SORCE satellite, both for total solar irradiance and broken down into spectral regions on timescales of several years. Methods: We use the SATIRE model and compare modeled total solar irradiance (TSI) with TSI measurements over the period 25 February 2003 to 1 November 2009. Spectral solar irradiance over 200-1630 nm is compared with the SIM instrument on SORCE over the period 21 April 2004 to 1 November 2009. We discuss the overall change in flux and the rotational and long-term trends during this period of decline from moderate activity to the recent solar minimum in ~10 nm bands and for three spectral regions of significant interest: the UV integrated over 200-300 nm, the visible over 400-691 nm and the IR between 972-1630 nm. Results: The model captures 97% of the observed TSI variation. This is on the order at which TSI detectors agree with each other during the period considered. In the spectral comparison, rotational variability is well reproduced, especially between 400 and 1200 nm. The magnitude of change in the long-term trends is many times larger in SIM at almost all wavelengths while trends in SIM oppose SATIRE in the visible between 500 and 700 nm and again between 1000 and 1200 nm. We discuss the remaining issues with both SIM data and the identified limits of the model, particularly with the way facular contributions are dealt with, the limit of flux identification in MDI magnetograms during solar minimum and the model atmospheres in the IR employed by SATIRE. However, it is unlikely that improvements in these areas will significantly enhance the agreement in the long-term trends. This disagreement implies that some mechanism other than surface magnetism is causing SSI variations, in particular between 2004 and 2006, if the SIM data are correct. Since SATIRE was able to reproduce UV irradiance between 1991 and 2002 from UARS, either the solar mechanism for SSI

  7. Solar Irradiance Sensor on the ExoMars 2016 Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arruego, I.; Apéstigue, V.; Martínez, J.; Jiménez, J. J.; Rivas, J.; González, M.; Álvarez, J.; Azcue, J.; Martín, I.; Canchal, R.

    2015-10-01

    DREAMS-SIS is a radiometer designed to provide in-situ measurements of the Sun irradiance on Mars surface, as well as to estimate the opacity of the Mars atmosphere, due to the suspended dust. It will be included in the DREAMS package (Dust characterization, Risk assessment and Environment Analyzer on the Martian Surface), payload of the EDM (Entry and Descend Module) for the EXOMARS 2016 ESA mission [1]. We report on the development and characteristics of this miniature sensor.

  8. Extreme ultraviolet solar irradiance during the rising phase of solar cycle 24 observed by PROBA2/LYRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Dammasch, Ingolf E.; Dominique, Marie; Zender, Joe; Cessateur, Gaël; D'Huys, Elke

    2012-08-01

    The Large-Yield Radiometer (LYRA) is a radiometer that has monitored the solar irradiance at high cadence and in four pass bands since January 2010. Both the instrument and its spacecraft, PROBA2 (Project for OnBoard Autonomy), have several innovative features for space instrumentation, which makes the data reduction necessary to retrieve the long-term variations of solar irradiance more complex than for a fully optimized solar physics mission. In this paper, we describe how we compute the long-term time series of the two extreme ultraviolet irradiance channels of LYRA and compare the results with those of SDO/EVE. We find that the solar EUV irradiance has increased by a factor of 2 since the last solar minimum (between solar cycles 23 and 24), which agrees reasonably well with the EVE observations.

  9. Solar EUV irradiance derived from a sounding rocket experiment on November 10, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1990-05-01

    Results are presented on the solar EUV irradiance measurements in the range 30-100 nm obtained in a sounding rocket experiment launched from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on November 10, 1988. The observed solar EUV irradiance was found to be about 20 percent less than the solar EUV flux from a proxy model based on the daily 10.7-cm solar flux and its 81-day mean and the AE-E solar EUV data taken in the 1970s. The November 10 measurement of the solar EUV flux provides a good calibration reference spectrum for the solar EUV instruments on the San Marco satellite.

  10. Solar EUV irradiance derived from a sounding rocket experiment on November 10, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on the solar EUV irradiance measurements in the range 30-100 nm obtained in a sounding rocket experiment launched from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on November 10, 1988. The observed solar EUV irradiance was found to be about 20 percent less than the solar EUV flux from a proxy model based on the daily 10.7-cm solar flux and its 81-day mean and the AE-E solar EUV data taken in the 1970s. The November 10 measurement of the solar EUV flux provides a good calibration reference spectrum for the solar EUV instruments on the San Marco satellite.

  11. New NSO Solar Surface Activity Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henney, C. J.; Harvey, J. W.

    2001-05-01

    Using NSO-Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope (KPVT) synoptic data, we present several new solar surface activity maps. The motivation is to test conventional wisdom about conditions that are likely to produce solar activity such as flares, coronal mass ejections and high speed solar wind streams. The ultimate goal is to improve real-time, observation-based models for the purpose of predicting solar activity. A large number of maps will eventually be produced based on the wide range of ideas and models of the conditions thought to lead to solar activity events. When data from the new SOLIS instruments becomes available, the range of possible models that can be tested will be greatly expanded. At present, the daily maps include ones that show magnetic field complexity, emerging flux and high speed solar wind sources. As a proxy for local magnetic potential energy, each element of the magnetic complexity map is the distance-weighted rms of the opposing ambient magnetic field. The flux emergence map is the difference between the two most recent absolute magnetic flux images. The solar wind source map is produced from coronal hole area data. The new maps are available on the NSO-Kitt Peak World Wide Web page. This research was supported in part by the Office of Navel Research Grant N00014-91-J-1040. The NSO-Kitt Peak data used here are produced cooperatively by NSF/AURA, NASA/GSFC, and NOAA/SEC.

  12. Anomalous effects in silicon solar cell irradiated by 1-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.E. )

    1989-09-15

    Several silicon solar cells having thicknesses of approximately 63 {mu}m, with and without back-surface fields (BSF), were irradiated with 1-MeV protons having fluences between 10{sup 10} and 10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. The irradiations were performed using both normal and isotropic incidence on the rear surfaces of the cells. It was observed that after irradiation with fluences greater than 10{sup 11} protons/cm{sup 2}, all BSF cells degraded at a faster rate than cells without BSF. The irradiation results are analyzed using a model in which irradiation-induced defects in the BSF region are taken into account. A number of other possibilities for BSF cell degradation are considered. Tentatively, it is concluded that an increase in defect density due to the formation of aluminum and proton complexes in BSF cells is responsible for the higher-power loss in the BSF cells compared to the non-BSF cells.

  13. Simulated solar UV-irradiation of endocrine disrupting chemical octylphenol.

    PubMed

    Neamţu, Mariana; Popa, Dana-Melania; Frimmel, Fritz H

    2009-05-30

    The photolysis of octylphenol (OP) was investigated using a solar simulator in the absence/presence of dissolved natural organic matter (DNOM), HCO(3)(-), NO(3)(-) and Fe(III) ions. The effects of different parameters such as initial pH, initial concentration of substrate, temperature, and the effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration on photodegradation of octylphenol in aqueous solution have been assessed. The results indicate that the oxidation rate increases in the presence of H(2)O(2), nitrate and DNOM. Phenol, 1,4-dihydroxylbenzene and 1,4-benzoquinone were identified as intermediate products of photodegradation of octylphenol, through an HPLC method. In addition, the disappearance of the estrogenic activity of octylphenol during irradiation using YES test was investigated. Based upon the YES test results, there was a strong decrease of estrogenic activity of octylphenol after 8h irradiation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:18829169

  14. Panel Discussions on Total Solar Irradiance Variations and the Maunder Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.; White, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    For more than a decade, total solar irradiance has been monitored from several satellites, namely and Nimbus-7, Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), the NASA ERBS, NOAA9 and NOAA10,EURECA, and the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (SARS).

  15. Ultraviolet spectral distribution and erythema-weighted irradiance from indoor tanning devices compared with solar radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    Sola, Yolanda; Baeza, David; Gómez, Miguel; Lorente, Jerónimo

    2016-08-01

    Concern regarding the impact of indoor tanning devices on human health has led to different regulations and recommendations, which set limits on erythema-weighted irradiance. Here, we analyze spectral emissions from 52 tanning devices in Spanish facilities and compare them with surface solar irradiance for different solar zenith angles. Whereas most of the devices emitted less UV-B radiation than the midday summer sun, the unweighted UV-A irradiance was 2-6 times higher than solar radiation. Moreover, the spectral distributions of indoor devices were completely different from that of solar radiation, differing in one order of magnitude at some UV-A wavelengths, depending on the lamp characteristics. In 21% of the devices tested, the erythema-weighted irradiance exceeded 0.3Wm(-2): the limit fixed by the European standard and the Spanish regulation. Moreover, 29% of the devices fall within the UV type 4 classification, for which medical advice is required. The high variability in erythema-weighted irradiance results in a wide range of exposure times to reach 1 standard erythemal dose (SED: 100Jm(-2)), with 62% of devices requiring exposures of <10min to reach 1 SED. Nevertheless, the unweighted UV-A dose during this time period would be from 1.4 to 10.3 times more than the solar UV-A dose. PMID:27318601

  16. Surface Irradiances Consistent With CERES-Derived Top-of-Atmosphere Shortwave and Longwave Irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Seiji; Loeb, Norman G.; Rose, Fred G.; Doelling, David R.; Rutan, David A.; Caldwell, Thomas E.; Yu, Lisan; Weller, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The estimate of surface irradiance on a global scale is possible through radiative transfer calculations using satellite-retrieved surface, cloud, and aerosol properties as input. Computed top-of-atmosphere (TOA) irradiances, however, do not necessarily agree with observation-based values, for example, from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). This paper presents amethod to determine surface irradiances using observational constraints of TOA irradiance from CERES. A Lagrange multiplier procedure is used to objectively adjust inputs based on their uncertainties such that the computed TOA irradiance is consistent with CERES-derived irradiance to within the uncertainty. These input adjustments are then used to determine surface irradiance adjustments. Observations by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), CloudSat, andModerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) that are a part of the NASA A-Train constellation provide the uncertainty estimates. A comparison with surface observations from a number of sites shows that the bias [root-mean-square (RMS) difference] between computed and observed monthlymean irradiances calculated with 10 years of data is 4.7 (13.3) W/sq m for downward shortwave and 22.5 (7.1) W/sq m for downward longwave irradiances over ocean and 21.7 (7.8) W m22 for downward shortwave and 21.0 (7.6) W/sq m for downward longwave irradiances over land. The bias andRMS error for the downward longwave and shortwave irradiances over ocean are decreased from those without constraint. Similarly, the bias and RMS error for downward longwave over land improves, although the constraint does not improve downward shortwave over land. This study demonstrates how synergetic use of multiple instruments (CERES,MODIS, CALIPSO, CloudSat, AIRS, and geostationary satellites) improves the accuracy of surface irradiance computations.

  17. Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolli, I.; Matthes, K.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Krivova, N. A.; Tourpali, K.; Weber, M.; Unruh, Y. C.; Gray, L.; Langematz, U.; Pilewskie, P.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W.; Shapiro, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Woods, T. N.

    2013-04-01

    measurements. However, the integral of the SSI computed with this model over the entire spectral range does not reproduce the measured cyclical changes of the total solar irradiance, which is an essential requisite for realistic evaluations of solar effects on the Earth's climate in CCMs. We show that within the range provided by the recent SSI observations and semi-empirical models discussed here, the NRLSSI model and SORCE observations represent the lower and upper limits in the magnitude of the SSI solar cycle variation. The results of the CCM simulations, forced with the SSI solar cycle variations estimated from the NRLSSI model and from SORCE measurements, show that the direct solar response in the stratosphere is larger for the SORCE than for the NRLSSI data. Correspondingly, larger UV forcing also leads to a larger surface response. Finally, we discuss the reliability of the available data and we propose additional coordinated work, first to build composite SSI data sets out of scattered observations and to refine current SSI models, and second, to run coordinated CCM experiments.

  18. Decoupling the effects of clear atmosphere and clouds to simplify calculations of the broadband solar irradiance at ground level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oumbe, A.; Qu, Z.; Blanc, P.; Lefèvre, M.; Wald, L.; Cros, S.

    2014-08-01

    In the case of infinite plane-parallel single- and double-layered cloud, the solar irradiance at ground level computed by a radiative transfer model can be approximated by the product of the irradiance under clear atmosphere and a modification factor due to cloud properties and ground albedo only. Changes in clear-atmosphere properties have negligible effect on the latter so that both terms can be calculated independently. The error made in using this approximation depends mostly on the solar zenith angle, the ground albedo and the cloud optical depth. In most cases, the maximum errors (95th percentile) on global and direct surface irradiances are less than 15 W m-2 and less than 2-5% in relative value. These values are similar to those recommended by the World Meteorological Organization for high-quality measurements of the solar irradiance. Practically, the results mean that a model for fast calculation of surface solar irradiance may be separated into two distinct and independent models, possibly abacus-based, whose input parameters and resolutions can be different, and whose creation requires less computation time and resources than a single model.

  19. Preliminary low temperature electron irradiation of triple junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2005-01-01

    JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature.

  20. Earth Climate Changes Connected To Solar Diameter and Irradiance Variabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, S.; Rozelot, J. P.

    Recent studies indicate that small but persistent variations in the total solar irradiance may play an important role in climate changes. If it is known that such changes are mainly due to changes in sunspots darkness and faculae brightness, it begins to be understood that changes in the radius of the Sun may also play a role. In a first part of this paper, we will show how the irradiance is affected by small distortions of the solar shape. Indeed such departures to a pure spherical Sun can be modelized as they reflect the gravitational distortions inside the Sun (variability of the rotation rate both in latitude and in depth as deduced by helioseismic measurements). These departures have been also observed from space (MDI on board SOHO) and from ground (solar astrolabes, scanning heliometer or other means). Such a variability on the Sun's di- ameter, certainly of no more than 40 mas (maybe less), will imply a change in the luminosity of about 6 parts per 10000. For the time being such variations have not been yet taken into account in the Earth climate changes. In the second part of this paper, we will focus on a longer period of time. We will briefly review the variabil- ity of the solar diameter over the last past four centuries, as it is suspected now with a rather good confidence that such a temporal variability may have a sense. We will compare this variability with the global Earth temperatures used as a climatic proxy. It can be seen that diameter changes over such a long period of time are indicative of an external variability on the Earth climate. The physical mechanism involved is obviously through the irradiance changes for which we will emphasize the need to get accurate and simultaneous measurements of the Sun's radius. The determination of the commonly used ratio W, which measures the relative variations of the radius over the relative variations of the irradiance, and as deduced in the first part of this paper, is helpful to pinpoint the source of

  1. Radiation damage in proton irradiated indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    1986-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells exposed to 10 MeV proton irradiations were found to have significantly greater radiation resistance than either GaAs or Si. Performance predictions were obtained for two proton dominated orbits and one in which both protons and electrons were significant cell degradation factors. Array specific power was calculated using lightweight blanket technology, a SEP array structure, and projected cell efficiencies. Results indicate that arrays using fully developed InP cells should out-perform those using GaAs or Si in orbits where radiation is a significant cell degradation factor.

  2. Photoelectrons as a tool to evaluate spectral and temporal variations of solar EUV and XUV irradiance models over solar rotation and solar cycle time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Woods, T. N.; Fontenla, J. M.; Richards, P. G.; Tobiska, W.; Solomon, S. C.; Warren, H. P.

    2010-12-01

    Solar radiation below 50 nm produces a substantial portion of the F region ionization and most of the E region ionization that drives chemical reactions in the thermosphere. Because of a lack of high temporal and spectral resolution Solar EUV and XUV observations, particularly below 27 nm, various solar irradiance models have been developed. We have developed a technique to use observations of escaping photoelectron fluxes from the FAST satellite and two different photoelectron production codes driven by model solar irradiance values to systematically examine differences between observed and calculated escaping photoelectron fluxes. We have compared modeled and observed photoelectron fluxes from the start of TIMED/SEE data availability (2002) to the end of FAST photoelectron observations (2009). Solar irradiance inputs included TIMED/SEE data, which is derived from a model below 27 nm, and the FISM Version 1, the SRPM predictive model based on solar observation, HEUVAC, S2000, and NRL, solar irradiance models. We used the GLOW and FLIP photoelectron production codes. We find that model photoelectron spectra generated using the HEUVAC solar irradiance model have the best overall agreement with observations. Photoelectron spectra generated with the the TIMED/SEE based FISM model best agree with the observations on solar cycle time scales. Below ~27 nm all but the HEUVAC solar irradiance model produces photoelectron fluxes that are systematically below observations. We also noted systematic differences in the photoelectron energy spectra below 25 eV produced by the GLOW and FLIP photoelectron production codes for all solar irradiance inputs.

  3. The new climate data record of total and spectral solar irradiance: Current progress and future steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, Odele; Lean, Judith; Rottman, Gary; Pilewskie, Peter; Snow, Martin; Lindholm, Doug

    2016-04-01

    We present a climate data record of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, from 1610 to the present. The data record was developed jointly by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado Boulder and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program, where the data record, source code, and supporting documentation are archived. TSI and SSI are constructed from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk using linear regression of proxies of solar magnetic activity with observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM), and SOlar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE). We show that TSI can be separately modeled to within TIM's measurement accuracy from solar rotational to solar cycle time scales and we assume that SSI measurements are reliable on solar rotational time scales. We discuss the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, and operational implementation and present comparisons of the modeled TSI and SSI with the measurement record and with other solar irradiance models. We also discuss ongoing work to assess the sensitivity of the modeled irradiances to model assumptions, namely, the scaling of solar variability from rotational-to-cycle time scales and the representation of the sunspot darkening index.

  4. Harnessing surface plasmons for solar energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    NASA research on the feasibility of solar-energy conversion using surface plasmons is reviewed, with a focus on inelastic-tunnel-diode techniques for power extraction. The need for more efficient solar converters for planned space missions is indicated, and it is shown that a device with 50-percent efficiency could cost up to 40 times as much per sq cm as current Si cells and still be competitive. The parallel-processing approach using broadband carriers and tunable diodes is explained, and the physics of surface plasmons on metal surfaces is outlined. Technical problems being addressed include phase-matching sunlight to surface plasmons, minimizing ohmic losses and reradiation in energy transport, coupling into the tunnels by mode conversion, and gaining an understanding of the tunnel-diode energy-conversion process. Diagrams illustrating the design concepts are provided.

  5. Skin Cancer, Irradiation, and Sunspots: The Solar Cycle Effect

    PubMed Central

    Zurbenko, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is diagnosed in more than 2 million individuals annually in the United States. It is strongly associated with ultraviolet exposure, with melanoma risk doubling after five or more sunburns. Solar activity, characterized by features such as irradiance and sunspots, undergoes an 11-year solar cycle. This fingerprint frequency accounts for relatively small variation on Earth when compared to other uncorrelated time scales such as daily and seasonal cycles. Kolmogorov-Zurbenko filters, applied to the solar cycle and skin cancer data, separate the components of different time scales to detect weaker long term signals and investigate the relationships between long term trends. Analyses of crosscorrelations reveal epidemiologically consistent latencies between variables which can then be used for regression analysis to calculate a coefficient of influence. This method reveals that strong numerical associations, with correlations >0.5, exist between these small but distinct long term trends in the solar cycle and skin cancer. This improves modeling skin cancer trends on long time scales despite the stronger variation in other time scales and the destructive presence of noise. PMID:25126567

  6. Enhanced efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cells by excimer laser irradiated carbon nanotube network counter electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Yun-San Fu, Wei-En; Yang, Po-Yu; Lee, I-Che; Chu, Chih-Chieh; Chou, Chia-Hsin; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2014-02-03

    The carbon nanotube network decorated with Pt nanoparticles (PtCNT) irradiated by excimer laser as counter electrode (CE) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has been systematically demonstrated. The conversion efficiency would be improved from 7.12% to 9.28% with respect to conventional Pt-film one. It was attributed to the enhanced catalytic surface from Pt nanoparticles and the improved conductivity due to the adjoining phenomenon of PtCNTs irradiated by laser. Moreover, the laser annealing could also promote the interface contact between CE and conductive glass. Therefore, such a simple laser-irradiated PtCNT network is promising for the future flexible DSSCs applications.

  7. The Mg 280-nm doublet as a monitor of changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Schlesinger, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    Solar irradiance data gathered with the Nimbus 7 spacecraft from 1978-1985 are compared with atmospheric MG 289-nm doublet emission line data to evaluate the possibility of using the rotational line data to calculate the total solar UV input. The satellite instrumentation is described, including the calibration equipment and procedures. The spacecraft records solar irradiance once per day and the remainder of the time records irradiance scattered by the atmosphere. The measured irradiances are converted to equivalent brightness temperatures, which can be interpolated for specific layers of the atmosphere. Sample daily data are provided to illustrate the correlation between variations in the Mg-II core radiation and the soalr UV irradiance. Techniques are defined for correcting for periodic variations in instrument performance to quantify long-term solar UV radiance variations. Using the atmospheric Mg-II doublet radiation for measuring soalr UV irradiance is concluded of value for characterizing the effects of solar radiation on the atmosphere.

  8. Solar Spectral Irradiance, Solar Activity, and the Near-Ultra-Violet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Stancil, P. C.; Landi, E.

    2015-08-01

    The previous calculations of the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) by the Solar Radiation Physical Modeling, version 2 system, are updated in this work by including new molecular photodissociation cross-sections of important species, and many more levels and lines in its treatment of non-LTE radiative transfer. The current calculations including the new molecular photodissociation opacities produce a reduced over-ionizaton of heavy elements in the lower chromosphere and solve the problems with prior studies of the UV SSI in the wavelength range 160-400 nm and now reproduce the available observations with much greater accuracy. Calculations and observations of the near-UV at 0.1 nm resolution and higher are compared. The current set of physical models includes four quiet-Sun and five active-region components, from which radiance is computed for ten observing angles. These radiances are combined with images of the solar disk to obtain the SSI and Total Solar Irradiance and their variations. The computed SSI is compared with measurements from space at several nm resolution and agreement is found within the accuracy level of these measurements. An important result is that the near-UV SSI increase with solar activity is significant for the photodissociation of ozone in the terrestrial atmosphere because a number of highly variable upper chromospheric lines overlap the ozone Hartley band.

  9. SME Observations of Solar Ultraviolet Irradiance, October 1981 to April 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottman, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    The primary science objective of the Solar Mesosphere Explorer was to establish the natural relation between solar ultraviolet irradiance and atmospheric ozone. To this end the SME instruments measured both solar spectral irradiance and altitude profiles of ozone from 50 km to 90 km. The Chapman reaction controlling atmospheric ozone production requires solar radiation in the O2 Schumann-Runge and Herzberg bands between 140 nm and 240 nm, and the commensurate ozone destruction involves longer wavelengths in the O3 Hartley band between 230nm and 290nm. The SME solar irradiance spectrometer made daily observations of these relevant spectral bands and extended further down to 115 nm to include Lyman-α. This talk reviews the original SME data and the reported solar variations at both intermediate time scales (especially 27-day variations related to solar rotation) and over the 11-year solar cycle. Recent reprocessing the SME solar data are providing small but important improvements to the data set.

  10. Are the most recent estimates for Maunder Minimum solar irradiance in agreement with temperature reconstructions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feulner, Georg

    2011-08-01

    Estimates for the total solar irradiance (TSI) during the 17th-century Maunder Minimum published in the last few years have pointed towards a TSI difference of 0.2-0.7 W m-2 as compared to the 2008/2009 solar minimum. Two recent studies, however, give anomalies which differ from this emerging consensus. The first study indicates an even smaller TSI difference, placing the Maunder Minimum TSI on the same level as the 2008/2009 minimum. The second study on the other hand suggests a very large TSI difference of 5.8 W m-2. Here I use coupled climate simulations to assess the implications of these two estimates on Northern-hemisphere surface air temperatures over the past millennium. Using a solar forcing corresponding to the estimate of the first study, simulated Northern-hemisphere temperatures over the past millennium are consistent with reconstructed surface air temperatures. The large TSI differences between times of high and low solar activity as suggested by the second study, however, yield temperatures during all past grand solar minima that are too low, an excessive variance in Northern-hemisphere temperature on timescales of 50-100 years as compared to reconstructions, and temperatures during the first half of the 20th century which are too low and inconsistent with the instrumental temperature record. In summary this suggests a more moderate TSI difference of less than 1 W m-2 and possibly as low as 0-0.3 W m-2.

  11. Surface ices in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1994-01-01

    Planetary volatile inventories are products of several factors: (1) condensation-accretion of pre-planetary material which determines the bulk volatile inventory; (2) energy history of a planet, including timing, causes, and mechanisms of degassing; (3) the volatile sinks, including temporary, long term, and permanent; and (4) external processes operating on the volatile inventory. Information regarding the current surface compositions provide insight into both internal and surface-atmosphere evolutionary history. Our discussion focuses upon the surface composition of outer solar system planets and satellites as determined by spacecraft and telescopic spectral observations. We provide a review and an update of the recent work by Cruikshank and Brown that includes more recent observations and interpretations. In the context of formation and evolution of solar system bodies, the interesting ices typically considered are simple molecules formed from elements having high cosmic abundances. These mainly include ices of H2O, NH3, SO2, H2S, CH4, CO, CO2, and N2. In the solid state, these ices have vibrational spectral features, analogous to their gaseous counterparts but rotational transitions are quenched, that lie in the near- and mid-infrared. The overtone and combination modes, occurring in the visible and near-IR region, are of particular importance as standard observational techniques used to identify these ices rely upon reflected solar energy. Table I summarizes the ices found on various bodies in the outer solar system. H2O is most abundant surface material in the inner and middle regions while more volatile species appear to dominate surfaces in the outermost edge of the outer solar system.

  12. Surface modification of multilayer graphene using Ga ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Quan; Shao, Ying; Ge, Daohan; Ren, Naifei; Yang, Qizhi

    2015-04-28

    The effect of Ga ion irradiation intensity on the surface of multilayer graphene was examined. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined that the irradiation caused defects in the crystal structure of graphene. The density of defects increased with the increase in dwell times. Furthermore, the strain induced by the irradiation changed the crystallite size and the distance between defects. These defects had the effect of doping the multilayer graphene and increasing its work function. The increase in work function was determined using contact potential difference measurements. The surface morphology of the multilayer graphene changed following irradiation as determined by atomic force microscopy. Additionally, the adhesion between the atomic force microscopy tip and sample increased further indicating that the irradiation had caused surface modification, important for devices that incorporate graphene.

  13. Solar Versus Fission Surface Power for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; McNatt, Jeremiah; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions to Mars using In-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar-power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. This “pathfinder” design utilized a 4.5 meter diameter lander. Its primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander’s ISRU payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production from atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,128 to 2,425 kg, versus the 2,751 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses increase as landing sites are selected further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling.

  14. Correlation between total solar irradiance and global land temperatures for the last 120 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varonov, A.; Shopov, Y. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the solar impact on one of the main Earth climate system components—the land-near-surface air temperature—during the past 120 years. Using statistical analysis, a correlation between the variations of the total solar irradiance and of the annual-mean land-near-surface air temperatures was found. An unknown time lag between both data sets was expected to be present due to the complexity of the Earth's climate system leading to a delayed response to changes in influencing factors. We found the best correlation with coefficient over 90% for a 14-year shift of the annual mean land temperature record ahead with data before 1970, while the same comparison with data until 2006 yields 61% correlation. These results show the substantially higher influence of the total solar irradiance on the global land temperatures before 1970. The decline of this influence during the last 40 years could be attributed to the increasing concentration of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere.

  15. Exposure testing of solar absorber surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has been involved in supporting, monitoring and conducting exposure testing of solar materials for approximately ten years. The Laboratory has provided technical monitoring of the IITRI, DSET, Lockheed, and Berry contracts and has operated the Los Alamos exposure Facility for over five years. This report will outline some of the past exposure testing, the testing still in progress, and describe some of the major findings. While this report will primarily emphasize solar absorber surfaces, some of the significant findings relative to advanced glazing will be discussed.

  16. Photoelectrons as a tool to evaluate solar EUV and XUV model irradiance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Woods, T. N.; Fontenla, J. M.; Richards, P. G.; Tobiska, W.; Solomon, S. C.; Warren, J.

    2011-12-01

    Solar radiation below 50 nm produces a substantial portion of the F region ionization and most of the E region ionization that drives chemical reactions in the thermosphere. At times before the launch of the SDO spacecraft there is a lack of high temporal and spectral resolution Solar EUV and XUV observations, particularly below 27 nm. To address the space data various solar irradiance models have been developed. We have developed a technique to use observations of escaping photoelectron fluxes from the FAST satellite and two different photoelectron production codes driven by model solar irradiance values to systematically examine differences between observed and calculated escaping photoelectron fluxes. We have compared modeled and observed photoelectron fluxes for the interval from September 14, 2006 to January 1, 2007. This is an interval included ~ 4 solar rotations and is characterized by modest solar and geomagnetic activity. Solar irradiance models included TIMED/SEE data, which is derived from a model below 27 nm, and the FISM Version 1, the SRPM predictive model based on solar observation, HEUVAC, S2000, and NRL, solar irradiance models. We used the GLOW and FLIP photoelectron production codes. Here we focus on the differences between solar irradiance models and small differences between photoelectron production code outputs using the same solar irradiance spectra over this time period.

  17. Solar energy converter using surface plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Sunlight is dispersed over a diffraction grating formed on the surface of a conducting film on a substrate. The angular dispersion controls the effective grating period so that a matching spectrum of surface plasmons is excited for parallel processing on the conducting film. The resulting surface plasmons carry energy to an array of inelastic tunnel diodes. This solar energy converter does not require different materials for each frequency band, and sunlight is directly converted to electricity in an efficient manner by extracting more energy from the more energetic photons.

  18. Solar vs. Fission Surface Power for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions. The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. The 4.5 meter (m) diameter pathfinder lander's primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander's In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production using atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept's propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept's propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,116 to 2,396 kg, versus the 2,686 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses are expected to approach or exceed the fission payload mass at landing sites further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling. Next, the team developed a solar-powered point design solution for a conceptual four-crew, 500-day surface mission consisting of up to four landers per

  19. ACRIM3 and the Total Solar Irradiance database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, Richard C.

    2014-08-01

    The effects of scattering and diffraction on the observations of the ACRIMSAT/ACRIM3 satellite TSI monitoring mission have been characterized by the preflight calibration approach for satellite total solar irradiance (TSI) sensors implemented at the LASP/TRF (Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics/Total Solar Irradiance Radiometer Facility). The TRF also calibrates the SI (International System of units) traceability to the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) cryo-radiometric scale. ACRIM3's self-calibration agrees with NIST to within the uncertainty of the test procedure (˜500 ppm). A correction of ˜5000 ppm was found for scattering and diffraction that has significantly reduced the scale difference between the results of the ACRIMSAT/ACRIM3 and SORCE/TIM satellite experiments. Algorithm updates reflecting more than 10 years of mission experience have been made that further improve the ACRIM3 results by eliminating some thermally driven signal and increasing the signal to noise ratio. The result of these changes is a more precise and detailed picture of TSI variability. Comparison of the results from the ACRIM3, SORCE/TIM and SOHO/VIRGO satellite experiments demonstrate the near identical detection of TSI variability on all sub-annual temporal and amplitude scales during the TIM mission. The largest occurs at the rotational period of the primary solar activity longitudes. On the decadal timescale, while ACRIM3 and VIRGO results exhibit close agreement throughout, TIM exhibits a consistent 500 ppm upward trend relative to ACRIM3 and VIRGO. A solar magnetic activity area proxy for TSI has been used to demonstrate that the ACRIM TSI composite and its +0.037 %/decade TSI trend during solar cycles 21-23 is the most likely correct representation of the extant satellite TSI database. The occurrence of this trend during the last decades of the 20th century supports a more robust contribution of TSI variation to detected global temperature increase

  20. A proposed update to the solar irradiance spectrum used in LOWTRAN and MODTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Gao, Bo-Cai

    1993-01-01

    The calibrated upwelling radiance spectra measured by AVIRIS are increasingly being analyzed with radiative transfer codes. Analysis of AVIRIS data with the LOWTRAN and MODTRAN radiative transfer codes has led to indications of an error in the solar irradiance spectra used by these codes. This paper presents evidence for the error and proposed update to the solar irradiance spectra used by LOWTRAN and MODTRAN.

  1. Do Flares Contribute to Total Solar Irradiance Variability ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, M.; Dudok de Wit, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) varies on all time scales and a major fraction of its variability can be reproduced by considering the appearance and disappearance of features, such as sunspots and faculae, on the solar disk. Other effects (e.g. the so called network), however, are contributing to the variability of the TSI, as evidenced by its unusually low level during the last solar minimum. Here we show that flares of various amplitudes also have a significant impact on the TSI. In contrast to standard belief, the dominant contribution comes from the visible domain. We next estimate the probability distribution of flares versus their total radiative output; previous estimates were restricted to a specific spectral range only (e.g. in the soft X-ray or radio domain) whereas we consider the total energy. The obtained distribution follows a power law; we investigate the possibility of small flares to have a major contribution to the TSI variability. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement SOTERIA (project n° 218816, www.soteria-space.eu)

  2. The solar absolute spectral irradiance 1150-3173 A - May 17, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, G. H.; Rottman, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The full-disk solar spectral irradiance in the spectral range 1150-3173 A was obtained from a rocket observation above White Sands Missile Range, NM, on May 17, 1982, half way in time between solar maximum and solar minimum. Comparison with measurements made during solar maximum in 1980 indicate a large decrease in the absolute solar irradiance at wavelengths below 1900 A to approximately solar minimum values. No change above 1900 A from solar maximum to this flight was observed to within the errors of the measurements. Irradiance values lower than the Broadfoot results in the 2100-2500 A spectral range are found, but excellent agreement with Broadfoot between 2500 and 3173 A is found. The absolute calibration of the instruments for this flight was accomplished at the National Bureau of Standards Synchrotron Radiation Facility which significantly improves calibration of solar measurements made in this spectral region.

  3. Graphitization of polymer surfaces by scanning ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, Yuri

    2014-10-20

    Graphitization of polymer surfaces was performed by low-energy Ar{sup +} and He{sup +} ion irradiation. A method of scanning irradiation was implemented. It was found that by scanning ion irradiation, a significantly higher electrical conductivity in the graphitized layers can be achieved in comparison with a conventional broad-beam irradiation. The enhancement of the conductance becomes more pronounced for narrower and better collimated ion beams. In order to analyze these results in more detail, the temperature dependence of conductance of the irradiated samples was investigated. The results of measurements are discussed in terms of weak localization corrections to conductance in disordered metals. The observed effects can be explained by enlargement of graphitic patches, which was achieved with the scanning ion irradiation method.

  4. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  5. CZTSSe thin film solar cells: Surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Chinmay Sunil

    Chalcopyrite semiconducting materials, specifically CZTS, are a promising alternative to traditional silicon solar cell technology. Because of the high absorption coefficient; films of the order of 1 micrometer thickness are sufficient for the fabrication of solar cells. Liquid based synthesis methods are advantageous because they are easily scalable using the roll to roll manufacturing techniques. Various treatments are explored in this study to enhance the performance of the selenized CZTS film based solar cells. Thiourea can be used as a sulfur source and can be used to tune band gap of CZTSSe. Bromine etching can be used to manipulate the thickness of sintered CZTSSe film. The etching treatment creates recombination centers which lead to poor device performance. Various after treatments were used to improve the performance of the devices. It was observed that the performance of the solar cell devices could not be improved by any of the after treatment steps. Other surface treatment processes are explored including KCN etching and gaseous H2S treatments. Hybrid solar cells which included use of CIGS nanoparticles at the interface between CZTSSe and CdS are also explored.

  6. The Contribution of the Solcon Instrument to the Long Term Total Solar Irradiance Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitte, S.; Joukoff, A.; Crommelynck, D.; Lee, R. B., III; Helizon, R.

    1999-01-01

    On century time scales, the variation in the total solar irradiance received by the earth is believed to be a major climate change driver. Therefore accurate and time stable measurements of the total solar irradiance are necessary. We present the latest contribution of the SOLar CONstant (SOLCON) instrument to these measurements, namely its measurements during the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker (IEH) 3 space shuttle flight, and its results: the verification of the ageing of the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), and the measurement of the Space Absolute Radiometric Reference (SARR) adjustment coefficients for the Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations (VIRGO) radiometers.

  7. Surface Modification of Polymer Substrates by Oxygen Ion Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Takaoka, G. H.; Ryuto, H.; Araki, R.; Yakushiji, T.

    2008-11-03

    Oxygen cluster ions and/or monomer ions were used for the sputtering and the surface modification of polymers such as polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). For the case of oxygen cluster ion irradiation, the sputtered depth increased with increase of the acceleration voltage, and the sputtering yield was much larger than that by the monomer ion irradiation. The sputtered particles represented the polymer structure, which indicated that the bond scission by the cluster ion irradiation resulted in an ejection of monomer molecule through the intermolecular collision. On the other hand, for the oxygen monomer ion irradiation, the implanted depth increased with increase of the acceleration voltage, and the bond scission occurred at the deep region through the binary collision with the high energetic ions. Therefore, the sputtering yield for the polymer surfaces decreased, and the sputtering effect became very small. Furthermore, the simultaneous use of oxygen cluster and monomer ions was more effective for oxidation of the PET surfaces rather than the monomer ion irradiation or the cluster ion irradiation. As a result, the contact angle measurement showed that the wettability of the PET surfaces irradiated by the simultaneous use of oxygen cluster and monomer ions was much enhanced.

  8. Climate variability related to the 11 year solar cycle as represented in different spectral solar irradiance reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschke, Tim; Kunze, Markus; Misios, Stergios; Matthes, Katja; Langematz, Ulrike; Tourpali, Kleareti

    2016-04-01

    Advanced spectral solar irradiance (SSI) reconstructions differ significantly from each other in terms of the mean solar spectrum, that is the spectral distribution of energy, and solar cycle variability. Largest uncertainties - relative to mean irradiance - are found for the ultraviolet range of the spectrum, a spectral region highly important for radiative heating and chemistry in the stratosphere and troposphere. This study systematically analyzes the effects of employing different SSI reconstructions in long-term (40 years) chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations to estimate related uncertainties of the atmospheric response. These analyses are highly relevant for the next round of CCM studies as well as climate models within the CMIP6 exercise. The simulations are conducted by means of two state-of-the-art CCMs - CESM1(WACCM) and EMAC - run in "atmosphere-only"-mode. These models are quite different with respect to the complexity of the implemented radiation and chemistry schemes. CESM1(WACCM) features a chemistry module with considerably higher spectral resolution of the photolysis scheme while EMAC employs a radiation code with notably higher spectral resolution. For all simulations, concentrations of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances, as well as observed sea surface temperatures (SST) are set to average conditions representative for the year 2000 (for SSTs: mean of decade centered over year 2000) to exclude anthropogenic influences and differences due to variable SST forcing. Only the SSI forcing differs for the various simulations. Four different forcing datasets are used: NRLSSI1 (used as a reference in all previous climate modeling intercomparisons, i.e. CMIP5, CCMVal, CCMI), NRLSSI2, SATIRE-S, and the SSI forcing dataset recommended for the CMIP6 exercise. For each dataset, a solar maximum and minimum timeslice is integrated, respectively. The results of these simulations - eight in total - are compared to each other with respect to their

  9. [Optical multi-channel detection and analysis on solar ultra-violet irradiance spectrum].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-yan; He, Jie; Zuo, Hao-yi; Liang, Hui-min; Yang, Jing-guo

    2007-05-01

    The present paper reports a new type of ultraviolet CCD optical multi-channel analyzer and its application to detecting solar ultraviolet irradiance spectrum. Spectral detecting range of 200-1 100 nm, spectral resolution of 0.1 nm and detecting sensitivity of 0.02 lx were reached in this instrument. The solar spectra of UVB and UVA were measured in real time in Chengdu area. The measurement results have good correlation with the detection using normal solar ultraviolet irradiance detector. Primary analysis on the detection results of solar spectra in UVB and UVA indicated that in the morning and in the afternoon the irradiance of solar ultraviolet is smaller than that at noon, and reverse correlation holds for the change of SZA (Solar Zenith Angle). In different wavelength interval of UVA and UVB, generally, the radiation flux of long wavelength is greater than that of short. Clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere have important influence on ultraviolet irradiance. PMID:17655086

  10. Prediction of global solar irradiance based on time series analysis: Application to solar thermal power plants energy production planning

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Luis; Marchante, Ruth; Cony, Marco; Zarzalejo, Luis F.; Polo, Jesus; Navarro, Ana

    2010-10-15

    Due to strong increase of solar power generation, the predictions of incoming solar energy are acquiring more importance. Photovoltaic and solar thermal are the main sources of electricity generation from solar energy. In the case of solar thermal energy plants with storage energy system, its management and operation need reliable predictions of solar irradiance with the same temporal resolution as the temporal capacity of the back-up system. These plants can work like a conventional power plant and compete in the energy stock market avoiding intermittence in electricity production. This work presents a comparisons of statistical models based on time series applied to predict half daily values of global solar irradiance with a temporal horizon of 3 days. Half daily values consist of accumulated hourly global solar irradiance from solar raise to solar noon and from noon until dawn for each day. The dataset of ground solar radiation used belongs to stations of Spanish National Weather Service (AEMet). The models tested are autoregressive, neural networks and fuzzy logic models. Due to the fact that half daily solar irradiance time series is non-stationary, it has been necessary to transform it to two new stationary variables (clearness index and lost component) which are used as input of the predictive models. Improvement in terms of RMSD of the models essayed is compared against the model based on persistence. The validation process shows that all models essayed improve persistence. The best approach to forecast half daily values of solar irradiance is neural network models with lost component as input, except Lerida station where models based on clearness index have less uncertainty because this magnitude has a linear behaviour and it is easier to simulate by models. (author)

  11. New model of Mars surface irradiation for the climate simulation chamber 'Artificial Mars'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasashvili, M. V.; Sabashvili, Sh. A.; Tsereteli, S. L.; Aleksidze, N. G.

    2013-04-01

    A new model of the Mars surface irradiation has been developed for the imitation of radiation-temperature parameters within Mars Climate Simulation Chamber (MCSC). In order to determine the values of annual and diurnal variations of the irradiance on the Martian surface, the Solar illumination E has been expressed by the distance r between the Sun and Mars and the Sun's altitude z in the Martian sky, along with its midday zenith distance z min. The arrangements of spring and autumn equinoxes as well as summer and winter solstice points in the Martian sky are discussed regarding the perihelion of Mars. Annual orbital points and variability of Solar z min for different planetary latitudes have been calculated for the 15 selected values of Mars's true anomaly, along with the illumination E for 12 hourly moments of Martian daytime on the Martian equator. These original calculations and the data which have been obtained are used for the construction of technical tools imitating variations of the surface irradiation and temperature within MCSC, programming of the supporting computer and the electric scheme, which provide proper remote control and set the environmental parameters that are analogues to the 24 hours 39 minutes circadian cycle on planet Mars. Spectral distribution as monochromatic irradiance, humidity control, atmospheric composition and other environmental parameters of planet Mars are also imitated and remotely controlled within MCSC, however, are not discussed in this particular article.

  12. Soft X-ray irradiance measured by the Solar Aspect Monitor on the Solar Dynamic Observatory Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. Y.; Bailey, S. M.; Jones, A.; Woodraska, D.; Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.

    2016-04-01

    The Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM) is a pinhole camera on the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. SAM projects the solar disk onto the CCD through a metallic filter designed to allow only solar photons shortward of 7 nm to pass. Contamination from energetic particles and out-of-band irradiance is, however, significant in the SAM observations. We present a technique for isolating the 0.01-7 nm integrated irradiance from the SAM signal to produce the first results of broadband irradiance for the time period from May 2010 to May 2014. The results of this analysis agree with a similar data product from EVE's EUV SpectroPhotometer to within 25%. We compare our results with measurements from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer Solar X-ray Photometer and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics Solar EUV Experiment at similar levels of solar activity. We show that the full-disk SAM broadband results compared well to the other measurements of the 0.01-7 nm irradiance. We also explore SAM's capability toward resolving spatial contribution from regions of solar disk in irradiance and demonstrate this feature with a case study of several strong flares that erupted from active regions on 11 March 2011.

  13. Surface characteristics of UV-irradiated polyurethane elastomers extended with α, ω-alkane diols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad; Barikani, Mehdi; Zuber, Mohammad; Islam-ud-Din

    2008-08-01

    Polyurethane elastomers (PUEs) based on 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI), poly (ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) and extended with series of chain extender (CE) were synthesized via two step polymerization technique. The synthesized samples were irradiated for 50, 100 and 200 h in an UV exposure unit as such the spectral distribution of the light is good match for terrestrial solar radiation. The modifications in the chemical structures of the PU before and after irradiation were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) technique. The effect of irradiation time and chain extenders length on surface properties were studied and investigated. Photo-oxidation of PU surface leads to fast increase in surface free energy and its polar component. Simultaneously, the work of water adhesion to polymer increases significantly during UV-irradiation. The higher changes in surface properties, observed by water absorption (%), equilibrium degree of swelling, as well as monitored by ATR-FT-IR and contact angle measurement, were found for the PU samples extended with higher number of methylene unit and irradiation time.

  14. How does clear-sky terrestrial irradiance vary with solar activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feulner, Georg

    2013-04-01

    I investigate recent claims for a strong variation of clear-sky terrestrial solar irradiance with solar activity (on the level of O(1%) over the 11-year cycle) derived from ground-based observations of the Sun. As it turns out, these erroneous results arise because important effects like the dimming by volcanic aerosols and long-term changes in atmospheric transmission independent of solar activity have to be corrected for. After taking these into account, clear-sky terrestrial solar irradiance can be shown to vary by O(0.1%) as expected from satellite-based measurements of the changes in Total Solar Irradiance over the solar cycle. On the one hand this example illustrates the usefulness of ground-based monitoring of solar irradiance data, but on the other hand it highlights the difficulties which can hamper an unbiased analysis of such datasets. References Feulner, G., 2011: The Smithsonian solar constant data revisited: no evidence for a strong effect of solar activity in ground-based insolation data, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 3291-3301, doi:10.5194/acp-11-3291-2011 Feulner, G., 2013: On the relation between solar activity and clear-sky terrestrial irradiance, Solar Phys., 282, 615-627, doi:10.1007/s11207-012-0129-z

  15. Silicon solar cell characterization at low temperatures and low illumination as a function of particulate irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Little, S. A.; Peacock, C. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Various configurations of back surface reflector silicon solar cells including small (2 x 2) cm and large (approx. 6 x 6) cm cells with conventional and wraparound contacts were subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation and characterized under both Earth orbital and deep space conditions of temperatures and illuminations. Current-Voltage (I-V) data were generated from +65 C to -150 C and at incident illuminations from 135.3 mW/sq cm to 5.4 mW/sq cm for these cells. Degradation in cell performance which is manifested only under deep space conditions is emphasized. In addition, the effect of particle irradiation on the high temperature and high intensity and low temperature and low intensity performance of the cells is described. The cells with wraparound contacts were found to have lower efficiencies at Earth orbital conditions than the cells with conventional contacts.

  16. A New Climate Data Record of Solar Spectral Irradiance from 1610 to Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a climate data record of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, from 1610 to the present. The data record was developed jointly by the University of Colorado at Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program, where the data record, source code, and supporting documentation are archived. SSI is constructed from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk using linear regression of proxies of solar magnetic activity with observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM); the measurements are assumed to be reliable on solar rotational time scales. We extend the SSI record to longer time scales by reproducing the integral of the SSI with independent measurements of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements made by the SORCE Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM); TSI can be separately modeled to within TIM's measurement accuracy from solar rotational to solar cycle time scales. We discuss the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, and operational implementation and present comparisons of the modeled SSI with the measurement record and with other solar irradiance models. We also discuss future work to improve the Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record with new measurements from the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS), different proxy representations of sunspot darkening and facular brightening, including the improved composite record of Mg II index being developed as part of the European-led SOlar Irradiance Data exploitation (SOLID) project, and to expand the uncertainty estimates to include model assumptions.

  17. Solar EUV irradiance during solar cycle 24 as observed by PROBA2/LYRA and SDO/EVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Dominique, Marie; Dammasch, Ingolf

    2013-04-01

    Solar EUV irradiance affects the upper atmospheres of planets and is a fundamental parameters for space weather. The Large-Yield Radiometer (LYRA) is a radiometer that has monitored the solar irradiance at high cadence and in four pass bands since January 2010. Both the instrument and its spacecraft, PROBA2 (Project for OnBoard Autonomy), have several innovative features for space instrumentation, which makes the data reduction necessary to retrieve the long-term variations of solar irradiance more complex than for a fully optimized solar physics mission. In this presentation, we describe how we compute the long-term time series of the two extreme ultraviolet irradiance channels of LYRA and compare the results with those of SDO/EVE and several proxies.

  18. The solar irradiance registered at a flat- hemispherical field of view- bolometric oscillation sensor on board PICARD satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Karatekin, Ozgur; van Ruymbeke, Michel; Dewitte, Steven; Thuillier, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    The value of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) is varying over the 11-year sunspot cycle. The cycle amplitude is about 0.1% solar constant, which could be traced with the absolute radiometers onboard dedicated space missions. The operating principle of the absolute radiometer is measuring the electrical heating power of the heat sensing unit during the closed and opened phase of each measurement cycle. The difference between the power integrated cross the closed phase and the power integrated cross the open phase gives the value of the solar irradiance. The cadence of the measurement is usually from one to several minutes. The final TSI value in physics unit is obtained after taking into account the electronic calibration, correction of the instruments effects, and normalizing to 1 AU. The Bolometric Oscillation Sensor on board PICARD microsatellite is a new designed remote sensing instrument. The BOS is operated continually with a 10 seconds cadence to fill the time gaps between open and close phases of the SOVAP absolute radiometer. The BOS has two sensing surfaces, the main one with a light mass is black coated, the second surface is white painted with a heavier mass. The sensor has a hemispherical field of view. The heat flux absorbed by the main detector is thermally conducted by a thin shunt to the heat sink. The principle of the measurements is that the sum of the power of the blacked coated surface and the power along the shunt is equal to the incoming electromagnetic radiation. However as the BOS has a HFOV, the incoming radiation caught by it, has three kinds of origin: the solar irradiance, the reflected solar visible light form the Earth and the terrestrial infrared radiation. In this work, we are going to discuss the solar irradiance isolated from the measurements of the BOS instrument as well as the comparison with the sunspot number and the TSI composite from the VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE experiments.

  19. Detectability of active triangulation range finder: a solar irradiance approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huizhe; Gao, Jason; Bui, Viet Phuong; Liu, Zhengtong; Lee, Kenneth Eng Kian; Peh, Li-Shiuan; Png, Ching Eng

    2016-06-27

    Active triangulation range finders are widely used in a variety of applications such as robotics and assistive technologies. The power of the laser source should be carefully selected in order to satisfy detectability and still remain eye-safe. In this paper, we present a systematic approach to assess the detectability of an active triangulation range finder in an outdoor environment. For the first time, we accurately quantify the background noise of a laser system due to solar irradiance by coupling the Perez all-weather sky model and ray tracing techniques. The model is validated with measurements with a modeling error of less than 14.0%. Being highly generic and sufficiently flexible, the proposed model serves as a guide to define a laser system for any geographical location and microclimate. PMID:27410637

  20. NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Warren, Harry; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent

    2011-10-01

    New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

  1. The NOAA Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS) - A new surface radiation monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, B.B.; DeLuisi, J.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes a new radiation monitoring program, the Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS), that builds upon and takes over from earlier NOAA networks monitoring components of solar radiation [both the visible component (SOLRAD) and the shortwave component that causes sunburn, UV-B] across the continental United States. ISIS is implemented in two levels. Level 1 addresses incoming radiation only, and level 2 addresses the surface radiation balance. Level 2 also constitutes the SURFRAD (Surface Radiation) program of the NOAA Office of Global Programs, specifically intended to provide radiation data to support large-scale hydrologic studies that will be conducted under the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment. Eventually, it is planned for level 2 sites to monitor all components of the surface energy balance. Both levels of ISIS will eventually measure both visible and UV radiation components. At present, there are nine sites that are considered to be at ISIS level 1 standard and an additional four level 2 SURFRAD sites. A 10th level 1 site will be in operation soon. Plans call for an increase in the number of sites of both kinds, up to about 15 ISIS sites, of which 6 will be at the SURFRAD level. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The variations of geomagnetic energy and solar irradiance and their impacts on Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanshi

    2012-10-01

    It is important to understand and estimate the energy inputs to the upper atmosphere, in order to provide accurate calculation and prediction of the thermospheric neutral density, which is important for satellite orbital determination. The primary energy sources of Earth's upper atmosphere are the solar irradiance and geomagnetic energy including Joule heating and particle precipitation. Various data (OMNI2, CHAMP, DMSP) and models (SOLAR2000, FISM, Weimer05, AMIE, NCAR TIE-GCM) are utilized to investigate the variations of energy inputs and their influences on the coupled thermosphere-ionosphere system, with focus on the wavelength dependence of solar irradiance enhancement during are events, the geomagnetic energy associated with high-speed solar wind streams, the altitudinal distribution of Joule heating in different solar conditions, and the variation of solar irradiance and geomagnetic energy inputs during last solar cycle.

  3. 18-months of UV irradiance observations from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, J.; Bjarnason, G. G.; Rottman, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    An instrument on the Solar Mesosphere Explorer has been making daily solar irradiance measurements in the 120-305 nm (UV) spectral interval since October 6, 1981. Calculations of the highest to lowest value of the irradiance within each solar rotation yield percent range values indicative of variations that are useful as input data for model calculations of stratosphere/mesosphere responses to short period solar variability, since solar radiation in the UV is largely responsible for the photochemical interactions and radiative heating of the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere.

  4. A Collaborative FP7 Effort towards the First European Comprehensive SOLar Irradiance Data Exploitation (SOLID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberreiter, Margit; Dasi, Maria; Delouille, Veronique; Del Zanna, Giulio; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Ermolli, Ilaria; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Krivova, Natalie; Mason, Helen; Qahwaji, Rami; Schmutz, Werner; Solanki, Sami; Thuillier, Gerard; Tourpali, Kleareti; Unruh, Yvonne; Verbeeck, Cis; Weber, Mark; Woods, Tom

    2013-04-01

    Variations of solar irradiance are the most important natural factor in the terrestrial climate and as such, the time dependent spectral solar irradiance is a crucial input to any climate modelling. There have been previous efforts to compile solar irradiance but it is still uncertain by how much the spectral and total solar irradiance changed on yearly, decadal and longer time scales. Observations of irradiance data exist in numerous disperse data sets. Therefore, it is important to bring together the European expertise in the field to analyse and merge the complete set of European irradiance data, complemented by archive data that include data from non-European missions. We report on the initiation of a collaborative effort to unify representatives from all European solar space experiments and European teams specialized in multi-wavelength solar image processing. It is intended to include the European groups involved in irradiance modelling and reconstruction. They will work with two different state of the art approaches to produce reconstructed spectral and total solar irradiance data as a function of time. These results will be used to bridge gaps in time and wavelength coverage of the observational data. This will allow the proposing SOLID team to reduce the uncertainties in the irradiance time series - an important requirement by the climate community - and to provide uniform data sets of modelled and observed solar irradiance data from the beginning of the space era to the present including proper error and uncertainty estimates. Climate research needs these data sets and therefore, the primary benefit is for the climate community, but the stellar community, planetary, lunar, and ionospheric researchers are also interested in having at their disposition incident radiation of the Sun. The proposing team plans to realize a wide international synergy in solar physics from 7 European countries, and collaborators from the US, complemented by representatives from

  5. Solar spectral irradiance and atmospheric transmission at Mauna Loa Observatory.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G E

    1982-06-01

    A radiometer was operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory during calendar year 1980 to estimate the spectral irradiance of the sun and its possible fluctuation in time near the peak of solar activity. Data were also acquired on seasonal trends of atmospheric transmissivity above the marine mixing layer in the central Pacific. Spectral irradiance remained constant to at least (1/2)% at all wavelengths monitored. Furthermore its absolute magnitude was in agreement with the Labs and Neckel values to +/-2% except at blue wavelengths where the Mauna Loa values are from 4 to 12% higher and at lambda = 850 nm where the Mauna Loa value is 9% lower. The residual aerosol optical depth above Mauna Loa Observatory during 1980 averaged tau(0) = 0.020. An intrusion of dust into the central Pacific from the Gobi Desert (as deduced by the composition of collected particles) invaded the Central Pacific from Mar. to May 1980 and caused a perturbation in optical depth (at lambda = 500 nm) of Deltatau(0) ~ 0.01-0.02. The optical depth increment caused by the Mt. St. Helens volcano was <0.005 in the 2-month period following the eruption. PMID:20389986

  6. Solar spectral irradiance and atmospheric transmission at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.E.

    1982-06-01

    A radiometer was operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory during calendar year 1980 to estimate the spectral irradiance of the sun and its possible fluctuation in time near the peak of solar activity. Data were also acquired on seasonal trends of atmospheric transmissivity above the marine mixing layer in the central Pacific. Spectral irradiance remained c constant to at least 1/2% at all wavelengths monitored. Furthermore its absolute magnitude was in agreement with the Labs and Neckel values to +- 2% except at blue wavelengths where the Mauna Loa values are from 4 to 12% higher and at lambda = 850 nm where the Mauna Loa value is 9% lower. The residual aerosol optical depth above Mauna Loa Observatory during 1980 averaged tau/sub 0/ = 0.020. An intrusion of dust into the central Pacific from the Gobi Desert (as deduced by the composition of collected particles) invaded the Central Pacific from Mar. to May 19890 and caused a perturbation in optical depth (at lambda = 500 nm) of ..delta..tau/sub 0/approx.0.01--0.02. The optical depth increment caused by the Mt. St. Helens volcano was <0.005 in the 2-month period following the eruption.

  7. Total Solar Irradiance: Present status of TSI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutz, Werner; Fehlmann, Andr; Finsterle, Wolfgang; Rozanov, Eugene

    Total Solar Irradiance is measured by pyrheliometers. These instruments are either fully charac-terized and measure in absolute units or they are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) at the World Radiation Center in Davos. The WRR in turn is so far only traceable to SI in power but not in irradiance. The added difficulty when discussing metrology of pyrheliome-ters in space is that the WRR is operated in air. Thus, so far, measurements of TSI in space rely on the full characterization of the instruments and a fully traceable TSI measurements has not yet been flown. This talk will give an overview over existing space observations of TSI and discusses the dif-ferences in the absolute and relative values between the various experiments. The challenge for future experiments is to get full traceability of the measurements in space. There are two upcoming experiments, PREMOS on PICARD and GLORY/TIM, which will yield TSI measurements which will be SI traceable.

  8. The Impact of the Revised Sunspot Record on Solar Irradiance Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, G.; Krivova, N.; Wu, C. J.; Lean, J.

    2016-03-01

    Reliable historical records of the total solar irradiance (TSI) are needed to assess the extent to which long-term variations in the Sun's radiant energy that is incident upon Earth may exacerbate (or mitigate) the more dominant warming in recent centuries that is due to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. We investigate the effects that the new Sunspot Index and Long-term Solar Observations (SILSO) sunspot-number time series may have on model reconstructions of the TSI. In contemporary TSI records, variations on timescales longer than about a day are dominated by the opposing effects of sunspot darkening and facular brightening. These two surface magnetic features, retrieved either from direct observations or from solar-activity proxies, are combined in TSI models to reproduce the current TSI observational record. Indices that manifest solar-surface magnetic activity, in particular the sunspot-number record, then enable reconstructing historical TSI. Revisions of the sunspot-number record therefore affect the magnitude and temporal structure of TSI variability on centennial timescales according to the model reconstruction methods that are employed. We estimate the effects of the new SILSO record on two widely used TSI reconstructions, namely the NRLTSI2 and the SATIRE models. We find that the SILSO record has little effect on either model after 1885, but leads to solar-cycle fluctuations with greater amplitude in the TSI reconstructions prior. This suggests that many eighteenth- and nineteenth-century cycles could be similar in amplitude to those of the current Modern Maximum. TSI records based on the revised sunspot data do not suggest a significant change in Maunder Minimum TSI values, and from comparing this era to the present, we find only very small potential differences in the estimated solar contributions to the climate with this new sunspot record.

  9. Solar cell having improved front surface metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Lillington, D.R.; Mardesich, N.; Dill, H.G.; Garlick, G.F.J.

    1987-09-15

    This patent describes a solar cell comprising: a first layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N+ conductivity; a second layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N conductivity overlying the first layer; a third layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a P conductivity overlying the N conductivity layer and forming a P-N junction therebetween. A layer of aluminium gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a p conductivity overlying the front major surface of the P conductivity third layer and having an exposed surface essentially parallel to the front major surface and at least one edge; a plurality of metallic contact lines made of a first metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a first predetermined distance traversing the exposed surface and extending through the aluminium gallium arsenide layer to the front major surface and making electrical contact to the third layer; a plurality of longitudinally disposed metallic grid lines made of a second metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a second predetermined distance located on the exposed surface of the aluminium gallium arsenide layer and which cross the metallic contact lines and make electrical contact to the metallic lines; a flat metallic strip disposed on the aluminium gallium arsenide layer exposed surface near the edge, the strip electrically coupling the metallic grid lines to one another; and a back contact located on the back major surface.

  10. Model Calculations of Solar Spectral Irradiance in the 3.7 Micron Band for Earth Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; Fontenla, Juan M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the launch of the first Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument aboard TIROS-N, measurements in the 3.7 micron atmospheric window have been exploited for use in cloud detection and screening, cloud thermodynamic phase and surface snow/ice discrimination, and quantitative cloud particle size retrievals. The utility of the band has led to the incorporation of similar channels on a number of existing satellite imagers and future operational imagers. Daytime observations in the band include both reflected solar and thermal emission energy. Since 3.7 micron channels are calibrated to a radiance scale (via onboard blackbodies), knowledge of the top-of-atmosphere solar irradiance in the spectral region is required to infer reflectance. Despite the ubiquity of 3.7 micron channels, absolute solar spectral irradiance data comes from either a single measurement campaign (Thekaekara et al. 1969) or synthetic spectra. In this study, we compare historical 3.7 micron band spectral irradiance data sets with the recent semi-empirical solar model of the quiet-Sun by Fontenla et al. (2006). The model has expected uncertainties of about 2 % in the 3.7 pm spectral region. We find that channel-averaged spectral irradiances using the observations reported by Thekaekara et al. are 3.2-4.1% greater than those derived from the Fontenla et al. model for MODIS and AVHRR instrument bandpasses; the Kurucz spectrum (1995) as included in the MODTRAN4 distribution, gives channel-averaged irradiances 1.2-1.5 % smaller than the Fontenla model. For the MODIS instrument, these solar irradiance uncertainties result in cloud microphysical retrievals uncertainties comparable with other fundamental reflectance error sources.

  11. An algorithm to evaluate solar irradiance and effective dose rates using spectral UV irradiance at four selected wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Anav, A; Rafanelli, C; Di Menno, I; Di Menno, M

    2004-01-01

    The paper shows a semi-analytical method for environmental and dosimetric applications to evaluate, in clear sky conditions, the solar irradiance and the effective dose rates for some action spectra using only four spectral irradiance values at selected wavelengths in the UV-B and UV-A regions (305, 320, 340 and 380 nm). The method, named WL4UV, is based on the reconstruction of an approximated spectral irradiance that can be integrated, to obtain the solar irradiance, or convoluted with an action spectrum to obtain an effective dose rate. The parameters required in the algorithm are deduced from archived solar spectral irradiance data. This database contains measurements carried out by some Brewer spectrophotometers located in various geographical positions, at similar altitudes, with very different environmental characteristics: Rome (Italy), Ny Alesund (Svalbard Islands, Norway) and Ushuaia (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina). To evaluate the precision of the method, a double test was performed with data not used in developing the model. Archived Brewer measurement data, in clear sky conditions, from Rome and from the National Science Foundation UV data set in San Diego (CA, USA) and Ushuaia, where SUV 100 spectroradiometers operate, were drawn randomly. The comparison of measured and computed irradiance has a relative deviation of about +/-2%. The effective dose rates for action spectra of Erythema, DNA and non-Melanoma skin cancer have a relative deviation of less than approximately 20% for solar zenith angles <50 degrees . PMID:15266087

  12. Reconstruction of total and spectral solar irradiance from 1974 to 2013 based on KPVT, SoHO/MDI, and SDO/HMI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, K. L.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Total and spectral solar irradiance are key parameters in the assessment of solar influence on changes in the Earth's climate. Aims: We present a reconstruction of daily solar irradiance obtained using the SATIRE-S model spanning 1974 to 2013 based on full-disc observations from the KPVT, SoHO/MDI, and SDO/HMI. Methods: SATIRE-S ascribes variation in solar irradiance on timescales greater than a day to photospheric magnetism. The solar spectrum is reconstructed from the apparent surface coverage of bright magnetic features and sunspots in the daily data using the modelled intensity spectra of these magnetic structures. We cross-calibrated the various data sets, harmonizing the model input so as to yield a single consistent time series as the output. Results: The model replicates 92% (R2 = 0.916) of the variability in the PMOD TSI composite including the secular decline between the 1996 and 2008 solar cycle minima. The model also reproduces most of the variability in observed Lyman-α irradiance and the Mg II index. The ultraviolet solar irradiance measurements from the UARS and SORCE missions are mutually consistent up to about 180 nm before they start to exhibit discrepant rotational and cyclical variability, indicative of unresolved instrumental effects. As a result, the agreement between model and measurement, while relatively good below 180 nm, starts to deteriorate above this wavelength. As with earlier similar investigations, the reconstruction cannot reproduce the overall trends in SORCE/SIM SSI. We argue, from the lack of clear solar cycle modulation in the SIM record and the inconsistency between the total flux recorded by the instrument and TSI, that unaccounted instrumental trends are present. Conclusions: The daily solar irradiance time series is consistent with observations from multiple sources, demonstrating its validity and utility for climate models. It also provides further evidence that photospheric magnetism is the prime driver of

  13. Improvements in NOAA SURFRAD and ISIS sites for near real-time solar irradiance for verification of NWP solar forecasts for the DOE NOAA Solar Forecast Improvement Project (SFIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, K. O.; McComiskey, A. C.; Long, C. N.; Marquis, M.; Olson, J. B.; James, E.; Benjamin, S.; Clack, C.

    2015-12-01

    The DOE-NOAA Solar Forecasting Improvement Project's (SFIP) main goal is to improve solar forecasting and thereby increase penetration of solar renewable energy on the electric grid. NOAA's ISIS and SURFRAD network is part of this initiative by providing high quality solar irradiance measurements for verification of improvements in solar forecasting for the short-term, day ahead, and ramp events. There are 14 ISIS and SURFRAD stations across the continental United States. We will give an overview of recent improvements in the networks for this project. The NOAA SURFRAD team has three main components: 1) In addition to the existing stations, two mobile SURFRAD stations have been built and deployed for 1 year each at two separate solar utility plants. 2) NOAA SURFRAD/ISIS will update the communications at their sites to provide near real-time data for verification activities at the 14 sites. 3) Global horizontal irradiance (GHI), direct normal solar irradiance (DNI), and aerosol optical depth at various spatial and temporal averaging will be compared to forecasts from the 3-km High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) and an advanced version of the 13-km Rapid Refresh (RAP) models. We will explore statistical correlations between in-coming and out-going shortwave radiation and longwave radiation at the surface for specific meteorological regimes and how well these are captured by NWP models.

  14. The measurement of solar spectral irradiances at wavelengths between 40 and 4000 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Two 1/8-meter Ebert-Fastie spectrometers were refurbished and upgraded in order to measure the solar spectral irradiances between 1160 A and 3100 A. An evacuated 1/4-meter normal-incidence spectrometer was also fabricated for spectral irradiance measurements over the wavelength range from 1250 A to 250 A. Procedures were developed for the calibration of all three instruments utilizing standards at the National Bureau of Standards. The two 1/8-meter spectrometers were flown to measure the solar spectral irradiances near solar maximum on two different dates. Data from these flights were analyzed. The performance of the spectrometers, and the results of an analysis of the variabilities of the solar spectral irradiances over the solar cycles 20 and 21 are discussed.

  15. Vortices in simulations of solar surface convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, R.; Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2011-09-01

    We report on the occurrence of small-scale vortices in simulations of the convective solar surface. Using an eigenanalysis of the velocity gradient tensor, we find the subset of high-vorticity regions in which the plasma is swirling. The swirling regions form an unsteady, tangled network of filaments in the turbulent downflow lanes. Near-surface vertical vortices are underdense and cause a local depression of the optical surface. They are potentially observable as bright points in the dark intergranular lanes. Vortex features typically exist for a few minutes, during which they are moved and twisted by the motion of the ambient plasma. The bigger vortices found in the simulations are possibly, but not necessarily, related to observations of granular-scale spiraling pathlines in "cork animations" or feature tracking. Three movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Irradiation of bioresorbable biomaterials for controlled surface degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, M.; Gilmore, B. F.; Miller, A.; Helt-Hansen, J.; Buchanan, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Bioresorbable polymers increasingly are the materials of choice for implantable orthopaedic fixation devices. Controlled degradation of these polymers is vital for preservation of mechanical properties during tissue repair and controlled release of incorporated agents such as osteoconductive or anti-microbial additives. The work outlined in this paper investigates the use of low energy electron beam irradiation to surface modify polyhydroxyacid samples incorporating beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). This work uniquely demonstrates that surface modification of bioresorbable polymers through electron beam irradiation allows for the early release of incorporated agents such as bioactive additives. Samples were e-beam irradiated at an energy of 125 keV and doses of either 150 kGy or 500 kGy. Irradiated and non-irradiated samples were degraded in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), to simulate bioresorption, followed by characterisation. The results show that low energy e-beam irradiation enhances surface hydrolytic degradation in comparison to bulk and furthermore allows for earlier release of incorporated calcium via dissolution into the surrounding medium.

  17. Space observations of the variability of solar irradiance in the near and far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ultraviolet solar irradiance in selected wavelength bands between 1200 and 3000 a were made continuously by photometers consisting of broad-band sensors operated on Numbus 3 and 4 which were launched in April 1969 and 1970. In addition, spectrophotometer measurements of the solar irradiance were made with a dispersive instrument at 12 selected wavelengths from 2550 to 3400 a with a 10 a bandpass on Nimbus 4. Variations of the solar irradiance associated with the solar rotational period were observed since the launch of Nimbus 3. These variations are apparently associated with two source regions separated by about 180 deg in solar longitude. The change in irradiance with solar rotation was found to increase with decreasing wavelengths. Different types of the observed variations in uv solar irradiance can be classified in accordance with characteristics times, e.g. in the order of increasing periods as follows: (1)flare associated enhancements (2) 27-day variations due to solar rotation; (3) a possible biennial effect; and (4) long term variations associated with the 11-year solar cycle.

  18. Solar EUV irradiance variability derived from terrestrial far ultraviolet dayglow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, D. J.; Lean, J. L.; Meier, R. R.; Christensen, A. B.; Paxton, L. J.; Morrison, D.; Craven, J. D.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Judge, D. L.; McMullin, D. R.

    2004-02-01

    Remotely sensed ultraviolet emissions from the Earth's upper atmosphere are shown to mirror fluctuations in solar EUV irradiance during July 2002, including the overall increase and decrease as the Sun rotated, and episodic increases associated with multiple solar flares. The TIMED/GUVI dayglow observations are used to derive a new quantity, QEUVGUVI, which is a measure of integrated solar EUV electromagnetic energy shortward of 45 nm. Both the absolute QEUVGUVI values and their modulation by solar rotation agree well with the corresponding solar EUV energy estimated by the NRLEUV irradiance variability model. The QEUVGUVI values do not support recent suggestions that the solar EUV irradiances estimated by the model of Hinteregger et al. be increased by a factor of four, nor even a factor of two.

  19. Prediction and measurement of direct-normal solar irradiance: A closure experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Halthore, R.N.; Schwartz, S.E.; Michalsky, J.J.; Anderson, G.P.; Ferrare, R.A.; Ten Brink, H.M.

    1997-03-01

    Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident on a plane perpendicular to the Sun`s direction on a unit area at the earth`s surface in unit time, depends only on the atmospheric extinction of sunlight without regard to the details of extinction--whether absorption or scattering. Here the authors describe a set of closure experiments performed in north-central Oklahoma, wherein measured atmospheric composition is input to a radiative transfer model, MODTRAN-3, to predict DNSI, which is then compared to measured values. Thirty six independent comparisons are presented; the agreement between predicted and measured values falls within the combined uncertainties in the prediction (2%) and measurement (0.2%) albeit with a slight bias ({approximately} 1% overprediction) that is independent of the solar zenith angle. Thus these results establish the adequacy of current knowledge of the solar spectrum and atmospheric extinction as embodied in MODTRAN-3 for use in climate models. An important consequence is the overwhelming likelihood that the atmospheric clear-sky absorption is accurately described to within comparable uncertainties.

  20. Prediction and measurement of direct-normal solar irradiance: A closure experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halthore, R. N.; Schwartz, S. E.; Michalsky, J. J.; Anderson, G. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Ten Brink, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident on a plane perpendicular to the Sun's direction on a unit area at the earth's surface in unit time, depends only on the atmospheric extinction of sunlight without regard to the details of extinction-whether absorption or scattering. Here the authors describe a set of closure experiments performed in north-central Oklahoma, wherein measured atmospheric composition is input to a radiative transfer model, MODTRAN-3, to predict DNSI, which is then compared to measured values. Thirty six independent comparisons are presented; the agreement between predicted and measured values falls within the combined uncertainties in the prediction (2%) and measurement (0.2%) albeit with a slight bias ((approximately) 1% overprediction) that is independent of the solar zenith angle. Thus these results establish the adequacy of current knowledge of the solar spectrum and atmospheric extinction as embodied in MODTRAN-3 for use in climate models. An important consequence is the overwhelming likelihood that the atmospheric clear-sky absorption is accurately described to within comparable uncertainties.

  1. The influence of cloud cover index on the accuracy of solar irradiance model estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F. R.; Silva, S. A. B.; Pereira, E. B.; Abreu, S. L.

    2008-04-01

    Cloud cover index ( CCI) obtained from satellite images contains information on cloud amount and their optical thickness. It is the chief climate data for the assessment of solar energy resources in most radiative transfer models, particularly for the model BRASIL-SR that is currently operational at CPTEC. The wide range of climate environments in Brazil turns CCI determination into a challenging activity and great effort has been directed to develop new methods and procedures to improve the accuracy of these estimations from satellite images (Martins 2001; Martins et al. 2003a; Ceballos et al. 2004). This work demonstrates the influence of CCI determination methods on estimates of surface solar irradiances obtained by the model BRASIL-SR comparing deviations among ground data and model results. Three techniques using visible and/or thermal infrared images of GOES-8 were employed to generate the CCI for input into the model BRASIL-SR. The ground-truth data was provided by the solar radiation station located at Caicó/PE, in Brazilian Northeast region, which is part of the UNEP/GEF project SWERA (Solar and Wind Energy Resources Assessment). Results have shown that the application of the bi-spectral techniques have reduced mean bias error up to 66% and root mean square error up to 50% when compared to the usual technique for CCI determination based on the straightforward determination of month-by-month extremes for maximum and minimum cloud states.

  2. Differences Between the Response of the Equatorial TEC and foF2 to Solar Soft X-ray Irradiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Eastes, R.; Reinisch, B. W.; Bailey, S.; Valladares, C.; Woods, T.

    2005-12-01

    Measurements of the solar soft X-ray irradiances from the SNOE satellite; the TEC from Ancon, Peru; and the foF2 from Jicamarca, Peru have been compared for a period of almost two years. While both TEC and foF2 have a significant response to changes in the solar irradiances, each responds differently. At noon time, solar irradiances have a stronger correlation with TEC than with foF2 and the solar irradiances lead TEC by ~1 day but they do not lead foF2. At earlier local times, the solar irradiances have a stronger correlation with foF2 than with TEC. The solar irradiances lead TEC by ~2 days and foF2 by ~1 day. The study shows that the ionospheric densities have a more significant dependence on solar soft X-ray irradiances than on F10.7.

  3. Solar Material Twists on Sun’s Surface

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar material twists above the sun’s surface in this close-up captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on June 7-8, 2016, showcasing the turbulence caused by combative magnetic forces on the ...

  4. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  5. Satellite Estimation of Spectral Surface UV Irradiance. 2; Effect of Horizontally Homogeneous Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krothov, N.; Herman, J. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahmad, Z.a; Fioletov, V.

    1998-01-01

    The local variability of UV irradiance at the Earth's surface is mostly caused by clouds in addition to the seasonal variability. Parametric representations of radiative transfer RT calculations are presented for the convenient solution of the transmission T of ultraviolet radiation through plane parallel clouds over a surface with reflectivity R(sub s). The calculations are intended for use with the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) measured radiances to obtain the calculated Lambert equivalent scene reflectivity R for scenes with and without clouds. The purpose is to extend the theoretical analysis of the estimation of UV irradiance from satellite data for a cloudy atmosphere. Results are presented for a range of cloud optical depths and solar zenith angles for the cases of clouds over a low reflectivity surface R(sub s) less than 0.1, over a snow or ice surface R(sub s) greater than 0.3, and for transmission through a non-conservative scattering cloud with single scattering albedo omega(sub 0) = 0.999. The key finding for conservative scattering is that the cloud-transmission function C(sub T), the ratio of cloudy-to clear-sky transmission, is roughly C(sub T) = 1 - R(sub c) with an error of less than 20% for nearly overhead sun and snow-free surfaces. For TOMS estimates of UV irradiance in the presence of both snow and clouds, independent information about snow albedo is needed for conservative cloud scattering. For non-conservative scattering with R(sub s) greater than 0.5 (snow) the satellite measured scene reflectance cannot be used to estimate surface irradiance. The cloud transmission function has been applied to the calculation of UV irradiance at the Earth's surface and compared with ground-based measurements.

  6. Detection of solar wind-produced water in irradiated rims on silicate minerals

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, John P.; Ishii, Hope A.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Ciston, James; Nielsen, Michael H.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The solar wind (SW), composed of predominantly ∼1-keV H+ ions, produces amorphous rims up to ∼150 nm thick on the surfaces of minerals exposed in space. Silicates with amorphous rims are observed on interplanetary dust particles and on lunar and asteroid soil regolith grains. Implanted H+ may react with oxygen in the minerals to form trace amounts of hydroxyl (−OH) and/or water (H2O). Previous studies have detected hydroxyl in lunar soils, but its chemical state, physical location in the soils, and source(s) are debated. If −OH or H2O is generated in rims on silicate grains, there are important implications for the origins of water in the solar system and other astrophysical environments. By exploiting the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we detect water sealed in vesicles within amorphous rims produced by SW irradiation of silicate mineral grains on the exterior surfaces of interplanetary dust particles. Our findings establish that water is a byproduct of SW space weathering. We conclude, on the basis of the pervasiveness of the SW and silicate materials, that the production of radiolytic SW water on airless bodies is a ubiquitous process throughout the solar system. PMID:24449869

  7. Detection of solar wind-produced water in irradiated rims on silicate minerals.

    PubMed

    Bradley, John P; Ishii, Hope A; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J; Ciston, James; Nielsen, Michael H; Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C

    2014-02-01

    The solar wind (SW), composed of predominantly ∼1-keV H(+) ions, produces amorphous rims up to ∼150 nm thick on the surfaces of minerals exposed in space. Silicates with amorphous rims are observed on interplanetary dust particles and on lunar and asteroid soil regolith grains. Implanted H(+) may react with oxygen in the minerals to form trace amounts of hydroxyl (-OH) and/or water (H2O). Previous studies have detected hydroxyl in lunar soils, but its chemical state, physical location in the soils, and source(s) are debated. If -OH or H2O is generated in rims on silicate grains, there are important implications for the origins of water in the solar system and other astrophysical environments. By exploiting the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we detect water sealed in vesicles within amorphous rims produced by SW irradiation of silicate mineral grains on the exterior surfaces of interplanetary dust particles. Our findings establish that water is a byproduct of SW space weathering. We conclude, on the basis of the pervasiveness of the SW and silicate materials, that the production of radiolytic SW water on airless bodies is a ubiquitous process throughout the solar system. PMID:24449869

  8. Formation of Polymeres on the Mineral Surface Preliminary Irradiated by UV Light.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otroshchenko, Vladimir; Vasilyeva, Nelly; Bach, A. N.

    Questions of studying of synthesis of biologically active molecules from low-molecular percussors on firm inorganic surface (mineral matrix) draw attention of researchers in connection with studying of abiogenesis, and also can have practical value for working out synthesis on firm surface of oligonucleotides, peptides etc. During the formation of planets or their development at later stages, high concentrations of mineral particles generated due to high volcanic activity might be accumulated in the upper atmosphere. These mineral particles experience the influence of solar ultraviolet radiation and could change their composition under the action of light. Simul-taneously, their surfaces adsorb gas molecules that could react with each other and form some more complicated products. Thus probable site of organic molecules is perhaps the surface of mineral particles where there is a formation of an organic matter which then gets on a surface of planets. We assumed, that in the top layers of ancient atmosphere volcanic dust (ashes), clay and gases has been concentrated. The opportunity of synthesis biologically significant polymers on a surface of particles of volcanic ashes and clay, preliminary irradiated UV was studied (the solar spectrum was modeled). Results coincide that earlier has been received at synthesis these molecules on a surface of particles clays or SiO2 at adsorption on it more simple molecules-percursors and subsequent UV irradiation. By us it has been shown now, that on a surface of particles of the montmorillonite or volcanic ashes preliminary irradiated UV by light, also there is a formation of biologically significant polymers on the basis of adsorbed molecules-percursores, in addition, really, probably formation linear polymeres. Some addi-tional experiments, concerning the possible molecular mechanism of formation ligonucleotides has been lead also. They are based on the assumption, that molecules of the water connected with mineral structure

  9. The use of satellite data assimilation methods in regional NWP for solar irradiance forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzrock, Frederik; Cros, Sylvain; Chane-Ming, Fabrice; Potthast, Roland; Linguet, Laurent; Sébastien, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    As an intermittent energy source, the injection of solar power into electricity grids requires irradiance forecasting in order to ensure grid stability. On time scales of more than six hours ahead, numerical weather prediction (NWP) is recognized as the most appropriate solution. However, the current representation of clouds in NWP models is not sufficiently precise for an accurate forecast of solar irradiance at ground level. Dynamical downscaling does not necessarily increase the quality of irradiance forecasts. Furthermore, incorrectly simulated cloud evolution is often the cause of inaccurate atmospheric analyses. In non-interconnected tropical areas, the large amplitudes of solar irradiance variability provide abundant solar yield but present significant problems for grid safety. Irradiance forecasting is particularly important for solar power stakeholders in these regions where PV electricity penetration is increasing. At the same time, NWP is markedly more challenging in tropic areas than in mid-latitudes due to the special characteristics of tropical homogeneous convective air masses. Numerous data assimilation methods and strategies have evolved and been applied to a large variety of global and regional NWP models in the recent decades. Assimilating data from geostationary meteorological satellites is an appropriate approach. Indeed, models converting radiances measured by satellites into cloud properties already exist. Moreover, data are available at high temporal frequencies, which enable a pertinent cloud cover evolution modelling for solar energy forecasts. In this work, we present a survey of different approaches which aim at improving cloud cover forecasts using the assimilation of geostationary meteorological satellite data into regional NWP models. Various approaches have been applied to a variety of models and satellites and in different regions of the world. Current methods focus on the assimilation of cloud-top information, derived from infrared

  10. First Steps Towards a Homogeneous Solar Spectral Irradiance Data Set: Selection, merging and quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Micha; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Dudok de Wit, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    The Sun varies over different timescales, from minutes to months, decades and millennia. Its variation is an important driver of terrestrial climate change and as such a significant input to climate models. While several observations exist to date over a broad frequency range, they are sparse over both frequency and time. As part of the SOLID (First European comprehensive SOlar Irradiance Data Exploitation) project we will show first results of constructing a homogeneous solar spectral irradiance data set of the UV. By combining a large variety of solar spectral irradiance data sets, we aim to reconstruct spectral solar variability further back in time and to deliver a data set that can be used by others, e.g. climate researchers in order to account for the non-constant solar forcing. We present the data used, together with preliminary internal uncertainty and error-estimates, self-consistent quality assessments, gap-filling methods and selection criteria. We use a combination of observed solar spectral irradiance from several missions, starting with OSO III in 1967, as well as available proxy data to identify outliers and trace them back to either instrumental or physical cause. The SOLID project is part of the seventh European framework programme. SOLID brings together representatives from all European solar space experiments and European teams specialized in irradiance modelling, reconstruction and solar image processing.

  11. Is solar mesogranulation a surface phenomenon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploner, S. R. O.; Solanki, S. K.; Gadun, A. S.

    2000-04-01

    Convection is the main form of energy transport in the subsurface layers of the sun and other cool stars. The imprint of cellular convection can be directly observed on the solar surface, with a hierarchy of four size scales. The smallest observed convection cells, called granules, have typical horizontal sizes of 1,000-2,000 km and have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations \\citep{spruit:97,stein:nordlund:98}. Cells at three larger scales are also detected \\citep{leighton:etal:62,november:etal:81,beck:etal:98}, but these have so far not been amenable to numerical modelling, so that their formation scenarios remain untested. Here we present a numerical simulation which resolves both the granular and the next larger, mesogranular, scale. The mesogranules have horizontal extents of 5,000-10,000 km. Our 2D simulation reproduces key properties of both granules and mesogranules. In addition, our simulation demonstrates that the observed mesogranulation is driven close to the solar surface and therefore rules out the text-book explanation of mesogranulation as cellular convection driven by superadiabaticity in the deeper layer where neutral helium ionizes. By proxy, this result also casts doubt on the traditional explanation of supergranulation, even larger convection cells with diameters of 20,000-30,000 km, as being driven by the yet deeper second ionization of helium.

  12. Combined effects of wind and solar irradiance on the spatial variation of midday air temperature over a mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Ock; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Dae-Jun; Shim, Kyo Moon; Yun, Jin I.

    2015-08-01

    When the midday temperature distribution in a mountainous region was estimated using data from a nearby weather station, the correction of elevation difference based on temperature lapse caused a large error. An empirical approach reflecting the effects of solar irradiance and advection was suggested in order to increase the reliability of the results. The normalized slope irradiance, which was determined by normalizing the solar irradiance difference between a horizontal surface and a sloping surface from 1100 to 1500 LST on a clear day, and the deviation relationship between the horizontal surface and the sloping surface at the 1500 LST temperature on each day were presented as simple empirical formulas. In order to simulate the phenomenon that causes immigrant air parcels to push out or mix with the existing air parcels in order to decrease the solar radiation effects, an advection correction factor was added to exponentially reduce the solar radiation effect with an increase in wind speed. In order to validate this technique, we estimated the 1500 LST air temperatures on 177 clear days in 2012 and 2013 at 10 sites with different slope aspects in a mountainous catchment and compared these values to the actual measured data. The results showed that this technique greatly improved the error bias and the overestimation of the solar radiation effect in comparison with the existing methods. By applying this technique to the Korea Meteorological Administration's 5-km grid data, it was possible to determine the temperature distribution at a 30-m resolution over a mountainous rural area south of Jiri Mountain National Park, Korea.

  13. Solar EUV irradiance from the San Marco ASSI - A reference spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidtke, Gerhard; Woods, Thomas N.; Worden, John; Rottman, Gary J.; Doll, Harry; Wita, Claus; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1992-01-01

    The only satellite measurement of the solar EUV irradiance during solar cycle 22 has been obtained with the Airglow Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) aboard the San Marco 5 satellite flown in 1988. The ASSI in-flight calibration parameters are established by using the internal capabilities of ASSI and by comparing ASSI results to the results from other space-based experiments on the ASSI calibration rocket and the Solar Mesospheric Explorer (SME). A solar EUV irradiance spectrum derived from ASSI observations on November 10, 1988 is presented as a reference spectrum for moderate solar activity for the aeronomy community. This ASSI spectrum should be considered as a refinement and extension of the solar EUV spectrum published for the same day by Woods and Rottman (1990).

  14. Solar EUV irradiance from the San Marco ASSI - A reference spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, Gerhard; Woods, Thomas N.; Worden, John; Rottman, Gary J.; Doll, Harry; Wita, Claus; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1992-11-01

    The only satellite measurement of the solar EUV irradiance during solar cycle 22 has been obtained with the Airglow Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) aboard the San Marco 5 satellite flown in 1988. The ASSI in-flight calibration parameters are established by using the internal capabilities of ASSI and by comparing ASSI results to the results from other space-based experiments on the ASSI calibration rocket and the Solar Mesospheric Explorer (SME). A solar EUV irradiance spectrum derived from ASSI observations on November 10, 1988 is presented as a reference spectrum for moderate solar activity for the aeronomy community. This ASSI spectrum should be considered as a refinement and extension of the solar EUV spectrum published for the same day by Woods and Rottman (1990).

  15. Initial Results of Aperture Area Comparisons for Exo-Atmospheric Total Solar Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. Carol; Litorja, Maritoni; Fowler, Joel B.; Butler, James J.

    2009-01-01

    In the measurement of exo-atmospheric total solar irradiance (TSI), instrument aperture area is a critical component in converting solar radiant flux to irradiance. In a May 2000 calibration workshop for the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), the solar irradiance measurement community recommended that NASA and NISI coordinate an aperture area measurement comparison to quantify and validate aperture area uncertainties and their overall effect on TSI uncertainties. From May 2003 to February 2006, apertures from 4 institutions with links to the historical TSI database were measured by NIST and the results were compared to the aperture area determined by each institution. The initial results of these comparisons are presented and preliminary assessments of the participants' uncertainties are discussed.

  16. Solar array development for the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Dawson, S.; Rapp, D.; Sharps, Paul; Aiken, D.; Spence, B. R.; White, S. F.; King, R. P.; Edmonson, K.

    2003-01-01

    JPL's missions to Mars have revealed factors that have an adverse impact on the performance of Mars Surface Solar Arrays. These factors included a spectrum shift toward the red wavelengths, atmospheric scattering and absorption and an accumulation of Mars surface dust on the arrays. All of these factors will reduce the power generated from state of the art triple junction solar cells used by earth orbiting satellites. This paper will report the results of JPL supported work conducted by US solar array manufacturers to increase the performance of solar arrays for future Mars surface missions. JPL awarded four vendors contracts to evaluate methods of improving power generation on the surface of Mars. These four contracts cover the redesign of the existing triple junction solar cell, modifying solar simulator output to match the Mars surface spectrum and techniques to control or remove dust from the surface of the arrays. The methodology and results of this evaluation will be presented in this paper.

  17. Discrepant responses of the global electron content to the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of EUV irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiding; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Zhang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the responses of the ionosphere to the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance are comparatively investigated using daily mean global electron content (GEC) and 0.1-50 nm EUV daily flux. GEC is well correlated with EUV on both the solar cycle and solar rotation timescales; however, the responses of GEC to the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of EUV are significantly different in terms of the following two aspects: (1) There is a significant time lag between the solar rotation variations of GEC and EUV; the lag is dominated by a 1-day lag and generally presents a decrease trend with solar activity decreasing. For the solar cycle variations of GEC and EUV, however, there are no evident time lags. (2) The GEC versus EUV slopes are different for the solar cycle and solar rotation variations of GEC and EUV; the solar cycle GEC versus EUV slope is higher than the solar rotation GEC versus EUV slope, and this difference occurs in different seasons and latitudinal bands. The results present an aspect of the difference between ionospheric climatology and weather.

  18. SOLAR2000 irradiances for climate change research, aeronomy and space system engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    2004-01-01

    Improvements to spectral and temporal solar irradiances are often based upon increasingly accurate and precise measurements as well as upon better understood physics. This paper reports on one example in an emerging trend for solar irradiance models that can be characterized as hybrid irradiance modeling. Empirical and physics-based modeling of irradiances are combined and take advantage of strengths within both methods to provide a variety of solar irradiance products to science and engineering users. The SOLAR2000 (S2K) version 1.24 model (v1.24) described in this paper has gone through 17 upgrades since it was originally released in 1999 as v0.10 and now incorporates three theoretical continua, 13 rocket spectra, and time series data from five satellites using 17 instruments. S2K currently produces six integrated irradiance proxies for science and engineering applications in addition to spectrally resolved irradiances in three common wavelength formats. Integrated irradiance proxies include the E10.7 integrated EUV energy flux, QEUV total thermospheric EUV heating rate, PEUV hemispheric EUV power, T∞ exospheric temperature, RSN derived sunspot number, and S integrated spectrum. Besides three spectral wavelength and six integrated irradiance formats there are three time frames of historical, nowcast, and forecast irradiance products produced by four model grades. The Research Grade (RG) model is developed for aeronomical and climate change research, the Professional Grade (PG) model is developed for space system engineering applications, the Operational Grade (OP) model is developed for institutional and agency real-time operational space weather applications, and the System Grade (SY) model is developed for commercial operational and production applications. This report describes these model characteristics as well as the current state of operational irradiances which are now in the second release of a first generation forecast methodology. Forecast Generation

  19. Atmospheric Sensitivity to Spectral Top-of-Atmosphere Solar Irradiance Perturbations, Using MODTRAN-5 Radiative Transfer Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G.; Berk, A.; Harder, G.; Fontenla, J.; Shettle, E.; Pilewski, P.; Kindel, B.; Chetwynd, J.; Gardner, J.; Hoke, M.; Jordan, A.; Lockwood, R.; Felde, G.; Archarya, P.

    2006-12-01

    The opportunity to insert state-of-the-art solar irradiance measurements and calculations, with subtle perturbations, into a narrow spectral resolution radiative transfer model has recently been facilitated through release of MODTRAN-5 (MOD5). The new solar data are from: (1) SORCE satellite measurements of solar variability over solar rotation cycle, & (2) ultra-narrow calculation of a new solar source irradiance, extending over the full MOD5 spectral range, from 0.2 um to far-IR. MODTRAN-5, MODerate resolution radiance and TRANsmittance code, has been developed collaboratively by Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Sciences, Inc., with history dating back to LOWTRAN. It includes approximations for all local thermodynamic equilibrium terms associated with molecular, cloud, aerosol and surface components for emission, scattering, and reflectance, including multiple scattering, refraction and a statistical implementation of Correlated-k averaging. The band model is based on 0.1 cm-1 (also 1.0, 5.0 and 15.0 cm-1 statistical binning for line centers within the interval, captured through an exact formulation of the full Voigt line shape. Spectroscopic parameters are from HITRAN 2004 with user-defined options for additional gases. Recent validation studies show MOD5 replicates line-by-line brightness temperatures to within ~0.02ºK average and <1.0ºK RMS. MOD5 can then serve as a surrogate for a variety of perturbation studies, including the two modes for the solar source function, Io. (1) Data from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite mission provide state-of-the-art measurements of UV, visible, near-IR, plus total solar radiation, on near real-time basis. These internally consistent estimates of Sun's output over solar rotation and longer time scales are valuable inputs for studying effects of Sun's radiation on Earth's atmosphere and climate. When solar rotation encounters bright plage and dark sunspots, relative variations are

  20. Surface texturing and patterning in solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    Surface texture can perform a number of functions in modern solar cell design. The most obvious function is in control of reflection from surfaces on which sunlight is incident. However, texture can also be used to influence the fate of light that is refracted into the cell. Light steering by surface texture can ensure this refracted light is absorbed in regions of the cell which are most responsive. When used with rear reflectors, surface texture can help trap weakly absorbed light into the cell, increasing the effective path length or optical thickness of the cell by factors of 30--60. Two general types of texture are considered. One involves macroscopic features of controlled shape designed to control the direction of interacting light. The other is based on the use of irregular features of size comparable to wavelength of the light. These can be very effective in scattering light into a wide range of directions. Non-optical uses of texture are also briefly described. 62 refs., 22 figs.

  1. Response of the Upper Atmosphere to Variations in the Solar Soft X-Ray Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Scott Martin

    1995-11-01

    Terrestrial Far Ultraviolet (FUV) airglow emissions have been suggested as a means for remote sensing the structure of the upper atmosphere. The energy which leads to the excitation of FUV airglow emissions is solar irradiance at Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray wavelengths. Solar irradiance at these wavelengths is known to be highly variable; studies of Nitric Oxide (NO) in the lower thermosphere have suggested a variability of more than an order of magnitude in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. To properly interpret the FUV airglow, the magnitude of the solar energy deposition must be known. Previous analyses have used the electron impact excited Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands of N _2 to infer the flux of photoelectrons in the atmosphere and thus to infer the magnitude of the solar irradiance. This dissertation presents the first simultaneous measurements of the FUV airglow, the major atmospheric constituent densities, and the solar EUV and soft x-ray irradiances. The measurements were made on three flights of an identical sounding rocket payload at different levels of solar activity. The linear response in brightness of the LBH bands to variations in solar irradiance is demonstrated. In addition to the N_2 LBH bands, atomic oxygen lines at 135.6 and 130.4 nm are also studied. Unlike the LBH bands, these emissions undergo radiative transfer effects in the atmosphere. The OI emission at 135.6 nm is found to be well modeled using a radiative transfer calculation and the known excitation processes. Unfortunately, the assumed processes leading to OI 130.4 nm excitation are found to be insufficient to reproduce the observed variability of this emission. Production of NO in the thermosphere is examined; it is shown that a lower than previously reported variability in the solar soft x-ray irradiance is required to explain the variability of NO.

  2. Solar global horizontal and direct normal irradiation maps in Spain derived from geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polo, J.

    2015-08-01

    Solar radiation derived from satellite imagery is a powerful and highly accurate technique for solar resource assessment due to its maturity and to the long term database of observation images available. This work presents the methodology developed at CIEMAT for mapping solar radiation from geostationary satellite information and it also shows solar irradiation maps of global horizontal and direct normal components elaborated for Spain. The maps presented here have been developed from daily solar irradiation estimated for eleven years of satellite images (2001-2011). An attempt to evaluate the uncertainty of the presented maps is made using ground measurements from 27 meteorological stations available in Spain for global horizontal irradiation obtained from the World Radiation Data Centre. In the case of direct normal irradiation the ground measurement database was scarce, having available only six ground stations with measurements for a period of 4 years. Yearly values of global horizontal irradiation are around 1800 kWh m-2 in most of the country and around 1950-2000 kWh m-2 for annual direct normal irradiation. Root mean square errors in monthly means were of 11% and of 29% for global horizontal and direct normal irradiation, respectively.

  3. Implications of solar irradiance variability upon long-term changes in the Earth's atmospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1992-01-01

    From 1979 through 1987, it is believed that variability in the incoming solar energy played a significant role in changing the Earth's climate. Using high-precision spacecraft radiometric measurements, the incoming total solar irradiance (total amount of solar power per unit area) and the Earth's mean, global atmospheric temperatures were found to vary in phase with each other. The observed irradiance and temperature changes appeared to be correlated with the 11-year cycle of solar magnetic activity. During the period from 1979 through 1985, both the irradiance and temperature decreased. From 1985 to 1987, they increased. The irradiance changed approximately 0.1 percent, while the temperature varied as much as 0.6 C. During the 1979-1987 period, the temperatures were forecasted to rise linearly because of the anthropogenic build-up of carbon dioxide and the hypothesized 'global warming', 'greenhouse effect', scenarios. Contrary to these scenarios, the temperatures were found to vary in a periodic manner in phase with the solar irradiance changes. The observed correlations between irradiance and temperature variabilily suggest that the mean, global temperature of the Earth may decline between 1990 and 1997 as solar magnetic activity decreases.

  4. Advancing Solar Irradiance Measurement for Climate-Related Studies: Accurate Constraint on Direct Aerosol Radiative Effect (DARE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Ji, Q. Jack

    2011-01-01

    Earth's climate is driven primarily by solar radiation. As summarized in various IPCC reports, the global average of radiative forcing for different agents and mechanisms, such as aerosols or CO2 doubling, is in the range of a few W/sq m. However, when solar irradiance is measured by broadband radiometers, such as the fleet of Eppley Precision Solar Pyranometers (PSP) and equivalent instrumentation employed worldwide, the measurement uncertainty is larger than 2% (e.g., WMO specification of pyranometer, 2008). Thus, out of the approx. 184 W/sq m (approx.263 W/sq m if cloud-free) surface solar insolation (Trenberth et al. 2009), the measurement uncertainty is greater than +/-3.6 W/sq m, overwhelming the climate change signals. To discern these signals, less than a 1 % measurement uncertainty is required and is currently achievable only by means of a newly developed methodology employing a modified PSP-like pyranometer and an updated calibration equation to account for its thermal effects (li and Tsay, 2010). In this talk, we will show that some auxiliary measurements, such as those from a collocated pyrgeometer or air temperature sensors, can help correct historical datasets. Additionally, we will also demonstrate that a pyrheliometer is not free of the thermal effect; therefore, comparing to a high cost yet still not thermal-effect-free "direct + diffuse" approach in measuring surface solar irradiance, our new method is more economical, and more likely to be suitable for correcting a wide variety of historical datasets. Modeling simulations will be presented that a corrected solar irradiance measurement has a significant impact on aerosol forcing, and thus plays an important role in climate studies.

  5. Description and primary results of Total Solar Irradiance Monitor, a solar-pointing instrument on an Earth observing satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongrui; Fang, Wei; Li, Huiduan

    2015-04-01

    Solar driving mechanism for Earth climate has been a controversial problem for centuries. Long-time data of solar activity is required by the investigations of the solar driving mechanism, such as Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) record. Three Total Solar Irradiance Monitors (TSIM) have been developed by Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics for China Meteorological Administration to maintain continuities of TSI data series which lasted for nearly 4 decades.The newest TSIM has recorded TSI daily with accurate solar pointing on the FY-3C meteorological satellite since Oct 2013. TSIM/FY-3C has a pointing system for automatic solar tracking, onboard the satellite designed mainly for Earth observing. Most payloads of FY-3C are developed for observation of land, ocean and atmosphere. Consequently, the FY-3C satellite is a nadir-pointing spacecraft with its z axis to be pointed at the center of the Earth. Previous TSIMs onboard the FY-3A and FY-3B satellites had no pointing system, solar observations were only performed when the sun swept through field-of-view of the instruments. And TSI measurements are influenced inevitably by the solar pointing errors. Corrections of the solar pointing errors were complex. The problem is now removed by TSIM/FY-3C.TSIM/FY-3C follows the sun accurately by itself using its pointing system based on scheme of visual servo control. The pointing system is consisted of a radiometer package, two motors for solar tracking, a sun sensor and etc. TSIM/FY-3C has made daily observations of TSI for more than one year, with nearly zero solar pointing errors. Short time-scale variations in TSI detected by TSIM/FY-3C are nearly the same with VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE.Instrument details, primary results of solar pointing control, solar observations and etc will be given in the presentation.

  6. SST, cloud classification and surface irradiances derived from operational satellite data during SOFIA/ASTEX and SEMAPHORE

    SciTech Connect

    Brisson, A.; LeBorgne, P.; Marsouin, A.; Moreau, T.

    1994-12-31

    SOFIA is the French component of ASTEX which was organized in the Azores region in June 1992. The scientific objectives of SOFIA during ASTEX were the study of energy transfer between the sea surface and the atmospheric boundary layer at various scales. SEMAPHORE was organized in the same region in October and November 1993 and was centered on the study of mesoscale ocean circulation and air/sea interactions. During those experiments, the Centre de Meteorologie Spatiale produced in real time satellite estimates of Sea Surface Temperature (SST), cloud type, surface solar and longwave irradiance fields over the area (27N-40N, 15W-30W). This presentation will review briefly the methods which have been used to calculate these parameters. During both campaigns, in situ measurements were made by buoys (SST) and aboard the IFREMER ship Suroit (SST, surface solar and longwave irradiance). The results of the comparison of the calculations with the in situ measurements will also be presented.

  7. Simulated solar light irradiation of mesotrione in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Ter Halle, Alexandra; Richard, Claire

    2006-06-15

    Photolysis is expected to be a major degradation process for pollutants in surface waters. We report here the first photodegradation study on mesotrione, a new triketone herbicide for use in maize. In a first step, we investigated the direct photolysis of mesotrione at 365 nm from a kinetic and analytical point of view. Mesotrione sensitizes its own oxidation through singlet oxygen formation and sensitizes the oxidation of H-donors through electron or H-atom transfer. In a second step, irradiation experiments were performed under conditions prevalent in the aqueous environment. Mesotrione in submicromolar concentrations was exposed to simulated sunlight, in addition to Suwannee River natural organic matter and/or nitrates. Suwannee River natural organic matter sensitizes the oxidation of mesotrione through the intermediacy of singlet oxygen, and the rate of mesotrione transformation is significantly enhanced for Suwannee River natural organic matter concentrations equal to or above 10 mg/L. Nitrates played a negligible role in SRNOM solutions. PMID:16830551

  8. Inferring surface solar absorption from broadband satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Vulis, Inna L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric solar radiation model and surface albedo models that include wavelength dependence and surface anisotropy are combined to study the possibility of inferring the surface solar absorption from satellite measurements. The model includes ocean, desert, pasture land, savannah, and bog surface categories. Problems associated with converting narrowband measurements to broadband quantities are discussed, suggesting that it would be easier to infer surface solar absorption from broadband measurements directly. The practice of adopting a linear relationship between planetary and surface albedo to estimate surface albedos from satellite measurements is examined, showing that the linear conversion between broadband planetary and surface albedos is strongly dependent on vegetation type. It is suggested that there is a linear slope-offset relationship between surface and surface-atmosphere solar absorption.

  9. Elimination of disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water during solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Qian-Yuan, Wu; Chao, Li; Ye, Du; Wen-Long, Wang; Huang, Huang; Hong-Ying, Hu

    2016-05-15

    Ecological storage of reclaimed water in ponds and lakes is widely applied in water reuse. During reclaimed water storage, solar light can degrade pollutants and improve water quality. This study investigated the effects of solar light irradiation on the disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water, including haloacetonitriles (HANs), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), trihalomethanes (THMs), haloketones (HKs) and chloral hydrate (CH). Natural solar light significantly decreased the formation potential of HANs, TCNM, and HKs in reclaimed water, but had a limited effect on the formation potential of THMs and CH. Ultraviolet (UV) light in solar radiation played a dominant role in the decrease of the formation potential of HANs, TCNM and HKs. Among the disinfection byproducts, the removal kinetic constant of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) with irradiation dose was much larger than those for dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP), trichloropropanone (1,1,1-TCP) and TCNM. During solar irradiation, fluorescence spectra intensities of reclaimed water also decreased significantly. The removal of tyrosine (Tyr)-like and tryptophan (Trp)-like protein fluorescence spectra intensity volumes was correlated to the decrease in DCAN formation potential. Solar irradiation was demonstrated to degrade Trp, Tyr and their DCAN formation potential. The photolysis products of Trp after solar irradiation were detected as kynurenine and tryptamine, which had chloroform, CH and DCAN formation potential lower than those of Trp. PMID:27010786

  10. Solar Spectral Irradiance at 782 nm as Measured by the SES Sensor Onboard Picard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Irbah, A.; Cessateur, G.; Bekki, S.; Damé, L.; Bolsée, D.; Pereira, N.

    2016-04-01

    Picard is a satellite dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of the total and solar spectral irradiance, the solar diameter, the solar shape, and to the Sun's interior through the methods of helioseismology. The satellite was launched on June 15, 2010, and pursued its data acquisitions until March 2014. A Sun Ecartometry Sensor (SES) was developed to provide the stringent pointing requirements of the satellite. The SES sensor produced an image of the Sun at 782 ± 2.5 nm. From the SES data, we obtained a new time series of the solar spectral irradiance at 782 nm from 2010 to 2014. During this period of Solar Cycle 24, the amplitude of the changes has been of the order of ± 0.08 %, corresponding to a range of about 2× 10^{-3} W m^{-2} nm^{-1}. SES observations provided a qualitatively consistent evolution of the solar spectral irradiance variability at 782 nm. SES data show similar amplitude variations with the semi-empirical model Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S), whereas the Spectral Irradiance Monitor instrument (SIM) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment satellite (SORCE) highlights higher amplitudes.

  11. A multi-millennial reconstruction of the total solar irradiance from the carbon radioisotope production rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, L. A.; Krivova, N.; Solanki, S.; Balmaceda, L.

    2008-05-01

    The total solar irradiance (TSI) changes by about 0.1% between solar activity minimum and maximum. In addition to this cyclic variation, a secular variation in the irradiance is also plausible. Recent models suggest that the magnitude of the secular increase in the TSI since the Maunder Minimum was comparable to the solar cycle variation. Detailed reconstructions of irradiance since the Maunder minimum are common, but on longer timescales hardly any quantitative reconstructions are available, due to the lack of solar data. Here we present a reconstruction of solar irradiance on millennial time scales. The reconstruction involves two steps: (1) modelling of the evolution of the solar open magnetic flux from the production rate of 14C (as earlier carried out by Solanki et al. 2004 and Usoskin et al. 2007) and (2) evaluation of the solar irradiance from the calculated open magnetic flux. The model is tested by comparing to the TSI reconstruction from the sunspot number for the last 4 centuries. We also discuss limits and uncertainties of the model.

  12. Contamination of Optical Surfaces Under Irradiation by Outgassed Volatile Products

    SciTech Connect

    Khasanshin, R. H.; Grigorevskiy, A. V.; Galygin, A. N.; Alexandrov, N. G.

    2009-01-05

    Deposition of outgassed products of a polymeric composite on model material surfaces being irradiated by electrons and protons with initial energies of E{sub e} = 40 keV and E{sub p} = 30 keV respectively was studied. It was shown that deposition of volatile products on model material surfaces being under ionizing radiations results in increase of organic film growth rate.

  13. Defect distribution near the surface of electron-irradiated silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, K. L.; Lee, Y. H.; Corbett, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The surface-defect distributions of electron-irradiated n-type silicon have been investigated using a transient capacitance technique. Schottky, p-n junction, and MOS structures were used in profiling the defect distributions. Surface depletions of defects observed were attributed to the vacancy distribution, but not that of oxygen, and other capture centers' distributions. The vacancy diffusion length at 300 K was estimated to be about 3-6 microns.

  14. Electrostatic lofting variability of lunar dust under solar wind and solar uv irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan Örger, Necmi; Rodrigo Cordova Alarcon, Jose; Cho, Mengu; Toyoda, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-01

    It has been considered that lunar horizon glow is produced by forward scattering of the sunlight above the terminator region by the electrically charged dust grains. Previous lunar missions showed that lunar horizon glow is highly varying phenomenon; therefore, it is required to understand how this physical mechanism fundamentally occurs in order to be able to observe it. Therefore, terminator region and the dayside of the moon are the focus areas of this study in order to explain forward scattering of the sunlight towards night side region in the future steps of this work. In this paper, the results of lunar dust height calculations are presented as a function of solar zenith angle and solar wind properties. First, equilibrium surface potential, Debye length and surface electric field have been calculated to be used in the dust model to predict the lofting of lunar dust under various solar wind conditions. Dependence of the dust lofting on different parameters such as electron temperature or plasma density can be explained from the initial results. In addition, these results showed that zero potential occurs between subsolar point and terminator region as it is expected, where the maximum height of dust particles are minimum, and its position changes according to the solar wind properties and photoemission electron temperature. Relative to this work, a CubeSat mission is currently being developed in Kyushu Institute of Technology to observe lunar horizon glow.

  15. The Total Solar Irradiance Record and Its Continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, R. C.

    2007-12-01

    Continuous time series of total solar irradiance (TSI) observations have been constructed from the set of redundant, overlapping TSI measurements made by satellite experiments during the past 29 Years. One, the ACRIM composite [Willson & Mordvinov, 2003], displays a significant upward trend in TSI of 0.04 percent per decade during solar cycles 21-23. Another, the PMOD composite [Frohlich & Lean, 1998], displays no significant trend using different combinations of TSI data sets, computational philosophy and assumptions. The potential significance of solar variability as a climate forcing makes it important to determine which TSI composites best represents the measurement database. Two types of experiments have provided TSI satellite data: self-calibrating, precision TSI monitors and Earth radiation budget (ERB) experiments. TSI monitors provide much higher accuracy and precision and are capable of self-calibrating the degradation of their sensors, providing enhanced data traceability. The ERB experiments are designed to provide less accurate and precise TSI 'boundary value' results for ERB modeling and cannot self-calibrate sensor degradation. The optimum composite TSI time series utilizes TSI monitor results where available. However, a two year gap in the TSI monitoring record between the ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 experiments (1989 - 1991) would have prevented compilation of a continuous record over the 29 years of satellite observations were it not for the availability of ERB results during the gap. The relationship between ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 results across the ACRIM gap can be derived using the overlapping ERB data sets: the Nimbus7/ERB and/or the ERBS/ERBE. These two choices are embodied in the construction of ACRIM and PMOD composites, respectively. The ACRIM composite uses the results for its constituent databases published by the experiment science teams and relates ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 using overlapping Nimbus7/ERB comparisons. The PMOD composite uses a different subset

  16. GONG Observations of Solar Surface Flows

    PubMed

    Hathaway; Gilman; Harvey; Hill; Howard; Jones; Kasher; Leibacher; Pintar; Simon

    1996-05-31

    Doppler velocity observations obtained by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) instruments directly measure the nearly steady flows in the solar photosphere. The sun's differential rotation is accurately determined from single observations. The rotation profile with respect to latitude agrees well with previous measures, but it also shows a slight north-south asymmetry. Rotation profiles averaged over 27-day rotations of the sun reveal the torsional oscillation signal-weak, jetlike features, with amplitudes of 5 meters per second, that are associated with the sunspot latitude activity belts. A meridional circulation with a poleward flow of about 20 meters per second is also evident. Several characteristics of the surface flows suggest the presence of large convection cells. PMID:8662460

  17. Evaluating the spatio-temporal performance of sky imager based solar irradiance analysis and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.; Kalisch, J.; Lorenz, E.; Heinemann, D.

    2015-10-01

    Clouds are the dominant source of variability in surface solar radiation and uncertainty in its prediction. However, the increasing share of solar energy in the world-wide electric power supply increases the need for accurate solar radiation forecasts. In this work, we present results of a shortest-term global horizontal irradiance (GHI) forecast experiment based on hemispheric sky images. A two month dataset with images from one sky imager and high resolutive GHI measurements from 99 pyranometers distributed over 10 km by 12 km is used for validation. We developed a multi-step model and processed GHI forecasts up to 25 min with an update interval of 15 s. A cloud type classification is used to separate the time series in different cloud scenarios. Overall, the sky imager based forecasts do not outperform the reference persistence forecasts. Nevertheless, we find that analysis and forecast performance depend strongly on the predominant cloud conditions. Especially convective type clouds lead to high temporal and spatial GHI variability. For cumulus cloud conditions, the analysis error is found to be lower than that introduced by a single pyranometer if it is used representatively for the whole area in distances from the camera larger than 1-2 km. Moreover, forecast skill is much higher for these conditions compared to overcast or clear sky situations causing low GHI variability which is easier to predict by persistence. In order to generalize the cloud-induced forecast error, we identify a variability threshold indicating conditions with positive forecast skill.

  18. The result of degradation analysis for solar cell characteristics by electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Takashi; Uesugi, Masato; Matsuda, Sumio

    1993-10-01

    The solar cells (silicon BSFR (Back Surface Field and Reflector) cell and GaAs cell) have been studied to establish an evaluation method of irradiation resistance and to understand degradation of electric characteristics quantitatively. This memorandum presents the effect of electron beam radiation on electric characteristics of solar cells and the data analysis. For degradation of a solar cell, the following four parameters were determined; open circuited voltage (V(sub oc)), short circuited current (I(sub sc)), maximum power (P(sub max)), and Fluctuation Factor (FF). Junction coefficient, tandem resistance, and saturation current were also calculated. From these results, speculated crystalline state of cell bulk was reviewed, and difference of a silicon cell and GaAs cell is scrutinized. When the junction coefficient is constant, the I(sub sc), V(sub oc) and P(sub max) can be expressed as a function of energy fluence of electron beam. The conversion factors were confirmed by two calculation methods.

  19. Proton irradiation of conventional and lithium solar cells - 11-37 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Carter, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Conventional n/p and lithium solar cells were irradiated with 11- to 37-MeV protons. The energy dependence of the solar cell degradation, calculated from electrical parameters and lifetime measurements, is shown to be very slight. Damage coefficients for the n/p cells are calculated. Annealing characteristics of both the lithium cells and the n/p cells are presented.

  20. Coloration and darkening of methane clathrate and other ices by charged particle irradiation - Applications to the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Murray, B. G. J. P. T.; Khare, B. N.; Sagan, Carl

    1987-01-01

    The results of laboratory experiments simulating the irradiation of hydrocarbon-H2O or hydrocarbon-H2O/NH3 clathrates by charged particles in the outer solar system are reported. Ices produced by condensing and boiling liquid CH4 on an H2O frost surface at 100 K or by cocondensing frosts from gaseous mixtures were exposed to coronal-discharge electron irradiation at 77 K, and the spectral properties of the irradiated surfaces were determined. Significant darkening of the initially white ices was observed at doses of 1 Gerg/sq cm, corresponding to 8-500 yrs of irradiation by Uranian magnetospheric electrons on the surfaces of the principal Uranian satellites, or to total destruction of CH4 in the upper 1 mm of the satellite surfaces after 0.05-3.0 Myr. It is estimated that 10 m or more of icy satellite or comet surfaces would be radiation-hardened to a CH4-free ice-tholin mixture over 4 Gyr.

  1. Low energy argon ion irradiation surface effects on triglycine sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragó, Carmen; Plaza, José L.; Marqués, Manuel I.; Gonzalo, Julio A.

    2013-09-01

    An experimental study of the effects of low energy (1-2 keV) argon ion (Ar+) irradiation on Triglycine Sulfate (TGS) has been performed. Ferroelectric parameters, such as the Curie temperature TC determined from the dielectric constant peaks ɛ(T), or the remnant polarization Pr, and coercive field Ec, obtained from the hysteresis loops, show interesting differences between samples irradiated in ferroelectric and paraelectric phases, respectively. The radiation damage seems to be superficial, as observed by AFM microscope, and the surface alteration in both phases becomes eventually notorious when the radiation dosage increases.

  2. Total solar irradiance measurements by ERB/Nimbus-7 - A review of nine years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, John R.; Alton, Bradley M.; Kyle, H. Lee; Hoyt, Douglas

    1988-01-01

    The total solar irradiance measurements made by the cavity sensor of the Earth Radiation Budget experiment on the Nimbus-7 spacecraft have detected the sunspot-blocking effect, established the downward trend of the declining solar cycle, and appear to be confirming an upturn in irradiance at the outset of the new cycle. Studies of the measurements' frequency spectra have advanced the interest in helioseismology or mode analysis, and studies of photospheric activity have advanced through the modeling of the sunspot blocking and photospheric brightening vs measured irradiance.

  3. Evaluation and Applications of the satellite-based CM SAF Solar Surface Radiation Climate Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentmann, J.; Herzog, S.; Kothe, S.; Mueller, R. W.; Pfeifroth, U.; Ahrens, B.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.

    2015-12-01

    The incoming surface solar radiation has been defined as an essential climate variable by GCOS. It is mandatory to monitor this part of the earth's energy balance, and thus gain insights on the state and variability of the climate system. In addition, data sets of surface solar radiation have received increased attention over the recent years as an important source of information for solar energy applications. The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) is deriving surface solar radiation from geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite instruments. While CM SAF is focusing on high-quality long-term climate data records, operational data is also provided with a short time latency within about 2 weeks. Here we present the SARAH data set (Solar Surface Radiation Dataset - Heliosat) based on Meteosat satellite observations. SARAH provides hourly, daily- and monthly-averaged data of the effective cloud albedo (CAL), the direct normalized solar radiation (DNI) and the solar irradiance (SIS) from 1983 to 2013 for the full view of the Meteosat satellite (i.e, Europe, Africa, parts of South America, and the Atlantic ocean). The data sets are generated with a high spatial resolution of 0.05 deg allowing for detailed regional studies, and are available in netcdf-format at no cost without restrictions at www.cmsaf.eu. The mean absolute bias (i.e., the accuracy) of the SARAH data set as compared to surface reference observations has been determined to be 5.5 W/m2 for SIS and 8.2 W/m2 for DNI, i.e., within the accuracy of the ground-based measurements. The interannual and decadal variability of the SARAH SIS data are comparable to surface observations in Europe, although with a tendency to underestimate the mean increase in surface solar radiation (1.65 W/m2/dec compared to 3.3 W/m2/dec). Substantial temporal and spatial variability in the overall increase in surface solar radiation is found in the SARAH data set. Temporal changes in the frequency

  4. Investigation of back surface fields effect on bifacial solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepeai, Suhaila; Sulaiman, M. Y.; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2012-11-01

    A bifacial solar cell, in contrast with a conventional monofacial solar cell, produces photo-generated current from both front and back sides. Bifacial solar cell is an attractive candidate for enhancing photovoltaic (PV) market competitiveness as well as supporting the current efforts to increase efficiency and lower material costs. This paper reports on the fabrication of bifacial solar cells using phosphorus-oxytrichloride (POCl3) emitter formation on p-type, nanotextured silicon (Si) wafer. Backside surface field was formed through Al-diffusion using conventional screen-printing process. Bifacial solar cells with a structure of n+pp+ with and without back surface field (BSF) were fabricated in which silicon nitride (SiN) anti reflection and passivation films were coated on both sides, followed by screen printing of Argentum (Ag) and Argentum/Aluminum (Ag/Al) on front and back contacts, respectively. Bifacial solar cells without BSF exhibited open circuit voltage (VOC) of 535 mV for front and 480 mV for back surface. With Al-alloyed BSF bifacial solar cells, the VOC improved to 580 mV for the front surface and 560 mV for the back surface. Simulation of bifacial solar cells using PC1D and AFORS software demonstrated good agreement with experimental results. Simulations showed that best bifacial solar cells are achieved through a combination of high lifetime wafer, low recombination back surface field, reduced contact resistance, and superior surface passivation.

  5. Wavelength dependence of solar flare irradiance enhancement and its influence on the thermosphere-ionosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Richmond, A. D.; Deng, Y.; Qian, L.; Solomon, S. C.; Chamberlin, P. C.

    2012-12-01

    The wavelength dependence of irradiance enhancement during solar flare is one of the important factors in determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system responds to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of irradiance, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) was run for 34 X-class flares. The results show that the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peak have a clear wavelength dependence. In the wavelength range between 0 - 195 nm, it can vary from 1% to 10000%. The solar irradiance enhancement is largest (~1000%) in the XUV range (0 - 25 nm), and is about 100% in the EUV range (25 - 120 nm). The influence of different wavebands on the T-I system during the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17.2-class) has also been examined using the latest version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM). While the enhancement of the globally integrated solar energy deposition is largest in the 0 - 14 nm waveband, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400km is largest for the 25 - 105 nm waveband. The effect of the enhancement of the 122 - 195 nm waveband is small in magnitude, but it decays slowly.

  6. Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements from the SBUV/2-Series and the SSBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a NOAA-11 SBUV/2 solar spectral irradiance data set which is free from long-term instrument drift, then perform scientific analysis using the data set. During the current period of performance, 29 February 1996 through 31 August 1996, we finalized the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 characterization using internal data. This included updating the instrument's electronic, photomultiplier tube gain, wavelength, diffuser degradation, and goniometric calibrations. We have also completed the SSBUV characterization, 1989-1994, and produced SSBUV irradiances for the first seven SSBUV flights. Both of these steps were needed before the long-term calibration of the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 solar spectral irradiance data set via SSBUV can be undertaken. A second major aspect of this work is to compare solar spectral irradiances from the SBUV/2 instruments and SSBUV with corresponding data from other instruments. In the preceding six months, SSBUV data from the ATLAS-3 (November 1994) mission were compared to coincident SUSIM ATLAS-3 data. The GOME instrument was launched by the European Space Agency in early 1995 and began making solar irradiance measurements in May 1995. Working with GOME scientists, we are using SSBUV data to validate the GOME solar irradiance data. Based in part on those findings, the GOME absolute calibration data were reanalyzed.

  7. Mars surface radiation exposure for solar maximum conditions and 1989 solar proton events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, L. C.; Nealy, J. E.

    1993-02-01

    The Langley heavy-ion/nucleon and the high-energy nucleon transport codes are used to predict the propagation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR's) and solar flare protons through the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars. Particle fluences and the resulting doses are estimated on the surface of Mars for GCR's during solar maximum conditions and the August, September, and October 1989 solar proton events. Surface doses are estimated with both a low-density and a high-density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere for altitudes of 0, 4, 8, and 12 km above the surface. A solar modulation function is incorporated to estimate the GCR dose variation between solar minimum and maximum conditions over the 11-year solar cycle. By using current Mars mission scenarios, doses to the skin, eye, and blood-forming organs are predicted for short- and long-duration stay times on the Martian surface throughout the solar cycle.

  8. Albumin grafting on biomaterial surfaces using gamma-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    Surface modification has been used extensively in various fields to introduce desirable surface properties without affecting the bulk properties of the material. In the area of biomaterials, the approach of surface modification offers an effective alternative to the synthesis of new biomaterials. The specific objective of this study was to modify different biomaterial surfaces by albumin grafting to improve their blood compatibility. The modified surfaces were characterized for surface-induced platelet activation and thrombus formation. This behavior was correlated with the conditions used for grafting. In particular, albumin was functionalized to introduce pendant double bonds into the molecule. The functionalized albumin was covalently attached to various surfaces, such as dimethyldichlorosilane-coated glass, polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly(vinyl chloride), and polyethylene by gamma-irradiation. Platelet adhesion and activation on these surfaces was examined using video microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The extent of grafting was found to be dependent on the albumin concentration used for adsorption and the gamma-irradiation time. Release of the grafted albumin during exposure to blood was minimal. The albumin-grafted fibers maintained their thromboresistant properties even after storage at elevated temperatures for prolonged time periods. Finally, the approach was used to graft albumin on the PLEXUS Adult Hollow Fiber Oxygenators (Shiley). The blood compatibility of the grafted oxygenators improved significantly when compared to controls.

  9. Application of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability in a Earth Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J. W.; Merkel, A.; Fontenla, J.; Marsh, D.; Woods, T. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) measures solar spectral variability in the 200-2400 nm range, accounting for about 97% of the total solar irradiance (TSI). SIM monitored the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and is now continuing these observations into the rising phase of cycle 24. The SIM observations indicate a slower evolutionary trend in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) over solar cycle times periods that are both in and out of phase with the TSI. To estimate the atmospheric response to the solar variability implied by these observations, quiet sun and active solar reference spectra were created as input into the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The SIM observations were combined with the SORCE SOLSTICE instrument in the 110-240 nm range and SRPM (Solar Radiation Physical Modeling) estimates in the infrared beyond the 2400 nm measurement limit of SIM to generate the reference spectra. The model output suggest a very different response in ozone than from atmospheric forcing from semi-empirical models of SSI. The model predicts a reduction in lower mesosphere at higher solar activity and a large increase in mid- to upper stratosphere. This structure can be explained by enhanced production of HOx,, and O3 self-healing effect. This structure is commensurate with contemporaneous observations of O3 from AURA-MLS and SABER.

  10. A possible correlation between maxima of the far ultraviolet solar irradiance and central meridian passages of solar magnetic sector boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of the relationship observed between enhancements in the far ultraviolet solar irradiance and the position of the solar magnetic sector boundaries. The ultraviolet observations were made with the monitor of ultraviolet solar energy (MUSE) experiments which were launched aboard Nimbus 3 in April 1969 and Nimbus 4 April 1970. A comparison between the positions of solar magnetic sector boundaries and ultraviolet enchancements of the sun seems to show, at least during the year of 1969, that the ultraviolet maxima tend to occur near the times when a solar sector boundary is near the central meridian. An estimate of the magnitude of the variable ultraviolet solar energy input into the atmosphere resulting from the rotation of active solar longitudes is that for wavelengths less that 175 nm and down to H Lyman alpha it exceeds the annual variation whereas at longer wavelengths it is less. The total observed peak to peak variation in the ultraviolet irradiance from 120 to 300 nm over a solar rotation is typically at least 230 ergs/sq cm sec.

  11. SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Arregui, I.; Terradas, J.

    2012-07-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

  12. Solar UV Irradiances and Associated Issues for the Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W.

    Several new solar proxies have been developed in the past year as the beginning of a second generation solar UV modeling and forecasting capability. These proxies help characterize the energy input into operational space physics models that provide information content on the neutral thermosphere and ionosphere. Between 1999-2000, a full solar spectrum was developed (SOLAR2000) for use in numerical atmospheric and ionospheric models relevant to climatological studies and the E10.7 index was produced for empirical thermospheric and ionospheric model applications. In 20012002, new proxies have been derived including a sunspot number, Rsn, for use by operational HF radio ray-trace algorithms and the Qeuv thermospheric heating rate for use by the aeronomy community to compare airglow-derived versus solar-derived upper atmosphere heating. The Peuv heat production term has also been developed as an index for comparing solar heating to joule heating on a global scale. The S(t) index is the integrated solar spectrum used for solar radiation pressure calculations related to spacecraft attitude control. Finally, the Tinf is the exospheric temperature that is provided for long-term climate change studies. Second generation modeling and forecasting is in development and includes higher cadence solar input information beyond daily flux values where solar flare characterization will soon become reality. The second generation forecasting is also incorporating improved algorithms ranging from wavelet transforms to solar dynamo theory in order to specify solar variability on seven time scales from nowcast and 72-hour forecast to 5 solar cycle estimation. These new proxies are derivatives of the SOLAR2000 model whose solar irradiance specification is compliant with the developing ISO draft standard WD 21348 for Determining Solar Irradiances.

  13. A I-V analysis of irradiated Gallium Arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heulenberg, A.; Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A computer program was used to analyze the illuminated I-V characteristics of four sets of gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells irradiated with 1-MeV electrons and 10-MeV protons. It was concluded that junction regions (J sub r) dominate nearly all GaAs cells tested, except for irradiated Mitsubishi cells, which appear to have a different doping profile. Irradiation maintains or increases the dominance by J sub r. Proton irradiation increases J sub r more than does electron irradiation. The U.S. cells were optimized for beginning of life (BOL) and the Japanese for end of life (EOL). I-V analysis indicates ways of improving both the BOL and EOL performance of GaAs solar cells.

  14. Surface Hardness Improvement of PMMA by Low Energy Ion Irradiation and Electron Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurabayashi, Yuya; Masaki, Takahiro; Iwao, Toru; Yumoto, Motoshige

    Surface modification of PMMA(polymethylmethacrylate) was carried out by irradiation of low energy ion and/or electron, which is expected to improve the surface hardness by introduction of a thin modified layer. Surface hardness was measured by using the nanoindentation test. To clarify the structure and the properties of the modified layer, depth profiles of composition and chemical bonds were analyzed using XPS(X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Forming cross-linking structure that contributed to the surface hardness was analyzed using dyeing method. From these results, it was confirmed that surface hardness increased and existence of cross-linking structure. It was suggested that the existence of the structure brought about the increase of surface hardness, and showed the utility of the dyeing method.

  15. Coloration and darkening of methane clathrate and other ices by charged particle irradiation: applications to the outer solar system.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W R; Murray, B G; Khare, B N; Sagan, C

    1987-12-30

    Methane clathrate is expected to be an important carbon-containing ice in the outer solar system. We investigate the effect of electron irradiation by coronal discharge on several simple hydrocarbons enclathrated in or mixed with H2O or H2O+NH3 in simulation of the effects of the solar wind, planetary magnetospheric particles, and cosmic rays on surfaces containing these ices in the outer solar system and interstellar space. H2O+CH4 clathrate, H2O+C2H6, H2O+CH4+NH3, H2O+C2H6+NH3, and H2O+C2H2 are all initially white ices, and all produce yellowish to brownish organic products upon charged particles irradiation. Significant coloration occurs with doses of 10(9) erg cm-2, corresponding to short interplanetary irradiation times. Uranian magnetospheric electrons penetrate to approximately 1 mm depth and deposit this dose in 8, 30, 65, 200, and 500 years into the surfaces of Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon, respectively. Further irradiation of the laboratory ice surface results in a progressive darkening and a more subdued color. For a conversion efficiency to solids G approximately equal to 1 molecule keV-1, the upper limit for the time for total destruction of CH4 and other simple hydrocarbons in the upper 1 mm is 5 x 10(4) years (Miranda) to 3 x 10(6) years (Oberon). Remote detection of CH4 is possible only when its replenishment rate exceeds the destruction rate at the depth probed by spectroscopy. Reflection spectroscopy or irradiated H2O+CH4 frost is compared with the spectra of several outer solar system objects and to other relevant organic and inorganic materials. Ultraviolet-visible and infrared transmission spectroscopy of the postirradiation residues is presented. Persistence of color and of CH4 ice bands on Triton and Pluto suggests ongoing surface activity and/or atmospheric haze. Over 4 x 10(9) year time scales, > or = 10 m of satellite and cometary surface material is processed by cosmic rays to a radiation-hardened ice-tholin mixture devoid

  16. A Model for Solar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance at the Bottom and Top of a Cloudless Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justus, C. G.; Paris, M. V.

    1985-03-01

    A simple model is presented that, in a cloud-free atmosphere, calculates solar spectral direct and diffuse irradiance and directional radiance at the surface, spectral absorption within the atmosphere and the upward reflected spectral irradiance or directional radiance at the top of the atmosphere. The irradiance model, based on similar approaches by Brine and Iqbal and others, evaluates the spectral irradiances between 0.29 and 4.0 m, with a resolution that varies from 0.005 to 0.1 m. Absorption by water vapor, ozone and the uniformly mixed gases is included, as are both scattering and absorption by atmospheric aerosols, which are modeled with simple wavelength-dependent optical depth, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter functions. Comparisons are presented of the model results with spectral irradiance and radiance computed by other more sophisticated models and with measurements from both ground-based and satellite instruments. The reasonable accuracy and simplicity of the model make it suitable for a number of applications, especially those involving tests of the sensitivity of spectral irradiances or radiances to variations in water vapor, ozone and various aerosol parameters.

  17. A model for solar spectral irradiance and radiance at the bottom and top of a cloudless atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justus, C. G.; Paris, M. V.

    1985-03-01

    A simple model is presented that, in a cloud-free atmosphere, calculates solar spectral direct and diffuse irradiance and directional radiance at the surface, spectral absorption within the atmosphere and the upward reflected spectral irradiance or directional radiance at the top of the atmosphere. The irradiance model, based on similar approaches by Brine and Iqbal and others, evaluates the spectral irradiances between 0.29 and 4.0 microns, with a resolution that varies from 0.005 to 0.1 micron. Absorption by water vapor, ozone and the uniformly mixed gases is included, as are both scattering and absorption by atmospheric aerosols, which are modeled with simple wavelength-dependent optical depth, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter functions. Comparisons are presented of the model results with spectral irradiance and radiance computed by other more sophisticated models and with measurements from both ground-based and satellite instruments. The reasonable accuracy and simplicity of the model make it suitable for a number of applications, especially those involving tests of the sensitivity of spectral irradiances or radiances to variations in water vapor, ozone and various aerosol parameters.

  18. Effects of UV-ozone irradiation on copper doped nickel acetate and its applicability to perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongmo; Lee, Hee Ryung; Kim, Hyeong Pil; Lin, Tengda; Kanwat, Anil; Mohd Yusoff, Abd Rashid Bin; Jang, Jin

    2016-04-28

    The effects of UV-ozone (UVO) irradiation on copper-doped nickel acetate and its applicability to perovskite solar cells were investigated. UVO irradiation of copper-doped nickel acetate significantly increased the electrical conductivity (from 4.28 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) to 5.66 × 10(-2) S cm(-1)), which is due to the increased carrier concentration (from 3.53 × 10(13) cm(-3) to 2.41 × 10(16) cm(-3)), and the charge extraction efficiency was enhanced, leading to better compatibility with the hole transport layer. By UVO irradiation, the work function was increased from 4.95 eV to 5.33 eV by the surface dipole formation, which effectively reduced the interface barrier between the hole transport layer and the MAPbI3 light absorbing layer. UVO Irradiation of the underlying layer also allows the MAPbI3 precursors to form better morphology with highly arranged crystallinity. Compared to the cells using non-irradiated copper doped nickel acetate, UVO-irradiated copper-doped nickel acetate devices showed an enhanced open-circuit voltage (3% increase), short circuit current (16% increase), fill factor (5% increase), showing an enhanced power conversion efficiency of 12.2% (21% increase). PMID:27088187

  19. Variation of solar cell sensitivity and solar radiation on tilted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klucher, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    The validity is studied that one of various insolation models used to compute solar radiation incident on tilted surfaces from global data measured on horizontal surfaces. The variation of solar cell sensitivity to solar radiation is determined over a wide range of atmospheric condition. A new model was formulated that reduced the deviations between measured and predicted insolation to less than 3 percent. Evaluation of solar cell sensitivity data indicates small change (2-3 percent) in sensitivity from winter to summer for tilted cells. The feasibility of using such global data as a means for calibrating terrestrial solar cells is discussed.

  20. Comparison of model estimated and measured direct-normal solar irradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Halthore, R.N.; Schwartz, S.E.; Michalsky, J.J.; Anderson, G.P.; Holben, B.N.; Ten Brink, H.M.

    1997-12-01

    Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time at the Earth{close_quote}s surface on a unit area perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the extinction, whether absorption or scattering. Here we report a set of closure experiments performed in north central Oklahoma in April 1996 under cloud-free conditions, wherein measured atmospheric composition and aerosol optical thickness are input to a radiative transfer model, MODTRAN 3, to estimate DNSI, which is then compared with measured values obtained with normal incidence pyrheliometers and absolute cavity radiometers. Uncertainty in aerosol optical thickness (AOT) dominates the uncertainty in DNSI calculation. AOT measured by an independently calibrated Sun photometer and a rotating shadow-band radiometer agree to within the uncertainties of each measurement. For 36 independent comparisons the agreement between measured and model-estimated values of DNSI falls within the combined uncertainties in the measurement (0.3{endash}0.7{percent}) and model calculation (1.8{percent}), albeit with a slight average model underestimate ({minus}0.18{plus_minus}0.94){percent}; for a DNSI of 839Wm{sup {minus}2} this corresponds to {minus}1.5{plus_minus}7.9Wm{sup {minus}2}. The agreement is nearly independent of air mass and water-vapor path abundance. These results thus establish the accuracy of the current knowledge of the solar spectrum, its integrated power, and the atmospheric extinction as a function of wavelength as represented in MODTRAN 3. An important consequence is that atmospheric absorption of short-wave energy is accurately parametrized in the model to within the above uncertainties. {copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

  1. Photocatalytic oxidation of pesticides by solar-irradiated TiO[sub 2] systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.M.; Grinstead, J.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Research at the Tennessee Valley Authority's National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center has been directed toward the development of passive basin type solar evaporators as a simple means of reducing the volume of fertilizer and pesticide contaminated rinsewater generated at fertilizer and agrichemical dealerships. In conjunction with this work, investigations are also devoted to TiO[sub 2] catalyzed solar photooxidation as a potential procedure for destroying pesticides in dilute aqueous systems. Initial tests in which dilute samples of the herbicides; Bicep (atrazine and metolachlor), Lasso (alachlor), and Sencor (metribuzin); were recirculated continuously over TiO[sub 2] impregnated fiberglass gauze, under solar irradiation, gave promising results. In the case of metribuzin, solar irradiation induced oxidation appeared effective at concentrations as high as 600 ppM. Catalytic efficiency did not appear greatly affected by using tap water rather than distilled water to dilute the pesticides. Two solar reactor designs will be discussed.

  2. Photocatalytic oxidation of pesticides by solar-irradiated TiO{sub 2} systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.M.; Grinstead, J.H. Jr.

    1992-12-01

    Research at the Tennessee Valley Authority`s National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center has been directed toward the development of passive basin type solar evaporators as a simple means of reducing the volume of fertilizer and pesticide contaminated rinsewater generated at fertilizer and agrichemical dealerships. In conjunction with this work, investigations are also devoted to TiO{sub 2} catalyzed solar photooxidation as a potential procedure for destroying pesticides in dilute aqueous systems. Initial tests in which dilute samples of the herbicides; Bicep (atrazine and metolachlor), Lasso (alachlor), and Sencor (metribuzin); were recirculated continuously over TiO{sub 2} impregnated fiberglass gauze, under solar irradiation, gave promising results. In the case of metribuzin, solar irradiation induced oxidation appeared effective at concentrations as high as 600 ppM. Catalytic efficiency did not appear greatly affected by using tap water rather than distilled water to dilute the pesticides. Two solar reactor designs will be discussed.

  3. Measurement of solar radiation at the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics of solar energy arriving at the surface of the Earth are defined and the history of solar measurements in the United States presented. Radiation and meteorological measurements being made at solar energy meteorological research and training sites and calibration procedures used there are outlined. Data illustrating the annual variation in daily solar radiation at Ann Arbor, Michigan and the diurnal variation in radiation at Albuquerque, New Mexico are presented. Direct normal solar radiation received at Albuquerque is contrasted with that received at Maynard, Massachusetts. Average measured global radiation for a period of one year for four locations under clear skies, 50% cloud cover, and 100% cloud cover is given and compared with the solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. The May distribution of mean daily direct solar radiation and mean daily global solar radiation over the United States is presented. The effects of turbidity on the direct and circumsolar radiation are shown.

  4. High-resolution solar spectral irradiance from extreme ultraviolet to far infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Harder, J.; Livingston, W.; Snow, M.; Woods, T.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents new extremely high-resolution solar spectral irradiance (SSI) calculations covering wavelengths from 0.12 nm to 100 micron obtained by the Solar Irradiance Physical Modeling (SRPM) system. Daily solar irradiance spectra were constructed for most of Solar Cycle 23 based on a set of physical models of the solar features and non-LTE calculations of their emitted spectra as function of viewing angle, and solar images specifying the distribution of features on the solar disk. Various observational tests are used to assess the quality of the spectra provided here. The present work emphasizes the effects on the SSI of the upper chromosphere and full-non-LTE radiative transfer calculation of level populations and ionizations that are essential for physically consistent results at UV wavelengths and for deep lines in the visible and IR. This paper also considers the photodissociation continuum opacity of molecular species, e.g., CH and OH, and proposes the consideration of NH photodissociation which can solve the puzzle of the missing near-UV opacity in the spectral range of the near-UV. Finally, this paper is based on physical models of the solar atmosphere and extends the previous lower-layer models into the upper-transition-region and coronal layers that are the dominant source of photons at wavelengths shorter than ˜50 nm (except for the He II 30.4 nm line, mainly formed in the lower-transition-region).

  5. Estimation of daily global solar irradiation under different sky conditions in central and southern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didari, Shohreh; Zand-Parsa, Shahrokh

    2015-10-01

    Daily global solar irradiation (R s) is one of the main inputs in environmental modeling. Because of the lack of its measuring facilities, high-quality and long-term data are limited. In this research, R s values were estimated based on measured sunshine duration and cloud cover of our synoptic meteorological stations in central and southern Iran during 2008, 2009, and 2011. Clear sky solar irradiation was estimated from linear regression using extraterrestrial solar irradiation as the independent variable with normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) of 4.69 %. Daily R s was calibrated using measured sunshine duration and cloud cover data under different sky conditions during 2008 and 2009. The 2011 data were used for model validation. According to the results, in the presence of clouds, the R s model using sunshine duration data was more accurate when compared with the model using cloud cover data (NRMSE = 11. 69 %). In both models, with increasing sky cloudiness, the accuracy decreased. In the study region, more than 92 % of sunshine durations were clear or partly cloudy, which received close to 95 % of total solar irradiation. Hence, it was possible to estimate solar irradiation with a good accuracy in most days with the measurements of sunshine duration.

  6. A measurement of the quiet network contribution to solar irradiance variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, Peter; Milano, Leo

    A large increase in quiet network area since the 17th century Maunder Minimum has been suggested as a mechanism for increasing solar irradiance sufficiently to drive global warming. We show that this mechanism requires essentially complete disappearance of network proceeding back in time to the beginning of the 20th century. This disappearance is ruled out by the many Ca K spectroheliograms taken since the discovery of the network in the early 1890's. Furthermore, network area measurements we have carried out on Ca K spectroheliograms digitized from the Mt. Wilson and NSO/Sacramento Peak archives, for the nine solar activity minima between 1914 and 1996, show no evidence of network area variations large enough to produce a significant long-term component of total irradiance variation. A network brightness variation of sufficient magnitude is also unlikely, given the linear dependence of solar microwave flux on area of bright structures.More generally, recent analyses of cycle 21,22 pyrheliometry, and of broadband stellar photometry, provide little support for any long-term irradiance component These results do not rule out a secular irradiance increase. But they suggest that high climate sensitivity to the relatively small changes in solar total and UV irradiance that have been observed, provides a more likely explanation of the global temperature-solar activity correlation.

  7. Segmentation of coronal features to understand the solar EUV and UV irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumara, S. T.; Kariyappa, R.; Zender, J. J.; Giono, G.; Delouille, V.; Chitta, L. P.; Damé, L.; Hochedez, J.-F.; Verbeeck, C.; Mampaey, B.; Doddamani, V. H.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The study of solar irradiance variability is of great importance in heliophysics, the Earth's climate, and space weather applications. These studies require careful identifying, tracking and monitoring of active regions (ARs), coronal holes (CHs), and the quiet Sun (QS). Aims: We studied the variability of solar irradiance for a period of two years (January 2011-December 2012) using the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA), the Sun Watcher using APS and image Processing (SWAP) on board PROBA2, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Methods: We used the spatial possibilistic clustering algorithm (SPoCA) to identify and segment coronal features from the EUV observations of AIA. The AIA segmentation maps were then applied on SWAP images, and parameters such as the intensity, fractional area, and contribution of ARs/CHs/QS features were computed and compared with the full-disk integrated intensity and LYRA irradiance measurements. Results: We report the results obtained from SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP images taken from January 2011 to December 2012 and compare the resulting integrated full-disk intensity with PROBA2/LYRA irradiance. We determine the contributions of the segmented features to EUV and UV irradiance variations. The variations of the parameters resulting from the segmentation, namely the area, integrated intensity, and relative contribution to the solar irradiance, are compared with LYRA irradiance. We find that the active regions have a great impact on the irradiance fluctuations. In the EUV passbands considered in this study, the QS is the greatest contributor to the solar irradiance, with up to 63% of total intensity values. Active regions, on the other hand, contribute to about 10%, and off-limb structures to about 24%. We also find that the area of the features is highly variable suggesting that their area has to be taken into account in irradiance models, in addition to their intensity variations

  8. Influence of spatiotemporally distributed irradiance data input on temperature evolution in parabolic trough solar field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubolz, K.; Schenk, H.; Hirsch, T.

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating solar field operation is affected by shadowing through cloud movement. For line focusing systems the impact of varying irradiance has been studied before by several authors with simulations of relevant thermodynamics assuming spatially homogeneous irradiance or using artificial test signals. While today's simulation capabilities allow more and more a higher spatiotemporal resolution of plant processes there are only few studies on influence of spatially distributed irradiance due to lack of available data. Based on recent work on generating real irradiance maps with high spatial resolution this paper demonstrates their influence on solar field thermodynamics. For a case study an irradiance time series is chosen. One solar field section with several loops and collecting header is modeled for simulation purpose of parabolic trough collectors and oil as heat transfer medium. Assuming homogeneous mass flow distribution among all loops we observe spatially varying temperature characteristics. They are analysed without and with mass flow control and their impact on solar field control design is discussed. Finally, the potential of distributed irradiance data is outlined.

  9. Free Flyer Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) and Climate Services Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R.; Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.

    2012-01-01

    NOAA's planned Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) mission will fly along with the NOAA user service payloads Advanced Data Collection System (ADCS) and Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking (SARSAT). In ' order to guarantee continuity in the 33-year solar irradiance climate data record, TSIS must be launched in time to overlap with current on-orbit solar irradiance instruments. Currently TSIS is moving towards a launch rcadinss date of January 2015. TSIS provides for continuation of the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) ,currently onboard NASA's Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) platform, launched in January 2003. The difficulty of ensuring continuity has increased due to the launch failure of NASA's Glory mission with its improved TIM. Achieving the needed overlap must now rely on extending SORCE. and maintaining the TSIS schedule. TSIS is one component of a NASA-NOAA joint program (JPSS) planned to transition certain climate observations to operational mode. We summarize issues of continuity, improvements being made to the TIM and 81M sensors, and plans to provide for traceability of total and spectral irradiance measurements to ground-based cryogenic standards.

  10. Solar Irradiance Reference Spectra (SIRS) for the 2008 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Harder, Jerald W.; Hock, Rachel A.; Snow, Martin; Eparvier, Francis G.; Fontenla, Juan; McClintock, William E.; Richard, Erik C.

    2009-01-01

    The IHY2007 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) for solar Carrington Rotation 2068 (20 March to 16 April 2008) has been very successful in obtaining a wide variety of solar, heliospheric, and planetary observations during times of solar cycle minimum conditions. One of these efforts is the generation of solar irradiance reference spectra (SIRS) from 0.1 nm to 2400 nm using a combination of satellite and sounding rocket observations. These reference spectra include daily satellite observations from TIMED Solar Extreme ultraviolet Experiment (SEE) and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments. The extreme ultraviolet range is also improved with higher spectral resolution observations using the prototype SDO Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard a sounding rocket launched on 14 April 2008. The SIRS result is an important accomplishment in that it is the first data set to have simultaneous measurements over the full spectral coverage up to 2400 nm during solar cycle minimum conditions.

  11. Surface Engineering of ZnO Thin Film for High Efficiency Planar Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Zong-Liang; Chiang, Chien-Hung; Wu, Chun-Guey

    2015-09-01

    Sputtering made ZnO thin film was used as an electron-transport layer in a regular planar perovskite solar cell based on high quality CH3NH3PbI3 absorber prepared with a two-step spin-coating. An efficiency up to 15.9% under AM 1.5G irradiation is achieved for the cell based on ZnO film fabricated under Ar working gas. The atmosphere of the sputtering chamber can tune the surface electronic properties (band structure) of the resulting ZnO thin film and therefore the photovoltaic performance of the corresponding perovskite solar cell. Precise surface engineering of ZnO thin film was found to be one of the key steps to fabricate ZnO based regular planar perovskite solar cell with high power conversion efficiency. Sputtering method is proved to be one of the excellent techniques to prepare ZnO thin film with controllable properties.

  12. Temporal and spectral variations of the photoelectron flux and solar irradiance during an X class solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Richards, P. G.

    2008-06-01

    Photoelectrons are the main energy source of airglow used to diagnose the state of the ionosphere-thermosphere system. Because of measurement uncertainties and substantial gaps in the historical record, parameterized models of the EUV irradiance and photoelectron flux are generally used to estimate airglow intensities. This paper compares observed and modeled photoelectron spectra from an X3 class flare that occurred on July 15, 2002. The photoelectron data were obtained from the FAST satellite. Model photoelectron spectra were obtained from the Field Line Inter-hemispheric Plasma (FLIP) model using 10 s cadence solar spectra at 1 nm resolution from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). The observed and modeled spectra agree well temporally and spectrally within the uncertainties of the models and data. Systematic differences found between observed and modeled photoelectron spectra suggest that the solar irradiance from FISM could be improved at wavelengths shortward of 17 nm.

  13. Gene Expression in the Scleractinian Acropora microphthalma Exposed to High Solar Irradiance Reveals Elements of Photoprotection and Coral Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Starcevic, Antonio; Dunlap, Walter C.; Cullum, John; Shick, J. Malcolm; Hranueli, Daslav; Long, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    Background The success of tropical reef-building corals depends on the metabolic co-operation between the animal host and the photosynthetic performance of endosymbiotic algae residing within its cells. To examine the molecular response of the coral Acropora microphthalma to high levels of solar irradiance, a cDNA library was constructed by PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridisation (PCR-SSH) from mRNA obtained by transplantation of a colony from a depth of 12.7 m to near-surface solar irradiance, during which the coral became noticeably paler from loss of endosymbionts in sun-exposed tissues. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel approach to sequence annotation of the cDNA library gave genetic evidence for a hypothetical biosynthetic pathway branching from the shikimic acid pathway that leads to the formation of 4-deoxygadusol. This metabolite is a potent antioxidant and expected precursor of the UV-protective mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), which serve as sunscreens in coral phototrophic symbiosis. Empirical PCR based evidence further upholds the contention that the biosynthesis of these MAA sunscreens is a ‘shared metabolic adaptation’ between the symbiotic partners. Additionally, gene expression induced by enhanced solar irradiance reveals a cellular mechanism of light-induced coral bleaching that invokes a Ca2+-binding synaptotagmin-like regulator of SNARE protein assembly of phagosomal exocytosis, whereby algal partners are lost from the symbiosis. Conclusions/Significance Bioinformatics analyses of DNA sequences obtained by differential gene expression of a coral exposed to high solar irradiance has revealed the identification of putative genes encoding key steps of the MAA biosynthetic pathway. Revealed also by this treatment are genes that implicate exocytosis as a cellular process contributing to a breakdown in the metabolically essential partnership between the coral host and endosymbiotic algae, which manifests as coral bleaching. PMID

  14. The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

  15. Wavelength Dependence of Solar Flare Irradiation and its Influence on the Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Yanshi; Richmond, Arthur D.; Deng, Yue; Qian, L.; Solomon, S.; Chamberlin, P.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of solar flare enhancement is one of the important factors determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system response to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of solar flare, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) has been run for 34 X-class flares. The results show that the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peak comparing to pre-flare condition have a clear wavelength dependence. In the wavelength range between 0 - 195 nm, it can vary from 1% to 10000%. The solar irradiance enhancement is largest ( 1000%) in the XUV range (0 - 25 nm), and is about 100% in EUV range (25 - 120 nm). The influence of different wavebands on the T-I system during the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17.2-class) has also been examined using the latest version of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere- Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM). While the globally integrated solar energy deposition is largest in the 0 - 14 nm waveband, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400 km is largest for 25 - 105 nm waveband. The effect of 122 - 195 nm is small in magnitude, but it decays slowly.

  16. Surface plasma wave excitation via laser irradiated overdense plasma foil

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-04-09

    A laser irradiated overdense plasma foil is seen to be susceptible to parametric excitation of surface plasma wave (SPW) and ion acoustic wave (IAW) on the ion plasma period time scale. The SPW is localised near the front surface of the foil while IAW extends upto the rear. The evanescent laser field and the SPW exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the IAW. The density perturbation associated with the latter beats with the laser induced oscillatory electron velocity to drive the SPW. At relativistic laser intensity, the growth rate is of the order of ion plasma frequency.

  17. Solar simulated irradiation modulates gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes in cultured human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Leccia, M T; Yaar, M; Allen, N; Gleason, M; Gilchrest, B A

    2001-08-01

    Exposure of skin to solar irradiation generates reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, membranes, mitochondria and proteins. To protect against such damage, skin cells have evolved antioxidant enzymes including glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), copper and zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD1), the mitochondrial manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD2), and catalase. This report examines the effect of a single low or moderate dose exposure to solar-simulating combined UVB and UVA irradiation on the gene expression and activities of these antioxidant enzymes in cultured normal human fibroblasts. We find that both doses initially decrease GSH-Px, SOD2 and catalase activities, but within 5 days after irradiation the activities of the enzymes return to pre-irradiation level (catalase) or are induced slightly (SOD1, GSH-Px) or substantially (SOD2) above the basal level. For SOD1, SOD2 and catalase, the higher dose also detectably modulates the mRNA level of these enzymes. Our results indicate that the effects of a single physiologic solar simulated irradiation dose persist for at least several days and suggest that skin cells prepare for subsequent exposure to damaging irradiation by upregulating this antioxidant defense system, in particular the mitochondrial SOD2. Our findings are consistent with the existence of a broad-based SOS-like response in irradiated human skin. PMID:11493316

  18. Simulation of the Mars Surface Solar Spectra for Optimized Performance of Triple-Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Joslin, David E.; Fetzer, Chris M.; King, RIchard R.; Karam, Nasser H.; Mardesich, Nick; Stella, Paul M.; Rapp, Donald; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The unparalleled success of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) powered by GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells has demonstrated a lifetime for the rovers that exceeded the baseline mission duration by more than a factor of five. This provides confidence in future longer-term solar powered missions on the surface of Mars. However, the solar cells used on the rovers are not optimized for the Mars surface solar spectrum, which is attenuated at shorter wavelengths due to scattering by the dusty atmosphere. The difference between the Mars surface spectrum and the AM0 spectrum increases with solar zenith angle and optical depth. The recent results of a program between JPL and Spectrolab to optimize GaInP/GaAs/Ge solar cells for Mars are presented. Initial characterization focuses on the solar spectrum at 60-degrees zenith angle at an optical depth of 0.5. The 60-degree spectrum is reduced to 1/6 of the AM0 intensity and is further reduced in the blue portion of the spectrum. JPL has modeled the Mars surface solar spectra, modified an X-25 solar simulator, and completed testing of Mars-optimized solar cells previously developed by Spectrolab with the modified X-25 solar simulator. Spectrolab has focused on the optimization of the higher efficiency Ultra Triple-Junction (UTJ) solar cell for Mars. The attenuated blue portion of the spectrum requires the modification of the top sub-cell in the GaInP/GaAs/Ge solar cell for improved current balancing in the triple-junction cell. Initial characterization confirms the predicted increase in power and current matched operation for the Mars surface 60-degree zenith angle solar spectrum.

  19. Mass fractionation of the lunar surface by solar wind sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switkowski, Z. E.; Haff, P. K.; Tombrello, T. A.; Burnett, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the mass-fractionation effects produced in connection with the bombardment of the moon by the solar wind. Most of the material ejected by sputtering escapes the moon's gravity, but some returning matter settles back onto the lunar surface. This material, which is somewhat richer in heavier atoms than the starting surface, is incorporated into the heavily radiation-damaged outer surfaces of grains. The investigation indicates that sputtering of the lunar surface by the solar wind will give rise to significant surface heavy atom enrichments if the grain surfaces are allowed to come into sputtering equilibrium.

  20. Corroboration for the influence of a component of solar irradiance on subsurface radon signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinitz, G.; Piatibratova, O.; Kotlarsky, P.; Sturrock, P.; Maritn, C.

    2012-04-01

    Rn-222 occurs at highly varying levels as a trace component in subsurface air (geogas). This high variability is traced by alpha and gamma activity due to the decay of radon and its progeny. Nuclear radiation from radon in geogas and in experiments using air+radon within a confined volume exhibits systematic temporal variations. These variations are composed of periodic and non-periodic signals spanning several orders of magnitude in time - from annual to daily and sub-daily durations. Analysis of extensive data sets from three key sites 200 km apart in the arid desert of southern Israel [1-3] and from a 5-year experiment using alpha and gamma detectors [4] demonstrate that the periodic variations, observed to a depth of >100 meters, are related to an above surface driver probably due to a component of solar irradiance. Insight was also derived from the long term variations in the geological and the experimental time series [5], indicated by the occurrence of multi-year variations, and clear semiannual and ternary annual signals which are in addition to the annual periodicity. New confirmations are based on recognizing further cyclic phenomena, some of which are not linked with Earth related periodicities. A likehood analysis of the alpha and gamma time series in a long-term experiment is performed. A Combined Power Statistic formed from the gamma, alpha-H and alpha-L sensors inside the experimental tank shows that the time series of the gamma radiation contains an annual periodicity as well as a clear semi-annual and possibly a ternary-annual periodicity. The same analysis also resolves additional periodicities in the frequency range of 10-15 yr-1 in the gamma time series which are indicative of a relationship to rotation of the sun around its axis [6]. Observation of solar periodicities in the temporal pattern of the nuclear radiation of radon is a significant independent substantiation for the notion of the influence of a component in solar irradiance. An

  1. Calibrated digital images of Campbell-Stokes recorder card archives for direct solar irradiance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horseman, A. M.; Richardson, T.; Boardman, A. T.; Tych, W.; Timmis, R.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2013-05-01

    A systematic, semi-automatic method for imaging the cards from the widely used Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder is described. We show how the application of inexpensive commercial equipment and practices can simply and robustly build an archive of high-quality card images and manipulate them into a form suitable for easy further analysis. Rectified and registered digital images are produced, with the card's midday marker in the middle of the longest side, and with a temporal scaling of 150 pixels per hour. The method improves on previous, mostly manual, analyses by simplifying and automating steps into a process capable of handling thousands of cards in a practical timescale. A prototype method of extraction of data from this archive is then tested by comparison with records from a co-located pyrheliometer at a resolution of the order of minutes. The comparison demonstrates that the Campbell-Stokes recorder archive contains a time series of downwelling solar-irradiance-related data with similar characteristics to that of benchmark pyrheliometer data from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network. A universal transfer function for card burn to direct downwelling short-wave radiation is still some way off and is the subject of ongoing research. Until such time as a universal transfer function is available, specific functions for extracting data in particular circumstances offer a useful way forward. The new image-capture method offers a practical way to exploit the worldwide sets of long-term Campbell-Stokes recorder data to create a time series of solar irradiance and atmospheric aerosol loading metrics reaching back over 100 yr from the present day.

  2. Space Weathering of airless bodies in the Solar System - Combining hypervelocity dust impacts with energetic irradiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiege, K.; Bennett, C.; Guglielmino, M.; Orlando, T. M.; Trieloff, M.; Srama, R.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical and mineralogical characterization of meteorites and their parent asteroids provides us with information about the processes and conditions during the formation of the inner Solar System. However, linking meteorites to their parent bodies is problematic. Astronomical observations aim to reconstruct the surface properties of these bodies primarily by visible and infrared spectra, but space weathering severely modifies the optical, compositional and physical properties of thin surface layers and thus precludes proper identification of chemistry and mineralogy. The effects of space weathering have been experimentally studied mainly with respect to ion bombardment and sputtering. Other studies aimed to simulate the influence of micrometeoroid bombardment by using laser ablation techniques. However, there is sufficient evidence that laser ablation does not realistically lead to the same effects as produced during real micrometeorite impacts. We performed micrometeorite bombardment using a 2MV dust accelerator at the Institute for Space Systems at University of Stuttgart, Germany, capable of generating impact speeds up to 100 km s-1. These results are combined with energetic irradiation experiments at the Electron and Photon Induced Chemistry on Surfaces (EPICS) laboratory at Georgia Institute of Technology, USA. By simulating highly realistic irradiation conditions, we are able to investigate the processes of particle and solar wind irradiation on solid planetary surfaces and study the formation of e.g., nanophase iron in minerals, the effects on hydrous minerals regarding their volatile budgets, or possible OH-formation in nominally anhydrous minerals and relate these to their optical properties. Using a variety of minerals, this work aims to contribute to a better understanding of the general alteration mechanisms in space environments in dependence of weathering agent and available material. We here present the results of initial comparison analysis and

  3. Observations of Solar Spectral Irradiance Change During Cycle 22 from NOAA-9 SBUV/2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    2003-01-01

    The NOM-9 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet, model 2 (SBUV/2) instrument is one of a series of instruments providing daily solar spectral irradiance measurements in the middle and near ultraviolet since 1978. The SBUV/2 instruments are primarily designed to measure stratospheric profile and total column ozone, using the directional albedo as the input to the ozone processing algorithm. As a result, the SBUV/2 instrument does not have onboard monitoring of all time-dependent response changes. We have applied internal comparisons and vicarious (external) comparisons to determine the long-term instrument characterization for NOAA-9 SBUV/2 to derive accurate solar spectral irradiances from March 1985 to May 1997 spanning two solar cycle minima with a single instrument. The NOAA-9 data show an amplitude of 9.3(+/- 2.3)% (81-day averaged) at 200-205 nm for solar cycle 22. This is consistent with the result of (Delta)F(sub 200-205) = 8.3(+/- 2.6)% for cycle 21 from Nimbus-7 SBUV and (Delta)F(sub 200-205) = 10(+/- 2)% (daily values) for cycle 23 from UARS SUSIM. NOAA-9 data at 245-250 nm show a solar cycle amplitude of (Delta)F(sub 245-250) = 5.7(+/- 1.8)%. NOAA-9 SBUV/2 data can be combined with other instruments to create a 25-year record of solar UV irradiance.

  4. Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements from the SBUV/2-Series and the SSBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    The NOAA-9 SBEV/2 instrument has made the first regular measurements ot solar UV activity over a complete solar cycle, beginning in March 1985 and continuing as of this writing. The NOAA-9 solar irradiance data set includes the minimum between Cycles 21-22 and the current minimum at the end of Cycle 22. Although overall solar activity is low during these periods, 27-day rotational modulation is frequently present. The episode of 13-day periodicity observed during September 1994 - March 1995 shows that phenomena previously associated with high levels of solar activity can occur at any point in the solar cycle. The 205 nm irradiance and Mg II index measured by NOAA-9 showed very similar behavior during the Cycle 21-22 minimum in 1985-1986, when 27-day periodicity dominated short-term solar variations, but behaved differently in 1994-1995 during the episode of 13-day periodicity. We plan further investigations into the physical causes of this result, since it affects the extent to which the Mg II index is an accurate proxy for 205 nm irradiance variations during such episodes. The NOAA-9 Mg II data are available.

  5. Global upper ocean heat storage response to radiative forcing from changing solar irradiance and increasing greenhouse gas/aerosol concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Warren B.; Cayan, Daniel R.; Lean, Judith

    1998-09-01

    We constructed gridded fields of diabatic heat storage changes in the upper ocean from 20°S to 60°N from historical temperature profiles collected from 1955 to 1996. We filtered these 42 year records for periods of 8 to 15 years and 15 to 30 years, producing depth-weighted vertical average temperature (DVT) changes from the sea surface to the top of the main pycnocline. Basin and global averages of these DVT changes reveal decadal and interdecadal variability in phase across the Indian, Pacific, Atlantic, and Global Oceans, each significantly correlated with changing surface solar radiative forcing at a lag of 0+/-2 years. Decadal and interdecadal changes in global average DVT are 0.06°+/-0.01°K and 0.04°K+/-0.01°K, respectively, the same as those expected from consideration of the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation balance (i.e., 0.3°K per Wm-2) in response to 0.1% changes in surface solar radiative forcing of 0.2 Wm-2 and 0.15 Wm-2, respectively. Global spatial patterns of DVT changes are similar to temperature changes simulated in coupled ocean-atmosphere models, suggesting that natural modes of Earth's variability are phase-locked to the solar irradiance cycle. A trend in global average DVT of 0.15°K over this 42 year record cannot be explained by changing surface solar radiative forcing. But when we consider the 0.5 Wm-2 increase in surface radiative forcing estimated from the increase in atmospheric greenhouse gas and aerosol (GGA) concentrations over this period [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 1995], the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation balance yields this observed change. Moreover, the sum of solar and GGA surface radiative forcing can explain the relatively sharp increase in global and basin average DVT in the late 1970's.

  6. Future Long-term Measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance by JPSS TSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, E. C.; Harber, D.; Harder, J. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Brown, S.; Smith, A.; Lykke, K.

    2011-12-01

    To advance scientific understanding of how solar variability affects climate processes it is important to maintain accurate, long-term records of solar irradiance. Continuation of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements is needed to characterize poorly understood wavelength-dependent climate processes. Measurement challenges in quantifying the influence of SSI variability on climate are achieving sufficient radiometric absolute accuracy and maintaining the long-term relative accuracy. The Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is a dual-instrument package that will acquire solar irradiance as part of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The TSIS Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) instrument will continue the SSI measurements that began with the SORCE SIM in 2003. The TSIS SIM incorporates design and calibration improvements to better quantify long-term SSI variability. Specific improvements include the pre-launch SI-traceable calibration, the measurement precision, and the long-term relative stability needed to meet the requirements for establishing a climate record of SSI into the future. To quantify the absolute accuracy over the full spectral range, we have developed a SIM Radiometer Facility (SIMRF) utilizing the NIST Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations using Uniform Sources (SIRCUS). This comprehensive facility includes tuneable laser light sources from the ultraviolet to the near infrared matched in radiant power to the solar spectrum and tied to a cryogenic radiometer traceable to the NIST Primary Optical Watt Radiometer (POWR). The full characterization and calibration follows a measurement equation approach at the unit-level for full validation of the end-to-end performance at the instrument-level to achieve a combined standard uncertainty of 0.25% .

  7. Mars surface radiation exposure for solar maximum conditions and 1989 solar proton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.

    1992-02-01

    The Langley heavy-ion/nucleon transport code, HZETRN, and the high-energy nucleon transport code, BRYNTRN, are used to predict the propagation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR's) and solar flare protons through the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars. Particle fluences and the resulting doses are estimated on the surface of Mars for GCR's during solar maximum conditions and the Aug., Sep., and Oct. 1989 solar proton events. These results extend previously calculated surface estimates for GCR's at solar minimum conditions and the Feb. 1956, Nov. 1960, and Aug. 1972 solar proton events. Surface doses are estimated with both a low-density and a high-density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere for altitudes of 0, 4, 8, and 12 km above the surface. A solar modulation function is incorporated to estimate the GCR dose variation between solar minimum and maximum conditions over the 11-year solar cycle. By using current Mars mission scenarios, doses to the skin, eye, and blood-forming organs are predicted for short- and long-duration stay times on the Martian surface throughout the solar cycle.

  8. Mars surface radiation exposure for solar maximum conditions and 1989 solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The Langley heavy-ion/nucleon transport code, HZETRN, and the high-energy nucleon transport code, BRYNTRN, are used to predict the propagation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR's) and solar flare protons through the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars. Particle fluences and the resulting doses are estimated on the surface of Mars for GCR's during solar maximum conditions and the Aug., Sep., and Oct. 1989 solar proton events. These results extend previously calculated surface estimates for GCR's at solar minimum conditions and the Feb. 1956, Nov. 1960, and Aug. 1972 solar proton events. Surface doses are estimated with both a low-density and a high-density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere for altitudes of 0, 4, 8, and 12 km above the surface. A solar modulation function is incorporated to estimate the GCR dose variation between solar minimum and maximum conditions over the 11-year solar cycle. By using current Mars mission scenarios, doses to the skin, eye, and blood-forming organs are predicted for short- and long-duration stay times on the Martian surface throughout the solar cycle.

  9. The spectral irradiance of some solar simulators and its effect on cell measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, C.H.; Anspaugh, B.E.; Downing, R.G.; Estey, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    Moderate resolution spectral irradiance measurements in the range 300 nm to 1100 nm have been made of eight radiant sources which are currently being used as solar simulators. Spectral irradiance data are presented in graphical form. To demonstrate the interplay of source spectral distribution and cell spectral response, measurements of short circuit current of five cells of differing response characteristics have been made with these sources. These results are presented in tabular and graphical form.

  10. A Comparison of Variable Total and Ultraviolet Solar Irradiance Inputs to 20 th Century Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, P. V.

    2002-05-01

    Analysis of spaceborne radiometry has shown that the total solar irradiance variation over the past two activity cycles was approximately proportional to the weighted difference between areas of dark spots and bright faculae and enhanced network. Empirical models of ultraviolet irradiance variation indicate that its behavior is dominated by changes in area of the bright component alone, whose photometric contrast increases at shorter wavelength.This difference in time behavior of total and UV irradiances could help to discriminate between their relative importance in forcing of global warming. Our recent digitization of archival Ca K images from Mt Wilson and NSO provides the first direct measurement of variations in area of the bright component, extending between 1915 and 1999 (previous models have relied on the sunspot number or other proxies to estimate the bright - component contribution). We use these more direct measurements to derive the time behavior of solar total and UV irradiance variation, over this period .We find that they are significantly different;the total irradiance variation accounts for over 80 percent of the variance in global temperature during this period, while the ultraviolet irradiance variation accounts for only about 20 percent. The amplitude of total irradiance variation in our model is smaller than required to influence global warming,in current climate models.Also, the impact of sulfate aerosol variations on the extended cooling between the 1940's and 1970's must be better understood before the significance of correlations between 20 th century global warming, and any solar activity index can be properly assessed. Despite these caveats, the lower correlation we find between global temperature and UV,compared to total, irradiance requires consideration in the search for physical mechanisms linking solar activity and climate. This work was supported in part under NASA grant NAG5-7607 to CRI, Inc., and NAG5-10998 to the Applied Physics

  11. Solar irradiance observed at Summit, Greenland: Possible links to magnetic activity on short timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, John E.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of ground-level visible sunlight (400-600 nm) from Summit, Greenland over the period August 2004 through October 2014 define the attenuation provided by cloudiness, including its dependence on solar elevation and season. The long-term mean cloud-attenuation increases with increasing solar zenith angle, consistent with radiative transfer calculations which treat a cloud as a plane parallel layer with a strong bias toward forward scattering and an albedo for diffuse radiation near 0.1. The ratio of measured irradiance to clear-sky irradiance for solar zenith angles greater than 66° has a small, but statistically significant, positive correlation with the previous day's magnetic activity as measured by the daily Ap index, but no clear relationship exists between the irradiance ratio and daily changes in the ground-level neutron flux measured at Thule over the time frame considered. A high value of Ap on one day tends to be followed by a day whose ground-level solar irradiance is slightly greater than would occur otherwise. In an average sense, the visible irradiance following a day with Ap>16 exceeds that following a day with Ap≤16 by 1.2-1.3% with a 95% confidence range of approximately ±1.0%. The results are broadly compatible with small changes in atmospheric scattering following magnetic disturbances.

  12. Solar irradiance from Nimbus-7 compared with ground-based photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Hoyt, D. V.

    1994-01-01

    We have compared total solar irradiance from Nimbus-7 with ground-based photometry from the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) for 109 days between 1 June and 31 December, 1988. We have also included in some analyses NOAA-9 SBUV2 data or F10.7 radio flux. The Nimbus-7 data are from orbital samples, averaged to the mean time of observation at SFO. Using the same parameters as in Chapman et al. (1992), the multiple regression gives an R(exp 2) = 0.9131 and a 'solar minimum' irradiance, S(sub 0) = 1371.76 +/- 0.18 W/sq m for the best fit.

  13. Solar irradiance in the stratosphere - Implications for the Herzberg continuum absorption of O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Mentall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A set of solar irradiance observations is analyzed that were performed from the third Solar Absorption Balloon Experiment (SABE-3) as the payload ascended through the stratosphere from 32 to 39 km. Comparison of these data with calculations of the attenuated irradiance based on simultaneous ozone and pressure measurements made from the payload suggests a refinement of the cross section values used in photochemical models. More ultraviolet radiation in the 200-210 nm spectral region reaches the middle stratosphere than is predicted by the absorption data presently available. It is suggested that significantly smaller values for the Herzberg continuum of O2 be used in future models.

  14. Towards the automatic identification of cloudiness condition by means of solar global irradiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, G.; Serrano, A.; Cancillo, M. L.

    2010-09-01

    This study focuses on the design of an automatic algorithm for classification of the cloudiness condition based only on global irradiance measurements. Clouds are a major modulating factor for the Earth radiation budget. They attenuate the solar radiation and control the terrestrial radiation participating in the energy balance. Generally, cloudiness is a limiting factor for the solar radiation reaching the ground, highly contributing to the Earth albedo. Additionally it is the main responsible for the high variability shown by the downward irradiance measured at ground level. Being a major source for the attenuation and high-frequency variability of the solar radiation available for energy purposes in solar power plants, the characterization of the cloudiness condition is of great interest. This importance is even higher in Southern Europe, where very high irradiation values are reached during long periods within the year. Thus, several indexes have been proposed in the literature for the characterization of the cloudiness condition of the sky. Among these indexes, those exclusively involving global irradiance are of special interest since this variable is the most widely available measurement in most radiometric stations. Taking this into account, this study proposes an automatic algorithm for classifying the cloudiness condition of the sky into three categories: cloud-free, partially cloudy and overcast. For that aim, solar global irradiance was measured by Kipp&Zonen CMP11 pyranometer installed on the terrace of the Physics building in the Campus of Badajoz (Spain) of the University of Extremadura. Measurements were recorded at one-minute basis for a period of study extending from 23 November 2009 to 31 March 2010. The algorithm is based on the clearness index kt, which is calculated as the ratio between the solar global downward irradiance measured at ground and the solar downward irradiance at the top of the atmosphere. Since partially cloudy conditions

  15. The solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance monitor (SUSIM) experiment on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Edlow, K. L.; Floyd, L. E., IV; Lean, J. L.; Vanhoosier, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    The state of solar ultraviolet irradiance measurements in 1978, when NASA requested proposals for a new generation of solar ultraviolet monitors to be flown on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), is described. To overcome the radiometric uncertainties that plagued the measurements at this time, the solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance monitor (SUSIM) instrument design included in-flight calibration light sources and multichannel photometers. Both are aimed at achieving a maximum precision of the SUSIM measurements over a long period of time, e.g., one solar cycle. The design of the SUSIM-UARS instrument is compared with the original design specifications for the UARS instruments. Details including optical train, filters, detectors, and contamination precautions are described. Also discussed are the SUSIM-UARS preflight calibration and characterization, as well as the results of the inflight performance of the instrument during the first 3 months of operation. Finally, flight operations, observation strategy, and data reduction schemes are outlined.

  16. A comparison of solar irradiances measured by SBUV, SME, and rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Barry M.; Heath, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) measurements of solar irradiance and predictions from the Mg 280-nm index are compared with each other and with coincident Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) and rocket measurements. The SBUV irradiances show a systematic decrease with time not seen in the rocket measurements; a correction for this decrease is introduced. The scatter and overall structure in the SME spectra is 3-5 percent, of the order of or larger than most of the changes predicted by the Mg index. The corrected SBUV ratio and the Mg index prediction for it agree to within 1 percent. Such agreement supports a common origin for variations between solar maximum and minimum and those for individual rotations: the degree to which active regions cover the visible hemisphere of the sun.

  17. Comparison Of Solar Surface Features Identified By The Autoclass Pattern Recognition Software From Mount Wilson Observatory Data To Solar Surface Feature Areas Measured By The San Fernando Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Daryl; Preminger, D.; Ulrich, R.; Bertello, L.; Cookson, A.; Chapman, G.

    2009-05-01

    In previous work, the AutoClass software, a Bayesian pattern recognition program based on a finite mixture model, developed by Cheeseman and Stutz (1996), has been used on Mount Wilson Solar Observatory (MWO) intensity and magnetogram images to identify spatially resolved areas on the solar surface associated with Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and to classify the identified areas in terms of traditional categories-spot, plage, quiet, etc. Those results, were in turn used to (1) model TSI variations as measured by satellite and composite TSI observations, with a correlation of better than 0.96, for the period 1996-2008-most of Cycle 23, and (2) create solar images as they would be seen by a hypothetical TSI instrument able to capture resolved images. Here, we compare the same regions identified by AutoClass which were found to be associated with TSI, and the indices derived from them, with the following areas measured by the San Fernando Observatory (SFO): (1) sunspot area in red continuum; (2) facular area in red continuum; (3) sunspot area in wide Ca K-line (WK-line); (4) plage area in WK-line; and (5) plage plus network area in WK-line. The correlations of the AutoClass-MWO indices with the different SFO area measurements varies from better than 0.91 to over 0.98, depending on the type of feature. The comparison of the spatially resolved surface areas identified by AutoClass in the MWO images to the areas of the different feature observed at SFO, and the creation of spatially resolved images depicting those areas, should enable better identification of the types of surface features associated with TSI measurements and their evolution over a solar cycle. The comparison should also assist in validating the automated categorization of solar features found using the AutoClass automated pattern recognition software.

  18. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  19. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  20. A Preliminary Analysis of Solar Irradiance Measurements at TNB Solar Research Centre for Optimal Orientation of Fixed Solar Panels installed in Selangor Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, A. M.; Ali, M. A. M.; Ahmad, B.; Shafie, R. M.; Rusli, R.; Aziz, M. A.; Hassan, J.; Wanik, M. Z. C.

    2013-06-01

    The well established rule for orienting fixed solar devices is to face south for places in the northern hemisphere and northwards for the southern hemisphere. However for regions near the equator such as in Selangor Malaysia, the position of the sun at solar noon is always near zenith both to the north and south depending on location and month of year. This paper reports an analysis of global solar radiation data taken at TNB Solar Research Centre, Malaysia. The solar radiation is measured using both shaded and exposed pyranometers together with a pyrheliometer which is mounted on a sun-tracker. The analysis on the solar measurements show that a near regular solar irradiation pattern had occurred often enough during the year to recommend an optimum azimuth orientation of installing the fixed solar panels tilted facing towards east. Even though all the solar measurements were done at a single location in TNBR Solar Research Centre at Bangi, for locations near the equator with similar weather pattern, the recommended azimuth direction of installing fixed solar panels and collectors tilted eastward will also be generally valid.

  1. SOLAR AND METEOROLOGICAL SURFACE OBSERVATION NETWORK (SAMSON) FOR NC, VA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solar and Meteorological Surface Observational Network (SAMSON) v1.0 data for 6 NWS stations in North Carolina and 4 in Virginia. Hourly solar elements are: extraterrestrial horizontal and extraterrestrial direct normal radiation; global, diffuse, and direct normal radiation. Met...

  2. Evaluating the spatio-temporal performance of sky-imager-based solar irradiance analysis and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Kalisch, John; Lorenz, Elke; Heinemann, Detlev

    2016-03-01

    Clouds are the dominant source of small-scale variability in surface solar radiation and uncertainty in its prediction. However, the increasing share of solar energy in the worldwide electric power supply increases the need for accurate solar radiation forecasts. In this work, we present results of a very short term global horizontal irradiance (GHI) forecast experiment based on hemispheric sky images. A 2-month data set with images from one sky imager and high-resolution GHI measurements from 99 pyranometers distributed over 10 km by 12 km is used for validation. We developed a multi-step model and processed GHI forecasts up to 25 min with an update interval of 15 s. A cloud type classification is used to separate the time series into different cloud scenarios. Overall, the sky-imager-based forecasts do not outperform the reference persistence forecasts. Nevertheless, we find that analysis and forecast performance depends strongly on the predominant cloud conditions. Especially convective type clouds lead to high temporal and spatial GHI variability. For cumulus cloud conditions, the analysis error is found to be lower than that introduced by a single pyranometer if it is used representatively for the whole area in distances from the camera larger than 1-2 km. Moreover, forecast skill is much higher for these conditions compared to overcast or clear sky situations causing low GHI variability, which is easier to predict by persistence. In order to generalize the cloud-induced forecast error, we identify a variability threshold indicating conditions with positive forecast skill.

  3. A Different View of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations: Modeling Total Energy over Six-Month Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Snow, Martin; Harder, Jerald; Chapman, Gary; Cookson, Angela

    2015-10-01

    A different approach to studying solar spectral irradiance (SSI) variations, without the need for long-term (multi-year) instrument degradation corrections, is examining the total energy of the irradiance variation during 6-month periods. This duration is selected because a solar active region typically appears suddenly and then takes 5 to 7 months to decay and disperse back into the quiet-Sun network. The solar outburst energy, which is defined as the irradiance integrated over the 6-month period and thus includes the energy from all phases of active region evolution, could be considered the primary cause for the irradiance variations. Because solar cycle variation is the consequence of multiple active region outbursts, understanding the energy spectral variation may provide a reasonable estimate of the variations for the 11-year solar activity cycle. The moderate-term (6-month) variations from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments can be decomposed into positive (in-phase with solar cycle) and negative (out-of-phase) contributions by modeling the variations using the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) facular excess and sunspot deficit proxies, respectively. These excess and deficit variations are fit over 6-month intervals every 2 months over the mission, and these fitted variations are then integrated over time for the 6-month energy. The dominant component indicates which wavelengths are in-phase and which are out-of-phase with solar activity. The results from this study indicate out-of-phase variations for the 1400 - 1600 nm range, with all other wavelengths having in-phase variations.

  4. In Search of Sun-Climate Connection Using Solar Irradiance Measurements and Climate Records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard K.; Kyle, H. Lee

    2000-01-01

    The Earth's temperature has risen approximately 0.5 degree-C in the last 150 years. Because the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide has increased nearly 30% since the industrial revolution, a common conjecture, supported by various climate models, is that anthropogenic greenhouse gases have contributed to global warming. Another probable factor for the warming is the natural variation of solar irradiance. Although the variation is as small as 0.1 % it is hypothesized that it contributes to part of the temperature rise. Warmer or cooler ocean temperature at one part of the Globe may manifest as abnormally wet or dry weather patterns some months or years later at another part of the globe. Furthermore, the lower atmosphere can be affected through its coupling with the stratosphere, after the stratospheric ozone absorbs the ultraviolet portion of the solar irradiance. In this paper, we use wavelet transforms based on Morlet wavelet to analyze the time-frequency properties in several datasets, including the Radiation Budget measurements, the long-term total solar irradiance time series, the long-term temperature at two locations for the North and the South Hemisphere. The main solar cycle, approximately 11 years, are identified in the long-term total solar irradiance time series. The wavelet transform of the temperature datasets show annual cycle but not the solar cycle. Some correlation is seen between the length of the solar cycle extracted from the wavelet transform and the North Hemisphere temperature time series. The absence of the 11-year cycle in a time series does not necessarily imply that the geophysical parameter is not affected by the solar cycle; rather it simply reflects the complex nature of the Earth's response to climate forcings.

  5. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Socol, Marcela; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ˜1.3 × 103 times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Socol, Marcela; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-28

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 3} times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  7. Surface Net Solar Radiation Estimated from Satellite Measurements: Comparisons with Tower Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhanqing; Leighton, H. G.; Cess, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    A parameterization that relates the reflected solar flux at the top of the atmosphere to the net solar flux at the surface in terms of only the column water vapor amount and the solar zenith angle was tested against surface observations. Net surface fluxes deduced from coincidental collocated satellite-measured radiances and from measurements from towers in Boulder during summer and near Saskatoon in winter have mean differences of about 2 W/sq m, regardless of whether the sky is clear or cloudy. Furthermore, comparisons between the net fluxes deduced from the parameterization and from surface measurements showed equally good agreement when the data were partitioned into morning and afternoon observations. This is in contrast to results from an empirical clear-sky algorithm that is unable to account adequately for the effects of clouds and that shows, at Boulder, a distinct morning to afternoon variation, which is presumably due to the predominance of different cloud types throughout the day. It is also demonstrated that the parameterization may be applied to irradiances at the top of the atmosphere that have been temporally averaged by using the temporally averaged column water vapor amount and the temporally averaged cosine of the solar zenith angle. The good agreement between the results of the parameterization and surface measurements suggests that the algorithm is a useful tool for a variety of climate studies.

  8. Lunar rock surfaces as detectors of solar processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    Lunar rock surfaces exposed at or just below the lunar surface are considered as detectors of the solar wind, solar flares and solar-derived magnetic fields through their interactions with galactic cosmic rays. The degradation of the solar detector capabilities of lunar surface rocks by meteoroid impact erosion, accreta deposition, loose dust, and sputtering, amorphous layer formation and accelerated diffusion due to solar particles and illumination is discussed, and it is noted that the complex interactions of factors affecting the outer micron of exposed surface material has so far prevented the development of a satisfactory model for a particle detector on the submicron scale. Methods for the determination of surface exposure ages based on the accumulation of light solar wind noble gases, Fe and Mg, impact craters, solar flare tracks, and cosmogenic Kr isotopes are examined, and the systematic variations in the ages determined by the various clocks are discussed. It is concluded that a means of obtaining satisfactory quantitative rate or flux data has not yet been established.

  9. Impact of a potential 21st century "grand solar minimum" on surface temperatures and stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anet, J. G.; Rozanov, E. V.; Muthers, S.; Peter, T.; BröNnimann, S.; Arfeuille, F.; Beer, J.; Shapiro, A. I.; Raible, C. C.; Steinhilber, F.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the effects of a recently proposed 21st century Dalton minimum like decline of solar activity on the evolution of Earth's climate and ozone layer. Three sets of two member ensemble simulations, radiatively forced by a midlevel emission scenario (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change RCP4.5), are performed with the atmosphere-ocean chemistry-climate model AOCCM SOCOL3-MPIOM, one with constant solar activity, the other two with reduced solar activity and different strength of the solar irradiance forcing. A future grand solar minimum will reduce the global mean surface warming of 2 K between 1986-2005 and 2081-2100 by 0.2 to 0.3 K. Furthermore, the decrease in solar UV radiation leads to a significant delay of stratospheric ozone recovery by 10 years and longer. Therefore, the effects of a solar activity minimum, should it occur, may interfere with international efforts for the protection of global climate and the ozone layer.

  10. Limitation of Ground-based Estimates of Solar Irradiance Due to Atmospheric Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Holben, Brent N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncertainty in ground-based estimates of solar irradiance is quantitatively related to the temporal variability of the atmosphere's optical thickness. The upper and lower bounds of the accuracy of estimates using the Langley Plot technique are proportional to the standard deviation of aerosol optical thickness (approx. +/- 13 sigma(delta tau)). The estimates of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) in two Cimel sun photometer channels from the Mauna Loa site of AERONET are compared with satellite observations from SOLSTICE (Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment) on UARS (Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite) for almost two years of data. The true solar variations related to the 27-day solar rotation cycle observed from SOLSTICE are about 0.15% at the two sun photometer channels. The variability in ground-based estimates is statistically one order of magnitude larger. Even though about 30% of these estimates from all Level 2.0 Cimel data fall within the 0.4 to approx. 0.5% variation level, ground-based estimates are not able to capture the 27-day solar variation observed from SOLSTICE.

  11. Theory of back-surface-field solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes simple concise theory of back-surface-field (BSF) solar cells (npp + junctions) based on Shockley's depletion-layer approximation and cites superiority of two-junction devices over conventional unijunction cells.

  12. Influence of crystal tilt on solar irradiance of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Klotzsche, Susann; Macke, Andreas

    2006-02-10

    The single and multiple scattering and absorption properties of hexagonal ice columns with different degrees of particle orientation are modeled in the solar spectral range by means of a ray-tracing single-scattering code and a Monte Carlo radiative-transfer code. The scattering properties are most sensitive to particle orientation for the solar zenith angles of 50 degrees (asymmetry parameter) and 90 degrees (single-scattering albedo). Provided that the ice columns are horizontally oriented, the usual assumption of random orientation leads to an overestimation (underestimation) of the reflected (transmitted) solar broadband radiation at high Sun elevation and to an underestimation (overestimation) at medium solar zenith angles. The orientation effect is more (less) pronounced in scattering and transmission (absorption) for smaller ice crystals. PMID:16512547

  13. Proton Irradiation Processing of Early Solar System Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetteland, C. J.; Sickafus, K. E.; Taylor, L. A.; McSween, H. Y.

    2015-07-01

    High-flux protons from Young Stellar Objects may result in secondary processing of early solar system solids. Chondrule precursors may be subjected to heating (possibly melting), nuclear transmutation, comminution, and carbon deposition.

  14. The Sun as a variable star: Solar and stellar irradiance variations; Colloquium of the International Astronomical Union, 143rd, Boulder, CO, Jun. 20-25, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit M. (Editor); Froehlich, Claus (Editor); Hudson, Hugh S. (Editor); Tobiska, W. Kent (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Variations in solar and stellar irradiances have long been of interest. An International Astronomical Union (IAU) colloquium reviewed such relevant subjects as observations, theoretical interpretations, and empirical and physical models, with a special emphasis on climatic impact of solar irradiance variability. Specific topics discussed included: (1) General Reviews on Observations of Solar and Stellar Irradiance Variability; (2) Observational Programs for Solar and Stellar Irradiance Variability; (3) Variability of Solar and Stellar Irradiance Related to the Network, Active Regions (Sunspots and Plages), and Large-Scale Magnetic Structures; (4) Empirical Models of Solar Total and Spectral Irradiance Variability; (5) Solar and Stellar Oscillations, Irradiance Variations and their Interpretations; and (6) The Response of the Earth's Atmosphere to Solar Irradiance Variations and Sun-Climate Connections.

  15. Effect of the chosen solar irradiance dataset on simulations of a Future Grand Minimum: Results from a state-of-the-art Chemistry-Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegl, T. C.; Langematz, U.

    2015-12-01

    The long-lasting minimum of Solar Cycle 23 as well as the overall weak maximum of Cycle 24 reveal the possibility for a return to Grand Solar Minimum conditions within the next decades. The past 1,000 years featured at least 5 excursions (lasting 60-100 years) of exceptionally low solar activity, induced by a weak magnetic field of the Sun. The last Grand Solar Minimum (the Maunder Minimum, 1645-1715) coincides with the Little Ice Age in Europe, a time of severe cold and hardship. The quantification of the implications of such a projected decrease in solar forcing is of ultimate importance, given the on-going public discussion of the role of carbon dioxide emissions for global warming, and the possible role a cooling due to decreasing solar activity could be ascribed to. However, existing model simulations that aim to answer these questions suffer from simplifications in the included parameterizations (e.g., no spectral radiation scheme), missing coupling with ocean models, or too low model tops. In addition, there is still no clear consensus about the actual strength of the Maunder Minimum, which is reflected in a range of spectral reconstruction datasets available. To estimate the range of climate response to different Maunder Minimum reconstructions, we compared 3 acknowledged solar datasets that show significant differences in both, total solar irradiance (TSI) and spectral irradiance (SSI) in a single model, first-time. For our purposes we choose to use the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry Model (EMAC) coupled to a mixed-layer ocean. EMAC incorporates interactive ozone chemistry, a high-resolution shortwave radiation scheme as well as a high model top (0.01 hPa). To get a clean climate signal, all simulations were conducted in time slice mode under 1960 conditions. The experiments show distinct differences in near surface temperatures and reveal the important role of stratospheric processes for the response of surface climate to solar irradiance variations.

  16. Progress in Projecting Solar Radiation at the Earth's Surface in Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, W.; Fildier, B.; Feldman, D.

    2015-12-01

    Projecting changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface in futureclimates is a critical input to forecast surface irradiance for solarenergy. We demonstrate the current state of the art using theensemble of opportunity assembled for the Coupled ModelIntercomparison Project (CMIP5) and the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The reliability of these projections depends upon the accuracy of theunderlying radiation codes, the fidelity of these codes to themeasured optical properties of key radiatively active atmosphericconstituents, and the realism of future projections of theseatmospheric constituents. These constituents include aerosols,clouds, water vapor, greenhouse gases that absorb near-infraredsunlight. Since the realism of future projections of anthropogenicaerosol species is contingent on the underlying scenario, we focus onthe other challenges in forecasting surface irradiance. Regarding accuracy, we demonstrate that current GCM shortwaveparameterizations often exhibit quite small errors relative tobenchmark radiative transfer codes. In addition, recent work hasbracketed the uncertainties in solar irradiance associated withcomplex cloud geometries. There is also an emerging consensus howcloud radiative effects will evolve in a warmer climate. However,there is evidence that current GCM codes still exhibit systematicerrors in the near-infrared water vapor bands, particularly for moistsub-tropical atmospheres. These errors will become more acute aswater vapor feedbacks, combined with global warming, increase thetotal precipitable water in the Earth's atmosphere.

  17. A semiparametric spatio-temporal model for solar irradiance data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Patrick, Joshua D.; Harvill, Jane L.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we evaluate semiparametric spatio-temporal models for global horizontal irradiance at high spatial and temporal resolution. These models represent the spatial domain as a lattice and are capable of predicting irradiance at lattice points, given data measured at other lattice points. Using data from a 1.2 MW PV plant located in Lanai, Hawaii, we show that a semiparametric model can be more accurate than simple interpolation between sensor locations. We investigate spatio-temporal models with separable and nonseparable covariance structures and find no evidence to support assuming a separable covariance structure. These results indicate a promising approach for modeling irradiance atmore » high spatial resolution consistent with available ground-based measurements. Moreover, this kind of modeling may find application in design, valuation, and operation of fleets of utility-scale photovoltaic power systems.« less

  18. Possible impacts of a descent into a Grand Solar Minimum on extratropical regional surface climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maycock, A. C.; Ineson, S.; Gray, L. J.; Scaife, A. A.; Lockwood, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Sun's output varies on a number of characteristic timescales, the most well-known of which is the approximately 11-year solar cycle. It has been shown that the Sun also exhibits cycles with a period of ~200 years, so-called Grand Solar Cycles. Reconstructions indicate that levels of solar activity have been relatively high for the past ~70 years, and it has been suggested that the Sun might be expected to evolve towards a state of lower output; however, the timescale and extent of such a 'Grand Solar Minimum' event is highly uncertain. This study presents sensitivity experiments with a state-of-the-art climate model to investigate the impact of reaching very low levels of solar output, similar to those thought to have occurred during the Maunder Minimum, by the middle of the 21st century. We investigate the effect of uncertainties in spectral solar irradiance by using both the semi-empirical model of Lean et al., which gives a relatively modest change in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region and is commonly used to represent solar variability in climate models, as well as the recent measurements from the SORCE satellite, which suggest a much larger change in the UV across the solar cycle for the period 2004-07. Under the assumption of there being a large change in the UV derived from a linear extrapolation of the SORCE data, it is shown that a period of very low solar activity would be associated with a more negative North Atlantic Oscillation index. This signature in the large-scale circulation is associated with changes in regional surface climate, including cooler temperatures across the UK and western Europe. In the experiment which assumes a smaller change in UV irradiance, the extratropical circulation responses in the stratosphere and troposphere are found to be of a consistent sign but smaller in magnitude. This highlights the importance of one possible mechanism for solar-climate interactions, namely the impact of tropical upper stratospheric heating on

  19. Measurements of solar spectral downwelling irradiance in the water column of a large reservoir in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potes, Miguel; João Costa, Maria; Salgado, Rui; Morais, Manuela; Bortoli, Daniele; Kostadinov, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Periodic profiles of spectral downwelling irradiance were performed at Alqueva reservoir, southeast of Portugal, with a new apparatus developed by the team. The device presents a hemispherical tip (180° of FOV) allowing measurements to be independent of solar zenith angle. It is coupled to a portable spectroradiometer through a fiber bundle driven by a customized frame for protection and to keep the tip pointing to the zenith direction in underwater environment. The profiles obtained can be used to estimate the spectral and broadband light attenuation coefficients in the water column. The attenuation coefficients are relevant for the water surface layer energy budget, in particular, this coefficient is important in the computation of the water surface temperature, which is a key parameter for heat and moisture transfers between the reservoirs and the atmosphere, namely by the lake models. A comparison measurement was performed with this new apparatus (180° of FOV) and the previous device (22° of FOV) in order to demonstrate the importance of using the hemispherical radiance. The comparison show resembling results between both devices, however the previous device tends to underestimate the attenuation coefficient and increase the degree of uncertainty.

  20. The Solar Spectral Irradiance Measured on Board the International Space Station and the Picard Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, G. O.; Bolsee, D.; Schmidtke, G.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2011-12-01

    On board the International Space Station, the spectrometers SOL-ACES and SOLSPEC measure the solar spectrum irradiance from 17 to 150 nm and 170 to 2900 nm, respectively. On board PICARD launched on 15 June 2010, the PREMOS instrument consists in a radiometer and several sunphotometers operated at several fixed wavelengths. We shall present spectra at different solar activity levels as well as their quoted accuracy. Comparison with similar data from other missions presently running in space will be shown incorporating the PREMOS measurements. Some special solar events will be also presented and interpreted.

  1. Pollen chemistry as a tool for reconstructing past solar and ultraviolet irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, Phillip; Fraser, Wesley; Lomax, Barry; Gosling, William

    2016-04-01

    Despite the importance of solar irradiance as a dominant control on Earth's energy budget, no proxy has been developed that can provide records on timescales of over 10 000 years. No independent empirical record of solar irradiance therefore exists prior to the Holocene, limiting our understanding of the relationships between solar energy inputs, global climate and biotic change over longer timescales. Here, we present a novel proxy based on the chemical composition of sporopollenin, the primary component of the outer walls of pollen and spores (sporomorphs). Sporopollenin chemistry is responsive to levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation exposure, via a concomitant change in the concentration of phenolic compounds. This relationship offers the possibility of using fossil sporomorph chemistry as a proxy for past UV-B flux, and by extension total solar irradiance (TSI). Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy provides an efficient, economical and non-destructive method for measuring phenolic compound concentration on small sample sizes (≤30 sporomorphs/sample). The high preservation potential of sporomorphs in the geologic record, and the conserved nature of sporopollenin chemistry and UV-B response across the Embryophyta, means that this new proxy has the potential to reconstruct UV-B and TSI flux over much longer timescales than has previously been possible. We demonstrate the utility of this proxy with two chemopalynological datasets. Orbital cyclicity is reconstructed using grass pollen from a 150 000 year long sediment record from Lake Bosumtwi in Ghana, and changes in solar output over the last 600 years are reconstructed using pine pollen from Nar Lake in Turkey. This proxy provides a new approach for quantifying and understanding the relationship between UV-B flux, solar insolation and past climate. The unpicking of this information offers the tantalising potential to determine how changes in solar irradiance have driven long-term changes in

  2. The Measurement of the Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability at 782 nm during the Solar Cycle 24 using the SES on-board PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, Mustapha; Hauchecorne, Alain; Irbah, Abdanour; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-04-01

    A Sun Ecartometry Sensor (SES) was developed to provide the stringent pointing requirements of the PICARD satellite. The SES sensor produced an image of the Sun at 782+/-5 nm. From the SES data, we obtained a new time series of the solar spectral irradiance at 782nm from 2010 to 2014. SES observations provided a qualitatively consistent evolution of the solar spectral irradiance variability at 782 nm during the solar cycle 24. Comparisons will be made with Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) semi-empirical model and with the Spectral Irradiance Monitor instrument (SIM) on-board the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment satellite (SORCE). These data will help to improve the representation of the solar forcing in the IPSL Global Circulation Model.

  3. Stratospheric ozone response to a solar irradiance reduction in a quadrupled CO2 environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.

    2014-07-01

    We used the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) global two-dimensional (2D) atmospheric model to investigate the stratospheric ozone response to a proposed geoengineering activity wherein a reduced top-of-atmosphere (TOA) solar irradiance is imposed to help counteract a quadrupled CO2 atmosphere. This study is similar to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Experiment G1. Three primary simulations were completed with the GSFC 2D model to examine this possibility: (A) a pre-industrial atmosphere with a boundary condition of 285 ppmv CO2 (piControl); (B) a base future atmosphere with 1140 ppmv CO2 (abrupt4xCO2); and (C) a perturbed future atmosphere with 1140 ppmv CO2 and a 4% reduction in the TOA total solar irradiance (G1). We found huge ozone enhancements throughout most of the stratosphere (up to 40%) as a result of a large computed temperature decrease (up to 18 K) when CO2 was quadrupled (compare simulation abrupt4xCO2 to piControl). Further, we found that ozone will additionally increase (up to 5%) throughout most of the stratosphere with total ozone increases of 1-2.5% as a result of a reduction in TOA total solar irradiance (compare simulation G1 to abrupt4xCO2). Decreases of atomic oxygen and temperature are the main drivers of this computed ozone enhancement from a reduction in TOA total solar irradiance.

  4. Spurious Acceleration Noise on the LISA Spacecraft Due to Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrzkowski, Brandon; Frank, Barret; Bolen, Brett; Larson, Shane

    2016-03-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a configuration of three satellites that will precisely measure the distance between each other in order to detect gravitational waves. Therefore, the stability of LISA satellite configuration will be crucial to its ability to measure gravitational waves, as will understanding the noise introduced in the measured gravitational wave signal from various environmental accelerations. Although solar irradiance will certainly be a large source of noise in the desired frequency band and will attempt to disrupt the satellite configuration, previous research has only considered zeroth order calculations of force by irradiance in static systems. To remedy this, we used a geometric and material based approach to calculate the force on the satellites' solar arrays, the only component facing the sun. Running our simulation of LISA based on irradiance data from the VIRGO (Variability of solar IRadiance and Gravity Oscillations) satellite, we examined the Fourier transform of force to find the associated acceleration noise within in the LISA frequency band due to solar irradiance. This research will help isolate the gravitational wave signal when LISA is flown. University of Mississippi.

  5. Reconstruction of the Solar EUV Irradiance as observed with SOHO/SEM and PROBA2/LYRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberreiter, M.; Delouille, V.; Mampaey, B.; Verbeeck, C.; Del Zanna, G.; Ermolli, I.; Kretzschmar, M.; Dominique, M.; Wieman, S. R.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2013-12-01

    The solar EUV spectrum has important effects on the Earth's upper atmosphere. For a detailed investigation of these effects it is important to have a constistent data series of the EUV spectral irradiance available. Here, we present the reconstruction of the solar EUV irradiance based on PSPT and SOHO/EIT images and along with synthetic spectra calculated for six different coronal features representing the brightness variation of the solar atmosphere. The EIT images are segmented with the SPoCA tool which allows to identify the features based on a consistent brightness classification for each feature. With the SOLMOD code we then calculate intensity spectra for 10 nm to 100 nm for each of the coronal feature. Weighting the intensity spectra with the area covered by each of the features yields the temporal variation of the EUV spectrum. The reconstructed time series is then validated against the spectral irradiance as observed with SOHO/SEM and PROBA2/LYRA. Our approach leads to a very good agreement between the reconstructed and the observed spectral irradiance. This is an important step towards the understanding of the variations of the solar EUV spectrum and ultimately its effect on the Earth's upper atmosphere.

  6. A method to measure the broadband longwave irradiance in the terrestrial direct solar beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Ibrahim; Konings, Jörgen; Xie, Yu

    2015-07-01

    Shortwave radiometers such as pyranometers, pyrheliometers, photovoltaic cells, and longwave radiometers such as pyrgeometers are calibrated with traceability to consensus References, which are maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs) and the World InfraRed Standard Group (WISG), respectively. Since the ACR is an open cavity with no window, and was developed to measure the extended broadband spectrum of the terrestrial direct solar beam irradiance, then there would be discrepancy in calibrating the shortwave radiometers because of their limited spectral band. On the other hand, pyrgeometers are calibrated during the nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This article describes a method to measure the broadband longwave irradiance in the terrestrial direct solar beam from 3 μm to 50 μm. The method might be used in developing calibration methods to address the mismatch between the broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometer calibration. We used the described method to measure the irradiance from sunrise to sunset; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 W m-2 to 16 W m-2 with an estimated uncertainty of 1.46 W m-2, for a solar zenith angle range from 80° to 16°, respectively.

  7. Solar Irradiance from GOES Albedo performance in a Hydrologic Model Simulation of Snowmelt Runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumargo, E.; Cayan, D. R.; McGurk, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    In many hydrologic modeling applications, solar radiation has been parameterized using commonly available measures, such as the daily temperature range, due to scarce in situ solar radiation measurement network. However, these parameterized estimates often produce significant biases. Here we test hourly solar irradiance derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) visible albedo product, using several established algorithms. Focusing on the Sierra Nevada and White Mountain in California, we compared the GOES irradiance and that from a traditional temperature-based algorithm with incoming irradiance from pyranometers at 19 stations. The GOES based estimates yielded 21-27% reduction in root-mean-squared error (average over 19 sites). The derived irradiance is then prescribed as an input to Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS). We constrain our experiment to the Tuolumne River watershed and focus our attention on the winter and spring of 1996-2014. A root-mean-squared error reduction of 2-6% in daily inflow to Hetch Hetchy at the lower end of the Tuolumne catchment was achieved by incorporating the insolation estimates at only 8 out of 280 Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) within the basin. Our ongoing work endeavors to apply satellite-derived irradiance at each individual HRU.

  8. Oxidation-Resistant Surfaces For Solar Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Egger, Robert A.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    Thin films on silver provide highly-reflective, corrosion-resistant mirrors. Study evaluated variety of oxidation-resistant reflective materials for use in solar dynamic power system, one that generates electricity by focusing Sunlight onto reciever of heat engine. Thin films of platinum and rhodium deposited by ion-beam sputtering on various substrate materials. Solar reflectances measured as function of time of exposure to radio-frequency-generated air plasma. Several protective coating materials deposited on silver-coated substrates and exposed to plasma. Analyzed before and after exposure by electon spectroscopy for chemical analysis and by Auger spectroscopy.

  9. Quality assurance of solar UV irradiance in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Gröbner, Julian; Hülsen, Gregor; Wuttke, Sigrid; Schrems, Otto; De Simone, Sara; Gallo, Veronica; Rafanelli, Claudio; Petkov, Boyan; Vitale, Vito; Edvardsen, Kåre; Stebel, Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    The first Arctic intercomparison of three solar ultraviolet (UV) spectroradiometers and two multifilter radiometers was held in May and June 2009 at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway. The transportable reference spectroradiometer QASUME acted as reference instrument for this intercomparison. The measurement period extended over eleven days, comprising clear sky and overcast weather conditions. Due to the high latitude, measurements could be performed throughout the day during this period. The intercomparison demonstrated that the solar UV measurements from all instruments agreed to within +/-15% during the whole measurement period, while the spectroradiometer from the Alfred-Wegener Institute agreed to better than +/-5%. This intercomparison has demonstrated that solar UV measurements can be performed reliably in the high-latitude Arctic environment with uncertainties comparable to mid-latitude sites. PMID:20221466

  10. Reflection properties of hydrogen ions at helium irradiated tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, K.; Tawada, Y.; Lee, H. T.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, N.; Sasao, M.; Kisaki, M.; Nishiura, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yamaoka, H.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured W surfaces prepared by He bombardment exhibit characteristic angular distributions of hydrogen ion reflection upon injection of 1 keV H+ beam. A magnetic momentum analyzer that can move in the vacuum chamber has measured the angular dependence of the intensity and the energy of reflected ions. Broader angular distributions were observed for He-irradiated tungsten samples compared with that of the intrinsic polycrystalline W. Both intensity and energy of reflected ions decreased in the following order: the polycrystalline W, the He-bubble containing W, and the fuzz W. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations based on Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target code suggests that lower atom density near the surface can make the reflection coefficients lower due to increasing number of collisions.

  11. Solar irradiances measured using SPN1 radiometers: uncertainties and clues for development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badosa, J.; Wood, J.; Blanc, P.; Long, C. N.; Vuilleumier, L.; Demengel, D.; Haeffelin, M.

    2014-08-01

    The fast development of solar radiation and energy applications, such as photovoltaic and solar thermodynamic systems, has increased the need for solar radiation measurement and monitoring, not only for the global component but also for the diffuse and direct. End users look for the best compromise between getting close to state-of-the-art measurements and keeping low capital, maintenance and operating costs. Among the existing commercial options, SPN1 is a relatively low cost solar radiometer that estimates global and diffuse solar irradiances from seven thermopile sensors under a shading mask and without moving parts. This work presents a comprehensive study of SPN1 accuracy and sources of uncertainty, which results from laboratory experiments, numerical modeling and comparison studies between measurements from this sensor and state-of-the art instruments for six diverse sites. Several clues are provided for improving the SPN1 accuracy and agreement with state-of-the art measurements.

  12. Solar irradiances measured using SPN1 radiometers: uncertainties and clues for development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badosa, J.; Wood, J.; Blanc, P.; Long, C. N.; Vuilleumier, L.; Demengel, D.; Haeffelin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The fast development of solar radiation and energy applications, such as photovoltaic and solar thermodynamic systems, has increased the need for solar radiation measurement and monitoring, for not only the global but also the diffuse and direct components. End users look for the best compromise between getting close to state-of-the-art measurements and keeping low capital, maintenance and operating costs. Among the existing commercial options, SPN1 is a relatively low cost solar radiometer that estimates global and diffuse solar irradiances from seven thermopile sensors under a shading mask and without moving parts. This work presents a comprehensive study of SPN1 accuracy and sources of uncertainty, drawing on laboratory experiments, numerical modelling and comparison studies between measurements from this sensor and state-of-the art instruments for six diverse sites. Several clues are provided for improving the SPN1 accuracy and agreement with state-of-the art measurements.

  13. Solar Irradiances Measured using SPN1 Radiometers: Uncertainties and Clues for Development

    SciTech Connect

    Badosa, Jordi; Wood, John; Blanc, Philippe; Long, Charles N.; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Demengel, Dominique; Haeffelin, Martial

    2014-12-08

    The fast development of solar radiation and energy applications, such as photovoltaic and solar thermodynamic systems, has increased the need for solar radiation measurement and monitoring, not only for the global component but also the diffuse and direct. End users look for the best compromise between getting close to state-of-the-art measurements and keeping capital, maintenance and operating costs to a minimum. Among the exist