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1

Water snails  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water snails have a shell for protection. They have two tentacles, a foot, and a head and a tail region. Water snails have eyes at the base of their sensory stalks. The stalks are used to smell and feel around the snail's environment.

Scott Bauer (USDA; ARS)

2005-08-03

2

Land and water snails  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Land snails live on the land and water snails make water their habitat. Land snails have shells to protect them and so do water snails. Land snails have two sets of antennae, while water snails only have one set.

Olivia Worland (Purdue University; Biological Sciences)

2008-06-03

3

Crawling beneath the free surface: Water snail locomotion  

E-print Network

Land snails move via adhesive locomotion. Through muscular contraction and expansion of their foot, they transmit waves of shear stress through a thin layer of mucus onto a solid substrate. Since a free surface cannot support shear stress, adhesive locomotion is not a viable propulsion mechanism for water snails that travel inverted beneath the free surface. Nevertheless, the motion of the freshwater snail, Sorbeoconcha physidae, is reminiscent of that of its terrestrial counterparts, being generated by the undulation of the snail foot that is separated from the free surface by a thin layer of mucus. Here, a lubrication model is used to describe the mucus flow in the limit of small amplitude interfacial deformations. By assuming the shape of the snail foot to be a traveling sine wave and the mucus to be Newtonian, an evolution equation for the interface shape is obtained and the resulting propulsive force on the snail is calculated. This propulsive force is found to be non-zero for moderate values of Capillary number but vanishes in the limits of high and low Capillary numbers. Physically, this force arises because the snail's foot deforms the free surface, thereby generating curvature pressures and lubrication flows inside the mucus layer that couple to the topography of the foot.

Sungyon Lee; John W. M. Bush; A. E. Hosoi; Eric Lauga

2008-06-23

4

Crawling beneath the free surface: Water snail locomotion Sungyon Lee,1  

E-print Network

onto a solid substrate. Since a free surface cannot support shear stress, adhesive locomotion by a thin layer of mucus. Here, a lubrication model is used to describe the mucus flow in the limit of small the snail's foot deforms the free surface, thereby generating curvature pressures and lubrication flows

Lauga, Eric

5

The effects of water availability on the life history of the desert snail, Trochoidea seetzeni  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In the Negev desert of Israel, the pulmonate land snailTrochoidea seetzeni is active, grows and reproduces in the month following the torrential winter rains. Thereafter, these snails estivate until the following year's rains. By experimental supplementation of water in the field, we examined the ability of these snails to alter their life histories. Specifically, we measured changes in feeding

David Ward; Robert Slotow

1992-01-01

6

Incidence of Parastrongylus cantonensis larvae in different fresh water snails in Dakahlia Governorate.  

PubMed

Samples of snails were collected from different water bodies in Dakahlia governorate to assess a survey on the naturally infected snails and their infection rate with the Parastrongylus cantonensis larvae. The nematode P. cantonensis is associated in the etiology of eosinophilic meningeoencephalitis of man. Lanistes carinatus showed the highest rate of infection with 19-400 larvae per snail. Biomphalaria alexandrina, B. glabrata, Bulinus truncatus, Lymnaea cailliaudi (natalensis), L. alexandrina, and Cleopatra cyclostomoides were found naturally infected with the larvae of P. cantonensis for the first time in Egypt. The number of larvae per infected snail varied depending on the snail type. The highest rate (39.2%) of infected snails was collected from the end canals at Tanneekh and the lowest in the river Nile (12.5%). PMID:12214935

el-Shazly, A M; el-Hamshary, Eman M; el-Shewy, Khalid M; Rifaat, Manal M A; el-Sharkawy, Iman M A

2002-08-01

7

Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces  

PubMed Central

Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

2012-01-01

8

Fasciola hepatica in Snails Collected from Water-Dropwort Fields using PCR  

PubMed Central

Fasciola hepatica is a trematode that causes zoonosis mainly in cattle and sheep and occasionally in humans. Fascioliasis has been reported in Korea; however, determining F. hepatica infection in snails has not been done recently. Thus, using PCR, we evaluated the prevalence of F. hepatica infection in snails at 4 large water-dropwort fields. Among 349 examined snails, F. hepatica-specific internal transcribed space 1 (ITS-1) and/or ITS-2 markers were detected in 12 snails and confirmed using sequence analysis. Morphologically, 213 of 349 collected snails were dextral shelled, which is the same aperture as the lymnaeid snail, the vectorial host for F. hepatica. Among the 12 F. hepatica-infected snails, 6 were known first intermediate hosts in Korea (Lymnaea viridis and L. ollula) and the remaining 6 (Lymnaea sp.) were potentially a new first intermediate host in Korea. It has been shown that the overall prevalence of the snails contaminated with F. hepatica in water-dropwort fields was 3.4%; however, the prevalence varied among the fields. This is the first study to estimate the prevalence of F. hepatica infection using the vectorial capacity of the snails in Korea. PMID:25548416

Kim, Hwang-Yong; Choi, In-Wook; Kim, Yeon-Rok; Quan, Juan-Hua; Ismail, Hassan Ahmed Hassan Ahmed; Cha, Guang-Ho; Hong, Sung-Jong

2014-01-01

9

Copper toxicity to the fresh water snail, Lymnaea luteola  

SciTech Connect

Haemocyanins are found in arthropoda and mollusca and show a copper content characteristic for each phylum. Heavy metal accumulation by mollusks is widely reported. Approximately one third of the enzymes either required addition of a metal ion as a cofactor in order to exhibit maximum activity or contained a slightly bound metal ion which appeared to be involved in the catalytic process. Copper is the only metal which has been detected in significant amounts in amino oxidase. The present study is designed to evaluate the influence of such copper, which is of such common occurrence in biological material, on some of the lipolytic enzymes of fresh water pulmonate snail, Lymnaea luteola when added to ambient medium. The present study also highlights the possible detoxification mechanism prevailing in this fresh water mollusk.

Reddy, N.M.; Rao, P.V.

1987-07-01

10

Survival of the Faucet Snail after Chemical Disinfection, pH extremes, and Heated Water Bath Treatments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata, a nonindigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia, was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871 and has spread to the mid-Atlantic states, the Great Lakes region, Montana, and most recently, the Mississippi River. The faucet snail serves as intermediate host for several trematodes that have caused large-scale mortality among water birds, primarily in the Great Lakes region

Andrew J. Mitchell; Rebecca A. Cole

2008-01-01

11

Supercharged Snails for Stream Ecology & Water-Quality Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gill-breathing freshwater snails (Family "Pleuroceridae") are ecologically important, abundant in many streams in the United States, and easy to collect and maintain under classroom conditions. These snails can be used in classroom tests to demonstrate effects of pollutants on aquatic organisms. In more advanced classes, students can cage the…

Stewart, Arthur J.; Ryon, Michael G.

2003-01-01

12

Garden snail  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One reason why the snail is considered to be a mollusk is because it doesn't have any legs. It moves around on its belly, which is actually called the foot. Some snails live in water while others only live on land.

Danielle N/A (None;)

2007-07-28

13

Fecal bacterial contamination in natural water reservoirs as an indicator of seasonal infection by Opisthorchis viverrini in snail intermediate hosts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opisthorchis viverrini, a carcinogenic liver fluke, requires Bithynia snails as the first intermediate host, which release cercariae after ingesting fluke eggs from contaminated water. Fecal bacterial contamination and O. viverrini-infected Bithynia snails were investigated in samples collected from natural water reservoirs in Ban Phai, Chonnabot and Muang Districts (Ban Lerngpeuy) in Khon Kaen Province, northeast Thailand, where there is a

Wanlop Kaewkes; Sasithorn Kaewkes; Smarn Tesana; Thewarach Laha; Banchob Sripa

14

Accumulation and distributions of 137Cs in fresh water snail Pila ampullacea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pila ampullacea are found in tropical freshwaters of Indonesia. This snail exhibit several characteristics of ideal indicator organisms in order to understand the bioaccumulation of 137Cs . Biokinetic experiment was performaced in aquaria system and under influenced of concentration K+ in water. The result of experiment shown that Under difference K+ concentration in water, Pila ampullacea have capability to accumulated 137Cs with CF value range 8.95 to 12.52 ml.g-1. Both uptake and depuration rate were influenced by concentration of K+ in water.

Suseno, Heny

2014-10-01

15

Snail Snooping.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an activity in which students in grades 5-8 learn about snail reproduction by observing and charting the activities of land snails, freshwater snails, and slugs. Instructions to implement and extend the activity are provided. (MDH)

Miller, Dorothy

1993-01-01

16

Fecal bacterial contamination in natural water reservoirs as an indicator of seasonal infection by Opisthorchis viverrini in snail intermediate hosts.  

PubMed

Opisthorchis viverrini, a carcinogenic liver fluke, requires Bithynia snails as the first intermediate host, which release cercariae after ingesting fluke eggs from contaminated water. Fecal bacterial contamination and O. viverrini-infected Bithynia snails were investigated in samples collected from natural water reservoirs in Ban Phai, Chonnabot and Muang Districts (Ban Lerngpeuy) in Khon Kaen Province, northeast Thailand, where there is a high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma. Water was sampled and examined six times (February, April, June, August, October and December 2006). The most probable number (MPN) index and coliform counts were utilized to evaluate fecal contamination; the cercarial shedding method was conducted for detecting infected snails. The data revealed that all water samples had a high MPN index number, and fecal coliform levels above the WHO standard. This indicated that water in these reservoirs was contaminated with feces or manure constituents. Water sampling from Ban Lerngpeuy showed full-scale bacterial contamination (>1609 MPN index) throughout the year. This finding was correlated with the highest prevalence of O. viverrini-infected snails, which were found nearly all year round in this area. Slightly lower fecal contamination levels were detected in water samples from Chonnabot and Ban Phai, with high MPN index numbers and coliform counts from April to October. This corresponded with the higher recovery of infected snails in June and August, but with relatively lower prevalence than those found in Ban Lerngpeuy. Among the sampling sites, the people in Ban Lerngpeuy live nearer to the reservoir than do those in Ban Phai and Chonnabot. These results indicate that fecal bacterial contamination in natural water reservoirs is an important indicator of seasonal transmission of O. viverrini eggs to snail intermediate hosts. Sanitation improvement is essential and future investigations on the sources of contamination are needed. PMID:21871971

Kaewkes, Wanlop; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Tesana, Smarn; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob

2012-03-01

17

THE WATER RELATIONS OF SNAILS AND SLUGS II. WEIGHT RHYTHMS IN ARfOX ATKR L. AND UMAX FLAWS L  

Microsoft Academic Search

IN the first paper of this series (Howes and Wells, 1934), we showed that active specimens of the edible snail (Helix pomatid) continually undergo considerable fluctuations in weight, due to changes in their water content, even in environments which do not greatly vary in physical properties. The following experiments were performed in order to find out whether similar phenomena occur

N. H. HOWES; G. P. WELLS

18

Implications of water hardness in ecotoxicological assessments for water quality regulatory purposes: a case study with the aquatic snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818).  

PubMed

Water hardness is a property depending on the presence of alkaline earth metals, mainly calcium and magnesium. Among the strategies for water quality monitoring, ecotoxicological assays are performed to minimize impacts and classify water bodies. For these laboratory evaluations parameters are previously defined in the guidelines, including water hardness for both cultivation and testing medium. The present work was performed to evaluate the effects of different levels of water hardness on the survival and reproduction of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata and discuss the influence of natural water hardness on the results of ecotoxicological tests with these environmental samples. Comparing the groups it was possible to observe that those maintained in waters with least hardness had lower reproductive success, while the groups maintained in highest hardness showed better reproduction. These data show that waters with low hardness make the reproduction of the snail B. glabrata unfeasible, and this reveal a problem for ecotoxicity assays using natural water samples. PMID:25055099

Oliveira-Filho, E C; Caixeta, N R; Simplício, N C S; Sousa, S R; Aragão, T P; Muniz, D H F

2014-02-01

19

Use of Ice-Water and Salt Treatments to Eliminate an Exotic Snail, the Red-Rim Melania, from Small Immersible Fisheries Equipment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ice-water and salt treatments were evaluated for disinfection of small immersible fisheries equipment contaminated with a nonindigenous tropical snail, the red-rim melania Melanoides tuberculatus. This introduced species can displace native snails and transmit trematodes directly to fish and indirectly to other animals, including humans. The red-rim melania has a well-developed operculum that protects it from desiccation and allows it to

Andrew J. Mitchell; Thomas M. Brandt

2009-01-01

20

Survival of the faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Bithynia tentaculata, the faucet snail, is a non indigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia that was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871. The snail’s distribution in the United States has expanded to the mid-Atlantic states and the drainage basin of the Great Lakes and most recently to the Mississippi...

21

Effect of water temperature and population density on the population dynamics of Schistosoma mansoni intermediate host snails.  

PubMed

BackgroundMathematical models can be used to identify areas at risk of increased or new schistosomiasis transmission as a result of climate change. The results of these models can be very different when parameterised to different species of host snail, which have varying temperature preferences. Currently, the experimental data needed by these models are available for only a few species of snail. The choice of density-dependent functions can also affect model results, but the effects of increasing densities on Biomphalaria populations have only previously been investigated in artificial aquariums.MethodsLaboratory experiments were conducted to estimate Biomphalaria sudanica mortality, fecundity and growth rates at ten different constant water temperatures, ranging from 13-32°C. Snail cages were used to determine the effects of snail densities on B. sudanica and B. stanleyi mortality and fecundity rates in semi-natural conditions in Lake Albert.Results B. sudanica survival and fecundity were highest at 20°C and 22°C respectively. Growth in shell diameter was estimated to be highest at 23°C in small and medium sized snails, but the relationship between temperature and growth was not clear. The fecundity of both B. sudanica and B. stanleyi decreased by 72-75% with a four-fold increase in population density. Increasing densities four-fold also doubled B. stanleyi mortality rates, but had no effect on the survival of B. sudanica.ConclusionsThe optimum temperature for fecundity was lower for B. sudanica than for previously studied species of Biomphalaria. In contrast to other Biomphalaria species, B. sudanica have a distinct peak temperature for survival, as opposed to a plateau of highly suitable temperatures. For both B. stanleyi and B. sudanica, fecundity decreased with increasing population densities. This means that snail populations may experience large fluctuations in numbers, even in the absence of any external factors such as seasonal temperature changes. Survival also decreased with increasing density for B. stanleyi, in contrast to B. sudanica and other studied Biomphalaria species where only fecundity has been shown to decrease. PMID:25388819

McCreesh, Nicky; Arinaitwe, Moses; Arineitwe, Wilber; Tukahebwa, Edridah M; Booth, Mark

2014-11-12

22

Snail Trails  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The slime trails of snails lead the author's students to a better understanding of science as inquiry and the processes of science. During this five-day activity, students get up close and personal with one of her favorite creatures, the land snail. Students begin by observing the organism and recording their observations. After making initial…

Galus, Pamela

2002-01-01

23

Does water chemistry affect the dietary uptake and toxicity of silver nanoparticles by the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis?  

PubMed

Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in many applications and likely released into the aquatic environment. There is increasing evidence that Ag is efficiently delivered to aquatic organisms from AgNPs after aqueous and dietary exposures. Accumulation of AgNPs through the diet can damage digestion and adversely affect growth. It is well recognized that aspects of water quality, such as hardness, affect the bioavailability and toxicity of waterborne Ag. However, the influence of water chemistry on the bioavailability and toxicity of dietborne AgNPs to aquatic invertebrates is largely unknown. Here we characterize for the first time the effects of water hardness and humic acids on the bioaccumulation and toxicity of AgNPs coated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) to the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis after dietary exposures. Our results indicate that bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag from PVP-AgNPs ingested with food are not affected by water hardness and by humic acids, although both could affect interactions with the biological membrane and trigger nanoparticle transformations. Snails efficiently assimilated Ag from the PVP-AgNPs mixed with diatoms (Ag assimilation efficiencies ranged from 82 to 93%). Rate constants of Ag uptake from food were similar across the entire range of water hardness and humic acid concentrations. These results suggest that correcting regulations for water quality could be irrelevant and ineffective where dietary exposure is important. PMID:24641838

Oliver, Ana López-Serrano; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Stoiber, Tasha L; Tejamaya, Mila; Römer, Isabella; Lead, Jamie R; Luoma, Samuel N

2014-06-01

24

Does water chemistry affect the dietary uptake and toxicity of silver nanoparticles by the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in many applications and likely released into the aquatic environment. There is increasing evidence that Ag is efficiently delivered to aquatic organisms from AgNPs after aqueous and dietary exposures. Accumulation of AgNPs through the diet can damage digestion and adversely affect growth. It is well recognized that aspects of water quality, such as hardness, affect the bioavailability and toxicity of waterborne Ag. However, the influence of water chemistry on the bioavailability and toxicity of dietborne AgNPs to aquatic invertebrates is largely unknown. Here we characterize for the first time the effects of water hardness and humic acids on the bioaccumulation and toxicity of AgNPs coated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) to the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis after dietary exposures. Our results indicate that bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag from PVP-AgNPs ingested with food are not affected by water hardness and by humic acids, although both could affect interactions with the biological membrane and trigger nanoparticle transformations. Snails efficiently assimilated Ag from the PVP-AgNPs mixed with diatoms (Ag assimilation efficiencies ranged from 82 to 93%). Rate constants of Ag uptake from food were similar across the entire range of water hardness and humic acid concentrations. These results suggest that correcting regulations for water quality could be irrelevant and ineffective where dietary exposure is important.

López-Serrano Oliver, Ana; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Stoiber, Tasha L.; Tejamaya, Mila; Römer, Isabella; Lead, Jamie R.; Luoma, Samuel N.

2014-01-01

25

O-Glycosylation of snails.  

PubMed

The glycosylation abilities of snails deserve attention, because snail species serve as intermediate hosts in the developmental cycles of some human and cattle parasites. In analogy to many other host-pathogen relations, the glycosylation of snail proteins may likewise contribute to these host-parasite interactions. Here we present an overview on the O-glycan structures of 8 different snails (land and water snails, with or without shell): Arion lusitanicus, Achatina fulica, Biomphalaria glabrata, Cepaea hortensis, Clea helena, Helix pomatia, Limax maximus and Planorbarius corneus. The O-glycans were released from the purified snail proteins by ?-elimination. Further analysis was carried out by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and - for the main structures - by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Snail O-glycans are built from the four monosaccharide constituents: N-acetylgalactosamine, galactose, mannose and fucose. An additional modification is a methylation of the hexoses. The common trisaccharide core structure was determined in Arion lusitanicus to be N-acetylgalactosamine linked to the protein elongated by two 4-O-methylated galactose residues. Further elongations by methylated and unmethylated galactose and mannose residues and/or fucose are present. The typical snail O-glycan structures are different to those so far described. Similar to snail N-glycan structures they display methylated hexose residues. PMID:22581130

Stepan, Herwig; Pabst, Martin; Altmann, Friedrich; Geyer, Hildegard; Geyer, Rudolf; Staudacher, Erika

2012-05-01

26

Snails home  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many gardeners and horticulturalists seek non-chemical methods to control populations of snails. It has frequently been reported that snails that are marked and removed from a garden are later found in the garden again. This phenomenon is often cited as evidence for a homing instinct. We report a systematic study of the snail population in a small suburban garden, in which large numbers of snails were marked and removed over a period of about 6 months. While many returned, inferring a homing instinct from this evidence requires statistical modelling. Monte Carlo techniques demonstrate that movements of snails are better explained by drift under the influence of a homing instinct than by random diffusion. Maximum likelihood techniques infer the existence of two groups of snails in the garden: members of a larger population that show little affinity to the garden itself, and core members of a local garden population that regularly return to their home if removed. The data are strongly suggestive of a homing instinct, but also reveal that snail-throwing can work as a pest management strategy.

Dunstan, D. J.; Hodgson, D. J.

2014-06-01

27

Causes of Late Pleistocene water level change in Lake Victoria, Equatorial East Africa, derived from clumped isotopes of land snails and fresh water mollusks. (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on the dependence of 13C-18O bond abundance in the carbonate lattice (measured as ?47) on the carbonate formation temperature. Most marine and freshwater biogenic carbonates are found to be in agreement with the clumped isotopes - temperature calibration. Clumped isotope thermometry is particularly useful in terrestrial environments where the interpretation of carbonate ?18O is limited due to difficulty in estimating the paleo-water isotopic composition. Clumped isotope-derived temperatures from land snails are generally higher than the ambient environmental temperatures, but show no evidence for disequilibrium. We attribute these higher body temperatures to snail eco-physiological adaptations through shell color, morphology, and behavior. We use the clumped isotope-derived temperatures in combination with shell ?18O to calculate snail body water ?18O composition. This parameter is interpreted as a paleo-hydrological indicator that reflects the isotopic composition of local precipitation modified by local evaporation. Rusinga and Mfangano Islands in Lake Victoria provide a unique opportunity to compare extant species of modern and fossil freshwater mollusks and land snails from the same location to examine lake paleo-hydrology. This location is particularly interesting as Lake Victoria itself is the main source of rain-water in the region such that the isotopic composition of land snail body water can be related back to the source waters. We combine clumped isotope and oxygen isotope measurements of both freshwater mollusks and land snails to examine the water balance of the lake, testing hypotheses about the mechanism of a significant rise in lake level in Lake Victoria ~35 - 40 ka BP. Outcrops of paleo-beach deposits ~18 m above the modern day lake level indicate high water stands at ~35-40 ka BP. Based on water balance models for Lake Victoria, an increase in lake level of this magnitude could be driven by local mean annual precipitation that is significantly greater than modern. However, this is inconsistent with regional climate reconstructions. This suggests that either lake level was controlled by non-climatic factors, or that local climate in the Lake Victoria basin was different than regional patterns of climate across eastern Africa. We use oxygen and clumped isotopes of modern and fossil shells (Corbicula sp., Melanoides sp. and Bellamya unicolor) from this 18 m beach outcrop on Mfangano Island to (1) compare with modern lake water ?18O values and (2) calculate paleo-water compositions. We combine these results with calculated snail body water ?18O composition (using oxygen and clumped isotopes) of land snails (Limicoloria cf. martensiana) from Rusinga and Mfangano Islands, to study hydrological changes of Lake Victoria. We use these data to evaluate the relative importance of climate change and tectonics as mechanisms for the Late Pleistocene expansion of Lake Victoria.

Zaarur, S.; Affek, H. P.; Tryon, C.; Peppe, D. J.; Faith, J.

2013-12-01

28

MINE DEVELOPMENT SURFACE WATER  

E-print Network

Mine Engineering Plan Surface Water Components Site Drainage Mine Site Dewatering (If covered Dewatering Open Pit Lake Drain site / Water Disposal Mine Site Runoff Dikes Seepage Underground Mine Rivers

Boisvert, Jeff

29

Snail Shell  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Plant seems to be a Heliotropum sp. Huge snail shells litter the wetland around Asuncion Bay. Near 25°15’49’’S, 57°37’47’’W. La plantita detrás del caracol parece ser un Heliotropium sp., Boraginaceae....

30

Developmental toxicity, acute toxicity and mutagenicity testing in freshwater snails Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) exposed to chromium and water samples.  

PubMed

A protocol combining acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and mutagenicity analysis in freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata for application in ecotoxicological studies is described. For acute toxicity testing, LC50 and EC50 values were determined; dominant lethal mutations induction was the endpoint for mutagenicity analysis. Reference toxicant potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) was used to characterize B. glabrata sensitivity for toxicity and cyclophosphamide to mutagenicity testing purposes. Compared to other relevant freshwater species, B. glabrata showed high sensitivity: the lowest EC50 value was obtained with embryos at veliger stage (5.76mg/L). To assess the model applicability for environmental studies, influent and effluent water samples from a wastewater treatment plant were evaluated. Gastropod sensitivity was assessed in comparison to the standardized bioassay with Daphnia similis exposed to the same water samples. Sampling sites identified as toxic to daphnids were also detected by snails, showing a qualitatively similar sensitivity suggesting that B. glabrata is a suitable test species for freshwater monitoring. Holding procedures and protocols implemented for toxicity and developmental bioassays showed to be in compliance with international standards for intra-laboratory precision. Thereby, we are proposing this system for application in ecotoxicological studies. PMID:25259848

Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Hamada, Natália; Grazeffe, Vanessa Siqueira; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Okazaki, Kayo; Granatelli, Amanda Tosatte; Pereira, Ivana Wuo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Nakano, Eliana

2014-12-01

31

Seasonal changes in sex ratio, maturation, and size composition of fresh water snail, Sinotaia quadrata histrica, in Lake Kasumigaura.  

PubMed

Sinotaia quadrata histrica is a fresh water viviparous snail distributing from the Kanto region to Kyushu Island, Japan. About 7000 snails were collected in Lake Kasumigaura (L. Nishiura and L. Kitaura) in 2001 and 2002, and the sex ratio, maturity in terms of the gonad-somatic index (GSI) and operculum diameter were determined. The total female proportion was 55.2% in 2001, 53.0% in 2002 in L. Nishiura, and that of L. Kitaura was 60.4% in 2002. Comparing the season, the female proportion was the highest during early summer in both 2001 (59.6%, July in L. Nishiura) and 2002 (61.6%, June in L. Nishiura, 65.8%, July in L. Kitaura). The GSI of females in L. Nishiura significantly increased from April to May and significantly decreased from June to August. The GSI of males was higher in spring, but significantly lower from June to August. The mean female operculum diameter was consistently larger than that of males for each month and year, and a particularly significant difference was found between females and males from April to August 2001, and from April to September 2002. The number of resting zones on the operculum correlates with the operculum diameter and the female proportion was larger in the snails, which have a high number of resting zones, suggesting a sex-dependent difference in age composition. This study estimated that the sex ratio and seasonal maturation of S. quadrata histrica and the sex-dependent difference in age composition might contribute to the population structure in L. Kasumigaura. PMID:15746900

Hirai, Narisato; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Koshio, Masaaki; Kawabe, Kiyoshi; Shiraishi, Fujio; Hayakawa, Youichi; Morita, Masatoshi

2004-01-01

32

Surface Water and Groundwater  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains 25 questions on the topic of surface water and groundwater, which covers rivers and aquifers. This is part of the Principles of Earth Science course at the University of South Dakota. Users submit their answers and are provided immediate verification.

Heaton, Timothy

33

SURFACE WATER EMAP PROJECT  

EPA Science Inventory

The surface water component of the EPA Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) Western Pilot is a five-year effort to assess the ecological condition of rivers and streams across 12 states in the western United States. EMAP is designed to monitor indicators of poll...

34

Remote surface water monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The Surface Water Division (SWD) and the Environmental Technologies Group (ET) have teamed up to create a complete remote surface water monitoring system based on new technologies in microelectronics and the environmental sciences. Careful evaluation of these new technologies has resulted in the design and installation of a working system that is easily installed, cost-effective and reliable. Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is part of the Department of Energy weapons complex. Because of its location upstream of the Denver, Colorado, Metropolitan area, the plant is required by law and interagency agreements to adhere to strict specifications for surface water monitoring and discharge, including the requirement for utilization of best available technology. RFP now has a successful remote surface water monitoring system. This system was developed by a team of result-oriented people with strong electronics backgrounds and many years of experience in instrumentation, microprocessors, and the environmental sciences. Even after implementation of the system, the team continues to seek out and test components that fit into the system and that also meet or exceed the strict system requirements. The systematic approach used in development made it possible to exceed regulatory requirements while maintaining accurate field data.

Baxter, D.; Goodwin, W.

1992-01-01

35

Remote surface water monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The Surface Water Division (SWD) and the Environmental Technologies Group (ET) have teamed up to create a complete remote surface water monitoring system based on new technologies in microelectronics and the environmental sciences. Careful evaluation of these new technologies has resulted in the design and installation of a working system that is easily installed, cost-effective and reliable. Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is part of the Department of Energy weapons complex. Because of its location upstream of the Denver, Colorado, Metropolitan area, the plant is required by law and interagency agreements to adhere to strict specifications for surface water monitoring and discharge, including the requirement for utilization of best available technology. RFP now has a successful remote surface water monitoring system. This system was developed by a team of result-oriented people with strong electronics backgrounds and many years of experience in instrumentation, microprocessors, and the environmental sciences. Even after implementation of the system, the team continues to seek out and test components that fit into the system and that also meet or exceed the strict system requirements. The systematic approach used in development made it possible to exceed regulatory requirements while maintaining accurate field data.

Baxter, D.; Goodwin, W.

1992-09-01

36

Internal Surface Water Flows  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program is an intergovernmental effort to reestablish and maintain the ecosystem of south Florida. One element of the restoration effort is the development of a firm scientific basis for resource decision making.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides scientitic information as part of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program. The USGS began its own project, called the South Florida Ecosystem Project in fiscal year 1995 for the purpose of gathering hydrologic, cartographic, and geologic data that relate to the mainland of south Florida, Florida Bay, and the Florida Keys and Reef ecosystems. Historical changes in water-management practices to accommodate a large and rapidly growing urban population along the Atlantic coast, as well as intensive agricultural activities, have resulted in a highly managed hydrologic system with canals, levees, and pumping stations. These structures have altered the hydology of the Everglades ecosystem on both coastal and interior lands. Surface-water flows in a direction south of Lake Okeechobee have been regulated by an extensive canal network, begun in the 1940's, to provide for drainage, flood control, saltwater intrusion control, agricultural requirements, and various environmental needs. Much of the development and subsequent monitoring of canal and river discharge south of Lake Okeechobee has traditionally emphasized the eastern coastal areas of Florida. Recently, more emphasis has been placed on providing a more accurate water budget for internal canal flows.

Murray, Mitchell H.

1999-01-01

37

Production of apple snail for space diet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For food production in space at recycling bio-elements under closed environment, appropriate organisms should be chosen to drive the closed materials recycle loop. We propose a combination of green algae, photosynthetic protozoa, and aquatic plants such as Wolffia spp., for the primary producer fixing solar energy to chemical form in biomass, and apple snail, Pomacea bridgesii, which converts this biomass to animal meat. Because of high proliferation rate of green algae or protozoa compared to higher plants, and direct conversion of them to apple snail, the efficiency of food production in this combination is high, in terms of energy usage, space for rearing, and yield of edible biomass. Furthermore, green algae and apple snail can form a closed ecological system with exchanging bio-elements between two member, i.e. excreta of snail turn to fertilizer of algae, and grown algae become feed for snail. Since apple snail stays in water or on wet substrate, control of rearing is easy to make. Mass production technology of apple snail has been well established to utilize it as human food. Nutrients of apple snail are also listed in the standard tables of food composition in Japan. Nutrients for 100 g of apple snail canned in brine are energy 340 kJ, protein 16.5 g, lipid 1.0 g, cholesterol 240 mg, carbohydrate 0.8 g, Ca 400 mg, Fe 3.9 mg, Zn 1.5 mg. It is rich in minerals, especially Ca and Fe. Vitamin contents are quite low, but K 0.005 mg, B2 0.09 mg, B12 0.0006 mg, folate 0.001 mg, and E 0.6 mg. The amino acid score of apple snail could not be found in literature. Overall, apple snail provides rich protein and animal lipid such as cholesterol. It could be a good source of minerals. However, it does not give enough vitamin D and B12 , which are supposed to be supplemented by animal origin foods. In terms of acceptance in food culture, escargot is a gourmet menu in French dishes, and six to ten snail, roughly 50 g, are served for one person. Apple snail reaches to 30 g of body weight within two or three month from its egg. Several hundreds of egg are laid by one snail. It start egg laying after three months from hatching. In order to harvest 50 g for every day's meal, 3 m2 is required for rearing space. Eating apple snail and establishing its rearing system might save the food crisis on Earth.

Yamashita, Masamichi; Motoki, Shigeru; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.; Katayama, Naomi

38

Apple Snails (Ampullariidae)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web site provides information on apple snails (family Ampullariidae), the largest living freshwater snails on earth, often kept as aquarium pets because of their attractive appearance and size. Topics include the care of apple snails, their anatomy, species and genera, and information on snail pests, embryology, and genetics. There is also a frequently-asked-questions feature, photos, links to web sites and literature, and an online discussion forum.

Ghesquiere, Stijn A.

39

Sustaining dry surfaces under water  

E-print Network

Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

Paul R. Jones; Xiuqing Hao; Eduardo R. Cruz-Chu; Konrad Rykaczewski; Krishanu Nandy; Thomas M. Schutzius; Kripa K. Varanasi; Constantine M. Megaridis; Jens H. Walther; Petros Koumoutsakos; Horacio D. Espinosa; Neelesh A. Patankar

2014-09-29

40

Regulation of laboratory populations of snails (Biomphalaria and Bulinus spp.) by river prawns, Macrobrachium spp. (Decapoda, Palaemonidae): implications for control of schistosomiasis.  

PubMed

Human schistosomiasis is a common parasitic disease endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. One barrier to achieving long-term control of this disease has been re-infection of treated patients when they swim, bathe, or wade in surface fresh water infested with snails that harbor and release larval parasites. Because some snail species are obligate intermediate hosts of schistosome parasites, removing snails may reduce parasitic larvae in the water, reducing re-infection risk. Here, we evaluate the potential for snail control by predatory freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii and M. vollenhovenii, native to Asia and Africa, respectively. Both prawn species are high value, protein-rich human food commodities, suggesting their cultivation may be beneficial in resource-poor settings where few other disease control options exist. In a series of predation trials in laboratory aquaria, we found both species to be voracious predators of schistosome-susceptible snails, hatchlings, and eggs, even in the presence of alternative food, with sustained average consumption rates of 12% of their body weight per day. Prawns showed a weak preference for Bulinus truncatus over Biomphalaria glabrata snails. Consumption rates were highly predictable based on the ratio of prawn: snail body mass, suggesting satiation-limited predation. Even the smallest prawns tested (0.5-2g) caused snail recruitment failure, despite high snail fecundity. With the World Health Organization turning attention toward schistosomiasis elimination, native prawn cultivation may be a viable snail control strategy that offers a win-win for public health and economic development. PMID:24388955

Sokolow, Susanne H; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kuris, Armand M

2014-04-01

41

Water surface depth instrument  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurement gage provides instant visual indication of water depth based on capillary action and light diffraction in a group of solid, highly polished polymethyl methacrylate rods. Rod lengths are adjustable to measure various water depths in any desired increments.

Davis, Q. C., IV

1970-01-01

42

SURFACE WATER & OCEAN TOPOGRAPHY  

E-print Network

neighboring image pixels, which requires an increase in the intrinsic range resolution of the instrument-downlink requirements (for both ocean and inland waters) can be met with eight 300-Mbps X-band stations globally. Ref levels for ocean and inland water dynamics · Key Instruments ­ Ka- or Ku-band radar ­ Ku-band altimeter

Christian, Eric

43

Copper uptake and depuration by juvenile and adult Florida apple snails ( Pomacea paludosa )  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study characterized copper (Cu) uptake and depuration by juvenile and adult Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) from water, soil, and diet. During a 28-day uptake period, juvenile apple snails were exposed to aqueous Cu and adult apple\\u000a snails were exposed to Cu-contaminated soil, water, and food. In the follow-up 14-day depuration period, both juvenile and\\u000a adult apple snails

Tham C. Hoang; Emily C. Rogevich; Gary M. Rand; Robert A. Frakes

2008-01-01

44

Influence of snail feces and mucus on oviposition and larval behavior ofPherbellia cinerella (Diptera: Sciomyzidae).  

PubMed

Larvae of the sciomyzid flyPherbellia cinerella are voracious predators of terrestrial helicid snails. Eggs are deposited in areas where snails occur and larvae hunt actively for their prey. Snail feces and mucus were tested to determine if they had any kairomone or stimulatory effects onP. cinerella. Adult flies oviposited more frequently on substrates containing fresh snail feces than on substrates containing snail mucus or water (control). However, mucus and feces both stimulated increased search behaviour in first instar larvae. These results are discussed in relation to snail biology, and the potential for augmentation of these flies in areas affected by pest snails. PMID:24227402

Coupland, J B

1996-02-01

45

Surface Water Hydrology and Watersheds  

E-print Network

becomes overland flow or direct runoff and feeds directly into streams. Lastly, the remainder of the water that flows downslope to a stream or lake. The hydrologic cycle can also be understood quantitatively where: P is precipitation, R is surface runoff, G is ground water flow, E is evaporation

Pasternack, Gregory B.

46

Surface Water Development in Texas.  

E-print Network

that affect surface water yield. Small reservoirs are most numer- ous in the central part of the State where annual runoff, except for South Texas, exceeds 1 inch. For example, more than 8,000 stock tanks and farm ponds are in the Nu- eces River Basin... Water Development ................................. 30 Appendix Tables .......................................... 32 ......... Appendix A: Major Conservation Storage Reservoirs 40 endix B: Water Development Board Policy ............... 41 eferences...

McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

1977-01-01

47

All About Snails  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website introduces younger students to snails. Topics include their physical characteristics and living habits, diet, reproduction, locomotion, life history, predators, and many others. There are also links to additional material on snails, including lesson plans, stories, poems, and songs, clip-art, art and craft activties, and other resources.

2001-11-01

48

Snail Shell Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents three inquiry-based lessons to develop the science process skills of observation, identification, and classification. Activities use whelk eggs and snail shells as the focus of the students' inquiries. Provides a list of 19 facts about whelks and snails. (MDH)

Matthews, Catherine

1992-01-01

49

The Classroom Animal: Snails.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Points out that snails are interesting and easily-managed classroom animals. One advantage of this animal is that it requires no special attention over weekends or holidays. Background information, anatomy, reproduction, and feeding are discussed, along with suggestions for housing aquatic and/or land snails. (DH)

Kramer, David S.

1985-01-01

50

Predation Risk and Avoidance Behavior in Two Freshwater Snails  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the predator avoidance behav- iors of two common freshwater snails, Physella virgata and Planorbella trivolvis, to the crayfish Procambarus simulans. In response to crayfish predation, the snails crawled above the waterline for several hours, then re- turned to the water. A significant size-dependent rela- tionship existed between crawlout (vertical migration above the waterline) and vulnerability to predation. All

JAMES E. ALEXANDER; ALAN P. COVICH

1991-01-01

51

Slime-Trail Tracking in the Predatory Snail, Euglandina rosea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Euglandina rosea, a predatory land snail, tracks prey and mates by following slime trails. Euglandina follow slime trails more than 80% of the time, following trails of their own species, but not those of prey snails, in the direction that they were laid. The attractive elements of prey slime are small, water-soluble compounds detected by specialized lip extensions. Although olfaction

Kavan T. Clifford; Liaini Gross; Kwame Johnson; Khalil J. Martin; Nagma Shaheen; Melissa A. Harrington

2003-01-01

52

Groundwater and surface water pollution  

SciTech Connect

This book contains almost all the technical know-how that is required to clean up the water supply. It provides a survey of up-to-date technologies for remediation, as well as a step-by-step guide to pollution assessment for both ground and surface waters. In addition to focusing on causes, effects, and remedies, the book stresses reuse, recycling, and recovery of resources. The authors suggest that through total recycling wastes can become resources.

Chae, Y.S.; Hamidi, A. [eds.

2000-07-01

53

Ground and Surface Water Concepts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of the Digital Atlas of Idaho contains an extensive collection of information about hydrology. Topics include surface water/groundwater interaction, runoff, stream gauging, hydrographs, aquifer types, groundwater movement, aquifer response to pumping, and more. The information is suitable for an upper level college audience.

John Welhan

54

Surface Water Waves and Tsunamis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of the enormous earthquake in Sumatra on December 26, 2004, and the devastating tsunami which followed, I have chosen the focus of my mini-course lectures at this year’s PASI to be on two topics which involve the dynamics of surface water waves. These topics are of interest to mathematicians interested in wave propagation, and particularly to Chilean scientists, I

Walter Craig

2006-01-01

55

Dragonfly predators influence biomass and density of pond snails.  

PubMed

Studies in lakes show that fish and crayfish predators play an important role in determining the abundance of freshwater snails. In contrast, there are few studies of snails and their predators in shallow ponds and marshes. Ponds often lack fish and crayfish but have abundant insect populations. Here we present the results of field surveys, laboratory foraging trials, and an outdoor mesocosm experiment, testing the hypothesis that insects are important predators of pulmonate snails. In laboratory foraging trials, conducted with ten species of insects, most insect taxa consumed snails, and larval dragonflies were especially effective predators. The field surveys showed that dragonflies constitute the majority of the insect biomass in fishless ponds. More focused foraging trials evaluated the ability of the dragonflies Anax junius and Pantala hymenaea to prey upon different sizes and species of pulmonate snails (Helisoma trivolvis, Physa acuta, and Stagnicola elodes). Anax junius consumed all three species up to the maximum size tested. Pantala hymenaea consumed snails with a shell height of 3 mm and smaller, but did not kill larger snails. P. acuta were more vulnerable to predators than were H. trivolvis or S. elodes. In the mesocosm experiment, conducted with predator treatments of A. junius, P. hymenaea, and the hemipteran Belostoma flumineum, insect predators had a pronounced negative effect on snail biomass and density. A. junius and B. flumineum reduced biomass and density to a similar degree, and both reduced biomass more than did P. hymenaea. Predators did not have a strong effect on species composition. A model suggested that A. junius and P. hymenaea have the largest effects on snail biomass in the field. Given that both pulmonate snails and dragonfly nymphs are widespread and abundant in marshes and ponds, snail assemblages in these water bodies are likely regulated in large part by odonate predation. PMID:17457617

Turner, Andrew M; Chislock, Michael F

2007-08-01

56

An ecological study of Bithynia snails, the first intermediate host of Opisthorchis viverrini in northeast Thailand.  

PubMed

Infection with the food-borne trematodiasis, liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, is a major public health concern in Southeast Asia. While epidemiology and parasitic incidence in humans are well studied, ecological information on the O. viverrini intermediate hosts remains limited. This study aimed to investigate the factors affecting the distribution and abundance of the first intermediate host, Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snails. Water quality and snails were sampled in 31 sites in Muang District, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand from June 2012 to January 2013 to characterize the B.s. goniomphalos snail habitats. Species relative abundance and Shannon's diversity and evenness indices were employed to describe snail compositions and diversities across different habitat types. Statistical analyses were conducted to examine the extent to which the water quality variables and species interactions account for the relative abundance of B.s. goniomphalos snails. The results showed that the freshwater habitats of ponds, streams and rice paddies possessed significantly different abiotic water qualities, with water temperature and pH showing distinct statistical differences (P<0.05). Different habitats had different snail diversity and species evenness, with high B.s. goniomphalos snail abundance at rice paddy habitats. The differences in snail abundance might be due to the distinct sets of abiotic water qualities associated with each habitat types. The relative abundance of B.s. goniomphalos snails was found to be negatively correlated with that of Filopaludina martensi martensi snails (r=-0.46, P<0.05), underscoring the possible influence of species interaction on B.s. goniomphalos snail population. Field work observations revealed that rice planting seasons and irrigation could regulate snail population dynamics at rice paddy habitats. This study provides new ecological insights into the factors affecting Bithynia snail distribution and abundance. It bridges the knowledge gap in O. viverrini disease ecology and highlights the potential effect of anthropogenic irrigation practices on B.s. goniomphalos snail ecology. PMID:24561073

Wang, Yi-Chen; Ho, Richard Cheng Yong; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Namsanor, Jutamas; Sithithaworn, Paiboon

2015-01-01

57

Evaporation from partially covered water surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaporative losses from large water bodies may exceed 20% of water used in irrigated agriculture, with losses from reservoirs estimated at 50% of storage capacity. Prominent among proposed methods to curtail these evaporative losses are various forms of partial covers placed over water surfaces. Studies show that evaporation through perforated covers and from partially covered water surfaces exhibit nonlinear behavior,

S. Assouline; K. Narkis; D. Or

2010-01-01

58

Water drop friction on superhydrophobic surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate water drop friction on superhydrophobic surfaces, the motion of water drops on three different superhydrophobic surfaces has been studied by allowing drops to slide down an incline and capturing their motion using high-speed video. Two surfaces were prepared using crystallization of an alkyl ketene dimer (AKD) wax and the third surface was the leaf of a Lotus (Nelumbo

P. H. Olin; S. B. Lindström; T. Pettersson; L. Wågberg

2013-01-01

59

Modeling snail breeding in Bioregenerative Life Support System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is known that snail meat is a high quality food that is rich in protein. Hence, heliciculture or land snail farming spreads worldwide because it is a profitable business. The possibility to use the snails of Helix pomatia in Biological Life Support System (BLSS) was studied by Japanese Researches. In that study land snails were considered to be producers of animal protein. Also, snail breeding was an important part of waste processing, because snails were capable to eat the inedible plant biomass. As opposed to the agricultural snail farming, heliciculture in BLSS should be more carefully planned. The purpose of our work was to develop a model for snail breeding in BLSS that can predict mass flow rates in and out of snail facility. There are three linked parts in the model called “Stoichiometry”, “Population” and “Mass balance”, which are used in turn. Snail population is divided into 12 age groups from oviposition to one year. In the submodel “Stoichiometry” the individual snail growth and metabolism in each of 12 age groups are described with stoichiometry equations. Reactants are written on the left side of the equations, while products are written on the right side. Stoichiometry formulas of reactants and products consist of four chemical elements: C, H, O, N. The reactants are feed and oxygen, products are carbon dioxide, metabolic water, snail meat, shell, feces, slime and eggs. If formulas of substances in the stoichiometry equations are substituted with their molar masses, then stoichiometry equations are transformed to the equations of molar mass balance. To get the real mass balance of individual snail growth and metabolism one should multiply the value of each molar mass in the equations on the scale parameter, which is the ratio between mass of monthly consumed feed and molar mass of feed. Mass of monthly consumed feed and stoichiometry coefficients of formulas of meat, shell, feces, slime and eggs should be determined experimentally. An age structure and size of snail population are optimized on the base of individual growth and metabolic characteristics with the help of the second submodel "Population". In this simulation a daily amount of snail meat consumed by crewmembers is a guideline which specifies population productivity. Also, the daily amount of snail meat may have an optional value. Prescribed population characteristics are used in the third submodel "Mass balance" to equalize input and output mass flow rates of snail facility. In this submodel we add a water and ash to the organic masses of feed, meat, feces, shell and eggs. Moreover, masses of calcium carbonate and potable water are added to the left side of mass balance equations. Mass of calcium carbonate is distributed among shell, feces and eggs. Summarizing the twelve equations for each snail age, we get the mass balance equation for the snail facility. All simulations are performed by using Solver Add-In for Excel 2007.

Kovalev, Vladimir; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Nickolay Manukovsky, D..

60

Organic contaminant transport in ground water, surface water, and surface water sediments: Year 1 progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Questions concerning the transport and fate of contaminants in the environment have typically been limited to single compounds. Hazardous-waste disposal facilities, chemical plants, oil refineries, etc., however, typically produce complex waste streams which may contact groundwater or surface waters. The study gives results on movement through ground and surface water of a complex mixture of organic compounds emanating from a

M. J. Crossey; H. L. Bergman

1984-01-01

61

Lichen endozoochory by snails.  

PubMed

Endozoochory plays a prominent role for the dispersal of seed plants. However, for most other plant taxa it is not known whether this mode of dispersal occurs at all. Among those other taxa, lichens as symbiotic associations of algae and fungi are peculiar as their successful dispersal requires movement of propagules that leaves the symbiosis functional. However, the potential for endozoochorous dispersal of lichen fragments has been completely overlooked. We fed sterile thalli of two foliose lichen species (Lobaria pulmonaria and Physcia adscendens) differing in habitat and air-quality requirements to nine snail species common in temperate Europe. We demonstrated morphologically that L. pulmonaria regenerated from 29.0% of all 379 fecal pellets, whereas P. adscendens regenerated from 40.9% of all 433 fecal pellets, showing that lichen fragments survived gut passage of all snail species. Moreover, molecular analysis of regenerated lichens confirmed the species identity for a subset of samples. Regeneration rates were higher for the generalist lichen species P. adscendens than for the specialist lichen species L. pulmonaria. Furthermore, lichen regeneration rates varied among snail species with higher rates after gut passage of heavier snail species. We suggest that gastropods generally grazing on lichen communities are important, but so far completely overlooked, as vectors for lichen dispersal. This opens new ecological perspectives and questions the traditional view of an entirely antagonistic relationship between gastropods and lichens. PMID:21533256

Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Werth, Silke; Rüetschi, Jörg; Fischer, Markus

2011-01-01

62

Small Snails, Enormous Elephants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity (located on page 2 of PDF) introduces learners to the real size of animals using nonstandard measurement. Learners use Unifix cubes and yarn lengths to measure a variety of animals (photos), from the very small like a snail to the very large like an elephant. As an extension, learners can use the cubes to create a bar graph depicting the animals' lengths.

Chicago Children's Museum

2011-01-01

63

Lichen Endozoochory by Snails  

PubMed Central

Endozoochory plays a prominent role for the dispersal of seed plants. However, for most other plant taxa it is not known whether this mode of dispersal occurs at all. Among those other taxa, lichens as symbiotic associations of algae and fungi are peculiar as their successful dispersal requires movement of propagules that leaves the symbiosis functional. However, the potential for endozoochorous dispersal of lichen fragments has been completely overlooked. We fed sterile thalli of two foliose lichen species (Lobaria pulmonaria and Physcia adscendens) differing in habitat and air-quality requirements to nine snail species common in temperate Europe. We demonstrated morphologically that L. pulmonaria regenerated from 29.0% of all 379 fecal pellets, whereas P. adscendens regenerated from 40.9% of all 433 fecal pellets, showing that lichen fragments survived gut passage of all snail species. Moreover, molecular analysis of regenerated lichens confirmed the species identity for a subset of samples. Regeneration rates were higher for the generalist lichen species P. adscendens than for the specialist lichen species L. pulmonaria. Furthermore, lichen regeneration rates varied among snail species with higher rates after gut passage of heavier snail species. We suggest that gastropods generally grazing on lichen communities are important, but so far completely overlooked, as vectors for lichen dispersal. This opens new ecological perspectives and questions the traditional view of an entirely antagonistic relationship between gastropods and lichens. PMID:21533256

Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Werth, Silke; Rüetschi, Jörg; Fischer, Markus

2011-01-01

64

Water surface capturing by image processing  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

An alternative means of measuring the water surface interface during laboratory experiments is processing a series of sequentially captured images. Image processing can provide a continuous, non-intrusive record of the water surface profile whose accuracy is not dependent on water depth. More trad...

65

Mutagens in surface waters: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of the literature on the mutagenicity\\/genotoxicity of surface waters is presented in this article. Subheadings of this article include a description of sample concentration methods, mutagenic\\/genotoxic bioassay data, and suspected or identified mutagens in surface waters published in the literature since 1990. Much of the published surface water mutagenicity\\/genotoxicity studies employed the Salmonella\\/mutagenicity test with strains TA98 and\\/or

Takeshi Ohe; Tetsushi Watanabe; Keiji Wakabayashi

2004-01-01

66

Ground Water and Surface Water: A Single Resource  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report discusses how natural processes and human activities affect the interactions of ground water and surface water, and the importance of considering ground water and surface water as a single resource. Topics include natural processes of ground- and surface-water interaction; chemical interactions; and the effect of landscapes on these interactions. There is also discussion of the effects of human activities such as agriculture, urban and industrial development, modifications to drainages, and changes to the atmosphere. A downloadable, printable version is provided.

67

Eye to Eye With Garden Snails  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Snail Unit encourages students to explore the external characteristics and behavior of snails. It effectively gets students past the "ugh, slime" reaction to recognizing individual differences in snails and challenges students to learn enough about the snail to be able to predict their behavior under a variety of conditions. Detailed observations are requested as are preparation and testing of hypotheses. This unit works very well with all levels of students and with heterogeneously grouped students. This Snail Unit consists of six lessons: (1) Introduction to a Snail (2) How do snails move? How fast is a snail's pace? (3) What and how do snails eat? (4) Are snails attracted to, or repelled by particular substances? (5) Can snails be enticed to travel faster or in a certain direction? (6) How are snails like other animals? How are they different?

BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:2.1 FN:Kathy Liu N:Liu; Kathy ORG:Access Excellence REV:2005-04-19 END:VCARD

1994-07-30

68

Inquiry, Land Snails, and Environmental Factors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces land snails for use in inquiry-based science activities. Describes common characteristics and safety considerations while introducing students to land snails. Explains procedures for inquiry-based use of land snails in classrooms. (YDS)

Barrow, Lloyd H.; Krantz, Patrick D.

2002-01-01

69

Use of Bayluscide (Bayer 73) for Snail Control in Fish Ponds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bayluscide applied to ponds on two commercial fish farms at five rates (from L1 to 13.5 kilogram per surface hectare) effectively controlled aquatic snails. Laboratory toxicity tests confirmed susceptibility of three endemic species of aquatic snail—Melanoides tuberculatus, Physella hendersoni, and Planorbella duryi—to Bayluscide. Observed 24-h concentrations lethal to 50% of snails (LC50) ranged from 0.062 to 0.085 mg\\/L, and 24-h

Ruth Francis-Floyd; James Gildea; Peggy Reed; Ruthellen Klinger

1997-01-01

70

Larval stages of digenetic trematodes in Melanopsis praemorsa snails from freshwater bodies in Palestine  

PubMed Central

Objective To detect the species of larval trematodes (cercariae) in Melanopsis praemorsa snails from 5 different fresh water bodies in Palestine. Methods A total of 1 880 Melanopsis praemorsa snails were collected from different fresh water bodies in Palestine from October, 2008 to November, 2010. Cercariae in Melanopsis praemorsa snails were obtained by lighting and crushing methods. The behavior of cercariae was observed using a dissecting microscope. Results Three different species of larval trematodes were identified from Melanopsis praemorsa snails collected only from Al-Bathan fresh water body, while snails from other water bodies were not infected. These species were microcercous cercaria, xiphidiocercaria and brevifurcate lophocercous cercaria. These cercariae called Cercaria melanopsi palestinia I, Cercaria melanopsi palestinia II and Cercaria melanopsi palestinia III have not been described before from this snail in Palestine. The infection rate of Melanopsis praemorsa collected from Al-Bathan fresh water body was 5.7%, while the overall infection rate of snails collected from all fresh water bodies was 4.3%. Details are presented on the morphology and behavior of the cercariae as well as their development within the snail. Conclusions These results have been recorded for the first time and these cercariae may be of medical and veterinary importance. PMID:23569759

Bdir, Sami; Adwan, Ghaleb

2011-01-01

71

Pharmaceutical bioaccumulation by periphyton and snails in an effluent-dependent stream during an extreme drought.  

PubMed

Increasing evidence indicates that pharmaceutical bioaccumulate in fish collected downstream from municipal wastewater effluent discharges. However, studies of pharmaceutical bioaccumulation by other aquatic organisms, including primary producers (e.g., periphyton) and grazers (e.g., snails), are lacking in wadeable streams. Here, we examined environmental occurrence and bioaccumulation of a range of pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern in surface water, a common snail (Planorbid sp.) and periphyton from an effluent-dependent stream in central Texas, USA, during a historic drought, because such limited dilution and instream flows may represent worst-case exposure scenarios for aquatic life to pharmaceuticals. Water and tissue samples were liquid-liquid extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization. Target analytes included 21 pharmaceuticals across multiple drug classes and 2 pharmacologically active metabolites. Several pharmaceuticals were detected at up to 4.7?gkg(-1) in periphyton and up to 42?gkg(-1) in Planorbid sp. We then identified limitations of several bioconcentration factor and bioaccumulation factor models, developed for other invertebrates, to assist interpretation of such field results. Observations from the present study suggest that waterborne exposure to pharmaceuticals may be more important than dietary exposure for snails. PMID:25261960

Du, Bowen; Haddad, Samuel P; Scott, W Casan; Chambliss, C Kevin; Brooks, Bryan W

2015-01-01

72

Gray solitons on the surface of water.  

PubMed

The dynamics of surface gravity water waves can be described by the self-defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Recent observations of black solitons on the surface of water confirmed its validity for finite, below critical depth. The black soliton is a limiting case of a family of gray soliton solutions with finite amplitude depressions. Here, we report observations of gray solitons in water waves, thus, complementing our previous observations of black solitons. PMID:24580162

Chabchoub, A; Kimmoun, O; Branger, H; Kharif, C; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Akhmediev, N

2014-01-01

73

MODELING TOOLS FOR GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

This project develops algorithms for simulating the dynamic interactions between surface water and ground water in rivers and riparian streams. The algorithms rely on physically based linear response functions which describe the exchange rates and volumes of water between the str...

74

Field Techniques for Estimating Water Fluxes Between Surface Water and Ground Water  

E-print Network

Field Techniques for Estimating Water Fluxes Between Surface Water and Ground Water Techniques.S. Geological Survey, retired. #12;Field Techniques for Estimating Water Fluxes Between Surface Water and Ground Water Edited by Donald O. Rosenberry and James W. LaBaugh Techniques and Methods 4­D2 U.S. Department

75

Surface Water Treatment Workshop Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual was developed for use at workshops designed to increase the knowledge of experienced water treatment plant operators. Each of the fourteen lessons in this document has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing that topic. Areas covered in this manual include: basic water

Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

76

Camouflaged or tanned: plasticity in freshwater snail pigmentation  

PubMed Central

By having phenotypically plastic traits, many organisms optimize their fitness in response to fluctuating threats. Freshwater snails with translucent shells, e.g. snails from the Radix genus, differ considerably in their mantle pigmentation patterns, with snails from the same water body ranging from being completely dark pigmented to having only a few dark patterns. These pigmentation differences have previously been suggested to be genetically fixed, but we propose that this polymorphism is owing to phenotypic plasticity in response to a fluctuating environment. Hence, we here aimed to assess whether common stressors, including ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and predation, induce a plastic response in mantle pigmentation patterns of Radix balthica. We show, in contrast to previous studies, that snails are plastic in their expression of mantle pigmentation in response to changes in UVR and predator threats, i.e. differences among populations are not genetically fixed. When exposed to cues from visually hunting fish, R. balthica increased the proportion of their dark pigmentation, suggesting a crypsis strategy. Snails increased their pigmentation even further in response to UVR, but this also led to a reduction in pattern complexity. Furthermore, when exposed to UVR and fish simultaneously, snails responded in the same way as in the UVR treatment, suggesting a trade-off between photoprotection and crypsis. PMID:24046875

Ahlgren, Johan; Yang, Xi; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Brönmark, Christer

2013-01-01

77

Polymorphism in pleistocene land snails.  

PubMed

Under suitable conditions the colors and patterns of the shells of land snails may be preserved for thousands of years. In a late Pleistocene population of Limicolaria martensiana all the major color forms that occur in modern living snails may be distinguished, and the basic polymorphism is at least 8,000 to 10,000 year old. PMID:17830234

Owen, D F

1966-04-01

78

Glow-Worms nu Snails  

Microsoft Academic Search

YOUR correspondent, Mr. R. S. Newall, has unconsciously reversed the natural condition of affairs in his note (NATURE, vol. xx. p. 197). The heading should have been as above Glow-worms devour snails, which are their natural food. The particular snail in question had probably been attacked by the one of the glow-worms, which had left some of its phosphorescent matter

R. McLachlan

1879-01-01

79

Ordering of confined water between metallic surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been pointed out (PCCP 2010, Poissier et al.) that the hydrogen bonding type interaction occuring at water/metal interface makes the two type of interfacial water orderings (hydrophobic or hydrophilic overlayers) very close in energy. The most stable, hydrophobic, overlayer has very small net dipole moment perpendicular to the surface, while the least stable (in vacuum) hydrophilic interface has a large ( 1.8 D) net dipole moment. First principles molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water confined between two Pd surfaces have been performed and structural and electronic water properties have been studied in detail. We show that water confinement in this situation results in a spontaneous symmetry breaking of the system, inducing an electric field across the liquid water slab. We discuss the origin of this spontaneous polarization and show its dependence with the confinement distance along the direction perpendicular to the planes of the surfaces.

Poissier, Adrien; Fernandez-Serra, Maria V.

2011-03-01

80

A Review of Surface Water Quality Models  

PubMed Central

Surface water quality models can be useful tools to simulate and predict the levels, distributions, and risks of chemical pollutants in a given water body. The modeling results from these models under different pollution scenarios are very important components of environmental impact assessment and can provide a basis and technique support for environmental management agencies to make right decisions. Whether the model results are right or not can impact the reasonability and scientificity of the authorized construct projects and the availability of pollution control measures. We reviewed the development of surface water quality models at three stages and analyzed the suitability, precisions, and methods among different models. Standardization of water quality models can help environmental management agencies guarantee the consistency in application of water quality models for regulatory purposes. We concluded the status of standardization of these models in developed countries and put forward available measures for the standardization of these surface water quality models, especially in developing countries. PMID:23853533

Li, Shibei; Jia, Peng; Qi, Changjun; Ding, Feng

2013-01-01

81

A molecular phylogeography approach to biological invasions of the New World by parthenogenetic Thiarid snails  

Microsoft Academic Search

The parthenogenetic snail Melanoides tuberculata , present in tropical fresh waters of most of the Old World before 1950, has now invaded the Neotropical area. The phylogeography of this snail was studied to evaluate the pathways and number of such invasions. Because of parthenogenetic reproduction, individuals are structured into genetical clones. Within populations from both the original and invaded areas,

B. FACON; J.-P. POINTIER; M. GLAUBRECHT; C. POUX; P. JARNE; P. DAVID

2003-01-01

82

Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water.

Stanley, Christopher B [ORNL; Rau, Dr. Donald [National Institutes of Health

2011-01-01

83

Subsurface And Surface Water Flow Interactions  

EPA Science Inventory

In this chapter we present basic concepts and principles underlying the phenomena of groundwater and surface water interactions. Fundamental equations and analytical and numerical solutions describing stream-aquifer interactions are presented in hillslope and riparian aquifer en...

84

Treatment of Seasonal Pesticides in Surface Waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous pesticides were monitored in surface waters in agricultural areas. Atrazine, alachlor, metolachlor, cyanazine, metribuzin, carbofuran, linuron, and simazine were found in the influent to three water treatment plants in stormwater runoff. Studies at these plants, together with bench-scale studies, demonstrated poor control by conventional treatment processes. The relatively high adsorption capacities of these agrichemicals indicate that granular activated carbon

Richard J. Miltner; David B. Baker; Thomas F. Speth; Carol A. Fronk

1989-01-01

85

SURFACE WATER INTAKES, NEUSE RIVER WATERSHED, NC  

EPA Science Inventory

The North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, in cooperation with the NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, developed the Surface Water Intakes digital data to enhance planning, siting and impact analysis in a...

86

Physicochemical properties of concentrated Martian surface waters  

E-print Network

Physicochemical properties of concentrated Martian surface waters Nicholas J. Tosca,1 Scott M. Mc mineral deposits in the Valles Marineris region, and the possible role of saline waters in forming recent geomorphologic features all underscore the need to understand the physical properties of highly concentrated

87

What's So Special about Water: Surface Tension  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this three-part activity, learners play a game and conduct two simple experiments to explore water and surface tension. Learners will have fun discovering how water "sticks" together. This lesson guide includes instructions for three mini activities, key vocabulary words, extension ideas, helpful hints, and resources. Educators can also use this "sticking together" activity to emphasize the importance of empathy and listening.

Bowers, Sally

2008-01-01

88

Water drop friction on superhydrophobic surfaces.  

PubMed

To investigate water drop friction on superhydrophobic surfaces, the motion of water drops on three different superhydrophobic surfaces has been studied by allowing drops to slide down an incline and capturing their motion using high-speed video. Two surfaces were prepared using crystallization of an alkyl ketene dimer (AKD) wax, and the third surface was the leaf of a Lotus (Nelumbo Nucifera). The acceleration of the water droplets on these superhydrophobic surfaces was measured as a function of droplet size and inclination of the surface. For small capillary numbers, we propose that the energy dissipation is dominated by intermittent pinning-depinning transitions at microscopic pinning sites along the trailing contact line of the drop, while at capillary numbers exceeding a critical value, energy dissipation is dominated by circulatory flow in the vicinity of the contacting disc between the droplet and the surface. By combining the results of the droplet acceleration with a theoretical model based on energy dissipation, we have introduced a material-specific coefficient called the superhydrophobic sliding resistance, b(sh). Once determined, this parameter is sufficient for predicting the motion of water drops on superhydrophobic surfaces of a general macroscopic topography. This theory also infers the existence of an equilibrium sliding angle, ?(eq), at which the drop acceleration is zero. This angle is decreasing with the radius of the drop and is in quantitative agreement with the measured tilt angles required for a stationary drop to start sliding down an incline. PMID:23721176

Olin, Pontus; Lindström, Stefan B; Pettersson, Torbjörn; Wågberg, Lars

2013-07-23

89

Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces  

PubMed Central

Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement of water as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate common features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water. PMID:22125414

Stanley, Christopher

2011-01-01

90

Water surface locomotion in tropical canopy ants.  

PubMed

Upon falling onto the water surface, most terrestrial arthropods helplessly struggle and are quickly eaten by aquatic predators. Exceptions to this outcome mostly occur among riparian taxa that escape by walking or swimming at the water surface. Here we document sustained, directional, neustonic locomotion (i.e. surface swimming) in tropical arboreal ants. We dropped 35 species of ants into natural and artificial aquatic settings in Peru and Panama to assess their swimming ability. Ten species showed directed surface swimming at speeds >3 body lengths s(-1), with some swimming at absolute speeds >10 cm s(-1). Ten other species exhibited partial swimming ability characterized by relatively slow but directed movement. The remaining species showed no locomotory control at the surface. The phylogenetic distribution of swimming among ant genera indicates parallel evolution and a trend toward negative association with directed aerial descent behavior. Experiments with workers of Odontomachus bauri showed that they escape from the water by directing their swimming toward dark emergent objects (i.e. skototaxis). Analyses of high-speed video images indicate that Pachycondyla spp. and O. bauri use a modified alternating tripod gait when swimming; they generate thrust at the water surface via synchronized treading and rowing motions of the contralateral fore and mid legs, respectively, while the hind legs provide roll stability. These results expand the list of facultatively neustonic terrestrial taxa to include various species of tropical arboreal ants. PMID:24920838

Yanoviak, S P; Frederick, D N

2014-06-15

91

Surface water clarification using M. oleifera seeds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Turbid surface water was treated using a pilot scale water treatment plant comprising coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation and rapid gravity filtration, using Moringa oleifera seeds\\/alum as coagulants. Turbidity removal of M. oleifera, alum, and the mixture of both M. oleifera\\/alum were compared, and results obtained were 7.2, 4.2 and 3.2 NTU, respectively. The turbidity achieved using M. oleifera\\/alum mixture and alum

A. G. Liew; M. J. M. M. Noor; S. A. Muyibi; A. M. S. Fugara; T. A. Muhammed; S. E. Iyuke

2006-01-01

92

Predator-induced life-history shifts in a freshwater snail.  

PubMed

The snail Physella virgata virgata, a widely distributed freshwater pulmonate, was observed to change its life-history characteristics in the presence of the crayfish Orconectes virilis in spring-fed Oklahoma streams. These changes were apparently initiated by a water-borne cue released when crayfish fed on conspecific snails. In the presence of the cue, snails exhibited rapid growth rates and little reproduction until they reached a size of about 10 mm after 8 months. In the absence of the cue, snails typically grew to about 4 mm (3.5 months) and then began reproduction. The chemically inducible shift indicates that the life histories of these snails are phenotypically plastic. By increasing the variance associated with size and age of maturity, prey may increase the likelihood of coexisting with seasonal predators. PMID:17776452

Crowl, T A; Covich, A P

1990-02-23

93

Slime-trail tracking in the predatory snail, Euglandina rosea.  

PubMed

Euglandina rosea, a predatory land snail, tracks prey and mates by following slime trails. Euglandina follow slime trails more than 80% of the time, following trails of their own species, but not those of prey snails, in the direction that they were laid. The attractive elements of prey slime are small, water-soluble compounds detected by specialized lip extensions. Although olfaction plays no role in trail following, strong odors disrupt tracking. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase also disrupts slime trail following, suggesting a role for nitric oxide in neural processing of slime trail stimuli. Euglandina can be conditioned to follow novel trails of glutamate or arginine paired with feeding on prey snails. These experiments demonstrate that slime-trail tracking in Euglandina is a robust, easily measured behavior that makes a good model system for studying sensory processing and learning in a novel modality. PMID:14570557

Clifford, Kavan T; Gross, Liaini; Johnson, Kwame; Martin, Khalil J; Shaheen, Nagma; Harrington, Melissa A

2003-10-01

94

Pollution of surface water in Europe  

PubMed Central

This paper discusses pollution of surface water in 18 European countries. For each an account is given of its physical character, population, industries, and present condition of water supplies; the legal, administrative, and technical means of controlling pollution are then described, and an outline is given of current research on the difficulties peculiar to each country. A general discussion of various aspects common to the European problem of water pollution follows; standards of quality are suggested; some difficulties likely to arise in the near future are indicated, and international collaboration, primarily by the exchange of information, is recommended to check or forestall these trends. PMID:13374532

Key, A.

1956-01-01

95

Natural Processes of Ground-Water and Surface-Water Interaction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site explains the hydrologic cycle and interactions of ground water with surface water, streams, lakes, and wetlands. There are sections about chemical interactions of ground water and surface water; evolution of water chemistry in drainage basins; and interaction of ground water and surface water in different landscapes. Mountainous, riverine, coastal, glacial and dune, and karst terrain are examined.

Thomas Winter

1998-01-01

96

Evaporation over fresh and saline water surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaporation over large water bodies has a crucial role in the global hydrological cycle. Evaporation occurs whenever there is a vapor pressure deficit between a water surface and the atmosphere, and the available energy is sufficient. Salinity affects the density and latent heat of vaporization of the water body, which reflects on the evaporation rate. Different models have been developed to estimate the evaporation process over water surfaces using earth observation data. Most of these models are concerned with the atmospheric parameters. However these models do not take into account the influence of salinity on the evaporation rate; they do not consider the difference in the energy needed for vaporization. For this purpose an energy balance model is required. Several energy balance models that calculate daily evapotranspiration exist, such as the surface energy balance system (SEBS). They estimate the heat fluxes by integration of satellite data and hydro-meteorological field data. SEBS has the advantage that it can be applied over a large scale because it incorporates the physical state of the surface and the aerodynamic resistances in the daily evapotranspiration estimation. Nevertheless this model has not used over water surfaces. The goal of this research is to adapt SEBS to estimate the daily evaporation over fresh and saline water bodies. In particular, 1) water heat flux and roughness of momentum and heat transfer estimation need to be updated, 2) upscaling to daily evaporation needs to be investigated and finally 3) integration of the salinity factor to estimate the evaporation over saline water needs to be performed. Eddy covariance measurements over the Ijsselmeer Lake (The Netherlands) were used to estimate the roughness of momentum and heat transfer at respectively 0.0002 and 0.0001 m. Application of these values over Tana Lake (freshwater), in Ethiopia showed latent heat to be in a good agreement with the measurements, with RMSE of 35.5 Wm-2and rRMSE of 4.7 %. Afterwards the validity of salinity adapted model was tested over different study areas using ECMWF data. It was found that for the original SEBS model and salinity-adapted model over Great Salt Lake, the RMSE were 0.62 and 0.24 mm respectively and the rRMSE 19% and 24%. The evaporation reduction of the Great Salt Lake and the oceans are 27% and 1 %, respectively. In conclusion, SEBS model is adapted to calculate the daily evaporation over fresh water and salt water by integration the salinity factor in the model.

Abdelrady, Ahmed; Timmermans, Joris; Vekerdy, Zoltan

2013-04-01

97

Groundwater and Surface Water: Understanding the Interaction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides an introduction to groundwater-surface water interactions and how groundwater can be affected by land use. The page describes threats to groundwater, common contaminants, sources of contamination, and groundwater management approaches and tools. A short glossary and a groundwater quiz are also included.

Nancy Phillips

98

Surface water (2.6) Deliberate human  

E-print Network

- landfills (7.8) - vadose zone and groundwater (3.6) - plants & soils (??) Surface water (2.6) Milk and cows ecosystems 2) collectors are located in non-urban areas Direct · Collect deposition using a `surrogate is being used at all CAP sites, via wet/dry bucket samplers Indirect · Measure the concentration

Hall, Sharon J.

99

Observing Global Surface Water Flood Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Flood waves moving along river systems are both a key determinant of globally important biogeochemical and ecological processes and, at particular times and particular places, a major environmental hazard. In developed countries, sophisticated observing networks and ancillary data, such as channel bathymetry and floodplain terrain, exist with which to understand and model floods. However, at global scales, satellite data currently provide the only means of undertaking such studies. At present, there is no satellite mission dedicated to observing surface water dynamics and, therefore, surface water scientists make use of a range of sensors developed for other purposes that are distinctly sub-optimal for the task in hand. Nevertheless, by careful combination of the data available from topographic mapping, oceanographic, cryospheric and geodetic satellites, progress in understanding some of the world's major river, floodplain and wetland systems can be made. This paper reviews the surface water data sets available to hydrologists on a global scale and the recent progress made in the field. Further, the paper looks forward to the proposed NASA/CNES Surface Water Ocean Topography satellite mission that may for the first time provide an instrument that meets the needs of the hydrology community.

Bates, Paul D.; Neal, Jefferey C.; Alsdorf, Douglas; Schumann, Guy J.-P.

2014-05-01

100

Electrolysis of water on (oxidized) metal surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Density functional theory calculations are used as the basis for an analysis of the electrochemical process, where by water is split to form molecular oxygen and hydrogen. We develop a method for obtaining the thermochemistry of the electrochemical water splitting process as a function of the bias directly from the electronic structure calculations. We consider electrodes of Pt(1 1 1) and Au(1 1 1) in detail and then discuss trends for a series of different metals. We show that the difficult step in the water splitting process is the formation of superoxy-type (OOH) species on the surface by the splitting of a water molecule on top an adsorbed oxygen atom. One conclusion is that this is only possible on metal surfaces that are (partly) oxidized. We show that the binding energies of the different intermediates are linearly correlated for a number of metals. In a simple analysis, where the linear relations are assumed to be obeyed exactly, this leads to a universal relationship between the catalytic rate and the oxygen binding energy. Finally, we conclude that for systems obeying these relations, there is a limit to how good a water splitting catalyst an oxidized metal surface can become.

Rossmeisl, J.; Logadottir, A.; Nørskov, J. K.

2005-12-01

101

Habitat preference of freshwater snails in relation to environmental factors and the presence of the competitor snail Melanoides tuberculatus (Müller, 1774).  

PubMed

Our objective is to evaluate the habitat preference of freshwater snails in relation to environmental factors and the presence of the competitor snail Melanoides tuberculatus. In the first phase, snails was collected at 12 sites. This sampling sites presented a degree of organic input. In the second phase 33 sampling sites were chosen, covering a variety of lotic and lentic environments. The snail species found at Guapimirim, state of Rio de Janeiro, displayed a marked habitat preference, specially in relation to the physical characteristics of each environment. Other limiting factors for snail distribution at the studied lotic environments were the water current velocity and the amount of organic matter, mainly to Physa marmorata, M. tuberculatus, and Biomphalaria tenagophila. The absence of interactions between M. tuberculatus and another snails could be associated to the distinct spatial distribution of those species and the instability of habitats. This later factor may favor the coexistence of M. tuberculatus with B. glabrata by reduction of population density. In areas of schistosomiasis transmission some habitat modification may add to the instability of the environment, which would make room for the coexistence of M. tuberculatus and Biomphalaria spp. In this way, some of the usual measures for the control of snail hosts would prevent the extinction of populations of Biomphalaria spp. by M. tuberculatus in particular habitats. PMID:16021304

Giovanelli, Alexandre; da Silva, Cesar Luiz Pinto Ayres Coelho; Leal, Geórgia Borges Eccard; Baptista, Darcílio Fernandes

2005-04-01

102

Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission was recommended in 2007 by the National Research Council's Decadal Survey, "Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond", for implementation by NASA. The SWOT mission is a partnership between two communities, the physical oceanography and the hydrology, to share high vertical accuracy and high spatial resolution topography data produced by the science payload, principally a Ka-band radar Interferometer (KaRIn). The SWOT payload also includes a precision orbit determination system consisting of GPS and DORIS receivers, a Laser Retro-reflector Assembly (LRA), a Jason-class nadir radar altimeter, and a JASON-class radiometer for tropospheric path delay corrections. The SWOT mission will provide large-scale data sets of ocean sea-surface height resolving scales of 15km and larger, allowing the characterization of ocean mesoscale and submesoscale circulation. The SWOT mission will also provide measurements of water storage changes in terrestrial surface water bodies and estimates of discharge in large (wider than 100m) rivers globally. The SWOT measurements will provide a key complement to other NASA spaceborne global measurements of the water cycle measurements by directly measuring the surface water (lakes, reservoirs, rivers, and wetlands) component of the water cycle. The SWOT mission is an international partnership between NASA and the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is also expected to contribute to the mission. SWOT is currently nearing entry to Formulation (Phase A). Its launch is targeted for October 2020.

Neeck, Steven P.; Lindstrom, Eric J.; Vaze, Parag V.; Fu, Lee-Lueng

2012-09-01

103

Silver speciation in wastewater effluent, surface waters, and pore waters  

SciTech Connect

Silver, inorganic sulfide, and thiol compounds were measured in municipal wastewater effluent, receiving waters, and pore waters from an anoxic lake sediment in order to predict silver speciation in these systems. The authors found submicromolar concentrations of inorganic sulfide even in fully oxic surface water. This inorganic sulfide is likely to exist in the form of colloidal metal sulfides, which have been shown to be stable under oxidizing conditions for periods of several hours. Inorganic sulfide in both the wastewater effluent and receiving waters was found to be 200 to 300 times in excess of silver concentrations, whereas inorganic sulfide in pore waters was 1,000 to 15,000 times in excess of silver concentrations. With sulfide in excess of silver, the authors predict silver sulfide complexes to dominate silver speciation. Thiols were present at low nanomolar levels in pore waters but were not detectable in wastewater effluent or receiving waters. Thiols do not appear to be important to silver speciation in these freshwater systems. Partitioning of silver into particular, colloidal, and dissolved size fractions showed that a significant proportion of silver is in the colloidal and dissolved phases. Dissolved phase concentrations were relatively constant in the treatment plant effluent and receiving waters, suggesting that silver in the <10-kDa size fraction is strongly complexed by ligands that are not significantly affected by aggregation or sorption processes.

Adams, N.W.H.; Kramer, J.R.

1999-12-01

104

The effect of aquatic plant abundance on shell crushing resistance in a freshwater snail.  

PubMed

Most of the shell material in snails is composed of calcium carbonate but the organic shell matrix determines the properties of calcium carbonate crystals. It has been shown that the deposition of calcium carbonate is affected by the ingestion of organic compounds. We hypothesize that organic compounds not synthesized by the snails are important for shell strength and must be obtained from the diet. We tested this idea indirectly by evaluating whether the abundance of the organic matter that snails eat is related to the strength of their shells. We measured shell crushing resistance in the snail Mexipyrgus churinceanus and the abundance of the most common aquatic macrophyte, the water lily Nymphaea ampla, in ten bodies of water in the valley of Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. We used stable isotopes to test the assumption that these snails feed on water lily organic matter. We also measured other factors that can affect crushing resistance, such as the density of crushing predators, snail density, water pH, and the concentration of calcium and phosphorus in the water. The isotope analysis suggested that snails assimilate water lily organic matter that is metabolized by sediment bacteria. The variable that best explained the variation in crushing resistance found among sites was the local abundance of water lilies. We propose that the local amount of water lily organic matter provides organic compounds important in shell biomineralization, thus determining crushing resistance. Hence, we propose that a third trophic level could be important in the coevolution of snail defensive traits and predatory structures. PMID:22970206

Chaves-Campos, Johel; Coghill, Lyndon M; García de León, Francisco J; Johnson, Steven G

2012-01-01

105

Uncertainty in surface water flood risk modelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two thirds of the flooding that occurred in the UK during summer 2007 was as a result of surface water (otherwise known as ‘pluvial') rather than river or coastal flooding. In response, the Environment Agency and Interim Pitt Reviews have highlighted the need for surface water risk mapping and warning tools to identify, and prepare for, flooding induced by heavy rainfall events. This need is compounded by the likely increase in rainfall intensities due to climate change. The Association of British Insurers has called for the Environment Agency to commission nationwide flood risk maps showing the relative risk of flooding from all sources. At the wider European scale, the recently-published EC Directive on the assessment and management of flood risks will require Member States to evaluate, map and model flood risk from a variety of sources. As such, there is now a clear and immediate requirement for the development of techniques for assessing and managing surface water flood risk across large areas. This paper describes an approach for integrating rainfall, drainage network and high-resolution topographic data using Flowroute™, a high-resolution flood mapping and modelling platform, to produce deterministic surface water flood risk maps. Information is provided from UK case studies to enable assessment and validation of modelled results using historical flood information and insurance claims data. Flowroute was co-developed with flood scientists at Cambridge University specifically to simulate river dynamics and floodplain inundation in complex, congested urban areas in a highly computationally efficient manner. It utilises high-resolution topographic information to route flows around individual buildings so as to enable the prediction of flood depths, extents, durations and velocities. As such, the model forms an ideal platform for the development of surface water flood risk modelling and mapping capabilities. The 2-dimensional component of Flowroute employs uniform flow formulae (Manning's Equation) to direct flow over the model domain, sourcing water from the channel or sea so as to provide a detailed representation of river and coastal flood risk. The initial development step was to include spatially-distributed rainfall as a new source term within the model domain. This required optimisation to improve computational efficiency, given the ubiquity of ‘wet' cells early on in the simulation. Collaboration with UK water companies has provided detailed drainage information, and from this a simplified representation of the drainage system has been included in the model via the inclusion of sinks and sources of water from the drainage network. This approach has clear advantages relative to a fully coupled method both in terms of reduced input data requirements and computational overhead. Further, given the difficulties associated with obtaining drainage information over large areas, tests were conducted to evaluate uncertainties associated with excluding drainage information and the impact that this has upon flood model predictions. This information can be used, for example, to inform insurance underwriting strategies and loss estimation as well as for emergency response and planning purposes. The Flowroute surface-water flood risk platform enables efficient mapping of areas sensitive to flooding from high-intensity rainfall events due to topography and drainage infrastructure. As such, the technology has widespread potential for use as a risk mapping tool by the UK Environment Agency, European Member States, water authorities, local governments and the insurance industry. Keywords: Surface water flooding, Model Uncertainty, Insurance Underwriting, Flood inundation modelling, Risk mapping.

Butler, J. B.; Martin, D. N.; Roberts, E.; Domuah, R.

2009-04-01

106

Simulation of lakes and surface water heat exchangers for design of surface water heat pump systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Surface Water Heat Pump (SWHP) system utilize surface water bodies, such as ponds, lakes, rivers, and the sea, as heat sources and/or sinks. These systems may be open-loop, circulating water between the surface water body and a heat exchanger on dry land, or closed-loop, utilizing a submerged surface water heat exchanger (SWHE). Both types of SWHP systems have been widely used, but little in the way of design data, design procedures, or energy calculation procedures is available to aid engineers in the design and analysis of these systems. For either type of SWHP system, the ability to predict the evolution of lake temperature with time is an important aspect of needed design and energy analysis procedures. This thesis describes the development and validation of a lake model that is coupled with a surface water heat exchanger model to predict both the lake dynamics (temperature, stratification, ice/snow cover) and the heat transfer performance of different types of SWHE. This one-dimensional model utilizes a detailed surface heat balance model at the upper boundary, a sediment conduction heat transfer model at the lower boundary, and an eddy diffusion model to predict transport within the lake. The lake model is implemented as part of the developed software design tool, which can be used as an aid in the sizing of SWHE used in closed loop SWHP systems.

Conjeevaram Bashyam, Krishna

107

Surface water management at FPL's Martin site  

SciTech Connect

Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) is the fourth largest electric utility in the country. It is projecting significant growth in the demand for electricity by the year 2000. In order to meet the increased demand, FPL is expanding the capacity of their existing Martin power plant site near Indiantown, Florida. The expansion plan will be implemented in three phases, increasing the site capacity from the current 1600 Mw to 3200 Mw. This article outlines the unique engineering challenges encountered during the planning of the site surface water management system improvements required to support the overall phased expansion. In addition, the article highlights the innovative strategies that were employed to assure an effective surface water management system and the benefits that results from thorough, up-front planning that addressed current and future phases of the project.

Brannen, W.F.; Callahan, P.T. (Florida Power and Light, West Palm Beach, FL (US)); Eng, L.H.; Nalbandian, O.J. (Bechtel Power Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-01-01

108

Surface of Miranda - Identification of water ice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Near-infrared spectrophotometry at 5-percent resolution shows Miranda to have a water-ice surface. Estimates of Miranda's albedo made from the depth of its 2.0-micron absorption band suggest that its visual geometric albedo is likely to be between 10 and 70 percent which when combined with the satellite's visual magnitude, yields a diameter of 500 + or 225 km. There is some evidence that suggests the visual geometric albedo of Miranda may be greater than or equal to 0.3, which implies that its diameter may lie near the lower end of the estimated range. With these results all the Uranian satellites are now known to have water-ice surfaces.

Brown, R. H.; Clark, R. N.

1984-05-01

109

Distribution and abundance of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis host snails along the Mara River in Kenya and Tanzania.  

PubMed

We purposively selected 39 sampling sites along the Mara River and its two perennial tributaries of Amala and Nyangores and sampled snails. In addition, water physicochemical parameters (temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, alkalinity, salinity and pH) were taken to establish their influence on the snail abundance and habitat preference. Out of the 39 sites sampled, 10 (25.6%) had snails. The snail species encountered included Biomphalaria pfeifferi Krauss - the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, Bulinus africanus - the intermediate host of Schistosoma haematobium, and Lymnaea natalensis Krauss - the intermediate host of both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica Cobbold. Ceratophallus spp., a non-vector snail was also encountered. Most (61.0%) of the snails were encountered in streamside pools. Schistosomiasis-transmitting host snails, B. pfeifferi and B. africanus, were fewer than fascioliasis-transmitting Lymnaea species. All the four different snail species were found to be attached to different aquatic weeds, with B. pfeifferi accounting for over half (61.1%) of the snails attached to the sedge, followed by B. africanus and Lymnaea spp., accounting for 22.2 and 16.7%, respectively. Ceratophallus spp. were non-existent in sedge. The results from this preliminary study show that snails intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis exists in different habitats, in few areas along the Mara River, though their densities are still low to have any noticeable impacts on disease transmission in case they are infected. The mere presence of the vector snails in these focal regions calls for their immediate control and institution of proper regulations, management, and education among the locals that can help curtail the spread of the snails and also schistosomiasis and fascioliasis within the Mara River basin. PMID:25405008

Dida, Gabriel O; Gelder, Frank B; Anyona, Douglas N; Matano, Ally-Said; Abuom, Paul O; Adoka, Samson O; Ouma, Collins; Kanangire, Canisius K; Owuor, Phillip O; Ofulla, Ayub V O

2014-01-01

110

Effects of Washing Produce Contaminated with the Snail and Slug Hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with Three Common Household Solutions  

PubMed Central

The emerging infectious disease angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease) is caused by ingesting snails and slugs infected by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The definitive hosts of A. cantonensis are rats and the obligatory intermediate hosts are slugs and snails. Many cases result from accidentally ingesting infected snails or slugs on produce (eg, lettuce). This study assessed three readily available household products as washing solutions for removing snails and slugs from produce (romaine lettuce) to lower the probability of accidentally ingesting them. The solutions were acetic acid (vinegar), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), and sodium chloride (domestic salt). Snail and slug species known to be intermediate hosts and that are common in the Hawaiian Islands were used in the experiments: the alien snail Succinea tenella, the alien semi-slug Parmarion martensi, and the alien slugs Veronicella cubensis and Deroceras laeve. None of the products was any more effective than washing and rinsing with tap water alone. Most snails and slugs were removed after treatment but some remained on the lettuce even after washing and rinsing the produce. Only washing, rinsing, and then rinsing each leaf individually resulted in complete removal of all snails and slugs. The study did not address removal of any remaining slime left by the snails and slugs, nor did it address killing of worms. PMID:23901391

Yeung, Norine W; Hayes, Kenneth A

2013-01-01

111

River regulation and interactions groundwater - surface water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The determination of a minimum acceptable flow in a river affected by regulation is a major task in management of hydropower development. The Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE), responsible for administrating the nation's water resources, requires an objective system that takes into account the needs of the developer and the rivers environment such as water quality, river biota, landscape, erosion and groundwater. A research project has been initiated with focus on interactions between groundwater and surface water. The purpose of the project is to provide the licensing authorities with tools for quantitative assessment of the effects of regulation on groundwater resources and at the same time the effect of groundwater abstraction on river flows. A small, urbanised alluvial plain (2 km^2) by the river Glomma in Central Southern Norway is used as a case study. The local aquifer consists of heterogeneous glaciofluvial and fluvial deposit, mainly sand and gravel. Two three-dimensional numerical models (Visual Modflow 3.0 and Feflow 5.0) have been used for this study. The models were calibrated with hydro-geological data collected in the field. Aquifer and river sediment has been examined by use of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and soil samples collection. Preferential flow has been examined by tracer tests. Water level, temperature and electric conductivity have been recorded in both aquifer and river. Hydro-climatic regime has been analysed by statistical tools. The first task of the project is to carry out water balance studies in order to estimate the change in rate of groundwater recharge from and to the river along a normal hydrologic year with snowmelting, flood, and baseflow. The second task is to analyse the potential effect of change in the river water regime (due to regulation and consecutive clogging) on groundwater resources and their interaction with stream water.

Colleuille, H.; Wong, W. K.; Dimakis, P.; Pedersen, T. S.

2003-04-01

112

APPLE SNAILS AS DISEASE VECTORS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Apple snails (Ampullariidae) are intermediate hosts of parasites causing at least three diseases in humans: cercarial dermatitis (“swimmer’s itch”) caused by trematode cercaria, intestinal problems caused by flukes in the genus Echinostoma, and eosinophilic meningitis caused by the nematode Angiostr...

113

Reproductive anomalies in stenoglossan snails related to pollution from marinas.  

PubMed

Over 3090 snails of the dioecious intertidal species Nassarius obsoletus Say were collected from a total of 71 localities. Their reproductive anatomy was examined for a superimposition of male characteristics on to the normal female anatomy, an abnormality called 'imposex'. Imposex was rated numerically in terms of the fraction of the population affected and the intensity of expression in bearer snails. An initial survey of 22 localities in Fairfield and Westport, Connecticut, led to the hypothesis that imposex was related to a substance arising from marinas. This was tested at nine pairs of marina and control localities in Long Island Sound, as well as six pairs along a transect ranging from Rhode Island to Georgia. Imposex scores were significantly higher at the marina locality in every pair. Further confirmation was found in a detailed survey of the estuarine harbor at Southport, Connecticut, which showed that adjacent populations could differ in the amount of imposex to the extent that both the snails and the waters they lived in remained separated by natural or man-made barriers. Imposex has been found in populations of N. obsoletus ranging from Damariscotta, Maine, to Savannah, Georgia, and it has been reported from San Francisco Bay, California. Similar anatomical abnormalities have been reported in at least 27 other species of taenioglossan and stenoglossan snails, extending the range to the Atlantic and Mediterranean coast of Europe and the British Isles. Concern is raised regarding the possible existence of another global pollutant with novel effects on marina biota. PMID:7185869

Smith, B S

1981-02-01

114

Impact of Water Withdrawals from Groundwater and Surface Water on Continental Water Storage Variations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Humans have strongly impacted the global water cycle, not only water flows but also water storage. We have performed a first global-scale analysis of the impact of water withdrawals on water storage variations, using the global water resources and use model WaterGAP. This required estimation of fractions of total water withdrawals from groundwater, considering five water use sectors. According to our assessment, the source of 35% of the water withdrawn worldwide (4300 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002) is groundwater. Groundwater contributes 42%, 36% and 27% of water used for irrigation, households and manufacturing, respectively, while we assume that only surface water is used for livestock and for cooling of thermal power plants. Consumptive water use was 1400 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002. It is the sum of the net abstraction of 250 cubic km/yr of groundwater (taking into account evapotranspiration and return flows of withdrawn surface water and groundwater) and the net abstraction of 1150 km3/yr of surface water. Computed net abstractions indicate, for the first time at the global scale, where and when human water withdrawals decrease or increase groundwater or surface water storage. In regions with extensive surface water irrigation, such as Southern China, net abstractions from groundwater are negative, i.e. groundwater is recharged by irrigation. The opposite is true for areas dominated by groundwater irrigation, such as in the High Plains aquifer of the central USA, where net abstraction of surface water is negative because return flow of withdrawn groundwater recharges the surface water compartments. In intensively irrigated areas, the amplitude of seasonal total water storage variations is generally increased due to human water use; however, in some areas, it is decreased. For the High Plains aquifer and the whole Mississippi basin, modeled groundwater and total water storage variations were compared with estimates of groundwater storage variations based on groundwater table observations, and with estimates of total water storage variations from the GRACE satellites mission. Due to the difficulty in estimating area-averaged seasonal groundwater storage variations from point observations of groundwater levels, it is uncertain whether WaterGAP underestimates actual variations or not. We conclude that WaterGAP possibly overestimates water withdrawals in the High Plains aquifer where impact of human water use on water storage is readily discernible based on WaterGAP calculations and groundwater observations. No final conclusion can be drawn regarding the possibility of monitoring water withdrawals in the High Plains aquifer using GRACE. For the less intensively irrigated Mississippi basin, observed and modeled seasonal groundwater storage reveals a discernible impact of water withdrawals in the basin, but this is not the case for total water storage such that water withdrawals at the scale of the whole Mississippi basin cannot be monitored by GRACE.

Doell, Petra; Hoffmann-Dobrev, Heike; Portmann, Felix T.; Siebert, Stefan; Eicker, Annette; Rodell, Matthew; Strassberg, Gil

2011-01-01

115

Water Drops on Surfaces Huamin Wang Peter J. Mucha  

E-print Network

-solid interaction, contact line/angle, virtual surface, water drop 1 Introduction Although simulating fluids has and splitting and the motion of water rivulets. The core of our algorithm is a virtual surface method, whichWater Drops on Surfaces Huamin Wang Peter J. Mucha Georgia Institute of Technology Greg Turk

Turk, Greg

116

Organophosphorous pesticides in surface water of Iran.  

PubMed

This research aims to evaluate the presence and distribution of pesticides in Babolrood River of Mazandaran Province in Iran. Mean diazinon levels in surface water ranged from 77.6 to 101.6 ?g L(-1) with maximum level of 768.9 ?g L(-1) and mean malathion levels ranged from 55.7 to 75.9 ?g L(-1) with maximum level of 506.6 ?g L(-1). The residues of malathion and diazinon pesticides in all of the stations, 2 weeks after spraying, were more than allowed limits. PMID:22349309

Fadaei, Abdolmajid; Dehghani, Mohammad Hadi; Nasseri, Simin; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Rastkari, Noushin; Shayeghi, Mansoreh

2012-06-01

117

Failure of transmission of low-pathogenic avian influenza virus between Mallards and freshwater snails: an experimental evaluation.  

PubMed

In aquatic bird populations, the ability of avian influenza (AI) viruses to remain infectious in water for extended periods provides a mechanism that allows viral transmission to occur long after shedding birds have left the area. However, this also exposes other aquatic organisms, including freshwater invertebrates, to AI viruses. Previous researchers found that AI viral RNA can be sequestered in snail tissues. Using an experimental approach, we determined whether freshwater snails (Physa acuta and Physa gyrina) can infect waterfowl with AI viruses by serving as a means of transmission between infected and naïve waterfowl via ingestion. In our first experiment, we exposed 20 Physa spp. snails to an AI virus (H3N8) and inoculated embryonated specific pathogen-free (SPF) chicken eggs with the homogenized snail tissues. Sequestered AI viruses remain infectious in snail tissues; 10% of the exposed snail tissues infected SPF eggs. In a second experiment, we exposed snails to water contaminated with feces of AI virus-inoculated Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) to evaluate whether ingestion of exposed freshwater snails was an alternate route of AI virus transmission to waterfowl. None of the immunologically naïve Mallards developed an infection, indicating that transmission via ingestion likely did not occur. Our results suggest that this particular trophic interaction may not play an important role in the transmission of AI viruses in aquatic habitats. PMID:24502718

Oesterle, Paul T; Huyvaert, Kathryn P; Orahood, Darcy; Mooers, Nicole; Sullivan, Heather; Franklin, Alan B; Root, J Jeffrey

2013-10-01

118

Population studies on Oncomelania quadrasi, the snail intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum, in the Philippines. 5. Quantitative analysis on successful snail control by land reclamation.  

PubMed

For the control of Oncomelania quadrasi, environmental modifications, i.e., clearing of vegetation, leveling of swampy depression and draining of stagnant water by channeling and excavation were carried out at 3 areas in Leyte, Philippines from 1974 to 1977. The change of snail population resulted in the land reclamation was evaluated by the methods previously developed by the population studies on this snail. As a result of statistical analysis based on y = log(x + 0.01) transformation and the antilogarithmic mean density A-y = (antilog -y) -0.01, the reduction of snail population was observed at 13 out of 18 sites studied at 3 project areas and the significant reduction was statistically confirmed at 9 sites of them. Particularly at Dagami area, which was a wide and heavily snail-infested land adjacent to Dagami Poblacion, the reduction rate of snail density reached 87.7% to 99.2% and some wet depressions have been converted into good rice fields with little snail infestation at the last survey. PMID:3090317

Makiya, K; Tanaka, H; Bañez, E; Blas, B L; Santos, A T

1986-04-01

119

Pumpkin Creek Surface-Ground Water by J. David Aiken  

E-print Network

Pumpkin Creek Surface-Ground Water Dispute by J. David Aiken UNL Water and Agricultural Law. In March 2001 the North Platte Natural Resources District (NRD) established the Pumpkin Creek ground water statute authorizing NRDs to restrict ground water uses to address conflicts between surface and ground

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

120

Emission of dimers from a free surface of heated water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emission rate of water dimers from a free surface and a wetted solid surface in various cases was calculated by a simplified Monte Carlo method with the use of the binding energy of water molecules. The binding energy of water molecules obtained numerically assuming equilibrium between the free surface of water and vapor in the temperature range of 298-438 K corresponds to the coordination number for liquid water equal to 4.956 and is close to the reference value. The calculation results show that as the water temperature increases, the free surface of water and the wetted solid surface become sources of free water dimers. At a temperature of 438 K, the proportion of dimers in the total flow of water molecules on its surface reaches 1%. It is found that in the film boiling mode, the emission rate of dimers decreases with decreasing saturation vapor. Two mechanisms of the emission are described.

Bochkarev, A. A.; Polyakova, V. I.

2014-09-01

121

Metolachlor and atrazine fate in surface water systems  

SciTech Connect

The detection of pesticides in surface water and ground water provokes concern involving human health risks associated with pesticide exposure. Monitoring studies of surface waters have detected concentrations of herbicides that exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed maximum contamination level (MCL) for drinking water. Conventional water treatment processes do not remove many herbicides. Tap water drawn from surface-water sources has been reported to contain levels of herbicides above the regulatory limits. There is current interest in the use of artificial wetlands and macrophyte-cultured ponds in waste-water-treatment systems. Aquatic plant-based water treatment systems improve waste water effluent by solid filtration and nutrient assimilation. Various aquatic plants have been shown to accumulate metals, absorb inorganic ions, and accelerate the biodegradation of complex organics. Our research evaluates the fate of metolachlor and atrazine in surface water, surface water/sediment, and surface water/aquatic plant incubation systems to study the influence of sediment and aquatic plants in the removal and biotransformation of herbicides from contaminated waters. Aquatic macrophyte systems may prove to be useful in the remediation of herbicide contaminated surface waters in water treatment facilities or in the reduction of herbicide concentrations from tile drain effluents prior to entering watersheds.

Rice, P.J.; Anderson, T.A.; Coats, J.R. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

1995-12-31

122

Moving Water Droplets on Aluminum and Copper Surfaces Using Surface Tension Gradients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The behavior of water droplets on metal surfaces is very important for many applications, especially in heat exchangers in air conditioning and refrigeration. We use photolithography and/or shadow masks to create alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic Cu micro-channels on an aluminum surface and to move water droplets on the surface. The contact angle that is formed between water droplets and the surface is clearly asymmetrical due to the different surface properties at the contact line between the droplets and the patterned surface. An HDFT self-assembled mono-layer allows for a large change in the water droplet contact angle on the copper, but seems to have no effect on the aluminum surface. We will show our results on the effect of the surface patterning and surface roughness on water droplet behavior. We also demonstrate that the engineered surface gradients cause water droplets to travel more than 1'' on a horizontal or upward tilted surface.

Alheshibri, Muidh; Rogers, Nathaniel; Sommers, Andrew; Eid, Khalid

2013-03-01

123

F-LE Snail Invasion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: In 1966, a Miami boy smuggled three Giant African Land Snails into the country. His grandmother eventually released them into the garden, and in seven ...

124

Snails, stable iostopes, and southwestern desert paleoclimates  

SciTech Connect

Modern and fossil molluscs (snails) occur in many localities in and semi-arid regions throughout the desert southwest. Live terrestrial snails are found under rocks and in forest litter and aquatic taxa inhabit springs, seeps, and/or wetlands. Molluscs uptake local water during their growing season (spring and summer) and incorporate its delta 180 signature into their shells. Preliminary 180 analysis of modem shells from the southern Great Basin indicates that the shells probably reflect meteoric water 180 values during the growing season. This provides a way to estimate the delta 180 value of precipitation and, thereby, the source of the moisture-bearing air masses. Significant 180 variability in shells analyzed include geographic location, elevation, taxonomy, and habitat (terrestrial, spring, or wetland). We found a rough inverse correlation with elevation in modem shells from the Spring Range in southern Nevada. The delta 180 values of modem and fossil shells are also very different; modem values in this location are much higher than those from nearby late Pleistocene-age molluscs suggesting that the Pleistocene summers were variously colder and wetter than today or less evaporative (more humid). Assuming shell material directly reflects the 180 of the growing-season environment, comparison of modem and fossil shell delta 180 values can potentially identify changes in air-mass moisture sources and can help to define seasonal precipitation change through time. Comprehension and quantification of community and isotopic variability in modem gastropods is required to create probabilistic valid transfer functions with fossil materials. Valid inferences about past environmental conditions can then be established with known confidence limits.

Sharpe, S.E. [Univ. and Community College System of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Whelan, J.F.; Forester, R.M.; Burdett, J.

1995-09-01

125

Strain-related variation in the persistence of influenza A virus in three types of water: distilled water, filtered surface water, and intact surface water  

PubMed Central

Background The persistence of influenza A (IA) virus in aquatic habitats has been demonstrated to be a determinant for virus transmission dynamics in wild duck populations. In this study, we investigated virus strain-related variation in persistence in water for nine wild duck isolated IA viruses of three subtypes (H3N8, H4N6, and H8N4). Results We experimentally estimated the loss of infectivity over time in three different types of water: distilled, filtered surface water, and intact surface water. All viruses persisted longest in distilled water followed by filtered surface water with markedly reduced durations of persistence observed in the intact surface water. Strain-related variations were observed in distilled and filtered surface water but limited variation was observed in the intact surface water. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the role of surface water for long-term (between years) maintenance of AI viruses in the environment may be limited, and suggest that the physico-chemical characteristics of water, as well as microorganisms, may be of strong importance. Results also indicate that the extent of strain-related variation observed in distilled water may overestimate persistence abilities for IA viruses in the wild and supports the need to develop experiments that account for these effects to assess subtype, genotype, as well as spatial and temporal variation in the persistence of IA viruses in aquatic habitats. PMID:23289857

2013-01-01

126

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1998, volume 1. surface-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1998 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 105 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 16 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations, discharge only for 9 low-flow partial-record stations, and stage only for 5 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

James, Robert W., Jr.; Saffer, Richard W.; Tallman, Anthony

1999-01-01

127

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1999, Volume 1. surface-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1999 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 111 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 17 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations, discharge only for 27 low-flow partial-record stations, and stage only for 5 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

James, Robert W.; Saffer, Richard W.; Tallman, Anthony J.

2000-01-01

128

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 2001, volume 1. surface-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 128 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 20 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations and stage only for 10 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

James, Robert W.; Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Tallman, Anthony J.

2002-01-01

129

Surface Films: Areas of Water Bodies That Are Often Overlooked  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer-reviewed article from BioScience is researching surface water. Material accumulates at the water-air interface of all natural water bodies to form a surface film. The interface is a dynamic environment, so surface films are altered by water movements, solar radiation, and biological processes. These films consist of a complex of organic matter and microorganisms, some of which are harmful. Researchers have often overlooked surface films when studying water bodies, and their importance is only now being recognized.

ROGER S. WOTTON and TERENCE M. PRESTON (;)

2005-02-01

130

Water vapor interactions with FeOOH particle surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interactions between iron (oxyhydr)oxide particle surfaces and water are of fundamental importance to natural and technological processes. In this Letter, we probe the interactions between submicron-sized lepidocrocite (?-FeOOH) surfaces and gaseous water using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Formation of hydrogen bonds between different lepidocrocite surface OH functional groups and water was specifically monitored in the O-H stretching region. Molecular dynamics simulations of the dominant crystallographic terminations of these particles provided insights into interfacial water structures and hydrogen bonding networks. Theoretical power spectra were moreover used to validate interpretations of experimental spectra. This Letter constrains our understanding of incipient water adsorption reactions leading to thermodynamically stable and reversible thin water films at FeOOH particle surfaces. It also suggests that these water layers are structurally analogous precursors to those occurring at a FeOOH surfaces contacted with liquid water.

Song, Xiaowei; Boily, Jean-François

2013-02-01

131

Understanding the Surface Potential of Water  

SciTech Connect

We have resolved the apparent inconsistency in quantifying the electrochemical surface potential at the liquid-vapor interface when using explicit ab initio electronic charge density and effective atomic partial charge models of liquid water. It is shown that regions of space must be excluded for the evaluation of the electric potential from a charge distribution to be useful in the interpretation of electrochemical measurements. This is not the case for work functions, electron diffraction or electron holography measurements. We find that the resulting electric potentials from partial charge models and ab initio charge distributions are quite different except for those regions of space between the molecules where the electron density is nearly zero. We compare our computed ab initio surface potential with high-energy electron diffraction and holography measurements and find good agreement. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Kathmann, Shawn M.; Kuo, I-F W.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.

2011-04-21

132

Manure Phosphorus and Surface Water Protection III: Transport Factors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson addresses transport factors that may contribute to phosphorus (P) delivery to surface waters.  Erosion, runoff, subsurface flow, drainage, and distance to surface water are the main factors.  In some places, wind erosion may also be important.  The effects of management practices on P transport are discussed, and water-related P transport processes are described in detail. 

133

NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SURFACE WATER WAVES ON THE SPHERE  

E-print Network

­surface potential flow model of water waves. The equations of motion have a Hamiltonian structure, are nonNUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SURFACE WATER WAVES ON THE SPHERE Panayotis Panayotaros Department for the numerical simulation of small amplitude water waves in spherical geometry. The method is based on a free

134

Instructions for measuring the rate of evaporation from water surfaces  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The ·rate of evaporation from water surfaces varies with the temperature of the water, the velocity of the wind at the water surface, and the dryness of the air. Consequently, the rate of evaporation from rivers, lakes, canals, or reservoirs varies widely in different localities and for the same locality in different seasons.

U.S. Geological Survey

1898-01-01

135

Floating Vegetated Mats For Improving Surface Water Quality  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Contamination of surface and ground waters is an environmental concern. Pollution from both point and nonpoint sources can render water unsuitable for use. Surface waters of concern include streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, canals, and wastewater lagoons. Lagooned wastewater from confined animal feedi...

136

Adsorption structure of water molecules on the Be(0001) surface  

SciTech Connect

By using density functional theory calculations, we systematically investigate the adsorption of water molecules at different coverages on the Be(0001) surface. The coverage dependence of the prototype water structures and energetics for water adlayer growth are systematically studied. The structures, energetics, and electronic properties are calculated and compared with other available studies. Through our systematic investigations, we find that water molecules form clusters or chains on the Be(0001) surface at low coverages. When increasing the water coverage, water molecules tend to form a 2?×?2 hexagonal network on the Be(0001) surface.

Yang, Yu; Li, Yanfang [LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Wang, Shuangxi [College of Science, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: zhang-ping@iapcm.ac.cn [LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-06-07

137

Photochemical Transformation Processes in Sunlit Surface Waters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photochemical reactions are major processes in the transformation of hardly biodegradable xenobiotics in surface waters. They are usually classified into direct photolysis and indirect or sensitised degradation. Direct photolysis requires xenobiotic compounds to absorb sunlight, and to get transformed as a consequence. Sensitised transformation involves reaction with transient species (e.g. °OH, CO3-°, 1O2 and triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter, 3CDOM*), photogenerated by so-called photosensitisers (nitrate, nitrite and CDOM). CDOM is a major photosensitiser: is it on average the main source of °OH (and of CO3-° as a consequence, which is mainly produced upon oxidation by °OH of carbonate and bicarbonate) and the only important source of 1O2 and 3CDOM* [1, 2]. CDOM origin plays a key role in sensitised processes: allochthonous CDOM derived from soil runoff and rich in fulvic and humic substances is usually more photoactive than autochthonous CDOM (produced by in-water biological processes and mainly consisting of protein-like material) or of CDOM derived from atmospheric deposition. An interesting gradual evolution of CDOM origin and photochemistry can be found in mountain lakes across the treeline, which afford a gradual transition of allochthonous- autochtonous - atmopheric CDOM when passing from trees to alpine meadows to exposed rocks [3]. Another important issue is the sites of reactive species photoproduction in CDOM. While there is evidence that smaller molecular weight fractions are more photoactive, some studies have reported considerable 1O2 reactivity in CDOM hydrophobic sites and inside particles [4]. We have recently addressed the problem and found that dissolved species in standard humic acids (hydrodynamic diameter < 0.1 ?m) account for the vast majority of 1O2 and triplet states photoproduction. In hydrophobic sites of particles, the formation rate of 1O2 is considerably lower than in the solution bulk [5], but the absence of water can significantly increase 1O2 half-life time (the main deactivation process of 1O2 in solution is collision with the solvent), thereby affording considerable reactivity toward hydrophobic solutes. The current knowledge in the field of natural photosensitizers in surface waters allows photoinduced transformation processes of organic pollutants to be assessed and modelled. For instance, it is possible to predict pollutant half-life times by knowing absorption spectrum, direct photolysis quantum yield and reaction rate constants with °OH, CO3-°, 1O2 and 3CDOM*, as a function of sunlight irradiance, water chemical composition (also affecting absorption) and column depth. Some examples of model application to real cases will be presented [6-8]. [1] Halladja et al., Environ Sci Technol 41, 6066 (2007) [2] Canonica et al., Environ Sci Technol 39, 9182 (2005) [3] De Laurentiis et al., Chemosphere 88, 1208 (2012) [4] Latch & McNeill, Science 311, 1743 (2006) [5] Minella et al., Chemosphere, accepted [6] Vione et al., Wat Res 45, 6725 (2011) [7] Sur et al., Sci Total Environ 426, 296 (2012) [8] De Laurentiis et al., Environ Sci Technol, DOI 10.1012/es3015887

Vione, D.

2012-12-01

138

Studies of the snail vectors of bilharziasis mansoni in north-eastern Brazil  

PubMed Central

The authors describe the bilharziasis endemic areas in north-eastern Brazil, giving the rainfall and general characteristics of the climate. The life-cycles of the two snail vectors—Australorbis glabratus and Tropicorbis centimetralis—in Pernambuco are described. Considerable attention is given to the effects on the snails of the annual drought, which causes many of the habitats to dry up and seriously affects the snail life-cycles and survival patterns. The snails are able to populate habitats that are dry for 5-7 months every year. They survive during the dry season in the protection of debris, vegetation, etc. A. glabratus is more susceptible to infection with Schistosoma mansoni than is T. centimetralis, but the latter is an effective vector, nevertheless, probably because it often occurs in very large numbers. A. glabratus with mature infections die or lose their infections when removed from the water for 20-30 days. Immature parasites are not killed under the same conditions. Infection with S. mansoni injures the snails and may kill them. It also reduces the reproductive capacity of the vectors, but it does not permanently castrate them. The epidemiological significance of these findings and their meaning in terms of snail control are discussed. PMID:13573116

Barbosa, Frederico S.; Olivier, Louis

1958-01-01

139

Controlling slugs and snails in orchids  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Slugs and snails are pests of orchids, preferring tender plant tissues such as flowers and root tips. Unlike many insect pests which feed only on certain types of plants, most species of slugs and snails are generalists, feeding on green plants, algae, fungi, decaying plant matter, or decaying anima...

140

Inquiry, Land Snails, and Environmental Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Land snails are common invertebrates that fascinate children. Unfortunately, they are seldom used for activities in the science classroom. Snails are inexpensive, take up little space in the classroom, and require only low maintenance, and their learning dividends can be enormous. For example, students can use them in inquiry-based activities that…

Barrow, Lloyd H.; Krantz, Patrick D.

2005-01-01

141

Evaluation of environmental methods to control snails in an irrigation system in Central Morocco.  

PubMed

The Moroccan Ministry of Public Health has launched a programme to eliminate schistosomiasis. One of the components in this process is the control of Bulinus truncatus, the intermediate host snail of Schistosoma haematobium. We evaluated three environmentally safe measures to control B. truncatus in siphon boxes, the main breeding sites for these snails in the Tessaout Amont irrigation system. The first method involved covering the siphon boxes to exclude light and reduce algal growth, the second consisted of increasing the frequency of emptying and cleaning the siphon boxes, and the third method increased water velocity to hinder the establishment of the intermediate hosts. The results showed that covering had a pronounced effect on snail and egg mass density, was accepted by the local community and prevented water contact. Cleaning the siphons three times during the irrigation season led to a reduction in snail density although it was not statistically significant and recolonization was rapid. Increasing water velocity by reducing the dimensions of siphon boxes delayed recolonization, but such a control measure can be applied only in specific situations where it does not pose hydraulic problems. The three interventions were selectively effective against B. truncatus, whereas other snails such as Physa acuta and Lymnaea peregra were hardly affected. Covering, the most promising control measure, could be useful in the Moroccan schistosomiasis eradication programme. However, further investigations are needed to assess its impact on water quality. PMID:10995096

Laamrani, H; Khallaayoune, K; Boelee, E; Laghroubi, M M; Madsen, H; Gryseels, B

2000-08-01

142

Structure and reactivity of water at biomaterial surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular self association in liquids is a physical process that can dominate cohesion (interfacial tension) and miscibility. In water, self association is a powerful organizational force leading to a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network (water structure). Localized perturbations in the chemical potential of water as by, for example, contact with a solid surface, induces compensating changes in water structure that can be

Erwin A Vogler

1998-01-01

143

Structure of water adsorbed on a mica surface  

SciTech Connect

Monte Carlo simulations of hydration water on the mica (001) surface under ambient conditions revealed water molecules bound closely to the ditrigonal cavities in the surface, with a lateral distribution of approximately one per cavity, and water molecules interposed between K{sup +} counter ions in a layer situated about 2.5 {angstrom} from a surface O along a direction normal to the (001) plane. The calculated water O density profile was in quantitative agreement with recent X-ray reflectivity measurements indicating strong lateral ordering of the hydration water but liquid-like disorder otherwise.

Park, Sung-Ho; Sposito, Garrison

2002-01-29

144

Physicochemical properties of concentrated Martian surface waters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding the processes controlling chemical sedimentation is an important step in deciphering paleoclimatic conditions from the rock records preserved on both Earth and Mars. Clear evidence for subaqueous sedimentation at Meridiani Planum, widespread saline mineral deposits in the Valles Marineris region, and the possible role of saline waters in forming recent geomorphologic features all underscore the need to understand the physical properties of highly concentrated solutions on Mars in addition to, and as a function of, their distinct chemistry. Using thermodynamic models predicting saline mineral solubility, we generate likely brine compositions ranging from bicarbonate-dominated to sulfate-dominated and predict their saline mineralogy. For each brine composition, we then estimate a number of thermal, transport, and colligative properties using established models that have been developed for highly concentrated multicomponent electrolyte solutions. The available experimental data and theoretical models that allow estimation of these physicochemical properties encompass, for the most part, much of the anticipated variation in chemistry for likely Martian brines. These estimates allow significant progress in building a detailed analysis of physical sedimentation at the ancient Martian surface and allow more accurate predictions of thermal behavior and the diffusive transport of matter through chemically distinct solutions under comparatively nonstandard conditions.

Tosca, Nicholas J.; McLennan, Scott M.; Lamb, Michael P.; Grotzinger, John P.

2011-05-01

145

Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), A Tool For Numerically Simulating Linked Groundwater, Surface Water And Land-Surface Hydrologic Processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) is a comprehensive input-driven application for simulating groundwater flow, surface water flow and land-surface hydrologic processes, and interactions between these processes, developed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). IWFM couples a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process and 1-D land surface, lake, stream flow and vertical unsaturated-zone flow processes which are solved

E. C. Dogrul; C. F. Brush; T. N. Kadir

2006-01-01

146

Metabolic acceleration in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under constant environmental conditions, most animals tend to grow following the von Bertalanffy growth curve. Deviations from this curve can point to changes in the environment that the animals experience, such as food limitation when the available food is not sufficient or suitable. However, such deviations can also point to a phenomenon called metabolic acceleration, which is receiving increasing attention in the field of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) modeling. Reasons for such an acceleration are usually changes in shape during ontogeny, which cause changes in the surface area to volume ratio of the organism. Those changes, in turn, lead to changes in some of the model parameters that have length in their dimension. The life-history consequences of metabolic acceleration as implemented in the DEB theory are an s-shaped growth curve (when body size is expressed as a length measure) and a prolongation of the hatching time. The great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis was earlier found to be food limited during the juvenile phase in laboratory experiments conducted under classical ecotoxicity test protocols. The pond snail has isomorphic shell growth but yet does not exhibit the expected von Bertalanffy growth curve under food limitation. When applying the standard DEB model to data from such life-cycle experiments, we also found that the hatching time is consistently underestimated, which could be a sign of metabolic acceleration. We here present an application of the DEB model including metabolic acceleration to the great pond snail. We account for the simultaneous hermaphroditism of the snail by including a model extension that describes the relative investment into the male and female function. This model allowed us to adequately predict the life history of the snail over the entire life cycle. However, the pond snail does not change in shape substantially after birth, so the original explanation for the metabolic acceleration does not hold. Since the change in shape is not the only explanation for metabolic acceleration in animals, we discuss the possible other explanations for this pattern in L. stagnalis.

Zimmer, Elke I.; Ducrot, V.; Jager, T.; Koene, J.; Lagadic, L.; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.

2014-11-01

147

An ontology design pattern for surface water features  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities exist due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology for other more context-dependent ontologies. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex or specialized surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this ontology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is implemented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided in this paper. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. Also provided is a discussion of why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, especially the previously developed Surface Network pattern. Finally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through an annotated geospatial dataset and sample queries using the classes of the Surface Water pattern.

Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E.; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, E. Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

2014-01-01

148

Spreading of Cholera through Surface Water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cholera epidemics are still a major public health concern to date in many areas of the world. In order to understand and forecast cholera outbreaks, one of the most important factors is the role played by the environmental matrix in which the disease spreads. We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. The environmental matrix in which the disease spreads is constituted by different human communities and their hydrologic interconnections. Each community is characterized by its spatial position, population size, water resources availability and hygiene conditions. By implementing a spatially explicit cholera model we seek the effects on epidemic dynamics of: i) the topology and metrics of the pathogens pathways that connect different communities; ii) the spatial distribution of the population size; and iii) the spatial distributions and quality of surface water resources and public health conditions, and how they vary with population size. The model has been applied to study the space-time evolution of a well documented cholera epidemic occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. The epidemic lasted for two years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. The model does well in reproducing the distribution of the cholera cases during the two outbreaks as well as their spatial spreading. We further extend the model by deriving the speed of propagation of traveling fronts in the case of uniformly distributed systems for different topologies: one and two dimensional lattices and river networks. The derivation of the spreading celerity proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. The conditions are sought by comparison between spreading and disease timescales. Consider a cholera epidemic that starts from a point and spreads throughout a finite size system, it is possible to identify two different timescales: i) the spreading timescale, that is the time needed for the disease to spread and involve all the communities in the system; and ii) the epidemic timescale, defined by the duration of the epidemic in a single community. Our results suggest that in many cases of real-life epidemiological interest, timescales of disease dynamics may trigger outbreaks that significantly depart from the predictions of classical space-implicit compartmental models.

Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

2009-12-01

149

Particles in Surface Waters: Coagulation and Transport  

E-print Network

Conventional water quality assessment and simulation of particles in natural waters focus on bulk concentrations of the suspended solid phase. These analyses rely directly or indirectly on a linear, 'average particle' approach to describe processes...

Culkin, Gerald W.; Lawler, Desmond F.

150

Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.  

SciTech Connect

Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios [University of Oklahoma; Ho, Thomas [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University

2011-01-01

151

Surface Tension: The Ways of Water.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes activities which help students understand several basic scientific concepts regarding water. Outlines objectives, materials needed, procedures, and questions to ask about student observations. Investigations include working with the self-sealing property of water, talcum powder, paper clips, and making water wetter. (RT)

Donalson-Sams, Marilyn

1988-01-01

152

CHARACTERIZING RAW SURFACE WATER AMENABLE TO MINIMAL WATER SUPPLY TREATMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The monitoring strategy must be sensitive to frequent and unpredictable fluctuations in water quality caused by major storm events and seasonal destratifications of the lake/impoundment. Therefore, daily monitoring of raw source water and the finished water quality entering distr...

153

Surface Water Temperature Observations of Large Lakes by Optimal Estimation  

E-print Network

Surface Water Temperature Observations of Large Lakes by Optimal Estimation Stuart N MacCallum(1 cloud screening have been developed to provide Lake Surface Water Temperature (LSWT) estimates from radiances. Therefore, the OE retrieval scheme developed is generic ­ i.e., applicable to all lakes. LSWTs

Merchant, Chris

154

WATER-IMMERSION DEEP-SUBWAVELENGTH SURFACE PLASMON VIRTUAL PROBES  

E-print Network

WATER-IMMERSION DEEP-SUBWAVELENGTH SURFACE PLASMON VIRTUAL PROBES QIAN WANG Optoelectronics 2014 Published 29 May 2014 In this paper, we report the observation of surface plasmon virtual probes in water by using near- ¯eld scanning optical microscope. The full-width half-maximum of the probe

Zheludev, Nikolay

155

Investigation of surface water behavior during glaze ice accretion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of experimental investigations that focused on isolating the primary factors that control the behavior of unfrozen surface water during glaze ice accretion were conducted. Detailed microvideo observations were made of glaze ice accretions on 2.54 cm diam cylinders in a closed-loop refrigerated wind tunnel. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed; a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film, a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads, and a zone where surface water ran back as rivulets. The location of the transition from the smooth to the rough zone was found to migrate towards the stagnation point with time. Comparative tests were conducted to study the effect of the substrate thermal and roughness properties on ice accretion. The importance of surface water behavior was evaluated by the addition of a surface tension reducing agent to the icing tunnel water supply, which significantly altered the accreted glaze ice shape. Measurements were made to determine the contact angle behavior of water droplets on ice. A simple multizone modification to current glaze ice accretion models was proposed to include the observed surface roughness behavior.

Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Turnock, Stephen R.

1990-01-01

156

[Equipment for biological experiments with snails aboard piloted orbital stations].  

PubMed

To fly biological experiments aboard piloted orbital stations, research equipment was built up of an incubation container, filter system and automatic temperature controller. Investigations included analysis of the makeup and concentrations of gases produced by animals (snails) during biocycle, and emitted after death. Filters are chemisorption active fibrous materials (AFM) with high sorption rate and water receptivity (cation exchange fiber VION-KN-1 and anion exchange fiber VION-AS-1), and water-repellent carbon adsorbent SKLTS. AFM filters were effective in air cleaning and practically excluded ingress of chemical substances from the container into cabin atmosphere over more than 100 days. PMID:21033402

Gorgiladze, G I; Korotkova, E V; Kuznetsova, E E; Mukhamedieva, L N; Begrov, V V; Pepeliaev, Iu V

2010-01-01

157

Herbicide Metabolites in Surface Water and Groundwater: Introduction and Overview  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Several future research topics for herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water are outlined in this chapter. They are herbicide usage, chemical analysis of metabolites, and fate and transport of metabolites in surface and ground water. These three ideas follow the themes in this book, which are the summary of a symposium of the American Chemical Society on herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water. First, geographic information systems allow the spatial distribution of herbicide-use data to be combined with geochemical information on fate and transport of herbicides. Next these two types of information are useful in predicting the kinds of metabolites present and their probable distribution in surface and ground water. Finally, methods development efforts may be focused on these specific target analytes. This chapter discusses these three concepts and provides an introduction to this book on the analysis, chemistry, and fate and transport of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water.

Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.

1996-01-01

158

The glass-liquid transition of water on hydrophobic surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interactions of thin water films with surfaces of graphite and vitrified room-temperature ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6])] were investigated using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry as a function of temperature and annealing time to elucidate the glass-liquid transition of water at the molecular level. Surface diffusion of water occurs at temperatures higher than 120 K, thereby forming three-dimensional clusters (a

Ryutaro Souda

2008-01-01

159

Coagulation of low turbidity surface waters with Moringa oleifera seeds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of Moringa oleifera seed extracts both as primary coagulant coagulant aid and its conjunctive use with alum in treating low turbidity waters was studied. The laboratory based studies used the natural polyelectrolyte to treat waters with turbidities between 23 and 90 ntu, obtained from three surface water sources in Kano, Nigeria. On the average, 50% turbidity removal was

Suleyman A. Muyibi; Charles A. Okuofu

1995-01-01

160

NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN  

E-print Network

NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN CALIFORNIA VINEYARDS S (sshubbard@lbl.gov) Detailed estimates of water content are necessary for variety of hydrogeological inves to obtain sufficient information about the spatial variation of water content within the root zone using

Rubin, Yoram

161

Water Order Profiles on Phospholipid/Cholesterol Membrane Bilayer Surfaces  

E-print Network

Water Order Profiles on Phospholipid/Cholesterol Membrane Bilayer Surfaces DAVID ROBINSON,1 2011 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). Abstract: Water is pivotal in the stabilization of macromolecular biological structures, although the dynamic en- semble structure of water near to molecular

O'Shea, Paul

162

Adenine nucleotides in snail muscles as one of biomarkers of fluoride toxicity.  

PubMed

The aim of this work was to determine the extent of bioaccumulation of fluorides in tissues of Helix aspersa maxima. The toxicity of fluorides administered orally on the energy balance of the snail's foot was investigated based on measurements of concentrations of adenine nucleotides and their metabolism degradation products. Quantitation of fluoride levels was done in soft tissues (foot, hepatopancreas) and shells of mature snails. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of purine compounds was performed in slices of foot from mature snails. Fluoride concentrations in pulverized shells were measured using an ion-selective electrode. Gas chromatography was used to determine fluoride concentrations in soft tissues (hepatopancreas and foot). Purines were measured in foot muscle slices with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Fluoride levels in soft tissues of the snail cannot serve as an indicator for biomonitoring purposes as no significant accumulation was observed during exposure to maximum allowable concentrations of fluoride in drinking water. Contrary to this, levels of fluoride in the shell rose significantly with this concentration of fluoride in drinking water. The effect of fluorides on energy metabolism of foot muscle was evidenced by elevated AMP levels, increased adenine nucleotide pool and reduced conversion of ADP to ATP. Exposure to rising F(-) concentrations was accompanied by decreasing values of the adenylate energy charge AEC. Determination of AMP or AEC in foot muscle of exposed snails seems to be a useful indicator of fluoride effects on metabolic activity. PMID:15931426

Rac, Monika; Safranow, Krzysztof; Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Chlubek, Dariusz; Machoy, Zygmunt

2005-06-01

163

The `Floating Thread', a Surface Phenomenon on Flowing Water  

Microsoft Academic Search

IN 1936, W. Schmidt1 described the following phenomenon. When the surface of slowly moving water encounters an obstacle (such as a stick put across a brook and upon its surface), a tiny elevation of the surface is formed at a distance of some decimetres or metres before the obstacle, ``appearing like a very fine thread or hair floating on the

I. Kuscer

1947-01-01

164

Biogeochemistry of DMS in Surface Waters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is important in influencing the formation of aerosols in the troposphere over large areas of the world's oceans. Understanding the dynamics of aerosols is important to understanding the earth's radiation balance. In evaluating the factors controlling DMS in the troposphere it is vital to understand the dynamics of DMS in the surface ocean. The biogeochemical processes controlling DMS concentration in seawater are myriad; modeling and theoretical estimation are problematic. At the beginning of this project we believed that we were on the verge of simplifying the ship-track measurement of DMS, and we proposed to deploy such a system to develop a database relating high frequency DMS measurements to biological and physicochemical and optical properties of surface water that can be quantified by remote sensing techniques. We designed a system to measure DMS concomitantly with other basic chemical and biological data in a flow-through system. The project was collaborative between Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Bermuda Biological Station for Research (BBSR). The project on which we are reporting was budgeted for only one year with a one year no-cost extension. At WHOI our effort was directed towards designing traps which would be used to concentrate DMS from seawater and allow storage for subsequent analysis. At that time, GC systems were too large for easy long-term deployment on a research vessel like R/V Weatherbird, so we focused on simplifying the shipboard sampling procedure. Initial studies of sample recovery with high levels of DMS suggested that Carboxen 1000, a relatively new carbon molecular sieve, could be used as a stable storage medium. The affinity of Carboxen for DMS is several orders of magnitude higher than gold wool (another adsorbent used for DMS collection) on a weight or volume basis. Furthermore, Carboxen's affinity for DMS is also far less susceptible to humidity than gold wool. Unfortunately, further experiments with low level DMS indicated that recovery of DMS after storage was not quantitative. The material has proven to be completely acceptable for short term storage and has been incorporated into a micro-GC system. Since working on this project, we have collaborated with RVM Scientific in Santa Barbara in the design and construction of small portable micro-GC's that will make feasible at-sea measurement in moving ships, making rapid gas analysis and quantification feasible in a ship-track mode. Throughout this period at both WHOI and BBSR, we continued to analyze field data to understand that patterns of time and space variability in DMS and the processes that govern it. These insights will be crucial to determining the specifications for our automated sampling program. The data from this, the longest continuous sampling program for ocean DMS, provided insights into year to year and short-term variability.

Dacey, J. W. H.

1997-01-01

165

Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison of different global data sources  

E-print Network

of the spatio-temporal variations of total terrestrial water storage (the sum of ground water, soil water1 Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison-satellite-derived surface water extent with other independent global data sets related to land water dynamics, such as water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

166

Assessing Phosphorous Loss to Protect Surface Water  

E-print Network

Phosphorus LossStory by Raul L. Garcia The Texas State Soil and Water ConservationBoard (TSSWCB) in collaboration with the Department of Soil and Crop Sciences at Texas A&M University, Texas Cooperative Extension (TCE), Texas Water Resources...

Garcia, Raul

2005-01-01

167

Water Quality Indicators Guide [and Teacher's Handbook]: Surface Waters.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide aids in finding water quality solutions to problems from sediment, animal wastes, nutrients, pesticides, and salts. The guide allows users to learn the fundamental concepts of water quality assessment by extracting basic tenets from geology, hydrology, biology, ecology, and wastewater treatment. An introduction and eight chapters are…

Terrell, Charles R.; Perfetti, Patricia Bytnar

168

Habitat characteristics for different freshwater snail species as determined biologically through macroinvertebrate information.  

PubMed

Macro-invertebrates including freshwater snails collected from 643 sites over 8 successive seasons among the River Nile, branches, main canals and certain drains in eight Egyptian Governorates. Thirteen snail species and one bivalve species were identified. The most distributed were Lanistus carinatus and Physa acuta while the most abundant were Cleopatra bulimoides and Physa acuta during the whole study. The sites that harbored each snail species in all the examined water-courses were grouped seasonally and their biological assessment was determined by their minimum and maximum total point similarity percentage to that of the corresponded reference site and mean of the total points. Habitats for most snail species attained minimum total point's similarity percentage less than 21% (very poor habitat) during autumn and winter then spring while during summer very poor habitat was harbored by only few snail species. P. acuta was the only survived snails in habitat which attained 0 as a minimum total point's similarity percentage during two seasons and L. carinatus and Succinea cleopatra during one season. With respect to medically important snails very poor sites constituted 23% of Biomphalaria alexandrina sites, 14% of Lymnaea natalensis and 9.4% of Bulinus truncatus sites. The studied macroinvertebrate matrices, total number of organisms, taxa richness, the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) index, ratio of EPT index to chironomidae, ratio of scraper to filtering collector, contribution of dominant macroinvertebrate major group, comparison revealed descending tolerances from B. alexanrina followed by L. natalensis then B. truncates, but Hilsenhoff Biotic Index (HBI) showed the same tolerance to organic pollution. PMID:22435158

El-Khayat, Hanaa M M; Mahmoud, Kadria M A; Mostafa, Bayomy B; Tantawy, Ahmad A; El-Deeb, Fatma A; Ragb, Fawzy M; Ismail, Nahed M; El-Said, Kalil M; Taleb, Hoda M Abu

2011-12-01

169

Interaction between water cluster ions and mica surface  

SciTech Connect

Water cluster ion beams were irradiated on mica surfaces to investigate the interaction between molecular cluster ions and a mica surface. The contact angle of the mica surface increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, but the increase in the contact angle was smaller than that induced by an ethanol cluster ion beam. The surface roughness also increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, whereas the intensity of K 2p x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peaks decreased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam. The decrease in the number of potassium atoms together with the increase in the surface roughness may be the causes of the increase in the contact angle.

Ryuto, Hiromichi, E-mail: ryuto@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ohmura, Yuki; Nakagawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Takaoka, Gikan H. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

2014-03-15

170

Water accounting for conjunctive groundwater/surface water management: case of the SingkarakOmbilin  

E-print Network

Water accounting for conjunctive groundwater/surface water management: case of the Singkarak University, 216 Riley-Robb Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-5701, USA b International Water Management Institute, P 2003 Abstract Because water shortages limit development in many parts of the world, a systematic

Walter, M.Todd

171

Plasma dynamics of water breakdown at a water surface induced by femtosecond laser pulses  

E-print Network

Plasma dynamics of water breakdown at a water surface induced by femtosecond laser pulses C. Sarpe Femtosecond laser pulse induced ultrafast plasma dynamics studies of water breakdown in the range up to 250 ps: 10.1063/1.2217158 Laser induced breakdown LIB in water has been inves- tigated extensively throughout

Peinke, Joachim

172

Schistosomes and snails: a molecular encounter  

PubMed Central

Biomphalaria glabrata snails play an integral role in the transmission of Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent for human schistosomiasis in the Western hemisphere. For the past two decades, tremendous advances have been made in research aimed at elucidating the molecular basis of the snail/parasite interaction. The growing concern that there is no vaccine to prevent schistosomiasis and only one effective drug in existence provides the impetus to develop new control strategies based on eliminating schistosomes at the snail-stage of the life cycle. To elucidate why a given snail is not always compatible to each and every schistosome it encounters, B. glabrata that are either resistant or susceptible to a given strain of S. mansoni have been employed to track molecular mechanisms governing the snail/schistosome relationship. With such snails, genetic markers for resistance and susceptibility were identified. Additionally, differential gene expression studies have led to the identification of genes that underlie these phenotypes. Lately, the role of schistosomes in mediating non-random relocation of gene loci has been identified for the first time, making B. glabrata a model organism where chromatin regulation by changes in nuclear architecture, known as spatial epigenetics, orchestrated by a major human parasite can now be investigated. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in using molecular approaches to describe snail/schistosome compatibility issues. Uncovering the signaling networks triggered by schistosomes that provide the impulse to turn genes on and off in the snail host, thereby controlling the outcome of infection, could also yield new insights into anti-parasite mechanism(s) that operate in the human host as well. PMID:25101114

Knight, Matty; Arican-Goktas, Halime D.; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Odoemelam, Edwin C.; Miller, André N.; Bridger, Joanna M.

2014-01-01

173

Tentacular function in snail olfactory orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.The olfactory orienting behavior of the terrestrial snailAchatina fulica was studied in intact animals, in animals with bilateral lesions of either the anterior tentacles or the posterior tentacles, and in animals with unilateral lesions of the posterior tentacles. Tentacular function was evaluated under three different conditions.2.One assay required the snails to locomote upwind in a two-armed olfactometer and enter the

Ronald Chase; Roger P. Croll

1981-01-01

174

Water structuring over the hydrophobic surface of cellulose.  

PubMed

Many important biological solutes possess not only polar and hydrogen-bonding functionalities but also weakly hydrating, or hydrophobic, surfaces. While the aggregation of these hydrophobic surfaces has been shown to play an important role in the aggregation of individual chains of cellulose, it is not known whether the water structuring imposed by these hydrophobic surfaces more closely resembles that associated with small hydrophobic solutes like methane and fats or more closely resembles that associated with extended hydrophobic surfaces like mica or waxy planes. By using molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the water molecule orientations over different regions of the 100 surface of cellulose in contact with water, it was found that the hydrophobic strips of the cellulose crystal are sufficiently narrow that they hydrate like a fatty acid chain, rather than like a more extended surface, suggesting that their aggregation would be dominated by entropy rather than enthalpy. PMID:25365241

Miyamoto, Hitomi; Schnupf, Udo; Brady, John W

2014-11-19

175

Chloride in ground water and surface water in the vicinity of selected surface-water sampling sites of the beneficial use monitoring program of Oklahoma, 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board Beneficial Use Monitoring Program reported exceedances of beneficial-use standards for chloride at 11 surface-water sampling sites from January to October 2002. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, conducted a study to determine the chloride concentrations in ground water in the vicinity of Beneficial Use Monitoring Program surface-water sampling sites not meeting beneficial use standards for chloride and compare chloride concentrations in ground water and surface water. The chloride-impaired Beneficial Use Monitoring Program surface-water sampling sites are located in the western and southern regions of Oklahoma. The ground-water sampling sites were placed in proximity to the 11 surface-water sampling sites designated impaired by chloride by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Two surface-water sampling sites were located on the Beaver River (headwaters of the North Canadian River), three sites on the Cimarron River, one site on Sandy Creek, one site on North Fork Red River, and four sites on the Red River. Six ground-water samples were collected, when possible, from two test holes located upstream from each of the 11 Beneficial Use Monitoring Program surface-water sampling sites. One test hole was placed on the left bank and right bank, when possible, of each Beneficial Use Monitoring Program surfacewater sampling site. All test holes were located on alluvial deposits adjacent to the Beneficial Use Monitoring Program surface-water sampling sites within 0.5 mile of the stream. Top, middle, and bottom ground-water samples were collected from the alluvium at each test hole, when possible. Water properties of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen were recorded in the field before sampling for chloride. The ground-water median chloride concentrations at 8 of the 11 Beneficial Use Monitoring Program sites were less than the surface-water median chloride concentrations. The Turpin and Beaver sites had similar ground-water and surface-water median chloride concentrations. The Buffalo site was the only site that had a large difference between the ground-water and surface-water chloride concentrations. The ground-water median chloride concentration was approximately 14,500 mg/L greater than the surface-water median chloride concentration at the Buffalo site.

Mashburn, Shana L.; Sughru, Michael P.

2004-01-01

176

OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN SURFACE WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Human enteric viruses cause a number of diseases when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking & recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet. Other members of enterovirus group cause numerous diseases. Hepatit...

177

Deep Groundwater Contributions to Surface Water in a Mountainous Watershed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With growing concerns about declining snowpack, warmer temperatures, and land use changes, it is becoming increasingly important to determine the sources that contribute to surface water. In western states, such as New Mexico, most of the surface water is derived from mountainous watersheds. However, the interaction between the groundwater and the surface water within these mountain systems is poorly understood. Geochemical data collected from a mesoscale (~200 km2) watershed in northern New Mexico indicate there may be significant groundwater contributions to the surface water that have largely been ignored in previous studies. Stable isotopic analysis of ?18O and ?2H and Piper diagrams for surface water, groundwater, and spring water are not geochemically distinct. Surface water solute concentrations for most constituents increase as a function of the drainage area while the stable isotopic signature remains constant, suggesting that the water is sourced from similar areas but has undergone differing degrees of geochemical evolution along different flow paths. Plots of SiO2 vs Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, and K+ show evidence of spatial evolution of groundwater with solute concentrations from the headwaters to the watershed outlet. We hypothesize that the increasing solute concentrations in the surface water are controlled by inputs from deep, more geochemically evolved groundwater. This is similar to what Frisbee et al. (2011) saw in the Saguache Watershed, though our watershed is significantly smaller and has a different geological setting. Due to the chemical kinetics involved, this more geochemically evolved groundwater would require longer residence time along a given flow path to achieve the observed chemical compositions. Significant contributions of old groundwater to surface water could result in the surface water system having increased buffering capacity against climate change. This deep groundwater component in watersheds has largely been unexplored. Our research provides support for our hypothesis and indicates that deep groundwater contributions to surface water may occur at even smaller scales than previously published. Silica concentration in surface water samples plotted as a function of upstream contributing area. Silica concentrations tend to increase with increasing upstream contributing area.

Tolley, D. G.; Harding, J. J.; Wilson, J. L.; Frisbee, M. D.

2012-12-01

178

The role of Snail in prostate cancer  

PubMed Central

Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer and the sixth leading cause of death from cancer in men. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process by which cancer cells invade and migrate, and is characterized by loss of cell-cell adhesion molecules such as E-cadherin and increased expression of mesenchymal proteins such as vimentin; EMT is also associated with resistance to therapy. Snail, a master regulator of EMT, has been extensively studied and reported in cancers such as breast and colon; however, its role in prostate cancer is not as widely reported. The purpose of this review is to put together recent facts that summarize Snail signaling in human prostate cancer. Snail is overexpressed in prostate cancer and its expression and activity is controlled via phosphorylation and growth factor signaling. Snail is involved in its canonical role of inducing EMT in prostate cancer cells; however, it plays a role in non-canonical pathways that do not involve EMT such regulation of bone turnover and neuroendocrine differentiation. Thus, studies indicate that Snail signaling contributes to prostate cancer progression and metastasis and therapeutic targeting of Snail in prostate cancer holds promise in ?future. PMID:23076049

Smith, Bethany N.; Odero-Marah, Valerie A.

2012-01-01

179

Third Stokes parameter emission from a periodic water surface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experiment in which the third Stokes parameter thermal emission from a periodic water surface was measured is documented. This parameter is shown to be related to the direction of periodicity of the periodic surface and to approach brightnesses of up to 30 K at X band for the surface used in the experiment. The surface actually analyzed was a 'two-layer' periodic surface; the theory of thermal emission from such a surface is derived and the theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements. These results further the idea of using the third Stokes parameter emission as an indicator of wind direction over the ocean.

Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.; Staelin, D. H.; Oneill, K.; Lohanick, A.

1991-01-01

180

Summary of I-129 measurements in ground and surface waters  

SciTech Connect

The iodine-129 content of groundwater and surface water at on-plant (Savannah River Plant) and off-plant locations has been determined at irregular intervals since 1970 using neutron activation analysis. I-129 was detected in groundwater near the Burial Ground and near the seepage basins of the Separations areas. For reference, I-129 concentrations in the groundwater can be compared to the EPA drinking water standard. At a few locations the concentrations exceeded both the existing and pending EPA drinking water standard. In surface water, Four Mile Creek was the only SRP stream found to transport significant I-129 to the Savannah River. Dilution by C-Reactor discharge and the Savannah River reduced the off-plant I-129 concentrations in river water to less than 1% of the existing EPA drinking water standard and less than 0.01% of the pending EPA drinking water standard.

Kantelo, M.V.

1987-11-17

181

Water-collecting behavior of nanostructured surfaces with special wettability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dew is commonly formed even in dry regions, and we examined the suitability of surfaces with superhydrophilic patterns on a superhydrophobic background as a dew-harvesting system. Nanostructured surfaces with mixed wettability were fabricated by ZnO and TiO2 nanorods. The condensation properties were investigated by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and the water-collecting function of the patterned surfaces in an artificial environment was confirmed. Condensation and water-collecting behavior were evaluated as a function of surface inclination angle and pattern shape. We examined the collecting efficiency among the different wettabilities at various inclination angles and observed the condensation behavior for various superhydrophilic shapes.

Choo, Soyoung; Choi, Hak-Jong; Lee, Heon

2015-01-01

182

Identifying and Mapping Seasonal Surface Water Frost with MGS TES  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared bolometers measured surface broadband albedo and temperature for more than three Mars years. As seasons progress on Mars, surface temperatures may fall below the frost point of volatiles in the atmosphere (namely, carbon dioxide and water). Systematic mapping of the spatial and temporal occurrence of these volatiles in the martian atmosphere, on the surface, and in the subsurface has shown their importance in understanding the climate of Mars. However, few studies have investigated seasonal surface water frost and its role in the global water cycle. We examine zonally-averaged TES daytime albedo, temperature, and water vapor abundance data [after Smith, 2004] to map the presence of surface water frost on Mars. Surface water frost occurs in the polar and mid latitudes, in regions with surface temperatures less than 220 K and above 150 K, and can significantly increase albedo relative to the bare surface. In the northern hemisphere water frost is most apparent in late fall/early winter, before the onset of carbon dioxide frost. Dust storms occurring near northern winter solstice affect albedo data and prevent us from putting a latitudinal lower limit on the water frost in the northern hemisphere. Regardless, seasonal water frost occurs at least as low as 48°N in Utopia Planitia, beginning at Ls=~230°, as observed by Viking Lander 2 [Svitek and Murray, 1990]. Daytime surface water frost was also observed at the Phoenix Lander site (68°N) beginning at Ls=~160° [Cull et al., 2010]. The timing of albedo variations observed by TES agree relatively well with lander observations of seasonal frost. Seasonal water frost is not detected during fall in the southern hemisphere. A potential explanation for this discrepancy, compared with frost detections in the north, is the disparity in atmospheric water vapor abundance between the two hemispheres. The frost point temperatures for water vapor in the southern hemisphere are ~5-10 K lower for the corresponding season and latitude in the north [Smith, 2004]. This inhibits the stability of water frost on the surface in the southern hemisphere and also lowers the maximum thickness of a water frost layer, potentially limiting its effect on surface albedo. Our work here shows that the seasonal progression in the northern hemisphere of Mars involves extensive deposition of water frost, similar in progression to the carbon dioxide seasonal ice cap. This behavior results in variation of surface albedo and therefore affects surface and subsurface temperatures, which could impact the distribution of ground ice. Surface frost and subsequent mixing of vapor back into the atmosphere likely plays an important role in the global water cycle. Mapping of water frost's geographical extent, timing, and impact on surface albedo can provide insight into the processes controlling the present Martian climate. References: Cull, S. et al. (2010) JGR, 115, E00E19. Smith, M. D. (2004) Icarus, 167, 148-165. Svitek, T. and Murray, B. (1990) JGR, 95(B2), 1495-1510.

Bapst, J.; Bandfield, J. L.; Wood, S. E.

2013-12-01

183

Formation of Water on a Warm Amorphous Silicate Surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well established that reactions on interstellar dust grain surfaces are indispensable for water formation in space. Among all the intermediate products that lead to water formation, the OH radical is especially important because is a product of all the three main water formation surface routes, i.e., the hydrogenation of O, O2, and O3, and it also connects these three routes. The desorption energy of OH from dust grain surfaces, along with dust grain temperature, determines the availability OH for grain surface versus gas-phase reactions. We experimentally investigated water formation on the surface of a warm amorphous silicate via H+O3?OH+O2. The surface temperature was kept at 50 K so as to exclude the interference of O2. It is found that OH has a significant residence time at 50 K. The OH desorption energy from amorphous silicate surface is calculated to be at least 1680 K, and possibly as high as 4760 K. Water is formed efficiently via OH+H and OH+H2, and the product H2O stays on the surface upon formation. Deuterium has also been used in place of hydrogen to check isotopic effects. This work is supported by NSF, Astronomy & Astrophysics Division (Grants No. 0908108 and 1311958) and NASA (Grant No. NNX12AF38G). We thank Dr. J.Brucato of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri for providing the samples used in these experiments.

Vidali, Gianfranco; He, Jiao

2014-06-01

184

Snail1, Snail2, and E47 promote mammary epithelial branching morphogenesis  

PubMed Central

Several E-box-binding transcription factors regulate individual and collective cell migration and enhance the motility of epithelial cells by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here, we characterized the role of a subset of these transcription factors and the EMT proteome in branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial tissues using a three-dimensional organotypic culture model of the mammary duct. We found that the transcription factors Snail1, Snail2, and E47 were transiently upregulated at branch sites; decreasing the expression of these transcription factors inhibited branching. Conversely, ectopic expression of Snail1, Snail2, and E47 induced branching in the absence of exogenous stimuli. These changes correlated with the expression of mesenchymal markers and repression of E-cadherin, which was essential for branching. Snail1 and Snail2 also promoted cell survival at branch sites, but this was not sufficient to induce branching. These findings indicate that Snail1, Snail2, and E47 can promote collective migration during branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial tissues through key regulators of EMT. PMID:21610693

Lee, KangAe; Gjorevski, Nikolce; Boghaert, Eline; Radisky, Derek C; Nelson, Celeste M

2011-01-01

185

Specialized insulin is used for chemical warfare by fish-hunting cone snails.  

PubMed

More than 100 species of venomous cone snails (genus Conus) are highly effective predators of fish. The vast majority of venom components identified and functionally characterized to date are neurotoxins specifically targeted to receptors, ion channels, and transporters in the nervous system of prey, predators, or competitors. Here we describe a venom component targeting energy metabolism, a radically different mechanism. Two fish-hunting cone snails, Conus geographus and Conus tulipa, have evolved specialized insulins that are expressed as major components of their venoms. These insulins are distinctive in having much greater similarity to fish insulins than to the molluscan hormone and are unique in that posttranslational modifications characteristic of conotoxins (hydroxyproline, ?-carboxyglutamate) are present. When injected into fish, the venom insulin elicits hypoglycemic shock, a condition characterized by dangerously low blood glucose. Our evidence suggests that insulin is specifically used as a weapon for prey capture by a subset of fish-hunting cone snails that use a net strategy to capture prey. Insulin appears to be a component of the nirvana cabal, a toxin combination in these venoms that is released into the water to disorient schools of small fish, making them easier to engulf with the snail's distended false mouth, which functions as a net. If an entire school of fish simultaneously experiences hypoglycemic shock, this should directly facilitate capture by the predatory snail. PMID:25605914

Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Gajewiak, Joanna; Karanth, Santhosh; Robinson, Samuel D; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Douglass, Adam D; Schlegel, Amnon; Imperial, Julita S; Watkins, Maren; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K; Yandell, Mark; Li, Qing; Purcell, Anthony W; Norton, Raymond S; Ellgaard, Lars; Olivera, Baldomero M

2015-02-10

186

EMAP SURFACE WATERS MONITORING AND RESEARCH STRATEGY - FY91  

EPA Science Inventory

This document describes the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment program's (EMAP) vision of what is needed to evaluate the ecological condition of the surface waters of the United States. It describes the content and organization of the research plan....

187

Nonpoint pollution of surface waters with phosphorus and nitrogen  

E-print Network

information, we are confident that: (1) nonpoint pollution of surface waters with P and N could be reduced by reducing surplus nutrient flows in agricultural systems and processes, reducing agricultural and urban runoff by diverse methods, and reducing N...

Carpenter, S. R.; Caraco, N. F.; Correll, D. L.; Howarth, R. W.; Sharpley, A. N.; Smith, Val H.

1998-08-01

188

40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR CLASSIFICATION OF SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES AND PRACTICES Classification of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For...

2010-07-01

189

NONPOINT POLLUTION OF SURFACE WATERS WITH PHOSPHORUS AND NITROGEN  

E-print Network

to downstream aquatic ecosystems, and which can also volatilize to the atmosphere, redepositing elsewhere and eventually reaching aquatic ecosystems. If current practices continue, nonpoint pollution of surface waters is virtually certain to increase...

Carpenter, Stephen R.; Caraco, Nina F. M.; Correll, David L.; Howarth, Robert W.; Sharpley, Andrew N.; Smith, Val H.

1998-01-01

190

43 CFR Appendix I to Part 11 - Methods for Estimating the Areas of Ground Water and Surface Water Exposure During the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Methods for Estimating the Areas of Ground Water and Surface Water Exposure During...Methods for Estimating the Areas of Ground Water and Surface Water Exposure During...part, the areas where exposure of ground water or surface water resources...

2012-10-01

191

43 CFR Appendix I to Part 11 - Methods for Estimating the Areas of Ground Water and Surface Water Exposure During the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Methods for Estimating the Areas of Ground Water and Surface Water Exposure During...Methods for Estimating the Areas of Ground Water and Surface Water Exposure During...part, the areas where exposure of ground water or surface water resources...

2013-10-01

192

43 CFR Appendix I to Part 11 - Methods for Estimating the Areas of Ground Water and Surface Water Exposure During the...  

...Methods for Estimating the Areas of Ground Water and Surface Water Exposure During...Methods for Estimating the Areas of Ground Water and Surface Water Exposure During...part, the areas where exposure of ground water or surface water resources...

2014-10-01

193

Snail control in urban sites in Brazil with slow-release hexabutyldistannoxane and pentachlorophenol*  

PubMed Central

Slow release formulations of hexabutyldistannoxane (TBTO) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) were tested for the control of Biomphalaria tenagophila in 52 urban sites in Rio de Janeiro. TBTO acted faster and lasted longer than PCP and at 15 g/m2 it eliminated snails from 76% of the treated sites for 1 year. Water pollution and rate of flow had no significant influence on the molluscicidal properties of either compound, but alkalinity lowered the activity of TBTO. Failure to control snail populations was due mainly to human interference and to the non-treatment of adjacent breeding sites that were temporarily dry and therefore overlooked. PMID:1088356

Toledo, J. V.; Da Silva, C. S. Monteiro; Bulhões, M. S.; Leme, L. A. Paes; Netto, J. A. Da Silva; Gilbert, B.

1976-01-01

194

Intermolecular Casimir-Polder forces in water and near surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Casimir-Polder force is an important long-range interaction involved in adsorption and desorption of molecules in fluids. We explore Casimir-Polder interactions between methane molecules in water, and between a molecule in water near SiO2 and hexane surfaces. Inclusion of the finite molecular size in the expression for the Casimir-Polder energy leads to estimates of the dispersion contribution to the binding energies between molecules and between one molecule and a planar surface.

Thiyam, Priyadarshini; Persson, Clas; Sernelius, Bo E.; Parsons, Drew F.; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Boström, Mathias

2014-09-01

195

Miscellaneous surface-water data, Pecos River basin, New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Miscellaneous surface-water data from the Pecos River basin of New Mexico are assembled into one table. Measurements and estimates of the discharge of streams, springs, and diversion canals and pumps that are not readily available to the public are given. The principal sources of information are published and unpublished reports and various records of the U.S. Geological Survey and the New Mexico State Engineer Office. Many thousands of surface-water discharge values are given. (USGS)

Cranston, C. Clare; Kues, Georgianna E.; Welder, G.E.

1981-01-01

196

Reducing Herbicide Entry into Surface Waters  

E-print Network

if runo#30; spr eads out evenly as it cr osses the #31;lter strip and is not concentrated into str eams. Filter strips usually ar e 15 to 25 feet wide. Grass waterways r educe water and soil runo#30; that occurs during light rainfall, but ar e less...

Baumann, Paul A.; Bean, Brent W.

1999-10-07

197

Physicochemical properties of concentrated Martian surface waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the processes controlling chemical sedimentation is an important step in deciphering paleoclimatic conditions from the rock records preserved on both Earth and Mars. Clear evidence for subaqueous sedimentation at Meridiani Planum, widespread saline mineral deposits in the Valles Marineris region, and the possible role of saline waters in forming recent geomorphologic features all underscore the need to understand the

Nicholas J. Tosca; Scott M. McLennan; Michael P. Lamb; John P. Grotzinger

2011-01-01

198

Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designs and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2009 water year (October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009), data were collected at 75 stations-69 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations, 1 spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, and 3 stations sampled in cooperation with the Elk River Watershed Improvement Association. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 72 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and seven-day low flow is presented.

Barr, Miya N.

2010-01-01

199

Occurrence of deeethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine in surface and ground water  

SciTech Connect

Field-disappearance studies and a regional study of nine rivers in the Midwest show that deethylatrazine (DEA) and deisopropylatrazine (DIA) occur frequently in surface water that has received runoff from two parent triazine herbicides, atrazine and cyanazine. The concentration of DEA and DIA in surface water varies with the hydrologic conditions of the basin and the timing of runoff, with maximum concentrations reaching 5 mg/L (DEA + DIA). Early rainfall followed by a dry summer will result in an early peak concentration of metabolites in surface water. A wet summer will delay the maximum concentrations of metabolites and increase their runoff into surface water, occasionally resulting in a slight separation of the parent atrazine maximum concentrations from the metabolite maximum concentrations giving a {open_quotes}second flush{close_quotes} of triazine metabolites to surface water. Replicated field dissipation studies of atrazine and cyanazine indicate that DIA/DEA ratios will vary from 0.4{plus_minus}0.1 when atrazine is the major triazine present to 0.6{plus_minus}0.1 when significant amounts of cyanazine are present. A comparison of transport time of DEA and DIA from field plots to their appearance in surface water indicates that storage and dilution are occurring in the alluvial aquifers of the basin.

Thurman, E.M.; Goolsby, D.A. [US Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States)

1996-10-01

200

A GIS water balance approach to support surface water flood risk management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concern has arisen as to whether the lack of appropriate consideration to surface water in urban spatial planning is reducing our capacity to manage surface water flood risk. Appropriate tools are required that allow spatial planners to explore opportunities and solutions for surface after flooding at large spatial scales. An urban surface water balance model has been developed that screens large urban areas to identify flooded areas and which allows solutions to be explored. The model hypothesis is that key hydrological characteristics; storage volume and location, flow paths and surface water generation capture the key processes responsible for surface water flooding> The model uses a LiDAR DEM (Light Detection and Ranging Digital Elevation Model) as the basis for determining surface water accumulation in a catchment and has been developed so that it requires minimal inputs and computational resources. The urban surface water balance approach is applied to Keighley in West Yorkshire where several instances of surface water flooding have been reported. This research used a postal questionnaire, followed up with site visits to collect data on surface water flooding locations in Keighley. A qualitative analysis based on field visits revealed that the degree of interaction with the sewer network varies spatially, and as the importance of the interaction of the sewer system increase, the accuracy of the model results are lowered. It also highlighted that local detail not present in the DEM, the presence of urban drainage assets and the performance of the sewer system which are not be represented in the model, can determine the accuracy of model results. Model results were used as a basis to develop solutions to surface water flooding. A least cost path methodology was developed to identify managed flood routes as a solution. These were translated into model inputs in the form a modified DEM.

Diaz-Nieto, J.

201

Surface Science in the Richmond Lab: Vapor/Water Studies  

E-print Network

, we are investigating the adsorption behavior of surface - modified nanoparticles at the CCl4/H2O/water (CCl4/H2O) interface as model systems for understanding different oil/water interfacial processes, and industrial applications.. We are studying a model polyelectrolyte, polymethacrylic acid (PMA), at the CCl4/H2

Richmond, Geraldine L.

202

CHARACTERIZING SURFACE WATERS THAT MAY NOT REQUIRE FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Field data from various utilities were studied with the object of identifying a set of characteristics of a surface water that might allow it to be successfully treated by disinfection alone, thus avoiding the need to filter. It was found possible to define water quality standard...

203

Tritium in surface waters of the Yenisei River basin.  

PubMed

This paper reports an investigation of the tritium content in the surface waters of the Yenisei River basin near the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC). In 2001 the maximum tritium concentration in the Yenisei River did not exceed 4 +/- 1 Bq l(-1), which is consistent with the data of 1998-99. However, it has been found that there are surface waters containing enhanced tritium as compared with the background values for the Yenisei River. For instance, in the Ploskii Stream and the Shumikha River the maximum tritium concentrations amount to 168 and 81 Bq l(-1), respectively. The source of tritium in these surface waters is the last operating reactor at the MCC, which still uses the Yenisei water as coolant. In water and sediment samples of the Bolshaya Tel River (a tributary of the Yenisei River) the tritium content turned out to be at least 10 times higher than the background values for the Yenisei River. The measurements conducted at the RPA RADON (Moscow) revealed not only tritium but also the artificial radionuclide (14)C in the Bolshaya Tel samples. The data obtained suggest that the Bolshaya Tel River receives the major part of tritium from sediments rather than from the water catchment area. This allows the conclusion that there is water exchange between the surface waters and the radioactively contaminated underground horizons of the "Severny" testing site. PMID:12600760

Bolsunovsky, A Ya; Bondareva, L G

2003-01-01

204

First Principles Studies of Water and Ice on Oxide Surfaces  

E-print Network

and donate H bonds) of the hydroxylated kaolinite surface is key to its many properties with regard to water and recombination of the water molecules within the dimers. Overall, it is hoped that these studies shed new light background 20 3.1 Electronic structure theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Born

Alavi, Ali

205

Formation of Trihalomethanes by Chlorination of Surface Water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, and dichloroiodomethane have been found in chlorinated drinking water. In addition to these five compounds, the other possible trihalomethanes (chlorodiiodomethane, bromochloroiodo-methane, dibromoiodomethane, bromodiiodomethane, and iodoform) can also be formed by chlorination of surface water containing bromides and iodides. Mass spectra for each of these ten compounds were obtained.

William W. Bunn; Bernard B. Haas; Edward R. Deane; Robert D. Kleopfer

1975-01-01

206

SURFACE WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS FOR MONITORING OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

This report develops and recommends prioritized listings of chemical, physical, and biological parameters which can be used to assess the environmental impact of oil shale development on surface water resources. Each of the potential water-related problems is addressed in the con...

207

Surface Experiment of Abrasive Water Jet Perforation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the experiment process and results of abrasive water jet perforation. This experiment was conducted in Kalamayi, China, Xinjiang Oilfield in October 2004. Referring to explosive perforation experiment, we made two cement cylinder samples with a diameter of 2.4 m, 1.2 m high, putting a 139.7 mm (5-1\\/2?) and a 177.8 mm (7?) casing sub in them, respectively.

Z. Huang; J. Niu; G. Li; X. Yuan; Y. Liu

2008-01-01

208

Dropwise condensation rate of water breath figures on polymer surfaces having similar surface free energies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates the effect of surface roughness, wettability, water contact angle hysteresis (CAH) and wetting hysteresis (WH) of polymeric substrates to the water drop condensation rate. We used five polyolefin coatings whose surface free energies were in a close range of 30-37 mJ/m2 but having different surface roughness and CAH. The formation of water breath figures was monitored at a temperature just below the dew point. The initial number of the condensed droplets per unit area (N0) and droplet surface coverage were determined during the early stage of drop condensation where the droplet coalescence was negligible. It was found that the mean drop diameter of condensed droplets on these polymer surfaces grow according to a power law with exponent 1/3 of time, similar to the previous reports given in the literature. It was determined that surface roughness and corresponding CAH and WH properties of polymers have important effects on the number of nucleation sites and growth rate of the condensed water droplets. N0 values and the surface coverage increased with the increase in surface roughness, CAH and WH of the polymer surfaces. The total condensed water drop volume also increased with the increase in surface roughness in accordance with the increase of the number of nucleated droplets.

Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yildirim

2012-10-01

209

Tritium in surface waters of the Yenisei River basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports an investigation of the tritium content in the surface waters of the Yenisei River basin near the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC). In 2001 the maximum tritium concentration in the Yenisei River did not exceed 4 ± 1 Bq l–1, which is consistent with the data of 1998–99. However, it has been found that there are surface

A. Ya. Bolsunovsky; L. G. Bondareva

2003-01-01

210

Langmuir circulation inhibits near-surface water turbulence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the surface ocean, breaking waves are a major source of air bubbles and turbulent kinetic energy. During the presence of a consistent surface wind, these wave-generated bubbles, along with other surface material like seaweed or foam, can be drawn into long rows along the surface. Driving this organization is Langmuir circulation, a phenomenon in which the wind and waves cause surface waters to rotate helically, moving like a wire wrapped around a pole in the windward direction. These spiral currents oscillate between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations, such that in some places the surface waters are pushed together and in others they are pulled apart. Researchers have previously found that at sites of convergence the bubbles produced by breaking waves are pushed to depths of 15 meters or more, with important implications for air-sea gas mixing and other processes.

Schultz, Colin

2012-07-01

211

An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features  

SciTech Connect

Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University, Athens; Mark, David [University at Buffalo, NY; Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

2014-01-01

212

Snail1 Expression Is Required for Sarcomagenesis12  

PubMed Central

Snail1 transcriptional repressor is a major inducer of epithelial-to mesenchymal transition but is very limitedly expressed in adult animals. We have previously demonstrated that Snail1 is required for the maintenance of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), preventing their premature differentiation. Now, we show that Snail1 controls the tumorigenic properties of mesenchymal cells. Increased Snail1 expression provides tumorigenic capabilities to fibroblastic cells; on the contrary, Snail1 depletion decreases tumor growth. Genetic depletion of Snail1 in MSCs that are deficient in p53 tumor suppressor downregulates MSC markers and prevents the capability of these cells to originate sarcomas in immunodeficient SCID mice. Notably, an analysis of human sarcomas shows that, contrarily to epithelial tumors, these neoplasms display high Snail1 expression. This is particularly clear for undifferentiated tumors, which are associated with poor outcome. Together, our results indicate a role for Snail1 in the generation of sarcomas. PMID:24947186

Alba-Castellón, Lorena; Batlle, Raquel; Francí, Clara; Fernández-Aceñero, María J.; Mazzolini, Rocco; Peña, Raúl; Loubat, Jordina; Alameda, Francesc; Rodríguez, Rufo; Curto, Josué; Albanell, Joan; Muñoz, Alberto; Bonilla, Félix; Ignacio Casal, J.; Rojo, Federico; García de Herreros, Antonio

2014-01-01

213

Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), A Tool For Numerically Simulating Linked Groundwater, Surface Water And Land-Surface Hydrologic Processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) is a comprehensive input-driven application for simulating groundwater flow, surface water flow and land-surface hydrologic processes, and interactions between these processes, developed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). IWFM couples a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process and 1-D land surface, lake, stream flow and vertical unsaturated-zone flow processes which are solved simultaneously at each time step. The groundwater flow system is simulated as a multilayer aquifer system with a mixture of confined and unconfined aquifers separated by semiconfining layers. The groundwater flow process can simulate changing aquifer conditions (confined to unconfined and vice versa), subsidence, tile drains, injection wells and pumping wells. The land surface process calculates elemental water budgets for agricultural, urban, riparian and native vegetation classes. Crop water demands are dynamically calculated using distributed soil properties, land use and crop data, and precipitation and evapotranspiration rates. The crop mix can also be automatically modified as a function of pumping lift using logit functions. Surface water diversions and groundwater pumping can each be specified, or can be automatically adjusted at run time to balance water supply with water demand. The land-surface process also routes runoff to streams and deep percolation to the unsaturated zone. Surface water networks are specified as a series of stream nodes (coincident with groundwater nodes) with specified bed elevation, conductance and stage-flow relationships. Stream nodes are linked to form stream reaches. Stream inflows at the model boundary, surface water diversion locations, and one or more surface water deliveries per location are specified. IWFM routes stream flows through the network, calculating groundwater-surface water interactions, accumulating inflows from runoff, and allocating available stream flows to meet specified or calculated deliveries. IWFM utilizes a very straight-forward input file structure, allowing rapid development of complex simulations. A key feature of IWFM is a new algorithm for computation of groundwater flow across element faces. Enhancements to version 3.0 include automatic time-tracking of input and output data sets, linkage with the HEC-DSS database, and dynamic crop allocation using logit functions. Utilities linking IWFM to the PEST automated calibration suite are also available. All source code, executables and documentation are available for download from the DWR web site. IWFM is currently being used to develop hydrologic simulations of California's Central Valley (C2VSIM); the west side of California's San Joaquin Valley (WESTSIM); Butte County, CA; Solano County, CA; Merced County, CA; and the Oregon side of the Walla Walla River Basin.

Dogrul, E. C.; Brush, C. F.; Kadir, T. N.

2006-12-01

214

Adsorption of surface functionalized silica nanoparticles onto mineral surfaces and decane/water interface.  

PubMed

The adsorption of silica nanoparticles onto representative mineral surfaces and at the decane/water interface was studied. The effects of particle size (the mean diameters from 5 to 75 nm), concentration and surface type on the adsorption were studied in detail. Silica nanoparticles with four different surfaces [unmodified, surface modified with anionic (sulfonate), cationic (quaternary ammonium (quat)) or nonionic (polyethylene glycol (PEG)) surfactant] were used. The zeta potential of these silica nanoparticles ranges from -79.8 to 15.3 mV. The shape of silica particles examined by a Hitachi-S5500 scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is quite spherical. The adsorption of all the nanoparticles (unmodified or surface modified) on quartz and calcite surfaces was found to be insignificant. We used interfacial tension (IFT) measurements to investigate the adsorption of silica nanoparticles at the decane/water interface. Unmodified nanoparticles or surface modified ones with sulfonate or quat do not significantly affect the IFT of the decane/water interface. It also does not appear that the particle size or concentration influences the IFT. However, the presence of PEG as a surface modifying material significantly reduces the IFT. The PEG surface modifier alone in an aqueous solution, without the nanoparticles, yields the same IFT reduction for an equivalent PEG concentration as that used for modifying the surface of nanoparticles. Contact angle measurements of a decane droplet on quartz or calcite plate immersed in water (or aqueous nanoparticle dispersion) showed a slight change in the contact angle in the presence of the studied nanoparticles. The results of contact angle measurements are in good agreement with experiments of adsorption of nanoparticles on mineral surfaces or decane/water interface. This study brings new insights into the understanding and modeling of the adsorption of surface-modified silica nanoparticles onto mineral surfaces and water/decane interface. PMID:23193372

Metin, Cigdem O; Baran, Jimmie R; Nguyen, Quoc P

2012-11-01

215

MONITORING OXIDATION-REDUCTION PROCESS DURING GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTIONS AT THE CHICKASAW NRA  

EPA Science Inventory

Mineralized ground waters at the Chickasaw National Recreational Area contain hydrogen sulfide, i.e., sulfur in the -2 valence state. As these mineralized ground waters discharge at the surface and mix with oxygen-rich waters a series of abiotic and biotic reactions occur that c...

216

DETECTION OF A GROUND-WATER/SURFACE-WATER INTERFACE WITH DIRECT-PUSH EQUIPMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

A ground-water/surface-water interface (GSI) was documented at the Thermo Chem CERCLA Site in Muskegon, MI via direct-push (DP) sampling. At that time, contaminated ground water flowed from the upland area of the site into the Black Creek floodplain. DP rods equipped with a 1.5...

217

ARSENIC SORUCE IDENTIFICATION AT THE GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTION ZONE AT A CONTAMINATED SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

One of the challenges in assessing the current impact of the discharge of arsenic contaminated ground water into a surface water body is differentiating the arsenic ground-water flux versus dissolution of in-place contaminated sediments. A field investigation has been carried ou...

218

Ions at Aqueous Interfaces: From Water Surface to Hydrated Proteins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The surfaces of aqueous solutions are traditionally viewed as devoid of inorganic ions. Molecular simulations and surface-selective spectroscopic techniques show, however, that large polarizable anions and hydronium cations can be found (and even enhanced) at the surface and are involved in chemistry at the air/water interface. Here, we review recent studies of ions at the air/water interface and compare from this perspective water with other polar solvents. For water, we focus in particular on the surface behavior of its ionic product (i.e., hydronium and hydroxide ions). We also investigate the feasibility of dielectric models for the description of the protein/water interface, in analogy to the air/water interface. Little correlation is found between these two interfaces in terms of ion segregation. Therefore, we suggest a local model of pairing of ions from the solution with charged and polar groups at the protein surface. We also describe corresponding results of experimental studies on aqueous model systems.

Jungwirth, Pavel; Winter, Bernd

2008-05-01

219

Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

2013-10-01

220

Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1989  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As of January 1, 1989, the surface-water data-collection network in Texas included 373 continuous-streamflow, 75 continuous or daily reservoir-content, 37 gage-height, 15 crest-stage partial-record, 200 data collection platform, 7 periodic discharge through range, 27 flood-hydrograph partial-record, 27 low-flow partial-record, 43 daily chemical-quality, 17 continuous-recording water quality, 87 periodic biological, 11 lake survey, 159 period organic and (or) nutrient, 2 periodic insecticide, 28 periodic pesticide, 19 automatic sampler, 137 periodic minor element, 126 periodic chemical-quality, 75 periodic physical organic, 17 continuous-recording temperature, and 29 national stream-gaging accounting network stations. Plate 1 shows the location of surface-water streamflow or reservoir-content and chemical-quality or sediment stations in Texas. Plate 2 shows the location of partial-record surface-water stations. (USGS)

Rawson, Jack, (compiler); Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.

1989-01-01

221

Influence of microwaves on the water surface tension.  

PubMed

In this study, microwave irradiation was applied to hanging droplets of both water and ethylene glycol. Once the irradiation had ceased and the droplet was allowed to return to its original temperature, it was found that the surface tension of ethylene glycol returned to its original value. In contrast, the water surface tension remained well below its original value for an extended period of time. Similar observations have been reported for magnetically treated water, but this is the first time that such a lasting effect has been reported for microwave irradiation. The effect can be attributed to the unique hydrogen bonds of interfacial water molecules. While the irradiation intensities used in this study are well above those in household devices, there is certainly the potential to apply the methodology to industrial applications where the manipulation of surface tension is required without the use of chemical addition. PMID:25101522

Parmar, Harisinh; Asada, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Yushin; Asakuma, Yusuke; Phan, Chi M; Pareek, Vishnu; Evans, Geoffrey M

2014-08-26

222

Ultrafast response of water near hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultrafast response of water near hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces is investigated by femtosecond pump-probe ellipsometry. Pump and probe pulses are from a dual Ti:sapphire laser with stable difference repetition rate. Every difference repetition rate, time delay is swept the whole pulse-to-pulse interval without an optical delay stage. Pump pulses induce heating and acoustic vibration to a Pd surface. The Pd surface is modified by thiol chemistry. Thiols with --OH and -CH3 end groups generate uniform hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, and these mixtures modulate hydrophobicity two-dimensionally. Probe pulses with circular polarization impinge at the Brewster's angle and are analyzed by a polarizer. The transient ellipticity shows a refractive index change of water by thermal conductance and novel insight into the peculiar qualities of interfacial water.

Min, Chang-Ki; Guan, Juan; Bae, Sung Chul; Cahill, David; Granick, Steve

2009-03-01

223

Dark solitons on the surface of water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) models the evolution dynamics in time and space of weakly nonlinear water wave trains in finite or infinite depth. In the defocusing regime (finite depth), the NLS admits a family of soliton solutions, which describe the strong depression of wave envelopes. These solitons are referred to dark solitons and have been already observed in optics and in Bose-Einstein condensates. We present experimental results on gray and black solitons, propagating in a wave flume. Furthermore, we analyze the data and discuss the discrepancies observed with respect to theoretical predictions. The results prove that in the case of weak-nonlinearity of the waves, the NLS describes well the dynamics of nonlinear wave packets in finite depth.

Chabchoub, Amin

2014-05-01

224

High surface water interaction in superhydrophobic nanostructured silicon surfaces: convergence between nanoscopic and macroscopic scale phenomena.  

PubMed

In the present work, we investigate wetting phenomena on freshly prepared nanostructured porous silicon (nPS) with tunable properties. Surface roughness and porosity of nPS can be tailored by controlling fabrication current density in the range 40-120 mA/cm(2). The length scale of the characteristic surface structures that compose nPS allows the application of thermodynamic wettability approaches. The high interaction energy between water and surface is determined by measuring water contact angle (WCA) hysteresis, which reveals Wenzel wetting regime. Moreover, the morphological analysis of the surfaces by atomic force microscopy allows predicting WCA from a semiempiric model adapted to this material. PMID:22149025

Muñoz-Noval, Álvaro; Hernando Pérez, Mercedes; Torres Costa, Vicente; Martín Palma, Raúl J; de Pablo, Pedro J; Manso Silván, Miguel

2012-01-24

225

Experimental observation of dark solitons on the surface of water.  

PubMed

We present the first ever observation of dark solitons on the surface of water. It takes the form of an amplitude drop of the carrier wave which does not change shape in propagation. The shape and width of the soliton depend on the water depth, carrier frequency, and the amplitude of the background wave. The experimental data taken in a water tank show an excellent agreement with the theory. These results may improve our understanding of the nonlinear dynamics of water waves at finite depths. PMID:25166807

Chabchoub, A; Kimmoun, O; Branger, H; Hoffmann, N; Proment, D; Onorato, M; Akhmediev, N

2013-03-22

226

[Distribution of arsenic in surface water in Tibet].  

PubMed

This research was aimed on studying the arsenic distribution of water in Yarlung Zangbo and Singe Zangbo basins in Tibet. Results showed that arsenic concentrations were different in different types of the water. The sequence of arsenic concentration from high to low was hot spring water (4920 microg x L(-1) +/- 1520 microg x L(-1), n =2), salt lake water (2180 microg x L(-1) +/- 3840 microg x L(-1), n =7), well water (194 microg x L(-1), n = 1), freshwater lake water (163 microg x L(-1) +/- 202 microg x L(-1), n =2) and stream water (35.5 microg x L(-1) +/- 57.0 microg x L(-1), n=74). The high arsenic concentration in surface water in Singe Zangbo and the upstream of Yarlung Zangbo were found. The average concentration of arsenic in water from Singe Zangbo (58.4 microg x L(-1) +/- 69.9 microg x L(-1), n = 39) was significantly higher than that from Yarlung Zangbo (10.8 microg x L(-1) +/- 16.9 microg x L(-1), n = 30). Arsenic concentration in 43.2% of stream water samples and all of the hot springs, saline lakes and well water were higher than 10 microg x L(-1). Yarlung Zangbo and Singe Zangbo are important sources of drinking water for the local people. There is a high risk for the local people who may suffer from chronic arsenic poisoning. PMID:23233967

Wang, Ming-Guo; Li, She-Hong; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Tang-Fu; Zheng, Bao-Shan

2012-10-01

227

Time dependence of forces between mica surfaces in water and its relation to the release of surface ions  

E-print Network

Time dependence of forces between mica surfaces in water and its relation to the release of surface between two smooth mica surfaces immersed in salt-free conductivity water. A long-ranged repulsion of K ions from the mica surface into the water. Subsequent force measurements at times following

Klein, Jacob

228

A Mechanism for Near-Surface Water Ice on Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent findings (e.g., Byrne et al, 2009) indicate that water ice lies very close to the surface at mid-latitudes on Mars. Re-interpretation of neutron and gamma-ray data is consistent with water ice buried less than a meter or two below the surface. Hydrothermal convection of brines provides a mechanism for delivering water to the near-surface. Previous numerical and experimental studies with pure water have indicated that hydrothermal circulation of pore water should be possible, given reasonable estimates of geothermal heat flux and regolith permeability. For pure water convection, the upper limit of the liquid zone would lie at some depth, but in the case of salt solutions, the boundary between liquid and frozen pore water could reach virtually to the surface. The principal drivers for hydrothermal circulation are regolith permeability, geothermal heat flux, surface temperature and salt composition. Both the Clifford and the Hanna-Phillips models of Martian regolith permeability predict sufficiently high permeabilities to sustain hydrothermal convection. Salts in solution will concentrate in upwelling plumes as the cold surface is approached. As water ice is excluded upon freezing, the remaining solution becomes a more concentrated brine, reaching its eutectic concentration before freezing. Numerical simulations considering several salts (NaCl, CaCl2, MgSO4), and a range of heat fluxes (20 - 100 mW/m2) covering the range of estimated present day heat flux (20 to 40 mW/m2) to moderately elevated conditions (60 to 100 mW/m2) such as might exist in the vicinity of volcanoes and craters, all indicate the same qualitative behavior. A completely liquid, convective regime occurs at depth, overlain by a partially frozen "mushy" layer (but still convecting despite the increased viscosity), overlain by a thin frozen layer at the surface. The thicknesses of these layers depend on the heat flux, surface temperature and the salt. As heat flux increases, the mushy region lies closer and closer to the surface, and the frozen layer thins. At the higher heat fluxes (> 60 mW/m2), upwelling plumes can deliver liquid brine to within a few meters of the surface, even breaching it for the salts with very low eutectic points.

Travis, B. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Maurice, S.

2009-12-01

229

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach  

SciTech Connect

This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

Coty, J

2009-03-16

230

Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates  

SciTech Connect

The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000?Hz, with 0.5?J per pulse energy output at 25?kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

Ruma,; Yoshihara, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Hosseini, S. H. R., E-mail: hosseini@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Akiyama, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Lukeš, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, Prague, Prague 18200 (Czech Republic)

2014-09-28

231

Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H2O2 and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

Ruma, Hosseini, S. H. R.; Yoshihara, K.; Akiyama, M.; Sakugawa, T.; Lukeš, P.; Akiyama, H.

2014-09-01

232

Reaction of water vapor with a clean liquid uranium surface  

SciTech Connect

To study the reaction of water vapor with uranium, we have exposed clean liquid uranium surfaces to H/sub 2/O under UHV conditions. We have measured the surface concentration of oxygen as a function of exposure, and determined the maximum attainable surface oxygen concentration X/sub 0//sup s/ as a function of temperature. We have used these measurements to estimate, close to the melting point, the solubility of oxygen (X/sub 0//sup b/, < 10/sup -4/) and its surface segregation coefficient ..beta../sup s/(> 10/sup 3/). 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Siekhaus, W.

1985-10-24

233

Effects of Human Activities on the Interaction of Ground Water and Surface Water  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This information describes how human activities affect ground water and ground water recharge. After a discussion of point and nonpoint sources of contaminants, there is information about the effects of irrigation development, surface-water reservoirs, and removal of flood-plain vegetation on the interaction of ground water and surface water. The site also covers the effects of nitrogen use, pesticide application to agricultural lands, and atmospheric deposition on the quality of ground and surface water. All of the above are supported by illustrations. In addition, there is information about urban and industrial pollution, modification of river valleys including the construction of levees and reservoirs, and modification of the atmosphere, which includes atmospheric deposition and global warming.

234

Differential Spatial Repositioning of Activated Genes in Biomphalaria glabrata Snails Infected with Schistosoma mansoni  

PubMed Central

Schistosomiasis is an infectious disease infecting mammals as the definitive host and fresh water snails as the intermediate host. Understanding the molecular and biochemical relationship between the causative schistosome parasite and its hosts will be key to understanding and ultimately treating and/or eradicating the disease. There is increasing evidence that pathogens that have co-evolved with their hosts can manipulate their hosts' behaviour at various levels to augment an infection. Bacteria, for example, can induce beneficial chromatin remodelling of the host genome. We have previously shown in vitro that Biomphalaria glabrata embryonic cells co-cultured with schistosome miracidia display genes changing their nuclear location and becoming up-regulated. This also happens in vivo in live intact snails, where early exposure to miracidia also elicits non-random repositioning of genes. We reveal differences in the nuclear repositioning between the response of parasite susceptible snails as compared to resistant snails and with normal or live, attenuated parasites. Interestingly, the stress response gene heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 is only repositioned and then up-regulated in susceptible snails with the normal parasite. This movement and change in gene expression seems to be controlled by the parasite. Other differences in the behaviour of genes support the view that some genes are responding to tissue damage, for example the ferritin genes move and are up-regulated whether the snails are either susceptible or resistant and upon exposure to either normal or attenuated parasite. This is the first time host genome reorganisation has been seen in a parasitic host and only the second time for any pathogen. We believe that the parasite elicits a spatio-epigenetic reorganisation of the host genome to induce favourable gene expression for itself and this might represent a fundamental mechanism present in the human host infected with schistosome cercariae as well as in other host-pathogen relationships. PMID:25211244

Arican-Goktas, Halime D.; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Bridger, Joanna M.; Knight, Matty

2014-01-01

235

Epigenetic Regulation of EMT: The Snail Story  

PubMed Central

While the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a fundamental role during development, its deregulation can adversely promote tumor metastasis. The phenotypic and cellular plasticity of EMT indicates that it is subject to epigenetic regulation. In this review, we try to embrace recent findings on the mechanisms of the transcription factor Snail-mediated E-cadherin silencing, which is a hallmark of EMT. Our studies as well as those of others have clearly demonstrated that Snail can recruit multiple chromatin enzymes including LSD1, HDAC1/2, PRC2, G9a and Suv39H1 to the E-cadherin promoter. These enzymes function in a highly orchestrated fashion to generate heterochromatin and promote DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)-mediated DNA methylation at the promoter region. Disruption of the connection between Snail and these chromatin-modifying enzymes may represent an efficient strategy for the treatment of EMT-related diseases. PMID:23888971

Lin, Yiwei; Dong, Chenfang; Zhou, Binhua P.

2014-01-01

236

The utility of surface temperature measurements for the remote sensing of surface soil water status  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experiments carried out on an Avondale loam soil indicated that the thermal inertia concept of soil water content detection is reasonably sound. The volumetric water contents of surface soil layers between 2 and 4 cm thick were found to be linear functions of the amplitude of the diurnal surface soil temperature wave for clear day-night periods. They were also found to be linear functions of the daily maximum value of the surface soil-air-temperature differential. Tests on three additional soils ranging from sandy loam to clay indicated that the relations determined for Avondale loam could not be accurately applied to these other soil types. When the moisture characteristic curves of each soil were used to transform water contents into pressure potentials, however, it was found that soil water pressure potential could be determined without prior knowledge of soil type, and thus its value as a potential soil water status survey tool was significantly enhanced.

Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

1975-01-01

237

Shallow water surface gravity wave imaging, spectra and their use in shallow water dredging operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Imaging of shallow waters using high resolution video imagery is described. Common to mono, stereo and trinocular imaging approaches from ground and airborne platforms is the need to validate the surface water wave field measurements, particularly the amplitude and specular reflectance of water surface small gravity waves. A technique for calibration and validation of water surface gravity wave field energy spectra is described. Results demonstrate the value of video imagery where water level staff gauges with approximately with 0.5 cm wave height accuracy are easily sensed using high definition videography. Essentially, a staff gauge placed in shallow water constructed from PVC materials with custom colored line coding are imaged at 30 H or high frame rates, followed by frame by frame analyses in order to detect the water level measured at 0.5 cm height intervals. The image based time series allow the development of shallow water gravity wave energy spectra using standard FFT analysis procedures. Spectral models based upon peak frequency, for example, are then used in a two dimensional water surface wave simulation model that generates radiative transfer based hyperspectral images of the water surface wave field. The simulated and observed water surface wave patch fields are compared by extracting vertical or horizontal transects within observed and simulated imagery. The approach allows one to developed spectral energy model probability distributions at low cost. The novel noncontact video sensing and image analysis methodology used to calibrate and validate shallow water gravity wave models yield a means for ultimately calculating bottom boundary velocities under measured or simulated wave fields. These boundary layer velocities can cause migration and horizontal particle fluxes (g cm-2 s-1), resuspension, settling, and increased turbidity during dredging operations, but not necessarily due to waterway dredging operations and activities.

Bostater, Charles R.; Yang, Bingyu

2014-10-01

238

Hydrologic Science and Satellite Measurements of Surface Water (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While significant advances continue to be made for satellite measurements of surface waters, important science and application opportunities remain. Examples include the following: (1) Our current methods of measuring floodwater dynamics are either sparsely distributed or temporally inadequate. As an example, flood depths are measured by using high water marks, which capture only the peak of the flood wave, not its temporal variability. (2) Discharge is well measured at individual points along stream networks using in-situ gauges, but these do not capture within-reach hydraulic variability such as the water surface slope changes on the rising and falling limbs of flood waves. (3) Just a 1.0 mm/day error in ET over the Congo Basin translates to a 35,000 m3/s discharge error. Knowing the discharge of the Congo River and its many tributaries should significantly improve our understanding of the water balance throughout the basin. The Congo is exemplary of many other basins around the globe. (4) Arctic hydrology is punctuated by millions of unmeasured lakes. Globally, there might be as many as 30 million lakes larger than a hectare. Storage changes in these lakes are nearly unknown, but in the Arctic such changes are likely an indication of global warming. (5) Well over 100 rivers cross international boundaries, yet the sharing of water data is poor. Overcoming this helps to better manage the entire river basin while also providing a better assessment of potential water related disasters. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT, http://swot.jpl.nasa.gov/) mission is designed to meet these needs by providing global measurements of surface water hydrodynamics. SWOT will allow estimates of discharge in rivers wider than 100m (50m goal) and storage changes in water bodies larger than 250m by 250m (and likely as small as one hectare).

Alsdorf, D. E.; Mognard, N. M.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

2010-12-01

239

Longwall dust control potentially enhanced by surface borehole water infusion  

SciTech Connect

Injecting water under pressure to wet the coalbed in advance of mining reduces mining-generated respirable dust. Owing to economic and geological barriers, water infusion for longwall dust control in the United States is currently limited to the Pocahontas No. 3 Coalbed in Virginia. Water is pumped into the coalbed through underground boreholes drilled horizontally from the headgate toward the tailgate side of retreat longwall panels. This paper theorizes that the barriers to widespread utilization of water infusion for longwall dust control could be overcome by long-duration, low-pressure water infusion through vertical gob gas boreholes. Currently, 43% of the 72 longwall mines in the United States employ vertical gob gas boreholes. Computer coalbed reservoir simulation suggests that one vertical surface borehole could infuse the same longwall panel area as four horizontal boreholes in the current water infusion system for longwall dust control in the Pocahontas No. 3 Coalbed.

Campoli, A.A.; McCall, F.E.; Finfinger, G.L. [Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Zuber, M.D. [S.A. Holditch and Associates, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-31

240

A route toward digital manipulation of water nanodroplets on surfaces.  

PubMed

Manipulation of an isolated water nanodroplet (WN) on certain surfaces is important to various nanofluidic applications but challenging. Here we present a digital nanofluidic system based on a graphene/water/mica sandwich structure. In this architecture, graphene provides a flexible protection layer to isolate WNs from the outside environment, and a monolayer ice-like layer formed on the mica surface acts as a lubricant layer to allow these trapped WNs to move on it freely. In combination with scanning probe microscope techniques, we are able to move, merge, and separate individual water nanodroplets in a controlled manner. The smallest manipulatable water nanodroplet has a volume down to yoctoliter (10(-24) L) scale. PMID:24645988

Cheng, Meng; Wang, Duoming; Sun, Zhaoru; Zhao, Jing; Yang, Rong; Wang, Guole; Yang, Wei; Xie, Guibai; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Peng; He, Congli; Liu, Donghua; Xu, Limei; Shi, Dongxia; Wang, Enge; Zhang, Guangyu

2014-04-22

241

The toxic activities of Arisaema erubescens and Nerium indicum mixed with Streptomycete against snails.  

PubMed

The comparative molluscicidal activities of Arisaema erubescens tuber extracts and Nerium indicum leaf extracts mixed with Streptomycete violacerruber dilution (SD) against the snail Oncomlania hupensis and the responses of the isozymes, esterase (EST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) to the A. erubescens extracts and the mixtures were investigated. The molluscicidal activity of A. erubescens water extracts mixed with S. violacerruber dilution was 4-5 times higher than a single A. erubescens or S. violacerruber dilution after 24-h exposure, and is also higher than that of N. indicum leaf water extracts mixed with S. violacerruber dilution. At the end of exposure to the N-butanol extracts of A. erubescens tubers (NEAT), the EST activity in snail liver decreased and some enzyme bands (EST 1 and EST 3 in exposure to NEAT) disappeared but the activities of SOD 1 increased. The effect was more obvious in mixture treatment than in single NEAT or SD treatment. The results indicated that molluscicidal activities of plant and microorganism could be more effective than single plant. The decline of the detoxic ability in snail liver cells could be the reason of the snail dying. PMID:21783953

Zhang, Yi; Ke, Wenshan; Yang, Jinglian; Ma, Anning; Yu, Zhensen

2009-03-01

242

Using surface tension data to predict differences in surface and bulk concentrations of nonelectrolytes in water.  

PubMed

Recently, we developed a quantitative interpretation of surface tension increments (STI) of salts, acids, and bases in terms of the solute (or salt ion) partitioning model (SPM). Here, we obtain an analogous SPM-based interpretation of surface tension increments of nonelectrolytes, which yields local-bulk partition coefficients (K(p)) quantifying the accumulation or exclusion of these solutes in the local region near the air-water surface, and the amount of water per unit area of that region (b1?). Sucrose exhibits the largest positive STI (approximately 1.4 ergs cm(-2) Osm(-1)). Assuming that K(p) = 0 for sucrose (i.e. that it is completely excluded from the surface of water), these STI provide a minimum estimate of b1? of 0.20 H(2)O/Å(2), or a minimum thickness of the surface region of approximately two layers of water at bulk density. This is the same value as obtained previously from analysis of surface tension and hydrocarbon solubility increments of Na(2)SO(4) and also for the interaction of glycine betaine with anionic carboxylate surface, indicating that this quantity is not a function of the type of solute or surface investigated and therefore that it may represent the molecular thickness of the region. Partition coefficients of other nonelectrolytes investigated range from moderately excluded (e.g urea) to moderately accumulated (e.g. glycerol, ethylene glycol); strongly accumulated surface active solutes (e.g. mono-substituted alcohols) were not included in this analysis. Partition coefficients for many salt ions obtained from STI and hydrocarbon solubility increments fall in a rank order which corresponds to the Hofmeister series for protein folding and protein solubility, indicating a common pattern of accumulation or exclusion of salt ions at the air-water surface and nonpolar surfaces of dissolved hydrocarbons and proteins; no such patterns are observed for nonelectrolytes. PMID:19436772

Pegram, Laurel M; Record, M Thomas

2009-02-12

243

Molecular dynamics studies of water deposition on hematite surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interest in carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery is increasing proportional to the decrease in naturally driven oil production and also due to the increasing demand for reduced emission of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Transport of carbon dioxide in offshore pipelines involves high pressure and low temperatures which may lead to the formation of hydrate between residual water dissolved in carbon dioxide. The critical question is whether the water at some condition of temperature and pressure will drop out as liquid droplets or as water adsorbed on the surfaces of the pipeline and then subsequently form hydrates heterogeneously. In this work we have used the 6-311G basis set with B3LYP to estimate the charge distribution of different sizes of hematite crystals. The obtained surface charge distribution were kept unchanged while the inner charge distribution where scaled so as to result in an overall neutral crystal. These rust particles were embedded in water and chemical potential for adsorbed water molecules were estimated through thermodynamic integration and compared to similar estimates for same size water cluster. Estimated values of water chemical potentials indicate that it is thermodynamically favorable for water to adsorb on hematite, and that evaluation of potential carbon dioxide hydrate formation conditions and kinetics should be based this sequence of processes.

Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Haynes, Martin

2012-12-01

244

Microcystins in potable surface waters: toxic effects and removal strategies.  

PubMed

In freshwater, harmful cyanobacterial blooms threaten to increase with global climate change and eutrophication of surface waters. In addition to the burden and necessity of removal of algal material during water treatment processes, bloom-forming cyanobacteria can produce a class of remarkably stable toxins, microcystins, difficult to remove from drinking water sources. A number of animal intoxications over the past 20 years have served as sentinels for widespread risk presented by microcystins. Cyanobacterial blooms have the potential to threaten severely both public health and the regional economy of affected communities, particularly those with limited infrastructure or resources. Our main objectives were to assess whether existing water treatment infrastructure provides sufficient protection against microcystin exposure, identify available options feasible to implement in resource-limited communities in bloom scenarios and to identify strategies for improved solutions. Finally, interventions at the watershed level aimed at bloom prevention and risk reduction for entry into potable water sources were outlined. We evaluated primary studies, reviews and reports for treatment options for microcystins in surface waters, potable water sources and treatment plants. Because of the difficulty of removal of microcystins, prevention is ideal; once in the public water supply, the coarse removal of cyanobacterial cells combined with secondary carbon filtration of dissolved toxins currently provides the greatest potential for protection of public health. Options for point of use filtration must be optimized to provide affordable and adequate protection for affected communities. PMID:24038121

Roegner, Amber F; Brena, Beatriz; González-Sapienza, Gualberto; Puschner, Birgit

2014-05-01

245

Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

1984-01-01

246

The use of radar imagery for surface water investigations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper is concerned with the interpretation of hydrologic features using L-band (HH) imagery collected by aircraft and Seasat systems. Areas of research needed to more precisely define the accuracy and repeatability of measurements related to the conditions of surfaces and boundaries of fresh water bodies are identified. These include: the definition of shoreline, the nature of variations in surface roughness across a water body and along streams and lake shores, and the separation of ambiguous conditions which appear similar to lakes.

Bryan, M. L.

1981-01-01

247

Regularity of traveling free surface water waves with vorticity  

E-print Network

We prove real analyticity of all the streamlines, including the free surface, of a gravity- or capillary-gravity-driven steady flow of water over a flat bed, with a H\\"{o}lder continuous vorticity function, provided that the propagating speed of the wave on the free surface exceeds the horizontal fluid velocity throughout the flow. Furthermore, if the vorticity possesses some Gevrey regularity of index $s$, then the stream function admits the same Gevrey regularity throughout the fluid domain; in particular if the Gevrey index $s$ equals to 1, then we obtain analyticity of the stream function. The regularity results hold for both periodic and solitary water waves.

Li, Wei-Xi

2011-01-01

248

Parametrically excited water surface ripples as ensembles of oscillons  

E-print Network

We show that ripples on the surface of deep water which are driven parametrically by monochromatic vertical vibration represent ensembles of oscillating solitons, or quasi-particles, rather than waves. Horizontal mobility of oscillons determines the broadening of spectral lines and transitions from chaos to regular patterns. It is found that microscopic additions of proteins to water dramatically affect the oscillon mobility and drive transitions from chaos to order. The shape of the oscillons in physical space determines the shape of the frequency spectra of the surface ripple.

Shats, Michael; Punzmann, Horst

2011-01-01

249

Aluminum in acidic surface waters: chemistry, transport, and effects.  

PubMed Central

Ecologically significant concentrations of Al have been reported in surface waters draining "acid-sensitive" watersheds that are receiving elevated inputs of acidic deposition. It has been hypothesized that mineral acids from atmospheric deposition have remobilized Al previously precipitated within the soil during soil development. This Al is then thought to be transported to adjacent surface waters. Dissolved mononuclear Al occurs as aquo Al, as well as OH-, F-, SO4(2-), and organic complexes. Although past investigations have often ignored non-hydroxide complexes of Al, it appears that organic and F complexes are the predominant forms of Al in dilute (low ionic strength) acidic surface waters. The concentration of inorganic forms of Al increases exponentially with decreases in solution pH. This response is similar to the theoretical pH dependent solubility of Al mineral phases. The concentration of organic forms of Al, however, is strongly correlated with variations in organic carbon concentration of surface waters rather than pH. Elevated concentrations of Al in dilute acidic waters are of interest because: Al is an important pH buffer; Al may influence the cycling of important elements like P, organic carbon, and trace metals; and Al is potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. An understanding of the aqueous speciation of Al is essential for an evaluation of these processes. PMID:3935428

Driscoll, C T

1985-01-01

250

Effects of Surface-Water Diversions on Habitat Availability for Native Macrofauna, Northeast Maui, Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Effects of surface-water diversions on habitat availability for native stream fauna (fish, shrimp, and snails) are described for 21 streams in northeast Maui, Hawaii. Five streams (Waikamoi, Honomanu, Wailuanui, Kopiliula, and Hanawi Streams) were chosen as representative streams for intensive study. On each of the five streams, three representative reaches were selected: (1) immediately upstream of major surface-water diversions, (2) midway to the coast, and (3) near the coast. This study focused on five amphidromous native aquatic species (alamoo, nopili, nakea, opae, and hihiwai) that are abundant in the study area. The Physical Habitat Simulation (PHABSIM) System, which incorporates hydrology, stream morphology and microhabitat preferences to explore relations between streamflow and habitat availability, was used to simulate habitat/discharge relations for various species and life stages, and to provide quantitative habitat comparisons at different streamflows of interest. Hydrologic data, collected over a range of low-flow discharges, were used to calibrate hydraulic models of selected transects across the streams. The models were then used to predict water depth and velocity (expressed as a Froude number) over a range of discharges up to estimates of natural median streamflow. The biological importance of the stream hydraulic attributes was then assessed with the statistically derived suitability criteria for each native species and life stage that were developed as part of this study to produce a relation between discharge and habitat availability. The final output was expressed as a weighted habitat area of streambed for a representative stream reach. PHABSIM model results are presented to show the area of estimated usable bed habitat over a range of streamflows relative to natural conditions. In general, the models show a continuous decrease in habitat for all modeled species as streamflow is decreased from natural conditions. The PHABSIM modeling results from the intensively studied streams were normalized to develop relations between the relative amount of diversion from a stream and the resulting relative change in habitat in the stream. These relations can be used to estimate changes in habitat for diverted streams in the study area that were not intensively studied. The relations indicate that the addition of even a small amount of water to a dry stream has a significant effect on the amount of habitat available. Equations relating stream base-flow changes to habitat changes can be used to provide an estimate of the relative habitat change in the study area streams for which estimates of diverted and natural median base flow have been determined but for which detailed habitat models were not developed. Stream water temperatures, which could have an effect on stream ecology and taro cultivation, were measured in five streams in the study area. In general, the stream temperatures measured at any of the monitoring sites were not elevated enough, based on currently available information, to adversely effect the growth or mortality of native aquatic macrofauna or to cause wetland taro to be susceptible to fungi and associated rotting diseases.

Gingerich, Stephen B.; Wolff, Reuben H.

2005-01-01

251

Hydrodynamic boundary condition of water on hydrophobic surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By combining total internal reflection fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy with Brownian dynamics simulations, we were able to measure the hydrodynamic boundary condition of water flowing over a smooth solid surface with exceptional accuracy. We analyzed the flow of aqueous electrolytes over glass coated with a layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (advancing contact angle ? = 108°) or perfluorosilane (? = 113°). Within an error of better than 10 nm the slip length was indistinguishable from zero on all surfaces.

Schaeffel, David; Yordanov, Stoyan; Schmelzeisen, Marcus; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kappl, Michael; Schmitz, Roman; Dünweg, Burkhard; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Koynov, Kaloian

2013-05-01

252

Hydrodynamic boundary condition of water on hydrophobic surfaces.  

PubMed

By combining total internal reflection fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy with Brownian dynamics simulations, we were able to measure the hydrodynamic boundary condition of water flowing over a smooth solid surface with exceptional accuracy. We analyzed the flow of aqueous electrolytes over glass coated with a layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (advancing contact angle ? = 108°) or perfluorosilane (? = 113°). Within an error of better than 10 nm the slip length was indistinguishable from zero on all surfaces. PMID:23767478

Schaeffel, David; Yordanov, Stoyan; Schmelzeisen, Marcus; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kappl, Michael; Schmitz, Roman; Dünweg, Burkhard; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Koynov, Kaloian

2013-05-01

253

Ground Water and Surface Water, A Single Resource: Challenges and Opportunities (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site looks at the future management of ground water and surface water in the United States and addresses the need for greater understanding of the interaction of ground and surface water with respect to the three issues of: water supply, water quality, and characteristics of aquatic environments. Special attention is given to the preservation of wetlands and riparian zones.

254

Comparison of pesticide residues in surface water and ground water of agriculture intensive areas  

PubMed Central

The organochlorines (OClPs) and organophosphates (OPPs) pesticides in surface and ground water having intensive agriculture activity were investigated to evaluate their potential pollution and risks on human health. As per USEPA 8081 B method, liquid-liquid extraction followed by Gas-Chromatographic technique with electron capture detector and mass selective detector (GC-MS) were used for monitoring of pesticides. Among organochlorines, ?,?,?,? HCH’s, aldrin, dicofol, DDT and its derivatives, ?,? endosulphan’s and endosulphan-sulphate were analysed; dichlorovos, ethion, parathion-methyl, phorate, chlorpyrifos and profenofos were determined among organophosphates. As compared to ground water, higher concentrations of OClPs and OPPs were found in surface water. Throughout the monitoring study, ??-?HCH (0.39 ?g/L in Amravati region),??-?endosulphan (0.78 ?g/L in Yavatmal region), chlorpyrifos (0.25 ?g/L in Bhandara region) and parathion-methyl (0.09 ?g/L in Amravati region) are frequently found pesticide in ground water, whereas ?,?,?-HCH (0.39 ?g/L in Amravati region), ?,??-?endosulphan (0.42 ?g/L in Amravati region), dichlorovos (0.25 ?g/L in Yavatmal region), parathion-methyl (0.42 ?g/L in Bhandara region), phorate (0.33 ?g/L in Yavatmal region) were found in surface water. Surface water was found to be more contaminated than ground water with more number of and more concentrated pesticides. Among pesticides water samples are found to be more contaminated by organophosphate than organochlorine. Pesticides in the surface water samples from Bhandara and Yavatmal region exceeded the EU (European Union) limit of 1.0 ?g/L (sum of pesticide levels in surface water) but were within the WHO guidelines for individual pesticides. PMID:24398360

2014-01-01

255

Snail bioaccumulation of triclocarban, triclosan, and methyltriclosan in a North Texas, USA, stream affected by wastewater treatment plant runoff.  

PubMed

Grazing by freshwater snails promotes nutrient turnover in algal communities. Grazed algal compartments may include antimicrobial agents and metabolites, such as triclocarban (TCC), triclosan (TCS), and methyltriclosan (MTCS), which are incompletely removed by wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) processing. The present study quantifies snail bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for TCC, TCS, and MTCS at the outfall of Pecan Creek (TX, USA), the receiving stream for the city of Denton (TX, USA) WWTP. Helisoma trivolvis (Say) is ubiquitous and thrives under standard laboratory conditions, leading to its choice for this bioaccumulation study in conjunction with Cladophora spp. Along with providing substrate for epiphytic growth, Cladophora spp. provide a source of food and shelter for H. trivolvis. After being caged for two weeks, algae and snails were collected from the WWTP outfall, along with water-column samples, and analyzed by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for TCS and MTCS and by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for TCC. Algal and snail samples were analyzed before exposure and found to be below practical quantitation limits for all antimicrobial agents. Triclocarban, TCS, and MTCS in water samples were at low-ppt concentrations (40-200 ng/L). Triclocarban, TCS, and MTCS were elevated to low-ppb concentrations (50-300 ng/g fresh wt) in caged snail samples and elevated to low-ppb concentrations (50-400 ng/g fresh wt) in caged algal samples. Resulting snail and algal BAFs were approximately three orders of magnitude, which supports rapid bioaccumulation among algae and adult caged snails at this receiving stream outfall. The results further support TCC, TCS, and MTCS as good candidate marker compounds for evaluation of environmental distribution of trace WWTP contaminants. PMID:18380516

Coogan, Melinda A; La Point, Thomas W

2008-08-01

256

Radiolysis Concerns for Water Shielding in Fission Surface Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of radiolysis concerns with regard to water shields for fission surface power. A review of the radiolysis process is presented and key parameters and trends are identified. From this understanding of the radiolytic decomposition of water, shield pressurization and corrosion are identified as the primary concerns. Existing experimental and modeling data addressing concerns are summarized. It was found that radiolysis of pure water in a closed volume results in minimal, if any net decomposition, and therefore reduces the potential for shield pressurization and corrosion.

Schoenfeld, Michael P. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States); Anghaie, Samim [Innovative Space Power and Propulsion Institute, 800 SW Archer Rd. Bldg.554, P.O. Box 116502, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6502 (United States)

2008-01-21

257

Roles of surface water areas for water and solute cycle in Hanoi city, Viet Nam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hanoi city, the capital of Viet Nam, has developed beside the Red river. Recent rapid urbanization of this city has reduced a large number of natural water areas such as lakes, ponds and canals not only in the central area but the suburban area. Contrary, the urbanization has increased artificial water areas such as pond for fish cultivation and landscaping. On the other hand, the urbanization has induced the inflow of waste water from households and various kinds of factories to these water areas because of delay of sewerage system development. Inflow of the waste water has induced eutrophication and pollution of these water areas. Also, there is a possibility of groundwater pollution by infiltration of polluted surface water. However, the role of these water areas for water cycle and solute transport is not clarified. Therefore, this study focuses on the interaction between surface water areas and groundwater in Hanoi city to evaluate appropriate land development and groundwater resource management. We are carrying out three approaches: a) understanding of geochemical characteristics of surface water and groundwater, b) monitoring of water levels of pond and groundwater, c) sampling of soil and pond sediment. Correlation between d18O and dD of precipitation (after GNIP), the Red River (after GNIR) and the water samples of this study showed that the groundwater is composed of precipitation, the Red River and surface water that has evaporation process. Contribution of the surface water with evaporation process was widely found in the study area. As for groundwater monitoring, the Holocene aquifers at two sites were in unconfined condition in dry season and the groundwater levels in the aquifer continued to increase through rainy season. The results of isotopic analysis and groundwater level monitoring showed that the surface water areas are one of the major groundwater sources. On the other hand, concentrations of dissolved Arsenic (filtered by 0.45um) in the pore water of the pond sediments were much higher than the pond water and closed to that of groundwater. Also, other metal elements showed the same trend. This result suggested that Arsenic and other metal elements recharged to these ponds is probably adsorbed and removed by sediments (including organic matters). That is, pond sediment plays an important role for solute transport as a filter of Arsenic and metal elements. The results of this study strongly suggest that the natural and artificial surface water areas have important roles for water cycle and solute transport in Hanoi city. Although the number of the natural water areas is decreasing, dredging of artificial water areas increases the infiltration from the surface to aquifers. Therefore, qualitative and quantitative preservation of the surface water areas is important for conservation of groundwater environment and contribute to sustainable groundwater management in Hanoi city.

Hayashi, Takeshi; Kuroda, Keisuke; Do Thuan, An; Tran Thi Viet, Nga; Takizawa, Satoshi

2013-04-01

258

Water and Carbon Dioxide Adsorption at Olivine Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate water and carbon dioxide adsorption at the (010) surface of five olivine minerals, namely, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), calcio-olivine (Ca2SiO4), tephroite (Mn2SiO4), fayalite (Fe2SiO4), and Co-olivine (Co2SiO4). Adsorption energies per water molecule obtained from energy minimizations varied from -78 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -128 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine at sub-monolayer coverage and became less exothermic as coverage increased. In contrast, carbon dioxide adsorption energies at sub-monolayer coverage ranged from -20 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -59 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine. Therefore, the DFT calculations show a strong driving force for carbon dioxide displacement by water at the surface of all olivine minerals in a competitive adsorption scenario. Additionally, adsorption energies for both water and carbon dioxide were found to be more exothermic for the alkaline-earth (AE) olivines than for the transition-metal (TM) olivines and to not correlate with the solvation enthalpies of the corresponding divalent cations. However, a correlation was obtained with the charge of the surface divalent cation indicating that the more ionic character of the AE cations in the olivine structure relative to the TM cations leads to greater interactions with adsorbed water and carbon dioxide molecules at the surface and thus more exothermic adsorption energies for the AE olivines. For calcio-olivine, which exhibits the highest divalent cation charge of the five olivines, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showed that this effect leads both water and carbon dioxide to react with the surface and form hydroxyl groups and a carbonate-like species, respectively.

Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

2013-11-14

259

Using artificial recharge to restore groundwater / surface water interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intensive use of ground water resources in small alluvial aquifers usually results in a severe depletion of ground water resources and a reduction of the stream discharge. As a result, a loss of ecological dynamics occurs in the riparian areas. In regions where recharge is quite limited because of climatic factors, those situations may endure as long as a wet year does not provide continuous stream discharge and replenishment of ground water resources. Another option to restore the interaction between ground and surface water consists in using reclaimed urban wastewater to recharge the alluvial aquifers. In that way, overall extractions may be partially balanced by returning used water to the ground. Such a situation has been studied in the Onyar River basin (NE Catalonia, Spain; extension: 295 sq km) where a continuous water table drawdown took place after several years of drought. As a consequence, stream discharge was nil, except on those river reaches were treated urban water was dumped. Because of high nutrient concentrations and salinity of treated water, the environmental quality of the riparian system degraded over time. Therefore, aquifer recharge using infiltration ponds (instead of dumping treated water to the stream) can be considered an appropriate action to rise the water table levels and to improve water quality through soil nutrient elimination. Field and laboratory experiments have been conducted to measure infiltration rates and soil solute reduction capability. Preliminary results show that the alluvial sediments of the Onyar basin may perform adequately if treated water is applied. Furthermore, a mathematical flow model allows to estimate water table levels after infiltration, the mass balance between the alluvial aquifer and the stream, and finally the length of the stream that will benefit from recharge. Acknowledgments: Research funded by joint project Fundación AGBAR - ICTA (UAB).

Menció, A.; Vilanova, E.; Mas-Pla, J.

2003-04-01

260

Evidence for the exposure of water ice on Titan's surface.  

PubMed

The smoggy stratosphere of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, veils its surface from view, except at narrow wavelengths centered at 0.83, 0.94, 1.07, 1.28, 1.58, 2.0, 2.9, and 5.0 micrometers. We derived a spectrum of Titan's surface within these "windows" and detected features characteristic of water ice. Therefore, despite the hundreds of meters of organic liquids and solids hypothesized to exist on Titan's surface, its icy bedrock lies extensively exposed. PMID:12714742

Griffith, Caitlin A; Owen, Tobias; Geballe, Thomas R; Rayner, John; Rannou, Pascal

2003-04-25

261

NAWQA RETROSPECTIVE DATABASE FOR NUTRIENTS IN GROUND WATER AND SURFACE WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to describe the status and trends in the quality of the Nations ground- and surface-water resources and to provide a sound understanding of the natural and human factors that affect the quality of these resources. ...

262

Manure Phosphorus and Surface Water Protection I: Basic Concepts of Soil and Water P  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson focuses on the process of eutrophication; the relationship between land application of manure and soil phosphorus (P) dynamics on P delivery to surface waters; and on the P dynamics in water bodies that result in increased P available to aquatic vegetation.

263

Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year  

SciTech Connect

The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy; Kuyumjian, Gregory

2009-09-01

264

Field Evaluation Of Arsenic Speciation In Sediments At The Ground Water/Surface Water Interface  

EPA Science Inventory

The speciation and mineralogy of sediments contaminated with arsenic at the ground water/surface water interface of the Ft. Devens Super Fund Site in Ft. Devens, MA were determined using X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Speciation and mineralog...

265

Evaluation of ATP measurements to detect microbial ingress by wastewater and surface water in drinking water.  

PubMed

Fast and reliable methods are required for monitoring of microbial drinking water quality in order to protect public health. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was investigated as a potential real-time parameter for detecting microbial ingress in drinking water contaminated with wastewater or surface water. To investigate the ability of the ATP assay in detecting different contamination types, the contaminant was diluted with non-chlorinated drinking water. Wastewater, diluted at 10(4) in drinking water, was detected with the ATP assay, as well as 10(2) to 10(3) times diluted surface water. To improve the performance of the ATP assay in detecting microbial ingress in drinking water, different approaches were investigated, i.e. quantifying microbial ATP or applying reagents of different sensitivities to reduce measurement variations; however, none of these approaches contributed significantly in this respect. Compared to traditional microbiological methods, the ATP assay could detect wastewater and surface water in drinking water to a higher degree than total direct counts (TDCs), while both heterotrophic plate counts (HPC 22 °C and HPC 37 °C) and Colilert-18 (Escherichia coli and coliforms) were more sensitive than the ATP measurements, though with much longer response times. Continuous sampling combined with ATP measurements displays definite monitoring potential for microbial drinking water quality, since microbial ingress in drinking water can be detected in real-time with ATP measurements. The ability of the ATP assay to detect microbial ingress is influenced by both the ATP load from the contaminant itself and the ATP concentration in the specific drinking water. Consequently, a low ATP concentration of the specific drinking water facilitates a better detection of a potential contamination of the water supply with the ATP assay. PMID:25086698

Vang, Óluva K; Corfitzen, Charlotte B; Smith, Christian; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

2014-11-01

266

Mate desertion in the snail kite  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mate desertion during the breeding cycle was documented at 28 of 36 (78%) snail kite, Rostrhamus sociabilis nests in Florida between 1979 and 1983. Offspring mortality occurred at only one deserted nest, however. Parents that were deserted by their mates continued to care for their young until independence (3?5 additional weeks) and provided snails at a rate similar to that of both parents combined before desertion. Males and females deserted with nearly equal frequency, except in 1982 when more females deserted. No desertion occurred during drought years, whereas desertion occurred at nearly every nest during favourable conditions. The occurrence of mate desertion was generally related to indirect measures of snail abundance: foraging range, snail delivery rates to the young and growth rates. Small broods were deserted more frequently by females than by males and tended to be deserted earlier than large ones. After desertion, deserters had the opportunity to re-mate and nest again since breeding seasons were commonly lengthy, but whether they did so was impossible to determine conclusively in most cases. The deserted bird sometimes incurred increased energetic costs and lost breeding opportunities during periods of monoparental care.

Beissinger, S.R.; Snyder, N.F.R.

1988-01-01

267

What happens when snails get sick?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scientists used to think that the two major groups of animals, vertebrates and invertebrates, protected themselves from getting sick in very different ways. A new study in snails suggests that both groups' immune systems might be slightly more similar than previously thought.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS; )

2004-07-09

268

The Dispersal of Snails by Birds  

Microsoft Academic Search

I WAS present at a meeting of the Malacological Society last May when Dr. Boycott read a very interesting paper, in which he showed how the small snail Balea perversa occurred on trees, walls, and rocks, but not on the ground. The question arose how it got from tree to tree; and in the resulting discussion the fact was brought

T. D. A. Cockerell

1921-01-01

269

Remote sensing of water basins using optical range - time images of water surface  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper is devoted to the development of remote optical methods for monitoring of sea surface. The technique for creating of large scale optical range - time - intensity optical images (RTI images) of sea surface under grazing angles of observation was developed and the optical system for monitoring of coastal zone and inland water up to some tens kilometers

V. Titov; V. Bakhanov; E. Zuikova; A. Luchinin

2011-01-01

270

Seasonal melting of surface water ice condensing in martian gullies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work we consider when and how much liquid water during present climate is possible within the gullies observed on the surface of Mars. These features are usually found on poleward directed slopes. We analyse the conditions for melting of H2O ice, which seasonally condenses within the gullies. We follow full annual cycle of condensation and sublimation of atmospheric

Konrad J. Kossacki; Wojciech J. Markiewicz

2004-01-01

271

CHARACTERIZING SURFACE WATERS THAT MAY NOT REQUIRE FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

A relatively clean raw surface water can be determined that is amenable to disinfection as the only controlling treatment process. The essential criteria and associated standards are: ecal coliform, 20 organisms/100 mL; Turbidity, 1.0 NTU; Color, 15 ACU; Chlorine Demand, 2 mg/L. ...

272

A cost function for neutralizing acidic Adirondack surface waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cost function for neutralizing acidic surface waters by base addition (liming) is derived based upon constrained cost minimization. The model is estimated using a sample of 547 acidic Adirondack lakes with total costs projected for neutralizing each lake to one of six possible target alkalinity levels. Empirical findings indicate that relatively accurate forecasts of lake neutralization costs can be

Donald Dutkowsky; Fredrick C. Menz

1985-01-01

273

RATES, CONSTANTS, AND KINETICS FORMULATIONS IN SURFACE WATER QUALITY MODELING  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent studies are reviewed to provide a comprehensive volume on state-of-the-art formulations used in surface water quality modeling along with accepted values for rate constants and coefficients. Topics covered include system geometric representation (spatial and temporal), phy...

274

REMOTE MONITORING OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SURFACE WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

This study shows that the intensity of the Raman normalized fluorescence emission induced in surface waters by ultraviolet radiation can be used to provide a unique remote sensing capability for airborne monitoring the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Trace concen...

275

Carbon dioxide supersaturation in the surface waters of lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (COâ) in the surface waters from a large number of lakes (1835) with a worldwide distribution show that only a small proportion of the 4665 samples analyzed (less than 10 percent) were within {+-}20 percent of equilibrium with the atmosphere and that most samples (87 percent) were supersaturated. The mean partial pressure

J. J. Cole; N. F. Caraco; G. W. Kling; T. K. Kratz

1994-01-01

276

Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania  

PubMed Central

Concern has been raised in the scientific literature about the environmental implications of extracting natural gas from deep shale formations, and published studies suggest that shale gas development may affect local groundwater quality. The potential for surface water quality degradation has been discussed in prior work, although no empirical analysis of this issue has been published. The potential for large-scale surface water quality degradation has affected regulatory approaches to shale gas development in some US states, despite the dearth of evidence. This paper conducts a large-scale examination of the extent to which shale gas development activities affect surface water quality. Focusing on the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania, we estimate the effect of shale gas wells and the release of treated shale gas waste by permitted treatment facilities on observed downstream concentrations of chloride (Cl?) and total suspended solids (TSS), controlling for other factors. Results suggest that (i) the treatment of shale gas waste by treatment plants in a watershed raises downstream Cl? concentrations but not TSS concentrations, and (ii) the presence of shale gas wells in a watershed raises downstream TSS concentrations but not Cl? concentrations. These results can inform future voluntary measures taken by shale gas operators and policy approaches taken by regulators to protect surface water quality as the scale of this economically important activity increases. PMID:23479604

Olmstead, Sheila M.; Muehlenbachs, Lucija A.; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Chu, Ziyan; Krupnick, Alan J.

2013-01-01

277

PHOTOREACTIONS IN SURFACE WATERS AND THEIR ROLE IN BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES  

EPA Science Inventory

During the past decade significant interest has developed in the influence of photochemical reactions on biogeochemical cycles in surface waters of lakes and the sea. A major portion of recent research on these photoreactions has focused on the colored component of dissolved org...

278

CONTROLLING STORM WATER RUNOFF WITH TRADABLE CREDITS FOR IMPERVIOUS SURFACES  

EPA Science Inventory

Storm water flow off impervious surface in a watershed can lead to stream degradation, habitat alteration, low base flows and toxic leading. We show that a properly designed tradable runoff credit (TRC) system creates economic incentives for landowners to employ best management p...

279

PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR METALS IN SURFACE WATER, SOIL, AND WASTE  

EPA Science Inventory

This report presents metal partition coefficients for the surface water pathway and for the source model used in the Multimedia, Multi-pathway, Multi-receptor Exposure and Risk Assessment (3MRA) technology under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Partition ...

280

Particle Dry Deposition to Water Surfaces: Processes and Consequences  

E-print Network

- rameters in determining the transfer rate (the deposition velocity) a simple model of particle dry deposition is presented. The model describes the calculation of the rate at which a particle of a given sizeParticle Dry Deposition to Water Surfaces: Processes and Consequences SARA C. PRYOR * and REBECCA J

Pryor, Sara C.

281

Surface water waves and tsunamis By Walter Craig  

E-print Network

, the east coast of the United States, and at Halifax, Nova Scotia. To describe ocean waves we will formulate: Tsunamis, nonlinear surface water waves 1. Tsunamis and ocean waves The name `tsunami' in Japanese of ocean waves which are occasionally generated by movements of the ocean floor. Very infrequently

Craig, Walter

282

Observation of water condensate on hydrophobic micro textured surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We visually observed that a dropwise condensation occurred initially and later changed into a filmwise condensation on hydrophobic textured surface at atmosphere pressure condition. It was observed that the condensate nucleated on the pillar side walls of the micro structure and the bottom wall adhered to the walls and would not be lifted to form a spherical water droplet using environmental scanning electron microscope.

Kim, Ki Wook; Do, Sang Cheol; Ko, Jong Soo; Jeong, Ji Hwan

2013-07-01

283

Assessment of the surface water quality in Northern Greece  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of different multivariate statistical approaches for the interpretation of a large and complex data matrix obtained during a monitoring program of surface waters in Northern Greece is presented in this study. The dataset consists of analytical results from a 3-yr survey conducted in the major river systems (Aliakmon, Axios, Gallikos, Loudias and Strymon) as well as streams, tributaries

V. Simeonov; J. A. Stratis; C. Samara; G. Zachariadis; D. Voutsa; A. Anthemidis; M. Sofoniou; Th. Kouimtzis

2003-01-01

284

Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania.  

PubMed

Concern has been raised in the scientific literature about the environmental implications of extracting natural gas from deep shale formations, and published studies suggest that shale gas development may affect local groundwater quality. The potential for surface water quality degradation has been discussed in prior work, although no empirical analysis of this issue has been published. The potential for large-scale surface water quality degradation has affected regulatory approaches to shale gas development in some US states, despite the dearth of evidence. This paper conducts a large-scale examination of the extent to which shale gas development activities affect surface water quality. Focusing on the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania, we estimate the effect of shale gas wells and the release of treated shale gas waste by permitted treatment facilities on observed downstream concentrations of chloride (Cl(-)) and total suspended solids (TSS), controlling for other factors. Results suggest that (i) the treatment of shale gas waste by treatment plants in a watershed raises downstream Cl(-) concentrations but not TSS concentrations, and (ii) the presence of shale gas wells in a watershed raises downstream TSS concentrations but not Cl(-) concentrations. These results can inform future voluntary measures taken by shale gas operators and policy approaches taken by regulators to protect surface water quality as the scale of this economically important activity increases. PMID:23479604

Olmstead, Sheila M; Muehlenbachs, Lucija A; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Chu, Ziyan; Krupnick, Alan J

2013-03-26

285

Design Methodology of Free Water Surface Constructed Wetlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simple criteria, guidelines and models are established for free water surface (FWS) constructed wetland selection and preliminary sizing. The analysis employs models for FWS constructed wetland design, considering simultaneously the removal requirements and the hydraulics of the system. On the basis of these models, a step-by-step methodology is developed outlining the design procedure for new and performance evaluation for existing

Maria A. Economopoulou; Vassilios A. Tsihrintzis

2004-01-01

286

Allying with armored snails: the complete genome of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont.  

PubMed

Deep-sea vents harbor dense populations of various animals that have their specific symbiotic bacteria. Scaly-foot gastropods, which are snails with mineralized scales covering the sides of its foot, have a gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont in their enlarged esophageal glands and diverse epibionts on the surface of their scales. In this study, we report the complete genome sequencing of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont. The endosymbiont genome displays features consistent with ongoing genome reduction such as large proportions of pseudogenes and insertion elements. The genome encodes functions commonly found in deep-sea vent chemoautotrophs such as sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation. Stable carbon isotope ((13)C)-labeling experiments confirmed the endosymbiont chemoautotrophy. The genome also includes an intact hydrogenase gene cluster that potentially has been horizontally transferred from phylogenetically distant bacteria. Notable findings include the presence and transcription of genes for flagellar assembly, through which proteins are potentially exported from bacterium to the host. Symbionts of snail individuals exhibited extreme genetic homogeneity, showing only two synonymous changes in 19 different genes (13?810 positions in total) determined for 32 individual gastropods collected from a single colony at one time. The extremely low genetic individuality in endosymbionts probably reflects that the stringent symbiont selection by host prevents the random genetic drift in the small population of horizontally transmitted symbiont. This study is the first complete genome analysis of gastropod endosymbiont and offers an opportunity to study genome evolution in a recently evolved endosymbiont. PMID:23924784

Nakagawa, Satoshi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yohey; Murakami, Shun-ichi; Watanabe, Tamaki; Fujiyoshi, So; Mino, Sayaka; Sawabe, Tomoo; Maeda, Takahiro; Makita, Hiroko; Nemoto, Suguru; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Watanabe, Hiromi; Watsuji, Tomo-o; Takai, Ken

2014-01-01

287

Allying with armored snails: the complete genome of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont  

PubMed Central

Deep-sea vents harbor dense populations of various animals that have their specific symbiotic bacteria. Scaly-foot gastropods, which are snails with mineralized scales covering the sides of its foot, have a gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont in their enlarged esophageal glands and diverse epibionts on the surface of their scales. In this study, we report the complete genome sequencing of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont. The endosymbiont genome displays features consistent with ongoing genome reduction such as large proportions of pseudogenes and insertion elements. The genome encodes functions commonly found in deep-sea vent chemoautotrophs such as sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation. Stable carbon isotope (13C)-labeling experiments confirmed the endosymbiont chemoautotrophy. The genome also includes an intact hydrogenase gene cluster that potentially has been horizontally transferred from phylogenetically distant bacteria. Notable findings include the presence and transcription of genes for flagellar assembly, through which proteins are potentially exported from bacterium to the host. Symbionts of snail individuals exhibited extreme genetic homogeneity, showing only two synonymous changes in 19 different genes (13?810 positions in total) determined for 32 individual gastropods collected from a single colony at one time. The extremely low genetic individuality in endosymbionts probably reflects that the stringent symbiont selection by host prevents the random genetic drift in the small population of horizontally transmitted symbiont. This study is the first complete genome analysis of gastropod endosymbiont and offers an opportunity to study genome evolution in a recently evolved endosymbiont. PMID:23924784

Nakagawa, Satoshi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yohey; Murakami, Shun-ichi; Watanabe, Tamaki; Fujiyoshi, So; Mino, Sayaka; Sawabe, Tomoo; Maeda, Takahiro; Makita, Hiroko; Nemoto, Suguru; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Watanabe, Hiromi; Watsuji, Tomo-o; Takai, Ken

2014-01-01

288

Phosphorus: a rate limiting nutrient in surface waters.  

PubMed

Phosphorus is an essential element for all life forms. It is a mineral nutrient. Orthophosphate is the only form of P that autotrophs can assimilate. Extracellular enzymes hydrolyze organic forms of P to phosphate. Eutrophication is the over-enrichment of surface waters with mineral nutrients. The results are excessive production of autotrophs, especially algae and cyanobacteria. This high productivity leads to high bacterial populations and high respiration rates, leading to hypoxia or anoxia in poorly mixed bottom waters and at night in surface waters during calm, warm conditions. Low dissolved oxygen causes the loss of aquatic animals and the release of many materials normally bound to bottom sediments, including various forms of P. This release of P reinforces the eutrophication. Excessive concentrations of P is the most common cause of eutrophication in freshwater lakes, reservoirs, streams, and in the headwaters of estuarine systems. In the ocean, N is believed to usually be the key mineral nutrient controlling primary production. Estuaries and continental shelf waters are a transition zone, in which excessive P and N create problems. It is best to measure and regulate total P inputs to whole aquatic ecosystems, but for an easy assay it is best to measure total P concentrations, including particulate P, in surface waters or N:P atomic ratios in phytoplankton. PMID:10228963

Correll, D L

1999-05-01

289

Numerical simulation of free water surface in pump intake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this paper is to verify the volume of fluid (VOF) method for simulating the free water surface flow in pump intake. With the increasing computer power, VOF method has been becoming a more flexible and accurate choice to replace the conventional fixed water surface method, because it does not require assumptions on the nature of air-water interface. Two examples are presented in this paper. The first example is presented for simulating the growth of air-entrained vortices. LES (Large Eddy Simulation) model, instead of RANS (Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes) turbulence model, is used to capture the peak of circular velocity around the vortex core. Numerical result shows good agreement with the benchmark experiment carried by the Turbomachinery Society of Japan. The second example predicts the flow rate distribution in the pump intake consisting of one opened and two closed channels. VOF result is compared with the conventional fixed water surface method assuming free-slip boundary condition on the fluid interface. The difference of flow pattern in the opened channel indicates that numerical flow field is affected remarkably by the setup of boundary condition at air-water interface.

Zhao, L. J.; Nohmi, M.

2012-11-01

290

Triangulation methods for height profile measurements on instationary water surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The precise measurement of water surface models or profiles plays an important role in experimental hydromechanics. Conventional gauge-based techniques often come with a large instrumental effort and a limited spatial resolution. The paper shows an efficient non-contact photogrammetric technique for the measurement of water-surface profiles, which is based on an extension of the well-known laser light sheet projection technique. While the original laser lightsheet triangulation technique is limited to surfaces with diffuse reflection properties, the developed technique is capable of measuring on reflecting instationary surfaces. This article presents the basic principle, potential and limitations of the method. Several evolution steps of the system with different applicability and different complexity are shown. A double projection plane system capable of simultaneously measuring water surface height and tilt profiles marks the ceiling of the development. Besides the geometrical models of different levels of complexity, system calibration procedures are described. The applicability of the techniques and their accuracy potential are shown in several practical tests.

Mulsow, Christian; Maas, Hans-Gerd; Westfeld, Patrick; Schulze, Matthias

2008-04-01

291

Digenean trematode infections of native freshwater snails and invasive Potamopyrgus antipodarum in the Grand Teton National Park/John D. Rockefeller Memorial Parkway Area.  

PubMed

Outside its native range, the invasive New Zealand mud snail (NZMS), Potamopyrgus antipodarum, is rarely reported to harbor parasites. To test this observation, 7 sites along the Snake River and Polecat Creek in the Grand Teton National Park/John D Rockefeller Memorial Parkway area (Wyoming) were surveyed for native aquatic snails, NZMS, and associated digenean trematodes, in July 2005. At 6 sites, native snails harbored patent digenean infections; within 2 hr, < or =10% of lymnaeid snails shed furcocercariae or xiphidiocercariae, and < or =42% of physid snails released furcocercariae or echinostome cercariae. Partial 18S rDNA sequences were recovered from several furcocercariae. Potamopyrgus antipodarum was present at, and collected from, 5 sites. Polymerase chain reaction assays targeting digenean rDNA sequences in DNA extracted from pools of 150 NZMS snails did not detect parasites. The examination of 960 NZMS by overnight shedding yielded 1 occurrence of (surface-encysted) metacercariae of an unclassified notocotylid (based on 18S and 28S rDNA sequences). The dissection of 150 ethanol-fixed NZMS (30/site) revealed 2 types of digenean metacercariae encysted in tissues of 5 snails from Polecat Creek. Thus, invasive NZMS may serve as first and second intermediate host for digenean parasites. PMID:18576875

Adema, C M; Lun, C-M; Hanelt, B; Seville, R S

2009-02-01

292

Water-Mediated Proton Hopping on an Iron Oxide Surface  

SciTech Connect

The diffusion of hydrogen atoms across solid oxide surfaces is often assumed to be accelerated by the presence of water molecules. Here we present a high-resolution, high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of the diffusion of H atoms on an FeO thin film. STM movies directly reveal a water-mediated hydrogen diffusion mechanism on the oxide surface at temperatures between 100 and 300 kelvin. Density functional theory calculations and isotope-exchange experiments confirm the STM observations, and a proton-transfer mechanism that proceeds via an H3O+-like transition state is revealed. This mechanism differs from that observed previously for rutile TiO2(110), where water dissociation is a key step in proton diffusion.

Merte, L. R.; Peng, Guowen; Bechstein, Ralf; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A.; Grabow, Lars C.; Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Wendt, Stefen; Laegsgaard, E.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

2012-05-18

293

Water-mediated proton hopping on an iron oxide surface.  

PubMed

The diffusion of hydrogen atoms across solid oxide surfaces is often assumed to be accelerated by the presence of water molecules. Here we present a high-resolution, high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of the diffusion of H atoms on an FeO thin film. STM movies directly reveal a water-mediated hydrogen diffusion mechanism on the oxide surface at temperatures between 100 and 300 kelvin. Density functional theory calculations and isotope-exchange experiments confirm the STM observations, and a proton-transfer mechanism that proceeds via an H(3)O(+)-like transition state is revealed. This mechanism differs from that observed previously for rutile TiO(2)(110), where water dissociation is a key step in proton diffusion. PMID:22605771

Merte, Lindsay R; Peng, Guowen; Bechstein, Ralf; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A; Grabow, Lars C; Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Wendt, Stefan; Lægsgaard, Erik; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Flemming

2012-05-18

294

Flow boiling of water on nanocoated surfaces in a microchannel  

E-print Network

Experiments were performed to study the effects of surface wettability on flow boiling of water at atmospheric pressure. The test channel is a single rectangular channel 0.5 mm high, 5 mm wide and 180 mm long. The mass flux was set at 100 kg/m2 s and the base heat flux varied from 30 to 80 kW/m2. Water enters the test channel under subcooled conditions. The samples are silicone oxide (SiOx), titanium (Ti), diamond-like carbon (DLC) and carbon-doped silicon oxide (SiOC) surfaces with static contact angles of 26{\\deg}, 49{\\deg}, 63{\\deg} and 103{\\deg}, respectively. The results show significant impacts of surface wettability on heat transfer coefficient.

Phan, Hai Trieu; Marty, Philippe; Colasson, Stéphane; Gavillet, Jérôme

2010-01-01

295

Freshwater molluscs as indicators of bioavailability and toxicity of metals in surface-water systems.  

PubMed

Freshwater molluscs--snails and bivalves--have been used frequently as bioindicator organisms. With increasing needs for research on contaminant effects in freshwater ecosystems, this kind of biomonitoring is likely to develop further in the future. Molluscs can be used effectively for studies of both organic and inorganic contaminants; this review focuses on studies involving bioaccumulation and toxicity of metals. Two important advantages of snails and bivalves over most other freshwater organisms for biomonitoring research are their large size and limited mobility. In addition, they are abundant in many types of freshwater environments and are relatively easy to collect and identify. At metal concentrations that are within ranges common to natural waters, they are generally effective bioaccumulators of metals. Biomonitoring studies with freshwater molluscs have covered a wide diversity of species, metals, and environments. The principal generalization that can be drawn from this research is that bioaccumulation and toxicity are extremely situation dependent; hence, it is difficult to extrapolate results from any particular study to other situations where the biological species or environmental conditions are different. Even within one species, individual characteristics such as size, life stage, sex, and genotype can have significant effects on responses to contaminants. The bioavailability of the metal is highly variable and depends on pH, presence of organic ligands, water hardness, and numerous other controlling factors. Despite this variability, past studies provide some general principles that can facilitate planning of research with freshwater snails and bivalves as metal bioindicators. These principles may also be useful in understanding and managing freshwater ecosystems. Bioaccumulation of metals in biota is a function of both uptake and depuration. Uptake in molluscs may be through either of two vectors--ingestion of food and other metal-containing substances or through direct adsorption of dissolved constituents. Under some conditions, the bioconcentration factors can be in the range of 10(3) to 10(6), relative to water. Most studies that provide comparisons among taxonomic groups indicate that bioaccumulation in molluscs is greater than that is fish. However, such comparisons should be interpreted with caution because metals tend to be nonuniformly distributed among different organs in both molluscs and fish. Bioaccumulation and acute and chronic toxicity are highly dependent on metal speciation. Mainly because of this influence of metal speciation, toxicity and bioaccumulation do not have a consistent relation to each other. Sensitivity to toxic effects of a metal is likely to be considerably greater in juvenile or larval stages than in adults. PMID:1771274

Elder, J F; Collins, J J

1991-01-01

296

Investigating surface water-well interaction using stable isotope ratios of water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Because surface water can be a source of undesirable water quality in a drinking water well, an understanding of the amount of surface water and its travel time to the well is needed to assess a well's vulnerability. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen in river water at the City of La Crosse, Wisconsin, show peak-to-peak seasonal variation greater than 4??? in 2001 and 2002. This seasonal signal was identified in 7 of 13 city municipal wells, indicating that these 7 wells have appreciable surface water contributions and are potentially vulnerable to contaminants in the surface water. When looking at wells with more than 6 sampling events, a larger variation in ??18O compositions correlated with a larger fraction of surface water, suggesting that samples collected for oxygen isotopic composition over time may be useful for identifying the vulnerability to surface water influence even if a local meteoric water line is not available. A time series of ??18O from one of the municipal wells and from a piezometer located between the river and the municipal well showed that the travel time of flood water to the municipal well was approximately 2 months; non-flood arrival times were on the order of 9 months. Four independent methods were also used to assess time of travel. Three methods (groundwater temperature arrival times at the intermediate piezometer, virus-culture results, and particle tracking using a numerical groundwater-flow model) yielded flood and non-flood travel times of less than 1 year for this site. Age dating of one groundwater sample using 3H-3He methods estimated an age longer than 1 year, but was likely confounded by deviations from piston flow as noted by others. Chlorofluorocarbons and SF6 analyses were not useful at this site due to degradation and contamination, respectively. This work illustrates the utility of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of water to determine the contribution and travel time of surface water in groundwater, and demonstrates the importance of using multiple methods to improve estimates for time of travel of 1 year or less. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Hunt, R.J.; Coplen, T.B.; Haas, N.L.; Saad, D.A.; Borchardt, M.A.

2005-01-01

297

Micro-Satellite Constellation for Global Surface Water Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alsdorf et al. [1] have proposed a Ka band interferometric radar system for global monitoring of surface waters from space. We explore the feasibility of a constellation of micro-satellites with optical sensors measuring the sun's specular reflection by surface waters. Our approach, which is complementary to that of Alsdorf et al., would provide weekly global coverage with a 10m ground spatial resolution if a six micro-satellite constellation used a 0.7° ground swath width and the ADEOS 1 orbital parameters. Optical sensing has three main obstacles; smoke, clouds and canopy structures. The sun's specular reflection provides a signal strength that, from observations, penetrates aerosols with an optical depth approaching 1.0 and provides detection down to perhaps 1/32 of a pixel, which would potentially allow detection of surface waters under many plant canopies. Our system would provide data to help answer Alsdorf's question, "What is the spatial and temporal variability in terrestrial surface water storage, and how can we predict these variations more accurately?" [1] In addition, modifying the arrangement of the satellites in the constellation could potentially provide data on the canopy structure. Including an additional instrument could provide estimates on atmospheric column methane and other estimates of other atmospheric trace gases concentration. [2] [1] D. E. Alsdorf, E. Rodríguez, and D. P. Lettenmaier, "Measuring surface water from space," Rev. Geophys, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 1-24, 2007. [2] North F. Larsen and Knut Stamnes, "Methane detection from space: use of sunglint", Opt. Eng. 45, 016202 (Feb 01, 2006); doi:10.1117/1.2150835

Apperson, A. T.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

2011-12-01

298

Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers.  

PubMed

Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed (1)H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5-10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in faster surface water diffusivity. Another is the concurrent tightening of lipid packing that reduces passive, possibly unwanted, diffusion of ions and water across the bilayer. PMID:25494784

Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Olijve, Luuk L C; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

2014-12-14

299

Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed 1H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5-10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in faster surface water diffusivity. Another is the concurrent tightening of lipid packing that reduces passive, possibly unwanted, diffusion of ions and water across the bilayer.

Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

2014-12-01

300

Water resources data for New Jersey, water year 1992. Volume 1. Surface-water data. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1991-30 September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Water resources data for the 1992 water year for New Jersey consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. The volume of the report contains discharge records for 99 gaging stations; tide summaries for 2 stations; stage and contents for 37 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 95 surface-water sites. Also included are data for 65 crest-stage partial-record stations, 13 tidal crest-stage gages, and 94 low-flow partial-record stations.

Bauersfeld, W.R.; Moshinsky, E.W.; Gurney, C.E.

1993-05-01

301

Diminished Mercury Emission From Water Surfaces by Duckweed (Lemna minor)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aquatic plants of the family Lemnaceae (generally referred to as duckweeds) are a widely distributed type of floating vegetation in freshwater systems. Under suitable conditions, duckweeds form a dense vegetative mat on the water surface, which reduces light penetration into the water column and decreases the amount of exposed water surface. These two factors would be expected to reduce mercury emission by limiting a) direct photoreduction of Hg(II), b) indirect reduction via coupled DOC photooxidation-Hg(II) reduction, and c) gas diffusion across the water-air interface. Conversely, previous studies have demonstrated transpiration of Hg(0) by plants, so it is therefore possible that the floating vegetative mat would enhance emission via transpiration of mercury vapor. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether duckweed limits mercury flux to the atmosphere by shading and the formation of a physical barrier to diffusion, or whether it enhances emission from aquatic systems via transpiration of Hg(0). Deionized water was amended with mercury to achieve a final concentration of approximately 35 ng/L and allowed to equilibrate prior to the experiment. Experiments were conducted in rectangular polystyrene flux chambers with measured UV-B transmittance greater than 60% (spectral cutoff approximately 290 nm). Light was able to penetrate the flux chamber from the sides as well as the top throughout the experiment, limiting the effect of shading by duckweed on the water surface. Flux chambers contained 8L of water with varying percent duckweed cover, and perforated plastic sheeting was used as an abiotic control. Exposures were conducted outside on days with little to no cloud cover. Real time mercury flux was measured using atomic absorption (Mercury Instruments UT-3000). Total solar and ultraviolet radiation, as well as a suite of meteorological parameters, were also measured. Results indicate that duckweed diminishes mercury emission from the water surface as compared to open water controls. Decreases in emission rate varied linearly with percent duckweed cover, with lower fluxes occurring at higher percent cover. Mercury flux in the duckweed treatments as compared to open water treatments decreased from 17% in the lowest percent cover treatment to 67% in the highest percent cover treatment. The observed decrease in mercury emission suggests that duckweed limits emission via the formation of a physical barrier to diffusion.

Wollenberg, J. L.; Peters, S. C.

2007-12-01

302

Overview of Incorporating Ground Water-Surface Water Transition Zones into Ecological Risk Assessments.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The evaluation of the ground water-surface water transition zone (TZ) in the context of site assessments has recently emerged as an issue in the scientific and regulatory community. Concentrations of contaminants in ground water can change over several orders of magnitude within the TZ. The Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) process requires evaluation of exposure and effects to characterize risk. Without knowledge of fate, transport and exposures within the TZ this process is prone to uncertainty. Although contaminated ground water is often evaluated separately from nearby sediments and surface water, these systems are intimately connected. Risk from contaminants in ground water can be evaluated using the existing ERA process. During Problem Formulation, ecosystem characterization can be extended to include TZ. Simple tools are available for conducting the exposure and effects analyses. The approach presented here is based on the assumption that protection levels for benthic and aquatic organisms will also protect transition zone-associated species and has the following steps: (1) consider the TZ when developing the conceptual site model during Problem Formulation at the earliest steps in the ecological risk assessment process; (2) review the available chemistry data for the site; (3) address fate and transport and determine if there is ground water-surface water interaction and exchange at the site; and (4) select assessment and measurement endpoints. The risks from contaminants in groundwater exposure is determined through the following tiered process: (1) comparing existing well, piezometer, or interstitial water concentrations against ambient water quality criteria; (2) evaluating exposure point concentrations in the TZ; and (3) evaluating exposure and effects using organisms (toxicity testing in lab or field; community analysis) or models. This approach, which combines chemical, biological and hydrological measurements, provides a more accurate description of complete exposure pathways in aquatic systems containing contaminated groundwater discharges to a surface water body. It also provides a scientifically defensible approach to determine existing or potential adverse effects.

Greenberg, M. S.; Duncan, P. B.; Black, J. N.; Fuentes, R.; Rosiu, C.; Kathyrn, D.

2004-05-01

303

Optimizing Nanopore Surface Properties for High-Efficiency Water Desalination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As water resources worldwide become rapidly scarcer, it is becoming increasingly important to devise new techniques to obtain clean water from seawater. At present, water purification technologies are limited by costly energy requirements relative to the theoretical thermodynamic limit and by insufficient understanding of the physical processes underlying ion filtration and fluid transport at the molecular scale. New advances in computational materials science offer a promising way to deepen our understanding of these physical phenomena. In this presentation, we describe a new approach for high-efficiency water desalination based on surface-engineered porous materials. This approach is especially relevant for promising technologies such as nanofiltration and membrane distillation, which offers promising advantages over traditional desalination technologies using mesoporous membranes that are only permeable to pure water vapor. More accurate molecular modeling of mesoporous and nanoporous materials represents a key step towards efficient large-scale treatment of seawater. Results regarding the effect of pore properties (surface texture, morphology, density, tortuosity) on desired performance characteristics such as ion selectivity, maximal water flux and energy requirements will be presented.

Cohen-Tanugi, David; Grossman, Jeffrey

2011-03-01

304

Surface water and groundwater interactions in coastal wetlands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Salt marshes are an important wetland system in the upper intertidal zone, interfacing the land and coastal water. Dominated by salt-tolerant plants, these wetlands provide essential eco-environmental services for maintaining coastal biodiversity. They also act as sediment traps and help stabilize the coastline. While they play an active role in moderating greenhouse gas emissions, these wetlands have become increasingly vulnerable to the impact of global climate change. Salt marshes are a complex hydrological system characterized by strong, dynamic interactions between surface water and groundwater, which underpin the wetland's eco-functionality. Bordered with coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur at different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil aeration conditions, which in turn affect marsh plant growth. This talk presents results and findings from recent numerical and experimental studies, focusing on the pore-water flow behaviour in the marsh soil under the influence of tides and density-gradients.

Li, Ling; Xin, Pei; Shen, Chengji

2014-05-01

305

43 CFR Appendix I to Part 11 - Methods for Estimating the Areas of Ground Water and Surface Water Exposure During the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Methods for Estimating the Areas of Ground Water and Surface Water Exposure During the Preassessment...2): 6.9+3.5=10.4 acres. Surface Water The area of surface water resources potentially exposed...

2011-10-01

306

Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface  

SciTech Connect

Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12??m{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

Huang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xiaokang.huang@tqs.com; Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold [TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc., 500 W Renner Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2014-05-15

307

Surface Water Frequency Distribution over the Continental Scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT satellite (QSCAT) is used to detect and monitor surface water changes on the continental United States (CONUS). We developed and implemented an algorithm to detect and map surface soil-moisture frequency for CONUS. QSCAT has a nearly daily coverage over the continental scale allowing an estimate of the spatial distribution of surface water (due to precipitation) frequency. Over CONUS, in-situ soil moisture and other meteorological data are available from field experiments and station networks to verify remote sensing results. Wet surface maps derived from QSCAT data compare well in timing and in spatial pattern with surface measurements of precipitation. Results for summer seasons (mid-May to mid-September) in the last half-decade over CONUS reveal a highly recurrent precipitation pattern over the Midwest with the wettest condition in year 2000 and a severe drought in 2003. In several New England states, summer 2001 experienced the most frequent precipitation-induced surface wetness. Moreover, QSCAT results for surface moisture pattern have been verified by an inter-comparison with Princeton University's LDAS (Land Data Assimilation System) precipitation maps (data courtesy of E. Wood) over the SMEX (Soil Moisture Experiment) region including Iowa and the surrounding states. Thus, QSCAT results can serve as an independent dataset for the inter-comparison of NLDAS (North American Land Data Assimilation System) and GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation System) results. Furthermore, with the large-scale coverage on the daily basis, QSCAT results are useful for flood and drought monitoring and water resource applications.

Nghiem, S. V.

2004-12-01

308

Water resources data, Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C., water year 2000, volume 1. surface-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2000 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 21 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations, discharge only for 27 low-flow partial-record stations, and stage only for 5 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

James, Robert W., Jr.; Saffer, Richard W.; Tallman, Anthony J.

2001-01-01

309

Water resources data Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C.,water year 2005, Volume 1. Surface-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2005 water year for Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 145 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; stage only for 2 tidal gaging station; and water quality at 19 gaging stations. Also included are stage only for 11 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C.

Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Tallman, Anthony J.

2006-01-01

310

Water resources data for Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C, water year 2003, volume 1. surface-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 140 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 17 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 crest-stage partial-record stations and stage only for 10 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C.

James, Robert W., Jr.; Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Tallman, Anthony J.

2003-01-01

311

Water resources data for Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C, water year 2002, Volume 1. surface-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 137 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 28 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 crest-stage partial-record stations and stage only for 8 tidal crest-stage partialrecord stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C.

James, Robert W., Jr.; Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Tallman, Anthony J.

2003-01-01

312

A "First Principles" Potential Energy Surface for Liquid Water from VRT Spectroscopy of Water Clusters  

SciTech Connect

We present results of gas phase cluster and liquid water simulations from the recently determined VRT(ASP-W)III water dimer potential energy surface. VRT(ASP-W)III is shown to not only be a model of high ''spectroscopic'' accuracy for the water dimer, but also makes accurate predictions of vibrational ground-state properties for clusters up through the hexamer. Results of ambient liquid water simulations from VRT(ASP-W)III are compared to those from ab initio Molecular Dynamics, other potentials of ''spectroscopic'' accuracy, and to experiment. The results herein represent the first time that a ''spectroscopic'' potential surface is able to correctly model condensed phase properties of water.

Goldman, N; Leforestier, C; Saykally, R J

2004-05-25

313

Evaluation of human enteric viruses in surface water and drinking water resources in southern Ghana.  

PubMed

An estimated 884 million people worldwide do not have access to an improved drinking water source, and the microbial quality of these sources is often unknown. In this study, a combined tangential flow, hollow fiber ultrafiltration (UF), and real-time PCR method was applied to large volume (100 L) groundwater (N = 4), surface water (N = 9), and finished (i.e., receiving treatment) drinking water (N = 6) samples for the evaluation of human enteric viruses and bacterial indicators. Human enteric viruses including norovirus GI and GII, adenovirus, and polyomavirus were detected in five different samples including one groundwater, three surface water, and one drinking water sample. Total coliforms and Escherichia coli assessed for each sample before and after UF revealed a lack of correlation between bacterial indicators and the presence of human enteric viruses. PMID:21212196

Gibson, Kristen E; Opryszko, Melissa C; Schissler, James T; Guo, Yayi; Schwab, Kellogg J

2011-01-01

314

Surface Seal in the Water-Entry of Hydrophobic Spheres  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine the surface seal phenomenon observed in the water entry of hydrophobic spheres. Using high speed shadowgraph imaging we experimentally investigate the dependence of surface seal time and critical pressure on projectile size, density, and impact velocity. In the initial stage of impact the projectile slams into the free surface projecting a splash curtain upward. As the projectile descends into the fluid, an air cavity forms behind it and eventually pinches off from the atmosphere. Previous studies have primarily focused on the low velocity case where surface seal does not occur and the events above the free surface are often ignored. As the projectile velocity increases, the pressure drop within the cavity increases. Surface seal occurs when this pressure drop exceeds a critical pressure and is characterized by the closure of the splash curtain. The splash curtain domes over and seals the cavity above the free surface. This dome closure emits a downward jet which propagates into the air cavity from above and affects the later cavity dynamics. We present scaling arguments for critical pressure and surface seal time based on our observations.

Jackson, Benjamin; Jung, Sunghwan; Vlachos, Pavlos

2011-11-01

315

Mucus secretion by the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis limits aluminum concentrations of the aqueous environment  

SciTech Connect

Extracellular mucopolysaccharide (EPS) is a significant component in many waters. Its role in the cycling and mobilization of metals is unclear. In vitro studies were conducted to examine the influence of EPS, secreted by the freshwater pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, on soluble water Al concentrations at near-neutral pH. Snails maintained in aerated water of known ion content and added aluminum reduced Al in solution as compared to controls. Although snails accumulated Al into soft tissue, this only accounted for a small percentage of the total reduction. The remaining Al was recovered following acidification of the water. This observation was attributed to pedal EPS secreted by L. stagnalis which is chiefly insoluble and substrate bound. The Al that remained in solution was more labile, possibly due to the influence of soluble EPS. Further experiments with isolated EPS, confirmed that this poorly soluble film binds and reduces Al in solution. The influence of EPS on the solution chemistry and bioavailability of Al and possibly other metals may be important in natural waters.

Jugdaohsingh, R.; Thompson, R.P.H.; Powell, J.J. [St. Thomas Hospital, London (United Kingdom)] [St. Thomas Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Campbell, M.M.; Mccrohan, C.R.; White, K.N. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). School of Biological Sciences] [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). School of Biological Sciences

1998-09-01

316

Remarkable patterns of surface water ordering around polarized buckminsterfullerene  

PubMed Central

Accurate description of water structure affects simulation of protein folding, substrate binding, macromolecular recognition, and complex formation. We study the hydration of buckminsterfullerene, the smallest hydrophobic nanosphere, by molecular dynamics simulations using a state-of-the-art quantum mechanical polarizable force field (QMPFF3), derived from quantum mechanical data at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ(-hp) level augmented by CCSD(T). QMPFF3 calculation of the hydrophobic effect is compared to that obtained with empirical force fields. Using a novel and highly sensitive method, we see polarization increases ordered water structure so that the imprint of the hydrophobic surface atoms on the surrounding waters is stronger and extends to long-range. We see less water order for empirical force fields. The greater order seen with QMPFF3 will affect biological processes through a stronger hydrophobic effect. PMID:21844369

Chopra, Gaurav; Levitt, Michael

2011-01-01

317

Surface-Water and Ground-Water Interactions in the Central Everglades, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recharge and discharge are hydrological processes that cause Everglades surface water to be exchanged for subsurface water in the peat soil and the underlying sand and limestone aquifer. These interactions are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology in the Everglades. Nonetheless, relatively few studies of surface water and ground water interactions have been conducted in the Everglades, especially in its vast interior areas. This report is a product of a cooperative investigation conducted by the USGS and the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) aimed at developing and testing techniques that would provide reliable estimates of recharge and discharge in interior areas of WCA-2A (Water Conservation Area 2A) and several other sites in the central Everglades. The new techniques quantified flow from surface water to the subsurface (recharge) and the opposite (discharge) using (1) Darcy-flux calculations based on measured vertical gradients in hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity of peat; (2) modeling transport through peat and decay of the naturally occurring isotopes 224Ra and 223Ra (with half-lives of 4 and 11 days, respectively); and (3) modeling transport and decay of naturally occurring and 'bomb-pulse' tritium (half-life of 12.4 years) in ground water. Advantages and disadvantages of each method for quantifying recharge and discharge were compared. In addition, spatial and temporal variability of recharge and discharge were evaluated and controlling factors identified. A final goal was to develop appropriately simplified (that is, time averaged) expressions of the results that will be useful in addressing a broad range of hydrological and ecological problems in the Everglades. Results were compared with existing information about water budgets from the South Florida Water Management Model (SFWMM), a principal tool used by the South Florida Water Management District to plan many of the hydrological aspects of the Everglades restoration. A century of water management for flood control and water storage in the Everglades resulted in the creation of the Water Conservation Areas (WCAs). Construction of the major canals began in the 1910s and the systems of levees that enclose the basins and structures that move water between basins were largely completed by the 1950s. The abandoned wetlands that remained outside of the Water Conservation areas tended to dry out and subside by 10 feet or more, which created abrupt transitions in land-surface elevations and water levels across the levees. The increases in topographic and hydraulic gradients near the margins of the WCAs, along with rapid pumping of water between basins to achieve management objectives, have together altered the patterns of recharge and discharge in the Everglades. The most evident change is the increase in the magnitude of recharge (on the upgradient side) and discharge (on the downgradient side) of levees separating WCA-2A from other basins or areas outside. Recharge and discharge in the vast interior of WCA-2A also likely have increased, but fluxes in the interior wetlands are more subtle and more difficult to quantify compared with areas close to the levees. Surface-water and ground-water interactions differ in fundamental ways between wetlands near WCA-2A's boundaries and wetlands in the basin's interior. The levees that form the WCA's boundaries have introduced step functions in the topographic and hydraulic gradients that are important as a force to drive water flow across the wetland ground surface. The resulting recharge and discharge fluxes tend to be unidirectional (connecting points of recharge on the upgradient side of the levee with points of discharge on the downgradient side), and fluxes are also relatively steady in magnitude compared with fluxes in the interior. Recharge flow paths are also relatively deep in their extent near levees, with fluxes passing entirely through the 1-m peat layer and inte

Harvey, Judson W.; Newlin, Jessica T.; Krest, James M.; Choi, Jungyill; Nemeth, Eric A.; Krupa, Steven L.

2004-01-01

318

Evaluation of the Surface-Water Quantity, Surface-Water Quality, and Rainfall Data-Collection Programs in Hawaii, 1994  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report documents the results of an evaluation of the surface-water quantity, surface-water quality, and rainfall data-collection programs in Hawaii. Fourteen specific issues and related goals were identified for the surface-water quantity program and a geographic information systems (GIS) data base was developed summarizing information for all surface-water stream gages that have been operated in Hawaii by the U.S. Geological Survey. Changes in status, which for some gages includes discontinuing operation, need to be considered at 42 sites where data are currently collected. The current surface-water quantity data base was determined to be adequate to address only two of the 14 specific issues and related goals. Alternatives were identified to address the areas where future issues and goals could not be adequately addressed. Options include new and expanded data collection, use of regional regression analyses, hydrologic and hydraulic modeling, and analysis and publication of existing data. A total of 47 streams were identified where additional stream-gaging stations are needed. Evaluation of the surface-water quality program was limited to a description of the U.S. Geological Survey's historical and existing programs and available analyses of data. Limitations of the program are described which primarily included lack of data regarding suspended sediment, land-use effects, quality of stream discharge to oceans, background water quality and nonpoint sources of contamination. Evaluation of the rainfall data program indicated that identified future goals could be discussed as either regional, systems related, current needs, forecasting, water quality, or trend analysis related. To address these goals, data from about 2,000 rain gages, 528 of which are active, are available. Data were found to only partially meet identified goals. Alternatives discussed to address the limitations include the need for more recording gages, primarily in areas of high rainfall. Another area of concern was the potential that many plantations will close and the effect these closings would have on continued operation of the important long-term gages they operate. Evaluation of data-collection programs in Hawaii needs to be an ongoing process. Equally important, data being collected need to be summarized and made available through data bases and published reports.

Fontaine, Richard A.

1996-01-01

319

Climate and pH Predict the Potential Range of the Invasive Apple Snail (Pomacea insularum) in the Southeastern United States  

PubMed Central

Predicting the potential range of invasive species is essential for risk assessment, monitoring, and management, and it can also inform us about a species’ overall potential invasiveness. However, modeling the distribution of invasive species that have not reached their equilibrium distribution can be problematic for many predictive approaches. We apply the modeling approach of maximum entropy (MaxEnt) that is effective with incomplete, presence-only datasets to predict the distribution of the invasive island apple snail, Pomacea insularum. This freshwater snail is native to South America and has been spreading in the USA over the last decade from its initial introductions in Texas and Florida. It has now been documented throughout eight southeastern states. The snail’s extensive consumption of aquatic vegetation and ability to accumulate and transmit algal toxins through the food web heighten concerns about its spread. Our model shows that under current climate conditions the snail should remain mostly confined to the coastal plain of the southeastern USA where it is limited by minimum temperature in the coldest month and precipitation in the warmest quarter. Furthermore, low pH waters (pH <5.5) are detrimental to the snail’s survival and persistence. Of particular note are low-pH blackwater swamps, especially Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia (with a pH below 4 in many areas), which are predicted to preclude the snail’s establishment even though many of these areas are well matched climatically. Our results elucidate the factors that affect the regional distribution of P. insularum, while simultaneously presenting a spatial basis for the prediction of its future spread. Furthermore, the model for this species exemplifies that combining climatic and habitat variables is a powerful way to model distributions of invasive species. PMID:23451090

Byers, James E.; McDowell, William G.; Dodd, Shelley R.; Haynie, Rebecca S.; Pintor, Lauren M.; Wilde, Susan B.

2013-01-01

320

Assembled monolayers of hydrophilic particles on water surfaces.  

PubMed

A facile and quick approach to prepare self-assembled monolayers of water-dispersible particles on the water surface is presented. Particle suspensions in alcohols were dropped on a water reservoir to form long-range ordered monolayers of various particles, including spherical solid particles, soft hydrogel particles, metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanowires, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), nanoplates, and nanosheets. A systematic study was conducted on the variables affecting the monolayer assembly: the solubility parameter of spreading solvents, particle concentration, zeta potential of the particles in the suspension, surface tension of the water phase, hardness of the particles, and addition of a salt in the suspension. This method requires no hydrophobic surface treatment of the particles, which is useful to exploit these monolayer films without changing the native properties of the particles. The study highlights a quick 2D colloidal assembly without cracks in the wafer scale as well as transparent conductive thin films made of SWCNTs and graphenes. PMID:21962177

Moon, Geon Dae; Lee, Tae Il; Kim, Bongsoo; Chae, GeeSung; Kim, Jinook; Kim, SungHee; Myoung, Jae-Min; Jeong, Unyong

2011-11-22

321

Reduction of water surface tension significantly impacts gecko adhesion underwater.  

PubMed

The gecko adhesive system is dependent on weak van der Waals interactions that are multiplied across thousands of fine hair-like structures (setae) on geckos' toe pads. Due to the requirements of van der Waals forces, we expect that any interruption between the setae and substrate, such as a water layer, will compromise adhesion. Our recent results suggest, however, that the air layer (plastron) surrounding the superhydrophobic toe pads aid in expelling water at the contact interface and create strong shear adhesion in water when in contact with hydrophobic surfaces. To test the function of the air plastron, we reduced the surface tension of water using two surfactants, a charged anionic surfactant and a neutral nonionic surfactant. We tested geckos on three substrates: hydrophilic glass and two hydrophobic surfaces, glass with a octadecyl trichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer (OTS-SAM) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). We found that the anionic surfactant inhibited the formation of the air plastron layer and significantly reduced shear adhesion to all three substrates. Interestingly, the air plastron was more stable in the nonionic surfactant treatments than the anionic surfactant treatments and we found that geckos adhered better in the nonionic surfactant than in the anionic surfactant on OTS-SAM and PTFE but not on glass. Our results have implications for the evolution of a superhydrophobic toe pad and highlight some of the challenges faced in designing synthetic adhesives that mimic geckos' toes. PMID:24944119

Stark, Alyssa Y; McClung, Brandon; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

2014-12-01

322

Surface-water exposure to quinoxyfen: Assessment in landscape vineyards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryProtection of surface- and ground-water quality is critical for economic viability, as well as for human health and the environment. Furthermore, maintenance of the biodiversity of natural aquatic ecosystems is very important. The objective of this paper is to report methodology developed for the assessment of the surface-water exposure to pesticide using as example the fungicide quinoxyfen because persistent, lipophylic and hazard for the aquatic organisms. Exposure monitoring was carried out over two years (2005 and 2006) following historical and subsequent applications in Italian vineyards and to investigate the presence of residue in non-target areas close to the crop receiving repeated applications. After development of the monitoring procedures, surface-water contamination and biota exposure were determined during and after field treatments. Very low concentrations were found in sediments, often in contradiction with model and laboratory results, leading to the conclusion that even the historical use of quinoxyfen in vineyards within the catchment was not contaminating sediment in water bodies, which was regarded as the natural sink for such a pesticide due to its strong sorptive properties. For biota, quinoxyfen residues in benthic macroinvertebrates and fish in the vast majority of the samples were below the corresponding limit of detection (LOD). Thus long-term accumulation of quinoxyfen in sediments and organisms of the aquatic ecosystems would not be expected due main to the environmental conditions of the landscape that mitigate the overall exposure.

Merli, Annalisa; Reeves, Graham; Meregalli, Giovanna; Piccinini, Armando; Negri, Ilaria; Carmignano, Pasquale; Balderacchi, Matteo; Capri, Ettore

2010-03-01

323

Determination of antibiotic residues in manure, soil, and surface waters  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the last years more and more often detections of antimicrobially active compounds ("antibiotics") in surface waters have been reported. As a possible input pathway in most cases municipal sewage has been discussed. But as an input from the realm of agriculture is conceivable as well, in this study it should be investigated if an input can occur via the pathway application of liquid manure on fields with the subsequent mechanisms surface run-off/interflow, leaching, and drift. For this purpose a series of surface waters, soils, and liquid manures from North Rhine-Westphalia (Northwestern Germany) were sampled and analyzed for up to 29 compounds by HPLC-MS/MS. In each of the surface waters antibiotics could be detected. The highest concentrations were found in samples from spring (300 ng/L of erythromycin). Some of the substances detected (e.g., tylosin), as well as characteristics in the landscape suggest an input from agriculture in some particular cases. In the investigation of different liquid manure samples by a fast immunoassay method sulfadimidine could be detected in the range of 1...2 mg/kg. Soil that had been fertilized with this liquid manure showed a content of sulfadimidine extractable by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of 15 ??g/kg dry weight even 7 months after the application. This indicates the high stability of some antibiotics in manure and soil.

Christian, T.; Schneider, R.J.; Farber, H.A.; Skutlarek, D.; Meyer, M.T.; Goldbach, H.E.

2003-01-01

324

The polarization patterns of skylight reflected off wave water surface.  

PubMed

In this paper we propose a model to understand the polarization patterns of skylight when reflected off the surface of waves. The semi-empirical Rayleigh model is used to analyze the polarization of scattered skylight; the Harrison and Coombes model is used to analyze light radiance distribution; and the Cox-Munk model and Mueller matrix are used to analyze reflections from wave surface. First, we calculate the polarization patterns and intensity distribution of light reflected off wave surface. Then we investigate their relationship with incident radiation, solar zenith angle, wind speed and wind direction. Our results show that the polarization patterns of reflected skylight from waves and flat water are different, while skylight reflected on both kinds of water is generally highly polarized at the Brewster angle and the polarization direction is approximately parallel to the water's surface. The backward-reflecting Brewster zone has a relatively low reflectance and a high DOP in all observing directions. This can be used to optimally diminish the reflected skylight and avoid sunglint in ocean optics measurements. PMID:24514848

Zhou, Guanhua; Xu, Wujian; Niu, Chunyue; Zhao, Huijie

2013-12-30

325

Sewage sludge application in a plantation: effects on trace metal transfer in soil-plant-snail continuum.  

PubMed

We studied the potential bioaccumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd by the snail Cantareus aspersus and evaluated the risk of leaching after application of sewage sludge to forest plantation ecosystems. Sewage sludge was applied to the soil surface at two loading rates (0, and 6 tons ha(-1) in dry matter) without incorporation into the soil so as to identify the sources of trace metal contamination in soil and plants and to evaluate effects on snail growth. The results indicated a snail mortality rate of less than 1% during the experiment, while their dry weight decreased significantly (<0.001) in all treatment modalities. Thus, snails showed no acute toxicity symptoms after soil amendment with sewage sludge over the exposure period considered. Additions of sewage sludge led to higher levels of trace metals in forest litter compared to control subplots, but similar trace metal concentrations were observed in sampling plants. Bioaccumulation study demonstrated that Zn had not accumulated in snails compared to Cu which accumulated only after 28 days of exposure to amended subplots. However, Pb and Cd contents in snails increased significantly after 14 and 28 days of exposure in both the control and amended subplots. At the last sampling date, in comparison to controls the Cd increase was higher in snails exposed to amended subplots. Thus, sludge spread therefore appears to be responsible for the observed bioaccumulation for Cu and Cd after 28days of exposure. Concerning Pb accumulation, the results from litter-soil-plant compartments suggest that soil is this metal's best transfer source. PMID:25262293

Bourioug, Mohamed; Gimbert, Frédéric; Alaoui-Sehmer, Laurence; Benbrahim, Mohammed; Aleya, Lotfi; Alaoui-Sossé, Badr

2015-01-01

326

The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

Farrell, William M.

2011-01-01

327

Disconnected surface water and groundwater: from theory to practice.  

PubMed

When describing the hydraulic relationship between rivers and aquifers, the term disconnected is frequently misunderstood or used in an incorrect way. The problem is compounded by the fact that there is no definitive literature on the topic of disconnected surface water and groundwater. We aim at closing this gap and begin the discussion with a short introduction to the historical background of the terminology. Even though a conceptual illustration of a disconnected system was published by Meinzer (1923), it is only within the last few years that the underlying physics of the disconnection process has been described. The importance of disconnected systems, however, is not widely appreciated. Although rarely explicitly stated, many approaches for predicting the impacts of groundwater development on surface water resources assume full connection. Furthermore, management policies often suggest that surface water and groundwater should only be managed jointly if they are connected. However, although lowering the water table beneath a disconnected section of a river will not change the infiltration rate at that point, it can increase the length of stream that is disconnected. Because knowing the state of connection is of fundamental importance for sustainable water management, robust field methods that allow the identification of the state of connection are required. Currently, disconnection is identified by showing that the infiltration rate from a stream to an underlying aquifer is independent of the water table position or by identifying an unsaturated zone under the stream. More field studies are required to develop better methods for the identification of disconnection and to quantify the implications of heterogeneity and clogging processes in the streambed on disconnection. PMID:20849421

Brunner, Philip; Cook, Peter G; Simmons, Craig T

2011-01-01

328

The impact of land use on microbial surface water pollution.  

PubMed

Our knowledge relating to water contamination from point and diffuse sources has increased in recent years and there have been many studies undertaken focusing on effluent from sewage plants or combined sewer overflows. However, there is still only a limited amount of microbial data on non-point sources leading to diffuse pollution of surface waters. In this study, the concentrations of several indicator micro-organisms and pathogens in the upper reaches of a river system were examined over a period of 16 months. In addition to bacteria, diffuse pollution caused by Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. was analysed. A single land use type predestined to cause high concentrations of all microbial parameters could not be identified. The influence of different land use types varies between microbial species. The microbial concentration in river water cannot be explained by stable non-point effluent concentrations from different land use types. There is variation in the ranking of the potential of different land use types resulting in surface water contamination with regard to minimum, median and maximum effects. These differences between median and maximum impact indicate that small-scale events like spreading manure substantially influence the general contamination potential of a land use type and may cause increasing micro-organism concentrations in the river water by mobilisation during the next rainfall event. PMID:25456147

Schreiber, Christiane; Rechenburg, Andrea; Rind, Esther; Kistemann, Thomas

2014-10-01

329

Measuring the true height of water films on surfaces.  

PubMed

Measuring the level of hydrophilicity of heterogeneous surfaces and the true height of water layers that form on them in hydrated conditions has a myriad of applications in a wide range of scientific and technological fields. Here, we describe a true non-contact mode of operation of atomic force microscopy in ambient conditions and a method to establish the source of apparent height. A dependency of the measured water height on operational parameters is identified with water perturbations due to uncontrolled modes of imaging where intermittent contact with the water layer, or even the surface, might occur. In this paper we show how to (1) determine when the water is being perturbed and (2) distinguish between four different interaction regimes. Each of the four types of interaction produces measurements ranging from fractions of the true height in one extreme to values which are as large as four times the real height in the other. We show the dependence of apparent height on the interaction regime both theoretically and empirically. The agreement between theory and experiment on a BaF2(111) sample displaying wet and un-wet regions validates our results. PMID:22025083

Santos, Sergio; Verdaguer, Albert; Souier, Tewfic; Thomson, Neil H; Chiesa, Matteo

2011-11-18

330

Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water.  

PubMed

When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1?mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10??m; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ~ 100??m; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ~ 2?m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet. PMID:25623086

Umeki, Takahiro; Ohata, Masahiko; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

2015-01-01

331

Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water  

E-print Network

When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 $\\mu\\,{\\rm m}$; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10$\\sim$100 $\\mu{\\rm m}$; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1$\\sim$2 m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet.

Takahiro Umeki; Masahiko Ohata; Hiizu Nakanishi; Masatoshi Ichikawa

2015-01-03

332

Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water  

PubMed Central

When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1?mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10??m; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ~ 100??m; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ~ 2?m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet. PMID:25623086

Umeki, Takahiro; Ohata, Masahiko; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

2015-01-01

333

The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves  

E-print Network

The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better tha...

Moldabayev, Daulet; Dutykh, Denys

2014-01-01

334

Oxidation of a polycrystalline titanium surface by oxygen and water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reactions of a well-characterized polycrystalline titanium surface with oxygen and water molecules at 150-850 K were studied in UHV by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and Fourier transform reflectance-absorption infrared spectroscopy (FT-RAIRS). At 150 K, O 2 oxidizes Ti 0 to Ti IV, Ti III and Ti II, but Ti exposure to H 2O at this temperature produces only Ti II species. At temperatures above 300 K, further oxidation of Ti by H 2O was observed. Maximum oxidation by either molecule is achieved at 550-600 K. Upon heating the oxidized titanium above 850 K, the oxide layer is completely reduced to Ti 0. Hydroxyl species are identified on the Ti surface after reaction with H 2O; they appear to be mostly hydrogen bonded between 250 and 350 K, and isolated in the 450-650 K surface temperature range. Depth profiling of the O 2-oxidized Ti surface shows that Ti IV/Ti III species account for about 20% of the total thickness of the oxide layers and are located near the surface, while Ti II has a broader distribution, and is concentrated close to the oxide-metal interface. The OH group concentration is maximized at 550 K on the sample surface and accounts for about 16% of the total surface oxygen, with a decreasing concentration of OH into the bulk of the titanium oxides.

Lu, Gang; Bernasek, Steven L.; Schwartz, Jeffrey

2000-06-01

335

Soil Moisture: The Hydrologic Interface Between Surface and Ground Waters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A hypothesis is presented that many hydrologic processes display a unique signature that is detectable with microwave remote sensing. These signatures are in the form of the spatial and temporal distributions of surface soil moisture. The specific hydrologic processes that may be detected include groundwater recharge and discharge zones, storm runoff contributing areas, regions of potential and less than potential evapotranspiration (ET), and information about the hydrologic properties of soils. In basin and hillslope hydrology, soil moisture is the interface between surface and ground waters.

Engman, Edwin T.

1997-01-01

336

Simulating piecewise-linear surface water and ground water interactions with MODFLOW.  

PubMed

The standard MODFLOW packages offer limited capabilities to model piecewise-linear boundary conditions to describe ground water-surface water interaction. Specifically, MODFLOW is incapable of representing a Cauchy-type boundary with different resistances for discharge or recharge conditions. Such a more sophisticated Cauchy boundary condition is needed to properly represent surface waters alternatively losing water through the bottom (high resistance) or gaining water mostly near the water surface (low resistance). One solution would be to create a new package for MODFLOW to accomplish this. However, it is also possible to combine multiple instances of standard packages in a single cell to the same effect. In this specific example, the general head boundary package is combined with the drain package to arrive at the desired piecewise-linear behavior. In doing so, the standard USGS MODFLOW version can be used without any modifications at the expense of a minor increase in preprocessing and postprocessing and computational effort. The extra preprocessing for creating the input and extra postprocessing to determine the water balance in terms of the physical entities from the MODFLOW cell fluxes per package can be taken care of by a user interface. PMID:19473274

Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan

2009-01-01

337

Utilizing an Automated Home-Built Surface Plasmon Resonance Apparatus to Investigate How Water Interacts with a Hydrophobic Surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By definition hydrophobic substances hate water. Water placed on a hydrophobic surface will form a drop in order to minimize its contact area. What happens when water is forced into contact with a hydrophobic surface? One theory is that an ultra-thin low- density region forms near the surface. We have employed an automated home-built Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) apparatus to investigate this boundary.

Poynor, Adele

2011-03-01

338

"Probing the Molecular and Chemical Properties of Acids at Water Surfaces"  

E-print Network

"Probing the Molecular and Chemical Properties of Acids at Water Surfaces" Prof. Geri Richmond behavior of nitric acid on a water surface relative to its bonding and acidic behavior in bulk water dynamics calculations. We find that nitric acid orients and bonds to a water surface in a way

Richmond, Geraldine L.

339

DEVELOPMENT OF GIARDIA C.T VALUES FOR THE SURFACE WATER TREATMENT RULE  

EPA Science Inventory

As a consequence of the 1986 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) the U.S. EPA has issued a Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR) for systems using surface and ground waters under the direct influence of surface water. n the Guidance Manual of the SWTR, the EPA recommen...

340

Impact of river restoration on groundwater - surface water - interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the end of the 19th century, flood protection was increasingly based on the construction of impermeable dams and side walls (BWG, 2003). In spite of providing flood protection, these measures also limited the connectivity between the river and the land, restricted the area available for flooding, and hampered the natural flow dynamics of the river. Apart from the debilitating effect on riverine ecosystems due to loss of habitats, these measures also limited bank filtration, inhibited the infiltration of storm water, and affected groundwater-surface water-interactions. This in turn had a profound effect on ecosystem health, as a lack of groundwater-surface water interactions led to decreased cycling of pollutants and nutrients in the hyporheic zone and limited the moderation of the water temperature (EA, 2009). In recent decades, it has become apparent that further damages to riverine ecosystems must be prohibited, as the damages to ecology, economy and society surmount any benefits gained from exploiting them. Nowadays, the restoration of rivers is a globally accepted means to restore ecosystem functioning, protect water resources and amend flood protection (Andrea et al., 2012; Palmer et al., 2005; Wortley et al., 2013). In spite of huge efforts regarding the restoration of rivers over the last 30 years, the question of its effectiveness remains, as river restorations often reconstruct a naturally looking rather than a naturally functioning stream (EA, 2009). We therefore focussed our research on the effectiveness of river restorations, represented by the groundwater-surface water-interactions. Given a sufficiently high groundwater level, a lack of groundwater-surface water-interactions after restoration may indicate that the vertical connectivity in the stream was not fully restored. In order to investigate groundwater-surface water-interactions we determined the thermal signature on the stream bed and in +/- 40 cm depth by using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS), a fibre optical method for temperature determination over long distances (Selker et al., 2006). Thermal signatures were determined in a small urban stream before and after restoration and compared to streams in natural and near-natural settings. BWG BUNDESAMT FÜR WASSER UND GEOLOGIE, 2003. Die Geschichte des Hochwasserschutzes in der Schweiz. Bericht des BWG, Serie Wasser. Biel. 208 p. EA ENVIRONMENT AGENCY (UK), 2009. The Hyporheic Handbook: A handbook on the groundwater-surface water interface and hyporheic zone for environment managers. Bristol. 280 p. ANDREA, F., GSCHÖPF, C., BLASCHKE, A.P., WEIGELHOFER, G., AND RECKENDORFER, W., 2012. Ecological niche models for the evaluation of management options in urban floodplain - conservation vs. restoration purposes. Environ. Sci. Policy, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2012.08.011. PALMER, M.A., BERNHARDT, E.S., ALLAN, J.D., LAKE, P.S., ALEXANDER, G., BROOKS, S., CARR, J., CLAYTON, S., DAHM, C.N., FOLLSTAD SHAH, J., GALAT, D.L., LOSS, S.G., GOODWIN, P., HART, D.D., HASSETT, B., JENKINSON, R., KONDOLF, G.M., LAVE, R., MEYER, J.L., O`DONNELL, T.K., PAGANO, L. AND SUDDUTH, E., 2005. Standards for ecologically successful river restoration. Journal of Applied Ecology, 42, pp. 208 - 217. DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2005.01004.x. WORTLEY, L., HERO, J-M., HOWES, M., 2013. Evaluating Ecological Restoration Success: A Review of the Literature. Restoration Ecology, 21 (5), pp. 537 - 543. DOI 10.1111/rec.12028. SELKER, J.S., THEVENAZ, L., HUWALD, H., MALLET, A., LUXEMBURG, W., VAN DE GIESEN, N., STEJSKAL, M., ZEMAN, J., WESTHOFF, M., AND PARLANGE, M.B., 2006. Distributed fibre-optic temperature sensing for hydrologic systems. Water Resources Research, 42(12), W12202.

Kurth, Anne-Marie; Schirmer, Mario

2014-05-01

341

Surface Water Quality as Affected by Sugarcane Residue Management Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the impacts of three sugarcane residue management techniques, namely postharvest burning of residue (BR),\\u000a shredding of residue (SR), and full postharvest retention of residue (RR), on the water quality of surface runoff from February\\u000a 2006 to September 2007 in Iberia, LA. Total runoff volumes recorded were 58,418, 57,923, and 46,578 L for the BR, SR, and\\u000a RR treatments,

Theophilus K. Udeigwe; Jim J. Wang; Howard P. Viator; Lewis Gaston

2010-01-01

342

Surface water risk assessment of pesticides in Ethiopia.  

PubMed

Scenarios for future use in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia were designed for 3 separate Ethiopian locations, which are aimed to be protective for the whole of Ethiopia. The scenarios estimate concentrations in surface water resulting from agricultural use of pesticides for a small stream and for two types of small ponds. Seven selected pesticides were selected since they were estimated to bear the highest risk to humans on the basis of volume of use, application rate and acute and chronic human toxicity, assuming exposure as a result of the consumption of surface water. Potential ecotoxicological risks were not considered as a selection criterion at this stage. Estimates of exposure concentrations in surface water were established using modelling software also applied in the EU registration procedure (PRZM and TOXSWA). Input variables included physico-chemical properties, and data such as crop calendars, irrigation schedules, meteorological information and detailed application data which were specifically tailored to the Ethiopian situation. The results indicate that for all the pesticides investigated the acute human risk resulting from the consumption of surface water is low to negligible, whereas agricultural use of chlorothalonil, deltamethrin, endosulfan and malathion in some crops may result in medium to high risk to aquatic species. The predicted environmental concentration estimates are based on procedures similar to procedures used at the EU level and in the USA. Addition of aquatic macrophytes as an ecotoxicological endpoint may constitute a welcome future addition to the risk assessment procedure. Implementation of the methods used for risk characterization constitutes a good step forward in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia. PMID:25481716

Teklu, Berhan M; Adriaanse, Paulien I; Ter Horst, Mechteld M S; Deneer, John W; Van den Brink, Paul J

2015-03-01

343

Perfluorinated Surfactants in Surface and Drinking Waters (9 pp)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background, Aim and Scope  \\u000a In this paper recent results are provided of an investigation on the discovery of 12 perfluorinated surfactants (PS) in different\\u000a surface and drinking waters (Skutlarek et al. 2006 a, Skutlarek et al. 2006 b). In the last years, many studies have reported\\u000a ubiquitous distribution of this group of perfluorinated chemicals, especially perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic

Martin Exner; Harald Färber

2006-01-01

344

Physiological and biochemical responses to cold and drought in the rock-dwelling pulmonate snail, Chondrina avenacea.  

PubMed

The pulmonate snail Chondrina avenacea lives on exposed rock walls where it experiences drastic daily and seasonal fluctuations of abiotic conditions and food availability. We found that tolerance to dry conditions was maintained at a very high level throughout the year and was mainly based on the snails' ability to promptly enter into estivation (quiescence) whenever they experienced drying out of their environment. Snails rapidly suppressed their metabolism and minimized their water loss using discontinuous gas exchange pattern. The metabolic suppression probably included periods of tissue hypoxia and anaerobism as indicated by accumulation of typical end products of anaerobic metabolism: lactate, alanine and succinate. Though the drought-induced metabolic suppression was sufficient to stimulate moderate increase of supercooling capacity, the seasonally highest levels of supercooling capacity and the highest tolerance to subzero temperatures were tightly linked to hibernation (diapause). Hibernating snails did not survive freezing of their body fluids and instead relied on supercooling strategy which allowed them to survive when air temperatures dropped to as low as -21 °C. No accumulation of low-molecular weight compounds (potential cryoprotectants) was detected in hibernating snails except for small amounts of the end products of anaerobic metabolism. PMID:23516021

Koštál, Vladimír; Rozsypal, Jan; Pech, Pavel; Zahradní?ková, Helena; Šimek, Petr

2013-08-01

345

Macro-invertebrate decline in surface water polluted with imidacloprid.  

PubMed

Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expected that surface water pollution with imidacloprid would negatively impact aquatic ecosystems. Availability of extensive monitoring data on the abundance of aquatic macro-invertebrate species, and on imidacloprid concentrations in surface water in the Netherlands enabled us to test this hypothesis. Our regression analysis showed a significant negative relationship (P<0.001) between macro-invertebrate abundance and imidacloprid concentration for all species pooled. A significant negative relationship was also found for the orders Amphipoda, Basommatophora, Diptera, Ephemeroptera and Isopoda, and for several species separately. The order Odonata had a negative relationship very close to the significance threshold of 0.05 (P = 0.051). However, in accordance with previous research, a positive relationship was found for the order Actinedida. We used the monitoring field data to test whether the existing three water quality norms for imidacloprid in the Netherlands are protective in real conditions. Our data show that macrofauna abundance drops sharply between 13 and 67 ng l(-1). For aquatic ecosystem protection, two of the norms are not protective at all while the strictest norm of 13 ng l(-1) (MTR) seems somewhat protective. In addition to the existing experimental evidence on the negative effects of imidacloprid on invertebrate life, our study, based on data from large-scale field monitoring during multiple years, shows that serious concern about the far-reaching consequences of the abundant use of imidacloprid for aquatic ecosystems is justified. PMID:23650513

Van Dijk, Tessa C; Van Staalduinen, Marja A; Van der Sluijs, Jeroen P

2013-01-01

346

Macro-Invertebrate Decline in Surface Water Polluted with Imidacloprid  

PubMed Central

Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expected that surface water pollution with imidacloprid would negatively impact aquatic ecosystems. Availability of extensive monitoring data on the abundance of aquatic macro-invertebrate species, and on imidacloprid concentrations in surface water in the Netherlands enabled us to test this hypothesis. Our regression analysis showed a significant negative relationship (P<0.001) between macro-invertebrate abundance and imidacloprid concentration for all species pooled. A significant negative relationship was also found for the orders Amphipoda, Basommatophora, Diptera, Ephemeroptera and Isopoda, and for several species separately. The order Odonata had a negative relationship very close to the significance threshold of 0.05 (P?=?0.051). However, in accordance with previous research, a positive relationship was found for the order Actinedida. We used the monitoring field data to test whether the existing three water quality norms for imidacloprid in the Netherlands are protective in real conditions. Our data show that macrofauna abundance drops sharply between 13 and 67 ng l?1. For aquatic ecosystem protection, two of the norms are not protective at all while the strictest norm of 13 ng l?1 (MTR) seems somewhat protective. In addition to the existing experimental evidence on the negative effects of imidacloprid on invertebrate life, our study, based on data from large-scale field monitoring during multiple years, shows that serious concern about the far-reaching consequences of the abundant use of imidacloprid for aquatic ecosystems is justified. PMID:23650513

Van Dijk, Tessa C.; Van Staalduinen, Marja A.; Van der Sluijs, Jeroen P.

2013-01-01

347

Local order of liquid water at metallic electrode surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the structure and dynamics of liquid water in contact with Pd and Au (111) surfaces using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with and without van der Waals interactions. Our results show that the structure of water at the interface of these two metals is very different. For Pd, we observe the formation of two different domains of preferred orientations, with opposite net interfacial dipoles. One of these two domains has a large degree of in-plane hexagonal order. For Au, a single domain exists with no in-plane order. For both metals, the structure of liquid water at the interface is strongly dependent on the use of dispersion forces. The origin of the structural domains observed in Pd is associated to the interplay between water/water and water/metal interactions. This effect is strongly dependent on the charge transfer that occurs at the interface and which is not modeled by current state of the art semi-empirical force fields.

Pedroza, Luana S.; Poissier, Adrien; Fernández-Serra, M.-V.

2015-01-01

348

Probing the hydration water diffusion of macromolecular surfaces and interfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We probe the translational dynamics of the hydration water surrounding the macromolecular surfaces of selected polyelectrolytes, lipid vesicles and intrinsically disordered proteins with site specificity in aqueous solutions. These measurements are made possible by the recent development of a new instrumental and methodological approach based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This technique selectively amplifies 1H NMR signals of hydration water around a spin label that is attached to a molecular site of interest. The selective 1H NMR amplification within molecular length scales of a spin label is achieved by utilizing short-distance range (~r-3) magnetic dipolar interactions between the 1H spin of water and the electron spin of a nitroxide radical-based label. Key features include the fact that only minute quantities (<10 ?l) and dilute (>=100 ?M) sample concentrations are needed. There is no size limit on the macromolecule or molecular assembly to be analyzed. Hydration water with translational correlation times between 10 and 800 ps is measured within ~10 Å distance of the spin label, encompassing the typical thickness of a hydration layer with three water molecules across. The hydration water moving within this time scale has significant implications, as this is what is modulated whenever macromolecules or molecular assemblies undergo interactions, binding or conformational changes. We demonstrate, with the examples of polymer complexation, protein aggregation and lipid-polymer interaction, that the measurements of interfacial hydration dynamics can sensitively and site specifically probe macromolecular interactions.

Ortony, Julia H.; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Franck, John M.; Kausik, Ravinath; Pavlova, Anna; Hunt, Jasmine; Han, Songi

2011-01-01

349

Local order of liquid water at metallic electrode surfaces.  

PubMed

We study the structure and dynamics of liquid water in contact with Pd and Au (111) surfaces using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with and without van der Waals interactions. Our results show that the structure of water at the interface of these two metals is very different. For Pd, we observe the formation of two different domains of preferred orientations, with opposite net interfacial dipoles. One of these two domains has a large degree of in-plane hexagonal order. For Au, a single domain exists with no in-plane order. For both metals, the structure of liquid water at the interface is strongly dependent on the use of dispersion forces. The origin of the structural domains observed in Pd is associated to the interplay between water/water and water/metal interactions. This effect is strongly dependent on the charge transfer that occurs at the interface and which is not modeled by current state of the art semi-empirical force fields. PMID:25612724

Pedroza, Luana S; Poissier, Adrien; Fernández-Serra, M-V

2015-01-21

350

Nitrate reducing activity pervades surface waters during upwelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nitrate reducing activity (NRA) is known to be mediated by microaerophilic to anaerobic bacteria and generally occurs in the sub-surface waters. However, we hypothesize that NRA could become prominent in the surface waters during upwelling. Hence, we examined nitrification and nitrate reduction along with hydrographic and environmental parameters off Trivandrum and Kochi, south-west-India in June 2010. Shoaling isolines of temperature, density, and nutrients revealed the onset of upwelling off Trivandrum. Shoaling of these signatures was absent in the northern transect off Kochi. The degree of nutrient consumption (DNC) was low emphasizing the presence of newly upwelled water off Trivandrum. A significant increase in NRA (df = 1, p < 0.05) was observed off Trivandrum than at Kochi. Moreover, as hypothesized, NRA at Trivandrum was pronounced at the surface with a maximum rate of 0.85 (± 0.02) ?mol L1 h- 1 nearshore which was ~ 29 × higher than that at Kochi. Further, an inverse relationship between NRA and NO3- concentration (n = 34, r = - 0.415, p < 0.01) suggested transformation of the upwelled nutrient. Nitrification/NRA was ~ 10 × lower at 0.28 off Trivandrum indicating a discernible shift towards reduction. Such contribution from bacterial activity could be a response towards restoration of homeostasis.

Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Halarnekar, Reena; Malik, Ashish; Vijayan, Vijitha; Varik, Sandesh; Kumari, Ritu; V. K., Jineesh; Gauns, Manguesh U.; Nair, Shanta; LokaBharathi, P. A.

2014-09-01

351

Remote surface water monitoring radio based telemetry system  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Department of EG&G Rocky Flats has designed and developed a unique Remote Surface Water Monitoring System using radio telemetry hardware and computer control software. The system is based on new technologies in microelectronics and envirorunental monitoring sensors. An engineering team, headed up by the Surface Water Division at EG&G, has proven that with careful evaluation of new technologies and hardware components, a reliable, cost effective and graphical user interface (GUI) system can be designed and installed. The network utilizes standard industrial control hardware and off-the-shelf components in order to meet several time requirements outlined by an Interagency Agreement (IAG) between the Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and state and local authorities. In addition, the system had to meet tight environmental specifications and procedures. The Rocky Flats Plant is part of the U.S. Department of Energy Weapons Complex and is located near the Denver metropolitan area. The plant is required by law, and Interagency Agreement, to maintain strict environmental standards for surface water monitoring and discharge characteristics, including the requirement for utilization of best available technology.

Goodwin, W.L.; Baxter, D.

1993-02-01

352

SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA A.K. Mohanty, K. Mahesh Kumar, B. A. Prakash and V.V.S. Gurunadha Rao Ecology and Environment Group National Geophysical Research Institute, (CSIR) Hyderabad - 500 606, India E-mail:atulyakumarmohanty@yahoo.com Abstract: Hyderabad Metropolitan Development Authority has taken up restoration of urban lakes around Hyderabad city under Green

A. K. Mohanty

2009-01-01

353

Mean surface water balance over Africa and its interannual variability  

SciTech Connect

This article presents calculations of surface water balance for the African continent using a revised version of the Lettau climatonomy. Calculations are based on approximately 1400 rainfall stations, with records generally covering 60 yr or longer. Continental maps of evapotranspiration. runoff, and soil moisture are derived for January, July, and the annual mean. The model is also used to provide a gross estimate of the interannual variability of these parameters over most of the continent and local water balance calculations for a variety of locations in Africa. The results are compared with four other comprehensive global water balance studies. The results of this study are being used to produce a gridded dataset for the continent, with potential applications for numerical modeling studies. 50 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

Nicholson, S.E.; Kim, J.; Ba, M.B. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)] [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Lare, A.R. [NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

1997-12-01

354

Observations of water vapor ions at the lunar surface.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Apollo 14 Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment observed a series of bursts of 48.6 eV water vapor ions at the lunar surface during a 14-hr period on Mar. 7, 1971. The maximum flux observed was 100 million ions per sq cm per sec per sr. These ions were also observed at Apollo 12, 183 km to the west. Evaluation of specific artificial sources including the Apollo missions and the Russian Lunokhod leads to the conclusion that the water vapor did not come from a man-made source. Natural sources exogenous to the moon such as comets and the solar wind are also found to be inadequate to explain the observed fluxes. Consequently, these water vapor ions appear to be of lunar origin.-

Freeman, J. W., Jr.; Hills, H. K.; Lindeman, R. A.; Vondrak, R. R.

1973-01-01

355

Evaporating behaviors of water droplet on superhydrophobic surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated the dynamic evaporating behaviors of water droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces with micropillars. Our experimental data showed that receding contact angles of the water droplet increased with the decreasing of the scale of the micropillars during evaporation, even though the solid area fractions of the microstructured substrates remained constant. We also experimentally found that the critical contact diameters of the transition between the Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel states are affected not only by the geometrical parameters of the microstructures, but also by the initial volume of the water droplet. The measured critical pressure is consistent with the theoretical model, which validated the pressure-induced impalement mechanism for the wetting state transition.

Hao, PengFei; Lv, CunJing; He, Feng

2012-12-01

356

The antidepressants venlafaxine ("Effexor") and fluoxetine ("Prozac") produce different effects on locomotion in two species of marine snail, the oyster drill (Urosalpinx cinerea) and the starsnail (Lithopoma americanum).  

PubMed

Human antidepressants have been previously shown to induce foot detachment from the substrate in aquatic snails. Prior to foot detachment, antidepressants also affect snail crawling speed. We tested two commonly prescribed antidepressants, venlafaxine ("Effexor") and fluoxetine ("Prozac") on crawling speed and time to reach the air-water interface in two species of marine snail, the oyster drill Urosalpinx cinerea and the American starsnail Lithopoma americanum. Exposure to venlafaxine increased crawling speed in both species, while fluoxetine slowed them down. Our lowest LOEC (lowest observed effect concentration) was 31.3 ?g/L venlafaxine in Urosalpinx. Similarly, snails (L. americanum) exposed to venlafaxine tended to move faster and more often to the air-water interface, but exposure to fluoxetine slowed them down. Our lowest LOEC was 345 ?g/L fluoxetine in Lithopoma. These results indicate that venlafaxine boosts locomotion, while fluoxetine reduces it, and both behaviors are preludes to foot detachment. The different effects of these two antidepressants on snail locomotion suggest differing physiological mechanisms of action in marine snails as well as possible ecological consequences. PMID:25481651

Fong, Peter P; Bury, Taylor B; Dworkin-Brodsky, Abigail D; Jasion, Christina M; Kell, Rose C

2015-02-01

357

Effect of Radiant Energy on Near-Surface Water  

PubMed Central

While recent research on interfacial water has focused mainly on the few interfacial layers adjacent to the solid boundary, century-old studies have extensively shown that macroscopic domains of liquids near interfaces acquire features different from the bulk. Interest in these long-range effects has been rekindled by recent observations showing that colloidal and molecular solutes are excluded from extensive regions next to many hydrophilic surfaces [Zheng and Pollack Phys. Rev. E 2003, 68, 031408]. Studies of these aqueous “exclusion zones” reveal a more ordered phase than bulk water, with local charge separation between the exclusion zones and the regions beyond [Zheng et al. Colloid Interface Sci. 2006, 127, 19; Zheng and Pollack Water and the Cell: Solute exclusion and potential distribution near hydrophilic surfaces; Springer: Netherlands, 2006; pp 165–174], here confirmed using pH measurements. The main question, however, is where the energy for building these charged, low-entropy zones might come from. It is shown that radiant energy profoundly expands these zones in a reversible, wavelength-dependent manner. It appears that incident radiant energy may be stored in the water as entropy loss and charge separation. PMID:19827846

Chai, Binghua; Yoo, Hyok; Pollack, Gerald H.

2010-01-01

358

[Performance of treatment wetland systems for surface water quality improvement].  

PubMed

Intercropped with Phragmites communis and Typha angustifolia, subsurface flow constructed wetland systems (CWs) with the surface area of 3 x 20m x 2m were established beside Guanting Reservoir, an important source water base of Beijing. The treatment performance of the systems with different season were studied, the impacts of influent concentration, hydraulic loading rate and water temperature on contaminations removal were analyzed. The result showed that the subsurface flow CWs had the better decontamination effect to micro-pollution surface water. The relationship between the concentrations of CODMn and NH4+ -N in inflow and outflow followed the linear equation. The removal rates of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) in the systems were 20%-60% and 30%-45%, respectively. The removal rates of contaminations were reduced with the decrease of water temperature and the increase of hydraulic loading rate, the removal rates of CODMn, N4+ -N and TN showed the positive correlation with their inflow concentration, but the removal rate of TP showed the negative correlation with its inflow concentration. Operation and management considerations of the subsurface flow CWs in winter were investigated in this study. PMID:15515938

Liu, Hong; Dai, Ming-li; Liu, Xue-yan; Ouyang, Wei; Liu, Pei-bin

2004-07-01

359

Sea, ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery has been extremely useful in understanding the tidal water movements in a large estuary such as Cook Inlet. As more imagery obtained during various tidal stages become available it appears that complex and fast changing micro-circulation patterns develop in various regions of Cook Inlet during each advancing and receding tide. More ERTS-1 synoptic imagery is needed to fully understand the effect of the approach of tidal front on the water movements in the various regions through the estuary. The conventional onboard ship data gathered during various cruises although revealed the overall circulation pattern in Cook Inlet but failed to show micro-subgyres which develop in various regions during each tide which are discernible on ther ERTS-1 imagery. Suspended load distribution in the Bering Sea during summer varies significantly. In areas of phytoplankton bloom and at the river mouths the suspended load is higher than the 1 mg/1 which is found over most areas. The influence of major rivers on temperature, salinity, and suspended load in surface water as well as at shallow depth is apparent. On the Bering shelf a strong pycnocline generally at depth 10-20 m is formed by surface fresh water flow which retains sediment in suspension over extended periods.

Sharma, G. D.; Wright, F. F.; Burns, J. J. (principal investigators)

1973-01-01

360

Reconnaissance of selected PPCP compounds in Costa Rican surface waters.  

PubMed

Eighty-six water samples were collected in early 2009 from Costa Rican surface water and coastal locations for the analysis of 34 pharmaceutical and personal care product compounds (PPCPs). Sampling sites included areas receiving treated and untreated wastewaters, and urban and rural runoff. PPCPs were analyzed using a combination of solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The five most frequently detected compounds were doxycycline (77%), sulfadimethoxine (43%), salicylic acid (41%), triclosan (34%) and caffeine (29%). Caffeine had the maximum concentration of 1.1 mg L(-1), possibly due to coffee bean production facilities upstream. Other compounds found in high concentrations include: doxycycline (74 ?g L(-1)), ibuprofen (37 ?g L(-1)), gemfibrozil (17 ?g L(-1)), acetominophen (13 ?g L(-1)) and ketoprofen (10 ?g L(-1)). The wastewater effluent collected from an oxidation pond had similar detection and concentrations of compounds compared to other studies reported in the literature. Waters receiving runoff from a nearby hospital showed higher concentrations than other areas for many PPCPs. Both caffeine and carbamazepine were found in low frequency compared to other studies, likely due to enhanced degradation and low usage, respectively. Overall concentrations of PPCPs in surface waters of Costa Rica are inline with currently reported occurrence data from around the world, with the exception of doxycycline. PMID:22048020

Spongberg, Alison L; Witter, Jason D; Acuña, Jenaro; Vargas, José; Murillo, Manuel; Umaña, Gerardo; Gómez, Eddy; Perez, Greivin

2011-12-15

361

Organochlorine and organophosphorous pesticide residues in ground water and surface waters of Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey undertaken in Kanpur, northern India, has shown the presence of high concentrations of both organochlorine and organophosphorous pesticides in the surface and ground water samples. Liquid–liquid extraction followed by GC-ECD was used for the determination of these compounds. Among the various pesticides analyzed, high concentrations of ?-HCH (0.259 ?g\\/l) and malathion (2.618 ?g\\/l) were detected in the surface

Nalini Sankararamakrishnan; Ajit Kumar Sharma; Rashmi Sanghi

2005-01-01

362

Organic acids enhance halogen activation on mildly acidic water surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Iodine species of marine origin are ubiquitous in the marine boundary layer (MBL). They are found over the open ocean (even in the absence of biogenic sources), the Antarctic coast, in rain, aerosols, ice, and snow, and participate in HOx/NOx cycles in the MBL. Surface-active organic acids coating the surface marine microlayer (SML) and marine aerosols could affect their chemical/physical properties. Recent field measurements show that organic acids represent ˜50% of the mass of fog waters collected in the US Gulf Coast. Here we report that I2(g) emissions from the heterogeneous reactions of O3(g) with I- (aq) are dramatically enhanced in the presence of surface-active organic acids under mildly acidic condition that are typical of fine marine aerosols. The amphiphilic weak carboxylic acids appear to promote I2(g) emissions by donating the interfacial protons more efficiently than water itself. We infer that the organic acids coating aerosol particles ejected from ocean's surface films could enhance I2(g) production in the MBL.

Hayase, S.; Enami, S.; Yabushita, A.; Kawasaki, M.; Hoffmann, M. R.; Colussi, A. J.

2011-12-01

363

Water  

MedlinePLUS

... to groundwater (the fresh water found under the Earth’s surface that supplies wells and springs). Everything that ... body is water. 4. How much of the earth’s surface is water? About 80 percent of the ...

364

An integrable evolution equation for surface waves in deep water  

E-print Network

In order to describe the dynamics of monochromatic surface waves in deep water, we derive a nonlinear and dispersive system of equations for the free surface elevation and the free surface velocity from the Euler equations in infinite depth. From it, and using a multiscale perturbative methods, an asymptotic model for small-aspect-ratio waves is derived. The model is shown to be completely integrable. The Lax pair, the first conserved quantities as well as the symmetries are exhibited. Theoretical and numerical studies reveal that it supports periodic progressive Stokes waves which peak and break in finite time. Comparison between the limiting wave solution of the asymptotic model and classical irrotational results is performed.

R. Kraenkel; H. Leblond; M. A. Manna

2011-01-30

365

Occurrence of perchlorate in drinking water, groundwater, surface water and human saliva from India.  

PubMed

Perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)), which is used as an oxidizer in jet and rocket fuels, pyrotechnic devices and explosives, is a widespread contaminant in surface waters and groundwater of many countries. Perchlorate is known to affect thyroid function. Despite the compound's widespread occurrence and potential health effects, perchlorate levels in drinking water in India are not known. In this study, water samples collected from 13 locations in six states (n=66), and saliva samples collected from four locations in three states (n=74) in India, were analyzed for perchlorate using high performance liquid chromatography interfaced with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Perchlorate was detected in most (76%) of the water samples analyzed at concentrations above the quantitation limit of 0.02 microg L(-1); concentrations ranged from <0.02 to 6.9 microg L(-1) (mean: 0.42+/-1.1 microg L(-1); median: 0.07 microg L(-1)). Mean concentrations of perchlorate in drinking water, groundwater, bottled water, surface water and rain water were 0.1, 1.0, <0.02, 0.05 and <0.02 microg L(-1), respectively. From a total of 66 water samples analyzed, only three samples contained perchlorate levels above 1 microg L(-1); all three were groundwater samples. Perchlorate was found in the saliva samples analyzed at concentrations above 0.2 microg L(-1) and up to 4.7 microg L(-1) (mean: 1.3+/-1.3 microg L(-1); median: 0.91 microug L(-1)). No remarkable differences in perchlorate concentrations were found among the sampling locations of water or saliva or in subgroups stratified by gender or age. Perchlorate concentrations in water samples from India are one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations reported for the United States. PMID:19328520

Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Praamsma, Meredith L; Oldi, John F; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Sinha, Ravindra K

2009-06-01

366

Major carbon-14 deficiency in modern snail shells from southern Nevada springs  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-14 contents as low as 3.3 +/- 0.2% modern (apparent age, 27,000 years) measured from the shells of snails Melanoides tuberculatus living in artesian springs in southern Nevada are attributed to fixation of dissolved HCO/sub 3//sup -/ with which the shells are in carbon isotope equilibrium. Recognition of the existence of such extreme deficiencies is necessary so that erroneous ages are not attributed to fresh water biogenic carbonates. 2 figures, 1 table.

Riggs, A.C.

1984-04-06

367

The Biological Control of the Snail Hosts of Schistosomes: The Role of Competitor Snails and Biological Invasions  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Biological control of the snail hosts of schistosomes has been ­considered in the last few decades as an alternative to molluscicides.\\u000a Several groups of organisms have been proposed to control snail hosts, but very few have proven their efficacy in the field.\\u000a Competitor snails can be considered as the most efficient biological control agents and numerous promising laboratory studies\\u000a and

Jean-Pierre Pointier; Patrice David; Philippe Jarne

368

Water resources data for Florida, water year 1992. Volume 1A. Northeast florida surface water. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1991-30 September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Water resources data for 1992 water year for northeast Florida include continuous or daily discharge for 140 streams, periodic discharge for 10 streams, miscellaneous discharge for 14 streams, continuous or daily stage for 32 streams, continuous or daily tide stage for 3 sites, periodic stage for 23 streams, peak discharge for 3 stream, and peak stage for 11 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 36 lakes, periodic elevations for 47 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 75 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 123 wells, and miscellaneous water-level measurements for 864 wells; quality-of-water data for 38 surface-water sites and 66 wells.

Not Available

1993-04-01

369

The toxicity and physiological effects of copper on the freshwater pulmonate snail, Lymnaea stagnalis.  

PubMed

Several recent studies have demonstrated that the freshwater pulmonate snail Lymnaea stagnalis is extremely sensitive to metals (Co, Ni, Pb) in chronic exposures. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the acute and chronic sensitivity of L. stagnalis to Cu and investigate the underlying mechanism(s) of toxic action. A 96-h LC50 of 31?g L(-1) Cu was estimated indicating L. stagnalis was moderately acutely sensitive to Cu relative to other aquatic organisms. However, in a 30-day chronic exposure using juvenile snails an EC20 of 1.8?g L(-1) Cu was estimated for snail growth making L. stagnalis the most sensitive organism tested to date for Cu. Hardness-based and BLM-based water quality criteria for Cu at the water quality conditions used in this study were 7.8 and 1.5?g L(-1), respectively, indicating L. stagnalis is significantly under-protected by hardness-based WQC. Investigations into the mechanism(s) of toxic action for Cu were conducted on young adult snails necessitating higher Cu exposures. Exposure to Cu at 12?g L(-1) resulted in no detectable effects on hemolymph osmolality, net Ca(2+) uptake, titratable acid excretion, or ammonia excretion. Exposure to 48?g L(-1) Cu was shown to significantly reduce (91%) net Ca(2+) uptake which is strongly correlated with shell deposition and corresponding snail growth. Snails exposed to 48?g L(-1) Cu also exhibited reduced ammonia excretion, a marked hemolymph acidosis, and a compensatory increase in titratable acid excretion. The reduction in net Ca(2+) uptake was hypothesized to be a secondary effect of Cu-induced inhibition of carbonic anhydrase, but no reduction in carbonic anhydrase activity was detected. Overall, it remains unclear whether inhibition of Ca(2+) uptake is a direct result of Cu exposure or, along with the other observed physiological effects, is secondary to an unidentified primary mode of toxic action. Given the hypersensitivity of L. stagnalis to Cu, further study into the mechanisms of action and effects of varying water chemistry on Cu toxicity is clearly warranted. PMID:21723419

Brix, Kevin V; Esbaugh, Andrew J; Grosell, Martin

2011-09-01

370

Remote sensing of surface water for environmental flows  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental flows represent water management activities that release flushes of water stored in dams on regulated rivers during dry periods. These flows aim to mimic natural flow and inundation regimes to maintain ecological health and function of rivers and wetlands. Assessment and understanding of the effectiveness of environmental flows requires quantification of temporal and spatial pattern of surface water and inundation dynamic in a synoptic yet detailed way and understanding dynamics of vegetation response to flooding. Here we focused on the on the entire Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia as a case study. The MDB is a large semi-arid region with scarce water resources, high hydroclimatic variability and competing water demands, impacted by climate change, altered flow regimes and land use changes. The basin covers 14% of the Australian continent and contains the nation's largest river system, important groundwater systems, and represents the most important agricultural area in the country. We used Landsat TM and ETM+ data time series to synoptically map the dynamic of surface water extent with an internally consistent algorithm over decades. Within the basin-wide study area we carried out a detailed investigation of the largest river red gum forest in the world, a key site for environmental flow and conservation management. Here we tracked the response of vegetation community condition to flooding across space and time. Results show high interannual variability in number and size of flooded areas. Vegetation community response to flooding varied in space and time and with vegetation types, densities and location relative to areas frequently inundated by environmental water release. Knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamic of flooding and the response of vegetation communities to flooding is important for management of floodplain wetlands and vegetation communities and for investigating effectiveness of environmental flows and flow regimes in the MDB. Historic flood inundation extent mapped via remote sensing can be used to quantify spatially explicit changes in vegetation communities as outcomes of management scenarios and allow managers to evaluate landscape-scale changes in species distribution in response to water management decisions. This methodology is globally applicable and relevant to areas with competing water demands (e.g., Nile river basin in Northern Africa, Okavango River delta in southwest Africa, Mekong River Basin, Southeast Asia).

Tulbure, M. G.; Kingsford, R.; Lucas, R.; Keith, D.

2013-12-01

371

A novel structural class of toxins: the methionine-rich peptides from the venoms of turrid marine snails (Mollusca, Conoidea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this investigation was to purify and characterize polypeptides from the venom ducts of the turrid snails Polystira albida and Gemmula periscelida (superfamily: Conoidea, family: Turridae), collected in Mexican waters. Venoms of other groups in the superfamily (family: Conidae, genus: Conus) have peptide toxins (‘conotoxins’), but no venom components have been characterized from any turrid species. Crude venoms

Estuardo López-Vera; Edgar P Heimer de la Cotera; Mar??a Maillo; Juan R Riesgo-Escovar; Baldomero M Olivera; Manuel B Aguilar

2004-01-01

372

Identification of optimum scopes of environmental factors for snails using spatial analysis techniques in Dongting Lake Region, China  

PubMed Central

Background Owing to the harmfulness and seriousness of Schistosomiasis japonica in China, the control and prevention of S. japonica transmission are imperative. As the unique intermediate host of this disease, Oncomelania hupensis plays an important role in the transmission. It has been reported that the snail population in Qiangliang Lake district, Dongting Lake Region has been naturally declining and is slowly becoming extinct. Considering the changes of environmental factors that may cause this phenomenon, we try to explore the relationship between circumstance elements and snails, and then search for the possible optimum scopes of environmental factors for snails. Methods Moisture content of soil, pH, temperature of soil and elevation were collected by corresponding apparatus in the study sites. The LISA statistic and GWR model were used to analyze the association between factors and mean snail density, and the values in high-high clustered areas and low-low clustered areas were extracted to find out the possible optimum ranges of these elements for snails. Results A total of 8,589 snail specimens were collected from 397 sampling sites in the study field. Besides the mean snail density, three environmental factors including water content, pH and temperature had high spatial autocorrelation. The spatial clustering suggested that the possible optimum scopes of moisture content, pH, temperature of the soil and elevation were 58.70 to 68.93%, 6.80 to 7.80, 22.73 to 24.23°C and 23.50 to 25.97 m, respectively. Moreover, the GWR model showed that the possible optimum ranges of these four factors were 36.58 to 61.08%, 6.541 to 6.89, 24.30 to 25.70°C and 23.50 to 29.44 m, respectively. Conclusion The results indicated the association between snails and environmental factors was not linear but U-shaped. Considering the results of two analysis methods, the possible optimum scopes of moisture content, pH, temperature of the soil and elevation were 58.70% to 68.93%, 6.6 to 7.0, 22.73°C to 24.23°C, and 23.5 m to 26.0 m, respectively. The findings in this research will help in making an effective strategy to control snails and provide a method to analyze other factors. PMID:24886456

2014-01-01

373

Ground-water and surface-water flow and estimated water budget for Lake Seminole, southwestern Georgia and northwestern Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Lake Seminole is a 37,600-acre impoundment formed at the confluence of the Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers along the Georgia?Florida State line. Outflow from Lake Seminole through Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam provides headwater to the Apalachicola River, which is a major supply of freshwater, nutrients, and detritus to ecosystems downstream. These rivers,together with their tributaries, are hydraulically connected to karst limestone units that constitute most of the Upper Floridan aquifer and to a chemically weathered residuum of undifferentiated overburden. The ground-water flow system near Lake Seminole consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer and undifferentiated overburden. The aquifer is confined below by low-permeability sediments of the Lisbon Formation and, generally, is semiconfined above by undifferentiated overburden. Ground-water flow within the Upper Floridan aquifer is unconfined or semiconfined and discharges at discrete points by springflow or diffuse leakage into streams and other surface-water bodies. The high degree of connectivity between the Upper Floridan aquifer and surface-water bodies is limited to the upper Eocene Ocala Limestone and younger units that are in contact with streams in the Lake Seminole area. The impoundment of Lake Seminole inundated natural stream channels and other low-lying areas near streams and raised the water-level altitude of the Upper Floridan aquifer near the lake to nearly that of the lake, about 77 feet. Surface-water inflow from the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers and Spring Creek and outflow to the Apalachicola River through Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam dominate the water budget for Lake Seminole. About 81 percent of the total water-budget inflow consists of surface water; about 18 percent is ground water, and the remaining 1 percent is lake precipitation. Similarly, lake outflow consists of about 89 percent surface water, as flow to the Apalachicola River through Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, about 4 percent ground water, and about 2 percent lake evaporation. Measurement error and uncertainty in flux calculations cause a flow imbalance of about 4 percent between inflow and outflow water-budget components. Most of this error can be attributed to errors in estimating ground-water discharge from the lake, which was calculated using a ground-water model calibrated to October 1986 conditions for the entire Apalachicola?Chattahoochee?Flint River Basin and not just the area around Lake Seminole. Evaporation rates were determined using the preferred, but mathematically complex, energy budget and five empirical equations: Priestley-Taylor, Penman, DeBruin-Keijman, Papadakis, and the Priestley-Taylor used by the Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network. Empirical equations require a significant amount of data but are relatively easy to calculate and compare well to long-term average annual (April 2000?March 2001) pan evaporation, which is 65 inches. Calculated annual lake evaporation, for the study period, using the energy-budget method was 67.2 inches, which overestimated long-term average annual pan evaporation by 2.2 inches. The empirical equations did not compare well with the energy-budget method during the 18-month study period, with average differences in computed evaporation using each equation ranging from 8 to 26 percent. The empirical equations also compared poorly with long-term average annual pan evaporation, with average differences in evaporation ranging from 3 to 23 percent. Energy budget and long-term average annual pan evaporation estimates did compare well, with only a 3-percent difference between estimates. Monthly evaporation estimates using all methods ranged from 0.7 to 9.5 inches and were lowest during December 2000 and highest during May 2000. Although the energy budget is generally the preferred method, the dominance of surface water in the Lake Seminole water budget makes the method inaccurate and difficult to use, because surface water makes up m

Dalton, Melinda S.; Aulenbach, Brent T.; Torak, Lynn J.

2004-01-01

374

A new device for collecting time-integrated water samples from springs and surface water bodies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new device termed the 'seepage sampler' was developed to collect representative water samples from springs, streams, and other surface-water bodies. The sampler collects composite, time-integrated water samples over short (hours) or extended (weeks) periods without causing significant changes to the chemical composition of the samples. The water sample within the sampler remains at the ambient temperature of the water body and does not need to be cooled. Seepage samplers are inexpensive to construct and easy to use. A sampling program of numerous springs and/or streams can be designed at a relatively low cost through the use of these samplers. Transient solutes migrating through such flow systems, potentially unnoticed by periodic sampling, may be detected. In addition, the mass loading of solutes (e.g., agrichemicals) may be determined when seepage samplers are used in conjunction with discharge measurements.

Panno, S.V.; Krapac, I.G.; Keefer, D.A.

1998-01-01

375

Incorporating groundwater-surface water interaction into river management models.  

PubMed

Accurate representation of groundwater-surface water interactions is critical to modeling low river flows in the semi-arid southwestern United States. Although a number of groundwater-surface water models exist, they are seldom integrated with river operation/management models. A link between the object-oriented river and reservoir operations model, RiverWare, and the groundwater model, MODFLOW, was developed to incorporate groundwater-surface water interaction processes, such as river seepage/gains, riparian evapotranspiration, and irrigation return flows, into a rule-based water allocations model. An explicit approach is used in which the two models run in tandem, exchanging data once in each computational time step. Because the MODFLOW grid is typically at a finer resolution than RiverWare objects, the linked model employs spatial interpolation and summation for compatible communication of exchanged variables. The performance of the linked model is illustrated through two applications in the Middle Rio Grande Basin in New Mexico where overappropriation impacts endangered species habitats. In one application, the linked model results are compared with historical data; the other illustrates use of the linked model for determining management strategies needed to attain an in-stream flow target. The flows predicted by the linked model at gauge locations are reasonably accurate except during a few very low flow periods when discrepancies may be attributable to stream gaging uncertainties or inaccurate documentation of diversions. The linked model accounted for complex diversions, releases, groundwater pumpage, irrigation return flows, and seepage between the groundwater system and canals/drains to achieve a schedule of releases that satisfied the in-stream target flow. PMID:20412319

Valerio, Allison; Rajaram, Harihar; Zagona, Edith

2010-01-01

376

The convoluted evolution of snail chirality  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The direction that a snail (Mollusca: Gastropoda) coils, whether dextral (right-handed) or sinistral (left-handed), originates in early development but is most easily observed in the shell form of the adult. Here, we review recent progress in understanding snail chirality from genetic, developmental and ecological perspectives. In the few species that have been characterized, chirality is determined by a single genetic locus with delayed inheritance, which means that the genotype is expressed in the mother's offspring. Although research lags behind the studies of asymmetry in the mouse and nematode, attempts to isolate the loci involved in snail chirality have begun, with the final aim of understanding how the axis of left-right asymmetry is established. In nature, most snail taxa (>90%) are dextral, but sinistrality is known from mutant individuals, populations within dextral species, entirely sinistral species, genera and even families. Ordinarily, it is expected that strong frequency-dependent selection should act against the establishment of new chiral types because the chiral minority have difficulty finding a suitable mating partner (their genitalia are on the ‘wrong’ side). Mixed populations should therefore not persist. Intriguingly, however, a very few land snail species, notably the subgenus Amphidromus sensu stricto, not only appear to mate randomly between different chiral types, but also have a stable, within-population chiral dimorphism, which suggests the involvement of a balancing factor. At the other end of the spectrum, in many species, different chiral types are unable to mate and so could be reproductively isolated from one another. However, while empirical data, models and simulations have indicated that chiral reversal must sometimes occur, it is rarely likely to lead to so-called ‘single-gene’ speciation. Nevertheless, chiral reversal could still be a contributing factor to speciation (or to divergence after speciation) when reproductive character displacement is involved. Understanding the establishment of chirality, the preponderance of dextral species and the rare instances of stable dimorphism is an important target for future research. Since the genetics of chirality have been studied in only a few pulmonate species, we also urge that more taxa, especially those from the sea, should be investigated.

Schilthuizen, M.; Davison, A.

2005-11-01

377

Surface water and ground-water thresholds for maintaining Populus– Salix forests, San Pedro River, Arizona  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground-water and surface flow depletions are altering riparian ecosystems throughout the southwestern United States, and have contributed to the decline of forests of the pioneer trees Populus fremontii (Fremont cottonwood) and Salix gooddingii (Goodding willow). On some rivers, these forests have been replaced by shrublands of Tamarix ramosissima (tamarisk), a drought-tolerant species from Eurasia. The physiological response of these three

S. J. Lite; J. C. Stromberg

2005-01-01

378

Stable isotope investigation of the Columbus, Ohio, water supply by examining precipitation, tap water, and surface/reservoir waters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Management of our water resources requires that human intervention as well as natural processes in the hydrologic cycle be fully understood, and integrated watershed management strategies be implemented to monitor variation and to maximize water resources. In this study of regional water supply, we utilize the stable isotopes of water to characterize the flow and relative residence time of water within a human-dominated watershed-reservoir system. Tap water, precipitation, and water from three reservoirs used for domestic water supply were collected in Franklin County, Ohio, from August 2010 until July 2011. Samples were analyzed for ?18O and ?D by a Picarro WS-CRDS Analyzer for Isotopic Water - Model L1102-i at The Ohio State University. Reservoir waters (?18O= -9.0% to -4.8% and ?D= -61% to -30%) are more enriched during the spring/summer months and more depleted during the fall/winter months, following changes in precipitation and capacity of each reservoir. Tap water samples (?18O= -9.1% to -4.3% and ?D= -58% to -29%), distributed from the Dublin Road Water Plant (DRWP) which utilizes surface water from Griggs and O'Shaughnessy Reservoirs on the Scioto River, display an isotopic mixture of these reservoir waters and precipitation. These data demonstrates how quickly precipitation moves through the water conveyance system. Previously collected Columbus, Ohio, tap water samples reported by Bowen et al. (2007) demonstrated a seasonal lag in the city's water supply with more enriched precipitation from the summer months showing up in the water supply during the fall/winter seasons, and more depleted precipitation from winter months being part of the water supply in the spring/summer seasons. The tap water samples from the Bowen et al. (2007) study were distributed by Hap Cremean Water Plant (HPWP) that utilizes surface water from Hoover Reservoir on Big Walnut Creek. This isotopic signature of seasonal enrichment and depletion in the tap water that does not follow the seasonal precipitation variation can be explained by storage in an automated underground clear well system at HPWP, which eliminates atmospheric interaction. Tap water samples derived from HPWP during May 2011 to June 2011 showed a similar enrichment pattern to the Bowen et al. (2007) data in which the distribution of more enriched samples begins around May - June. Volume-weighed precipitation signatures were calculated through correlating rainfall event isotopic signatures and monthly total rainfall amounts. The ?18O values range -15% to -2.0% and ?D -110% to -5.0%, with more enriched precipitation in the spring and summer and more depleted precipitation in the fall and winter. This variation in precipitation masks the reservoir water isotopic signature, especially in tap water distributed from DRWP. These data suggest that the water stored underground also is important for monitoring tap water-reservoir watershed dynamics especially under changing environments that control influences of precipitation mixing and evaporation.

Leslie, D. L.; Lyons, W. B.

2011-12-01

379

Modeling surface water-groundwater interaction with MODFLOW: some considerations.  

PubMed

The accuracy with which MODFLOW simulates surface water-groundwater interaction is examined for connected and disconnected losing streams. We compare the effect of different vertical and horizontal discretization within MODFLOW and also compare MODFLOW simulations with those produced by HydroGeoSphere. HydroGeoSphere is able to simulate both saturated and unsaturated flow, as well as surface water, groundwater and the full coupling between them in a physical way, and so is used as a reference code to quantify the influence of some of the simplifying assumptions of MODFLOW. In particular, we show that (1) the inability to simulate negative pressures beneath disconnected streams in MODFLOW results in an underestimation of the infiltration flux; (2) a river in MODFLOW is either fully connected or fully disconnected, while in reality transitional stages between the two flow regimes exist; (3) limitations in the horizontal discretization of the river can cause a mismatch between river width and cell width, resulting in an error in the water table position under the river; and (4) because coarse vertical discretization of the aquifer is often used to avoid the drying out of cells, this may result in an error in simulating the height of the groundwater mound. Conditions under which these errors are significant are investigated. PMID:19891721

Brunner, Philip; Simmons, Craig T; Cook, Peter G; Therrien, René

2010-01-01

380

Freak waves at the surface of deep water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the paper [1] authors applied canonical transformation to water wave equation not only to remove cubic nonlinear terms but to simplify drastically fourth order terms in Hamiltonian. After the transformation well-known but cumbersome Zakharov equation is drastically simplified and can be written in X-space in compact way. This new equation is very suitable for analytic study as well as for numerical simulation At the same time one of the important issues concerning this system is the question of its integrability. The first part of the work is devoted to numerical and analytical study of the integrability of the equation obtained in [1]. In the second part we present generalization of the improved Zakharov equation for the "almost" 2-D water waves at the surface of deep water. When considering waves slightly inhomogeneous in transverse direction, one can think in the spirit of Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation for Korteveg-de-Vries equation taking into account weak transverse diffraction. Equation can be written instead of classical variables ?(x,y,t) and ?(x,y,t) in terms of canonical normal variable b(x,y,t). This equation is very suitable for robust numerical simulation. Due to specific structure of nonlinearity in the Hamiltonian the equation can be effectively solved on the computer. It was applied for simulation of sea surface waving including freak waves appearing.

Dyachenko, A. I.; Kachulin, D. I.; Zakharov, V. E.

2014-05-01

381

Freak waves at the surface of deep water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the paper ([1]) authors applied canonical transformation to water wave equation not only to remove cubic nonlinear terms but to simplify drastically fourth order terms in Hamiltonian. After the transformation well-known but cumbersome Zakharov equation is drastically simplified and can be written in X-space in compact way. This new equation is very suitable for analytic study as well as for numerical simulation. At the same time one of the important issues concerning this system is the question of its integrability. The first part of the work is devoted to numerical and analytical study of the integrability of the equation obtained in ([1]). In the second part we present generalization of the improved Zakharov equation for the 'almost' 2-D water waves at the surface of deep water. When considering waves slightly inhomogeneous in transverse direction, one can think in the spirit of Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation for Korteveg-de-Vries equation taking into account weak transverse diffraction. Equation can be written instead of classical variables ?(x,y,t) and ?(x,y,t) in terms of canonical normal variable b(x,y,t). This equation is very suitable for robust numerical simulation. Due to specific structure of nonlinearity in the Hamiltonian the equation can be effectively solved on the computer. It was applied for simulation of sea surface waving including freak waves appearing. References [1] A.I. Dyachenko and V.E. Zakharov, Europ. J. Mech. B 32, 17 (2012)

Kachulin, Dmitriy; Dyachenko, Alexander; Zakharov, Vladimir

2014-05-01

382

Classification of Water Surfaces Using Airborne Topographic LIDAR Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate Digital Terrain Models (DTM) are inevitable inputs for mapping areas subject to natural hazards. Topographic airborne laser scanning has become an established technique to characterize the Earth surface: lidar provides 3D point clouds allowing a fine reconstruction of the topography. For flood hazard modeling, the key step before terrain modeling is the discrimination of land and water surfaces within the delivered point clouds. Therefore, instantaneous shoreline, river borders, inland waters can be extracted as a basis for more reliable DTM generation. This paper presents an automatic, efficient, and versatile workflow for land/water classification of airborne topographic lidar data. For that purpose, a classification framework based on Support Vector Machines (SVM) is designed. First, a restricted set of features, based only 3D lidar point coordinates and flightline information, is defined. Then, the SVM learning step is performed on small but well-targeted areas thanks to an automatic region growing strategy. Finally, label probabilities given by the SVM are merged during a probabilistic relaxation step in order to remove pixel-wise misclassification. Results show that survey of millions of points are labelled with high accuracy (>95% in most cases for coastal areas, and >89% for rivers) and that small natural and anthropic features of interest are still well classified though we work at low point densities (0.5-4 pts/m2). Our approach is valid for coasts and rivers, and provides a strong basis for further discrimination of land-cover classes and coastal habitats.

Smeeckaert, J.; Mallet, C.; David, N.

2013-05-01

383

Soil and water characteristics of a young surface mine wetland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coal companies are reluctant to include wetland development in reclamation plans partly due to a lack of information on the resulting characteristics of such sites. It is easier for coal companies to recreate terrestrial habitats than to attempt experimental methods and possibly face significant regulatory disapproval. Therefore, we studied a young (10 years) wetland on a reclaimed surface coal mine in southern Illinois so as to ascertain soil and water characteristics such that the site might serve as a model for wetland development on surface mines. Water pH was not measured because of equipment problems, but evidence (plant life, fish, herpetofauna) suggests suitable pH levels. Other water parameters (conductivity, salinity, alkalinity, chloride, copper, total hardness, iron, manganese, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and sulfate) were measured, and only copper was seen in potentially high concentrations (but with no obvious toxic effects). Soil variables measured included pH, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, potassium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, aluminum, iron, sulfate, chloride, and percent organic matter. Soils were slightly alkaline and most parameters fell within levels reported for other studies on both natural and manmade wetlands. Aluminum was high, but this might be indicative more of large amounts complexed with soils and therefore unavailable, than amounts actually accessible to plants. Organic matter was moderate, somewhat surprising given the age of the system.

Andrew Cole, C.; Lefebvre, Eugene A.

1991-05-01

384

Biomimicry using Nano-Engineered Enhanced Condensing Surfaces for Sustainable Fresh Water Technology  

E-print Network

materials-based technology with nano/micro manufacturingNano-Engineered Enhanced Condensing Surfaces for Sustainable Fresh Water TechnologyNano-Engineered Enhanced Condensing Surfaces for Sustainable Fresh Water Technology

Al-Beaini, Sara

2012-01-01

385

Role of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction  

E-print Network

: Climate change; Groundwater; Surface water; Forecasting; United States. Author keywords: ClimateRole of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction over an investigation of the role of climatic variability on interannual groundwater and streamflow variability

Arumugam, Sankar

386

Horizon effects with surface waves on moving water  

E-print Network

Surface waves on a stationary flow of water are considered, in a linear model that includes the surface tension of the fluid. The resulting gravity-capillary waves experience a rich array of horizon effects when propagating against the flow. In some cases three horizons (points where the group velocity of the wave reverses) exist for waves with a single laboratory frequency. Some of these effects are familiar in fluid mechanics under the name of wave blocking, but other aspects, in particular waves with negative co-moving frequency and the Hawking effect, were overlooked until surface waves were investigated as examples of analogue gravity [Sch\\"utzhold R and Unruh W G 2002 Phys. Rev. D 66 044019]. A comprehensive presentation of the various horizon effects for gravity-capillary waves is given, with emphasis on the deep water/short wavelength case kh>>1 where many analytical results can be derived. A similarity of the state space of the waves to that of a thermodynamic system is pointed out.

Germain Rousseaux; Philippe Maissa; Christian Mathis; Pierre Coullet; Thomas G. Philbin; Ulf Leonhardt

2010-10-01

387

Ground-water/surface-water relations along Honey Creek, Washtenaw County, Michigan, 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the city of Ann Arbor, Mich., investigated the ground-water/surface-water relations along the lower reaches of Honey Creek, Washtenaw County, Mich., and an unnamed tributary to Honey Creek (the discharge tributary) from June through October 2003. Streamflow in these reaches was artificially high during a naturally low-flow period due to an anthropogenic discharge. Ground-water/surface-water relations were examined by seepage runs (series of streamflow measurements for the computation of streams gains or losses) and measurements of the difference in head between the stream surface and shallow aquifer. Specific conductance and water-temperature measurements were used as ancillary data to help identify gaining and losing reaches. Three seepage runs and four runs in which hydraulic-head differences between the stream and shallow aquifer were measured (piezometer runs) were made during periods of base flow. Streamflow measurements were made at 18 sites for the seepage runs. Instream piezometers were installed at 16 sites and bank piezometers were installed at 2 sites. Two deeper instream piezometers were installed at site 13 on September 4, 2003 to collect additional data on the ground-water/surface-water relations at that site. The seepage runs indicate that the main stem of Honey Creek and the discharge tributary in the study area are overall gaining reaches. The seepage runs also indicate that smaller reaches of Honey Creek and the discharge tributary may be losing reaches and that this relation may change over time with changing hydraulic conditions. The piezometer-run measurements support the seepage-run results on the main stem, whereas piezometer-run measurements both support and conflict with seepage-run measurements on the discharge tributary. Seepage runs give an average for the reach, whereas piezometer head-difference measurements are for a specific area around the piezometer. Data that may appear to be conflicting actually may be showing that within a gaining reach there are localized areas that lose streamflow The overall gain in streamflow along with specific measurements of head differences, specific conductance, and water temperature indicate that ground water is discharging to Honey Creek and the discharge tributary. Although reaches and areas that lose streamflow have been identified, data collected during this study cannot confirm or disprove that the loss is to the regional ground-water system.

Healy, Denis F.

2005-01-01

388

Relating soil specific surface area, water film thickness, and water vapor adsorption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

of soil specific surface area (SSA) and dry-end water vapor adsorption are important for porous media characterization and for prediction of water and vapor fluxes in arid environments. The objective of the presented study was to model water adsorption, film thickness, and SSA based on the t-curve theory originally developed for N2 adsorption. Data from 21 source soils with clay contents ranging from 0.6 to 52.2% were used to estimate specific surface area based on water retention, a t-curve type method, the linear prediction method, and a simplified monolayer method. The water retention and the t-curve methods were found to be mathematically analogous and were among the most accurate with regard to correlation coefficient (r = 0.97) and root-mean-square error (RMSE = 11.36 × 103 m2/kg) when compared to measurements obtained with the standard ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME) method. The corrected t-curve method significantly overestimated SSA when compared to EGME data. Comparison of all considered methods with N2-BET (BET) measurements disclosed lower correlation coefficients. For soil studies, the vapor adsorption in conjunction with the t-curve or water retention methods should be preferred for SSA estimation as they show much higher correlation with soil clay content and EGME measurements.

Leão, Tairone Paiva; Tuller, Markus

2014-10-01

389

A system for calibrating seepage meters used to measure flow between ground water and surface water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A system has been developed for generating controlled rates of seepage across the sediment-water interface representing flow between ground water and surface water. The seepage- control system facilitates calibration and testing of seepage measurement devices commonly called seepage meters. Two slightly different seepage-control systems were evaluated. Both designs make use of a 1.5-m-diameter by 1.5-m-tall polyethylene flux tank partially filled with sand that overlies a pipe manifold and diffuser plate to provide a uniform flux of water through the sand. The flux tank is filled with water to maintain a water depth above the sand bed of about 0.6 m. Flow is generated by routing water through tubing that connects an adjustable-height reservoir to the base of the flux tank, through the diffuser plate and sand, and across the sediment-water interface. Seepage rate is controlled by maintaining a constant water depth in the reservoir while routing flow between the reservoir and the flux tank. The rate of flow is controlled by adjusting the height of the reservoir with a manually operated fork lift. Flow from ground water to surface water (inflow) occurs when the water surface of the reservoir is higher than the water surface of the flux tank. Flow from surface water to ground water (outflow) occurs when the water surface of the reservoir is lower than the water surface of the flux tank. Flow rates as large as ?55 centimeters per day were generated by adjusting the reservoir to the extremes of the operable range of the fork lift. The minimum seepage velocity that the flowmeter can reliably measure is about 7 centimeters per day. Water in the reservoir is maintained at a nearly constant depth by pumping return flow between the reservoir and flux tanks based on output from a submersible pressure transducer placed in the reservoir. A datalogger switches the pump on and off at appropriate intervals to maintain a nearly constant water depth inside the reservoir, which maintains a virtually constant hydraulic gradient between the reservoir and flux tanks. The datalogger also records flow, in units of volume per time, as measured by an in-line flowmeter positioned between the base of the flux tank and the reservoir. Seepage flux in units of distance per time is determined by dividing the flowmeter output by the surface area at the sediment-water interface in the flux tank. Spatial heterogeneity in seepage was evident in both flux tanks in spite of attempts to minimize heterogeneity during tank construction. Medium sand was used in both flux tanks and care was taken to homogenize the sand during and after filling of the tanks. Time was provided for release or dissolution of trapped air, and water was circulated to remove fine-grained sediments prior to system use. In spite of these precautions, seepage measured with five to six small 20.25-cm-diameter seepage meters varied by about a factor of two. Use of larger diameter seepage meters, which cover a larger percentage of the sediment surface of the flux tanks, greatly minimized measured seepage heterogeneity. The seepage-control system was used to demonstrate that seepage-meter efficiency is sensitive to the type of seepage-meter bag and that bag-measured seepage rate is sensitive to the duration of the seepage-meter measurement only during very short measurement times. The in-line flowmeter used with this system is incapable of measuring seepage rates below about 7 centimeters per day. Smaller seepage rates can be measured manually. The seepage- control system also can be modified for measuring slower seepage rates with the use of two flowmeters and a slightly different water-routing system, or a fluid-metering pump can be used to control flow through the flux tank instead of an adjustable-height reservoir.

Rosenberry, Donald O.; Menheer, Michael A.

2006-01-01

390

Surface and Ground Water Geochemistry Near the Donlin Creek Gold Deposit, Southwestern Alaska  

E-print Network

Surface and Ground Water Geochemistry Near the Donlin Creek Gold Deposit, Southwestern Alaska By S ........................................................................................................................................... 6 Gold Mineralization

391

Enhancing Drinking Water Supply by Better Understanding Surface Water Ground Water Interaction  

E-print Network

, with ground water commonly providing the baseflow component of streamflow. Hence, if a well is drilled near drawn inot the subsurface by the induced hydraulic gradient. Ground-water sources that are under (2) of the definition is aimed at establishing whether there is a well established hydraulic

Rhode Island, University of

392

Concentration Data for Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Ground Water, Surface Water, and Finished Water of Selected Community Water Systems in the United States, 2002-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey began implementing Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs) in 2001 that focus on characterizing the quality of source water and finished water of aquifers and major rivers used by some of the larger community water systems (CWSs) in the United States. As used for SWQA studies, source water is the raw (ambient) water collected at the supply well prior to water treatment (for ground water) or the raw (ambient) water collected from the river near the intake (for surface water), and finished water is the water that is treated and ready to be delivered to consumers. Finished water is collected before entering the distribution system. SWQA studies are conducted in two phases, and the objectives of SWQA studies are twofold: (1) to determine the occurrence and, for rivers, seasonal changes in concentrations of a broad list of anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) in aquifers and rivers that have some of the largest withdrawals for drinking-water supply (phase 1), and (2) for those AOCs found to occur most frequently in source water, characterize the extent to which these compounds are present in finished water (phase 2). These objectives were met for SWQA studies by collecting ground-water and surface-water (source) samples and analyzing these samples for 258 AOCs during phase 1. Samples from a subset of wells and surface-water sites located in areas with substantial agricultural production in the watershed were analyzed for 19 additional AOCs, for a total of 277 compounds analyzed for SWQA studies. The 277 compounds were classified according to the following 13 primary use or source groups: (1) disinfection by-products; (2) fumigant-related compounds; (3) fungicides; (4) gasoline hydrocarbons, oxygenates, and oxygenate degradates; (5) herbicides and herbicide degradates; (6) insecticides and insecticide degradates; (7) manufacturing additives; (8) organic synthesis compounds; (9) pavement- and combustion-derived compounds; (10) personal care and domestic use products; (11) plant- or animal-derived biochemicals; (12) refrigerants and propellants; and (13) solvents. Source and finished water samples were collected during phase 2 and analyzed for constituents that were detected frequently during phase 1. This report presents concentration data for AOCs in ground water, surface water, and finished water of CWSs sampled for SWQA studies during 2002-05. Specifically, this report presents the analytical results of samples collected during phase 1 including (1) samples from 221 wells that were analyzed for 258 AOCs; (2) monthly samples from 9 surface-water sites that were analyzed for 258 AOCs during phase 1; and (3) samples from a subset of the wells and surface-water sites located in areas with substantial agricultural production that were analyzed for 3 additional pesticides and 16 pesticide degradates. Samples collected during phase 2 were analyzed for selected AOCs that were detected most frequently in source water during phase 1 sampling; analytical results for phase 2 are presented for (1) samples of source water and finished water from 94 wells; and (2) samples of source water and finished water samples that were collected monthly and during selected flow conditions at 8 surface-water sites. Results of quality-assurance/quality-control samples collected for SWQA studies during 2002-05 also are presented.

Carter, Janet M.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Kingsbury, James A.; Hopple, Jessica A.

2007-01-01

393

A New Vulnerability Assessment Approach for Surface Water and Groundwater  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of a state-wide effort to characterize the vulnerability of Mississippi's surface water and groundwater resources, we are developing a new set of vulnerability assessment tools. Unlike previous vulnerability assessment models (e.g., DRASTIC and WRASTIC), we separately consider three metrics for (1) intrinsic and (2) extrinsic sources of vulnerability and (3) consequences. Intrinsic vulnerability is defined as the vulnerability related to water resource characteristics (e.g., aquifer hydraulic properties, watershed topography, etc.), while extrinsic vulnerability is due to external features (e.g., number of abandoned wells, USTs, etc.). The consequence metric considers toxicity and location-specific human, environmental, and economic consequences. Each of the three metrics is normalized between 0 and 1, and the final vulnerability (risk) assessed as the product of vulnerability, susceptibility, and consequence. Intrinsic vulnerability is determined from the travel/residence time from a point on the land surface to surface water bodies or, in the case of groundwater, potential receptors. Unlike previous vulnerability assessment methods, our intrinsic vulnerability method focuses on assessment of relative travel/residence time and includes effects related to sorption, decay, and attenuation. Extrinsic vulnerability can be approached in two ways. In the first, a general extrinsic vulnerability is determined using a normalized indexing factor based on expert opinion and GIS-based density calculations for extrinsic sources of vulnerability (e.g., transportation corridors, industrial facilities, etc.). In the second, contaminant specific scenarios are considered based on local data. The consequence metric is determined using a toxicity-weighted measure of the potential impact on human, environmental, and economic assets. The vulnerability assessment methodology and GIS-based tools are being applied across the state at the hydrologic basin scale.

Holt, R. M.; Pickens, J.; Jones, T.; Kuszmaul, J. S.; Phillips, P.; Holtz, T.; Gunter, B.

2007-12-01

394

Pesticides in surface water of the Mid-Atlantic region  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality data from 463 surface-water sites were compiled and analyzed to document the occurrence and distribution of pesticides in surface water of the Mid-Atlantic region as part of the Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Those data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from October 1973 through March 1997 were used in the analyses. Data are available for a large part of the Mid-Atlantic region, but large spatial gaps in the data do exist. USGS data bases contained analyses of surface-water samples for 127 pesticide compounds, including 12 degradates, but only 16 of the compounds were commonly detected. Atrazine, metolachlor, simazine, prometon, alachlor, tebuthiuron, cyanazine, diazinon, carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, pendimethalin, 2,4-D, dieldrin, DCPA, metribuzin, and desethylatrazine (an atrazine degradate) were detected in more than 100 of the samples analyzed. At least one pesticide was detected in about 75 percent of the samples collected and at more than 90 percent of the sites sampled. Concentrations greater than the Federal Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for drinking water of 3 micrograms per liter (ug/L) for atrazine were found in 67 of 2,076 samples analyzed; concentrations greater than the MCL of 2ug/L for alachlor were found in 13 of 1,693 samples analyzed, and concentrations greater than the MCL of 4 ug/L for simazine were found in 17 of 1,995 samples analyzed. Concentrations of four pesticides were greater than Federal Health Advisory levels for drinking water, and concentrations of nine pesticides were greater than Federal Ambient Water-Quality Criteria for the Protection of Aquatic Organisms. Streams draining basins with different land uses tend to have different pesticide detection frequencies and median concentrations. Median concentrations of herbicides tend to be highest in streams draining basins in which the major land use is agriculture, whereas median concentrations of insecticides tend to be highest in streams draining extensively urbanized basins. Concentrations of both herbicides and insecticides are usually highest during the spring and summer, although many pesticides are present at low concentrations in surface water throughout the year. Pesticide concentrations vary greatly seasonally and over different hydrologic conditions, with overall variation sometimes exceeding four orders of magnitude. During periods of pesticide application (typically spring and summer), the occurrence of selected pesticides in some streams in the Mid-Atlantic region is related to streamflow. Correlations between concentrations of selected pesticides and streamflow are statistically significant during spring and summer for small (draining less than 55 square miles) streams. Concentrations of selected pesticides in small streams increase during high flows in the growing season, up to 30 times the concentrations present during low-flow conditions in the growing season. In small streams draining urban areas, concentrations of atrazine decrease during high-flow events but concentrations of the insecticides diazinon and chlorpyrifos increase. This may be due to the differences in the pesticides used in agricultural and urban areas and the amounts applied.

Ferrari, Matthew J.; Ator, Scott W.; Blomquist, Joel D.; Dysart, Joel E.

1997-01-01

395

Modeling global distribution of agricultural insecticides in surface waters.  

PubMed

Agricultural insecticides constitute a major driver of animal biodiversity loss in freshwater ecosystems. However, the global extent of their effects and the spatial extent of exposure remain largely unknown. We applied a spatially explicit model to estimate the potential for agricultural insecticide runoff into streams. Water bodies within 40% of the global land surface were at risk of insecticide runoff. We separated the influence of natural factors and variables under human control determining insecticide runoff. In the northern hemisphere, insecticide runoff presented a latitudinal gradient mainly driven by insecticide application rate; in the southern hemisphere, a combination of daily rainfall intensity, terrain slope, agricultural intensity and insecticide application rate determined the process. The model predicted the upper limit of observed insecticide exposure measured in water bodies (n = 82) in five different countries reasonably well. The study provides a global map of hotspots for insecticide contamination guiding future freshwater management and conservation efforts. PMID:25555206

Ippolito, Alessio; Kattwinkel, Mira; Rasmussen, Jes J; Schäfer, Ralf B; Fornaroli, Riccardo; Liess, Matthias

2015-03-01

396

Thermodynamics of surface defects at the aspirin/water interface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a simulation scheme to calculate defect formation free energies at a molecular crystal/water interface based on force-field molecular dynamics simulations. To this end, we adopt and modify existing approaches to calculate binding free energies of biological ligand/receptor complexes to be applicable to common surface defects, such as step edges and kink sites. We obtain statistically accurate and reliable free energy values for the aspirin/water interface, which can be applied to estimate the distribution of defects using well-established thermodynamic relations. As a show case we calculate the free energy upon dissolving molecules from kink sites at the interface. This free energy can be related to the solubility concentration and we obtain solubility values in excellent agreement with experimental results.

Schneider, Julian; Zheng, Chen; Reuter, Karsten

2014-09-01

397

Surface electromyography during physical exercise in water: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Aquatic exercise has been widely used for rehabilitation and functional recovery due to its physical and physiological benefits. However, there is a high variability in reporting on the muscle activity from surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals. The aim of this study is to present an updated review of the literature on the state of the art of muscle activity recorded using sEMG during activities and exercise performed by humans in water. Methods A literature search was performed to identify studies of aquatic exercise movement. Results Twenty-one studies were selected for critical appraisal. Sample size, functional tasks analyzed, and muscles recorded were studied for each paper. The clinical contribution of the paper was evaluated. Conclusions Muscle activity tends to be lower in water-based compared to land-based activity; however more research is needed to understand why. Approaches from basic and applied sciences could support the understanding of relevant aspects for clinical practice. PMID:24731774

2014-01-01

398

Weak acids enhance halogen activation on atmospheric water's surfaces.  

PubMed

We report that rates of I(2)(g) emissions, measured via cavity ring-down spectroscopy, during the heterogeneous ozonation of interfacial iodide: I(-)(surface, s) + O(3)(g) + H(+)(s) ?? I(2)(g), are enhanced several-fold, whereas those of IO·(g) are unaffected, by the presence of undissociated alkanoic acids on water. The amphiphilic weak carboxylic acids appear to promote I(2)(g) emissions by supplying the requisite interfacial protons H(+)(s) more efficiently than water itself, at pH values representative of submicrometer marine aerosol particles. We infer that the organic acids coating aerosol particles ejected from ocean's topmost films should enhance I(2)(g) production in marine boundary layers. PMID:21513276

Hayase, Sayaka; Yabushita, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Enami, Shinichi; Hoffmann, Michael R; Colussi, Agustín J

2011-05-19

399

Microbial Monitoring of Surface Water in South Africa: An Overview  

PubMed Central

Infrastructural problems force South African households to supplement their drinking water consumption from water resources of inadequate microbial quality. Microbial water quality monitoring is currently based on the Colilert®18 system which leads to rapidly available results. Using Escherichia coli as the indicator microorganism limits the influence of environmental sources on the reported results. The current system allows for understanding of long-term trends of microbial surface water quality and the related public health risks. However, rates of false positive for the Colilert®18-derived concentrations have been reported to range from 7.4% to 36.4%. At the same time, rates of false negative results vary from 3.5% to 12.5%; and the Colilert medium has been reported to provide for cultivation of only 56.8% of relevant strains. Identification of unknown sources of faecal contamination is not currently feasible. Based on literature review, calibration of the antibiotic-resistance spectra of Escherichia coli or the bifidobacterial tracking ratio should be investigated locally for potential implementation into the existing monitoring system. The current system could be too costly to implement in certain areas of South Africa where the modified H2S strip test might be used as a surrogate for the Colilert®18. PMID:23066390

Luyt, Catherine D.; Tandlich, Roman; Muller, Wilhelmine J.; Wilhelmi, Brendan S.

2012-01-01

400

Microbial monitoring of surface water in South Africa: an overview.  

PubMed

Infrastructural problems force South African households to supplement their drinking water consumption from water resources of inadequate microbial quality. Microbial water quality monitoring is currently based on the Colilert®18 system which leads to rapidly available results. Using Escherichia coli as the indicator microorganism limits the influence of environmental sources on the reported results. The current system allows for understanding of long-term trends of microbial surface water quality and the related public health risks. However, rates of false positive for the Colilert®18-derived concentrations have been reported to range from 7.4% to 36.4%. At the same time, rates of false negative results vary from 3.5% to 12.5%; and the Colilert medium has been reported to provide for cultivation of only 56.8% of relevant strains. Identification of unknown sources of faecal contamination is not currently feasible. Based on literature review, calibration of the antibiotic-resistance spectra of Escherichia coli or the bifidobacterial tracking ratio should be investigated locally for potential implementation into the existing monitoring system. The current system could be too costly to implement in certain areas of South Africa where the modified H(2)S strip test might be used as a surrogate for the Colilert®18. PMID:23066390

Luyt, Catherine D; Tandlich, Roman; Muller, Wilhelmine J; Wilhelmi, Brendan S

2012-08-01

401

Water electrolysis using electrodes with modified surface/volume  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Steel (12X18H10T) as the real electrode material is investigated to be used for different electrolysis applications, as the parallel plate electrodes for standard electrolysis in alkaline solutions, as well as the coaxial electrodes for high voltage short pulse electrolysis in water. The increase of catalytic activity of steel electrodes for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in different electrolytes could be easy achieved by co-deposition of metal hydride (LaNi5) particles with electrolytic nickel. The results revealed that Ni + LaNi5 with high real surface have a very high activity for the HER, due to the high active surface and specific microstructural features determining the electrocatalytic activity of the investigated alloys.

Vanags, M.; Kleperis, J.; Bajars, G.; Lusis, A.

2007-12-01

402

Sound generation as a drop falls on a water surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Impact of a drop on a water surface is accompanied by a series of sound pulses propagating in air and underwater. Depending on the falling mode (drop size and initial velocity), pulses substantially differ in amplitude, duration, and modulation frequency. We study falling modes in which in addition to conventional sound packets—the shock pulse and single resonance sound packets—several packets are observed. Experiments were conducted with simultaneous recording of sound in air and underwater and were accompanied by synchronous video depiction of currents in the drop impact region. Comparison of videograms and phonograms demonstrate that the sources of sound packets are gas cavities of arbitrary shape detached from the underwater cavern under the action of large accelerations (several km/s2) during a sharp change in its surface area, which gradually achieve equilibrial elliptical and spherical shapes.

Prokhorov, V. E.; Chashechkin, Yu. D.

2011-11-01

403

Barriers, repellents and antifeedants for slug and snail control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory bioassays were carried out to evaluate the efficacy of various products with potential for slug and snail control in horticulture and agriculture. The products tested were cinnamamide, copper ammonium carbonate, garlic, aluminium and copper foil, a mulch, ureaformaldehyde and the proprietary products SnailBan® and Tex-R® matting. The trials were carried out using the slug Deroceras panormitanum (Lessona and Pollonera,

I Schüder; G. Port; J. Bennison

2003-01-01

404

Images of Minute Minnesota Land Snails Matt Barthel  

E-print Network

at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay (UWGB). The shells imaged were assigned to species (or subspecies) based Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The snails were imaged in N-SEM mode at a vacuum of 10 Pa collection and lab processing of samples containing the shells. Students enrolled in the land snail practicum

Nekola, Jeffrey C.

405

Carthusian snail Monacha cartusiana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-print Network

Carthusian snail Monacha cartusiana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets as a prohibited mollusk species by Michigan's plant protection regulations (MDA 2009). Plant hosts A wide variety plants. In addition, invasive snails can potentially transmit plant and animal pathogens and displace

406

The Snail Resource of the Eastern Berin9 Sea  

E-print Network

; potential resources, like east- ern Bering Sea snails, are virtually un- known. Several species of large. Japan has harvested snails in the eastern Bering Sea since the early 1970's and there is potential for the development of a U.S. domestic fishery ABSTRACT-A trawl survey in the east- ern Bering Sea outlined

407

TOTAL ALKALINITY OF SURFACE WATERS: A MAP OF THE WESTERN REGION  

EPA Science Inventory

The map of total alkalinity of surface waters in the western region illustrates the general patterns of the relative potential sensitivity of surface waters to acidic deposition. As with geology and physiography, surface water alkalinity in the West varies widely. Most all low-al...

408

Correlation Between Opacity and Surface Water Vapor Pressure Measurements at Rio Frio  

E-print Network

Correlation Between Opacity and Surface Water Vapor Pressure Measurements at Rio Frio M.A. Holdaway 1, 1996 Abstract We use the surface water vapor pressure measured by weather stations at 4060 m opacity. The surface water vapor pressure is inverted some 20% of the time at night and some 35

Groppi, Christopher

409

Accepted Manuscript Liquid freshwater transport and Polar Surface Water characteristics in the East  

E-print Network

Accepted Manuscript Liquid freshwater transport and Polar Surface Water characteristics in the East and Polar Surface Water characteristics in the East Greenland Current during the AO-02 Oden expedition to the journal pertain. #12;ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT Liquid freshwater transport and Polar Surface Water

Nilsson, Johan

410

MODFLOW-Based Coupled Surface Water Routing and Groundwater-Flow Simulation.  

PubMed

In this paper, we present a flexible approach for simulating one- and two-dimensional routing of surface water using a numerical surface water routing (SWR) code implicitly coupled to the groundwater-flow process in MODFLOW. Surface water routing in SWR can be simulated using a diffusive-wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations and/or a simplified level-pool approach. SWR can account for surface water flow controlled by backwater conditions caused by small water-surface gradients or surface water control structures. A number of typical surface water control structures, such as culverts, weirs, and gates, can be represented, and it is possible to implement operational rules to manage surface water stages and streamflow. The nonlinear system of surface water flow equations formulated in SWR is solved by using Newton methods and direct or iterative solvers. SWR was tested by simulating the (1) Lal axisymmetric overland flow, (2) V-catchment, and (3) modified Pinder-Sauer problems. Simulated results for these problems compare well with other published results and indicate that SWR provides accurate results for surface water-only and coupled surface water/groundwater problems. Results for an application of SWR and MODFLOW to the Snapper Creek area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA are also presented and demonstrate the value of coupled surface water and groundwater simulation in managed, low-relief coastal settings. PMID:24902965

Hughes, J D; Langevin, C D; White, J T

2014-06-01

411

Seasonally resolved surface water ?14C variability in the Lombok Strait: A coralline perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a bimonthly resolved surface water ?14C time series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water ?14C average is ?60.5‰, and individual samples range from ?72‰ to 134‰. The annual average postbomb maximum occurs in 1973 at 122‰. The timing

T. P. Guilderson; S. Fallon; M. D. Moore; D. P. Schrag; C. D. Charles

2009-01-01

412

MODFLOW-based coupled surface water routing and groundwater-flow simulation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In this paper, we present a flexible approach for simulating one- and two-dimensional routing of surface water using a numerical surface water routing (SWR) code implicitly coupled to the groundwater-flow process in MODFLOW. Surface water routing in SWR can be simulated using a diffusive-wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations and/or a simplified level-pool approach. SWR can account for surface water flow controlled by backwater conditions caused by small water-surface gradients or surface water control structures. A number of typical surface water control structures, such as culverts, weirs, and gates, can be represented, and it is possible to implement operational rules to manage surface water stages and streamflow. The nonlinear system of surface water flow equations formulated in SWR is solved by using Newton methods and direct or iterative solvers. SWR was tested by simulating the (1) Lal axisymmetric overland flow, (2) V-catchment, and (3) modified Pinder-Sauer problems. Simulated results for these problems compare well with other published results and indicate that SWR provides accurate results for surface water-only and coupled surface water/groundwater problems. Results for an application of SWR and MODFLOW to the Snapper Creek area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA are also presented and demonstrate the value of coupled surface water and groundwater simulation in managed, low-relief coastal settings.

Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; White, Jeremy T.

2014-01-01

413

High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave Information  

E-print Network

1 High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave the applicability of a surface geophysical method, ground penetrating radar (GPR), for use as a water content, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 1. Introduction Information about near surface soil water content

Rubin, Yoram

414

Traveling surface waves of moderate amplitude in shallow water  

PubMed Central

We study traveling wave solutions of an equation for surface waves of moderate amplitude arising as a shallow water approximation of the Euler equations for inviscid, incompressible and homogeneous fluids. We obtain solitary waves of elevation and depression, including a family of solitary waves with compact support, where the amplitude may increase or decrease with respect to the wave speed. Our approach is based on techniques from dynamical systems and relies on a reformulation of the evolution equation as an autonomous Hamiltonian system which facilitates an explicit expression for bounded orbits in the phase plane to establish existence of the corresponding periodic and solitary traveling wave solutions. PMID:24895474

Gasull, Armengol; Geyer, Anna

2014-01-01

415

Dynamics of water droplet on a heated nanotubes surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated an effect of nanotubes on a heated surface onto Leidenfrost droplet through high speed visualization and momentum balance analysis. Delayed cutback phenomena and Leidenfrost Point (LFP) by dramatically high heating level were observed, and it is elucidated through wettable and spreadable features induced by nanotubes. As much delayed LFP, transient boiling regime with explosion-like dynamics of a water droplet on the nanotubes was observed. Furthermore, nanotubes required higher wall temperature to maintain non wetting cushion, due to the induced slip condition by porous features.

Kim, Seol Ha; Seon Ahn, Ho; Kim, Joonwon; Kaviany, Massoud; Hwan Kim, Moo

2013-06-01

416

Traveling surface waves of moderate amplitude in shallow water.  

PubMed

We study traveling wave solutions of an equation for surface waves of moderate amplitude arising as a shallow water approximation of the Euler equations for inviscid, incompressible and homogeneous fluids. We obtain solitary waves of elevation and depression, including a family of solitary waves with compact support, where the amplitude may increase or decrease with respect to the wave speed. Our approach is based on techniques from dynamical systems and relies on a reformulation of the evolution equation as an autonomous Hamiltonian system which facilitates an explicit expression for bounded orbits in the phase plane to establish existence of the corresponding periodic and solitary traveling wave solutions. PMID:24895474

Gasull, Armengol; Geyer, Anna

2014-06-01

417

Collisions of two breathers at the surface of deep water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results of numerical experiments on long time evolution and collisions of breathers (which correspond to envelope solitons in the NLSE approximation) at the surface of deep ideal fluid. The collision happens to be nonelastic. In the numerical experiment it can be observed only after many acts of interactions. This supports the hypothesis of "deep water nonintegrability". The experiments were performed in the framework of the new and refined version of the Zakharov equation free of nonessential terms in the quartic Hamiltonian. Simplification is possible due to exact cancellation of nonelastic four-wave interaction.

Dyachenko, A. I.; Kachulin, D. I.; Zakharov, V. E.

2013-06-01

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Collisions of two breathers at the surface of deep water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results of numerical experiments on long-term evolution and collisions of br