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Sample records for surface water snail

  1. Crawling beneath the free surface: Water snail locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungyon; Bush, John W. M.; Hosoi, A. E.; Lauga, Eric

    2008-08-01

    Land snails move via adhesive locomotion. Through muscular contraction and expansion of their foot, they transmit waves of shear stress through a thin layer of mucus onto a solid substrate. Since a free surface cannot support shear stress, adhesive locomotion is not a viable propulsion mechanism for water snails that travel inverted beneath the free surface. Nevertheless, the motion of the freshwater snail, Sorbeoconcha physidae, is reminiscent of that of its terrestrial counterparts, being generated by the undulation of the snail foot that is separated from the free surface by a thin layer of mucus. Here, a lubrication model is used to describe the mucus flow in the limit of small-amplitude interfacial deformations. By assuming the shape of the snail foot to be a traveling sine wave and the mucus to be Newtonian, an evolution equation for the interface shape is obtained and the resulting propulsive force on the snail is calculated. This propulsive force is found to be nonzero for moderate values of the capillary number but vanishes in the limits of high and low capillary number. Physically, this force arises because the snail's foot deforms the free surface, thereby generating curvature pressures and lubrication flows inside the mucus layer that couple to the topography of the foot.

  2. Pesticide Mixture Toxicity in Surface Water Extracts in Snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) by an in Vitro Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition Assay and Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Tufi, Sara; Wassenaar, Pim N H; Osorio, Victoria; de Boer, Jacob; Leonards, Pim E G; Lamoree, Marja H

    2016-04-01

    Many chemicals in use end up in the aquatic environment. The toxicity of water samples can be tested with bioassays, but a metabolomic approach has the advantage that multiple end points can be measured simultaneously and the affected metabolic pathways can be revealed. A current challenge in metabolomics is the study of mixture effects. This study aims at investigating the toxicity of an environmental extract and its most abundant chemicals identified by target chemical analysis of >100 organic micropollutants and effect-directed analysis (EDA) using the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) bioassay and metabolomics. Surface water from an agricultural area was sampled with a large volume solid phase extraction (LVSPE) device using three cartridges containing neutral, anionic, and cationic sorbents able to trap several pollutants classes like pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PAHs, PCBs, and perfluorinated surfactants. Targeted chemical analysis and AChE bioassay were performed on the cartridge extracts. The extract of the neutral sorbent cartridge contained most of the targeted chemicals, mainly imidacloprid, thiacloprid, and pirimicarb, and was the most potent AChE inhibitor. Using an EDA approach, other AChE inhibiting candidates were identified in the neutral extract, such as carbendazim and esprocarb. Additionally, a metabolomics experiment on the central nervous system (CNS) of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis was conducted. The snails were exposed to the extract, the three most abundant chemicals individually, and a mixture of these. The extract disturbed more metabolic pathways than the three most abundant chemicals individually, indicating the contribution of other chemicals. Most pathways perturbed by the extract exposure overlapped with those related to exposure to neonicotinoids, like the polyamine metabolism involved in CNS injuries. Metabolomics for the straightforward comparison between a complex mixture and single compound toxicity is still challenging but, compared to traditional biotesting, is a promising tool due to its increased sensitivity. PMID:26900769

  3. The microstructures of biomineralized surfaces: a spectroscopic study on the exoskeletons of fresh water (Apple) snail, Pila globosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasuna, C. P. Lakshmi; Narasimhulu, K. V.; Gopal, N. O.; Rao, J. Lakshmana; Rao, T. V. R. K.

    2004-08-01

    In view of the importance in understanding biomineralization processes in different molluskan species, the common fresh water apple snail Pila globosa in Indian origin was taken to explore its mineralized exoskeleton structures. The detailed structural studies of the exoskeletons of P. globosa have been undertaken. The isolated layers present in these shells were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), optical absorption, and infrared spectral techniques. The EPR spectra of the organic protein layer periostracum show the characteristic signals corresponding to Fe 3+ ions at g=4.1 and 2.0. The EPR spectra of the ostracum (middle) layer at room temperature gives a complicated spectrum consisting of a number of Mn 2+ signals of at least three sets due to the aragonite nature of the material. The results indicate the presence of the multivalent manganese ions, which undergo the redox mechanisms. The thermal variation of the EPR spectra show marked effect on these samples both in g-values and the basic spectral pattern.

  4. Movements of florida apple snails in relation to water levels and drying events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darby, P.C.; Bennetts, R.E.; Miller, S.J.; Percival, H.F.

    2002-01-01

    Florida apple snails (Pomacea Paludosa) apparently have only a limited tolerance to wetland drying events (although little direct evidence exists), but their populations routinely face dry downs under natural and managed water regimes. In this paper, we address speculation that apple snails respond to decreasing water levels and potential drying events by moving toward refugia that remain inundated. We monitored the movements of apple snails in central Florida, USA during drying events at the Blue Cypress Marsh (BC) and at Lake Kissimmee (LK). We monitored the weekly movements of 47 BC snails and 31 LK snails using radio-telemetry. Snails tended to stop moving when water depths were 10 cm. Snails moved along the greatest positive depth gradient (i.e., towards deeper water) when they encountered water depths between 10 and 20 cm. Snails tended to move toward shallower water in water depths ???50 cm, suggesting that snails were avoiding deep water areas such as canals and sloughs. Of the 11 BC snails originally located in the area that eventually went dry, three (27%) were found in deep water refugia by the end of the study. Only one of the 31 LK snails escaped the drying event by moving to deeper water. Our results indicate that some snails may opportunistically escape drying events through movement. The tendency to move toward deeper water was statistically significant and indicates that this behavioral trait might enhance survival when the spatial extent of a dry down is limited. However, as water level falls below 10 cm, snails stop moving and become stranded. As the spatial extent of a dry down increases, we predict that the number of snails stranded would increase proportionally. Stranded Pomacea paludosa must contend with dry marsh conditions, possibly by aestivation. Little more than anecdotal information has been published on P. paludosa aestivation, but it is a common adaptation among other apple snails (Caenogastropoda: Ampullaridae). ?? 2002, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  5. Exploring the temporal effects of seasonal water availability on the snail kite of Florida: Part III

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooij, Wolf M.; Martin, Julien; Kitchens, Wiley M.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The Florida snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis) is an endangered raptor that occurs as an isolated population, currently of about 2,000 birds, in the wetlands of southern and central Florida, USA. Its exclusive prey species, the apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) is strongly influenced by seasonal changes in water abundance. Droughts during the snail kite breeding season have a direct negative effect on snail kite survival and reproduction, but droughts are also needed to maintain aquatic vegetation types favorable to snail kite foraging for snails. We used a spatially explicit matrix model to explore the effects of temporal variation in water levels on the viability of the snail kite population under different temporal drought regimes in its wetland breeding habitat. We focused on three aspects of variations in water levels that were likely to affect kites: (1) drought frequency; (2) drought duration; and (3) drought timing within the year. We modeled a 31-year historical scenario using four different scenarios in which the average water level was maintained constant, but the amplitude of water level fluctuations was modified. Our results reveal the complexity of the effects of temporal variation in water levels on snail kite population dynamics. Management implications of these results are discussed. In particular, management decisions should not be based on annual mean water levels alone, but must consider the intra-annual variability.

  6. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  7. Copper toxicity to the fresh water snail, Lymnaea luteola

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, N.M.; Rao, P.V.

    1987-07-01

    Haemocyanins are found in arthropoda and mollusca and show a copper content characteristic for each phylum. Heavy metal accumulation by mollusks is widely reported. Approximately one third of the enzymes either required addition of a metal ion as a cofactor in order to exhibit maximum activity or contained a slightly bound metal ion which appeared to be involved in the catalytic process. Copper is the only metal which has been detected in significant amounts in amino oxidase. The present study is designed to evaluate the influence of such copper, which is of such common occurrence in biological material, on some of the lipolytic enzymes of fresh water pulmonate snail, Lymnaea luteola when added to ambient medium. The present study also highlights the possible detoxification mechanism prevailing in this fresh water mollusk.

  8. Supercharged Snails for Stream Ecology & Water-Quality Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Arthur J.; Ryon, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Gill-breathing freshwater snails (Family "Pleuroceridae") are ecologically important, abundant in many streams in the United States, and easy to collect and maintain under classroom conditions. These snails can be used in classroom tests to demonstrate effects of pollutants on aquatic organisms. In more advanced classes, students can cage the…

  9. Stable isotope composition of land snail body water and its relation to environmental waters and shell carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Goodfriend, G.A.; Magaritz, M.; Gat, J.R. )

    1989-12-01

    Day-to-day and within-day (diel) variations in {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O of the body water of the land snail, Theba pisana, were studied at a site in the southern coastal plain of Israel. Three phases of variation, which relate to isotopic changes in atmospheric water vapor, were distinguished. The isotopic variations can be explained by isotopic equilibration with atmospheric water vapor and/or uptake of dew derived therefrom. During the winter, when the snails are active, there is only very minor enrichment in {sup 18}O relative to equilibrium with water vapor or dew, apparently as a result of metabolic activity. But this enrichment becomes pronounced after long periods of inactivity. Within-day variation in body water isotopic composition is minor on non-rain days. Shell carbonate is enriched in {sup 18}O by ca. 1-2% relative to equilibrium with body water. In most regions, the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor (or dew) is a direct function of that of rain. Because the isotopic composition of snail body water is related to that of atmospheric water vapor and the isotopic composition of shell carbonate in turn is related to that of body water, land snail shell carbonate {sup 18}O should provide a reliable indication of rainfall {sup 18}O. However, local environmental conditions and the ecological properties of the snail species must be taken into account.

  10. Influence of water quality on zinc toxicity to the Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) and sensitivity of freshwater snails to zinc.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Tong, Xin

    2015-03-01

    The present study characterized the influence of water-quality characteristics on zinc (Zn) toxicity to the Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) and the sensitivity of freshwater snails to Zn. Standard 96-h renewal acute toxicity tests were conducted with Zn and juvenile P. paludosa under 3 conditions of pH and alkalinity, water hardness, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Median lethal effect concentrations (96-h LC50s), no-observed- effect concentrations, lowest-observed-effect concentrations, LC10s, and LC20s were determined for each test. The results showed that Zn toxicity to P. paludosa decreased linearly with increasing hardness, pH, and DOC. A multiple linear regression model based on pH, hardness, and DOC was able to explain 99% of the observed variability in LC50s. These results are useful for the development of a biotic ligand model (BLM) for P. paludosa and Zn. Zinc acute toxicity data were collected from the literature for 12 freshwater snail species in a wide range of water-quality characteristics for species sensitivity distribution analysis. The results showed that P. paludosa is the second most sensitive to Zn. The present study also suggested that aqueous ZnCO3 and ZnHCO3 (-) can be bioavailable to P. paludosa. Therefore, bioavailability models (e.g., BLM) should take these Zn species into consideration for bioavailability when applied to snails. PMID:25475172

  11. Use of ice water and salt treatments to eliminate an exotic snail, red-rim melania Melanoides tuberculatus, from small immersible fisheries equipment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ice water and salt treatments were evaluated for disinfection of fisheries equipment contaminated with a non-indigenous tropical snail, the red-rim melania Melanoides tuberculatus. The snail can displace native snails and can transmit trematodes directly to fishes and indirectly to other animals, i...

  12. Survival of the faucet snail after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, A.J.; Cole, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata, a nonindigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia, was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871 and has spread to the mid-Atlantic states, the Great Lakes region, Montana, and most recently, the Mississippi River. The faucet snail serves as intermediate host for several trematodes that have caused large-scale mortality among water birds, primarily in the Great Lakes region and Montana. It is important to limit the spread of the faucet snail; small fisheries equipment can serve as a method of snail distribution. Treatments with chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water baths were tested to determine their effectiveness as a disinfectant for small fisheries equipment. Two treatments eliminated all test snails: (1) a 24-h exposure to Hydrothol 191 at a concentration of at least 20 mg/L and (2) a treatment with 50??C heated water for 1 min or longer. Faucet snails were highly resistant to ethanol, NaCl, formalin, Lysol, potassium permanganate, copper sulfate, Baquacil, Virkon, household bleach, and pH extremes (as low as 1 and as high as 13).

  13. A water snail catches a ride on STS-90 as part of Neurolab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A water snail (Biomphalaria glabrata), like those that are part of the Neurolab payload on Space Shuttle Mission STS-90, is held up for inspection in the Operations and Checkout Building. The snails will fly in the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS) Minimodule, a middeck locker-sized fresh water habitat, designed to allow the controlled incubation of aquatic species in a self-stabilizing, artifical ecosystem for up to three weeks under space conditions. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, includes Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D.

  14. Accumulation and distributions of {sup 137}Cs in fresh water snail Pila ampullacea

    SciTech Connect

    Suseno, Heny

    2014-10-24

    Pila ampullacea are found in tropical freshwaters of Indonesia. This snail exhibit several characteristics of ideal indicator organisms in order to understand the bioaccumulation of {sup 137}Cs. Biokinetic experiment was performaced in aquaria system and under influenced of concentration K{sup +} in water. The result of experiment shown that Under difference K{sup +} concentration in water, Pila ampullacea have capability to accumulated {sup 137}Cs with CF value range 8.95 to 12.52 ml.g{sup −1}. Both uptake and depuration rate were influenced by concentration of K{sup +} in water.

  15. Accumulation and distributions of 137Cs in fresh water snail Pila ampullacea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suseno, Heny

    2014-10-01

    Pila ampullacea are found in tropical freshwaters of Indonesia. This snail exhibit several characteristics of ideal indicator organisms in order to understand the bioaccumulation of 137Cs . Biokinetic experiment was performaced in aquaria system and under influenced of concentration K+ in water. The result of experiment shown that Under difference K+ concentration in water, Pila ampullacea have capability to accumulated 137Cs with CF value range 8.95 to 12.52 ml.g-1. Both uptake and depuration rate were influenced by concentration of K+ in water.

  16. Snail Snooping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dorothy

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students in grades 5-8 learn about snail reproduction by observing and charting the activities of land snails, freshwater snails, and slugs. Instructions to implement and extend the activity are provided. (MDH)

  17. An artificial perch to help Snail Kites handle an exotic Apple Snail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pias, Kyle E.; Welch, Zach C.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, the Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) is a federally endangered species and restricted to the wetlands of south-central Florida where the current population numbers less than 1,500. The Snail Kite is an extreme dietary specialist, previously feeding almost exclusively on one species of snail, the Florida Apple Snail (Pomacea paludosa). Within the past decade, an exotic species of apple snail, the Island Apple Snail (Pomacea insularum), has become established on lakes in central Florida. Island Apple Snails are larger than the native Florida Apple Snails, and Snail Kites handle the exotic snails less efficiently. Juvenile Snail Kites, in particular, have lower daily energy balances while feeding on Island Apple Snails. An inexpensive, easy-to-construct platform was developed that would provide Snail Kites with a flat, stable surface on which to extract snails. The platform has the potential to reduce the difficulties Snail Kites experience when handling exotic snails, and may benefit the Snail Kite population as a whole. Initial observations indicate that Snail Kites use the platforms frequently, and snails extracted at the platforms are larger than snails extracted at other perches.

  18. The effects of water quality and age on the acute toxicity of copper to the Florida apple snail, Pomacea paludosa.

    PubMed

    Rogevich, E C; Hoang, T C; Rand, G M

    2008-05-01

    Copper (Cu)-containing compounds have been used in Florida as fungicides, herbicides, and soil amendments, resulting in elevated Cu in the aquatic ecosystem. The Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa), a key species in south Florida, may be adversely affected by Cu. Water-quality parameters, such as hardness, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), pH, and alkalinity, affect metal bioavailability and toxicity in aquatic organisms; however, it is uncertain to what extent these factors affect Cu toxicity in the Florida apple snail. The research presented here characterized the acute (96-hour) toxicity of Cu in water to the Florida apple snail at various life stages and under different water-quality parameters. Cu was more toxic to juvenile than adult apple snails. There was no difference between the 96-hour LC(50) at pH 5.5 and 6.5; however, the 96-hour LC(50 )values at pH 7.5 and 8.5 were greater than at lower pHs. The decrease in Cu(2+) above pH 7, as predicted by the MINTEQ model, accounted for the pH effect. Cu toxicity decreased as DOC increased from 0.2 to 30 mg/L. Unlike other aquatic organisms, hardness had no effect on Cu toxicity to the Florida apple snail, suggesting another mechanism of toxicity. Whole-body tissue analysis indicated that the lethal body burden of 120-day-old snails exposed to Cu for 4 days was 30 mg/kg Cu dry weight. Multiple regression analysis indicated that Cu toxicity was a function of organism age, DOC, and pH. PMID:18180860

  19. Predation potential of the water bugs Sphaerodema rusticum on the sewage snails Physa acuta.

    PubMed

    Aditya, G; Raut, S K

    2002-06-01

    The sewage snail Physa acuta is a serious threat to certain economic plants and to the purification plant of sewage works by rendering the biofilters ineffective. Various attempts are being made to control it. The efficacy of the predacious water bugs Sphaerodema rusticum was judged experimentally, in the laboratory in the potential control of P. acuta. It is revealed that, when supplied separately, the first, second and third instar and the adult S. rusticum did not attack P. acuta belonging to 3.1-8 mm, 5.1-8 mm, 7.1-8 mm and water bugs belonging to the third, fourth, fifth instar and adult stages though preyed upon P. acuta with 3.1-8 mm shell length. The average rate of predation by a single S. rusticum varied from 0.14-3.08 individuals per day depending upon the size of P. acuta and the stage of S. rusticum. A single S. rusticum, irrespective of instar and adult stages, destroyed on average 4.16 P. acuta daily irrespective of sizes. It is estimated that one S. rusticum could destroy 1,360 P. acuta in its life time. The results clearly indicate that the water bug S. rusticum may be used to control the snails P. acuta. PMID:12118286

  20. Three Gorges Dam: Impact of Water Level Changes on the Density of Schistosome-Transmitting Snail Oncomelania hupensis in Dongting Lake Area, China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin-Yi; Zhou, Yi-Biao; Chen, Yue; Liang, Song; Li, Lin-Han; Zheng, Sheng-Bang; Zhu, Shao-ping; Ren, Guang-Hui; Song, Xiu-Xia; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis remains an important public health issue in China and worldwide. Oncomelania hupensis is the unique intermediate host of schistosoma japonicum, and its change influences the distribution of S. japonica. The Three Gorges Dam (TGD) has substantially changed the ecology and environment in the Dongting Lake region. This study investigated the impact of water level and elevation on the survival and habitat of the snails. Methods Data were collected for 16 bottomlands around 4 hydrological stations, which included water, density of living snails (form the Anxiang Station for Schistosomiasis Control) and elevation (from Google Earth). Based on the elevation, sixteen bottomlands were divided into 3 groups. ARIMA models were built to predict the density of living snails in different elevation areas. Results Before closure of TGD, 7 out of 9 years had a water level beyond the warning level at least once at Anxiang hydrological station, compared with only 3 out of 10 years after closure of TGD. There were two severe droughts that happened in 2006 and 2011, with much fewer number of flooding per year compared with other study years. Overall, there was a correlation between water level changing and density of living snails variation in all the elevations areas. The density of living snails in all elevations areas was decreasing after the TGD was built. The relationship between number of flooding per year and the density of living snails was more pronounced in the medium and high elevation areas; the density of living snails kept decreasing from 2003 to 2014. In low elevation area however, the density of living snails decreased after 2003 first and turned to increase after 2011. Our ARIMA prediction models indicated that the snails would not disappear in the Dongting Lake region in the next 7 years. In the low elevation area, the density of living snails would increase slightly, and then stabilize after the year 2017. In the medium elevation region, the change of the density of living snails would be more obvious and would increase till the year 2020. In the high elevation area, the density of living snails would remain stable after the year 2015. Conclusion The TGD influenced water levels and reduced the risk of flooding and the density of living snails in the study region. Based on our prediction models, the density of living snails in all elevations tends to be stabilized. Control of S. japonica would continue to be an important task in the study area in the coming decade. PMID:26114956

  1. A comparison of metal levels and antioxidant enzymes in freshwater snails, Lymnaea natalensis, exposed to sediment and water collected from Wright Dam and Lower Mguza Dam, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Siwela, A H; Nyathi, C B; Naik, Y S

    2010-10-01

    We compared the bioaccumulation of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) with antioxidant enzyme activity in tissues of the snails, Lymnaea natalensis, exposed to elements of two differently polluted dams. 45 snails were exposed to sediment and water collected from Wight Dam (reference) whilst another 45 snails were also exposed to sediment and water collected from Lower Mguza Dam (polluted dam). Except for Fe in sediment and Pb in water, metal concentrations were statistically higher in sediment and water collected from Lower Mguza Dam. Lead, Cd and Zn were two times higher in tissues of snails exposed to Lower Mguza Dam elements. On one hand, superoxide dismutase (SOD), diphosphotriphosphodiaphorase (DTD) and catalase (CAT) activities were significantly lower whilst malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly higher in tissues of snails exposed to Lower Mguza Dam sediment and water. On the other hand, selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPX) activity was significantly elevated in tissues of snails exposed to Lower Mguza Dam sediment and water. Snails exposed to Lower Mguza Dam elements seem to have responded to pollution by increasing CAT and Se-GPX specific activity in an effort to detoxify peroxides produced as a result of metal induced oxidative stress. PMID:20813407

  2. Dry down impacts on apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) demography: Implications for wetland water management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darby, P.C.; Bennetts, R.E.; Percival, H.F.

    2008-01-01

    Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa Say) are prey for several wetland-dependent predators, most notably for the endangered Florida snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis Vieillot). Management concerns for kites have been raised regarding the impacts of wetland dry downs on snails, but little data exists to validate these concerns. We simulated drying events in experimental tanks, where we observed that snail survival patterns, regardless of hydrology, were driven by a post-reproductive die off. In contrast to earlier reports of little to no dry down tolerance, we found that 70% of pre-reproductive adult-sized snails survived a 12-week dry down. Smaller size classes of snails exhibited significantly lower survival rates (< 50% after eight weeks dry). Field surveys showed that 77% of egg production occurs in April-June. Our hydrologic analyses of six peninsular Florida wetlands showed that most dry downs overlapped a portion of the peak snail breeding season, and 70% of dry downs were ??? 12 weeks in duration. Dry down timing can affect recruitment by truncating annual egg production and stranding juveniles. Dry down survival rates and seasonal patterns of egg cluster production helped define a range of hydrologic conditions that support robust apple snail populations, and illustrate why multiple characteristics of dry down events should be considered in developing target hydrologic regimes for wetland fauna. ?? 2008, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  3. Does water chemistry limit the distribution of New Zealand mud snails in Redwood National Park?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vazquez, Ryan; Ward, Darren M.; Sepulveda, Adam

    2016-01-01

    New Zealand mud snails (NZMS) are exotic mollusks present in many waterways of the western United States. In 2009, NZMS were detected in Redwood Creek in Redwood National Park, CA. Although NZMS are noted for their ability to rapidly increase in abundance and colonize new areas, after more than 5 years in Redwood Creek, their distribution remains limited to a ca. 300 m reach. Recent literature suggests that low specific conductivity and environmental calcium can limit NZMS distribution. We conducted laboratory experiments, exposing NZMS collected from Redwood Creek to both natural waters and artificial treatment solutions, to determine if low conductivity and calcium concentration limit the distribution of NZMS in Redwood National Park. For natural water exposures, we held NZMS in water from their source location (conductivity 135 μS/cm, calcium 13 mg/L) or water from four other locations in the Redwood Creek watershed encompassing a range of conductivity (77–158 μS/cm) and calcium concentration (<5–13 mg/L). For exposures in treatment solutions, we manipulated both conductivity (range 20–200 μS/cm) and calcium concentration (range <5–17.5 mg/L) in a factorial design. Response variables measured included mortality and reproductive output. Adult NZMS survived for long periods (>4 months) in the lowest conductivity waters from Redwood Creek and all but the lowest-conductivity treatment solutions, regardless of calcium concentration. However, reproductive output was very low in all natural waters and all low-calcium treatment solutions. Our results suggest that water chemistry may inhibit the spread of NZMS in Redwood National Park by reducing their reproductive output.

  4. Implications of water hardness in ecotoxicological assessments for water quality regulatory purposes: a case study with the aquatic snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818).

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Filho, E C; Caixeta, N R; Simplício, N C S; Sousa, S R; Aragão, T P; Muniz, D H F

    2014-02-01

    Water hardness is a property depending on the presence of alkaline earth metals, mainly calcium and magnesium. Among the strategies for water quality monitoring, ecotoxicological assays are performed to minimize impacts and classify water bodies. For these laboratory evaluations parameters are previously defined in the guidelines, including water hardness for both cultivation and testing medium. The present work was performed to evaluate the effects of different levels of water hardness on the survival and reproduction of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata and discuss the influence of natural water hardness on the results of ecotoxicological tests with these environmental samples. Comparing the groups it was possible to observe that those maintained in waters with least hardness had lower reproductive success, while the groups maintained in highest hardness showed better reproduction. These data show that waters with low hardness make the reproduction of the snail B. glabrata unfeasible, and this reveal a problem for ecotoxicity assays using natural water samples. PMID:25055099

  5. Snail Trails

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela

    2002-01-01

    The slime trails of snails lead the author's students to a better understanding of science as inquiry and the processes of science. During this five-day activity, students get up close and personal with one of her favorite creatures, the land snail. Students begin by observing the organism and recording their observations. After making initial…

  6. Survival and behavior of Chinese mystery snails (Bellamya chinensis) in response to simulated water body drawdowns and extended air exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unstad, Kody M.; Uden, Daniel R.; Allen, Craig R.; Chaine, Noelle M.; Haak, Danielle M.; Kill, Robert A.; Pope, Kevin L.; Stephen, Bruce J.; Wong, Alec

    2013-01-01

    Nonnative invasive mollusks degrade aquatic ecosystems and induce economic losses worldwide. Extended air exposure through water body drawdown is one management action used for control. In North America, the Chinese mystery snail (Bellamya chinensis) is an invasive aquatic snail with an expanding range, but eradication methods for this species are not well documented. We assessed the ability of B. chinensis to survive different durations of air exposure, and observed behavioral responses prior to, during, and following desiccation events. Individual B. chinensis specimens survived air exposure in a laboratory setting for > 9 weeks, and survivorship was greater among adults than juveniles. Several B. chinensis specimens responded to desiccation by sealing their opercula and/or burrowing in mud substrate. Our results indicate that drawdowns alone may not be an effective means of eliminating B. chinensis. This study lays the groundwork for future management research that may determine the effectiveness of drawdowns when combined with factors such as extreme temperatures, predation, or molluscicides.

  7. Effector mechanism in the response of Schistosoma mansoni miracidia to snail-conditioned water.

    PubMed

    Roberts, T M; Linck, R W; Chernin, E

    1980-02-01

    Schistosoma mansoni miracidia respond to snail-conditioned water (SCW) by sharply increasing their rate of turning when they encounter abrupt decreases in stimulant concentration (Roberts et al., '79). We examined the role of the cilia and the subepithelial muscles in the turning behavior of stimulated miracidia. Several lines of evidence indicated that miracidia do not turn by altering their ciliary beat. Ciliary beating on detergent-treated miracidia was reactivated using solutions containing ATP and Mg2+. These organisms were unable to turn spontaneously, a characteristic of live miracidia. Several divalent cations which stimulate increased turning of intact miracidia failed to support ciliary reactivation of detergent-treated organisms. Further, intact miracidia increased their rate of turning in gradients of Mg2+, but detergent-treated organisms swimming in reactivation solution did not turn in Mg2+ gradients. High speed cinematography of intact miracidia swimming in gradients of SCW or Mg2+ illustrated that turning is invariably accompanied by flexion of the body. This bending occurred only at the transverse interciliary ridges between the first and second, and second and third tiers of ciliated plates. Flexion was not observed at the interciliary ridge between the third and fourth tiers of plates, suggesting that miracidia turn by contracting specific portions of their subepithelial musculature. PMID:7373270

  8. Snails home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstan, D. J.; Hodgson, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    Many gardeners and horticulturalists seek non-chemical methods to control populations of snails. It has frequently been reported that snails that are marked and removed from a garden are later found in the garden again. This phenomenon is often cited as evidence for a homing instinct. We report a systematic study of the snail population in a small suburban garden, in which large numbers of snails were marked and removed over a period of about 6 months. While many returned, inferring a homing instinct from this evidence requires statistical modelling. Monte Carlo techniques demonstrate that movements of snails are better explained by drift under the influence of a homing instinct than by random diffusion. Maximum likelihood techniques infer the existence of two groups of snails in the garden: members of a larger population that show little affinity to the garden itself, and core members of a local garden population that regularly return to their home if removed. The data are strongly suggestive of a homing instinct, but also reveal that snail-throwing can work as a pest management strategy.

  9. Studying snails and stream health

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, C.

    1992-01-01

    A type of snail (Elimia) that is abundant in most streams in east Tennessee is noticeably absent in contaminated Oak Ridge streams, indicating a significant level of pollution. Such a snail could serve as a sensitive indicator of and contributor to improved water quality in Oak Ridge streams as remediation programs take effect.

  10. O-Glycosylation of snails.

    PubMed

    Stepan, Herwig; Pabst, Martin; Altmann, Friedrich; Geyer, Hildegard; Geyer, Rudolf; Staudacher, Erika

    2012-05-01

    The glycosylation abilities of snails deserve attention, because snail species serve as intermediate hosts in the developmental cycles of some human and cattle parasites. In analogy to many other host-pathogen relations, the glycosylation of snail proteins may likewise contribute to these host-parasite interactions. Here we present an overview on the O-glycan structures of 8 different snails (land and water snails, with or without shell): Arion lusitanicus, Achatina fulica, Biomphalaria glabrata, Cepaea hortensis, Clea helena, Helix pomatia, Limax maximus and Planorbarius corneus. The O-glycans were released from the purified snail proteins by β-elimination. Further analysis was carried out by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and - for the main structures - by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Snail O-glycans are built from the four monosaccharide constituents: N-acetylgalactosamine, galactose, mannose and fucose. An additional modification is a methylation of the hexoses. The common trisaccharide core structure was determined in Arion lusitanicus to be N-acetylgalactosamine linked to the protein elongated by two 4-O-methylated galactose residues. Further elongations by methylated and unmethylated galactose and mannose residues and/or fucose are present. The typical snail O-glycan structures are different to those so far described. Similar to snail N-glycan structures they display methylated hexose residues. PMID:22581130

  11. Snail Shell

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Plant seems to be a Heliotropum sp. Huge snail shells litter the wetland around Asuncion Bay. Near 251549S, 573747W. La plantita detrs del caracol parece ser un Heliotropium sp., Boraginaceae....

  12. Does water chemistry affect the dietary uptake and toxicity of silver nanoparticles by the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    López-Serrano Oliver, Ana; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Stoiber, Tasha L.; Tejamaya, Mila; Römer, Isabella; Lead, Jamie R.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in many applications and likely released into the aquatic environment. There is increasing evidence that Ag is efficiently delivered to aquatic organisms from AgNPs after aqueous and dietary exposures. Accumulation of AgNPs through the diet can damage digestion and adversely affect growth. It is well recognized that aspects of water quality, such as hardness, affect the bioavailability and toxicity of waterborne Ag. However, the influence of water chemistry on the bioavailability and toxicity of dietborne AgNPs to aquatic invertebrates is largely unknown. Here we characterize for the first time the effects of water hardness and humic acids on the bioaccumulation and toxicity of AgNPs coated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) to the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis after dietary exposures. Our results indicate that bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag from PVP-AgNPs ingested with food are not affected by water hardness and by humic acids, although both could affect interactions with the biological membrane and trigger nanoparticle transformations. Snails efficiently assimilated Ag from the PVP-AgNPs mixed with diatoms (Ag assimilation efficiencies ranged from 82 to 93%). Rate constants of Ag uptake from food were similar across the entire range of water hardness and humic acid concentrations. These results suggest that correcting regulations for water quality could be irrelevant and ineffective where dietary exposure is important.

  13. Does water chemistry affect the dietary uptake and toxicity of silver nanoparticles by the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis?

    PubMed

    Oliver, Ana López-Serrano; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Stoiber, Tasha L; Tejamaya, Mila; Römer, Isabella; Lead, Jamie R; Luoma, Samuel N

    2014-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in many applications and likely released into the aquatic environment. There is increasing evidence that Ag is efficiently delivered to aquatic organisms from AgNPs after aqueous and dietary exposures. Accumulation of AgNPs through the diet can damage digestion and adversely affect growth. It is well recognized that aspects of water quality, such as hardness, affect the bioavailability and toxicity of waterborne Ag. However, the influence of water chemistry on the bioavailability and toxicity of dietborne AgNPs to aquatic invertebrates is largely unknown. Here we characterize for the first time the effects of water hardness and humic acids on the bioaccumulation and toxicity of AgNPs coated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) to the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis after dietary exposures. Our results indicate that bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag from PVP-AgNPs ingested with food are not affected by water hardness and by humic acids, although both could affect interactions with the biological membrane and trigger nanoparticle transformations. Snails efficiently assimilated Ag from the PVP-AgNPs mixed with diatoms (Ag assimilation efficiencies ranged from 82 to 93%). Rate constants of Ag uptake from food were similar across the entire range of water hardness and humic acid concentrations. These results suggest that correcting regulations for water quality could be irrelevant and ineffective where dietary exposure is important. PMID:24641838

  14. Modeling apple snail population dynamics on the Everglades landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darby, Phil; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Romanach, Stephanie; Suir, Kevin J.; Bridevaux, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Comparisons of model output to empirical data indicate the need for more data to better understand, and eventually parameterize, several aspects of snail ecology in support of EverSnail. A primary value of EverSnail is its capacity to describe the relative response of snail abundance to alternative hydrologic scenarios considered for Everglades water management and restoration.

  15. Effects of natal departure and water level on survival of juvenile snail kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis) in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dreitz, V.J.; Kitchens, W.M.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Survival rate from fledging to breeding, or juvenile survival, is an important source of variation in lifetime reproductive success in birds. Therefore, determining the relationship between juvenile survival and environmental factors is essential to understanding fitness consequences of reproduction in many populations. With increases in density of individuals and depletion of food resources, quality of most habitats deteriorates during the breeding season. Individuals respond by dispersing in search of food resources. Therefore, to understand the influence of environmental factors on juvenile survival, it is also necessary to know how natal dispersal influences survival of juveniles. We examined effects of various environmental factors and natal dispersal behavior on juvenile survival of endangered Snail Kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis) in central and southern Florida, using a generalized estimating equations (GEEs) approach and model selection criteria. Our results suggested yearly effects and an influence of age and monthly minimum hydrologic levels on juvenile Snail Kite survival. Yearly variation in juvenile survival has been reported by other studies, and other reproductive components of Snail Kites also exhibit such variation. Age differences in juvenile survival have also been seen in other species during the juvenile period. Our results demonstrate a positive relationship between water levels and juvenile survival. We suggest that this is not a direct linear relationship, such that higher water means higher juvenile survival. The juvenile period is concurrent with onset of the wet season in the ecosystem we studied, and rainfall increases as juveniles age. For management purposes, we believe that inferences suggesting increasing water levels during the fledging period will increase juvenile survival may have short-term benefits but lead to long-term declines in prey abundance and possibly wetland vegetation structure.

  16. Causes of Late Pleistocene water level change in Lake Victoria, Equatorial East Africa, derived from clumped isotopes of land snails and fresh water mollusks. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaarur, S.; Affek, H. P.; Tryon, C.; Peppe, D. J.; Faith, J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on the dependence of 13C-18O bond abundance in the carbonate lattice (measured as Δ47) on the carbonate formation temperature. Most marine and freshwater biogenic carbonates are found to be in agreement with the clumped isotopes - temperature calibration. Clumped isotope thermometry is particularly useful in terrestrial environments where the interpretation of carbonate δ18O is limited due to difficulty in estimating the paleo-water isotopic composition. Clumped isotope-derived temperatures from land snails are generally higher than the ambient environmental temperatures, but show no evidence for disequilibrium. We attribute these higher body temperatures to snail eco-physiological adaptations through shell color, morphology, and behavior. We use the clumped isotope-derived temperatures in combination with shell δ18O to calculate snail body water δ18O composition. This parameter is interpreted as a paleo-hydrological indicator that reflects the isotopic composition of local precipitation modified by local evaporation. Rusinga and Mfangano Islands in Lake Victoria provide a unique opportunity to compare extant species of modern and fossil freshwater mollusks and land snails from the same location to examine lake paleo-hydrology. This location is particularly interesting as Lake Victoria itself is the main source of rain-water in the region such that the isotopic composition of land snail body water can be related back to the source waters. We combine clumped isotope and oxygen isotope measurements of both freshwater mollusks and land snails to examine the water balance of the lake, testing hypotheses about the mechanism of a significant rise in lake level in Lake Victoria ~35 - 40 ka BP. Outcrops of paleo-beach deposits ~18 m above the modern day lake level indicate high water stands at ~35-40 ka BP. Based on water balance models for Lake Victoria, an increase in lake level of this magnitude could be driven by local mean annual precipitation that is significantly greater than modern. However, this is inconsistent with regional climate reconstructions. This suggests that either lake level was controlled by non-climatic factors, or that local climate in the Lake Victoria basin was different than regional patterns of climate across eastern Africa. We use oxygen and clumped isotopes of modern and fossil shells (Corbicula sp., Melanoides sp. and Bellamya unicolor) from this 18 m beach outcrop on Mfangano Island to (1) compare with modern lake water δ18O values and (2) calculate paleo-water compositions. We combine these results with calculated snail body water δ18O composition (using oxygen and clumped isotopes) of land snails (Limicoloria cf. martensiana) from Rusinga and Mfangano Islands, to study hydrological changes of Lake Victoria. We use these data to evaluate the relative importance of climate change and tectonics as mechanisms for the Late Pleistocene expansion of Lake Victoria.

  17. Developmental toxicity, acute toxicity and mutagenicity testing in freshwater snails Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) exposed to chromium and water samples.

    PubMed

    Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Hamada, Natália; Grazeffe, Vanessa Siqueira; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Okazaki, Kayo; Granatelli, Amanda Tosatte; Pereira, Ivana Wuo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Nakano, Eliana

    2014-12-01

    A protocol combining acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and mutagenicity analysis in freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata for application in ecotoxicological studies is described. For acute toxicity testing, LC50 and EC50 values were determined; dominant lethal mutations induction was the endpoint for mutagenicity analysis. Reference toxicant potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) was used to characterize B. glabrata sensitivity for toxicity and cyclophosphamide to mutagenicity testing purposes. Compared to other relevant freshwater species, B. glabrata showed high sensitivity: the lowest EC50 value was obtained with embryos at veliger stage (5.76mg/L). To assess the model applicability for environmental studies, influent and effluent water samples from a wastewater treatment plant were evaluated. Gastropod sensitivity was assessed in comparison to the standardized bioassay with Daphnia similis exposed to the same water samples. Sampling sites identified as toxic to daphnids were also detected by snails, showing a qualitatively similar sensitivity suggesting that B. glabrata is a suitable test species for freshwater monitoring. Holding procedures and protocols implemented for toxicity and developmental bioassays showed to be in compliance with international standards for intra-laboratory precision. Thereby, we are proposing this system for application in ecotoxicological studies. PMID:25259848

  18. Snail Shell

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Plant seems to be a Heliotropum sp. Huge snail shells litter the wetland around Asuncion Bay. Near 25°15’49’’S, 57°37’47’’W. La plantita detrás del caracol parece ser un Heliotropium sp., Boraginaceae....

  19. Effect of pond water depth on snail populations and fish-borne zoonotic trematode transmission in juvenile giant gourami (Osphronemus goramy) aquaculture nurseries.

    PubMed

    Thien, P C; Madsen, H; Nga, H T N; Dalsgaard, A; Murrell, K D

    2015-12-01

    Infection with fish-borne zoonotic trematodes (FZT) is an important public health problem in many parts of Southeast Asia. People become infected with FZT when eating raw or undercooked fish that contain the infective stage (metacercariae) of FZT. The parasites require specific freshwater snails as first intermediate host and a variety of fish species, both wild caught and cultured, as second intermediate host. Aquaculture production has grown almost exponentially in SE Asia and in order to produce fish free from FZT metacercariae, it is important to mitigate factors promoting transmission to fish. Here we report results from a cross-sectional study to look at the association between pond depth and infection with FZT in giant gourami nursery ponds. Density of intermediate host snails was positively associated with pond depth (count ratio associated with a 1m increase in pond depth was 10.4 (95% C.L.: 1.61-67.1, p<0.5)) and this may partly explain the higher prevalence and intensity of FZT infection in juvenile fish. High fry stocking density (>200 fry m(-3)) was associated with lower host snail density (count ratio=0.15) than low stocking density (<100 fry m(3)). Ponds stocked with 100-200 fry m(-3) had snail counts 0.76 (95% C.L.: 0.33-1.75, p n.s.) of those in ponds stocked with fry density of <100 fry m(-3). Since density of intermediate snail hosts was associated with FZT transmission to fish, effort should be taken to reduce snail density prior to stocking the fry, but focus should also be on habitats surrounding ponds as transmission may occur through cercariae produced outside ponds and carried into ponds with water pumped into ponds. PMID:26209455

  20. Survival of the faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bithynia tentaculata, the faucet snail, is a non indigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia that was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871. The snail’s distribution in the United States has expanded to the mid-Atlantic states and the drainage basin of the Great Lakes and most recently to the Mississippi...

  1. Water surface is acidic

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Victoria; Milet, Anne; Vácha, Robert; Jungwirth, Pavel; Devlin, J. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Water autoionization reaction 2H2O → H3O− + OH− is a textbook process of basic importance, resulting in pH = 7 for pure water. However, pH of pure water surface is shown to be significantly lower, the reduction being caused by proton stabilization at the surface. The evidence presented here includes ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations of water slabs with solvated H3O+ and OH− ions, density functional studies of (H2O)48H+ clusters, and spectroscopic isotopic-exchange data for D2O substitutional impurities at the surface and in the interior of ice nanocrystals. Because H3O+ does, but OH− does not, display preference for surface sites, the H2O surface is predicted to be acidic with pH < 4.8. For similar reasons, the strength of some weak acids, such as carbonic acid, is expected to increase at the surface. Enhanced surface acidity can have a significant impact on aqueous surface chemistry, e.g., in the atmosphere. PMID:17452650

  2. Influence of an extreme high water event on survival, reproduction, and distribution of snail kites in Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennetts, R.E.; Kitchens, W.M.; Dreitz, V.J.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrology frequently has been reported as the environmental variable having the greatest influence on Florida snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis) populations. Although drought has received the most attention, high-water conditions also have been reported to affect kites. Years of high water generally have been reported to be favorable for nesting, although prolonged high water may be detrimental to sustaining suitable habitat. During 1994 and 1995, southern Florida experienced an extreme high water event. This event enabled us to compare survival, nesting success, number of young per successful nest, and spatial distribution of nesting before, during, and after the event. We found no evidence of an effect (either negative or positive) on survival of adult kites. In contrast, juvenile kites experienced the highest survival during the event, although our data suggest greater annual variability than can be explained by the event alone. We found no evidence of an effect of the high water event on nest success or number of young per successful nest. Nest success was highest during the event in the southern portion of the range but was quite similar to other years, both before and after the event. Our data do indicate a substantial shift in the spatial distribution of nesting birds. During the event, nesting activity shifted to higher elevations (i.e., shallower water) in the major nesting areas of the Everglades region. Nesting also occurred in Big Cypress National Preserve during the event, which is typically too dry to support nesting kites. Thus, our data indicate a potential short-term benefit of increased juvenile survival and an expansion of nesting habitat. However, the deterioration of habitat quality from prolonged high water precludes any recommendation for such conditions to be maintained for extended periods. ?? 2002, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  3. Histopathological effects of copper on selected epithelial tissues of snails

    SciTech Connect

    Wolmarans, C.T.; van Aardt, W.J.; Coetzee, J.

    1986-06-01

    The exposure of freshwater snails to copper sulfate has several harmful effects on the snails. These effects include several physiological disturbances as well as certain behavioral and histological changes. On the strength of these findings it was decided to investigate, by means of transmission electron microscopy, whether histological changes occur in the surface epithelium of the snail Bulinus tropicus after exposure to copper sulfate.

  4. Impact of changing water levels and weather on Oncomelania hupensis hupensis populations, the snail host of Schistosoma japonicum, downstream of the Three Gorges Dam.

    PubMed

    Seto, Edmund Y W; Wu, Weiping; Liu, Hong-Yun; Chen, Hong-Gen; Hubbard, Alan; Holt, Ashley; Davis, George M

    2008-06-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that dams impact riverine ecosystems and human diseases. Poyang Lake, one of the largest schistosomiasis endemic environments in China, will change due to the construction of the Yangtze River Three Gorges Dam. We assess changes in Oncomelania hupensis hupensis, the snail host for Schistosoma japonicum, in response to changing water levels and weather from 1998 to 2002. In the 5 years following the major flooding of Poyang Lake in 1998, seasonal water levels have gradually decreased, concomitant with decreases in mean and variance of fall snail densities. Nonlinear relationships suggest that the highest spring density is associated with current, 2-, and 3-month prior temperatures of 18 degrees, 9.1 degrees, and 5.8 degrees C, while the highest fall density is associated with 2- and 3-month prior water levels of 17 and 18 m, respectively. This suggests that lower, more stable water levels downstream of the dam may result in a reduction in mean fall densities and their variance. However, additional data are needed to determine whether snail populations that are typically destroyed by seasonal floods may live longer in more stable environments created by the dam. PMID:18787918

  5. SURFACE WATER EMAP PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface water component of the EPA Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) Western Pilot is a five-year effort to assess the ecological condition of rivers and streams across 12 states in the western United States. EMAP is designed to monitor indicators of poll...

  6. Production of apple snail for space diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Motoki, Shigeru; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.; Katayama, Naomi

    For food production in space at recycling bio-elements under closed environment, appropriate organisms should be chosen to drive the closed materials recycle loop. We propose a combination of green algae, photosynthetic protozoa, and aquatic plants such as Wolffia spp., for the primary producer fixing solar energy to chemical form in biomass, and apple snail, Pomacea bridgesii, which converts this biomass to animal meat. Because of high proliferation rate of green algae or protozoa compared to higher plants, and direct conversion of them to apple snail, the efficiency of food production in this combination is high, in terms of energy usage, space for rearing, and yield of edible biomass. Furthermore, green algae and apple snail can form a closed ecological system with exchanging bio-elements between two member, i.e. excreta of snail turn to fertilizer of algae, and grown algae become feed for snail. Since apple snail stays in water or on wet substrate, control of rearing is easy to make. Mass production technology of apple snail has been well established to utilize it as human food. Nutrients of apple snail are also listed in the standard tables of food composition in Japan. Nutrients for 100 g of apple snail canned in brine are energy 340 kJ, protein 16.5 g, lipid 1.0 g, cholesterol 240 mg, carbohydrate 0.8 g, Ca 400 mg, Fe 3.9 mg, Zn 1.5 mg. It is rich in minerals, especially Ca and Fe. Vitamin contents are quite low, but K 0.005 mg, B2 0.09 mg, B12 0.0006 mg, folate 0.001 mg, and E 0.6 mg. The amino acid score of apple snail could not be found in literature. Overall, apple snail provides rich protein and animal lipid such as cholesterol. It could be a good source of minerals. However, it does not give enough vitamin D and B12 , which are supposed to be supplemented by animal origin foods. In terms of acceptance in food culture, escargot is a gourmet menu in French dishes, and six to ten snail, roughly 50 g, are served for one person. Apple snail reaches to 30 g of body weight within two or three month from its egg. Several hundreds of egg are laid by one snail. It start egg laying after three months from hatching. In order to harvest 50 g for every day's meal, 3 m2 is required for rearing space. Eating apple snail and establishing its rearing system might save the food crisis on Earth.

  7. Foraging and refuge use by a pond snail: Effects of physiological state, predators, and resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojdak, Jeremy M.

    2009-09-01

    The costs and benefits of anti-predator behavioral responses should be functions of the actual risk of predation, the availability of the prey's resources, and the physiological state of the prey. For example, a food-stressed individual risks starvation when hiding from predators, while a well-fed organism can better afford to hide (and pay the cost of not foraging). Similarly, the benefits of resource acquisition are probably highest for the prey in the poorest state, while there may be diminishing returns for prey nearing satiation. Empirical studies of state-dependent behavior are only beginning, however, and few studies have investigated interactions between all three potentially important factors. Here I present the results of a laboratory experiment where I manipulated the physiological state of pond snails ( Physa gyrina), the abundance of algal resources, and predation cues ( Belostoma flumineum waterbugs consuming snails) in a full factorial design to assess their direct effects on snail behavior and indirect effects on algal biomass. On average, snails foraged more when resources were abundant, and when predators were absent. Snails also foraged more when previously exposed to physiological stress. Snails spent more time at the water's surface (a refuging behavior) in the presence of predation cues on average, but predation, resource levels, and prey state had interactive effects on refuge use. There was a consistent positive trait-mediated indirect effect of predators on algal biomass, across all resource levels and prey states.

  8. Is the interspecific variation of body size of land snails correlated with rainfall in Israel and Palestine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorf, Bernhard

    2006-11-01

    The hypothesis that body size of land snail species increases with aridity in Israel and Palestine because large snails lose relatively less water due to their lower surface to volume ratio has been investigated. Data on rainfall amplitudes of 84 land snail species in Israel and Palestine and on their body sizes were used to test for interspecific correlations between body size and rainfall. Four methods, means of body sizes in rainfall categories, the midpoint method, the across-species method, and a phylogenetically controlled analysis (CAIC) showed that there is no significant correlation between body size of land snail species and their rainfall amplitude in Israel and Palestine. The lack of an interspecific correlation between body size and rainfall amplitude may be the result of conflicting selective forces on body size.

  9. Internal Surface Water Flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, Mitchell H.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program is an intergovernmental effort to reestablish and maintain the ecosystem of south Florida. One element of the restoration effort is the development of a firm scientific basis for resource decision making.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides scientitic information as part of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program. The USGS began its own project, called the South Florida Ecosystem Project in fiscal year 1995 for the purpose of gathering hydrologic, cartographic, and geologic data that relate to the mainland of south Florida, Florida Bay, and the Florida Keys and Reef ecosystems. Historical changes in water-management practices to accommodate a large and rapidly growing urban population along the Atlantic coast, as well as intensive agricultural activities, have resulted in a highly managed hydrologic system with canals, levees, and pumping stations. These structures have altered the hydology of the Everglades ecosystem on both coastal and interior lands. Surface-water flows in a direction south of Lake Okeechobee have been regulated by an extensive canal network, begun in the 1940's, to provide for drainage, flood control, saltwater intrusion control, agricultural requirements, and various environmental needs. Much of the development and subsequent monitoring of canal and river discharge south of Lake Okeechobee has traditionally emphasized the eastern coastal areas of Florida. Recently, more emphasis has been placed on providing a more accurate water budget for internal canal flows.

  10. Regulation of laboratory populations of snails (Biomphalaria and Bulinus spp.) by river prawns, Macrobrachium spp. (Decapoda, Palaemonidae): implications for control of schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2014-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis is a common parasitic disease endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. One barrier to achieving long-term control of this disease has been re-infection of treated patients when they swim, bathe, or wade in surface fresh water infested with snails that harbor and release larval parasites. Because some snail species are obligate intermediate hosts of schistosome parasites, removing snails may reduce parasitic larvae in the water, reducing re-infection risk. Here, we evaluate the potential for snail control by predatory freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii and M. vollenhovenii, native to Asia and Africa, respectively. Both prawn species are high value, protein-rich human food commodities, suggesting their cultivation may be beneficial in resource-poor settings where few other disease control options exist. In a series of predation trials in laboratory aquaria, we found both species to be voracious predators of schistosome-susceptible snails, hatchlings, and eggs, even in the presence of alternative food, with sustained average consumption rates of 12% of their body weight per day. Prawns showed a weak preference for Bulinus truncatus over Biomphalaria glabrata snails. Consumption rates were highly predictable based on the ratio of prawn: snail body mass, suggesting satiation-limited predation. Even the smallest prawns tested (0.5–2g) caused snail recruitment failure, despite high snail fecundity. With the World Health Organization turning attention toward schistosomiasis elimination, native prawn cultivation may be a viable snail control strategy that offers a win-win for public health and economic development. PMID:24388955

  11. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in water, sediments, aquatic plant and histopathological effects on the golden apple snail in Beung Boraphet reservoir, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Dummee, Vipawee; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Tanhan, Phanwimol; Pokethitiyook, Prayad; Damrongphol, Praneet

    2012-12-01

    Changes in the seasonal concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Fe, Zn, Pb and Cd) were determined in water, sediments, snails (Pomacea canaliculata) and aquatic plants (Ipomoea aquatica) in three selected tributaries of the Beung Boraphet reservoir, Nakhon Sawan Province, central Thailand. Only Fe, Cu, Mn and Zn were detected by FAAS in all samples collected. The water quality of Beung Boraphet was medium clean with Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn concentrations well below internationally accepted limits. According to the criteria proposed for sediments by the EPA Region V, Zn and Mn concentrations were within the non-polluted range while Fe and Cu (wet season) concentrations fell into the class of severely polluted sediment. Both P. canaliculata and I. aquatica bioconcentrated more Mn in their tissues than were found in sediments, especially in the wet season. The results of Pearson correlation study and BCF values also indicated similar findings. Only Mn showed the importance of sediment-to-snail concentration and high BCF values in both snails and plants. P. canaliculata exposed to contaminated sediment for two months, showed higher accumulation of metals (Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn) in the digestive tracts and digestive glands than in the foot muscles. Histopathological changes included alterations in the epithelial lining of the digestive tracts, digestive glands and the gills. Loss of cilia and increase in mucous cells were observed in the digestive tracts and gills, while the digestive glands exhibited an increase of dark granules and basophilic cells, and dilation of digestive cells. The results indicated that both P. canaliculata and I. aquatica could be used as biomonitors of sedimentary metal contamination for the Beung Boraphet reservoir. PMID:23079739

  12. Cercarial Dermatitis Transmitted by Exotic Marine Snail

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Andrew N.; James, David; Hui, Lucia; Hom, Albert; Loker, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer’s itch) is caused by the penetration of human skin by cercariae of schistosome parasites that develop in and are released from snail hosts. Cercarial dermatitis is frequently acquired in freshwater habitats, and less commonly in marine or estuarine waters. To investigate reports of a dermatitis outbreak in San Francisco Bay, California, we surveyed local snails for schistosome infections during 2005–2008. We found schistosomes only in Haminoea japonica, an Asian snail first reported in San Francisco Bay in 1999. Genetic markers place this schistosome within a large clade of avian schistosomes, but do not match any species for which there are genetic data. It is the second known schistosome species to cause dermatitis in western North American coastal waters; these species are transmitted by exotic snails. Introduction of exotic hosts can support unexpected emergence of an unknown parasite with serious medical or veterinary implications. PMID:20735918

  13. Snail Shell Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Presents three inquiry-based lessons to develop the science process skills of observation, identification, and classification. Activities use whelk eggs and snail shells as the focus of the students' inquiries. Provides a list of 19 facts about whelks and snails. (MDH)

  14. The Classroom Animal: Snails.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David S.

    1985-01-01

    Points out that snails are interesting and easily-managed classroom animals. One advantage of this animal is that it requires no special attention over weekends or holidays. Background information, anatomy, reproduction, and feeding are discussed, along with suggestions for housing aquatic and/or land snails. (DH)

  15. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Nandy, Krishanu; Schutzius, Thomas M.; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Walther, Jens H.; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-01-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys – thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments. PMID:26282732

  16. Using snails as bioindicators of heavy metal exposure at a Department of Defense facility

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, C.; Randolph, J.C.; Henshel, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    Mollusks are useful bioindicators of aquatic contamination. They are easy to identify and handle, are widely distributed, and are known to accumulate heavy metals. The authors evaluated the accumulation of heavy metals in snails at points both upstream and downstream from potential contaminant sources, indigenous snails (Elimia livescens) were collected from an upstream site and placed in plastic mesh cages in 6 sites in 3 watersheds on base, upstream and downstream of 3 potential contamination sources. At each site there were 3 cages containing 12 snails each. In a parallel laboratory study snails were placed in 6 jars in 3 different treatments. One treatment contained stream water taken from the same sites where the snails were collected. The other two treatments had the same stream water spiked with 2 different concentrations of metals. The higher concentration of metals reflected the level of each metal detected in surface water downstream of one of the potentially contaminated sites. The lower metal concentration jars were spiked with metals at 1/2 the concentrations used in the higher level treatment. The animals were left in the cages and the jars for 12 weeks. After being removed from the cages and jars the snails were freeze-dried, weighed whole, then dissected into shelf and organic tissue. Tissue and shell were separately analyzed for metal content. Water and sediment samples were collected in the beginning and end of the field study and also analyzed for heavy metals. The heavy metal analysis was done on an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Fe, Mn, Pb and Ni have been analyzed. Initial results show that there are differences in the concentrations of the metals in the three watersheds. Also, there is a higher concentration of Fe and Mn in tissue compared to shell, and higher concentration of Pb in shell compared to tissue.

  17. SURFACE WATER INTAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) GIS layer represents the locations of public water system (PWS) facilities in NY and NJ; every PWS has one or more facilities. Data for this layer came from the Safe Drinking Water Information System/Federal version (SDWIS/FED)...

  18. Surface Water Response Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    During response to spills, or for facility planning, the vulnerability of downstream water resources is a major concern. How long and at what concentration do spilled contaminants reach downstream receptors? Models have the potential to answer these questions, but only if they ...

  19. Snail Chirality: The Unwinding.

    PubMed

    Maderspacher, Florian

    2016-03-01

    Most snails are coiled clockwise, but in some species rare genetic variants with reverse coiling occur. Now, a molecular determinant of coiling direction has been identified, the cytoskeletal regulator formin. PMID:26954445

  20. An ecological study of Bithynia snails, the first intermediate host of Opisthorchis viverrini in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Chen; Ho, Richard Cheng Yong; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Namsanor, Jutamas; Sithithaworn, Paiboon

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the food-borne trematodiasis, liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, is a major public health concern in Southeast Asia. While epidemiology and parasitic incidence in humans are well studied, ecological information on the O. viverrini intermediate hosts remains limited. This study aimed to investigate the factors affecting the distribution and abundance of the first intermediate host, Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snails. Water quality and snails were sampled in 31 sites in Muang District, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand from June 2012 to January 2013 to characterize the B.s. goniomphalos snail habitats. Species relative abundance and Shannon's diversity and evenness indices were employed to describe snail compositions and diversities across different habitat types. Statistical analyses were conducted to examine the extent to which the water quality variables and species interactions account for the relative abundance of B.s. goniomphalos snails. The results showed that the freshwater habitats of ponds, streams and rice paddies possessed significantly different abiotic water qualities, with water temperature and pH showing distinct statistical differences (P<0.05). Different habitats had different snail diversity and species evenness, with high B.s. goniomphalos snail abundance at rice paddy habitats. The differences in snail abundance might be due to the distinct sets of abiotic water qualities associated with each habitat types. The relative abundance of B.s. goniomphalos snails was found to be negatively correlated with that of Filopaludina martensi martensi snails (r=-0.46, P<0.05), underscoring the possible influence of species interaction on B.s. goniomphalos snail population. Field work observations revealed that rice planting seasons and irrigation could regulate snail population dynamics at rice paddy habitats. This study provides new ecological insights into the factors affecting Bithynia snail distribution and abundance. It bridges the knowledge gap in O. viverrini disease ecology and highlights the potential effect of anthropogenic irrigation practices on B.s. goniomphalos snail ecology. PMID:24561073

  1. Modeling snail breeding in Bioregenerative Life Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Vladimir; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Nickolay Manukovsky, D..

    It is known that snail meat is a high quality food that is rich in protein. Hence, heliciculture or land snail farming spreads worldwide because it is a profitable business. The possibility to use the snails of Helix pomatia in Biological Life Support System (BLSS) was studied by Japanese Researches. In that study land snails were considered to be producers of animal protein. Also, snail breeding was an important part of waste processing, because snails were capable to eat the inedible plant biomass. As opposed to the agricultural snail farming, heliciculture in BLSS should be more carefully planned. The purpose of our work was to develop a model for snail breeding in BLSS that can predict mass flow rates in and out of snail facility. There are three linked parts in the model called “Stoichiometry”, “Population” and “Mass balance”, which are used in turn. Snail population is divided into 12 age groups from oviposition to one year. In the submodel “Stoichiometry” the individual snail growth and metabolism in each of 12 age groups are described with stoichiometry equations. Reactants are written on the left side of the equations, while products are written on the right side. Stoichiometry formulas of reactants and products consist of four chemical elements: C, H, O, N. The reactants are feed and oxygen, products are carbon dioxide, metabolic water, snail meat, shell, feces, slime and eggs. If formulas of substances in the stoichiometry equations are substituted with their molar masses, then stoichiometry equations are transformed to the equations of molar mass balance. To get the real mass balance of individual snail growth and metabolism one should multiply the value of each molar mass in the equations on the scale parameter, which is the ratio between mass of monthly consumed feed and molar mass of feed. Mass of monthly consumed feed and stoichiometry coefficients of formulas of meat, shell, feces, slime and eggs should be determined experimentally. An age structure and size of snail population are optimized on the base of individual growth and metabolic characteristics with the help of the second submodel "Population". In this simulation a daily amount of snail meat consumed by crewmembers is a guideline which specifies population productivity. Also, the daily amount of snail meat may have an optional value. Prescribed population characteristics are used in the third submodel "Mass balance" to equalize input and output mass flow rates of snail facility. In this submodel we add a water and ash to the organic masses of feed, meat, feces, shell and eggs. Moreover, masses of calcium carbonate and potable water are added to the left side of mass balance equations. Mass of calcium carbonate is distributed among shell, feces and eggs. Summarizing the twelve equations for each snail age, we get the mass balance equation for the snail facility. All simulations are performed by using Solver Add-In for Excel 2007.

  2. Some aspects of snail ecology in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    de Meillon, B.; Frank, G. H.; Allanson, B. R.

    1958-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present the preliminary results of a recent ecological survey of some rivers in the Transvaal, Union of South Africa. Representative samples of the molluscan fauna of the rivers were collected and chemical analyses of the river waters were carried out. In addition, such characteristics as current speed, temperature, turbidity, biochemical oxygen demand, and amount of oxygen absorbed from potassium permanganate were determined. No evidence was obtained to show that the chemical composition of natural, unpolluted waters plays any part in determining vector snail habitats. Current speed was found to have some effect, bilharzia vector snails not being found in fast-flowing waters. Of the other factors, turbidity was shown to be of some importance, probably because it affects the growth of the algae on which certain snails seem to depend for their proper development, and severe pollution with sewage and industrial wastes also appeared to have an adverse affect on the snail population. PMID:13573112

  3. Nematode and snail metallothioneins.

    PubMed

    Höckner, Martina; Dallinger, Reinhard; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R

    2011-10-01

    Metallobiologists have, at large, neglected soil dwelling invertebrates; exceptions are the nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans) and snails (Helix pomatia and Cantareus aspersus). This review aims to compare and contrast the molecular, protein and cellular mechanisms of the multifunctional nematode and snail metallothioneins (MTs). The C. elegans genome contains two MT genes, mtl-1, which is constitutively expressed in the pharynx and likely to act as an essential and/or toxic metal sensor, and mtl-2, which plays a negligible role under normal physiological conditions but is strongly induced (as mtl-1) in intestinal cells upon metal exposure. It has been possible to follow the intricate phenotypic responses upon the knockdown/knockout of single and multiple MT isoforms and we have started to decipher the multifunctional role of C. elegans MTs. The snails have contributed to our understanding regarding MT evolution and diversity, structure and metal-specific functionality. The H. pomatia and C. aspersus genomes contain at least three MT isoform genes. CdMT is responsible for cadmium detoxification, CuMT is involved in copper homeostasis and Cd/CuMT is a putative ancestral MT possibly only of minor importance in metal metabolism. Further investigations of nematode, snail and other invertebrate MTs will allow the development of alternative biomarker approaches and lead to an improved understanding of metallobiology, protein evolution and toxicogenomics. PMID:21822727

  4. Nematode and snail metallothioneins.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Höckner M; Dallinger R; Stürzenbaum SR

    2011-10-01

    Metallobiologists have, at large, neglected soil dwelling invertebrates; exceptions are the nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans) and snails (Helix pomatia and Cantareus aspersus). This review aims to compare and contrast the molecular, protein and cellular mechanisms of the multifunctional nematode and snail metallothioneins (MTs). The C. elegans genome contains two MT genes, mtl-1, which is constitutively expressed in the pharynx and likely to act as an essential and/or toxic metal sensor, and mtl-2, which plays a negligible role under normal physiological conditions but is strongly induced (as mtl-1) in intestinal cells upon metal exposure. It has been possible to follow the intricate phenotypic responses upon the knockdown/knockout of single and multiple MT isoforms and we have started to decipher the multifunctional role of C. elegans MTs. The snails have contributed to our understanding regarding MT evolution and diversity, structure and metal-specific functionality. The H. pomatia and C. aspersus genomes contain at least three MT isoform genes. CdMT is responsible for cadmium detoxification, CuMT is involved in copper homeostasis and Cd/CuMT is a putative ancestral MT possibly only of minor importance in metal metabolism. Further investigations of nematode, snail and other invertebrate MTs will allow the development of alternative biomarker approaches and lead to an improved understanding of metallobiology, protein evolution and toxicogenomics.

  5. Inquiry, Land Snails, and Environmental Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Krantz, Patrick D.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces land snails for use in inquiry-based science activities. Describes common characteristics and safety considerations while introducing students to land snails. Explains procedures for inquiry-based use of land snails in classrooms. (YDS)

  6. Food composition and feeding habits of some fresh water fishes in various water systems at Abbassa, Egypt, with special reference to snails transmitting diseases.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Abd El-Rahman A; Ismail, Nahed M M

    2005-08-01

    Study of feeding habits of freshwater fishes collected from ponds at World Fish Center (ICLARM) showed that the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus and Forskal catfish, Bagras bayad had the highest proportion of full stomachs (31-58% & 44-45% respectively). In cichlid fishes, the rate of full stomachs was much lower, being 0.0-12.5% and showed higher incidence of empty stomachs that varied from 37.5% for Oreochromis niloticus to 78.3% for Sarotherodon galilaeus. Food items were analyzed by the percentage of point assessment (P%), abundance (N%) and frequency of occurrence (F%). Results of the three methods of analyses (Index of relative importance, I.R.I) emphasized the importance of plants (1214.7) as a major food resource in the stomach of Nile tilapia, O. niloticus followed by shell fragments (628.5), whereas, snail soft bodies were the main food category in the diet of hybrid tilapia O. niloticus x O. aureus (2539.3). Shell fragments (652) and snail soft bodies (296.9) were the 1st in relative importance as foods of O. aurea. In case of S. galillae, shell fragments (338) came 2nd in I.R.I. after plants (559). Present investigation shows that shell fragments were represented by 11.1% and 15.1% in the diet of African catfish, C. gariepinus by (N%) and (P%) methods, however, they came as the second food item in its diet by I.R.I (1237.3). According to F% method, both shell fragments and Crustacea were present in the diet of C. gariepinus considerable proportions each of 47.4%. Shell fragments were represented by low proportions in the diet of B. bayad 3.9, 2.1 and 22.2 by N%, P% and F% respectively. PMID:16083073

  7. Heavy metal concentrations in the freshwater snail Biomphalaria alexandrina uninfected or infected with cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni and/or Echinostoma liei in Egypt: the potential use of this snail as a bioindicator of pollution.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, O M S; Mossa, A-T H; El Einin, H M A

    2014-12-01

    In spite of using aquatic snails as bioindicators for water pollution, little attention has been paid to the effect of parasitism upon the concentration of heavy metals (Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn) in these organisms. The present study therefore aimed to compare the concentrations of heavy metals in trematode-infected Biomphalaria alexandrina collected from Kafer Alsheikh and Menofia provinces, Egypt, with uninfected snails from the same sites, in order to assess the effect of parasitism on the use of these snails as bioindicators. The concentrations of heavy metals in the soft parts and shells of snails were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results showed that the heavy metal profile in snails infected with Echinostoma liei was very different from that in snails infected with Schistosoma mansoni. The total concentration of heavy metals in E. liei-infected snails collected from Kafer Alsheikh or Menofia province was greater than in uninfected snails. In contrast, the total concentration of heavy metals in S. mansoni-infected snails was reduced compared with uninfected snails. In conclusion, the status of snails with respect to parasitic infection must be taken into consideration when these snails are used as bioindicators. PMID:23710821

  8. Experimental infection of the digeneans to some congeneric snail species radiated in a single water system: Relative importance of local evolution and phylogenetic constraint.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Misako

    2016-06-01

    To determine the relative importance of local adaptation caused by host-parasite coevolution and resource tracking by the parasites, the susceptibility of the freshwater snail genus Semisulcospira to the digenean parasite genus Genarchopsis was investigated experimentally. Four snail species endemic to the Lake Biwa system in Japan and two non-endemic species were investigated. All but one species was also tested for local variation in susceptibility. Parasites were obtained from Takashima (mix population of Genarchopsis gigi and Genarchopsis chubuensis) and Nagahama (G. chubuensis). In endemic Semisulcospira, closely related specie pairs (Semisulcospira habei and Semisulcospira niponica, Semisulcospira decipiens and Semisulcospira nakasekoae) showed similar susceptibilities to parasites from both localities. S. habei and S. niponica were highly susceptible to parasites from Takashima, but were resistant to parasites from Nagahama. S. decipiens and S. nakasekoae showed moderate susceptibility to parasites from both localities. None of the endemic snail species showed a clear local variation in susceptibility. These results show that the susceptibility of endemic Semisulcospira to Genarchopsis is conservative and can be regarded as an example of resource-tracking. One of the non-endemic snails, Semisulcospira libertina, showed local variation in susceptibility. This variation was not related to the sympatry of the parasites used for the experimental infection, suggesting that it was not the result of local adaptation by parasites. PMID:26773868

  9. Infection with schistosome parasites in snails leads to increased predation by prawns: implications for human schistosomiasis control.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Scott J; De Leo, Giulio A; Wood, Chelsea L; Sokolow, Susanne H

    2015-12-01

    Schistosomiasis - a parasitic disease that affects over 200 million people across the globe - is primarily transmitted between human definitive hosts and snail intermediate hosts. To reduce schistosomiasis transmission, some have advocated disrupting the schistosome life cycle through biological control of snails, achieved by boosting the abundance of snails' natural predators. But little is known about the effect of parasitic infection on predator-prey interactions, especially in the case of schistosomiasis. Here, we present the results of laboratory experiments performed on Bulinus truncatus and Biomphalaria glabrata snails to investigate: (i) rates of predation on schistosome-infected versus uninfected snails by a sympatric native river prawn, Macrobrachium vollenhovenii, and (ii) differences in snail behavior (including movement, refuge-seeking and anti-predator behavior) between infected and uninfected snails. In predation trials, prawns showed a preference for consuming snails infected with schistosome larvae. In behavioral trials, infected snails moved less quickly and less often than uninfected snails, and were less likely to avoid predation by exiting the water or hiding under substrate. Although the mechanism by which the parasite alters snail behavior remains unknown, these results provide insight into the effects of parasitic infection on predator-prey dynamics and suggest that boosting natural rates of predation on snails may be a useful strategy for reducing transmission in schistosomiasis hotspots. PMID:26677260

  10. Wave Turbulence on Water Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey; Lukaschuk, Sergei

    2016-03-01

    We overview the wave turbulence approach by example of one physical system: gravity waves on the surface of an infinitely deep fluid. In the theoretical part of our review, we derive the nonlinear Hamiltonian equations governing the water-wave system and describe the premises of the weak wave turbulence theory. We outline derivation of the wave-kinetic equation and the equation for the probability density function, and most important solutions to these equations, including the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectra corresponding to a direct and an inverse turbulent cascades, as well as solutions for non-Gaussian wave fields corresponding to intermittency. We also discuss strong wave turbulence as well as coherent structures and their interaction with random waves. We describe numerical and laboratory experiments, and field observations of gravity wave turbulence, and compare their results with theoretical predictions.

  11. Surface water discharges from onshore stripper wells.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-01-16

    Under current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, small onshore oil producers are allowed to discharge produced water to surface waters with approval from state agencies; but small onshore gas producers, however, are prohibited from discharging produced water to surface waters. The purpose of this report is to identify those states that allow surface water discharges from small onshore oil operations and to summarize the types of permitting controls they use. It is intended that the findings of this report will serve as a rationale to encourage the EPA to revise its rules and to remove the prohibition on surface water discharges from small gas operations.

  12. Larval stages of digenetic trematodes in Melanopsis praemorsa snails from freshwater bodies in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Bdir, Sami; Adwan, Ghaleb

    2011-01-01

    Objective To detect the species of larval trematodes (cercariae) in Melanopsis praemorsa snails from 5 different fresh water bodies in Palestine. Methods A total of 1 880 Melanopsis praemorsa snails were collected from different fresh water bodies in Palestine from October, 2008 to November, 2010. Cercariae in Melanopsis praemorsa snails were obtained by lighting and crushing methods. The behavior of cercariae was observed using a dissecting microscope. Results Three different species of larval trematodes were identified from Melanopsis praemorsa snails collected only from Al-Bathan fresh water body, while snails from other water bodies were not infected. These species were microcercous cercaria, xiphidiocercaria and brevifurcate lophocercous cercaria. These cercariae called Cercaria melanopsi palestinia I, Cercaria melanopsi palestinia II and Cercaria melanopsi palestinia III have not been described before from this snail in Palestine. The infection rate of Melanopsis praemorsa collected from Al-Bathan fresh water body was 5.7%, while the overall infection rate of snails collected from all fresh water bodies was 4.3%. Details are presented on the morphology and behavior of the cercariae as well as their development within the snail. Conclusions These results have been recorded for the first time and these cercariae may be of medical and veterinary importance. PMID:23569759

  13. The use of cold water to kill the exotic snail, red-rim melania Melanoides tuberculatus, a vector of the fish gill trematode Centrocestus formosanus, caught in dip nets and small seines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A non-indigenous tropical snail, the red-rim melania Melanoides tuberculatus, has become established and is spreading in the United States. This parthenogenic snail can brood young internally, has the potential to displace native snail populations, and can transmit trematodes directly to fish and i...

  14. Copper uptake and depuration by juvenile and adult Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa).

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Rogevich, Emily C; Rand, Gary M; Frakes, Robert A

    2008-10-01

    The present study characterized copper (Cu) uptake and depuration by juvenile and adult Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) from water, soil, and diet. During a 28-day uptake period, juvenile apple snails were exposed to aqueous Cu and adult apple snails were exposed to Cu-contaminated soil, water, and food. In the follow-up 14-day depuration period, both juvenile and adult apple snails were held in laboratory freshwater with background Cu concentrations<4 microg/l. For juvenile apple snails, whole body Cu concentrations increased with time and reached a plateau after 14 days. The data followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics rather than a one compartment first order kinetics model. The mean Cu bioconcentration factor (BCF) for juvenile apple snails was 1493 and the depuration half-life was 10.5-13.8 days. For adult snails, dietary uptake of Cu resulted in higher bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) compared to uptake from soil. Most of the accumulated Cu was located in soft tissue (about 60% in the viscera and 40% in the foot). The shell contained <1% of the total accumulated copper. Soft tissue is usually consumed by predators of the apple snail. Therefore, the results of the present study show that Cu transfer through the food chain to the apple snail may lead to potential risk to its predators. PMID:18642077

  15. Water surface capturing by image processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alternative means of measuring the water surface interface during laboratory experiments is processing a series of sequentially captured images. Image processing can provide a continuous, non-intrusive record of the water surface profile whose accuracy is not dependent on water depth. More trad...

  16. Ground water and surface water; a single resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, Thomas C.; Harvey, Judson W.; Franke, O. Lehn; Alley, William M.

    1998-01-01

    The importance of considering ground water and surface water as a single resource has become increasingly evident. Issues related to water supply, water quality, and degradation of aquatic environments are reported on frequently. The interaction of ground water and surface water has been shown to be a significant concern in many of these issues. Contaminated aquifers that discharge to streams can result in long-term contamination of surface water; conversely, streams can be a major source of contamination to aquifers. Surface water commonly is hydraulically connected to ground water, but the interactions are difficult to observe and measure. The purpose of this report is to present our current understanding of these processes and activities as well as limitations in our knowledge and ability to characterize them.

  17. TREATMENT OF SEASONAL PESTICIDES IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous pesticides were monitored in surface waters in agricultural areas. Atrazine, alachlor, metolachlor, cyanazine, metribuzin, carbofuran, linuron, and simazine were found in the influent to three water treatment plants in storm runoff following their application. Studies at...

  18. Use of a saponin based molluscicide to control Pomacea canaliculata snails in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    San Martns, R; Gelmi, Claudio; de Oliveira, Jaime Vargas; Galo, Jos Luis; Pranto, Honorio

    2009-10-01

    Pomacea canaliculata snails pose a severe problem to direct seeded rice cultivated in Southern Brazil. Control of this snail is nowadays performed with toxic chemicals such as copper sulfate and fungicides such as fentin. A novel natural molluscicide based on alkali modified quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) saponins was tested under laboratory conditions. Snails were collected in rice fields close to Porto Alegre (State of Rio Grande do Sul) and in Brusque (State of Santa Catarina, 400 km north of Porto Alegre). In Santa Catarina the product was very effective, while in Porto Alegre it had no effect. This unexpected behavior was probably due to the respiratory habits of the snails under different contents of dissolved oxygen in the water. Near Porto Alegre the water used in rice fields is heavily polluted, with dissolved oxygen levels of 1-2 ppm, and the snails rely primarily on their siphon and lungs to breathe. Since saponin control is probably due to an interaction between saponins with the sterols present in the cell walls in the gills, no control was observed. By contrast, in Santa Catarina the dissolved oxygen level of the water is 5-6 ppm, and the snails remain mostly underwater, breathing with their gills. In this case the snails died within 24 h at a dose of 20 and 30 ppm of product. To test this observation, snails grown in polluted waters were forced to remain underwater in saponin solutions and water (control) preventing the use of their siphon to breathe. The snails exposed to saponin solutions died, while the control snails survived, indicating that they were still able to use their gills to breathe. These results indicate that the use of the saponin product is limited to rice fields not irrigated with heavily polluted waters. PMID:19911565

  19. Snails from heavy-metal polluted environments have reduced sensitivity to carbon dioxide-induced acidity.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, Hugh; Cleary, David A; Marble, Aaron M; Phillips, Morgan V; Stoddard, Timothy J; Tuthill, Lara M; Winslow, James R

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 reacts with water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3) which increases water acidity. While marine acidification has received recent consideration, less attention has been paid to the effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide on freshwater systems-systems that often have low buffering potential. Since many aquatic systems are already impacted by pollutants such as heavy metals, we wondered about the added effect of rising atmospheric CO2 on freshwater organisms. We studied aquatic pulmonate snails (Physella columbiana) from both a heavy-metal polluted watershed and snails from a reference watershed that has not experienced mining pollution. We used gaseous CO2 to increase water acidity and we then measured changes in antipredatory behavior and also survival. We predicted a simple negative additive effect of low pH. We hypothesized that snails from metal-polluted environments would be physiologically stressed and impaired due to defense responses against heavy metals. Instead, snails from populations that acclimated or evolved in the presence of heavy metal mining pollution were more robust to acidic conditions than were snails from reference habitats. Snails from mining polluted sites seemed to be preadapted to a low pH environment. Their short-term survival in acidic conditions was better than snails from reference sites that lacked metal pollution. In fact, the 48 h survival of snails from polluted sites was so high that it did not significantly differ from the 24 h survival of snails from control sites. This suggests that the response of organisms to a world with rising anthropogenic carbon dioxide levels may be complex and difficult to predict. Snails had a weaker behavioral response to stressful stimuli if kept for 1 month at a pH that differed from their lake of origin. We found that snails raised at a pH of 5.5 had a weaker response (less of a decrease in activity) to concentrated heavy metals than did snails raised at their natal pH of 6.5. Furthermore, snails raised a pH of 5.5, 6.0, and 7.0 all had a weaker antipredatory response to an extract of crushed snail cells than did the pH 6.5 treatment snails. PMID:26090314

  20. Muscle versus Snail: Muscle wins.

    PubMed

    Simoes, Sergio; Tepass, Ulrich

    2016-01-18

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) are often governed by the transcription factor Snail and entail the loss of apical junctions from epithelial cells. In this issue, Weng and Wieschaus (2016. J Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201508056) report that actomyosin contractility can strengthen junctions to override Snail-dependent junctional disassembly and postpone EMT during Drosophila melanogaster gastrulation. PMID:26754649

  1. Radar imaging of water surface flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, K. R.; Lindenmuth, W. T.; Weller, C. S.; Anthony, D. G.

    We describe the capabilities of coherent high resolution radar to observe remotely the effects of an upwelling subsurface flow on the water surface. This observation is possible because the radar radiation backscatters very strongly from surface features with dimensions similar to its wavelength, in this case X-band at 0.03 m. This technique provides imaging capability with relatively high spatial resolution ( 0.3 m) and fast time sampling ( 0.006 s) over a large surface area. The processed data reveal both the line-of-sight velocity spectrum of moving water surface features, and their water surface radar backscatter cross-section. We believe that the surface features are generated by subsurface vortices oriented normal to the surface. The vortices are advected with the bulk flow of the jet. Our radar observations of the down-stream flow from a submerged waterjet that is directed parallel to the surface are consistent with those previously measured by laser velocimetry.

  2. Streaks Of Colored Water Indicate Surface Airflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Response faster and contamination less than in oil-flow technique. Flowing colored water provides accurate and clean way to reveal flows of air on surfaces of models in wind tunnels. Colored water flows from small orifices in model, forming streak lines under influence of air streaming over surface of model.

  3. Two dimensional mixtures at water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Madhumita; Datta, Alokmay

    2013-02-01

    Thiol capped gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) form a simple two dimensional (2D) liquid on water surface but this thin film is unstable under compression. Amphiphilic stearic acid (StA) molecules on water surface, on the other hand, form a complex and more stable 2D liquid. We have initiated a study on a mixture of StA and Au NPs in a monolayer through Surface Pressure (π) - Specific Molecular Area (A) isotherms and Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM). A mixture of Stearic Acid and Au nanoparticles (10% by weight) produces a monolayer on water surface that acts as a 2D liquid with phases that are completely reversible with negligible hysteresis.

  4. Gray solitons on the surface of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabchoub, A.; Kimmoun, O.; Branger, H.; Kharif, C.; Hoffmann, N.; Onorato, M.; Akhmediev, N.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of surface gravity water waves can be described by the self-defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Recent observations of black solitons on the surface of water confirmed its validity for finite, below critical depth. The black soliton is a limiting case of a family of gray soliton solutions with finite amplitude depressions. Here, we report observations of gray solitons in water waves, thus, complementing our previous observations of black solitons.

  5. Pesticide mitigation strategies for surface water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pesticide residues are being increasingly detected in surface water in agricultural and urban areas. In some cases water bodies are being listed under the Clean Water Act 303(d) as impaired and Total Maximum Daily Loads are required to address the impairments in agricultural areas. Pesticides in sur...

  6. The feeding habits of the snail kite in Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sykes, P.W., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The feeding habits of the Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis) were observed intermittently from 1967-1980 in Florida, USA. Approximately 97% of all observed foraging bouts were over marshes having sparse emergent vegetation. The visually-hunting kite was unable to forage over floating mats of exotic water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes). Male kites had shorter hunting bouts than females. For still-hunting, the birds' perches ranged from 0.15-4.6 m high and captures occurred an average of 5.8 m from perches. Females were significantly more successful (70%) for course-hunting than males (48%), but I found no difference for still-hunting. Birds tended to forage throughout the day, except for occasional inactive periods by some individuals during midday. On cooler days, foraging commenced slightly later in the morning than on warmer days. Kites probably capture freshwater apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) as deep as 16 cm. Capture rates for adults generally ranged from 1.7-3.4 snails per hour. Kites usually foraged over a common hunting area, and defense of foraging sites was rare. Handling of snails, from the kite's arrival at the feeding perch unit consumption, averaged 2.7 min, with no significant difference between sexes. However, adult females were more efficient at the extraction portion of this process than were adult males. Snails were usually extracted before being brought to the nest, except in the latter part of the nestling period when some snails were extracted at or near the nest and some were brought intact. Adults feed small chicks bill to bill, and both parents generally shared equally in care of the young, except at two nests where the females did 67% or more of the feeding. Mean length of snails taken by kites was 42.8 mm (range 25.2-71.3 n=697) and mean diameter was 45.8 mm (range 27.4-82.4, n=697). The most common size classes tkaen were 30-60 mm in length and diameter. Nutritional and gross energy values were determined for apple snails. Female snails with albumen glands removed (versus males or mixed samples of both sexes of complete tissue or with viscera removed) had the highest caloric value (.hivin.x=4.04 kcal/g, n=10). Kites cast pellets, a behavior documented here for the first time.

  7. Surface Water Treatment Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This manual was developed for use at workshops designed to increase the knowledge of experienced water treatment plant operators. Each of the fourteen lessons in this document has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing that topic. Areas covered in this manual include: basic water…

  8. Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthess, Georg

    1984-04-01

    The burning of fossil carbon compounds causes an annual rise of about 0.2% of the total atmospheric CO2, which is about 50% the annual output of manmade CO2. One of the major reasons for this beneficial phenomenon is probably the CO2 uptake by the ocean water. A thorough knowledge of this process is needed for a prediction of the long-term impact of the use of fossil fuels on the environment. The example indicates that mass transfer across the gas-water interface is an important aspect in the geophysical, geochemical, and biochemcial cycle of natural and manmade substances. It regulates the transition between the dissolved state in the water and the gaseous state in the atmosphere. The knowledge of the air-water exchange is probably the most advanced of all the transport processes between environmental compartments. Nevertheless, there is still a need for a better understanding of this interfacial mass transfer, which is a critical factor of great scientific and practical relevance in assessments of the various pathways of wastes in the environment and for their engineering management.

  9. Water vapor retrieval over many surface types

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.C.; Johnson, J.

    1996-04-01

    In this paper we present a study of of the water vapor retrieval for many natural surface types which would be valuable for multi-spectral instruments using the existing Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) for the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature. An atmospheric code (6S) and 562 spectra were used to compute the top of the atmosphere radiance near the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature in steps of 2.5 nm as a function of precipitable water (PW). We derive a novel technique called ``Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption`` (APDA) and show that APDA performs better than the CIBR over many surface types.

  10. Proterometra macrostoma (Trematoda: Azygiidae): location of the redia and emergence path from the snail, Elimia semicarinata (Gastropoda: Pleuroceridae).

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ronald; Berg, Ericka; Dolan, Julianna; King, Bailey; Martin, Michon; Mehmeti, Franceska

    2013-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe (1) the osmotic environment and precise location of the Proterometra macrostoma redia in its snail intermediate host, (2) where retraction of the distome body into the cercarial tail occurs, and (3) the subsequent emergence path of the cercaria out of the snail. Snails, Elimia semicarinata , were collected from North Elkhorn Creek in Scott County, Kentucky and screened daily for patent infections. Live rediae were extracted from infected snails in either artificial pond water (APW) or artificial snail water (ASW) and monitored for changes in morphology and movement every hour over 5 hr at 22 C. Infected and control snails were simultaneously fixed and decalcified in Cal-Ex II, prepared for routine paraffin sectioning, and serial sections subsequently analyzed for rediae and cercariae location. Significantly (?(2) = 42.45; 1 df; P = 0.0001) more rediae showed movement in ASW than in APW after 5 hr, suggesting a host compartment separate from the mantle cavity. Histological sections clearly showed rediae developing in close association with the snail digestive tract, within the peri-intestinal sinus of the snail, and isolated from the mantle cavity by a mantle membrane. Retraction of the distome body into the cercarial tail follows the emergence of the cercaria from the redia. Cercariae then enter the mantle cavity and emerge into fresh water through a siphon-like structure formed by the mantle collar of the snail. PMID:23343411

  11. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Christopher B; Rau, Dr. Donald

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water.

  12. Small Molecules in the Cone Snail Arsenal.

    PubMed

    Neves, Jorge L B; Lin, Zhenjian; Imperial, Julita S; Antunes, Agostinho; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Olivera, Baldomero M; Schmidt, Eric W

    2015-10-16

    Cone snails are renowned for producing peptide-based venom, containing conopeptides and conotoxins, to capture their prey. A novel small-molecule guanine derivative with unprecedented features, genuanine, was isolated from the venom of two cone snail species. Genuanine causes paralysis in mice, indicating that small molecules and not just polypeptides may contribute to the activity of cone snail venom. PMID:26421741

  13. Subsurface And Surface Water Flow Interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter we present basic concepts and principles underlying the phenomena of groundwater and surface water interactions. Fundamental equations and analytical and numerical solutions describing stream-aquifer interactions are presented in hillslope and riparian aquifer en...

  14. HEALTH ASPECTS OF SURFACE WATER SUPPLIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current EPA regulations are insufficient to prevent the waterborne transmission of disease, as waterborne outbreaks have occurred in systems which have not exceeded current regulation for coliforms and turbidity. Waterborne outbreaks reported in surface water systems provide data...

  15. Mars water vapor, near-surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.; Lucich, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous paper we concluded that the temperature sensors aboard the Viking landers (VL-1 and VL-2) were detecting the water vapor frost point. Analysis of one Mars year of data at both lander sites substantiates this conclusion. At VL-1 it is found that the water vapor mixing ratio is constant with height through the bulk of the atmosphere, most of the time. Exceptions are during the onset phases of the two major dust storms when temporary enhancement of near-surface vapor occurs (the same phenomenon is observed at VL-2), and some depletion of near-surface vapor during the decay phase of the first storm, possibly the second storm as well. The former suggests near-surface, northward transport of water vapor with the storms. The latter suggests adsorption of vapor on dust particles followed by surface deposition. At VL-2, severe near-surface depletion of water vapor occurs during northern autumn and winter. The residual vapor is in equilibrium with the surface condensate observed at the site during this period, indicating that the source region for the condensate must be aloft with downward transport by dust fall-out. Since the near-surface water vapor mixing ratio and concentration at VL-1 generally parallels the column abundance over VL-1 obtained by the orbiters, this suggests that VL-1 can be used to give a measure of column abundance for as long as the temperature sensors remain operational.

  16. Mars water vapor, near-surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.; Lucich, R. D.

    1982-08-01

    In a previous paper we concluded that the temperature sensors aboard the Viking landers (VL-1 and VL-2) were detecting the water vapor frost point. Analysis of one Mars year of data at both lander sites substantiates this conclusion. At VL-1 it is found that the water vapor mixing ratio is constant with height through the bulk of the atmosphere, most of the time. Exceptions are during the onset phases of the two major dust storms when temporary enhancement of near-surface vapor occurs (the same phenomenon is observed at VL-2), and some depletion of near-surface vapor during the decay phase of the first storm, possibly the second storm as well. The former suggests near-surface, northward transport of water vapor with the storms. The latter suggests adsorption of vapor on dust particles followed by surface deposition. At VL-2, severe near-surface depletion of water vapor occurs during northern autumn and winter. The residual vapor is in equilibrium with the surface condensate observed at the site during this period, indicating that the source region for the condensate must be aloft with downward transport by dust fall-out. Since the near-surface water vapor mixing ratio and concentration at VL-1 generally parallels the column abundance over VL-1 obtained by the orbiters, this suggests that VL-1 can be used to give a measure of column abundance for as long as the temperature sensors remain operational.

  17. Water Adsorption on Lubricated Carbon Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Masahiro

    2001-02-01

    The fundamental properties of adsorption, i.e., molecular mobility and interaction energy between lubricants, water, and overcoats, are investigated for perfluorinated polyether (PFPE) lubricants on carbon surfaces in order to design mechanically reliable magnetic storage devices. The interaction between PFPE molecules and water molecules on carbon surfaces in dry and humid environments is analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Two NMR spectrum peaks of water on carbon surfaces on which the PFPE diol is coated are observed when humid air of 90% relative humidity (RH) is introduced. One peak at a low chemical shift corresponds to the adsorbed water on the carbon surface. The other peak at a high chemical shift shows sorbed water molecules in the PFPE diol film. Minimum molecular mobility is observed for OH groups, i.e., adsorption sites, in dry air. However, the molecular mobility increases because of the lubricant desorption when humid air is introduced. The increased spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) for the proton in the OH group reveals the desorption phenomena. Adsorption energies between the adsorbates (lubricants and water) and the adsorbent (carbon powder) are measured using a flow micro-calorimeter. When water vapor is introduced, the negative heat of adsorption is observed, which indicates the lubricant desorption caused by the water molecules.

  18. SURFACE WATER INTAKES, NEUSE RIVER WATERSHED, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, in cooperation with the NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, developed the Surface Water Intakes digital data to enhance planning, siting and impact analysis in a...

  19. How Does Water Wet a Surface?

    PubMed

    Maier, Sabine; Salmeron, Miquel

    2015-10-20

    The adsorption and reactions of water on surfaces has attracted great interest, as water is involved in many physical and chemical processes at interfaces. On metal surfaces, the adsorption energy of water is comparable to the hydrogen bond strength in water. Therefore, the delicate balance between the water-water and the water-metal interaction strength determines the stability of water structures. In such systems, kinetic effects play an important role and many metastable states can form with long lifetimes, such that the most stable state may not reached. This has led to difficulties in the theoretical prediction of water structures as well as to some controversial results. The direct imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in ultrahigh vacuum at low temperatures offers a reliable means of understanding the local structure and reaction of water molecules, in particular when interpreted in conjunction with density functional theory calculations. In this Account, a selection of recent STM results on the water adsorption and dissociation on close-packed metal surfaces is reviewed, with a particular focus on Ru(0001). The Ru(0001) surface is one where water adsorbs intact in a metastable state at low temperatures and where partially dissociated layers are formed at temperatures above ∼150 K. First, we will describe the structure of intact water clusters starting with the monomer up to the monolayer. We show that icelike wetting layers do not occur on close-packed metal surfaces but instead hydrogen bonded layers in the form of a mixture of pentagonal, hexagonal, and heptagonal molecular rings are observed. Second, we will discuss the dissociation mechanism of water on Ru(0001). We demonstrate that water adsorption changes from dissociative to molecular as a function of the oxygen preadsorbed on Ru. Finally, we briefly review recent STM experiments on bulk ice (Ih and Ic) and water adsorption on insulating thin films. We conclude with an outlook illustrating the manipulation capabilities of STM in respect to probe the proton and hydrogen dynamics in water clusters. PMID:26418288

  20. The effect of aquatic plant abundance on shell crushing resistance in a freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Campos, Johel; Coghill, Lyndon M; García de León, Francisco J; Johnson, Steven G

    2012-01-01

    Most of the shell material in snails is composed of calcium carbonate but the organic shell matrix determines the properties of calcium carbonate crystals. It has been shown that the deposition of calcium carbonate is affected by the ingestion of organic compounds. We hypothesize that organic compounds not synthesized by the snails are important for shell strength and must be obtained from the diet. We tested this idea indirectly by evaluating whether the abundance of the organic matter that snails eat is related to the strength of their shells. We measured shell crushing resistance in the snail Mexipyrgus churinceanus and the abundance of the most common aquatic macrophyte, the water lily Nymphaea ampla, in ten bodies of water in the valley of Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. We used stable isotopes to test the assumption that these snails feed on water lily organic matter. We also measured other factors that can affect crushing resistance, such as the density of crushing predators, snail density, water pH, and the concentration of calcium and phosphorus in the water. The isotope analysis suggested that snails assimilate water lily organic matter that is metabolized by sediment bacteria. The variable that best explained the variation in crushing resistance found among sites was the local abundance of water lilies. We propose that the local amount of water lily organic matter provides organic compounds important in shell biomineralization, thus determining crushing resistance. Hence, we propose that a third trophic level could be important in the coevolution of snail defensive traits and predatory structures. PMID:22970206

  1. The Effect of Aquatic Plant Abundance on Shell Crushing Resistance in a Freshwater Snail

    PubMed Central

    Chaves-Campos, Johel; Coghill, Lyndon M.; García de León, Francisco J.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the shell material in snails is composed of calcium carbonate but the organic shell matrix determines the properties of calcium carbonate crystals. It has been shown that the deposition of calcium carbonate is affected by the ingestion of organic compounds. We hypothesize that organic compounds not synthesized by the snails are important for shell strength and must be obtained from the diet. We tested this idea indirectly by evaluating whether the abundance of the organic matter that snails eat is related to the strength of their shells. We measured shell crushing resistance in the snail Mexipyrgus churinceanus and the abundance of the most common aquatic macrophyte, the water lily Nymphaea ampla, in ten bodies of water in the valley of Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. We used stable isotopes to test the assumption that these snails feed on water lily organic matter. We also measured other factors that can affect crushing resistance, such as the density of crushing predators, snail density, water pH, and the concentration of calcium and phosphorus in the water. The isotope analysis suggested that snails assimilate water lily organic matter that is metabolized by sediment bacteria. The variable that best explained the variation in crushing resistance found among sites was the local abundance of water lilies. We propose that the local amount of water lily organic matter provides organic compounds important in shell biomineralization, thus determining crushing resistance. Hence, we propose that a third trophic level could be important in the coevolution of snail defensive traits and predatory structures. PMID:22970206

  2. Taken to the limit--Is desiccation stress causing precocious encystment of trematode parasites in snails?

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Katie; Poulin, Robert

    2015-12-01

    When hosts experience environmental stress, the quantity and quality of resources they provide for parasites may be diminished, and host longevity may be decreased. Under stress, parasites may adopt alternative strategies to avoid fitness reductions. Trematode parasites typically have complex life cycles, involving asexual reproduction in a gastropod first intermediate host. A rare phenomenon, briefly mentioned in the literature, and termed 'precocious encystment' involves the next stage in the parasites' life cycle (metacercarial cyst) forming within the preceding stage (redia), while still inside the snail. In the trematode Parorchis sp. NZ using rocky shore snails exposed to long periods outside water, we hypothesised that this might be an adaptive strategy against desiccation, preventing parasite emergence from the snail. To test this, we first investigated the effect of prolonged desiccation on the survival of two species of high intertidal snails. Secondly, we measured the reproductive output (cercarial production) of the parasite under wet and dry conditions. Finally, we quantified the influence of desiccation stress on the occurrence of precocious encystment. Snail mortality was higher under dry conditions, indicating stress, and it was somewhat exacerbated for infected snails. Parasite reproductive output differed between wet and dry conditions, with parasites of snails kept in dry conditions producing more cercariae when placed in water. Little variation was observed in the occurrence of precocious encystment, although some subtle patterns emerged. Given the stresses associated with living in high intertidal environments, we discuss precocious encystment as a possible stress response in this trematode parasite. PMID:26344863

  3. Stable water layers on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Tai, Lin-Ai; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Pin; Yang, Chung-Shi; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-02-17

    Liquid layers adhered to solid surfaces and that are in equilibrium with the vapor phase are common in printing, coating, and washing processes as well as in alveoli in lungs and in stomata in leaves. For such a liquid layer in equilibrium with the vapor it faces, it has been generally believed that, aside from liquid lumps, only a very thin layer of the liquid, i.e., with a thickness of only a few nanometers, is held onto the surface of the solid, and that this adhesion is due to van der Waals forces. A similar layer of water can remain on the surface of a wall of a microchannel after evaporation of bulk water creates a void in the channel, but the thickness of such a water layer has not yet been well characterized. Herein we showed such a water layer adhered to a microchannel wall to be 100 to 170 nm thick and stable against surface tension. The water layer thickness was measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the water layer structure was characterized by using a quantitative nanoparticle counting technique. This thickness was found for channel gap heights ranging from 1 to 5 μm. Once formed, the water layers in the microchannel, when sealed, were stable for at least one week without any special care. Our results indicate that the water layer forms naturally and is closely associated only with the surface to which it adheres. Our study of naturally formed, stable water layers may shed light on topics from gas exchange in alveoli in biology to the post-wet-process control in the semiconductor industry. We anticipate our report to be a starting point for more detailed research and understanding of the microfluidics, mechanisms and applications of gas-liquid-solid systems. PMID:26856872

  4. Polarimetric thermal emission from periodic water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Wilson, W. J.; Li, F. K.; Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results and theoretical calculations are presented to study the polarimetric emission from water surfaces with directional features. For our ground-based Ku-band radiometer measurements, a water pool was constructed on the roof of a building in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and a fiberglass surface with periodic corrugations in one direction was impressed on the top of the water surface to create a stationary water surface underneath it. It is observed that the measured Stokes parameters of corrugated fiberglass-covered water surfaces are functions of azimuth angles and agree very well with the theoretical calculations. The theory, after being verified by the experimental data, was then used to calculate the Stokes parameters of periodic surfaces without fiberglass surface layer and with rms height of the order of wind-generated water ripples. The magnitudes of the azimuthal variation of the calculated emissivities at horizontal and vertical polarizations corresponding to the first two Stokes parameters are found to be comparable to the values measured by airborne radiometers and SSM/I. In addition, the third Stokes parameter not shown in the literature is seen to have approximately twice the magnitude of the azimuth variation of either T(sub h) or T(sub v), which may make it more sensitive to the row direction, while less susceptive to noises because the atmospheric and system noises tend to be unpolarized and are expected to be cancelled out when the third Stokes parameter is derived as the difference of two or three power measurements, as indicated by another experiment carried out at a swimming pool with complicated surroundings. The results indicate that passive polarimetry is a potential technology in the remote sensing of ocean wind vector which is a crucial component in the understanding of global climate change. Issues related to the application of microwave passive polarimetry to ocean wind are also discussed.

  5. Water surface locomotion in tropical canopy ants.

    PubMed

    Yanoviak, S P; Frederick, D N

    2014-06-15

    Upon falling onto the water surface, most terrestrial arthropods helplessly struggle and are quickly eaten by aquatic predators. Exceptions to this outcome mostly occur among riparian taxa that escape by walking or swimming at the water surface. Here we document sustained, directional, neustonic locomotion (i.e. surface swimming) in tropical arboreal ants. We dropped 35 species of ants into natural and artificial aquatic settings in Peru and Panama to assess their swimming ability. Ten species showed directed surface swimming at speeds >3 body lengths s(-1), with some swimming at absolute speeds >10 cm s(-1). Ten other species exhibited partial swimming ability characterized by relatively slow but directed movement. The remaining species showed no locomotory control at the surface. The phylogenetic distribution of swimming among ant genera indicates parallel evolution and a trend toward negative association with directed aerial descent behavior. Experiments with workers of Odontomachus bauri showed that they escape from the water by directing their swimming toward dark emergent objects (i.e. skototaxis). Analyses of high-speed video images indicate that Pachycondyla spp. and O. bauri use a modified alternating tripod gait when swimming; they generate thrust at the water surface via synchronized treading and rowing motions of the contralateral fore and mid legs, respectively, while the hind legs provide roll stability. These results expand the list of facultatively neustonic terrestrial taxa to include various species of tropical arboreal ants. PMID:24920838

  6. Distribution and abundance of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis host snails along the Mara River in Kenya and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Dida, Gabriel O; Gelder, Frank B; Anyona, Douglas N; Matano, Ally-Said; Abuom, Paul O; Adoka, Samson O; Ouma, Collins; Kanangire, Canisius K; Owuor, Phillip O; Ofulla, Ayub V O

    2014-01-01

    We purposively selected 39 sampling sites along the Mara River and its two perennial tributaries of Amala and Nyangores and sampled snails. In addition, water physicochemical parameters (temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, alkalinity, salinity and pH) were taken to establish their influence on the snail abundance and habitat preference. Out of the 39 sites sampled, 10 (25.6%) had snails. The snail species encountered included Biomphalaria pfeifferi Krauss - the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, Bulinus africanus - the intermediate host of Schistosoma haematobium, and Lymnaea natalensis Krauss - the intermediate host of both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica Cobbold. Ceratophallus spp., a non-vector snail was also encountered. Most (61.0%) of the snails were encountered in streamside pools. Schistosomiasis-transmitting host snails, B. pfeifferi and B. africanus, were fewer than fascioliasis-transmitting Lymnaea species. All the four different snail species were found to be attached to different aquatic weeds, with B. pfeifferi accounting for over half (61.1%) of the snails attached to the sedge, followed by B. africanus and Lymnaea spp., accounting for 22.2 and 16.7%, respectively. Ceratophallus spp. were non-existent in sedge. The results from this preliminary study show that snails intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis exists in different habitats, in few areas along the Mara River, though their densities are still low to have any noticeable impacts on disease transmission in case they are infected. The mere presence of the vector snails in these focal regions calls for their immediate control and institution of proper regulations, management, and education among the locals that can help curtail the spread of the snails and also schistosomiasis and fascioliasis within the Mara River basin. PMID:25405008

  7. Distribution and abundance of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis host snails along the Mara River in Kenya and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Dida, Gabriel O.; Gelder, Frank B.; Anyona, Douglas N.; Matano, Ally-Said; Abuom, Paul O.; Adoka, Samson O.; Ouma, Collins; Kanangire, Canisius K.; Owuor, Phillip O.; Ofulla, Ayub V. O.

    2014-01-01

    We purposively selected 39 sampling sites along the Mara River and its two perennial tributaries of Amala and Nyangores and sampled snails. In addition, water physicochemical parameters (temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, alkalinity, salinity and pH) were taken to establish their influence on the snail abundance and habitat preference. Out of the 39 sites sampled, 10 (25.6%) had snails. The snail species encountered included Biomphalaria pfeifferi Krauss – the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, Bulinus africanus – the intermediate host of Schistosoma haematobium, and Lymnaea natalensis Krauss – the intermediate host of both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica Cobbold. Ceratophallus spp., a non-vector snail was also encountered. Most (61.0%) of the snails were encountered in streamside pools. Schistosomiasis-transmitting host snails, B. pfeifferi and B. africanus, were fewer than fascioliasis-transmitting Lymnaea species. All the four different snail species were found to be attached to different aquatic weeds, with B. pfeifferi accounting for over half (61.1%) of the snails attached to the sedge, followed by B. africanus and Lymnaea spp., accounting for 22.2 and 16.7%, respectively. Ceratophallus spp. were non-existent in sedge. The results from this preliminary study show that snails intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis exists in different habitats, in few areas along the Mara River, though their densities are still low to have any noticeable impacts on disease transmission in case they are infected. The mere presence of the vector snails in these focal regions calls for their immediate control and institution of proper regulations, management, and education among the locals that can help curtail the spread of the snails and also schistosomiasis and fascioliasis within the Mara River basin. PMID:25405008

  8. Coupled surface-water and ground-water model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1991-01-01

    In areas with dynamic and hydraulically well connected ground-water and surface-water systems, it is desirable that stream-aquifer interaction be simulated with models of equal sophistication and accuracy. Accordingly, a new, coupled ground-water and surface-water model was developed by combining the U.S. Geological Survey models MODFLOW and BRANCH. MODFLOW is the widely used modular three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water model and BRANCH is a one-dimensional numerical model commonly used to simulate flow in open-channel networks. Because time steps used in ground-water modeling commonly are much longer than those used in surface-water simulations, provision has been made for handling multiple BRANCH time steps within one MODFLOW time step. Verification testing of the coupled model was done using data from previous studies and by comparing results with output from a simpler four-point implicit open-channel flow model linked with MODFLOW.

  9. Surface water records of New Mexico, water year 1961

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1962-01-01

    The surface-water records for the 1961 water year for gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites within the State of New Mexico are given in this report. For convenience there are also included for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey, under the direction of W. L. Heckler, district engineer, Surface Water Branch. This report marks the beginning of a new method of presenting, annually, basic data on surface-water records by States. Through September 30, 1960, the records of discharge and stage of streams and contents and stage of lakes or reservoirs were published in an annual series of U. S. Geological Survey water supply papers entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States." Since 1951 there has been 20 volumes in the series; each volume covered an area whose boundaries coincided with those of certain natural drainage areas. The records in New Mexico were contained in Parts 7, 8, and 9 of that series. Beginning with the 1961 water year, streamflow records and related data will be released by the Geological Survey in annual reports On a State-boundary basis. Distribution of these basic-data reports will be limited and primarily for local needs. The records later will be published in Geological Survey watersupply paper at 5-year intervals. These 5-year water-supply papers will show daily discharge and will be compiled on the same geographical areas previously used for the annual series; however, some of the 14 parts of conterminous United States will be further subdivided.

  10. Water molecule conformation outside a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, F.; Gabbay, I.; March, N. H.

    1981-05-01

    The effect of a metal surface on the conformation of a water molecule has been analyzed by discussing two independent effects: (i) the screening of the proton-proton repulsion, (ii) the interaction of the lone-pair orbitals with the surface. Both effects tend to increase the HOH angle. However, the interaction between the lone-pairs with the surface is the dominant effect for a water molecule approaching the surface. In particular, for a chemisorbed state this interaction is responsible for the major part of the molecule deformation. We have estimated that for H 2O chemisorbed on Ru, the HOH angle must increase from the free molecule value of 104.5° by 3.1 ± 0.5° in good agreement with the experimental evidence.

  11. The Bethe surface of liquid water.

    PubMed

    Dingfelder, M; Inokuti, M

    1999-07-01

    The Bethe surface of liquid water, which was previously calculated by using a semiempirical model, is compared with recently available data from IXS experiments (inelastic x-ray scattering; Compton scattering of high energy photons) in liquid water. No alarming discrepancy is found for a global view of the Bethe surface, in part because the two sets of data have been constrained by the Bethe sum rule. The shape of the Bethe ridge given by the new data is broader than that obtained through the impulse approximation. The extrapolation to the optical limit (viz., at zero momentum transfer) is shown, and the reliability of these data is discussed in detail. PMID:10461754

  12. Epidemiology of cercarial stage of trematodes in freshwater snails from Chiang Mai province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chontananarth, Thapana; Wongsawad, Chalobol

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the epidemiological situation of cercarial trematodes infection in freshwater snails from different water resources in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Methods The snail specimens were collected from 13 districts of Chiang Mai province during April 2008 to February 2012. The prevalence of cercarial infection in snails was investigated using the crushing method. The drawing was done with the help of a camera lucida for the morphological study. Results A total of 2 479 snail individuals were collected and classified into 7 families, 11 genera, and 14 species, Among them, 8 snails species were found to be infected with an overall prevalence of 17.27% (428/2 479), which infected with nine groups of cercariae; gymnocephalous cercaria, strigea cercaria, megalurous cercaria, monostome cercaria, parapleurolophocercous cercaria (Haplorchis cercaria), pleurolophocercous cercaria, furcocercous cercaria (Transversotrema cercaria), xiphidiocercaria, and virgulate cercaria. The parapleurolophocercous cercaria was found to be the dominant type among the cercarial infection in the snails (64.25%). Conclusions The various species of snails found in the research location act as the intermediate hosts for the high prevalence of parasitic infection of many species of mammals. This work will provide new information on both the distribution and first intermediate host of trematodes. PMID:23620846

  13. Pollution of surface water in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Key, A.

    1956-01-01

    This paper discusses pollution of surface water in 18 European countries. For each an account is given of its physical character, population, industries, and present condition of water supplies; the legal, administrative, and technical means of controlling pollution are then described, and an outline is given of current research on the difficulties peculiar to each country. A general discussion of various aspects common to the European problem of water pollution follows; standards of quality are suggested; some difficulties likely to arise in the near future are indicated, and international collaboration, primarily by the exchange of information, is recommended to check or forestall these trends. PMID:13374532

  14. Arsenic speciation in freshwater snails and its life cycle variation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Vivian W-M; Kanaki, Katerina; Pergantis, Spiros A; Cullen, William R; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2012-03-01

    Terrestrial snails are consumed by humans occasionally and they are an important food source for many creatures including fish and birds. Little is known about arsenic speciation in these gastropods, let alone life cycle variations. Here we report on the arsenic speciation in freshwater snails from Pender Island and Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada, which was determined on methanol/water extracts (43-59% extraction efficiency) by using high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and HPLC-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The tetramethylarsonium ion, oxo-arsenosugars and thio-arsenosugars are the main arsenic species encountered. Arsenobetaine, which is commonly found in the marine environment, is minor. Live bearing snails Viviparidae sp. from Pender Island were maintained in aquaria and the arsenic speciation in the unborn, newly born, and adult animals was monitored. Oxo-arsenosugars predominate in the adults, whereas thio-arsenosugars seem to predominate in juveniles, suggesting that these arsenicals are snail metabolites. PMID:22193982

  15. The Application of Electric Shock as a Novel Pest Control Method for Apple Snail, Pomacea canaliculata (Gastropoda: Ampullariidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagyu, Yoshihito; Tsuji, Satoshi; Satoh, Saburoh; Yamabe, Chobei

    The apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, brought to Japan from Taiwan for human consumption in the 1980s, has come to be considered as deleterious for rice cultivation. The snail is unable to injure young rice plants while receiving electric shock because the snail retracts its entire body into its shell and shuts its aperture with its operculum. Electric shock should be applied intermittently to reduce the amount of energy that is wasted when the snail is in its shell made of one of the insulator. The minimum electric shock required for controlling snails and the time required for movement after application of electric shock to determine the frequency of each electric shock were investigated using two methods; vertical and horizontal application of the electrical stimulation. The results showed that there is a strong correlation between the strength of electric shock and the reaction of the snails, and electric shock made snails inactive when it was applied 0.35 A/m2 in the horizontal direction and 0.45 A/m2 in the vertical direction with water of 11 mS/m. A positive correlation was also found between electric shock and the reaction of the snails and shell height. In comparison with larger snails, the smaller snails had higher threshold levels against electric current density because their shorter feet tended to have lower voltage dorp. Moreover, the frequency of electric shock should be chosen the minimum duration for the inactive condition, and it was approximately 10 seconds. Consequently the direction of electric current should be in the horizontal direction above 0.35 A/m2 and the frequency of electric shock should be less than 10 seconds for practical use. However, electric shock would have to be maintained at greater than 0.35 A/m2 because snails might become habituated to electric shock and water in paddy field would have high electric conductivity.

  16. [Surface water pollution and microbiological indicators].

    PubMed

    Aulicino, Francesca Anna; Marranzano, Marina; Mauro, Luisa

    2005-01-01

    Surface waters must undergo careful quality assessment before being used as drinking water. Contamination with wastewaters, whether treated, untreated or partially treated, is a risk to public health. Most waterborne infections are caused by ingestion of contaminated water, but contact or inhalation also represent a risk. In industrialized countries, epidemic episodes are mainly due to the spread of new agents or newly identified infections (Arcobacter, Norovirus, Cryptosporodium, Giardia, etc.). To determine the microbial quality of water environments, the latest regulations identify three different groups of indicators according to their contaminating role: faecal, processing, and model or index organisms. No single organism is an adequate indicator of the diverse conditions of water environments. Thus, it is necessary to accurately identify specific indicators. PMID:16552127

  17. Evaporation over fresh and saline water surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrady, Ahmed; Timmermans, Joris; Vekerdy, Zoltan

    2013-04-01

    Evaporation over large water bodies has a crucial role in the global hydrological cycle. Evaporation occurs whenever there is a vapor pressure deficit between a water surface and the atmosphere, and the available energy is sufficient. Salinity affects the density and latent heat of vaporization of the water body, which reflects on the evaporation rate. Different models have been developed to estimate the evaporation process over water surfaces using earth observation data. Most of these models are concerned with the atmospheric parameters. However these models do not take into account the influence of salinity on the evaporation rate; they do not consider the difference in the energy needed for vaporization. For this purpose an energy balance model is required. Several energy balance models that calculate daily evapotranspiration exist, such as the surface energy balance system (SEBS). They estimate the heat fluxes by integration of satellite data and hydro-meteorological field data. SEBS has the advantage that it can be applied over a large scale because it incorporates the physical state of the surface and the aerodynamic resistances in the daily evapotranspiration estimation. Nevertheless this model has not used over water surfaces. The goal of this research is to adapt SEBS to estimate the daily evaporation over fresh and saline water bodies. In particular, 1) water heat flux and roughness of momentum and heat transfer estimation need to be updated, 2) upscaling to daily evaporation needs to be investigated and finally 3) integration of the salinity factor to estimate the evaporation over saline water needs to be performed. Eddy covariance measurements over the Ijsselmeer Lake (The Netherlands) were used to estimate the roughness of momentum and heat transfer at respectively 0.0002 and 0.0001 m. Application of these values over Tana Lake (freshwater), in Ethiopia showed latent heat to be in a good agreement with the measurements, with RMSE of 35.5 Wm-2and rRMSE of 4.7 %. Afterwards the validity of salinity adapted model was tested over different study areas using ECMWF data. It was found that for the original SEBS model and salinity-adapted model over Great Salt Lake, the RMSE were 0.62 and 0.24 mm respectively and the rRMSE 19% and 24%. The evaporation reduction of the Great Salt Lake and the oceans are 27% and 1 %, respectively. In conclusion, SEBS model is adapted to calculate the daily evaporation over fresh water and salt water by integration the salinity factor in the model.

  18. [Factors that can affect the breeding and maintenance of infected snails and the production of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae].

    PubMed

    De Souza, C P; Araújo, N; Jannotti, L K; Gazzinelli, G

    1987-01-01

    Mass production of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae was affected by biological and chemical agents. Rotifers and ostracods, snail predators, were identified in our colony. Rotifers were easily eradicated by washing the aquaria and lettuce with diluted solution of acetic acid. On the other hand, ostracods were difficult to eradicate and led to a high level mortality of infected snails (50-60%). Snails maintained in an incubator at constant temperature and total darkness produced maximum shedding when submitted to brightness and high temperature (about 30 degrees C). The number of cercariae shed was practically the same between pH 5-7. Contaminants such as Cu and Pb added to glass distilled water decreased the cercariae production. In conclusion, laboratory maintenance of large number of infected snails for mass production of cercariae is much simpler and more efficient than the conventional technique with running tap water although a high rate of mortality is observed in the snail colony. PMID:3507569

  19. Hydrodynamic Modeling Approaches for Surface Water Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber, F. H.; Shukla, S.

    2004-12-01

    Hydrologic modeling of surface water reservoirs is an effective tool in evaluating different water management options for addressing regional water issues in Florida. However, modeling reservoir water dynamics could be challenging because of the difference in scale between canals and the entire reservoir. Water pumped into the reservoirs is first discharged into canals inside the reservoirs, which distributes the water. The canal eventually overflows and water floods all the reservoir. Two modeling approaches to simulate this process were tested on two reservoirs using the integrated MIKE-SHE and MIKE 11 model. The first approach simulates the 1- D flow in the canal in a link-node model and once water floods, it is modeled as 2-D flow. The second approach simulates the entire impoundment as a canal. In both reservoirs, Modeling Approach 1 resulted in overestimation of peaks and poor results. Modeling Approach 2 showed considerable improvements in the results and a satisfactory match between observed and simulated water levels. The difference is attributed to the difficulty in representing the canal flooding process in hydrodynamic models.

  20. Global modeling of fresh surface water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Eikelboom, T.; van Vliet, M. T.; Van Beek, L. P.

    2011-12-01

    Temperature determines a range of water physical properties, the solubility of oxygen and other gases and acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing chemical reaction rates, phytoplankton and zooplankton composition and the presence or absence of pathogens. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism, tolerance to parasites, diseases and pollution and life history. Compared to statistical approaches, physically-based models of surface water temperature have the advantage that they are robust in light of changes in flow regime, river morphology, radiation balance and upstream hydrology. Such models are therefore better suited for projecting the effects of global change on water temperature. Till now, physically-based models have only been applied to well-defined fresh water bodies of limited size (e.g., lakes or stream segments), where the numerous parameters can be measured or otherwise established, whereas attempts to model water temperature over larger scales has thus far been limited to regression type of models. Here, we present a first attempt to apply a physically-based model of global fresh surface water temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modelled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by short and long-wave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice-formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We used the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global fresh surface water temperature at daily time steps on a 0.5x0.5 degree grid for the period 1970-2000. Meteorological forcing was obtained from the CRU data set, downscaled to daily values with ECMWF ERA40 re-analysis data. We compared our simulation results with daily temperature data from rivers and lakes (USGS, limited to the USA) and compared mean monthly temperatures with those recorded in the GEMS data set. Results show that the model is able to capture well the mean monthly surface temperature for the majority of the GEMS stations both in time as well as in space, while the inter-annual variability as derived from the USGS data was captured reasonably well. Results are poorest for the arctic rivers, possibly because the timing of ice-breakup is predicted too late in the year due to the lack of including a mechanical break-up mechanism. The spatio-temporal variation of water temperature reveals large temperature differences between water and atmosphere for the higher latitudes, while considerable lateral transport of heat can be observed for rivers crossing hydroclimatic zones such as the Nile, the Mississippi and the large rivers flowing into the Arctic. Overall, our model results show great promise for future projection of global fresh surface water temperature under global change.

  1. NANOFILTRATION FOULANTS FROM A TREATED SURFACE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The foulant from pilot nanofiltration membrane elements fed conventionally-treated surface water for 15 months was analyzed for organic, inorganic, and biological parameters. The foulant responsible for flux loss was shown to be a film layer 20 to 80 um thick with the greatest de...

  2. Observing Global Surface Water Flood Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Paul D.; Neal, Jefferey C.; Alsdorf, Douglas; Schumann, Guy J.-P.

    2014-05-01

    Flood waves moving along river systems are both a key determinant of globally important biogeochemical and ecological processes and, at particular times and particular places, a major environmental hazard. In developed countries, sophisticated observing networks and ancillary data, such as channel bathymetry and floodplain terrain, exist with which to understand and model floods. However, at global scales, satellite data currently provide the only means of undertaking such studies. At present, there is no satellite mission dedicated to observing surface water dynamics and, therefore, surface water scientists make use of a range of sensors developed for other purposes that are distinctly sub-optimal for the task in hand. Nevertheless, by careful combination of the data available from topographic mapping, oceanographic, cryospheric and geodetic satellites, progress in understanding some of the world's major river, floodplain and wetland systems can be made. This paper reviews the surface water data sets available to hydrologists on a global scale and the recent progress made in the field. Further, the paper looks forward to the proposed NASA/CNES Surface Water Ocean Topography satellite mission that may for the first time provide an instrument that meets the needs of the hydrology community.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of water solvating biomolecular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyden, Matthias

    Changes in the potential energy and entropy of water molecules hydrating biomolecular interfaces play a significant role for biomolecular solubility and association. Free energy perturbation and thermodynamic integration methods allow calculations of free energy differences between two states from simulations. However, these methods are computationally demanding and do not provide insights into individual thermodynamic contributions, i.e. changes in the solvent energy or entropy. Here, we employ methods to spatially resolve distributions of hydration water thermodynamic properties in the vicinity of biomolecular surfaces. This allows direct insights into thermodynamic signatures of the hydration of hydrophobic and hydrophilic solvent accessible sites of proteins and small molecules and comparisons to ideal model surfaces. We correlate dynamic properties of hydration water molecules, i.e. translational and rotational mobility, to their thermodynamics. The latter can be used as a guide to extract thermodynamic information from experimental measurements of site-resolved water dynamics. Further, we study energy-entropy compensations of water at different hydration sites of biomolecular surfaces. This work is supported by the Cluster of Excellence RESOLV (EXC 1069) funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  4. Landsat - A satellite surface water divining rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, K. J.; Schlosser, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    A DAM (Detection and Mapping) package is developed to provide accurate up-to-date economical and properly formatted maps of surface water using Landsat earth resources satellite digital data in order to detect and locate unrecorded water impoundments. The operational procedure is discussed in terms of data acquisition, establishment of the control network, specification of map characteristics, and generation of maps. Preliminary evaluations essentially indicate that the DAM package can be readily used by personnel unfamiliar with computer processing of remote sensing data, that no false detections are encountered, and that detection accuracy of surface water impoundments greater than 4 hectares is between 95-98%. However, terrain shadows present a problem in mountainous areas at low sun angles. A total cost of less than 15 cents per sq mile to compile the inventory is noted.

  5. Water at surfaces with tunable surface chemistries and the chiral imprint of water around DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Poul

    Aqueous interfaces are ubiquitous in atmospheric chemistry and biological systems but are notoriously hard to probe experimentally. Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy offers an avenue to directly probe the vibrational modes of the water OH stretching band but this method is challenging to implement to buried surfaces. Here we present results from sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy probing the buried interface between a functionalized surface and aqueous solutions. Studying such buried surfaces offers the advantage of being able to systematically tune the surface chemistry using self-assembled monolayers, i.e. the hydrophobic and hydrophilic character, and examine the effect on the interfacial water. In addition to water at these controlled surfaces, we have initiated studying water at biological surfaces. This includes the solvation structure around DNA. X-ray experiments at cryogenic temperatures have found crystallographic water in the minor grove of DNA giving rise to the notion of a spine of hydration surrounding DNA. Such structured water should exhibit a chiral structure adapted from DNA. We investigate if such a chiral water structure exist around DNA at room temperature using chiral SFG. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under a NSF CAREER Grant (CHE-1151079).

  6. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Misako; Indo, Hiroko P.; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Iwashita, Yoichiro; Fukushige, Tomoko; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Kanekura, Takuro; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Ozawa, Masayuki

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ► MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ► TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of key enzymes. This results in enhanced glucose dependency and leads to cell death under low-glucose conditions. On the other hand, the reduced requirements for oxygen and nutrients from the surrounding environment, might confer the resistance to cell death induced by hypoxia and malnutrition.

  7. Celss nutrition system utilizing snails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midorikawa, Y.; Fujii, T.; Ohira, A.; Nitta, K.

    At the 40th IAF Congress in Malaga, a nutrition system for a lunar base CELSS was presented. A lunar base with a total of eight crew members was envisaged. In this paper, four species of plants—rice, soybean, lettuce and strawberry—were introduced to the system. These plants were sufficient to satisfy fundamental nutritional needs of the crew members. The supply of nutrition from plants and the human nutritional requirements could almost be balanced. Our study revealed that the necessary plant cultivation area per crew member would be nearly 40 m 3 in the lunar base. The sources of nutrition considered in the study were energy, sugar, fat, amino acids, inorganic salt and vitamins; however, calcium, vitamin B 2, vitamin A and sodium were found to be lacking. Therefore, a subsystem to supply these elements is of considerable value. In this paper, we report on a study for breeding snails and utilizing meat as food. Nutrients supplied from snails are shown to compensate for the abovementioned lacking elements. We evaluate the snail breeder and the associated food supply system as a subsystem of closed ecological life support system.

  8. Surface water records of New Mexico, water year 1963

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1964-01-01

    This report is the third in a series presenting, annually, basic data on surface-water records by States. Through September 30, 1960, the records of discharge and stage of streams and contents and stage of lakes or reservoirs were published in an annual series of U. S. Geological Survey water-supply papers entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States". Since 1951 there have been 20 volumes in the series; each volume covered an area whose boundaries coincided with those of certain natural drainage areas. The records in New Mexico were contained in Parts 7, 8, and 9 of that series. Beginning with the 1961 water year, streamflow records and related data will be released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State-boundary basis. Distribution of these basic-data reports will be limited and primarily for local needs. The records later will be published in Geological Survey water-supply papers at 5- year intervals. These 5-year water-supply papers will show daily discharge and will be compiled on the same geographical areas previously used for the annual series; however, some of the 14 parts of conterminous United States will be further subdivided.

  9. Surface Water Applications of Satellite Scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Barber, D. G.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Leshkevich, G. A.; Markus, T.; Neumann, G.; Njoku, E. G.; Perovich, D. K.; Steffen, K.; Sturm, M.; van Woert, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    We present an overview of the use of satellite scatterometry to detect surface water in liquid and solid phases for various regional geophysical applications. We study scatterometer/radiometer signatures of surface soil moisture with in-situ data from SCAN, Oklahoma Mesonet, and NCDC/GSOD stations. Results indicate scatterometer data can detect and inventory wet surface events due to rains to determine the regional frequency of surface water cycling. Animated time-series of scatterometer data over the SMEX (Soil Moisture EXperiment) region in mid-west US illustrate the monitoring of surface water variabilities over large scales. An automated flood processing algorithm implemented at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) provides daily updated data over the world to the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO) for early flood detections. We verify the flooded areas with MODIS clear-sky observations. We obtain weekly wetland results in Africa, Asia, North America, and South America. We show wetland monitoring results over the Eastern Arkansas - Mississippi River Valley with a comparison of the maximum extent to MODIS standard water. We investigate scatterometer signatures of snowmelt with field experiments carried out in Alaska to develop algorithms for snowmelt detection over the northern hemisphere. We present animated snowmelt results over the Lena River region in Siberia leading to floods (in 2000-2003) including the 2001 Lena Flood of the Century. Snowmelt timing parameters derived from scatterometer data are appropriate for assimilation into hydrology models for river discharge estimate and for flood forecast. We map ice cover over the Great Lakes and compare the results with observations from US Coast Guard (USCG) Mackinaw icebreaker and from a web camera on Granite Island. Over Greenland, we map and monitor surface melt areas and compare the results to in-situ measurements from the Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net). Results show extensive melt over the Greenland ice surface in 2002 in record amounts. We carried out a sea-ice mapping field experiment using the USCG Healy icebreaker over the Barents Sea in 2001. We detect a peculiar sea-ice barrier east of Svalbard, which poses hazards to ship navigation east of Svalbard. We map sea ice melt and refreezing areas by combining QuikSCAT and SSM/I products over the Arctic sea ice with verification from the Canadian C-ICE field experiment. Finally, we discuss limitations of current satellite scatterometers and the need for future advanced satellite sensors for surface-water applications.

  10. Uncertainty in surface water flood risk modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, J. B.; Martin, D. N.; Roberts, E.; Domuah, R.

    2009-04-01

    Two thirds of the flooding that occurred in the UK during summer 2007 was as a result of surface water (otherwise known as ‘pluvial') rather than river or coastal flooding. In response, the Environment Agency and Interim Pitt Reviews have highlighted the need for surface water risk mapping and warning tools to identify, and prepare for, flooding induced by heavy rainfall events. This need is compounded by the likely increase in rainfall intensities due to climate change. The Association of British Insurers has called for the Environment Agency to commission nationwide flood risk maps showing the relative risk of flooding from all sources. At the wider European scale, the recently-published EC Directive on the assessment and management of flood risks will require Member States to evaluate, map and model flood risk from a variety of sources. As such, there is now a clear and immediate requirement for the development of techniques for assessing and managing surface water flood risk across large areas. This paper describes an approach for integrating rainfall, drainage network and high-resolution topographic data using Flowroute™, a high-resolution flood mapping and modelling platform, to produce deterministic surface water flood risk maps. Information is provided from UK case studies to enable assessment and validation of modelled results using historical flood information and insurance claims data. Flowroute was co-developed with flood scientists at Cambridge University specifically to simulate river dynamics and floodplain inundation in complex, congested urban areas in a highly computationally efficient manner. It utilises high-resolution topographic information to route flows around individual buildings so as to enable the prediction of flood depths, extents, durations and velocities. As such, the model forms an ideal platform for the development of surface water flood risk modelling and mapping capabilities. The 2-dimensional component of Flowroute employs uniform flow formulae (Manning's Equation) to direct flow over the model domain, sourcing water from the channel or sea so as to provide a detailed representation of river and coastal flood risk. The initial development step was to include spatially-distributed rainfall as a new source term within the model domain. This required optimisation to improve computational efficiency, given the ubiquity of ‘wet' cells early on in the simulation. Collaboration with UK water companies has provided detailed drainage information, and from this a simplified representation of the drainage system has been included in the model via the inclusion of sinks and sources of water from the drainage network. This approach has clear advantages relative to a fully coupled method both in terms of reduced input data requirements and computational overhead. Further, given the difficulties associated with obtaining drainage information over large areas, tests were conducted to evaluate uncertainties associated with excluding drainage information and the impact that this has upon flood model predictions. This information can be used, for example, to inform insurance underwriting strategies and loss estimation as well as for emergency response and planning purposes. The Flowroute surface-water flood risk platform enables efficient mapping of areas sensitive to flooding from high-intensity rainfall events due to topography and drainage infrastructure. As such, the technology has widespread potential for use as a risk mapping tool by the UK Environment Agency, European Member States, water authorities, local governments and the insurance industry. Keywords: Surface water flooding, Model Uncertainty, Insurance Underwriting, Flood inundation modelling, Risk mapping.

  11. Excitation of surface electromagnetic waves on water.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Goben, C A; Davarpanah, M; Boone, J L

    1978-11-01

    Excitation of surface electromagnetic waves (SEW) on water was studied using optical coupling techniques at microwave frequencies. Excitation of SEW was also achieved using direct horn antenna coupling. The transmitted SEW power was increased by adding acid and salt to water. The horn antenna gave the maximum excitation efficiency 70%. It was increased to 75% by collimating the electromagnetic beam in the vertical direction. Excitation efficiency for the prism (0 degrees pitch angle) and grating couplers were 15.2% and 10.5% respectively. By changing the prism coupler pitch angle to +36 degrees , its excitation efficiency was increased to 82%. PMID:20204001

  12. Snails, stable iostopes, and southwestern desert paleoclimates

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.E.; Whelan, J.F.; Forester, R.M.; Burdett, J.

    1995-09-01

    Modern and fossil molluscs (snails) occur in many localities in and semi-arid regions throughout the desert southwest. Live terrestrial snails are found under rocks and in forest litter and aquatic taxa inhabit springs, seeps, and/or wetlands. Molluscs uptake local water during their growing season (spring and summer) and incorporate its delta 180 signature into their shells. Preliminary 180 analysis of modem shells from the southern Great Basin indicates that the shells probably reflect meteoric water 180 values during the growing season. This provides a way to estimate the delta 180 value of precipitation and, thereby, the source of the moisture-bearing air masses. Significant 180 variability in shells analyzed include geographic location, elevation, taxonomy, and habitat (terrestrial, spring, or wetland). We found a rough inverse correlation with elevation in modem shells from the Spring Range in southern Nevada. The delta 180 values of modem and fossil shells are also very different; modem values in this location are much higher than those from nearby late Pleistocene-age molluscs suggesting that the Pleistocene summers were variously colder and wetter than today or less evaporative (more humid). Assuming shell material directly reflects the 180 of the growing-season environment, comparison of modem and fossil shell delta 180 values can potentially identify changes in air-mass moisture sources and can help to define seasonal precipitation change through time. Comprehension and quantification of community and isotopic variability in modem gastropods is required to create probabilistic valid transfer functions with fossil materials. Valid inferences about past environmental conditions can then be established with known confidence limits.

  13. Laser induced surface stress on water droplets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Neng; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2014-10-01

    Laser induced stress on spherical water droplets is studied. At mechanical equilibrium, the body stress vanishes therefore we consider only the surface stress. The surface stress on sub-wavelength droplets is slightly weaker along the light propagation direction. For larger droplets, due to their light focusing effect, the forward stress is significantly enhanced. For a particle roughly 3 micron in radius, when it is excited at whispering gallery mode with Q ∼ 10⁴ by a 1 Watt Gaussian beam, the stress can be enhanced by two orders of magnitude, and can be comparable with the Laplace pressure. PMID:25321955

  14. Source Water Assessment for the Las Vegas Valley Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, S. P.; Piechota, T. C.

    2003-12-01

    The 1996 amendment to the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 created the Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP) with an objective to evaluate potential sources of contamination to drinking water intakes. The development of a Source Water Assessment Plan for Las Vegas Valley surface water runoff into Lake Mead is important since it will guide future work on source water protection of the main source of water. The first step was the identification of the watershed boundary and source water protection area. Two protection zones were delineated. Zone A extends 500 ft around water bodies, and Zone B extends 3000 ft from the boundaries of Zone A. These Zones extend upstream to the limits of dry weather flows in the storm channels within the Las Vegas Valley. After the protection areas were identified, the potential sources of contamination in the protection area were inventoried. Field work was conducted to identify possible sources of contamination. A GIS coverage obtained from local data sources was used to identify the septic tank locations. Finally, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits were obtained from the State of Nevada, and included in the inventory. After the inventory was completed, a level of risk was assigned to each potential contaminating activity (PCA). The contaminants of concern were grouped into five categories: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), synthetic organic compounds (SOCs), inorganic compounds (IOCs), microbiological, and radionuclides. The vulnerability of the water intake to each of the PCAs was assigned based on these five categories, and also on three other factors: the physical barrier effectiveness, the risk potential, and the time of travel. The vulnerability analysis shows that the PCAs with the highest vulnerability rating include septic systems, golf courses/parks, storm channels, gas stations, auto repair shops, construction, and the wastewater treatment plant discharges. Based on the current water quality data (prior to treatment), the proximity of Las Vegas Wash to the intake, and the results of the vulnerability analysis of potential contaminating activities, it is determined that the drinking water intake is at a Moderate level of risk for VOC, SOC, and microbiological contaminants. The drinking water intake is at a High level of risk for IOC contaminants. Vulnerability to radiological contamination is Moderate. Source water protection in the Las Vegas Valley is strongly encouraged because of the documented influence of the Las Vegas Wash on the quality of the water at the intake.

  15. Water quality analysis of surface water: a Web approach.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Poonam; Chaurasia, Meenal; Sohony, R A; Gupta, Indrani; Kumar, R

    2013-07-01

    The chemical, physical and biological characteristics of water with respect to its suitability describe its quality. Concentration of pesticides or fertilisers degrades the water quality and affects marine life. A comprehensive environmental data information system helps to perform and complete common tasks in less time with less effort for data verification, data calculations, graph generation, and proper monitoring, which helps in the further mitigation step. In this paper, focus is given to a web-based system developed to express the quality of water in the imprecise environment of monitoring data. Water samples were analyzed for eight different surface water parameters, in which four parameters such as pH, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, and fecal coliform were used for the water quality index calculation following MPCB Water Quality Standards of class A-II for best designated use. The analysis showed that river points in a particular year were in very bad category with certainty level of 0-38% which is unsuitable for drinking purposes; samples in bad category had certainty level that ranged from 38 to 50%; samples in medium to good category had certainty levels from 50 to 100%, and the remaining samples were in good to excellent category, suitable for drinking purposes, with certainty levels from 63 to 100%. PMID:23238782

  16. Atmospheric radiation model for water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Gaskill, D. W.; Lierzer, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    An atmospheric correction model was extended to account for various atmospheric radiation components in remotely sensed data. Components such as the atmospheric path radiance which results from singly scattered sky radiation specularly reflected by the water surface are considered. A component which is referred to as the virtual Sun path radiance, i.e. the singly scattered path radiance which results from the solar radiation which is specularly reflected by the water surface is also considered. These atmospheric radiation components are coded into a computer program for the analysis of multispectral remote sensor data over the Great Lakes of the United States. The user must know certain parameters, such as the visibility or spectral optical thickness of the atmosphere and the geometry of the sensor with respect to the Sun and the target elements under investigation.

  17. Impact of invasive apple snails on the functioning and services of natural and managed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, Finbarr G.; Stuart, Alexander M.; Kudavidanage, Enoka P.

    2014-01-01

    At least 14 species of apple snail (Ampullariidae) have been released to water bodies outside their native ranges; however, less than half of these species have become widespread or caused appreciable impacts. We review evidence for the impact of apple snails on natural and managed wetlands focusing on those studies that have elucidated impact mechanisms. Significant changes in wetland ecosystems have been noted in regions where the snails are established: Two species in particular (Pomacea canaliculata and Pomacea maculata) have become major pests of aquatic crops, including rice, and caused enormous increases in molluscicide use. Invasive apple snails have also altered macrophyte community structure in natural and managed wetlands through selective herbivory and certain apple snail species can potentially shift the balance of freshwater ecosystems from clear water (macrophyte dominated) to turbid (plankton dominated) states by depleting densities of native aquatic plants. Furthermore, the introductions of some apple snail species have altered benthic community structure either directly, through predation, or indirectly, through exploitation competition or as a result of management actions. To date much of the evidence for these impacts has been based on correlations, with few manipulative field or mesocosm experiments. Greater attention to impact monitoring is required, and, for Asia in particular, a landscape approach to impact management that includes both natural and managed-rice wetlands is recommended.

  18. Survival and growth of freshwater pulmonate and nonpulmonate snails in 28-day exposures to copper, ammonia, and pentachlorophenol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Dorman, Rebecca A.; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    We performed toxicity tests with two species of pulmonate snails (Lymnaea stagnalis and Physa gyrina) and four taxa of nonpulmonate snails in the family Hydrobiidae (Pyrgulopsis robusta,Taylorconcha serpenticola, Fluminicola sp., and Fontigens aldrichi). Snails were maintained in static-renewal or recirculating culture systems with adults removed periodically to isolate cohorts of offspring for toxicity testing. This method successfully produced offspring for both species of pulmonate snails and for two hydrobiid species, P. robusta and Fluminicola sp. Toxicity tests were performed for 28 days with copper, ammonia, and pentachlorophenol in hard reconstituted water with endpoints of survival and growth. Tests were started with 1-week-old L. stagnalis, 2-week-old P. gyrina, 5- to 13-week-old P. robusta and Fluminicola sp., and older juveniles and adults of several hydrobiid species. For all three chemicals, chronic toxicity values for pulmonate snails were consistently greater than those for hydrobiid snails, and hydrobiids were among the most sensitive taxa in species sensitivity distributions for all three chemicals. These results suggest that the toxicant sensitivity of nonpulmonate snails in the family Hydrobiidae would not be adequately represented by results of toxicity testing with pulmonate snails.

  19. Survival and Growth of Freshwater Pulmonate and Nonpulmonate Snails in 28-Day Exposures to Copper, Ammonia, and Pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Besser, John M; Dorman, Rebecca A; Hardesty, Douglas L; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2016-02-01

    We performed toxicity tests with two species of pulmonate snails (Lymnaea stagnalis and Physa gyrina) and four taxa of nonpulmonate snails in the family Hydrobiidae (Pyrgulopsis robusta, Taylorconcha serpenticola, Fluminicola sp., and Fontigens aldrichi). Snails were maintained in static-renewal or recirculating culture systems with adults removed periodically to isolate cohorts of offspring for toxicity testing. This method successfully produced offspring for both species of pulmonate snails and for two hydrobiid species, P. robusta and Fluminicola sp. Toxicity tests were performed for 28 days with copper, ammonia, and pentachlorophenol in hard reconstituted water with endpoints of survival and growth. Tests were started with 1-week-old L. stagnalis, 2-week-old P. gyrina, 5- to 13-week-old P. robusta and Fluminicola sp., and older juveniles and adults of several hydrobiid species. For all three chemicals, chronic toxicity values for pulmonate snails were consistently greater than those for hydrobiid snails, and hydrobiids were among the most sensitive taxa in species sensitivity distributions for all three chemicals. These results suggest that the toxicant sensitivity of nonpulmonate snails in the family Hydrobiidae would not be adequately represented by results of toxicity testing with pulmonate snails. PMID:26747374

  20. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis. PMID:26991185

  1. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis.

  2. Controlling slugs and snails in orchids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slugs and snails are pests of orchids, preferring tender plant tissues such as flowers and root tips. Unlike many insect pests which feed only on certain types of plants, most species of slugs and snails are generalists, feeding on green plants, algae, fungi, decaying plant matter, or decaying anima...

  3. Inquiry, Land Snails, and Environmental Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Krantz, Patrick D.

    2005-01-01

    Land snails are common invertebrates that fascinate children. Unfortunately, they are seldom used for activities in the science classroom. Snails are inexpensive, take up little space in the classroom, and require only low maintenance, and their learning dividends can be enormous. For example, students can use them in inquiry-based activities that…

  4. Environmental calcium modifies induced defences in snails.

    PubMed

    Rundle, Simon D; Spicer, John I; Coleman, Ross A; Vosper, Jo; Soane, Julie

    2004-02-01

    Inducible defences are adaptive phenotypes that arise in response to predation threats. Such plasticity incurs costs to individuals, but there has been little interest in how such induced traits in animals may be constrained by environmental factors. Here, we demonstrate that calcium availability interacts with predation cues to modify snail shell growth and form. Small snails increased their growth and were heavier when exposed to fish chemical cues, but this response was calcium limited. There was also an interactive effect of fish cues and calcium on the shell growth of larger snails, but shell strength and aperture narrowness were affected by calcium alone. For small snails, behavioural avoidance was greatest for snails exhibiting least morphological plasticity, suggesting a trade-off. There was no trade-off of somatic growth with plasticity. We suggest that the expression of defensive traits in molluscs can be constrained by calcium availability, which has implications for molluscan ecology and evolution. PMID:15101422

  5. Release of Lungworm Larvae from Snails in the Environment: Potential for Alternative Transmission Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Giannelli, Alessio; Colella, Vito; Abramo, Francesca; do Nascimento Ramos, Rafael Antonio; Falsone, Luigi; Brianti, Emanuele; Varcasia, Antonio; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Knaus, Martin; Fox, Mark T.; Otranto, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastropod-borne parasites may cause debilitating clinical conditions in animals and humans following the consumption of infected intermediate or paratenic hosts. However, the ingestion of fresh vegetables contaminated by snail mucus and/or water has also been proposed as a source of the infection for some zoonotic metastrongyloids (e.g., Angiostrongylus cantonensis). In the meantime, the feline lungworms Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior are increasingly spreading among cat populations, along with their gastropod intermediate hosts. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of alternative transmission pathways for A. abstrusus and T. brevior L3 via the mucus of infected Helix aspersa snails and the water where gastropods died. In addition, the histological examination of snail specimens provided information on the larval localization and inflammatory reactions in the intermediate host. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty-four specimens of H. aspersa received ~500 L1 of A. abstrusus and T. brevior, and were assigned to six study groups. Snails were subjected to different mechanical and chemical stimuli throughout 20 days in order to elicit the production of mucus. At the end of the study, gastropods were submerged in tap water and the sediment was observed for lungworm larvae for three consecutive days. Finally, snails were artificially digested and recovered larvae were counted and morphologically and molecularly identified. The anatomical localization of A. abstrusus and T. brevior larvae within snail tissues was investigated by histology. L3 were detected in the snail mucus (i.e., 37 A. abstrusus and 19 T. brevior) and in the sediment of submerged specimens (172 A. abstrusus and 39 T. brevior). Following the artificial digestion of H. aspersa snails, a mean number of 127.8 A. abstrusus and 60.3 T. brevior larvae were recovered. The number of snail sections positive for A. abstrusus was higher than those for T. brevior. Conclusions Results of this study indicate that A. abstrusus and T. brevior infective L3 are shed in the mucus of H. aspersa or in water where infected gastropods had died submerged. Both elimination pathways may represent alternative route(s) of environmental contamination and source of the infection for these nematodes under field conditions and may significantly affect the epidemiology of feline lungworms. Considering that snails may act as intermediate hosts for other metastrongyloid species, the environmental contamination by mucus-released larvae is discussed in a broader context. PMID:25884402

  6. The Curiously Slow Snail Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vener, David; Balmforth, Neil; Sekora, Mike; Bush, John; Young, Bill

    2004-11-01

    Motivated by the curious behavior of the commercially available `snail ball,' we investigate the complex dynamics of a journal bearing (specifically, a cylindrical shell containing a viscous fluid and a solid cylinder) rolling down an inclined plane. An existing exact solution for the resulting Stokes flow is used to build up a hierarchy of reduced models of increasing complexity. Particular attention is paid to the case where the outer cylinder is fixed; the resulting numerical simulations are compared to experiment to test the model's validity. Finally, we generate numerical results for the fully dynamical problem, in which the outer cylinder rolls without slipping under the influence of gravity.

  7. The effects of wetland habitat structure on Florida apple snail density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karunaratne, L.B.; Darby, P.C.; Bennetts, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    Wetlands often support a variety of juxtaposed habitat patches (e.g., grass-, shrub- or tree-dominated) differentially suited to support the inhabiting fauna. The proportion of available habitat types has been affected by human activity and consequently has contributed to degrading habitat quality for some species. The Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) has drawn attention as a critical prey item for wetlands wildlife and as an indicator of wetlands restoration success in peninsular Florida, USA. An apparent contradiction has evolved wherein this species appears intolerant of drying events, but these disturbances may be necessary to maintain suitable habitat structure for apple snails. We recently reported that assertions regarding intolerance to dry downs in this species were inaccurate. Here, we compared snail density in habitats with (wet prairie) and without (slough) emergent macrophytes, as well as evaluating the effects of structural attributes within the broad wet prairie habitat type. Snail densities were greater in prairies relative to sloughs (??2= 12.90, df=1, P=0.0003), often by a factor of two to three. Within wet prairie habitats, we found greater snail densities in Panicum hemitomon as compared to Eleocharis cellulosa (??2=31.45, df=1, P=0.0001). Significantly fewer snails were found in dense E. cellulosa as compared to habitats with lower stem density (??2= 10.73, df=1, P=0.011). Our results indicate that wet prairie habitat supports greater snail densities than nymphaea-dominatd slough. Our results have implications for wetlands water management in that continuous inundation has been shown to convert wet prairie to slough habitat, and we suggest this should be avoided in support of apple snails and their predators. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  8. Shading decreases the abundance of the herbivorous California horn snail, Cerithidea californica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorda, Julio; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the intertidal zone in estuaries of California, USA and Baja California, Mexico is covered with vascular vegetation. Shading by these vascular plants influences abiotic and biotic processes that shape benthic community assemblages. We present data on the effects of shading on the California horn snail, Cerithidea californica. This species is important because it is the most common benthic macrofaunal species in these systems and acts as an obligate intermediate host of several species of rematode parasites that infect several other species. Using observational and experimental studies, we found a negative effect of shade on the distribution and abundance of the California horn snail. We hypothesized that shading reduces the abundance of the epipelic diatoms that the snails feeds on, causing snails to leave haded areas. We observed a negative relationship between vascular plant cover, sub-canopy light levels, and snail density in Mugu Lagoon. Then we experimentally manipulated light regimes, by clipping vegetation and adding shade structures, and found higher snail densities at higher light levels. In Goleta Slough, we isolated the effect of shade from vegetation by documenting a negative relationship between the shade created by two bridges and diatom and snail densities. We also found that snails moved the greatest distances over shaded channel banks compared to unshaded channel banks. Further, we documented the effect of water depth and channel bank orientation on shading in this system. An additional effect of shading is the reduction of temperature, providing an alternative explanation for some of our results. These results broaden our knowledge of how variation in the light environment influences the ecology of estuarine ecosystems.

  9. Studies of the snail vectors of bilharziasis mansoni in north-eastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Frederico S.; Olivier, Louis

    1958-01-01

    The authors describe the bilharziasis endemic areas in north-eastern Brazil, giving the rainfall and general characteristics of the climate. The life-cycles of the two snail vectors—Australorbis glabratus and Tropicorbis centimetralis—in Pernambuco are described. Considerable attention is given to the effects on the snails of the annual drought, which causes many of the habitats to dry up and seriously affects the snail life-cycles and survival patterns. The snails are able to populate habitats that are dry for 5-7 months every year. They survive during the dry season in the protection of debris, vegetation, etc. A. glabratus is more susceptible to infection with Schistosoma mansoni than is T. centimetralis, but the latter is an effective vector, nevertheless, probably because it often occurs in very large numbers. A. glabratus with mature infections die or lose their infections when removed from the water for 20-30 days. Immature parasites are not killed under the same conditions. Infection with S. mansoni injures the snails and may kill them. It also reduces the reproductive capacity of the vectors, but it does not permanently castrate them. The epidemiological significance of these findings and their meaning in terms of snail control are discussed. PMID:13573116

  10. Surface Crystallization of Supercooled Water in Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The process by which liquid cloud droplets homogeneously crystallize into ice is still not well-understood. The ice nucleation process based on the standard and classical theory of homogeneous freezing, initiates within the interior volume of a cloud droplet. Current experimental data on homogeneous freezing rates of ice in droplets of supercooled water, both in air and emulsion oil samples, show considerable scatter. For example, at -33 C, the reported volume-based freezing rates of ice in supercooled water vary by as much as 5 orders of magnitude, which is well outside the range of measurement uncertainties. Here, we show that the process of ice nucleus formation at the air (or oil)-liquid water interface may help to explain why experimental results on ice nucleation rates yield different results in different ambient phases. Our results also suggest that surface crystallization of ice in cloud droplets can explain why low amounts of supercooled water have been observed in the atmosphere near -40 C.

  11. Evaluation of environmental methods to control snails in an irrigation system in Central Morocco.

    PubMed

    Laamrani, H; Khallaayoune, K; Boelee, E; Laghroubi, M M; Madsen, H; Gryseels, B

    2000-08-01

    The Moroccan Ministry of Public Health has launched a programme to eliminate schistosomiasis. One of the components in this process is the control of Bulinus truncatus, the intermediate host snail of Schistosoma haematobium. We evaluated three environmentally safe measures to control B. truncatus in siphon boxes, the main breeding sites for these snails in the Tessaout Amont irrigation system. The first method involved covering the siphon boxes to exclude light and reduce algal growth, the second consisted of increasing the frequency of emptying and cleaning the siphon boxes, and the third method increased water velocity to hinder the establishment of the intermediate hosts. The results showed that covering had a pronounced effect on snail and egg mass density, was accepted by the local community and prevented water contact. Cleaning the siphons three times during the irrigation season led to a reduction in snail density although it was not statistically significant and recolonization was rapid. Increasing water velocity by reducing the dimensions of siphon boxes delayed recolonization, but such a control measure can be applied only in specific situations where it does not pose hydraulic problems. The three interventions were selectively effective against B. truncatus, whereas other snails such as Physa acuta and Lymnaea peregra were hardly affected. Covering, the most promising control measure, could be useful in the Moroccan schistosomiasis eradication programme. However, further investigations are needed to assess its impact on water quality. PMID:10995096

  12. Metabolic acceleration in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Elke I.; Ducrot, V.; Jager, T.; Koene, J.; Lagadic, L.; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.

    2014-11-01

    Under constant environmental conditions, most animals tend to grow following the von Bertalanffy growth curve. Deviations from this curve can point to changes in the environment that the animals experience, such as food limitation when the available food is not sufficient or suitable. However, such deviations can also point to a phenomenon called metabolic acceleration, which is receiving increasing attention in the field of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) modeling. Reasons for such an acceleration are usually changes in shape during ontogeny, which cause changes in the surface area to volume ratio of the organism. Those changes, in turn, lead to changes in some of the model parameters that have length in their dimension. The life-history consequences of metabolic acceleration as implemented in the DEB theory are an s-shaped growth curve (when body size is expressed as a length measure) and a prolongation of the hatching time. The great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis was earlier found to be food limited during the juvenile phase in laboratory experiments conducted under classical ecotoxicity test protocols. The pond snail has isomorphic shell growth but yet does not exhibit the expected von Bertalanffy growth curve under food limitation. When applying the standard DEB model to data from such life-cycle experiments, we also found that the hatching time is consistently underestimated, which could be a sign of metabolic acceleration. We here present an application of the DEB model including metabolic acceleration to the great pond snail. We account for the simultaneous hermaphroditism of the snail by including a model extension that describes the relative investment into the male and female function. This model allowed us to adequately predict the life history of the snail over the entire life cycle. However, the pond snail does not change in shape substantially after birth, so the original explanation for the metabolic acceleration does not hold. Since the change in shape is not the only explanation for metabolic acceleration in animals, we discuss the possible other explanations for this pattern in L. stagnalis.

  13. Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1969; Part 1. Surface water records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1970-01-01

    Beginning with the 1961 water year, surface-water records have been released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State-boundary basis. Distribution of these reports is limited; they are designed primarily for rapid release of data shortly after the end of the water year to meet local needs. The discharge and reservoir storage records for 1961-65 also will be published in a Geological Survey water-supply paper series entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States 1961-65."

  14. Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1973; Part 1. Surface water records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1974-01-01

    Surface-water records for the 1973 calendar year for New Mexico, including records of streamflow or reservoir storage at gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites, are given in this report and their locations shown in figures 1, 2. Records for a 'few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States also are included. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the US. Geological Survey under the direction of W. E. Hale, district chief. These data represent that portion of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico. Through September 30, 1960, the records of discharge and stage of streams and canals and contents and stage of lakes or reservoirs were published in an annual series of U.S. Geological Survey water supply papers entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States" Beginning with the 1961 water year, surface-water records have been released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State boundary basis. Distribution of these reports is limited; they are designed primarily for rapid release of data shortly after the end of the water year to meet local needs. The discharge and reservoir storage records for 1961-65 also are published in a Geological Survey water supply paper series entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States 1961-65." There will be a similar series of water-supply papers for the water years 1966-70.

  15. Ground Water / Surface Water Exchange: Streambed Versus a Channel Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shope, C. L.; Constantz, J. E.; Cooper, C. A.; McKay, W. A.

    2007-12-01

    The streambed is important in controlling exchange of water, solutes, and heat between streams and ground water. Processes such as sedimentation, erosion, and fluctuations in diurnal temperatures can have significant effects on the streambed hydraulic conductivity, which in turn affects fluid velocities across the streambed. The objectives of this study are to quantify the difference in flux magnitude and direction within and around a channel bar. The focus of this presentation is to compare fluxes in channel bar sediments with fluxes in the streambed to determine the effect of the upper boundary conditions on sediment fluxes. A network of piezometers was installed on and around a channel bar located within the Truckee River, a dense 6th order river network, located primarily in northwest Nevada. Instruments used were temperature loggers, pressure transducers, and stage recorders. Several methods were simultaneously utilized to quantify water and heat fluxes and to interpret the hydrodynamic processes through the streambed sediments. Numerical simulations are being completed to quantify the spatial and temporal fluid flux and heat transport in relation to varied hydraulic parameters such as variable river stage, geometry, and hydraulic conductivity. In general, we have found that surface water exchange to the streambed occurs at the upstream portion of bed features and streambed discharge dominates at the downstream bed feature. This exchange is evidenced at the channel bar as well as localized riffles and point bars adjacent to the channel bar. We found that at least two separate hydraulic conditions are evident during our study. The range in water levels between the piezometers was altered from approximately 1.25 m to a minimum of 0.10 m and the mean potentiometric surface increased by 1 m. These variations are geomorphic responses due to a flood event, inundating the channel bar, and a channel restoration project both upstream and downstream of the study area. These alterations have caused a reversal in the vertical head gradient (VHG) in some locations by up to 0.14. There also appears to be a critical stage height that alters the flux direction or magnitude. In conclusion, stage boundary conditions coupled with streambed features significantly contribute to the exchange direction. Sedimentation and erosion from restoration activities and streambed evolution also impacted fluid flux patterns due to their impact on streambed surface hydraulic conductivity patterns.

  16. Field and laboratory evaluation of the influence of copper-diquat on apple snails in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Imlay, M.J.; McMillan, W.E.; Martin, T.W.; Takekawa, J.; Johnson, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    The recent decline of apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) populations in canals surrounding Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in southern Florida coincided with the use of copper-diquat for the control of the aquatic weed hydrilla (Hydrilla ver/icillara). Field and laboratory studies were designed to assess the effects of copper-diquat on apple snails, which are the primary food of the endangered snail kite Rostrhamus sociabilis (formerly known as the Everglade kite). Acute toxicities (96-h LC50 values) of Cutrine-Plus and Komeen (chelated formulations of copper) to immature apple snails were 22 and 241-?g/L, respectively. Diquat was toxic at a concentration of 1,800 I-?g/L and did not increase the toxicity of copper when the chemicals were used in combination. Evaluation of field samples indicated that copper concentrations were higher in detritus than in water. plants and mud, and that there was a gradient of copper concentration from the canal to the interior, the highest residues being in samples from the canal. Copper associated with detritus (up to 150 ?g/g) had no effect on growth or survival of apple snails in field cage and tank studies. Also, field applications of copper.diquat to hydrilla had no effect on survival of caged adult and immature snails. Copper from field applications was rapidly taken out of solution by plants and organic material in the water and subsequently incorporated into the bottom detritus. Although the effects of repeated applications of copper-diquat and high body burdens of copper (accumulated during exposure to herbicidal treatment) on survival and reproduction of apple snails are not known, the information available indicates that treatment of hydrilla with copper-diquat was probably not responsible for the decline in the apple snail population. Application at recommended rates should pose no threat to these snails in the organically rich waters of southern Florida.

  17. Mathematical simulation of an aquatic snail population*

    PubMed Central

    Jobin, W. R.; Michelson, E. H.

    1967-01-01

    Techniques for controlling the intermediate snail hosts of schistosomiasis have had to be evaluated by field trials, since the complexity of snail population dynamics has so far made it impossible to predict the effects of these techniques and thereby avoid costly field testing. However, in laboratory studies with Biomphalaria glabrata it was found that the fecundity of these snails was directly proportional to F/NV, where F is the total amount of food in the habitat, N the number of snails, and V the volume of the habitat. The use of this fecundity variable together with data published on snail longevity and fecundity made it possible to construct a mathematical model of a snail population which may eventually be useful for evaluating snail control methods. For preliminary verification of the model, its predictions were compared with a published history of a population of Bulinus globosus in a small pond. The general agreement of the predicted and observed population data indicated that the basic structure of the model was sound. PMID:5301741

  18. Relaxations and Interfacial Water Ordering at the Corundum (110) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2010-09-17

    In situ high resolution specular X-ray reflectivity measurements were used to examine relaxations and interfacial water ordering occurring at the corundum (110)-water interface. Sample preparation affected the resulting surface structure. Annealing in air at 1373 K produced a reconstructed surface formed through an apparently ordered aluminum vacancy. The effect of the reconstruction on in-plane periodicity was not determined. The remaining aluminum sites on the surface maintain full coordination by oxygen and the surface was coated with a layer of physically adsorbed water. Ordering of water further from the surface was not observed. Acid etching of this surface and preparing a surface through annealing at 723 K both produced an unreconstructed surface with identical relaxations and water ordering. Relaxations were confined primarily to the top {approx}4 {angstrom} of the surface and were dominated by an increased distribution width of the fully occupied surface aluminum site and outward relaxation of the oxygen surface functional groups. A layer of adsorbed water fully coated the surface and occurred in two distinct sites. Water above this showed signs of layering and indicated that water ordering extended 7-10 {angstrom} from the surface. Relaxations and the arrangement of interfacial water were nearly identical on both the unreconstructed corundum and isostructural hematite (110) surfaces. Comparison to corundum and hematite (012) suggests that the arrangement of interfacial water is primarily controlled by mineral surface structure.

  19. Chapter 5: Surface water quality sampling in streams and canals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface water sampling and water quality assessments have greatly evolved in the United States since the 1970s establishment of the Clean Water Act. Traditionally, water quality referred to only the chemical characteristics of the water and its toxicological properties related to drinking water or ...

  20. Impact of Water Withdrawals from Groundwater and Surface Water on Continental Water Storage Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doell, Petra; Hoffmann-Dobrev, Heike; Portmann, Felix T.; Siebert, Stefan; Eicker, Annette; Rodell, Matthew; Strassberg, Gil

    2011-01-01

    Humans have strongly impacted the global water cycle, not only water flows but also water storage. We have performed a first global-scale analysis of the impact of water withdrawals on water storage variations, using the global water resources and use model WaterGAP. This required estimation of fractions of total water withdrawals from groundwater, considering five water use sectors. According to our assessment, the source of 35% of the water withdrawn worldwide (4300 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002) is groundwater. Groundwater contributes 42%, 36% and 27% of water used for irrigation, households and manufacturing, respectively, while we assume that only surface water is used for livestock and for cooling of thermal power plants. Consumptive water use was 1400 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002. It is the sum of the net abstraction of 250 cubic km/yr of groundwater (taking into account evapotranspiration and return flows of withdrawn surface water and groundwater) and the net abstraction of 1150 km3/yr of surface water. Computed net abstractions indicate, for the first time at the global scale, where and when human water withdrawals decrease or increase groundwater or surface water storage. In regions with extensive surface water irrigation, such as Southern China, net abstractions from groundwater are negative, i.e. groundwater is recharged by irrigation. The opposite is true for areas dominated by groundwater irrigation, such as in the High Plains aquifer of the central USA, where net abstraction of surface water is negative because return flow of withdrawn groundwater recharges the surface water compartments. In intensively irrigated areas, the amplitude of seasonal total water storage variations is generally increased due to human water use; however, in some areas, it is decreased. For the High Plains aquifer and the whole Mississippi basin, modeled groundwater and total water storage variations were compared with estimates of groundwater storage variations based on groundwater table observations, and with estimates of total water storage variations from the GRACE satellites mission. Due to the difficulty in estimating area-averaged seasonal groundwater storage variations from point observations of groundwater levels, it is uncertain whether WaterGAP underestimates actual variations or not. We conclude that WaterGAP possibly overestimates water withdrawals in the High Plains aquifer where impact of human water use on water storage is readily discernible based on WaterGAP calculations and groundwater observations. No final conclusion can be drawn regarding the possibility of monitoring water withdrawals in the High Plains aquifer using GRACE. For the less intensively irrigated Mississippi basin, observed and modeled seasonal groundwater storage reveals a discernible impact of water withdrawals in the basin, but this is not the case for total water storage such that water withdrawals at the scale of the whole Mississippi basin cannot be monitored by GRACE.

  1. Organic acids in naturally colored surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamar, William L.; Goerlitz, D.F.

    1966-01-01

    Most of the organic matter in naturally colored surface waters consists of a mixture of carboxylic acids or salts of these acids. Many of the acids color the water yellow to brown; however, not all of the acids are colored. These acids range from simple to complex, but predominantly they are nonvolatile polymeric carboxylic acids. The organic acids were recovered from the water by two techniques: continuous liquid-liquid extraction with n-butanol and vacuum evaporation at 50?C (centigrade). The isolated acids were studied by techniques of gas, paper, and column chromatography and infrared spectroscopy. About 10 percent of the acids recovered were volatile or could be made volatile for gas chromatographic analysis. Approximately 30 of these carboxylic acids were isolated, and 13 of them were individually identified. The predominant part of the total acids could not be made volatile for gas chromatographic analysis. Infrared examination of many column chromatographic fractions indicated that these nonvolatile substances are primarily polymeric hydroxy carboxylic acids having aromatic and olefinic unsaturation. The evidence suggests that some of these acids result from polymerization in aqueous solution. Elemental analysis of the sodium fusion products disclosed the absence of nitrogen, sulfur, and halogens.

  2. Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1974; Part 1, Surface water records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1975-01-01

    Surface-water records for the 1974 calendar year for New Mexico, including records of streamflow or reservoir storage at gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites, are given in this report and their locations shown in figures 1, 2. Records for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States also are included. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S, Geological Survey under the direction of W. E. Hale, district chief. These data represent that portion of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico. Records of discharge and stage of streams, and contents and stage of lakes and reservoirs are published in a series of U.S. Geological Survey water-supply papers entitled, "Surface Water Supply of the United States." Through September 30, 1960, these water-supply papers were in an annual series, and since then, are in a 5-year series. More information is given under heading, "Publications" on page 8. Beginning with the 1961 water year, surface-water records have been released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State boundary basis. Distribution of these reports is limited; they are designed primarily for rapid release of data shortly after the end of the water year to meet local needs. Beginning with the 1971 calendar year, surface water records have been released on a calendar year basis.

  3. [Equipment for biological experiments with snails aboard piloted orbital stations].

    PubMed

    Gorgiladze, G I; Korotkova, E V; Kuznetsova, E E; Mukhamedieva, L N; Begrov, V V; Pepeliaev, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    To fly biological experiments aboard piloted orbital stations, research equipment was built up of an incubation container, filter system and automatic temperature controller. Investigations included analysis of the makeup and concentrations of gases produced by animals (snails) during biocycle, and emitted after death. Filters are chemisorption active fibrous materials (AFM) with high sorption rate and water receptivity (cation exchange fiber VION-KN-1 and anion exchange fiber VION-AS-1), and water-repellent carbon adsorbent SKLTS. AFM filters were effective in air cleaning and practically excluded ingress of chemical substances from the container into cabin atmosphere over more than 100 days. PMID:21033402

  4. Surface-water availability, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Alfred L.; Davis, Marvin E.

    1975-01-01

    The average annual runoff, about 1,270 mgd (million gallons per day), originating in Tuscaloosa County is equivalent to 20 inches or 0.95 mgd per square mile. The Black Warrior and Sipsey Rivers, the largest streams in the county, have average flows of 5,230 mgd and 580 mgd, respectively, where they leave the county, and median annual 7-day low flows in excess of 150 mgd and 35 mgd, respectively. North River, Big Sandy Creek, and Hurricane Creek have average flows in excess of 100 mgd and median annual 7-day low flows in excess of 2 mgd. Surface water generally contains less than 100 mg/l (milligrams per liter) dissolved solids, less than 10 mg/l chloride, and is soft to moderately hard. Streams having the higher hardness and the higher dissolved-solids content are in eastern Tuscaloosa County.

  5. Metolachlor and atrazine fate in surface water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, P.J.; Anderson, T.A.; Coats, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    The detection of pesticides in surface water and ground water provokes concern involving human health risks associated with pesticide exposure. Monitoring studies of surface waters have detected concentrations of herbicides that exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed maximum contamination level (MCL) for drinking water. Conventional water treatment processes do not remove many herbicides. Tap water drawn from surface-water sources has been reported to contain levels of herbicides above the regulatory limits. There is current interest in the use of artificial wetlands and macrophyte-cultured ponds in waste-water-treatment systems. Aquatic plant-based water treatment systems improve waste water effluent by solid filtration and nutrient assimilation. Various aquatic plants have been shown to accumulate metals, absorb inorganic ions, and accelerate the biodegradation of complex organics. Our research evaluates the fate of metolachlor and atrazine in surface water, surface water/sediment, and surface water/aquatic plant incubation systems to study the influence of sediment and aquatic plants in the removal and biotransformation of herbicides from contaminated waters. Aquatic macrophyte systems may prove to be useful in the remediation of herbicide contaminated surface waters in water treatment facilities or in the reduction of herbicide concentrations from tile drain effluents prior to entering watersheds.

  6. Moving Water Droplets on Aluminum and Copper Surfaces Using Surface Tension Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alheshibri, Muidh; Rogers, Nathaniel; Sommers, Andrew; Eid, Khalid

    2013-03-01

    The behavior of water droplets on metal surfaces is very important for many applications, especially in heat exchangers in air conditioning and refrigeration. We use photolithography and/or shadow masks to create alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic Cu micro-channels on an aluminum surface and to move water droplets on the surface. The contact angle that is formed between water droplets and the surface is clearly asymmetrical due to the different surface properties at the contact line between the droplets and the patterned surface. An HDFT self-assembled mono-layer allows for a large change in the water droplet contact angle on the copper, but seems to have no effect on the aluminum surface. We will show our results on the effect of the surface patterning and surface roughness on water droplet behavior. We also demonstrate that the engineered surface gradients cause water droplets to travel more than 1'' on a horizontal or upward tilted surface.

  7. Water Surface Turbulance and Internal Waves, Norfolk, VA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Norfolk and the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, VA, (37.5N, 75.5W) was exposed in sunglint conditions to emphasizes water surface patterns. Outgoing tides from the bay generate considerable turbulence as they encounter coastal ocean currents and can be observed as differences in the reflective properties of the water surface. Smooth flowing water has high reflectivity. Turbulent water has a rough surface and low reflectance. Ship wakes can also be seen.

  8. The environmental effects of trace elements concentration in sea snails using atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Amri, F. A.

    2003-05-01

    Water pollution bas increased in heavy industrialised areas. Most industrial water wastes end up in the sea. Monitoring the elemental composition in marine organisms, such as snails, provides the essential elements in living organisms and through the food chain to man. 50 samples of each of two kinds of snails have been collected from the west coast of Libya. Samples were digeste with nitric acid and the concentration of Copper, Iron, Magnesium and Zinc were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The results shows that Mg has the highest value while the Copper has the lowest in both kind of snaiis. A pattern of the trace elements concentration was investigated regarding the size and kind of snails.

  9. Photochemical Transformation Processes in Sunlit Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vione, D.

    2012-12-01

    Photochemical reactions are major processes in the transformation of hardly biodegradable xenobiotics in surface waters. They are usually classified into direct photolysis and indirect or sensitised degradation. Direct photolysis requires xenobiotic compounds to absorb sunlight, and to get transformed as a consequence. Sensitised transformation involves reaction with transient species (e.g. °OH, CO3-°, 1O2 and triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter, 3CDOM*), photogenerated by so-called photosensitisers (nitrate, nitrite and CDOM). CDOM is a major photosensitiser: is it on average the main source of °OH (and of CO3-° as a consequence, which is mainly produced upon oxidation by °OH of carbonate and bicarbonate) and the only important source of 1O2 and 3CDOM* [1, 2]. CDOM origin plays a key role in sensitised processes: allochthonous CDOM derived from soil runoff and rich in fulvic and humic substances is usually more photoactive than autochthonous CDOM (produced by in-water biological processes and mainly consisting of protein-like material) or of CDOM derived from atmospheric deposition. An interesting gradual evolution of CDOM origin and photochemistry can be found in mountain lakes across the treeline, which afford a gradual transition of allochthonous- autochtonous - atmopheric CDOM when passing from trees to alpine meadows to exposed rocks [3]. Another important issue is the sites of reactive species photoproduction in CDOM. While there is evidence that smaller molecular weight fractions are more photoactive, some studies have reported considerable 1O2 reactivity in CDOM hydrophobic sites and inside particles [4]. We have recently addressed the problem and found that dissolved species in standard humic acids (hydrodynamic diameter < 0.1 μm) account for the vast majority of 1O2 and triplet states photoproduction. In hydrophobic sites of particles, the formation rate of 1O2 is considerably lower than in the solution bulk [5], but the absence of water can significantly increase 1O2 half-life time (the main deactivation process of 1O2 in solution is collision with the solvent), thereby affording considerable reactivity toward hydrophobic solutes. The current knowledge in the field of natural photosensitizers in surface waters allows photoinduced transformation processes of organic pollutants to be assessed and modelled. For instance, it is possible to predict pollutant half-life times by knowing absorption spectrum, direct photolysis quantum yield and reaction rate constants with °OH, CO3-°, 1O2 and 3CDOM*, as a function of sunlight irradiance, water chemical composition (also affecting absorption) and column depth. Some examples of model application to real cases will be presented [6-8]. [1] Halladja et al., Environ Sci Technol 41, 6066 (2007) [2] Canonica et al., Environ Sci Technol 39, 9182 (2005) [3] De Laurentiis et al., Chemosphere 88, 1208 (2012) [4] Latch & McNeill, Science 311, 1743 (2006) [5] Minella et al., Chemosphere, accepted [6] Vione et al., Wat Res 45, 6725 (2011) [7] Sur et al., Sci Total Environ 426, 296 (2012) [8] De Laurentiis et al., Environ Sci Technol, DOI 10.1012/es3015887

  10. Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 2001, volume 1. surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Robert W.; Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Tallman, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 128 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 20 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations and stage only for 10 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

  11. Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1998, volume 1. surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Robert W., Jr.; Saffer, Richard W.; Tallman, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1998 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 105 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 16 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations, discharge only for 9 low-flow partial-record stations, and stage only for 5 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

  12. Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1999, Volume 1. surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Robert W.; Saffer, Richard W.; Tallman, Anthony J.

    2000-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1999 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 111 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 17 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations, discharge only for 27 low-flow partial-record stations, and stage only for 5 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

  13. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Investigation of How Water Meets a Hydrophobic Surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poynor, Adele; Shemelya, Corey

    2009-03-01

    By definition hydrophobic substances hate water. Water placed on a hydrophobic surface will form a drop in order to minimize its contact area. What happens when water is forced into contact with a hydrophobic surface? One theory is that an ultra-thin low- density region forms near the surface. We have employed the surface-sensitive, quantum-optical technique of Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) to verify the existence of this region at the boundary.

  14. Adsorbed water on iron surface by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, F. W.; Campos, T. M. B.; Cividanes, L. S.; Simonetti, E. A. N.; Thim, G. P.

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption of H2O molecules on metal surfaces is important to understand the early process of water corrosion. This process can be described by computational simulation using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo. However, this simulation demands an efficient description of the surface interactions between the water molecule and the metallic surface. In this study, an effective force field to describe the iron-water surface interactions was developed and it was used in a molecular dynamics simulation. The results showed a very good agreement between the simulated vibrational-DOS spectrum and the experimental vibrational spectrum of the iron-water interface. The water density profile revealed the presence of a water double layer in the metal interface. Furthermore, the horizontal mapping combined with the angular distribution of the molecular plane allowed the analysis of the water structure above the surface, which in turn agrees with the model of the double layer on metal surfaces.

  15. In situ biodenitrification of nitrate surface water

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.C.; Ballew, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project has successfully operated a full-scale in situ biodenitrification system to treat water with elevated nitrate levels in abandoned raffinate pits. Bench- and pilot-scale studies were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the process and to support its full-scale design and application. Bench testing evaluated variables that would influence development of an active denitrifying biological culture. The variables were carbon source, phosphate source, presence and absence of raffinate sludge, addition of a commercially available denitrifying microbial culture, and the use of a microbial growth medium. Nitrate levels were reduced from 750 mg/L NO{sub 3}-N to below 10 mg/L NO{sub 3}-N within 17 days. Pilot testing simulated the full-scale process to determine if nitrate levels could be reduced to less than 10 mg/L NO{sub 3}-N when high levels are present below the sludge surface. Four separate test systems were examined along with two control systems. Nitrates were reduced from 1,200 mg/L NO{sub 3}-N to below 2 mg/L NO{sub 3}-N within 21 days. Full-scale operation has been initiated to denitrify 900,000-gal batches alternating between two 1-acre ponds. The process used commercially available calcium acetate solution and monosodium/disodium phosphate solution as a nutrient source for indigenous microorganisms to convert nitrates to molecular nitrogen and water.

  16. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  17. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and implementing regulations, specifically 33 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a...

  18. Floating Vegetated Mats For Improving Surface Water Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of surface and ground waters is an environmental concern. Pollution from both point and nonpoint sources can render water unsuitable for use. Surface waters of concern include streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, canals, and wastewater lagoons. Lagooned wastewater from confined animal feedi...

  19. Instructions for measuring the rate of evaporation from water surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1898-01-01

    The ·rate of evaporation from water surfaces varies with the temperature of the water, the velocity of the wind at the water surface, and the dryness of the air. Consequently, the rate of evaporation from rivers, lakes, canals, or reservoirs varies widely in different localities and for the same locality in different seasons.

  20. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and implementing regulations, specifically 33 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a...

  1. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and implementing regulations, specifically 33 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a...

  2. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and implementing regulations, specifically 33 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a...

  3. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  4. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and implementing regulations, specifically 33 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a...

  5. Adsorption structure of water molecules on the Be(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yu; Li, Yanfang; Wang, Shuangxi; Zhang, Ping

    2014-06-07

    By using density functional theory calculations, we systematically investigate the adsorption of water molecules at different coverages on the Be(0001) surface. The coverage dependence of the prototype water structures and energetics for water adlayer growth are systematically studied. The structures, energetics, and electronic properties are calculated and compared with other available studies. Through our systematic investigations, we find that water molecules form clusters or chains on the Be(0001) surface at low coverages. When increasing the water coverage, water molecules tend to form a 2 × 2 hexagonal network on the Be(0001) surface.

  6. First-principles study of water desorption from montmorillonite surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Meng, Yingfeng; Liu, Houbin; Yang, Mingli

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge about water desorption is important to give a full picture of water diffusion in montmorillonites (MMT), which is a driving factor in MMT swelling. The desorption paths and energetics of water molecules from the surface of MMT with trapped Li(+), Na(+) or K(+) counterions were studied using periodic density functional theory calculations. Two paths-surface and vacuum desorption-were designed for water desorption starting from a stationary structure in which water bonds with both the counterion and the MMT surface. Surface desorption is energetically more favorable than vacuum desorption due to water-surface hydrogen bonds that help stabilize the intermediate structure of water released from the counterion. The energy barriers of water desorption are in the order of Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+), which can be attributed to the short ionic radius of Li(+), which favors strong binding with the water molecule. The temperature dependence of water adsorption and desorption rates were compared based on the computed activation energies. Our calculations reveal that the water desorption on the MMT surface has a different mechanism from water adsorption, which results from surface effects favoring stabilization of water conformers during the desorption process. PMID:27083565

  7. Behavioural responses of the snail Lymnaea acuminata to carbohydrates in snail-attractant pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Farindra; Singh, D. K.

    Snail control is one of the most important tools in the campaign to reduce the incidence of fascioliasis. In order to attain this objective, the method of bait formulation in order to contain an attractant and a molluscicide is an expedient approach to lure the target snail population to the molluscicide. This study identifies certain carbohydrates, namely sucrose, maltose, glucose, fructose and starch, for preparing such baits. These were tested on Lymnaea acuminata, an intermediate host of the digenean trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. The behavioural responses of snails to these carbohydrates were examined. Significant variations in behavioural responses were observed in the snail even when the five carbohydrates were used in low concentrations in snail-attractant pellets. Starch emerged as the strongest attractant for Lymnaea acuminata, followed by maltose.

  8. Physicochemical properties of concentrated Martian surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosca, Nicholas J.; McLennan, Scott M.; Lamb, Michael P.; Grotzinger, John P.

    2011-05-01

    Understanding the processes controlling chemical sedimentation is an important step in deciphering paleoclimatic conditions from the rock records preserved on both Earth and Mars. Clear evidence for subaqueous sedimentation at Meridiani Planum, widespread saline mineral deposits in the Valles Marineris region, and the possible role of saline waters in forming recent geomorphologic features all underscore the need to understand the physical properties of highly concentrated solutions on Mars in addition to, and as a function of, their distinct chemistry. Using thermodynamic models predicting saline mineral solubility, we generate likely brine compositions ranging from bicarbonate-dominated to sulfate-dominated and predict their saline mineralogy. For each brine composition, we then estimate a number of thermal, transport, and colligative properties using established models that have been developed for highly concentrated multicomponent electrolyte solutions. The available experimental data and theoretical models that allow estimation of these physicochemical properties encompass, for the most part, much of the anticipated variation in chemistry for likely Martian brines. These estimates allow significant progress in building a detailed analysis of physical sedimentation at the ancient Martian surface and allow more accurate predictions of thermal behavior and the diffusive transport of matter through chemically distinct solutions under comparatively nonstandard conditions.

  9. Water Resources Data: New Jersey, Water Year 1998, Volume 1, Surface-Water Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, T.J.; Centinaro, G.L.; Dudek, J.F.; Corcino, V.; Stekroadt, G.C.; McTigure, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    This volume of the annual hydrologic data report of New Jersey is one of a series of annual reports that document hydrologic data gathered from the U.S. Geological Survey's surface- and ground-water data-collection networks in each State, Puerto Rico, and the Trust Territories. These records of streamflow, ground-water levels, and water quality provide the hydrologic information needed by state, local and federal agencies, and the private sector for developing and managing our Nation's land and water resources.

  10. Specialized insulin is used for chemical warfare by fish-hunting cone snails.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Gajewiak, Joanna; Karanth, Santhosh; Robinson, Samuel D; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Douglass, Adam D; Schlegel, Amnon; Imperial, Julita S; Watkins, Maren; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K; Yandell, Mark; Li, Qing; Purcell, Anthony W; Norton, Raymond S; Ellgaard, Lars; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2015-02-10

    More than 100 species of venomous cone snails (genus Conus) are highly effective predators of fish. The vast majority of venom components identified and functionally characterized to date are neurotoxins specifically targeted to receptors, ion channels, and transporters in the nervous system of prey, predators, or competitors. Here we describe a venom component targeting energy metabolism, a radically different mechanism. Two fish-hunting cone snails, Conus geographus and Conus tulipa, have evolved specialized insulins that are expressed as major components of their venoms. These insulins are distinctive in having much greater similarity to fish insulins than to the molluscan hormone and are unique in that posttranslational modifications characteristic of conotoxins (hydroxyproline, γ-carboxyglutamate) are present. When injected into fish, the venom insulin elicits hypoglycemic shock, a condition characterized by dangerously low blood glucose. Our evidence suggests that insulin is specifically used as a weapon for prey capture by a subset of fish-hunting cone snails that use a net strategy to capture prey. Insulin appears to be a component of the nirvana cabal, a toxin combination in these venoms that is released into the water to disorient schools of small fish, making them easier to engulf with the snail's distended false mouth, which functions as a net. If an entire school of fish simultaneously experiences hypoglycemic shock, this should directly facilitate capture by the predatory snail. PMID:25605914

  11. Distribution of 129I in terrestrial surface water environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuegao; Gong, Meng; Yi, Peng; Aldahan, Ala; Yu, Zhongbo; Possnert, Göran; Chen, Li

    2015-10-01

    The global distribution of the radioactive isotope iodine-129 in surface waters (lakes and rivers) is presented here and compared with the atmospheric deposition and distribution in surface marine waters. The results indicate relatively high concentrations in surface water systems in close vicinity of the anthropogenic release sources as well as in parts of Western Europe, North America and Central Asia. 129I level is generally higher in the terrestrial surface water of the Northern hemisphere compared to the southern hemisphere. The highest values of 129I appear around 50°N and 40°S in the northern and southern hemisphere, separately. Direct gaseous and marine atmospheric emissions are the most likely avenues for the transport of 129I from the sources to the terrestrial surface waters. To apply iodine-129 as process tracer in terrestrial surface water environment, more data are needed on 129I distribution patterns both locally and globally.

  12. Water Resources Data, New Jersey, Water Year 1992, Volume 1. Surface-Water Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauersfeld, W.R.; Moshinsky, E.W.; Gurney, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1992 water year for New Jersey consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This volume of the report contains discharge records for 99 gaging stations; tide summaries for 2 stations; stage and contents for 37 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 95 surface-water sites. Also included are data for 65 crest-stage partial-record stations, 13 tidal crest-stage gages, and 94 low-flow partial-record stations. Locations of these sites are shown on Figures 11 and 12. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program. Miscellaneous data were collected at 42 measuring sites and 9 water-quality sampling sites. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Jersey.

  13. Water Resources Data, New Jersey, Water Year 1991, Volume 1. Surface-Water Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauersfeld, W.R.; Moshinsky, E.W.; Pustay, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for New Jersey consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This volume of the report contains discharge records for 95 gaging stations; tide summaries for 4 stations; stage and contents for 33 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 101 surface-water sites. Also included are data for 67 crest-stage partial-record stations, 13 tidal crest-stage gages, and 91 low-flow partial-record stations. Locations of these sites are shown on Figures 11 and 12. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program. Miscellaneous data were collected at 57 measuring sites and 13 water-quality sampling sites. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Jersey.

  14. Spreading of Cholera through Surface Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-12-01

    Cholera epidemics are still a major public health concern to date in many areas of the world. In order to understand and forecast cholera outbreaks, one of the most important factors is the role played by the environmental matrix in which the disease spreads. We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. The environmental matrix in which the disease spreads is constituted by different human communities and their hydrologic interconnections. Each community is characterized by its spatial position, population size, water resources availability and hygiene conditions. By implementing a spatially explicit cholera model we seek the effects on epidemic dynamics of: i) the topology and metrics of the pathogens pathways that connect different communities; ii) the spatial distribution of the population size; and iii) the spatial distributions and quality of surface water resources and public health conditions, and how they vary with population size. The model has been applied to study the space-time evolution of a well documented cholera epidemic occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. The epidemic lasted for two years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. The model does well in reproducing the distribution of the cholera cases during the two outbreaks as well as their spatial spreading. We further extend the model by deriving the speed of propagation of traveling fronts in the case of uniformly distributed systems for different topologies: one and two dimensional lattices and river networks. The derivation of the spreading celerity proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. The conditions are sought by comparison between spreading and disease timescales. Consider a cholera epidemic that starts from a point and spreads throughout a finite size system, it is possible to identify two different timescales: i) the spreading timescale, that is the time needed for the disease to spread and involve all the communities in the system; and ii) the epidemic timescale, defined by the duration of the epidemic in a single community. Our results suggest that in many cases of real-life epidemiological interest, timescales of disease dynamics may trigger outbreaks that significantly depart from the predictions of classical space-implicit compartmental models.

  15. Snail control in urban sites in Brazil with slow-release hexabutyldistannoxane and pentachlorophenol*

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, J. V.; Da Silva, C. S. Monteiro; Bulhões, M. S.; Leme, L. A. Paes; Netto, J. A. Da Silva; Gilbert, B.

    1976-01-01

    Slow release formulations of hexabutyldistannoxane (TBTO) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) were tested for the control of Biomphalaria tenagophila in 52 urban sites in Rio de Janeiro. TBTO acted faster and lasted longer than PCP and at 15 g/m2 it eliminated snails from 76% of the treated sites for 1 year. Water pollution and rate of flow had no significant influence on the molluscicidal properties of either compound, but alkalinity lowered the activity of TBTO. Failure to control snail populations was due mainly to human interference and to the non-treatment of adjacent breeding sites that were temporarily dry and therefore overlooked. PMID:1088356

  16. Structure of water adsorbed on a mica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Ho; Sposito, Garrison

    2002-01-29

    Monte Carlo simulations of hydration water on the mica (001) surface under ambient conditions revealed water molecules bound closely to the ditrigonal cavities in the surface, with a lateral distribution of approximately one per cavity, and water molecules interposed between K{sup +} counter ions in a layer situated about 2.5 {angstrom} from a surface O along a direction normal to the (001) plane. The calculated water O density profile was in quantitative agreement with recent X-ray reflectivity measurements indicating strong lateral ordering of the hydration water but liquid-like disorder otherwise.

  17. Surface Tension: The Ways of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donalson-Sams, Marilyn

    1988-01-01

    Describes activities which help students understand several basic scientific concepts regarding water. Outlines objectives, materials needed, procedures, and questions to ask about student observations. Investigations include working with the self-sealing property of water, talcum powder, paper clips, and making water wetter. (RT)

  18. How Water Meets a Hydrophobic Surface: Reluctantly and with Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poynor, Adele; Hong, Liang; Granick, Steve; Robinson, Ian; Fenter, Paul; Zhang, Zhan

    2007-03-01

    By definition hydrophobic substances hate water. Water placed on a hydrophobic surface will form a drop in order to minimize its contact area. What happens when water is forced into contact with a hydrophobic surface? One theory is that an ultra-thin low- density region forms near the surface. To investigate the existence of this layer, we have employed three surface sensitive techniques, time-resolved phase-modulated ellipsometry, surface plasmon resonance, and X-ray reflectivity. Both ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity provide strong evidence for the low-density layer and illuminate unexpected temporal behavior.

  19. Salinity adaptation of the invasive New Zealand mud snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) in the Columbia River estuary (Pacific Northwest, USA): Physiological and molecular studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoy, Marshal; Boese, Bruce L.; Taylor, Louise; Reusser, Deborah; Rodriguez, Rusty

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine salinity stress tolerances of two populations of the invasive species New Zealand mud snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum, one population from a high salinity environment in the Columbia River estuary and the other from a fresh water lake. In 1996, New Zealand mud snails were discovered in the tidal reaches of the Columbia River estuary that is routinely exposed to salinity at near full seawater concentrations. In contrast, in their native habitat and throughout its spread in the western US, New Zealand mud snails are found only in fresh water ecosystems. Our aim was to determine whether the Columbia River snails have become salt water adapted. Using a modification of the standard amphipod sediment toxicity test, salinity tolerance was tested using a range of concentrations up to undiluted seawater, and the snails were sampled for mortality at daily time points. Our results show that the Columbia River snails were more tolerant of acute salinity stress with the LC50 values averaging 38 and 22 Practical Salinity Units for the Columbia River and freshwater snails, respectively. DNA sequence analysis and morphological comparisons of individuals representing each population indicate that they were all P. antipodarum. These results suggest that this species is salt water adaptable and in addition, this investigation helps elucidate the potential of this aquatic invasive organism to adapt to adverse environmental conditions.

  20. Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1965; Part 1. Surface water records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1966-01-01

    The surface-water records for the 1965 water year for gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites within the State of New Mexico are given in this report. For convenience there are also Included records for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, under the direction of W. E. Hale, District Chief, Water Resources Division. This report is the fifth In a series presenting, annually, basic data on surface-water records by States. Through September 30, 1960, the records of discharge and stage of streams and contents and stage of lakes or reservoirs were published in an annual series of U. S. Geological Survey water-supply papers entitled Surface Water Supply of the United States. Since 1951 there have been 20 volumes in the series; each volume covered an area whose boundaries coincided with those of certain natural drainage areas. The records in New Mexico were contained in Parts 7, 8 and 9 of that series. Beginning with the 1961 water year, streamflow records and related data will be released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State-boundary basis. Distribution of these basic-data reports will be limited and primarily for local needs. The records later will be published in Geological Survey water-supply papers at 5~year intervals. These 5-year water-supply papers will show daily discharge and will be compi led On the same geographical areas previously used for the annual series; however, some of the 14 parts of conterminous United States will be further subdivided.

  1. Water ordering and surface relaxations at the hematite (110) water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Fenter, Paul; Park, Changyong

    2009-02-07

    Structural characterization of iron oxide-water interfaces provides insight into the mechanisms through which these minerals control contaminant fate and element cycling in soil, sedimentary, and groundwater systems. Ordering of interfacial water and structural relaxations at the hematite (1 1 0) surface have been investigated in situ using high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity. These measurements demonstrate that relaxations are constrained to primarily the top ~5 Å of the surface. Near-surface iron atoms do not relax substantially, although the uppermost layer displays an increased distribution width, while the undercoordinated oxygens on the surface uniformly relaxed outward. Two sites of adsorbed water and additional layering of water farther from the surface were observed. Water fully covers the (1 1 0) surface and appears to form a continuous network extending into bulk solution, with positional order decreasing to that of a disordered bulk fluid within 1 nm. The arrangement of water is similar to that on the hematite (0 1 2) surface, which has a similar surface topography, although these surfaces display different vibrational amplitudes or positional disorder of adsorbed water molecules and average spacings of near-surface layered water. Comparison between these surfaces suggests that interfacial water ordering on hematite is controlled primarily by surface structure and steric constraints and that highly ordered water is likely common to most hematite-water interfaces.

  2. Activities affecting surface water resources: A general overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In November 1987, P.E.I. signed a federal/provincial work-sharing arrangement on water resource management focusing on groundwater pollution, surface water degradation and estuarine eutrophication. The surface water program was designed to identify current surface water uses and users within 12 major watersheds across the Island containing 26 individual rivers, as well as problems arising due to practices that degrade the quality of surface water and restricts its value to other user groups. This report presents a general overview of the program, covering the general characteristics of the Island; operations in agriculture, fish and wildlife, forestry, recreation, fisheries, and industry; alterations of natural features of waterways; wetlands; additional watershed activities such as hydrometric stations and subdivision development; and activities affecting surface water resources such as sedimentation sources, pollution point sources and instream obstructions.

  3. Reproduction and demography of the Florida Everglade (Snail) Kite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, N.F.R.; Beissinger, S.R.; Chandler, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    An 18-year study of reproduction and survival of the Florida Everglade (Snail) Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) has revealed the following: extremely poor nesting success (only 13.6% of nests found at the nest-building stage successful); extremely long breeding seasons (some reproductive activity in almost all months in good years); frequent multiple brooding and frequent multiple brooding and frequent renesting after failure; low egg hatchability (81%); high failure rates due to nest collapse, desertion, and predation; extremely high survival of juveniles and adults under good water conditions; and high vulnerability to drought due to near total dependency on a single species of drought-sensitive snail for food. Despite low nesting success, the species has increased rapidly under good conditions, mainly because of multiple nesting attempts within long breeding seasons and high survival rates of free-flying birds. Nesting success varied significantly between regions and nest substrates, but not as a function of seasons or solitary vs. colonial nesting. While nesting success was reduced in low water years, this effect was at least partly due to heavy use of poor nest substrates under such conditions. Clutch size and numbers of young per successful nest varied with regions, but not as a function of seasons or water levels. The effects of coloniality on clutch size and numbers of young were inconsistent. Significant effects of nest-substrate types on clutch size and numbers of young were apparently artifacts of substrate differences between regions.

  4. An ontology design pattern for surface water features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E.; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, E. Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities exist due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology for other more context-dependent ontologies. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex or specialized surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this ontology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is implemented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided in this paper. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. Also provided is a discussion of why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, especially the previously developed Surface Network pattern. Finally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through an annotated geospatial dataset and sample queries using the classes of the Surface Water pattern.

  5. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-01

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet.

  6. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-14

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet. PMID:26374054

  7. Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1964; Part I. Surface water records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1965-01-01

    The surface-water records for the 1964 water year for gaging stations, partialrecord stations, and miscellaneous sites within the State of New Mexico are given in this report. For convenience there are also included records for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey, under the direction of W. L. Heckler, district engineer, Surface Water Branch. This report is the fourth in a series presenting, annually, basic data on surfacewater records by States. Through September 30, 1960, the records of discharge and stage of streams and contents and stage of lakes or reservoirs were published in an annual series of U. S. Geological Survey water-supply papers entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States." Since 1951 there have been 20 volumes in the series; each volume covered an area whose boundaries coincided with those of certain natural drainage areas. The records in New Mexico were contained in Parts 7, 8, and 9 of that series. Beginning with the 1961 water year, streamflow records and related data will be released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State-boundary basis. Distribution of these basic-data reports will be limited and primarily for local needs. The records later will be published in Geological Survey water-supply papers at 5-year intervals. These 5-year water-supply papers will show daily discharge and will be compiled on the same geographical areas previously used for the annual series; however, some of the 14 parts of conterminous United States will be further subdivided.

  8. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  9. Epigenetic Regulation of EMT: The Snail Story

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yiwei; Dong, Chenfang; Zhou, Binhua P.

    2014-01-01

    While the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a fundamental role during development, its deregulation can adversely promote tumor metastasis. The phenotypic and cellular plasticity of EMT indicates that it is subject to epigenetic regulation. In this review, we try to embrace recent findings on the mechanisms of the transcription factor Snail-mediated E-cadherin silencing, which is a hallmark of EMT. Our studies as well as those of others have clearly demonstrated that Snail can recruit multiple chromatin enzymes including LSD1, HDAC1/2, PRC2, G9a and Suv39H1 to the E-cadherin promoter. These enzymes function in a highly orchestrated fashion to generate heterochromatin and promote DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)-mediated DNA methylation at the promoter region. Disruption of the connection between Snail and these chromatin-modifying enzymes may represent an efficient strategy for the treatment of EMT-related diseases. PMID:23888971

  10. Biogeochemistry of DMS in Surface Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacey, J. W. H.

    1997-01-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is important in influencing the formation of aerosols in the troposphere over large areas of the world's oceans. Understanding the dynamics of aerosols is important to understanding the earth's radiation balance. In evaluating the factors controlling DMS in the troposphere it is vital to understand the dynamics of DMS in the surface ocean. The biogeochemical processes controlling DMS concentration in seawater are myriad; modeling and theoretical estimation are problematic. At the beginning of this project we believed that we were on the verge of simplifying the ship-track measurement of DMS, and we proposed to deploy such a system to develop a database relating high frequency DMS measurements to biological and physicochemical and optical properties of surface water that can be quantified by remote sensing techniques. We designed a system to measure DMS concomitantly with other basic chemical and biological data in a flow-through system. The project was collaborative between Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Bermuda Biological Station for Research (BBSR). The project on which we are reporting was budgeted for only one year with a one year no-cost extension. At WHOI our effort was directed towards designing traps which would be used to concentrate DMS from seawater and allow storage for subsequent analysis. At that time, GC systems were too large for easy long-term deployment on a research vessel like R/V Weatherbird, so we focused on simplifying the shipboard sampling procedure. Initial studies of sample recovery with high levels of DMS suggested that Carboxen 1000, a relatively new carbon molecular sieve, could be used as a stable storage medium. The affinity of Carboxen for DMS is several orders of magnitude higher than gold wool (another adsorbent used for DMS collection) on a weight or volume basis. Furthermore, Carboxen's affinity for DMS is also far less susceptible to humidity than gold wool. Unfortunately, further experiments with low level DMS indicated that recovery of DMS after storage was not quantitative. The material has proven to be completely acceptable for short term storage and has been incorporated into a micro-GC system. Since working on this project, we have collaborated with RVM Scientific in Santa Barbara in the design and construction of small portable micro-GC's that will make feasible at-sea measurement in moving ships, making rapid gas analysis and quantification feasible in a ship-track mode. Throughout this period at both WHOI and BBSR, we continued to analyze field data to understand that patterns of time and space variability in DMS and the processes that govern it. These insights will be crucial to determining the specifications for our automated sampling program. The data from this, the longest continuous sampling program for ocean DMS, provided insights into year to year and short-term variability.

  11. Investigation of surface water behavior during glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Turnock, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    A series of experimental investigations that focused on isolating the primary factors that control the behavior of unfrozen surface water during glaze ice accretion were conducted. Detailed microvideo observations were made of glaze ice accretions on 2.54 cm diam cylinders in a closed-loop refrigerated wind tunnel. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed; a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film, a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads, and a zone where surface water ran back as rivulets. The location of the transition from the smooth to the rough zone was found to migrate towards the stagnation point with time. Comparative tests were conducted to study the effect of the substrate thermal and roughness properties on ice accretion. The importance of surface water behavior was evaluated by the addition of a surface tension reducing agent to the icing tunnel water supply, which significantly altered the accreted glaze ice shape. Measurements were made to determine the contact angle behavior of water droplets on ice. A simple multizone modification to current glaze ice accretion models was proposed to include the observed surface roughness behavior.

  12. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Surface water requirements. 258.27 Section 258.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements....

  13. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27 Section 258.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements....

  14. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  15. Economic Impacts of Surface Mining on Household Drinking Water Supplies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides information on the economic and social impacts of contaminated surface and ground water supplies on residents and households near surface mining operations. The focus is on coal slurry contamination of water supplies in Mingo County, West Virginia, and descr...

  16. TOTAL ALKALINITY OF SURFACE WATERS OF THE US

    EPA Science Inventory

    This map provides a synoptic illustration of the national patterns of surface water alkalinity in the conterminous United States. Alkalinity is the most readily available measure of the acid-neutralizing capacity of surface waters and provides a reasonable estimate o...

  17. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.

  18. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27 Section 258.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF units shall not: (a) Cause a discharge...

  19. Water resources data, New Jersey, water year 2004-volume 1. surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Centinaro, G.L.; White, B.T.; Hoppe, H.L.; Dudek, J.F.; Protz, A.R.; Reed, T.J.; Shvanda, J.C.; Watson, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for New Jersey are presented in three volumes, and consists of records of stage, discharge, and water-quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water-quality of ground water. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 105 gaging stations; tide summaries at 27 tidal gaging stations; stage and contents at 39 lakes and reservoirs; and diversions from 51 surface-water sources. Also included are stage and discharge for 108 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage-only at 34 tidal crest-stage gages, and discharge for 124 low-flow partial-record stations. Locations of these sites are shown in figures 8-11. Additional discharge measurements were made at 131 miscellaneous sites that are not part of the systematic data-collection program. Discontinued station tables for gaging stations, crest-stage gages, tidal crest-stage and tidal gaging stations show historical coverage. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Information System (NWIS) data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Hydrologic conditions are also described for this water year, including stream-flow, precipitation, reservoir conditions, and air temperatures.

  20. Water resources data, New Jersey, water year 2005. Volume 1 - surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, B.T.; Hoppe, H.L.; Centinaro, G.L.; Dudek, J.F.; Painter, B.S.; Protz, A.R.; Reed, T.J.; Shvanda, J.C.; Watson, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2005 water year for New Jersey are presented in three volumes, and consists of records of stage, discharge, and water-quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water-quality of ground water. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 103 gaging stations; tide summaries at 28 tidal gaging stations; stage and contents at 34 lakes and reservoirs; and diversions from 50 surface-water sources. Also included are stage and discharge for 116 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage-only at 33 tidal crest-stage gages, and discharge for 155 low-flow partial-record stations. Locations of these sites are shown in figures 8-11. Additional discharge measurements were made at 222 miscellaneous sites that are not part of the systematic data-collection program. Discontinued station tables for gaging stations, crest-stage gages, tidal crest-stage and tidal gaging stations show historical coverage. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Information System (NWIS) data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Hydrologic conditions are also described for this water year, including stream-flow, precipitation, reservoir conditions, and air temperatures.

  1. Modeling of water outgassing from metal surfaces (III)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Dylla, H.F.

    1995-07-01

    A model of water adsorption on metal oxide layers and water outgassing from metal surfaces has been developed. The oxide layer is assumed to have porous structure and a pore length ({ital l}) distribution of 1/{ital l}{sup 2}. Numerical evaluation shows that the quantity of water adsorbed is logarithmic with time within a certain time range as experimentally observed. The outgassing rate from surfaces with adsorbed water distributed uniformly on the inner surfaces of individual pores is shown analytically to be inversely proportional to time. This result is consistent with frequently observed pumpdown curves. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

  2. Modeling of water outgassing from metal surfaces (III)

    SciTech Connect

    Minxu Li; H. F. Dylla

    1995-06-01

    A model of water adsorption on metal oxide layers and water outgassing from metal surfaces has been developed. The oxide layer is assumed to have porous structure and a pore length (l) distribution of l/l{sup 2}. Numerical evaluation shows that the quantity of water adsorbed is logarithmic with time within a certain time range as experimentally observed. The outgassing rate from surfaces with adsorbed water distributed uniformly on the inner surfaces of individual pores is shown analytically to be inversely proportional to time. This result is consistent with frequently observed pumpdown curves.

  3. Sea-ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F.; Sharma, G. D.; Burns, J. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Over 1500 water samples from surface and from standard hydrographic depths were collected during June and July 1973 from Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska. The measurement of temperature, salinity, and productivity indicated that various distinct water masses cover the Bering Sea Shelf. The suspended load in surface waters will be correlated with the ERTS-1 imagery as it becomes available to delineate the surface water circulation. The movement of ice floes in the Bering Strait and Bering Sea indicated that movement of ice varies considerably and may depend on wind stress as well as ocean currents.

  4. Environmental factors influencing isolation of enteroviruses from polluted surface waters.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, T G; Wallis, C; Melnick, J L

    1974-05-01

    The influence of water quality upon the concentration of virus on location was assessed in field studies conducted in the Houston ship channel, Galveston Bay, and Houston waste treatment plants. Clarification of polluted surface waters was accomplished with minimal loss of virus. Virus from clarified sewage effluents and saline waters was then adsorbed and concentrated on textile and membrane filter surfaces. Direct measurements of virus from large volumes of polluted surface waters under existing field conditions were then made using the virus concentrator equipment. PMID:4364463

  5. Water adsorption on the LaMnO3 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billman, Chris R.; Wang, Yan; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Studying the adsorption of water on the metallic LaMnO3 surface can provide insight into this complicated surface-adsorbate interaction. Using density functional theory, we investigated the adsorption of a water monomer, dimer, trimer, and a monolayer on the surface. The electronic structure of ground state configurations is explored using analysis of density of states, charge density, and crystal orbital overlap populations. We found that the interaction between the surface and water molecules is stronger than hydrogen bonding between molecules, which facilitates wetting of the surface. Adsorbed water molecules form very strong hydrogen bonds, with substantially shifted OH stretch modes. For the monolayer of adsorbed water, a hint of a bilayer is observed with a height separation of only 0.2 A˚. However, simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images and vibrational spectra suggest a significant difference between the two layers due to intermolecular bonding and interaction with the substrate.

  6. Cold-induced spreading of water drops on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Faryar; Kavehpour, H Pirouz

    2015-02-24

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are characterized by their peculiarities, such as water-repellent, anti-icing, and freezing-delay properties. Wetting dynamics of deposited water drops on cooling hydrophobic surfaces, which directly affects the aforementioned properties, has not been studied thoroughly. Here, water drops are cooled on different hydrophobic surfaces in a controlled environment. During the cooling process, a significant increase in the drop footprint and decrease in the apparent contact angle are observed because of premature and capillary condensation, followed by thin water film formation adjacent to the solid-liquid-gas line. The water thin film propagates on the hydrophobic substrates radially away from the trijunction, followed by spreading of the drop on the film, which was experimentally validated through high-speed visualization. In addition, the roles of physical variables, such as the substrate temperature, humidity of surrounding air, types of hydrophobic surfaces, surface roughness, and drop volume, on post-spreading shape are investigated experimentally. PMID:25631237

  7. Herbicide Metabolites in Surface Water and Groundwater: Introduction and Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    Several future research topics for herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water are outlined in this chapter. They are herbicide usage, chemical analysis of metabolites, and fate and transport of metabolites in surface and ground water. These three ideas follow the themes in this book, which are the summary of a symposium of the American Chemical Society on herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water. First, geographic information systems allow the spatial distribution of herbicide-use data to be combined with geochemical information on fate and transport of herbicides. Next these two types of information are useful in predicting the kinds of metabolites present and their probable distribution in surface and ground water. Finally, methods development efforts may be focused on these specific target analytes. This chapter discusses these three concepts and provides an introduction to this book on the analysis, chemistry, and fate and transport of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water.

  8. Water adsorption on the LaMnO3 surface.

    PubMed

    Billman, Chris R; Wang, Yan; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2016-02-14

    Studying the adsorption of water on the metallic LaMnO3 surface can provide insight into this complicated surface-adsorbate interaction. Using density functional theory, we investigated the adsorption of a water monomer, dimer, trimer, and a monolayer on the surface. The electronic structure of ground state configurations is explored using analysis of density of states, charge density, and crystal orbital overlap populations. We found that the interaction between the surface and water molecules is stronger than hydrogen bonding between molecules, which facilitates wetting of the surface. Adsorbed water molecules form very strong hydrogen bonds, with substantially shifted OH stretch modes. For the monolayer of adsorbed water, a hint of a bilayer is observed with a height separation of only 0.2 A˚. However, simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images and vibrational spectra suggest a significant difference between the two layers due to intermolecular bonding and interaction with the substrate. PMID:26874497

  9. Trematode maturation patterns in a migratory snail host: What happens during upshore residency in a Mediterranean lagoon?

    PubMed

    Born-Torrijos, Ana; Raga, Juan Antonio; Holzer, Astrid Sibylle

    2016-02-01

    Maturation of trematode larval stages is expected to be temporally and spatially adapted to maximise the encounter with the adequate downstream host, i.e. the host, which will be infected by this parasite stage. Since studies on intramolluscan parasite maturation are scarce but important in the context of parasite transmission, the larval development inside sporocysts was monitored during upshore residency of the snail host Gibbula adansonii (Trochidae), i.e., from March to May (2011 and 2013), when these snails temporarily reside in the intertidal habitat of a Western Mediterranean lagoon (40° 37' 35″ N, 0° 44' 31″ E, Spain). Data on the relative quantity of different maturation stages of Cainocreadium labracis and Macvicaria obovata (Opecoelidae) parasitising the G. adansonii as well as on snail and sporocyst size were explored using linear models and linear mixed models. The effect of the trematodes on snail growth was shown to be species-specific, with snail and sporocyst size acting as proxies of the reproductive capacity of M. obovata but not that of C. labracis. The number of cercarial embryos and germinal balls did not show monthly variation in either parasite species, but a higher number of mature stages and the highest maturity index was found in April. Hence, during the snail's limited spawning-related presence in the upshore waters of the lagoon, continuous production and output of infectious cercariae was observed, which indicates a link between larval maturation and snail migration. The synchronization of snails, mature parasite transmission stages and downstream hosts in time and space guarantees a successful completion of the life cycle. PMID:26446090

  10. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption. PMID:21584320

  11. Water Quality Indicators Guide [and Teacher's Handbook]: Surface Waters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Charles R.; Perfetti, Patricia Bytnar

    This guide aids in finding water quality solutions to problems from sediment, animal wastes, nutrients, pesticides, and salts. The guide allows users to learn the fundamental concepts of water quality assessment by extracting basic tenets from geology, hydrology, biology, ecology, and wastewater treatment. An introduction and eight chapters are…

  12. Surface-Water Quality-Assurance Plan for the USGS Wisconsin Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garn, H.S.

    2007-01-01

    This surface-water quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Wisconsin Water Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Discipline, for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, management, and publication of surface-water data. The roles and responsibilities of Water Science Center personnel in following these policies and procedures including those related to safety and training are presented.

  13. Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1968; Part 1. Surface water records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1969-01-01

    The surface-water records for the 1968 water year for gaging stations, partial record stations, and miscellaneous sites within the State of New Mexico are given in this report. For convenience there are also included records for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey, under the direction of W. E. Hale, District Chief, Water Resources Division. This report is the eighth in a series presenting, annually, basic data on surfacewater records by States. Through September 30, 1960, "the records of discharge and stage of streams and contents and stage of lakes or reservoirs were published in an annual series of U. S. Geological Survey water-supply papers entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States.!! Since 1951 there have been 20 volumes in the series; each volume covered an area whose boundaries coincided with those of certain natural drainage areas. The records in New Mexico were contained in Parts 7, 8, and 9 of that series. Beginning with the 1961 water year, streamflow records and related data have been released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State-boundary basis. Distribution of these basic-data reports is limited and primarily for local needs. The records will be published in Geological Survey water-supply papers at 5-year intervals. These 5-year water-supply papers will show daily discharge and will be compiled on the same geographical areas previously used for the annual series; however, some of the 14 parts of conterminous United States will be further subdivided.

  14. Embodied energy comparison of surface water and groundwater supply options.

    PubMed

    Mo, Weiwei; Zhang, Qiong; Mihelcic, James R; Hokanson, David R

    2011-11-01

    The embodied energy associated with water provision comprises an important part of water management, and is important when considering sustainability. In this study, an input-output based hybrid analysis integrated with structural path analysis was used to develop an embodied energy model. The model was applied to a groundwater supply system (Kalamazoo, Michigan) and a surface water supply system (Tampa, Florida). The two systems evaluated have comparable total energy embodiments based on unit water production. However, the onsite energy use of the groundwater supply system is approximately 27% greater than the surface water supply system. This was primarily due to more extensive pumping requirements. On the other hand, the groundwater system uses approximately 31% less indirect energy than the surface water system, mainly because of fewer chemicals used for treatment. The results from this and other studies were also compiled to provide a relative comparison of embodied energy for major water supply options. PMID:21889184

  15. Water vapor adsorption on meta lithium zirconate ceramic breeding surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvani, C.; Casadio, S.; Mancini, M. R.

    1997-12-01

    Water vapor adsorption on Li 2ZrO 3 surfaces in He and He+0.1%H 2 purging gases was measured at temperatures from 100 to 500°C and H 2O partial pressure from 1 to 20 Pa. The data sets, the best fitting empirical water adsorption isotherms and water desorption kinetics are reported and discussed.

  16. Water surface tension modulates the swarming mechanics of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Wu, Chih-Ching; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Many Bacillus subtilis strains swarm, often forming colonies with tendrils on agar medium. It is known that B. subtilis swarming requires flagella and a biosurfactant, surfactin. In this study, we find that water surface tension plays a role in swarming dynamics. B. subtilis colonies were found to contain water, and when a low amount of surfactin is produced, the water surface tension of the colony restricts expansion, causing bacterial density to rise. The increased density induces a quorum sensing response that leads to heightened production of surfactin, which then weakens water surface tension to allow colony expansion. When the barrier formed by water surface tension is breached at a specific location, a stream of bacteria swarms out of the colony to form a tendril. If a B. subtilis strain produces surfactin at levels that can substantially weaken the overall water surface tension of the colony, water floods the agar surface in a thin layer, within which bacteria swarm and migrate rapidly. This study sheds light on the role of water surface tension in regulating B. subtilis swarming, and provides insight into the mechanisms underlying swarming initiation and tendril formation. PMID:26557106

  17. Substrate-dependent reactivity of water on metal carbide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Didziulis, S.V.; Frantz, P.; Perry, S.S.; El-bjeirami, O.; Imaduddin, S.; Merrill, P.B.

    1999-12-16

    The interaction of water with two transition metal carbide (TiC) and vanadium carbide (VC), has been investigated. The adsorption, reaction, and desorption of water on the (100) face of single-crystal samples of these materials have been studied as a function of substrate temperature over the range 100--600 K. The adsorption state of water on these surfaces has been probed with high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The reactivity of water has been directly measured with HREELS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The desorption of molecular water and the products of surface reactions has been followed with temperature programmed desorption. Collectively, these measurements indicate that water adsorbs both molecularly and dissociatively on TiC and VC; however, a greater degree of reactivity at cryogenic temperatures is observed on TiC. Dissociation of water produces surface bound hydrogen and hydroxyl groups on both surfaces and a fully dissociated surface oxide on TiC. Furthermore, a greater participation of the surface carbon atoms in observed at the TiC surface through the evolution of CO{sub x} species at elevated temperatures. The differences in surface bonding and desorption profiles are discussed in terms of differences in electronic structure of the two metal carbides. Some possible implications of these studies for the use of TiC and VC as tribological materials are also discussed.

  18. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human enteric viruses cause a number of diseases when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking & recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet. Other members of enterovirus group cause numerous diseases. Hepatit...

  19. Layers of Porous Superhydrophobic Surfaces for Robust Water Repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Farzad; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    In nature, birds exhibit multiple layers of superhydrophobic feathers that repel water. Inspired by bird feathers, we utilize porous superhydrophobic surfaces and compare the wetting and dewetting characteristics of a single surface to stacks of multiple surfaces. The superhydrophobic surfaces were submerged in water in a closed chamber. Pressurized gas was regulated to measure the critical pressure for the water to fully penetrate through the surfaces. In addition to using duck feathers, two-tier porous superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated to serve as synthetic mimics with a controlled surface structure. The energy barrier for the wetting transition was modeled as a function of the number of layers and their orientations with respect to each other. Moreover, after partial impalement into a subset of the superhydrophobic layers, it was observed that a full dewetting transition was possible, which suggests that natural organisms can exploit their multiple layers to prevent irreversible wetting.

  20. Multivariate analyses of water chemistry: surface and ground water interactions.

    PubMed

    Woocay, Arturo; Walton, John

    2008-01-01

    Multivariate statistical methods (MSMs) applied to ground water chemistry provide valuable insight into the main hydrochemical species, hydrochemical processes, and water flowpaths important to ground water evolution. The MSMs of principal component factor analysis (FA) and k-means cluster analysis (CA) were sequentially applied to major ion chemistry from 211 different ground water-sampling locations in the Amargosa Desert. The FA reduces the number of variables describing the system and finds relationships between major ions. The CA of the reduced system produced objective hydrochemical facies, which are independent of, but in good agreement with, lithological data. The derived factors and hydrochemical facies are innovatively presented on biplots, revealing composition of hydrochemical processes and facies, and overlaid on a digital elevation model, displaying flowpaths and interactions with geologic and topographic features in the region. In particular, a distinct ground water chemical signature is observed beneath and surrounding the extended flowpath of Fortymile Wash, presenting some contradiction to contemporary water levels along with potential interaction with a fault line. The signature surrounding the ephemeral Fortymile Wash is believed to represent the relic of water that infiltrated during past pluvial periods when the amount of runoff in the wash was significantly larger than during the current drier period. This hypothesis and aforementioned analyses are supported by the examination of available chloride, oxygen-18, hydrogen-2, and carbon-14 data from the region. PMID:18194324

  1. The Dual Protection of a Micro Land Snail against a Micro Predatory Snail

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Shinichiro; Chiba, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Defense against a single predatory attack strategy may best be achieved not by a single trait but by a combination of different traits. We tested this hypothesis experimentally by examining the unique shell traits (the protruded aperture and the denticles within the aperture) of the micro land snail Bensonella plicidens. We artificially altered shell characteristics by removing the denticles and/or cutting the protruded aperture. These snails were offered to the carnivorous micro land snail Indoennea bicolor, which preys on the snails by gaining entry to their shell. B. plicidens exhibited the best defence when both of the traits studied were present; the defensive ability of B. plicidens decreased if either trait was removed and was further reduced if both traits were removed. These results suggest that a combination of different traits provides more effective defence against attack by the predator than either single trait by itself. PMID:23326582

  2. Crocodylus niloticus (Crocodilia) is highly sensitive to water surface waves.

    PubMed

    Grap, Nadja J; Monzel, Anna S; Kohl, Tobias; Bleckmann, Horst

    2015-10-01

    Crocodiles show oriented responses to water surface wave stimuli but up to now behavioral thresholds are missing. This study determines the behavioral thresholds of crocodilians to water surface waves. Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) were conditioned to respond to single-frequency water surface wave stimuli (duration 1150 ms, frequency 15, 30, 40, 60 and 80 Hz), produced by blowing air onto the water surface. Our study shows that C. niloticus is highly sensitive to capillary water surface waves. Threshold values decreased with increasing frequency and ranged between 10.3 μm (15 Hz) and 0.5 μm (80 Hz) peak-to-peak wave amplitude. For the frequencies 15 Hz and 30 Hz the sensitivity of one spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus) to water surface waves was also tested. Threshold values were 12.8 μm (15 Hz) down to 1.76 μm (30 Hz), i.e. close to the threshold values of C. niloticus. The surface wave sensitivity of crocodiles is similar to the surface wave sensitivity of semi-aquatic insects and fishing spiders but does not match the sensitivity of surface-feeding fishes which is higher by one to two orders of magnitude. PMID:26153334

  3. Interaction of surface and subsurface waters in the system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazukhina, Svetlana; Masloboev, Vladimir; Chudnenko, Konstantin; Bychinski, Valerii; Sandimirov, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    Purpose of the study - to assess the influence of the Khibiny massif on the formation of the chemical composition of surface and subsurface waters, generated within its boundaries using physical-chemical modeling ("Selector" software package). Objects of monitoring - rivers with sources in the upper reaches of the Khibiny massif (surface waters), and boreholes, located in these rivers' valleys (subsurface waters) have been chosen as objects of monitoring. Processes of formation of surface and subsurface waters, generated within the boundaries of the Khibiny massif, have been considered within the framework of a unified system "water-rock-atmosphere-carbon". The initial data of the model: chemical compositions of the Khibiny massif rocks and chemical analyses of atmospheric and surface waters. Besides, there have been considered Clarke concentrations S, Cl, F, C, their influence on the formation of chemical composition of water solutions; geochemical mobility of chemical elements. The previously developed model has been improved with the purpose of assessment of the influence of organic substance, either liquid or solid, on the formation of the chemical composition of water. The record of the base model of the multisystem includes 24 independent components (Al-B-Br-Ar-He-Ne-C-Ca-Cl-F-K-Mg-Mn-N-Na-P-S-Si-Sr-Cu-Zn-H-O-e), 872 dependent components, including, in a water solution - 295, in a gas phase - 76, liquid hydrocarbons - 111, solid phases, organic and mineral substances - 390. The record of solid phases of multisystem is made with consideration of the mineral composition of the Khibiny massif. Using the created model, the physical-chemical modeling of surface and subsurface water generation has been carried out: 1. The system "water-rock-atmosphere" has been studied, depending on the interaction degree (ksi) of rock with water. A model like this allowed investigating the interactions of surface waters (rivers and lakes) with rocks that form the Khibiny massif. 2. The evolution of subsurface waters has been studied using reservoir dynamics. It was assumed that the generated surface waters react with rock, when getting down at a certain depth, which allows tracing the process of formation and change of waters in the underground space. A computer model of surface waters was compared with the results of clean water monitoring (2001), while the computer calculation of subsurface waters was compared to the data of monitoring of Vudjavrjok, Kunijok and Oleny Ruchey rivers deposits.

  4. Quality of Surface Water in Missouri, Water Year 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otero-Benitez, William; Davis, Jerri V.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2007 water year (October 1, 2006 through September 30, 2007), data were collected at 67 stations including two U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations and one spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, dissolved nitrite plus nitrte, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and selected pesticide data summaries are presented for 64 of these stations, which primarily have been classified in groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, main land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State during water year 2007 is presented.

  5. Freshwater molluscs as indicators of bioavailability and toxicity of metals in surface-water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.F.; Collins, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Freshwater molluscs--snails and bivalves--have been used frequently as bioindicator organisms. With increasing needs for research on contaminant effects in freshwater ecosystems, this kind of biomonitoring is likely to develop further in the future. Molluscs can be used effectively for studies of both organic and inorganic contaminants; this review focuses on studies involving bioaccumulation and toxicity of metals. Two important advantages of snails and bivalves over most other freshwater organisms for biomonitoring research are their large size and limited mobility. In addition, they are abundant in many types of freshwater environments and are relatively easy to collect and identify. At metal concentrations that are within ranges common to natural waters, they are generally effective bioaccumulators of metals. Biomonitoring studies with freshwater molluscs have covered a wide diversity of species, metals, and environments. The principal generalization that can be drawn from this research is that bioaccumulation and toxicity are extremely situation dependent; hence, it is difficult to extrapolate results from any particular study to other situations where the biological species or environmental conditions are different. Even within one species, individual characteristics such as size, life stage, sex, and genotype can have significant effects on responses to contaminants. The bioavailability of the metal is highly variable and depends on pH, presence of organic ligands, water hardness, and numerous other controlling factors. Despite this variability, past studies provide some general principles that can facilitate planning of research with freshwater snails and bivalves as metal bioindicators. These principles may also be useful in understanding and managing freshwater ecosystems.

  6. Survival of Phytophthora infestans in Surface Water.

    PubMed

    Porter, Lyndon D; Johnson, Dennis A

    2004-04-01

    ABSTRACT Coverless petri dishes with water suspensions of sporangia and zoospores of Phytophthora infestans were embedded in sandy soil in eastern Washington in July and October 2001 and July 2002 to quantify longevity of spores in water under natural conditions. Effects of solar radiation intensity, presence of soil in petri dishes (15 g per dish), and a 2-h chill period on survival of isolates of clonal lineages US-8 and US-11 were investigated. Spores in water suspensions survived 0 to 16 days under nonshaded conditions and 2 to 20 days under shaded conditions. Mean spore survival significantly increased from 1.7 to 5.8 days when soil was added to the water. Maximum survival time of spores in water without soil exposed to direct sunlight was 2 to 3 days in July and 6 to 8 days in October. Mean duration of survival did not differ significantly between chilled and nonchilled sporangia, but significantly fewer chilled spores survived for extended periods than that of nonchilled spores. Spores of US-11 and US-8 isolates did not differ in mean duration of survival, but significantly greater numbers of sporangia of US-8 survived than did sporangia of US-11 in one of three trials. PMID:18944114

  7. Summary of surface-water quality, ground-water quality, and water withdrawals for the Spirit Lake Reservation, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vining, Kevin C.; Cates, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    Available surface-water quality, ground-water quality, and water-withdrawal data for the Spirit Lake Reservation were summarized. The data were collected intermittently from 1948 through 2004 and were compiled from U.S. Geological Survey databases, North Dakota State Water Commission databases, and Spirit Lake Nation tribal agencies. Although the quality of surface water on the reservation generally is satisfactory, no surface-water sources are used for consumable water supplies. Ground water on the reservation is of sufficient quality for most uses. The Tokio and Warwick aquifers have better overall water quality than the Spiritwood aquifer. Water from the Spiritwood aquifer is used mostly for irrigation. The Warwick aquifer provides most of the consumable water for the reservation and for the city of Devils Lake. Annual water withdrawals from the Warwick aquifer by the Spirit Lake Nation ranged from 71 million gallons to 122 million gallons during 2000-04.

  8. Compton Scattering from Bulk and Surface of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Vaknin, David

    2014-03-01

    Elastic and Compton scattering at grazing angle X-ray incidence from water show distinct behaviors below and above the critical angle for total reflections suggesting surface restructuring of the water surface. Using X-ray synchrotron radiation in reflectivity mode, we collect the Thomson and Compton scattering signals with energy dispersive detector at various angles near the normal to surface as a function of the angle of incidence. Analysis of the ratio between the Thomson and Compton intensity above the critical angle (which mainly probes bulk water) is a constant as expected from incoherent scattering from single water molecule, whereas the signal from the surface shows strong angular dependence on the incident angle. Although we do not fully understand the phenomena, we attribute the observation to more organized water at the interface. Ames Laboratory, DOE under contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 and Advanced Photon Source, DOE under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. Carbon evasion from surface waters in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butman, D. E.; Stackpoole, S. M.; Clow, D. W.; Striegl, R. G.; Verdin, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Gaseous evasion of carbon dioxide and methane from freshwater surfaces has been shown to be upwards of 50% of the total freshwater carbon flux. In many cases, surface efflux is the dominant removal pathway for carbon, however large-scale estimates remain poorly constrained. As part of the ongoing efforts to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of natural ecosystems in the US by the USGS LandCarbon Program, we present the results of a synthesis of available CO2 in streams and rivers, and CO2 and CH4 measurements in lakes across Alaska. For stream carbon, we performed modifications to a synthetic streamline dataset derived from the Elevation Derivatives for National Applications (EDNA) to reflect more recent and accurate climate. Stream and river surface areas only account for 0.54% of the total area of Alaska while preliminary data suggests lakes account for nearly 3.4%. Preliminary analysis suggests 24 Tg-C yr-1 is evaded from fluvial surfaces, with the highest fluxes located in the southeastern region of the state driven by longer periods above freezing, high annual precipitation, and steep topography. We are currently quantifying the uncertainties in these estimates as well as analyzing a new dataset on CO2 and CH4 concentrations in Alaskan lakes. We will present the first estimate for the total freshwater surface carbon flux for Alaska.

  10. Behavior of severely supercooled water drops impacting on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Tanmoy; Antonini, Carlo; Tiwari, Manish K.; Mularczyk, Adrian; Imeri, Zulkufli; Schoch, Philippe; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-11-01

    Surface icing, commonplace in nature and technology, has broad implications to daily life. To prevent surface icing, superhydrophobic surfaces/coatings with rationally controlled roughness features (both at micro and nano-scale) are considered to be a promising candidate. However, to fabricate/synthesize a high performance icephobic surface or coating, understanding the dynamic interaction between water and the surface during water drop impact in supercooled state is necessary. In this work, we investigate the water/substrate interaction using drop impact experiments down to -17°C. It is found that the resulting increased viscous effect of water at low temperature significantly affects all stages of drop dynamics such as maximum spreading, contact time and meniscus penetration into the superhydrophobic texture. Most interestingly, the viscous effect on the meniscus penetration into roughness feature leads to clear change in the velocity threshold for rebounding to sticking transition by 25% of supercooled drops. Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) Grant 200021_135479.

  11. Interaction between water cluster ions and mica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuto, Hiromichi Ohmura, Yuki; Nakagawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Takaoka, Gikan H.

    2014-03-15

    Water cluster ion beams were irradiated on mica surfaces to investigate the interaction between molecular cluster ions and a mica surface. The contact angle of the mica surface increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, but the increase in the contact angle was smaller than that induced by an ethanol cluster ion beam. The surface roughness also increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, whereas the intensity of K 2p x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peaks decreased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam. The decrease in the number of potassium atoms together with the increase in the surface roughness may be the causes of the increase in the contact angle.

  12. Mate desertion in the snail kite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beissinger, S.R.; Snyder, N.F.R.

    1988-01-01

    Mate desertion during the breeding cycle was documented at 28 of 36 (78%) snail kite, Rostrhamus sociabilis nests in Florida between 1979 and 1983. Offspring mortality occurred at only one deserted nest, however. Parents that were deserted by their mates continued to care for their young until independence (3?5 additional weeks) and provided snails at a rate similar to that of both parents combined before desertion. Males and females deserted with nearly equal frequency, except in 1982 when more females deserted. No desertion occurred during drought years, whereas desertion occurred at nearly every nest during favourable conditions. The occurrence of mate desertion was generally related to indirect measures of snail abundance: foraging range, snail delivery rates to the young and growth rates. Small broods were deserted more frequently by females than by males and tended to be deserted earlier than large ones. After desertion, deserters had the opportunity to re-mate and nest again since breeding seasons were commonly lengthy, but whether they did so was impossible to determine conclusively in most cases. The deserted bird sometimes incurred increased energetic costs and lost breeding opportunities during periods of monoparental care.

  13. [Mapping sensitivity of surface waters to acidification in China].

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuemei; Hao, Jiming; Duan, Lei; Zhou, Zhongping

    2002-01-30

    Acidification of surface waters can be decided by some environmental factors, such as soil's buffering capacity, neutralization capacity of bedrock to acid deposition and types of land use, among which the most important factor is the soil's resistance to acidification. Therefore, information about soils, geology and land use can be used to predict the regional occurrence of acidification surface waters under different flows. In this paper, information and data about Chinese soils, geology and land use types were collected to determine and to map the sensitivity of surface waters to acidification. Results showed that in China, most surface waters were not sensitive to acidification. The few most sensitive surface waters were located in the north part of Northeastern China, accounting for 2.67% of all the country land. It was the combined results of strongly acidified ortho podzolic soil, acidified bedrock and coniferous forest. Surface waters which were not very sensitive to acidification were distributed both in the region of dark brown forest soil in Northeastern China and in the ferralsol and yellow-brown earth area in Southern China, occupying 15.2% of all the country land. The other surface waters which distributed on 82.11% of all the country land were not sensitive to acidification at all. Most in the Northern China because of the high resistance of soils to acidification and the others were in the Southern China where calcareous soils and agricultural lands were widely distributed. Since soils were quite resistant to acid, acidification of surface waters of large area will not likely occur in the southern region of China suffering from heavy acid deposition in the near future. Nevertheless, the acid deposition in Northern China should be controlled as soon as possible in case that acidified surface waters will be found there. PMID:11987398

  14. Measurements of Water Surface Snow Lines in Classical Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blevins, Sandra M.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Banzatti, Andrea; Zhang, Ke; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.; Salyk, Colette; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep Herschel-PACS spectroscopy of far-infrared water lines from a sample of four protoplanetary disks around solar-mass stars, selected to have strong water emission at mid-infrared wavelengths. By combining the new Herschel spectra with archival Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy, we retrieve a parameterized radial surface water vapor distribution from 0.1 to 100 au using two-dimensional dust and line radiative transfer modeling. The surface water distribution is modeled with a step model composed of a constant inner and outer relative water abundance and a critical radius at which the surface water abundance is allowed to change. We find that the four disks have critical radii of ˜3-11 au, at which the surface water abundance decreases by at least 5 orders of magnitude. The measured values for the critical radius are consistently smaller than the location of the surface snow line, as predicted by the observed spectral energy distribution. This suggests that the sharp drop-off of the surface water abundance is not solely due to the local gas-solid balance, but may also be driven by the deactivation of gas-phase chemical pathways to water below 300 K. Assuming a canonical gas-to-dust ratio of 100, as well as coupled gas and dust temperatures Tgas = Tdust, the best-fit inner water abundances become implausibly high (0.01-1.0 {{{{H}}}2}-1). Conversely, a model in which the gas and dust temperatures are decoupled leads to canonical inner-disk water abundances of ˜ {10}-4 {{{H}}}2-1, while retaining gas-to-dust ratios of 100. That is, the evidence for gas-dust decoupling in disk surfaces is stronger than for enhanced gas-to-dust ratios.

  15. Bacterial pollution of the riverine surface microlayer and subsurface water.

    PubMed

    Skórczewski, Piotr; Mudryk, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    The density and distribution of bacteria indicative of pollution in the surface microlayer and subsurface water of the River Słupia were estimated. The number of heterotrophic bacteria, total coliforms, fecal coliforms and fecal streptococci were higher in the surface microlayer than in the underlying water. The average bacterial enrichment factor (EF) of the parameters studied in the bacterioneuston was 1.7 to 1.8 times higher than in bacterioplankton. During the annual study cycle, bacterial pollution indicators inhabiting the surface microlayer and subsurface water showed considerable monthly changes. PMID:19587410

  16. Investigation of surface water behavior during glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Turnock, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    Microvideo observations of glaze ice accretions on 1-in-diameter cylinders in a closed-loop refrigerated wind tunnel were obtained to study factors controlling the behavior of unfrozen surface water during glaze ice accretion. Three zones of surface water behavior were noted, each with a characteristic roughness. The effect of substrate thermal and roughness properties on ice accretions was also studied. The contact angle and hysteresis were found to increase sharply at temperatures just below 0 C, explaining the high resistance to motion of water beads observed on accreting glaze ice surfaces. Based on the results, a simple multizone modification to the current glaze ice accretion model is proposed.

  17. Deep Groundwater Contributions to Surface Water in a Mountainous Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolley, D. G.; Harding, J. J.; Wilson, J. L.; Frisbee, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    With growing concerns about declining snowpack, warmer temperatures, and land use changes, it is becoming increasingly important to determine the sources that contribute to surface water. In western states, such as New Mexico, most of the surface water is derived from mountainous watersheds. However, the interaction between the groundwater and the surface water within these mountain systems is poorly understood. Geochemical data collected from a mesoscale (~200 km2) watershed in northern New Mexico indicate there may be significant groundwater contributions to the surface water that have largely been ignored in previous studies. Stable isotopic analysis of δ18O and δ2H and Piper diagrams for surface water, groundwater, and spring water are not geochemically distinct. Surface water solute concentrations for most constituents increase as a function of the drainage area while the stable isotopic signature remains constant, suggesting that the water is sourced from similar areas but has undergone differing degrees of geochemical evolution along different flow paths. Plots of SiO2 vs Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, and K+ show evidence of spatial evolution of groundwater with solute concentrations from the headwaters to the watershed outlet. We hypothesize that the increasing solute concentrations in the surface water are controlled by inputs from deep, more geochemically evolved groundwater. This is similar to what Frisbee et al. (2011) saw in the Saguache Watershed, though our watershed is significantly smaller and has a different geological setting. Due to the chemical kinetics involved, this more geochemically evolved groundwater would require longer residence time along a given flow path to achieve the observed chemical compositions. Significant contributions of old groundwater to surface water could result in the surface water system having increased buffering capacity against climate change. This deep groundwater component in watersheds has largely been unexplored. Our research provides support for our hypothesis and indicates that deep groundwater contributions to surface water may occur at even smaller scales than previously published. Silica concentration in surface water samples plotted as a function of upstream contributing area. Silica concentrations tend to increase with increasing upstream contributing area.

  18. Thin Water Films at Multifaceted Hematite Particle Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Boily, Jean-François; Yeşilbaş, Merve; Md Musleh Uddin, Munshi; Baiqing, Lu; Trushkina, Yulia; Salazar-Alvarez, Germàn

    2015-12-01

    Mineral surfaces exposed to moist air stabilize nanometer- to micrometer-thick water films. This study resolves the nature of thin water film formation at multifaceted hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticle surfaces with crystallographic faces resolved by selected area electron diffraction. Dynamic vapor adsorption (DVA) in the 0-19 Torr range at 298 K showed that these particles stabilize water films consisting of up to 4-5 monolayers. Modeling of these data predicts water loadings in terms of an "adsorption regime" (up to 16 H2O/nm(2)) involving direct water binding to hematite surface sites, and of a "condensation regime" (up to 34 H2O/nm(2)) involving water binding to hematite-bound water nanoclusters. Vibration spectroscopy identified the predominant hematite surface hydroxo groups (-OH, μ-OH, μ3-OH) through which first layer water molecules formed hydrogen bonds, as well as surface iron sites directly coordinating water molecules (i.e., as geminal η-(OH2)2 sites). Chemometric analyses of the vibration spectra also revealed a strong correspondence in the response of hematite surface hydroxo groups to DVA-derived water loadings. These findings point to a near-saturation of the hydrogen-bonding environment of surface hydroxo groups at a partial water vapor pressure of ∼8 Torr (∼40% relative humidity). Classical molecular dynamics (MD) resolved the interfacial water structures and hydrogen bonding populations at five representative crystallographic faces expressed in these nanoparticles. Simulations of single oriented slabs underscored the individual roles of all (hydro)oxo groups in donating and accepting hydrogen bonds with first layer water in the "adsorption regime". These analyses pointed to the preponderance of hydrogen bond-donating -OH groups in the stabilization of thin water films. Contributions of μ-OH and μ3-OH groups are secondary, yet remain essential in the stabilization of thin water films. MD simulations also helped resolve crystallographic controls on water-water interactions occurring in the "condensation regime". Water-water hydrogen bond populations are greatest on the (001) face, and decrease in importance in the order (001) > (012) ≈ (110) > (014) ≫ (100). Simulations of a single (∼5 nm × ∼ 6 nm × ∼ 6 nm) nanometric hematite particle terminated by the (001), (110), (012), and (100) faces also highlighted the key roles that sites at particle edges play in interconnecting thin water films grown along contiguous crystallographic faces. Hydroxo-water hydrogen bond populations showed that edges were the preferential loci of binding. These simulations also suggested that equilibration times for water binding at edges were slower than on crystallographic faces. In this regard, edges, and by extension roughened surfaces, are expected to play commanding roles in the stabilization of thin water films. Thus, in focusing on the properties of nanometric-thick water layers at hematite surfaces, this study revealed the nature of interactions between water and multifaced particle surfaces. Our results pave the way for furthering our understanding of mineral-thin water film interfacial structure and reactivity on a broader range of materials. PMID:26559158

  19. Luneburg modified lens for surface water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichard, Helene; Maurel, Agnes; Petitjeans, Phillipe; Martin, Paul; Pagneux, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that when the waves pass across an elevated bathymetry, refraction often results in amplification of waves behind it. In this sense, focusing of liquid surface waves can be used to enhance the harvest efficiency of ocean power. An ocean wave focusing lens concentrates waves on a certain focal point by transforming straight crest lens of incident waves into circular ones just like an optical lens. These devices have attracted ocean engineers and are promising because they enable the effective utilization of wave energy, the remaining challenge being to increase the harvest efficiency of the lens. In this work, in order to improve well known focusing of surface liquid waves by lens, the propagation of liquid surface waves through a Luneburg modified lens is investigated. The traditional Luneburg lens is a rotationally symmetric lens with a spatially varying refractive-index profile that focuses an incident plane wave on the rim of the lens. The modified Luneburg lens allows to choose the position of the focal point, which can lie inside or outside the lens. This new degree of freedom leads to enhanced focusing and tunable focusing. The focusing of linear surface waves through this lens is investigated and is shown to be more efficient than classical profile lenses.

  20. LANDSCAPE INDICATORS OF SURFACE WATER CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task comprises three inter-related projects: 1) impervious surface mapping and evaluation of its impact ; 2) detection of BMPs and estimation of their ability to reduce nutrient input into streams, and; 3) detection of isolated wetlands. Each substask addresses critical is...

  1. Assessment of information on ground-water/surface-water interactions in the northern midcontinent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strobel, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Ground-water/surface-water interactions are important to the hydrology of shallow aquifers, streams, lakes, and wetlands. Information on ground-water/surface-water interactions in the northern midcontinent was assessed. The ground-water/surface-water interactions in physiographic and climatic areas that contain many wetlands differed from the interactions in areas that consisted predominantly of alluvial aquifers along large streams. In both types of areas, however, the interactions are complex. The distribution of shallow ground-water observation wells in the northern midcontinent and the frequency of measurement were evaluated. Most shallow wells are located adjacent to major streams, especially in areas where wetlands are not a dominant surface-water feature. The frequency of measurement was inconsistent between states.

  2. Third Stokes parameter emission from a periodic water surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.; Staelin, D. H.; Oneill, K.; Lohanick, A.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment in which the third Stokes parameter thermal emission from a periodic water surface was measured is documented. This parameter is shown to be related to the direction of periodicity of the periodic surface and to approach brightnesses of up to 30 K at X band for the surface used in the experiment. The surface actually analyzed was a 'two-layer' periodic surface; the theory of thermal emission from such a surface is derived and the theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements. These results further the idea of using the third Stokes parameter emission as an indicator of wind direction over the ocean.

  3. Structure and dynamics of water at the mackinawite (001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terranova, Umberto; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2016-03-01

    We present a molecular dynamics investigation of the properties of water at the interface with the mackinawite (001) surface. We find water in the first layer to be characterised by structural properties which are reminiscent of hydrophobic substrates, with the bulk behaviour being recovered beyond the second layer. In addition, we show that the mineral surface reduces the mobility of interfacial water compared to the bulk. Finally, we discuss the important differences introduced by simulating water under conditions of high temperature and pressure, a scenario relevant to geochemistry.

  4. Coherent structures in liquid water close to hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Giudice, Emilio; Tedeschi, Alberto; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Voeikov, Vladimir

    2013-06-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) predicts the occurrence of a number of coherent dynamical phenomena in liquid water. In the present paper we focus our attention on the joint coherent oscillation of the almost free electrons produced by the coherent oscillation of the electron clouds of water molecules, which has been described in previous publications, and of the negative electric charges lying on the solid surfaces wet by water. This joint coherent oscillation gives rise to a number of phenomenological consequences which are found to exist in the physical reality and coincide with the layers of Exclusion Zone (EZ) water experimentally observed close to hydrophilic surfaces.

  5. Structure and dynamics of water at the mackinawite (001) surface.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Umberto; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2016-03-01

    We present a molecular dynamics investigation of the properties of water at the interface with the mackinawite (001) surface. We find water in the first layer to be characterised by structural properties which are reminiscent of hydrophobic substrates, with the bulk behaviour being recovered beyond the second layer. In addition, we show that the mineral surface reduces the mobility of interfacial water compared to the bulk. Finally, we discuss the important differences introduced by simulating water under conditions of high temperature and pressure, a scenario relevant to geochemistry. PMID:26957175

  6. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, Miya N.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designs and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2009 water year (October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009), data were collected at 75 stations-69 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations, 1 spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, and 3 stations sampled in cooperation with the Elk River Watershed Improvement Association. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 72 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and seven-day low flow is presented.

  7. Surface water records of New Mexico, water year 1962

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1963-01-01

    year intervals. These 5-year water-supply papers will show daily discharge and will be compiled on the same geographical areas previously used for the annual series; however, some of the 14 parts of conterminous United States will be further subdivided.

  8. Factors influencing counts in an annual survey of Snail Kites in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennetts, R.E.; Link, W.A.; Sauer, J.R.; Sykes, P.W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Snail Kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis) in Florida were monitored between 1969 and 1994 using a quasi-systematic annual survey. We analyzed data from the annual Snail Kite survey using a generalized linear model where counts were regarded as over-dispersed Poisson random variables. This approach allowed us to investigate covariates that might have obscured temporal patterns of population change or induced spurious patterns in count data by influencing detection rates. We selected a model that distinguished effects related to these covariates from other temporal effects, allowing us to identify patterns of population change in count data. Snail Kite counts were influenced by observer differences, site effects, effort, and water levels. Because there was no temporal overlap of the primary observers who collected count data, patterns of change could be estimated within time intervals covered by an observer, but not for the intervals among observers. Modeled population change was quite different from the change in counts, suggesting that analyses based on unadjusted counts do not accurately model Snail Kite population change. Results from this analysis were consistent with previous reports of an association between water levels and counts, although further work is needed to determine whether water levels affect actual population size as well as detection rates of Snail Kites. Although the effects of variation in detection rates can sometimes be mitigated by including controls for factors related to detection rates, it is often difficult to distinguish factors wholly related to detection rates from factors related to population size. For factors related to both, count survey data cannot be adequately analyzed without explicit estimation of detection rates, using procedures such as capture-recapture.

  9. Turbulent flow over an interactive alternating land-water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Heerwaarden, C.; Mellado, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The alternating land-water surface is a challenging surface to represent accurately in weather and climate models, but it is of great importance for the surface energy balance in polar regions. The complexity of this surface lies in the fact that secondary circulations, which form at the boundary of water and land, interact strongly with the surface energy balance. Due to its large heat capacity, the water temperature adapts slowly to the flow, thus the properties of the atmosphere determine the uptake of energy from the water. In order to study this complex system in a simpler way, retaining only the most essential physics, we have simplified the full surface energy balance including radiation. We have derived a boundary condition that mimics the full balance and can be formulated as a so-called Robin boundary condition: a linear combination of Dirichlet (fixed temperature) and Neumann (fixed temperature gradient) ones. By spatially varying the coefficients, we are able to express land and water using this boundary condition. We have done a series of direct numerical simulations in which we generate artificial land-water patterns from noise created from a Gaussian spectrum centered around a dominant wave number. This method creates realistic random patterns, but we are still in control of the length scales. We show that the system can manifest itself in three regimes: micro-, meso- and macro-scale. In the micro-scale, we find perfect mixing of the near-surface atmosphere that results in identical air properties over water and land. In the meso-scale, secondary circulations alter the heat exchange considerably by advecting air between land and water. In addition, they bring the surface temperature of the land closer to that of the air, thereby modulating the energy loss due to outgoing longwave radiation. In the macro-scale regime, the flow over land and water become independent of each other and only the large scale forcings determine the energy balance.

  10. Cryptosporidium contamination of surface and water supplies in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Brasseur, Philippe; Agnamey, Patrice; Emmanuel, Evens; Pape, Jean W; Vaillant, Michel; Raccurt, Christian P

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is one of the most frequent causes of diarrhea in Haiti. Transmission in children less than five years-old, HIV-infected individuals, and people living in low socio-economic conditions is frequently due to consumption of water or food contaminated by Cryptosporidium oocysts. This study examined the circulation of Cryptosporidium oocysts in surface waters and in public water supplies in the district of Port-au-Prince. Data were gathered from December 2000 to June 2002 in 37 sites. In the district of Port-au-Prince, 24/37 samples of water collected (65%) were contaminated by Cryptosporidium oocysts and 10/11 (91%) of those collected in reservoirs used by people living in peripheral areas. The rate of contamination was 7/13 (54%) in water from public standpipes provided by the public company of water distribution. All surface water (4/4) collected was highly contaminated. PMID:21337181

  11. Water diffusion on TiO2 anatase surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, L.; Gala, F.; Zollo, G.

    2015-06-01

    Compatibility between biological molecules and inorganic materials, such as crystalline metal oxides, is strongly dependent on the selectivity properties and the adhesion processes at the interface between the two systems. Among the many different aspects that affect the adsorption processes of peptides or proteins onto inorganic surfaces, such as the charge state of the amino acids, the peptide 3D structure, the surface roughness, the presence of vacancies or defects on and below the surface, a key role is certainly played by the water solvent whose molecules mediate the interaction. Then the surface hydration pattern may strongly affect the adsorption behavior of biological molecules. For the particular case of (101) anatase TiO2 surface that has a fundamental importance in the interaction of biocompatible nano-devices with biological environment, it was shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that various hydration patterns are close in energy and that the water molecules are mobile at as low temperature values as 190 K. Then it is important to understand the dynamical behavior of first hydration layer of the (101) anatase surface. As a first approach to this problem, density functional calculations are used to investigate water diffusion on the (101) anatase TiO2 surface by sampling the potential energy surface of water molecules of the first hydration layer thus calculating the water molecule migration energy along some relevant diffusion paths on the (101) surface. The measured activation energy of water migration seems in contrast with the observed surface mobility of the water molecules that, as a consequence could be explained invoking a strong role of the entropic term in the context of the transition state theory.

  12. Surface Propensities of the Self-Ions of Water

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The surface charge of water, which is important in a wide range of chemical, biological, material, and environmental contexts, has been a subject of lengthy and heated debate. Recently, it has been shown that the highly efficient LEWIS force field, in which semiclassical, independently mobile valence electron pairs capture the amphiproticity, polarizability and H-bonding of water, provides an excellent description of the solvation and dynamics of hydroxide and hydronium in bulk water. Here we turn our attention to slabs, cylinders, and droplets. In extended simulations with 1000 molecules, we find that hydroxide consistently prefers the surface, hydronium consistently avoids the surface, and the two together form an electrical double layer until neutralization occurs. The behavior of hydroxide can largely be accounted for by the observation that hydroxide moving to the surface loses fewer hydrogen bonds than are gained by the water molecule that it displaces from the surface. At the same time, since the orientation of the hydroxide increases the ratio of dangling hydrogens to dangling lone pairs, the proton activity of the exposed surface may be increased, rather than decreased. Hydroxide also moves more rapidly in the surface than in the bulk, likely because the proton donating propensity of neighboring water molecules is focused on the one hydrogen that is not dangling from the surface. PMID:27163053

  13. Surface Propensities of the Self-Ions of Water.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chen; Herzfeld, Judith

    2016-04-27

    The surface charge of water, which is important in a wide range of chemical, biological, material, and environmental contexts, has been a subject of lengthy and heated debate. Recently, it has been shown that the highly efficient LEWIS force field, in which semiclassical, independently mobile valence electron pairs capture the amphiproticity, polarizability and H-bonding of water, provides an excellent description of the solvation and dynamics of hydroxide and hydronium in bulk water. Here we turn our attention to slabs, cylinders, and droplets. In extended simulations with 1000 molecules, we find that hydroxide consistently prefers the surface, hydronium consistently avoids the surface, and the two together form an electrical double layer until neutralization occurs. The behavior of hydroxide can largely be accounted for by the observation that hydroxide moving to the surface loses fewer hydrogen bonds than are gained by the water molecule that it displaces from the surface. At the same time, since the orientation of the hydroxide increases the ratio of dangling hydrogens to dangling lone pairs, the proton activity of the exposed surface may be increased, rather than decreased. Hydroxide also moves more rapidly in the surface than in the bulk, likely because the proton donating propensity of neighboring water molecules is focused on the one hydrogen that is not dangling from the surface. PMID:27163053

  14. Formation of Water on a Warm Amorphous Silicate Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidali, Gianfranco; He, Jiao

    2014-06-01

    It is well established that reactions on interstellar dust grain surfaces are indispensable for water formation in space. Among all the intermediate products that lead to water formation, the OH radical is especially important because is a product of all the three main water formation surface routes, i.e., the hydrogenation of O, O2, and O3, and it also connects these three routes. The desorption energy of OH from dust grain surfaces, along with dust grain temperature, determines the availability OH for grain surface versus gas-phase reactions. We experimentally investigated water formation on the surface of a warm amorphous silicate via H+O3→OH+O2. The surface temperature was kept at 50 K so as to exclude the interference of O2. It is found that OH has a significant residence time at 50 K. The OH desorption energy from amorphous silicate surface is calculated to be at least 1680 K, and possibly as high as 4760 K. Water is formed efficiently via OH+H and OH+H2, and the product H2O stays on the surface upon formation. Deuterium has also been used in place of hydrogen to check isotopic effects. This work is supported by NSF, Astronomy & Astrophysics Division (Grants No. 0908108 and 1311958) and NASA (Grant No. NNX12AF38G). We thank Dr. J.Brucato of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri for providing the samples used in these experiments.

  15. A siphon gage for monitoring surface-water levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCobb, T.D.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Socolow, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold regions cause discontinuity and inaccuracy in the data collected. Installation and field testing of a siphon gage using 0.75-in-diameter polyethylene tubing at Ashumet Pond in Falmouth, Massachusetts, demonstrated that the siphon gage can provide long-term data with a field effort and accuracy equivalent to measurement of ground-water levels at an observation well.A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold regions cause discontinuity and inaccuracy in the data collected. Installation and field testing of a siphon gage using 0.75-in-diameter polyethylene tubing at Ashumet Pond in Falmouth, Massachusetts, demonstrated that the siphon gage can provide long-term data with a field effort and accuracy equivalent to measurement of ground-water levels at an observation well.

  16. The biological impact of landfill leachate on nearby surface water

    SciTech Connect

    Geis, S.W.

    1994-12-31

    Five landfill sites were evaluated for their potential to adversely impact the biotic community of surface waters. Acute and chronic aquatic toxicity tests were used to determine the toxicity of water samples collected from landfill monitoring wells and the nearest surface water. Four of the five landfill sites exhibited acute or chronic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna, or Pimephales promelas. Toxicity identification procedures performed on water samples revealed toxic responses to metals and one toxic response to organic compounds. Surface water toxicity at an industrial landfill is most likely due to zinc from a tire production facility. Iron and a surfactant were determined to be the probable causes for toxicity at two municipal solid waste landfills.

  17. Surface water connectivity dynamics of a large scale extreme flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigg, Mark A.; Michaelides, Katerina; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Bates, Paul D.

    2013-11-01

    Uses the MODIS surface water product observations of the 2011 Bangkok flood.A data gap filling method is developed to better preserve the dynamics of the event.We quantify surface water connectivity geostatistically to give new flood insights.There is a clear structure to the connectivity of the event through time and space.Changes and thresholds in the connectivity are linked to major flood mechanisms.

  18. Miscellaneous surface-water data, Pecos River basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cranston, C. Clare; Kues, Georgianna E.; Welder, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    Miscellaneous surface-water data from the Pecos River basin of New Mexico are assembled into one table. Measurements and estimates of the discharge of streams, springs, and diversion canals and pumps that are not readily available to the public are given. The principal sources of information are published and unpublished reports and various records of the U.S. Geological Survey and the New Mexico State Engineer Office. Many thousands of surface-water discharge values are given. (USGS)

  19. Epidemiology of Schistosoma mansoni infection and its relationship to snail distribution in a village at the Nile bank south to Cairo.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Hanan A; El-Ayyat, Afaf; Kader, Ahmed Abdel; Sabry, Hoda Y; Amer, Neimat M

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between epidemiology of S. mansoni infection and snail distribution at a village, related to Guiza Governorate and lies south to Cairo, was investigated. A systematic random sample of houses was selected. All inhabitants of the houses were invited to share in the study. The Number examined was 704. Urine and stools were examined using Nucleopore filtration and standard Kato-Katz techniques, respectively. Snail collection was done from 35 sites along the water bodies related to the village. Snails collected were examined by cercariae shedding under light. Snail differentiation was done. The results showed that the prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni human infection was 25.1 % and GMEC was 2.4 +/- 5.5. Schistosoma haematobium infection was zero percent. Biomphlaria alexandrina snail infection rate was 3.7% with density equal 0.5 +/- 1.3. Bulinus truncatus snail infection rate was zero percent. The pattern of S. mansoni human infection was closely related to snail distribution and infection. Presence of a hybrid species of B. alexandrina and B. glabrata may explain the epidemiological pattern found in the studied village. PMID:16916052

  20. Chlorine stress mediates microbial surface attachment in drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Le, Yang; Jin, Juliang; Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Guowei

    2015-03-01

    Microbial attachment to drinking water pipe surfaces facilitates pathogen survival and deteriorates disinfection performance, directly threatening the safety of drinking water. Notwithstanding that the formation of biofilm has been studied for decades, the underlying mechanisms for the origins of microbial surface attachment in biofilm development in drinking water pipelines remain largely elusive. We combined experimental and mathematical methods to investigate the role of environmental stress-mediated cell motility on microbial surface attachment in chlorination-stressed drinking water distribution systems. Results show that at low levels of disinfectant (0.0-1.0 mg/L), the presence of chlorine promotes initiation of microbial surface attachment, while higher amounts of disinfectant (>1.0 mg/L) inhibit microbial attachment. The proposed mathematical model further demonstrates that chlorination stress (0.0-5.0 mg/L)-mediated microbial cell motility regulates the frequency of cell-wall collision and thereby controls initial microbial surface attachment. The results reveal that transport processes and decay patterns of chlorine in drinking water pipelines regulate microbial cell motility and, thus, control initial surface cell attachment. It provides a mechanistic understanding of microbial attachment shaped by environmental disinfection stress and leads to new insights into microbial safety protocols in water distribution systems. PMID:25359474

  1. Formation and transport of deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine in surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.; Mills, M.S.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Perry, C.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Field disappearance studies and a regional study of nine rivers in the Midwest Corn Belt show that deethylatrazine (DEA; 2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and deisopropylatrazine (DIA; 2-amino-4-chloro-6-ethylaminos-triazine) occur frequently in surface water that has received runoff from two parent triazine herbicides, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and cyanazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-methylpropionitrileamino-s-triazine). The concentration of DEA and DIA in surface water varies with the hydrologic conditions of the basin and the timing of runoff, with maximum concentrations reaching 5 ??g/L (DEA + DIA). Early rainfall followed by a dry summer will result in an early peak concentration of metabolites in surface water. A wet summer will delay the maximum concentrations of metabolites and increase their runoff into surface water, occasionally resulting in a slight separation of the parent atrazine maximum concentrations from the metabolite maximum concentrations, giving a "second flush?? of triazine metabolites to surface water. Replicated field dissipation studies of atrazine and cyanazine indicate that DIA/DEA ratios will vary from 0.4 ?? 0.1 when atrazine is the major triazine present to 0.6 ?? 0.1 when significant amounts of cyanazine are present. A comparison of transport time of DEA and DIA from field plots to their appearance in surface water indicates that storage and dilution are occurring in the alluvial aquifers of the basin.

  2. Digenean trematode infections of native freshwater snails and invasive Potamopyrgus antipodarum in the Grand Teton National Park/John D. Rockefeller Memorial Parkway Area.

    PubMed

    Adema, C M; Lun, C-M; Hanelt, B; Seville, R S

    2009-02-01

    Outside its native range, the invasive New Zealand mud snail (NZMS), Potamopyrgus antipodarum, is rarely reported to harbor parasites. To test this observation, 7 sites along the Snake River and Polecat Creek in the Grand Teton National Park/John D Rockefeller Memorial Parkway area (Wyoming) were surveyed for native aquatic snails, NZMS, and associated digenean trematodes, in July 2005. At 6 sites, native snails harbored patent digenean infections; within 2 hr, < or =10% of lymnaeid snails shed furcocercariae or xiphidiocercariae, and < or =42% of physid snails released furcocercariae or echinostome cercariae. Partial 18S rDNA sequences were recovered from several furcocercariae. Potamopyrgus antipodarum was present at, and collected from, 5 sites. Polymerase chain reaction assays targeting digenean rDNA sequences in DNA extracted from pools of 150 NZMS snails did not detect parasites. The examination of 960 NZMS by overnight shedding yielded 1 occurrence of (surface-encysted) metacercariae of an unclassified notocotylid (based on 18S and 28S rDNA sequences). The dissection of 150 ethanol-fixed NZMS (30/site) revealed 2 types of digenean metacercariae encysted in tissues of 5 snails from Polecat Creek. Thus, invasive NZMS may serve as first and second intermediate host for digenean parasites. PMID:18576875

  3. SURFACE WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS FOR MONITORING OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report develops and recommends prioritized listings of chemical, physical, and biological parameters which can be used to assess the environmental impact of oil shale development on surface water resources. Each of the potential water-related problems is addressed in the con...

  4. CHARACTERIZING SURFACE WATERS THAT MAY NOT REQUIRE FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field data from various utilities were studied with the object of identifying a set of characteristics of a surface water that might allow it to be successfully treated by disinfection alone, thus avoiding the need to filter. It was found possible to define water quality standard...

  5. Specialized insulin is used for chemical warfare by fish-hunting cone snails

    PubMed Central

    Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Gajewiak, Joanna; Karanth, Santhosh; Robinson, Samuel D.; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Douglass, Adam D.; Schlegel, Amnon; Imperial, Julita S.; Watkins, Maren; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.; Yandell, Mark; Li, Qing; Purcell, Anthony W.; Norton, Raymond S.; Ellgaard, Lars; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2015-01-01

    More than 100 species of venomous cone snails (genus Conus) are highly effective predators of fish. The vast majority of venom components identified and functionally characterized to date are neurotoxins specifically targeted to receptors, ion channels, and transporters in the nervous system of prey, predators, or competitors. Here we describe a venom component targeting energy metabolism, a radically different mechanism. Two fish-hunting cone snails, Conus geographus and Conus tulipa, have evolved specialized insulins that are expressed as major components of their venoms. These insulins are distinctive in having much greater similarity to fish insulins than to the molluscan hormone and are unique in that posttranslational modifications characteristic of conotoxins (hydroxyproline, γ-carboxyglutamate) are present. When injected into fish, the venom insulin elicits hypoglycemic shock, a condition characterized by dangerously low blood glucose. Our evidence suggests that insulin is specifically used as a weapon for prey capture by a subset of fish-hunting cone snails that use a net strategy to capture prey. Insulin appears to be a component of the nirvana cabal, a toxin combination in these venoms that is released into the water to disorient schools of small fish, making them easier to engulf with the snail’s distended false mouth, which functions as a net. If an entire school of fish simultaneously experiences hypoglycemic shock, this should directly facilitate capture by the predatory snail. PMID:25605914

  6. Dark solitons on the surface of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabchoub, Amin

    2014-05-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) models the evolution dynamics in time and space of weakly nonlinear water wave trains in finite or infinite depth. In the defocusing regime (finite depth), the NLS admits a family of soliton solutions, which describe the strong depression of wave envelopes. These solitons are referred to dark solitons and have been already observed in optics and in Bose-Einstein condensates. We present experimental results on gray and black solitons, propagating in a wave flume. Furthermore, we analyze the data and discuss the discrepancies observed with respect to theoretical predictions. The results prove that in the case of weak-nonlinearity of the waves, the NLS describes well the dynamics of nonlinear wave packets in finite depth.

  7. Langmuir circulation inhibits near-surface water turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-07-01

    In the surface ocean, breaking waves are a major source of air bubbles and turbulent kinetic energy. During the presence of a consistent surface wind, these wave-generated bubbles, along with other surface material like seaweed or foam, can be drawn into long rows along the surface. Driving this organization is Langmuir circulation, a phenomenon in which the wind and waves cause surface waters to rotate helically, moving like a wire wrapped around a pole in the windward direction. These spiral currents oscillate between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations, such that in some places the surface waters are pushed together and in others they are pulled apart. Researchers have previously found that at sites of convergence the bubbles produced by breaking waves are pushed to depths of 15 meters or more, with important implications for air-sea gas mixing and other processes.

  8. Mobility of Water on Oxide Surfaces Studied by QENS

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Although neutron scattering is often considered a bulk probe, we demonstrate that the mobility of surface water on oxide nano-powders can be investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering. We discuss how the reduced number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule associated with surface confinement leads to a qualitative modification of single-particle translational dynamics compared to bulk water. The mobility of surface water in zirconium oxide with two hydration layers present is discussed in detail. The outer hydration layer exhibits translational dynamics on the time scale of tens of picoseconds, and thus can be studied using time-of-flight neutron spectrometry. The translational dynamics of the inner hydration layer in the range of hundreds of picoseconds can be assessed with backscattering neutron spectrometry. Interestingly, despite being slower by two orders of magnitude, the translational motion of the molecules of the inner hydration layer may share more common traits with bulk water compared to the motion of the outer hydration layer, the dynamics of which is slower than that of bulk water by just one order of magnitude. Similar to bulk water, the temperature dependence of the residence time for the water molecules of the inner hydration layer is non-Arrhenius, and can be described by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) law. On the other hand, the molecules of the outer hydration layer demonstrate Arrhenius-type temperature dependence indicative of thermally activated surface jump diffusion. Our recent study of surface water on cerium oxide, which exhibits faster dynamics compared to water on zirconium oxide, has ventured into the low-temperature region (down to 200 K). Below 215 K, we have found a deviation from the VFT temperature dependence for the residence time indicative of a surprise "fragile"-to-"strong" transition in the surface water. While "fragile"-to-"strong" transition has been predicted in supercooled bulk water, there has been no prediction of such a transition in surface water. We discuss the links between our results and recent work on hydration water in carbon nanotubes and proteins.

  9. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  10. Using water isotopes in the evaluation of land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmo, Francesca; Risi, Camille; Ottlé, Catherine; Bastrikov, Vladislav; Valdayskikh, Victor; Cattani, Olivier; Jouzel, Jean; Gribanov, Konstantin; Nekrasova, Olga; Zacharov, Vyacheslav; Ogée, Jérôme; Wingate, Lisa; Raz-Yaseef, Naama

    2013-04-01

    Several studies show that uncertainties in the representation of land surface processes contribute significantly to the spread in projections for the hydrological cycle. Improvements in the evaluation of land surface models would therefore translate into more reliable predictions of future changes. The isotopic composition of water is affected by phase transitions and, for this reason, is a good tracer for the hydrological cycle. Particularly relevant for the assessment of land surface processes is the fact that bare soil evaporation and transpiration bear different isotopic signatures. Water isotopic measurement could thus be employed in the evaluation of the land surface hydrological budget. With this objective, isotopes have been implemented in the most recent version of the land surface model ORCHIDEE. This model has undergone considerable development in the past few years. In particular, a newly discretised (11 layers) hydrology aims at a more realistic representation of the soil water budget. In addition, biogeophysical processes, as, for instance, the dynamics of permafrost and of its interaction with snow and vegetation, have been included. This model version will allow us to better resolve vertical profiles of soil water isotopic composition and to more realistically simulate the land surface hydrological and isotopic budget in a broader range of climate zones. Model results have been evaluated against temperature profiles and isotopes measurements in soil and stem water at sites located in semi-arid (Yatir), temperate (Le Bray) and boreal (Labytnangi) regions. Seasonal cycles are reasonably well reproduced. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis investigates to what extent water isotopic measurements in soil water can help constrain the representation of land surface processes, with a focus on the partitioning between evaporation and transpiration. In turn, improvements in the description of this partitioning may help reduce the uncertainties in the land surface hydrological response to climate change. The work is partly supported by the grant of Ministry of Education and Science of RF under the contract N^ 11.G34.31.0064.

  11. A Model of Surface Energy Budget over Water, Snow and Ice Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Bras, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    The recently developed maximum entropy production (MEP) model of turbulent and conductive heat fluxes over land surfaces is generalized to water/snow/ice surfaces. Analogous to the case of land surfaces, an analytical solution of latent, sensible and surface water/snow/ice heat flux is derived as a function of surface temperature (e.g. sea surface temperature) and surface net short- and long wave radiation. Compared to the classical bulk transfer equations based models, the MEP model does not need wind speed, near-surface air temperature and roughness lengths as input. The model is parameter parsimonious. A test of the MEP model against observations from several field experiments has suggested its usefulness and potential for predicting conductive and turbulent fluxes over water/snow/ice surfaces. The model is a suitable tool for remote sensing of the surface energy balance over oceans, snow covered Antarctica and sea ice. The model can also be incorporated into regional and global atmospheric models as an alternative algorithm for surface energy/water balance.

  12. Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), A Tool For Numerically Simulating Linked Groundwater, Surface Water And Land-Surface Hydrologic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogrul, E. C.; Brush, C. F.; Kadir, T. N.

    2006-12-01

    The Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) is a comprehensive input-driven application for simulating groundwater flow, surface water flow and land-surface hydrologic processes, and interactions between these processes, developed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). IWFM couples a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process and 1-D land surface, lake, stream flow and vertical unsaturated-zone flow processes which are solved simultaneously at each time step. The groundwater flow system is simulated as a multilayer aquifer system with a mixture of confined and unconfined aquifers separated by semiconfining layers. The groundwater flow process can simulate changing aquifer conditions (confined to unconfined and vice versa), subsidence, tile drains, injection wells and pumping wells. The land surface process calculates elemental water budgets for agricultural, urban, riparian and native vegetation classes. Crop water demands are dynamically calculated using distributed soil properties, land use and crop data, and precipitation and evapotranspiration rates. The crop mix can also be automatically modified as a function of pumping lift using logit functions. Surface water diversions and groundwater pumping can each be specified, or can be automatically adjusted at run time to balance water supply with water demand. The land-surface process also routes runoff to streams and deep percolation to the unsaturated zone. Surface water networks are specified as a series of stream nodes (coincident with groundwater nodes) with specified bed elevation, conductance and stage-flow relationships. Stream nodes are linked to form stream reaches. Stream inflows at the model boundary, surface water diversion locations, and one or more surface water deliveries per location are specified. IWFM routes stream flows through the network, calculating groundwater-surface water interactions, accumulating inflows from runoff, and allocating available stream flows to meet specified or calculated deliveries. IWFM utilizes a very straight-forward input file structure, allowing rapid development of complex simulations. A key feature of IWFM is a new algorithm for computation of groundwater flow across element faces. Enhancements to version 3.0 include automatic time-tracking of input and output data sets, linkage with the HEC-DSS database, and dynamic crop allocation using logit functions. Utilities linking IWFM to the PEST automated calibration suite are also available. All source code, executables and documentation are available for download from the DWR web site. IWFM is currently being used to develop hydrologic simulations of California's Central Valley (C2VSIM); the west side of California's San Joaquin Valley (WESTSIM); Butte County, CA; Solano County, CA; Merced County, CA; and the Oregon side of the Walla Walla River Basin.

  13. Interaction of surface waves with vorticity in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda, Enrique; Lund, Fernando

    1993-06-01

    Vortical flows in shallow water interact with long surface waves by virtue of the nonlinear terms of the fluid equations. Analytical formulas are derived that quantify the spontaneous generation of such waves by unsteady vorticity as well as the scattering of surface waves by vorticity. In the first Born approximation the radiated surface elevation is linearly related to the Fourier transform of the vorticity. The ``dislocated'' wave fronts that are analogous to the Aharonov-Bohm effect are obtained as a special case.

  14. Profile of the Interface between a Hydrophobic Surface and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Salas, Ursula; Stalgren, Johan; Majkrzak, Charles; Heinrich, Frank; Toney, Michael; Vanderah, David

    2008-03-01

    Aqueous interfaces are ubiquitous and play a fundamental role in biology, chemistry, and geology. The structure of water near interfaces is of the utmost importance, including chemical reactivity and macromolecular function. Theoretical work by Chandler et al. on polar-apolar interfaces predicts that a water depletion layer exists between a hydrophobic surface and bulk water for hydrophobes larger than ˜20nm2 (a ˜4A in radius apolar molecule). Until now, what the interface really looks like remains in dispute since recent experiments give conflicting results: from complete wetting (no water depletion layer) to a water depletion layer. Those experiments that have found a water depletion layer report 40-70% water in the depletion zone: 40 -70% and a width of ˜3A. However, an alternative interpretation to the profiles exists where no depletion layer is required. By studying hydrophobic SAM surfaces against several water mixtures we obtained the hydrophobic/water profile by phase sensitive neutron reflectivity. With this model independent technique we observe a 2 times wider and drier depletion water layer: 6A thick and 0-25% water. Given the level of disagreement, I will review the topic of immiscible interfaces and show how phase sensitive reflectometry is unique in obtaining nm resolution profiles without fitting bias.

  15. Reduced water density at hydrophobic surfaces: Effect of dissolved gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doshi, Dhaval A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2005-07-01

    Here, direct noninvasive neutron reflectivity measurements reveal the presence of a reduced (deuterated) water density region, with a sigmoidal density profile at the hydrophobic silane-water interface that depends on the type and concentration of dissolved gases in the water. Removal of dissolved gases decreases the width of the reduced water density region, and their reintroduction leads to its increase. When compared with recent computer simulations, a locally fluctuating density profile is proposed, whereas preexisting nanobubbles are excluded. The presence of a fluctuating reduced water density region between two hydrophobic surfaces and the attractive “depletion force” to which it leads may help explain the hydrophobic force and its reported diminution in deaerated water. Our results are also quantitatively consistent with recent dynamic surface force apparatus results that drastically revise previous estimates of the slip length of water flowing past hydrophobic surfaces from microns to ≈20 nm. Our observations, therefore, go a long way toward reconciling three quite different types of experiments and phenomena: water depletion at hydrophobic surfaces, water slip at hydrophobic surfaces, and the hydrophobic interaction. Author contributions: D.A.D., E.B.W., J.N.I., and J.M. designed research; D.A.D., E.B.W., and J.M. performed research; D.A.D. and E.B.W. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; D.A.D. and E.B.W. analyzed data; and D.A.D., E.B.W., J.N.I., and J.M. wrote the paper.Abbreviations: AFM, atomic force microscopy; D2O, deuterated water; NR, neutron reflectivity; OTS, octadecyl-tricholorosilane; SLD, scattering length density.

  16. Polarized infrared emissivity for a rough water surface.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J; Marston, C

    2000-11-20

    The polarization state of infrared emission from water at large viewing angles is explained mathematically by a polarization-dependent emissivity. To provide polarized emissivity values for a wind-roughened water surface in a convenient format, this electronic paper provides interactive tables and plots of polarized water emissivity for the spectral range of 3-15 microm. The rough surface is modeled as a collection of specular facets with slopes given by a Gaussian distribution. The interactive electronic format provides a tutorial on emission polarization and it allows readers to copy the desired numbers and paste them into their electronic applications without the difficulty of transcribing numbers from printed tables. PMID:19407889

  17. Nucleate boiling of water from plain and structured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Das, A.K.; Das, P.K.; Saha, P.

    2007-08-15

    Heat transfer from plain surface and from surfaces with distinct nucleation sites has been investigated under saturated pool boiling condition. Surfaces have been prepared with regular array of discrete nucleation sites formed by micro-drilling. Distilled water has been used as the boiling liquid. Out of various available correlations, Rohsenow correlation [W.M. Rohsenow, A method of correlating heat transfer data for surface boiling of liquids, Trans. ASME 74 (1952) 969-976] gives best agreement with the experimental data from plain surface at low degree of superheat. A mechanistic model also provides a good trend matching with the same experimental data. With the introduction of artificial nucleation sites substantial augmentation in heat transfer for distilled water compared to the plane surface has been noted. Continuous increase in nucleation site density increases the rate of heat transfer with a diminishing trend of enhancement. A correlation similar to that of Yamagata et al. [K. Yamagata, F. Hirano, K. Nishiwaka, H. Matsouka, Nucleate boiling of water on the horizontal heating surface, Mem. Fac. Eng. Kyushu 15 (1955) 98] has been developed to fit the experimental data of plane surface. Modification of the same correlation to take care of the nucleation site density has been developed and used to predict the experimental data from augmented surfaces. (author)

  18. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-01-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field. PMID:24149467

  19. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-10-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

  20. Planktonic foraminifera as recorders of past surface-water stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulitza, Stefan; Dürkoop, Anke; Hale, Walter; Wefer, Gerold; Niebler, Hans Stefan

    1997-04-01

    The δ18O difference between shallow- and deep-living planktonic foraminifera is a proxy for the stratification of surface waters. In Holocene sediments from the Atlantic this difference increases from about 0‰ in subpolar regions to ˜3‰ in the tropics. The δ18O values of the shallow dwellers Globigerinoides sacculifer and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma mainly reflect surface-water conditions. The calcification depth of the deep-living species Globorotalia truncatulinoides (right-coiling) is affected by the stratification of the water column. In the subtropics, shell formation of G. truncatulinoides (right-coiling) begins in weakly stratified surface waters. In the tropics, the initial shell is secreted below the mixed layer. This hydrographically induced difference in calcification depth allows the use of the isotopic difference between G. truncatulinoides and the shallow species as a proxy for the stratification of surface waters. The Δδ18O between G. truncatulinoides and G. sacculifer from tropical gravity Core GeoB 1523-1 was significantly lower during isotope stage 2. This suggests that the glacial temperature stratification of western equatorial Atlantic surface waters was significantly reduced relative to the Holocene.

  1. Cytophilic receptors for foreignness and some factors which influence phagocytosis by invertebrate leucocytes: in vitro phagocytosis by amoebocytes of the snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed Central

    van der Knaap, W P; Sminia, T; Schutte, R; Boerrigter-Barendsen, L H

    1983-01-01

    By means of in vitro phagocytosis it was demonstrated that macrophage-like blood cells of an invertebrate (amoebocytes of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis) possess cytophilic receptors for foreignness. These receptors are lectin molecules which are reversibly bound to the surface of the cells. Phagocytosis is dependent, beyond recognition of foreignness, on temperature and pH, and on the feeding condition of the snails. PMID:6822406

  2. Sewage sludge application in a plantation: effects on trace metal transfer in soil-plant-snail continuum.

    PubMed

    Bourioug, Mohamed; Gimbert, Frédéric; Alaoui-Sehmer, Laurence; Benbrahim, Mohammed; Aleya, Lotfi; Alaoui-Sossé, Badr

    2015-01-01

    We studied the potential bioaccumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd by the snail Cantareus aspersus and evaluated the risk of leaching after application of sewage sludge to forest plantation ecosystems. Sewage sludge was applied to the soil surface at two loading rates (0, and 6 tons ha(-1) in dry matter) without incorporation into the soil so as to identify the sources of trace metal contamination in soil and plants and to evaluate effects on snail growth. The results indicated a snail mortality rate of less than 1% during the experiment, while their dry weight decreased significantly (<0.001) in all treatment modalities. Thus, snails showed no acute toxicity symptoms after soil amendment with sewage sludge over the exposure period considered. Additions of sewage sludge led to higher levels of trace metals in forest litter compared to control subplots, but similar trace metal concentrations were observed in sampling plants. Bioaccumulation study demonstrated that Zn had not accumulated in snails compared to Cu which accumulated only after 28 days of exposure to amended subplots. However, Pb and Cd contents in snails increased significantly after 14 and 28 days of exposure in both the control and amended subplots. At the last sampling date, in comparison to controls the Cd increase was higher in snails exposed to amended subplots. Thus, sludge spread therefore appears to be responsible for the observed bioaccumulation for Cu and Cd after 28days of exposure. Concerning Pb accumulation, the results from litter-soil-plant compartments suggest that soil is this metal's best transfer source. PMID:25262293

  3. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrillo, E. R., (compiler); Buckner, H.D.; Rawson, Jack

    1988-01-01

    As of January 1, 1988, the surface water data collection network in Texas included 368 continuous streamflow, 72 continuous or daily reservoir-contents, 38 gage height only, 15 crest stage partial record, 4 periodic discharge through range, 32 flood-hydrograph partial-record, 9 flood-profile partial-record, 36 low-flow partial record, 45 daily chemical-quality, 19 lake surveys, 160 periodic organic and (or) nutrient, 3 periodic insecticide, 33 periodic pesticide, 20 automatic sampler, 137 periodic minor elements, 125 periodic chemical-quality, 74 periodic physical-organic, 24 continuous-recording three- or four-parameter water quality, 34 periodic sediment, 21 continuous-recording temperature, and 30 national stream-quality accounting network stations. Plate 1 shows the location of surface water streamflow or reservoir content and chemical quality or sediment stations in Texas. Plate 2 shows the location of partial-record surface-water stations. (USGS)

  4. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawson, Jack, (compiler); Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    As of January 1, 1989, the surface-water data-collection network in Texas included 373 continuous-streamflow, 75 continuous or daily reservoir-content, 37 gage-height, 15 crest-stage partial-record, 200 data collection platform, 7 periodic discharge through range, 27 flood-hydrograph partial-record, 27 low-flow partial-record, 43 daily chemical-quality, 17 continuous-recording water quality, 87 periodic biological, 11 lake survey, 159 period organic and (or) nutrient, 2 periodic insecticide, 28 periodic pesticide, 19 automatic sampler, 137 periodic minor element, 126 periodic chemical-quality, 75 periodic physical organic, 17 continuous-recording temperature, and 29 national stream-gaging accounting network stations. Plate 1 shows the location of surface-water streamflow or reservoir-content and chemical-quality or sediment stations in Texas. Plate 2 shows the location of partial-record surface-water stations. (USGS)

  5. Circumnutation on the water surface: female flowers of Vallisneria

    PubMed Central

    Kosuge, Keiko; Iida, Satoko; Katou, Kiyoshi; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Circumnutation, the helical movement of growing organ tips, is ubiquitous in land plants. The mechanisms underlying circumnutation have been debated since Darwin's time. Experiments in space and mutant analyses have revealed that internal oscillatory (tropism-independent) movement and gravitropic response are involved in circumnutation. Female flower buds of tape grass (Vallisneria asiatica var. biwaensis) circumnutate on the water surface. Our observations and experiments with an artificial model indicated that gravitropism is barely involved in circumnutation. Instead, we show that helical intercalary growth at the base of peduncle plays the primary role in all movements in Vallisneria. This growth pattern produces torsional bud rotation, and gravity and buoyancy forces have a physical effect on the direction of peduncle elongation, resulting in bud circumnutation on the water surface. In contrast to other water-pollinated hydrophilous plants, circumnutation in Vallisneria enables female flowers to actively collect male flowers from a larger surface area of water. PMID:23355948

  6. The Proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Alsdorf, Douglas; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Morrow, Rosemary; Mognard, Nelly; Vaze, Parag; Lafon, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    A new space mission concept called Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) is being developed jointly by a collaborative effort of the international oceanographic and hydrological communities for making high-resolution measurement of the water elevation of both the ocean and land surface water to answer the questions about the oceanic submesoscale processes and the storage and discharge of land surface water. The key instrument payload would be a Ka-band radar interferometer capable of making high-resolution wide-swath altimetry measurement. This paper describes the proposed science objectives and requirements as well as the measurement approach of SWOT, which is baselined to be launched in 2019. SWOT would demonstrate this new approach to advancing both oceanography and land hydrology and set a standard for future altimetry missions.

  7. Mucus secretion by the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis limits aluminum concentrations of the aqueous environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jugdaohsingh, R.; Thompson, R.P.H.; Powell, J.J.; Campbell, M.M.; Mccrohan, C.R.; White, K.N.

    1998-09-01

    Extracellular mucopolysaccharide (EPS) is a significant component in many waters. Its role in the cycling and mobilization of metals is unclear. In vitro studies were conducted to examine the influence of EPS, secreted by the freshwater pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, on soluble water Al concentrations at near-neutral pH. Snails maintained in aerated water of known ion content and added aluminum reduced Al in solution as compared to controls. Although snails accumulated Al into soft tissue, this only accounted for a small percentage of the total reduction. The remaining Al was recovered following acidification of the water. This observation was attributed to pedal EPS secreted by L. stagnalis which is chiefly insoluble and substrate bound. The Al that remained in solution was more labile, possibly due to the influence of soluble EPS. Further experiments with isolated EPS, confirmed that this poorly soluble film binds and reduces Al in solution. The influence of EPS on the solution chemistry and bioavailability of Al and possibly other metals may be important in natural waters.

  8. Hydrochemical characteristics and water quality assessment of surface water and groundwater in Songnen plain, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Song, Xianfang; Zhang, Yinghua; Han, Dongmei; Tang, Changyuan; Yu, Yilei; Ma, Ying

    2012-05-15

    Water quality is the critical factor that influence on human health and quantity and quality of grain production in semi-humid and semi-arid area. Songnen plain is one of the grain bases in China, as well as one of the three major distribution regions of soda saline-alkali soil in the world. To assess the water quality, surface water and groundwater were sampled and analyzed by fuzzy membership analysis and multivariate statistics. The surface water were gather into class I, IV and V, while groundwater were grouped as class I, II, III and V by fuzzy membership analysis. The water samples were grouped into four categories according to irrigation water quality assessment diagrams of USDA. Most water samples distributed in category C1-S1, C2-S2 and C3-S3. Three groups were generated from hierarchical cluster analysis. Four principal components were extracted from principal component analysis. The indicators to water quality assessment were Na, HCO(3), NO(3), Fe, Mn and EC from principal component analysis. We conclude that surface water and shallow groundwater are suitable for irrigation, the reservoir and deep groundwater in upstream are the resources for drinking. The water for drinking should remove of the naturally occurring ions of Fe and Mn. The control of sodium and salinity hazard is required for irrigation. The integrated management of surface water and groundwater for drinking and irrigation is to solve the water issues. PMID:22417739

  9. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1996 water year. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P.; McLean, C.T.

    1996-11-01

    The principle investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 17 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data show less runoff than do data for the 1995 water year. Water chemistry data from larger storm events occurring at some stations are also published here.

  10. DETECTION OF A GROUND-WATER/SURFACE-WATER INTERFACE WITH DIRECT-PUSH EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground-water/surface-water interface (GSI) was documented at the Thermo Chem CERCLA Site in Muskegon, MI via direct-push (DP) sampling. At that time, contaminated ground water flowed from the upland area of the site into the Black Creek floodplain. DP rods equipped with a 1.5...

  11. MONITORING OXIDATION-REDUCTION PROCESS DURING GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTIONS AT THE CHICKASAW NRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineralized ground waters at the Chickasaw National Recreational Area contain hydrogen sulfide, i.e., sulfur in the -2 valence state. As these mineralized ground waters discharge at the surface and mix with oxygen-rich waters a series of abiotic and biotic reactions occur that c...

  12. 77 FR 12227 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: Uncovered Finished Water Reservoirs; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 141 and 142 Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: Uncovered Finished Water Reservoirs; Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of public..., concerning information that may inform the regulatory review of the uncovered finished water...

  13. ARSENIC SORUCE IDENTIFICATION AT THE GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTION ZONE AT A CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the challenges in assessing the current impact of the discharge of arsenic contaminated ground water into a surface water body is differentiating the arsenic ground-water flux versus dissolution of in-place contaminated sediments. A field investigation has been carried ou...

  14. Structural and dynamical properties of water on chemically modified surfaces: The role of the instantaneous surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Selemon; Tsige, Mesfin

    Surfaces of polymers such as atactic polystyrene (aPS) represent very good model systems for amorphous material surfaces. Such polymer surfaces are usually modified either chemically or physically for a wide range of applications that include friction, lubrication and adhesion. It is thus quite important to understand the structural and dynamical properties of liquids that come in contact with them to achieve the desired functional properties. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water molecules in a slab of water in contact with atactic polystyrene surfaces of varying polarity. We find that the density of water molecules and the number distribution of hydrogen bonds as a function of distance relative to an instantaneous surface exhibit a structure indicative of a layering of water molecules near the water/PS interface. For the dynamics, we use time correlation functions of hydrogen bonds and the incoherent structure function for the water molecules. Our results indicate that the polarity of the surface dramatically affects the dynamics of the interfacial water molecules with the dynamics slowing down with increasing polarity. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR1410290.

  15. Hydraulic Inversion of River Depth and Discharge from Observations of Surface Currents and Water Surface Elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, J.; Holland, K. T.; Calantoni, J.

    2014-12-01

    We developed a finite difference model for deterministic prediction of river depth and discharge from measurements of surface currents, water surface elevation slope and shoreline coordinates. The model is based on the inversion of the Reynolds-averaged depth-averaged steady shallow water equations in streamline curvilinear coordinates and assumes a quadratic bottom drag law with a known spatially-uniform friction coefficient. Iterative techniques are used to invert the discretized algebraic system relating the water depth to local gradients of the depth-averaged velocity and the water surface elevation. Inversion tests with in situ measurements of water surface elevations and surface currents from a 2010 field experiment on the Kootenai River (ID) showed encouraging agreement between the measured and predicted bathymetry. In situ measurements of velocity depth profiles obtained with an acoustic Doppler current profiler are used to relate the measured surface currents to the depth-averaged velocity used in the 2D hydraulic model. The shorelines were extracted from video imagery and the surface currents were estimated from remotely sensed infrared imagery or measured in situ from drifters. The value of the friction coefficient was obtained from previous calibration simulations with a forward hydraulic model that minimized the difference between the predicted and measured velocity and water level on a set of points along the river channel.

  16. Experimental Values of the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, P. T.

    1951-01-01

    The results of surface-tension measurements for supercooled water are presented. A total of 702 individual measurements of surface tension of triple-distilled water were made in the temperature range, 27 to -22.2 C, with 404 of these measurements at temperatures below 0 C. The increase in magnitude of surface tension with decreasing temperature, as indicated by measurements above 0 C, continues to -22.2 C. The inflection point in the surface-tension - temperature relation in the vicinity of 0 C, as indicated by the International Critical Table values for temperatures down to -8 C, is substantiated by the measurements in the temperature range, 0 to -22.2 C. The surface tension increases at approximately a linear rate from a value of 76.96+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -8 C to 79.67+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -22.2 C.

  17. Fecundity of the Chinese mystery snail in a Nebraska reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephen, Bruce J.; Allen, Craig R.; Chaine, Noelle M.; Fricke, Kent A.; Haak, Danielle M.; Hellman, Michelle L.; Kill, Robert A.; Nemec, Kristine T.; Pope, Kevin L.; Smeenk, Nicholas A.; Uden, Daniel R.; Unstad, Kody M.; VanderHam, Ashley E.; Wong, Alec

    2013-01-01

    The Chinese mystery snail (Bellamya chinensis) is a non-indigenous, invasive species in freshwater ecosystems of North America. We provide fecundity estimates for a population of these snails in a Nebraska reservoir. We dissected 70 snails, of which 29 were females. Nearly all female snails contained developing young, with an average of 25 young per female. Annual fecundity was estimated at between 27.2 and 33.3 young per female per year. Based on an estimated adult population and the calculated fecundity, the annual production for this reservoir was between 2.2 and 3.7 million young.

  18. Surface water resources issues analysis: Wheeler Reservoir watershed region

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.P.

    1990-02-01

    This report is one in a continuing series of periodic water resources issues analyses (WRIAs) conducted within the various local drainage basins that comprise the larger Tennessee River drainage basin. These analyses, based primarily upon existing information gathered from a variety of sources, perform several functions: document known or probable water quality issues that should be addressed by TVA or others; identify specific needs for additional information; guide routine surface water monitoring programs; and provide focus for planning and setting priorities for subsequent water quality assessments, mitigative activities, and resource management projects. 4 refs., 1 fig., 16 tabs.

  19. Foulant Characteristics Comparison in Recycling Cooling Water System Makeup by Municipal Reclaimed Water and Surface Water in Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Xu; Jing, Wang; Yajun, Zhang; Jie, Wang; Shuai, Si

    2015-01-01

    Due to water shortage, municipal reclaimed water rather than surface water was replenished into recycling cooling water system in power plants in some cities in China. In order to understand the effects of the measure on carbon steel corrosion, characteristics of two kinds of foulant produced in different systems were studied in the paper. Differences between municipal reclaimed water and surface water were analyzed firstly. Then, the weight and the morphology of two kinds of foulant were compared. Moreover, other characteristics including the total number of bacteria, sulfate reducing bacteria, iron bacteria, extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), protein (PN), and polysaccharide (PS) in foulant were analyzed. Based on results, it could be concluded that microbial and corrosive risk would be increased when the system replenished by municipal reclaimed water instead of surface water. PMID:25893132

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

  1. Fluctuating Helical Asymmetry and Morphology of Snails (Gastropoda) in Divergent Microhabitats at ‘Evolution Canyons I and II,’ Israel

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Shmuel; Schwartz, Nathan P.; Mienis, Hendrik K.; Nevo, Eviatar; Graham, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Developmental instability of shelled gastropods is measured as deviations from a perfect equiangular (logarithmic) spiral. We studied six species of gastropods at ‘Evolution Canyons I and II’ in Carmel and the Galilee Mountains, Israel, respectively. The xeric, south-facing, ‘African’ slopes and the mesic, north-facing, ‘European’ slopes have dramatically different microclimates and plant communities. Moreover, ‘Evolution Canyon II’ receives more rainfall than ‘Evolution Canyon I.’ Methodology/Principal Findings We examined fluctuating asymmetry, rate of whorl expansion, shell height, and number of rotations of the body suture in six species of terrestrial snails from the two ‘Evolution Canyons.’ The xeric ‘African’ slope should be more stressful to land snails than the ‘European’ slope, and ‘Evolution Canyon I’ should be more stressful than ‘Evolution Canyon II.’ Only Eopolita protensa jebusitica showed marginally significant differences in fluctuating helical asymmetry between the two slopes. Contrary to expectations, asymmetry was marginally greater on the ‘European’ slope. Shells of Levantina spiriplana caesareana at ‘Evolution Canyon I,’ were smaller and more asymmetric than those at ‘Evolution Canyon II.’ Moreover, shell height and number of rotations of the suture were greater on the north-facing slopes of both canyons. Conclusions/Significance Our data is consistent with a trade-off between drought resistance and thermoregulation in snails; Levantina was significantly smaller on the ‘African’ slope, for increasing surface area and thermoregulation, while Eopolita was larger on the ‘African’ slope, for reducing water evaporation. In addition, ‘Evolution Canyon I’ was more stressful than Evolution Canyon II’ for Levantina. PMID:22848631

  2. Integrated Land Surface Water State Indicators for Climate Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, B. T.; McDonald, K. C.; Steiner, N.; Azarderakhsh, M.; Schroeder, R.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate characterization of seasonal freeze/thaw transition timing coupled with accompanying characterization of snowpack water content, surface inundation, and radiation balance give the potential for an unambiguous indication of climate change. Earth remote sensing data sources have demonstrated utility for determining these surface and radiation balance state variables. NASA's Climate Indicators Team seeks to develop and test potential climate indicators that employ NASA capabilities to support the National Climate Assessemnt and are useful to decision makers. We present development of a set of climate indicators built upon remote sensing measures of surface water state variables: Landscape freeze/thaw (FT), Snow Water Equivalent (SWE), Surface inundation fraction (Fw), and radiative flux. Indicators based on and derived from these parameters may be assembled from integrated remote sensing datasets and provide key information in assessment of climate state. Combined, these state variables provide unique insight into linkages and feedbacks in terrestrial energy, water and carbon cycles and allow examination to the response of the integrated system to climate drivers. Assembled from existing remote sensing datasets, these deliverables will represent the first broad-scale observationally-based, comprehensive measures of surface water state and distribution coupled to atmospheric radiation for use in climate change assessment.

  3. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruma, Hosseini, S. H. R.; Yoshihara, K.; Akiyama, M.; Sakugawa, T.; Lukeš, P.; Akiyama, H.

    2014-09-01

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H2O2 and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  4. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R. Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.; Akiyama, M.; Lukeš, P.

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  5. A new calibration curve for carbonate clumped isotope thermometer of land snail shells (aragonite)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Yamada, K.; Yoshida, N.

    2013-12-01

    Clumped isotope data (Δ47) of carbonate is considered as a useful tool to reflect both the temperature and oxygen isotopic composition of water where the carbonate grew [1]. Zarrur et al. reported the relationship between snail shell calcification temperatures and the mean annual/ activity season ambient temperatures based on a calibration curve established by Ghosh et al. [2]. However, the clumped isotope temperature is always higher than the environment temperature. For better understanding this phenomenon, we present a new empirical calibration curve based on land snail shells (aragonite) cultured in the controlled temperature environment. In 2012, we cultured the land snails ';Euhadra' which were collected from Yokohama, Japan. They were cultured from eggs to adults around 6-8 months under the temperature of 20°, 25° and 30°, respectively. Each temperature group contains 15-20 snails. All of them were fed by cabbages during their life span. To study the effect of ingested carbonate, some of them were fed by Ca3(PO4)2 powder while others were fed by CaCO3 powder. Clumped isotope data for all samples were analyzed by a Thermo Finnigan MAT 253 Mass Spectrometer and calibrated by an ';absolute reference frame' [3]. We found an empirical linear relationship between Δ47 and controlled ambient temperature, which is slightly deviated from the published theoretical and experimental calibration curves based on both inorganic and biogenic materials. We will discuss the potential controlling factors caused this kind of deviation combine with the land snail growth environment. [1] Ghosh et al., 2006, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta. 70, 1439-1456 [2] Zaarur et al. 2011. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 75, 6859-6869 [3] Dennis et al., 2011. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 75, 7117-7131

  6. SARAH2: A NEAR FIELD EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR SURFACE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The near field surface water model (SARAH2) calculates maximum allowable hazardous waste concentrations, based on predicted exposure to humans or aquatic life from contaminated surface water. The surface water contamination pathways analyzed in SARAH2 include groundwater leachate...

  7. Impact of Water Recovery from Wastes on the Lunar Surface Mission Water Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Hogan, John Andrew; Wignarajah, Kanapathipi; Pace, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Future extended lunar surface missions will require extensive recovery of resources to reduce mission costs and enable self-sufficiency. Water is of particular importance due to its potential use for human consumption and hygiene, general cleaning, clothes washing, radiation shielding, cooling for extravehicular activity suits, and oxygen and hydrogen production. Various water sources are inherently present or are generated in lunar surface missions, and subject to recovery. They include: initial water stores, water contained in food, human and other solid wastes, wastewaters and associated brines, ISRU water, and scavenging from residual propellant in landers. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the contribution of water recovery from life support wastes on the overall water balance for lunar surface missions. Water in human wastes, metabolic activity and survival needs are well characterized and dependable figures are available. A detailed life support waste model was developed that summarizes the composition of life support wastes and their water content. Waste processing technologies were reviewed for their potential to recover that water. The recoverable water in waste is a significant contribution to the overall water balance. The value of this contribution is discussed in the context of the other major sources and loses of water. Combined with other analyses these results provide guidance for research and technology development and down-selection.

  8. Surface water pesticide modelling for decision support in drinking water production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, Nele; Dams, Jef; Bronders, Jan; Peleman, Gisèle; Verdickt, Liesbeth

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of pesticides and other contaminants in river systems may compromise the use of surface water for drinking water production. To reduce the cost of removal of pesticides from the raw water, drinking water companies can: search for other raw water sources, invest in water storage capacity to overcome periods with high pesticide concentrations (often related to the application period), or impose measures to reduce the emission of pesticides to surface water (i.e. sustainable application strategies or use restrictions). To select the most appropriate water management options, the costs and effects of the aforementioned actions need to be evaluated. This evaluation requires knowledge on the concentrations and loads of pesticides at the point of drinking water abstraction, as well as insight in the contribution and the temporal variability of different sources or subbasins. In such a case, a modelling approach can assist in generating measurement-based datasets and to compare different scenarios for water management. We illustrate how a modelling approach can provide decision support for water management related to drinking water abstraction from surface water in a catchment that suffers from elevated pesticide concentrations. The study area is a water production center (WPC) located in northwestern Belgium. The WPC abstracts raw water from the river IJzer or from a natural pond and its connected streams. The available quantities as well as the quality of the water vary throughout the year. The WPC uses a reservoir of 3 million m³ to capture and store raw water to overcome periods with limited water availability and/or poor water quality. However, the pressure on water increases and in the future this buffering capacity might be no longer sufficient to fulfill the drinking water production demand. A surface water quality model for the area is set up using InfoWorks RS. The model is applied to obtain insight in the concentrations and loads at the different points of drinking water abstraction (river IJzer and Blankaart pond), the contribution of the subbasins, and the seasonal dynamics. The model is also applied for scenario analysis related to water management and varying climatological conditions. Especially in summer, the availability of raw water of good quality for the WPC is limited. The discharge of the river IJzer is low and a minimum level is required for navigation, and the pond is part of a nature reserve where a minimum water level is imposed for conservation of aquatic habitats, and application of pesticides on the surrounding agricultural lands results in high pesticide concentrations (e.g. bentazon > 1µg/L).

  9. The utility of surface temperature measurements for the remote sensing of surface soil water status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out on an Avondale loam soil indicated that the thermal inertia concept of soil water content detection is reasonably sound. The volumetric water contents of surface soil layers between 2 and 4 cm thick were found to be linear functions of the amplitude of the diurnal surface soil temperature wave for clear day-night periods. They were also found to be linear functions of the daily maximum value of the surface soil-air-temperature differential. Tests on three additional soils ranging from sandy loam to clay indicated that the relations determined for Avondale loam could not be accurately applied to these other soil types. When the moisture characteristic curves of each soil were used to transform water contents into pressure potentials, however, it was found that soil water pressure potential could be determined without prior knowledge of soil type, and thus its value as a potential soil water status survey tool was significantly enhanced.

  10. Internal distribution of Cd in lettuce and resulting effects on Cd trophic transfer to the snail: Achatina fulica.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Cheng; Dang, Fei; Cang, Long; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying Cd trophic transfer along the soil-lettuce-snail food chain were investigated. The fate of Cd within cells, revealed by assessment of Cd chemical forms and of subcellular partitioning, differed between the two examined lettuce species that we examined (L. longifolia and L. crispa). The species-specific internal Cd fate not only influenced Cd burdens in lettuce, with higher Cd levels in L. crispa, but also affected Cd transfer efficiency to the consumer snail (Achatina fulica). Especially, the incorporation of Cd chemical forms (Cd in the inorganic, water-soluble and pectates and protein-integrated forms) in lettuce could best explain Cd trophic transfer, when compared to dietary Cd levels alone and/or subcellular Cd partitioning. Trophically available metal on the subcellular partitioning base failed to shed light on Cd transfer in this study. After 28-d of exposure, most Cd was trapped in the viscera of Achatina fulica, and cadmium bio-magnification was noted in the snails, as the transfer factor of lettuce-to-snail soft tissue was larger than one. This study provides a first step to apply a chemical speciation approach to dictate the trophic bioavailability of Cd through the soil-plant-snail system, which might be an important pre-requisite for mechanistic understanding of metal trophic transfer. PMID:25930053

  11. The convoluted evolution of snail chirality.

    PubMed

    Schilthuizen, M; Davison, A

    2005-11-01

    The direction that a snail (Mollusca: Gastropoda) coils, whether dextral (right-handed) or sinistral (left-handed), originates in early development but is most easily observed in the shell form of the adult. Here, we review recent progress in understanding snail chirality from genetic, developmental and ecological perspectives. In the few species that have been characterized, chirality is determined by a single genetic locus with delayed inheritance, which means that the genotype is expressed in the mother's offspring. Although research lags behind the studies of asymmetry in the mouse and nematode, attempts to isolate the loci involved in snail chirality have begun, with the final aim of understanding how the axis of left-right asymmetry is established. In nature, most snail taxa (>90%) are dextral, but sinistrality is known from mutant individuals, populations within dextral species, entirely sinistral species, genera and even families. Ordinarily, it is expected that strong frequency-dependent selection should act against the establishment of new chiral types because the chiral minority have difficulty finding a suitable mating partner (their genitalia are on the 'wrong' side). Mixed populations should therefore not persist. Intriguingly, however, a very few land snail species, notably the subgenus Amphidromus sensu stricto, not only appear to mate randomly between different chiral types, but also have a stable, within-population chiral dimorphism, which suggests the involvement of a balancing factor. At the other end of the spectrum, in many species, different chiral types are unable to mate and so could be reproductively isolated from one another. However, while empirical data, models and simulations have indicated that chiral reversal must sometimes occur, it is rarely likely to lead to so-called 'single-gene' speciation. Nevertheless, chiral reversal could still be a contributing factor to speciation (or to divergence after speciation) when reproductive character displacement is involved. Understanding the establishment of chirality, the preponderance of dextral species and the rare instances of stable dimorphism is an important target for future research. Since the genetics of chirality have been studied in only a few pulmonate species, we also urge that more taxa, especially those from the sea, should be investigated. PMID:16217668

  12. The convoluted evolution of snail chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilthuizen, M.; Davison, A.

    2005-11-01

    The direction that a snail (Mollusca: Gastropoda) coils, whether dextral (right-handed) or sinistral (left-handed), originates in early development but is most easily observed in the shell form of the adult. Here, we review recent progress in understanding snail chirality from genetic, developmental and ecological perspectives. In the few species that have been characterized, chirality is determined by a single genetic locus with delayed inheritance, which means that the genotype is expressed in the mother's offspring. Although research lags behind the studies of asymmetry in the mouse and nematode, attempts to isolate the loci involved in snail chirality have begun, with the final aim of understanding how the axis of left-right asymmetry is established. In nature, most snail taxa (>90%) are dextral, but sinistrality is known from mutant individuals, populations within dextral species, entirely sinistral species, genera and even families. Ordinarily, it is expected that strong frequency-dependent selection should act against the establishment of new chiral types because the chiral minority have difficulty finding a suitable mating partner (their genitalia are on the ‘wrong’ side). Mixed populations should therefore not persist. Intriguingly, however, a very few land snail species, notably the subgenus Amphidromus sensu stricto, not only appear to mate randomly between different chiral types, but also have a stable, within-population chiral dimorphism, which suggests the involvement of a balancing factor. At the other end of the spectrum, in many species, different chiral types are unable to mate and so could be reproductively isolated from one another. However, while empirical data, models and simulations have indicated that chiral reversal must sometimes occur, it is rarely likely to lead to so-called ‘single-gene’ speciation. Nevertheless, chiral reversal could still be a contributing factor to speciation (or to divergence after speciation) when reproductive character displacement is involved. Understanding the establishment of chirality, the preponderance of dextral species and the rare instances of stable dimorphism is an important target for future research. Since the genetics of chirality have been studied in only a few pulmonate species, we also urge that more taxa, especially those from the sea, should be investigated.

  13. Hydroeconomic optimization of integrated water management and transfers under stochastic surface water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tingju; Marques, Guilherme Fernandes; Lund, Jay R.

    2015-05-01

    Efficient reallocation and conjunctive operation of existing water supplies is gaining importance as demands grow, competitions among users intensify, and new supplies become more costly. This paper analyzes the roles and benefits of conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater and market-based water transfers in an integrated regional water system where agricultural and urban water users coordinate supply and demand management based on supply reliability and economic values of water. Agricultural users optimize land and water use for annual and perennial crops to maximize farm income, while urban users choose short-term and long-term water conservation actions to maintain reliability and minimize costs. The temporal order of these decisions is represented in a two-stage optimization that maximizes the net expected benefits of crop production, urban conservation and water management including conjunctive use and water transfers. Long-term decisions are in the first stage and short-term decisions are in a second stage based on probabilities of water availability events. Analytical and numerical analyses are made. Results show that conjunctive use and water transfers can substantially stabilize farmer's income and reduce system costs by reducing expensive urban water conservation or construction. Water transfers can equalize marginal values of water across users, while conjunctive use minimizes water marginal value differences in time. Model results are useful for exploring the integration of different water demands and supplies through water transfers, conjunctive use, and conservation, providing valuable insights for improving system management.

  14. Spatial development of the wind-driven water surface flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, Rémi; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2015-04-01

    The water velocity field induced by wind and waves beneath an air-water interface is investigated experimentally versus fetch in the large Marseille-Luminy wind wave tank. Measurements of the vertical velocity profiles inside the subsurface shear layer were performed by a three-component Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The surface drift current was also derived from visualizations of small floating drifters recorded by a video camera looking vertically from above the water surface. Surface wave height and slopes were determined simultaneously by means of capacitance gauges and a single-point laser slope system located in the immediate vicinity of the profiler. Observations were made at steady low to moderate wind speeds and various fetches ranging between 1 and 15 meters. This study first corroborates that the thin subsurface water boundary layer forced by wind at the leading edge of the water sheet is laminar. The surface drift current velocity indeed increases gradually with fetch, following a 1/3 power law characteristic of an accelerated flat-plate laminar boundary layer. The laminar-turbulent transition manifests itself by a sudden decrease in the water surface flow velocity and a rapid deepening of the boundary layer due to the development of large-scale longitudinal vortices. Further downstream, when characteristic capillary-gravity wind waves develop at the surface, the water flow velocity increases again rapidly within a sublayer of typically 4 mm depth. This phenomenon is explained by the occurrence of an intense momentum flux from waves to the mean flow due to the dissipation of parasitic capillaries generated ahead of the dominant wave crests. This phenomenon also sustains significant small-scale turbulent motions within the whole boundary layer. However, when gravity-capillary waves of length longer than 10 cm then grow at the water surface, the mean flow velocity field decreases drastically over the whole boundary layer thickness. At the same time, long-lived three-dimensional coherent structures which present strong similarities with the so-called Langmuir circulations start to grow. The main features of the wind-induced water surface flow observed at these different stages of development will be compared with previous observations and the results of numerical simulations as described by Tsai et al. (2005, 2009).

  15. Effects of Surface-Water Diversions on Habitat Availability for Native Macrofauna, Northeast Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, Stephen B.; Wolff, Reuben H.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of surface-water diversions on habitat availability for native stream fauna (fish, shrimp, and snails) are described for 21 streams in northeast Maui, Hawaii. Five streams (Waikamoi, Honomanu, Wailuanui, Kopiliula, and Hanawi Streams) were chosen as representative streams for intensive study. On each of the five streams, three representative reaches were selected: (1) immediately upstream of major surface-water diversions, (2) midway to the coast, and (3) near the coast. This study focused on five amphidromous native aquatic species (alamoo, nopili, nakea, opae, and hihiwai) that are abundant in the study area. The Physical Habitat Simulation (PHABSIM) System, which incorporates hydrology, stream morphology and microhabitat preferences to explore relations between streamflow and habitat availability, was used to simulate habitat/discharge relations for various species and life stages, and to provide quantitative habitat comparisons at different streamflows of interest. Hydrologic data, collected over a range of low-flow discharges, were used to calibrate hydraulic models of selected transects across the streams. The models were then used to predict water depth and velocity (expressed as a Froude number) over a range of discharges up to estimates of natural median streamflow. The biological importance of the stream hydraulic attributes was then assessed with the statistically derived suitability criteria for each native species and life stage that were developed as part of this study to produce a relation between discharge and habitat availability. The final output was expressed as a weighted habitat area of streambed for a representative stream reach. PHABSIM model results are presented to show the area of estimated usable bed habitat over a range of streamflows relative to natural conditions. In general, the models show a continuous decrease in habitat for all modeled species as streamflow is decreased from natural conditions. The PHABSIM modeling results from the intensively studied streams were normalized to develop relations between the relative amount of diversion from a stream and the resulting relative change in habitat in the stream. These relations can be used to estimate changes in habitat for diverted streams in the study area that were not intensively studied. The relations indicate that the addition of even a small amount of water to a dry stream has a significant effect on the amount of habitat available. Equations relating stream base-flow changes to habitat changes can be used to provide an estimate of the relative habitat change in the study area streams for which estimates of diverted and natural median base flow have been determined but for which detailed habitat models were not developed. Stream water temperatures, which could have an effect on stream ecology and taro cultivation, were measured in five streams in the study area. In general, the stream temperatures measured at any of the monitoring sites were not elevated enough, based on currently available information, to adversely effect the growth or mortality of native aquatic macrofauna or to cause wetland taro to be susceptible to fungi and associated rotting diseases.

  16. Infiltration of pesticides in surface water into nearby drinking water supply wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaguerra, F.; Albrechtsen, H.; Binning, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Drinking water wells are often placed near streams because streams often overly permeable sediments and the water table is near the surface in valleys, and so pumping costs are reduced. The lowering of the water table by pumping wells can reverse the natural flow from the groundwater to the stream, inducing infiltration of surface water to groundwater and consequently to the drinking water well. Many attenuation processes can take place in the riparian zone, mainly due to mixing, biodegradation and sorption. However, if the water travel time from the surface water to the pumping well is too short, or if the compounds are poorly degradable, contaminants can reach the drinking water well at high concentrations, jeopardizing drinking water quality. Here we developed a reactive transport model to evaluate the risk of contamination of drinking water wells by surface water pollution. The model was validated using data of a tracer experiment in a riparian zone. Three compounds were considered: an older pesticide MCPP (Mecoprop) which is mobile and persistent, glyphosate (Roundup), a new biodegradable and strongly sorbed pesticide, and its degradation product AMPA. Global sensitivity analysis using the method of Morris was employed to identify the dominant model parameters. Results showed that the presence of an aquitard and its characteristics (degree of fracturing and thickness), pollutant properties and well depth are the crucial factors affecting the risk of drinking water well contamination from surface water. Global sensitivity analysis results were compared with rank correlation statistics between pesticide concentrations and geological parameters derived from a comprehensive database of Danish drinking water wells. Aquitard thickness and well depth are the most critical parameters in both the model and observed data.

  17. Occurrence of illicit drugs in surface waters in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaiyang; Du, Peng; Xu, Zeqiong; Gao, Tingting; Li, Xiqing

    2016-06-01

    Illicit drugs have been recognized as a group of emerging contaminants. In this work, occurrence of common illicit drugs and their metabolites in Chinese surface waters was examined by collecting samples from 49 lakes and 4 major rivers across the country. Among the drugs examined, methamphetamine and ketamine were detected with highest frequencies and concentration levels, consistent with the fact that these are primary drugs of abuse in China. Detection frequencies and concentrations of other drugs were much lower than in European lakes and rivers reported in the literature. In most Chinese surface waters methamphetamine and ketamine were detected at concentrations of several ng L(-1) or less, but in some southern lakes and rivers, these two drugs were detected at much higher concentrations (up to several tens ng L(-1)). Greater occurrence of methamphetamine and ketamine in southern surface waters was attributed to greater abuse and more clandestine production of the two drugs in southern China. PMID:26942687

  18. Radar image sequence analysis of inhomogeneous water surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seemann, Joerg; Senet, Christian M.; Dankert, Heiko; Hatten, Helge; Ziemer, Friedwart

    1999-10-01

    The radar backscatter from the ocean surface, called sea clutter, is modulated by the surface wave field. A method was developed to estimate the near-surface current, the water depth and calibrated surface wave spectra from nautical radar image sequences. The algorithm is based on the three- dimensional Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) of the spatio- temporal sea clutter pattern in the wavenumber-frequency domain. The dispersion relation is used to define a filter to separate the spectral signal of the imaged waves from the background noise component caused by speckle noise. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) contains information about the significant wave height. The method has been proved to be reliable for the analysis of homogeneous water surfaces in offshore installations. Radar images are inhomogeneous because of the dependency of the image transfer function (ITF) on the azimuth angle between the wave propagation and the antenna viewing direction. The inhomogeneity of radar imaging is analyzed using image sequences of a homogeneous deep-water surface sampled by a ship-borne radar. Changing water depths in shallow-water regions induce horizontal gradients of the tidal current. Wave refraction occurs due to the spatial variability of the current and water depth. These areas cannot be investigated with the standard method. A new method, based on local wavenumber estimation with the multiple-signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm, is outlined. The MUSIC algorithm provides superior wavenumber resolution on local spatial scales. First results, retrieved from a radar image sequence taken from an installation at a coastal site, are presented.

  19. Salmonellae as an Index of Pollution of Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, William B.; Hanks, John B.; Thomason, Berenice M.; Murlin, Alma M.; Biddle, James W.; Croom, John M.

    1972-01-01

    Screening enrichments of surface water specimens by means of a polyvalent fluorescent antibody reagent for the salmonellae yielded approximately 60% more positive specimens than was obtained by cultural procedures. It is not known what fraction of the excess of fluorescent antibody-positive over culturally positive specimens represents staining of non-salmonellae or non-arizonae as opposed to the staining of non-cultivatable organisms of these two genera. Cotton gauze and rayon-polypropylene fiber swabs were equally sensitive for collecting salmonellae from the streams examined. Tetrathionate enrichment incubated at 41.5 C appeared to be superior to selenite-cystine for isolation of salmonellae from surface waters. Twenty-eight serotypes of Salmonella and two serotypes of Arizona were identified in the 121 positive specimens. In water rated moderately polluted, 65% of all specimens tested were positive; in minimally polluted waters, 38% were positive; and in unpolluted streams, 44% were positive. PMID:4562473

  20. Zearalenone occurrence in surface waters in central Illinois, USA.

    PubMed

    Maragos, Chris M

    2012-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is an estrogenic secondary metabolite produced by certain fungi that commonly infest important cereal crops. The ability of ZEN to move from contaminated crops to surface waters has been demonstrated previously. This article reports the development and application of a method for the measurement of ZEN in surface waters from the central part of Illinois, USA. The method uses a cleanup procedure based on tandem reverse-phase disks and immunoaffinity columns, separation by liquid chromatography and detection by a combination of absorbance and fluorescence. ZEN was frequently found in samples of waters from lakes, streams and a field ditch. Although the frequency of detection was high (32% above the limit of detection, 0.4 ng L⁻¹), the levels found were low, with the highest sample having 5.7 ng L⁻¹. Therefore, although fungi can contribute to the exposure to environmental estrogens, the contribution from zearalenone in water is likely small. PMID:24779696

  1. Molecular dynamics studies of water deposition on hematite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Haynes, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The interest in carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery is increasing proportional to the decrease in naturally driven oil production and also due to the increasing demand for reduced emission of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Transport of carbon dioxide in offshore pipelines involves high pressure and low temperatures which may lead to the formation of hydrate between residual water dissolved in carbon dioxide. The critical question is whether the water at some condition of temperature and pressure will drop out as liquid droplets or as water adsorbed on the surfaces of the pipeline and then subsequently form hydrates heterogeneously. In this work we have used the 6-311G basis set with B3LYP to estimate the charge distribution of different sizes of hematite crystals. The obtained surface charge distribution were kept unchanged while the inner charge distribution where scaled so as to result in an overall neutral crystal. These rust particles were embedded in water and chemical potential for adsorbed water molecules were estimated through thermodynamic integration and compared to similar estimates for same size water cluster. Estimated values of water chemical potentials indicate that it is thermodynamically favorable for water to adsorb on hematite, and that evaluation of potential carbon dioxide hydrate formation conditions and kinetics should be based this sequence of processes.

  2. Distribution of metals and accumulation of lead by different tissues in the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis (L.)

    SciTech Connect

    Pyatt, F.B.; Pyatt, A.J.; Pentreath, V.W.

    1997-07-01

    The concentrations of several metals in different body tissues of the freshwater snail, Lymnaea stagnalis (L.), collected from an uncontaminated environment, were measured by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Significant concentrations of the potentially toxic elements manganese, titanium, and copper were detected in all tissues, although they were not detectable in the water sampled at collection; bioaccumulation is thus evidenced. Highest concentrations of manganese and copper were present in the shell, while highest concentrations of titanium were present in the head and foot. Experimental snails were continuously exposed to lead chloride (lead at 5 ppm) for an experimental period of 3 weeks. Both elements were accumulated to different extents by the snail tissues but with high concentrations again in the head of the animals, and chloride also in the visceral hump. No significant alterations in the distribution of the other elements measured were observed in the lead chloride-exposed animals.

  3. Nanostructuring of metal surfaces by corrosion for efficient water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jooyoung; Lim, Guh-Hwan; Lim, Byungkwon

    2016-01-01

    We show that simply by corroding Ni foam in an aqueous solution, it is possible to produce nanostructured surfaces. When Ni foam was corroded in water or an aqueous solution containing NaCl, a dense array of Ni(OH)2 nanosheets was produced on the surface of the foam. When corroded in the presence of RuCl3, the nanostructured surface composed of Ni(OH)2 nanosheets decorated with ultrasmall RuO2 nanoparticles was obtained. At an applied voltage of 1.7 V, the combination of these two nanostructured surfaces yielded a water-splitting current density more than three times that obtained on the commercial Pt wire electrodes.

  4. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  5. Intermolecular Casimir-Polder forces in water and near surfaces.

    PubMed

    Thiyam, Priyadarshini; Persson, Clas; Sernelius, Bo E; Parsons, Drew F; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Boström, Mathias

    2014-09-01

    The Casimir-Polder force is an important long-range interaction involved in adsorption and desorption of molecules in fluids. We explore Casimir-Polder interactions between methane molecules in water, and between a molecule in water near SiO(2) and hexane surfaces. Inclusion of the finite molecular size in the expression for the Casimir-Polder energy leads to estimates of the dispersion contribution to the binding energies between molecules and between one molecule and a planar surface. PMID:25314410

  6. The use of radar imagery for surface water investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the interpretation of hydrologic features using L-band (HH) imagery collected by aircraft and Seasat systems. Areas of research needed to more precisely define the accuracy and repeatability of measurements related to the conditions of surfaces and boundaries of fresh water bodies are identified. These include: the definition of shoreline, the nature of variations in surface roughness across a water body and along streams and lake shores, and the separation of ambiguous conditions which appear similar to lakes.

  7. GROUND-WATER DRAINAGE TO SURFACE MINES REFINED.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, Linda S.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in seepage flux and hydraulic head (ground-water level) resulting from ground-water drainage into the first and subsequent cuts of a surface coal mine can be estimated by a technique that considers drainage from the unsaturated zone and drainage effects of the advancing mine. A 'single-layer' technique is used, in which each layer of a stratified aquifer system is considered separately. Use of the technique requires knowledge of some aquifer characteristics at the proposed mining site and an estimate of the rate of approach of the advancing surface mine.

  8. Insight into water molecules bonding on 4d metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Javier; Michaelides, Angelos; Scheffler, Matthias

    2008-03-01

    Water-metal interactions are of capital importance to a wide variety of phenomena in materials science, catalysis, corrosion, electrochemistry, etc. Here we address the nature of the bond between water molecules and metal surfaces through a careful systematic study. Specifically, the bonding of isolated water molecules to a series of close-packed transition metal surfaces - Ru(0001), Rh(111), Pd(111) and Ag(111) - has been examined in detail with density functional theory (DFT). Aiming to understand the origin behind energetic and structural trends along the 4d series we employ a range of analysis tools, such as decomposition of the density of states, electron density differences, electronic reactivity function and inspection of individual Kohn-Sham orbitals. The results obtained allow us to rationalize the bonding between water and transition metal surfaces as a balance of covalent and electrostatic interactions. A frontier orbital scheme based on so-called two-center four-electron interactions between molecular orbitals of water and d band states of the surface proves incisive in understanding these systems.

  9. Pesticides in surface waters: distribution, trends, and governing factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Steven J.; Capel, Paul D.; Majewski, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Pesticde use in agriculture and non-agriculture settings has increased dramatically over the last several decades. Concern about adverse effects on the environment and human health has spurred an enormous amount of research into their environmental behavior and fate. Pesticides in Surface Waters presents a comprehensive summary of this research. This book evaluates published studies that focus on measuring pesticide concentration. The studies chosen include peer reviewed scientific literature, government reports, laboratory studies, and those using microcosms and artificial streams and ponds. The authors used this information to develop their overview of pesticide contamination of surface waters. The exhaustive compilation of data along with the fundamental science make this book essential for those involved in pesticide use, environmental protection, water quality, and human or ecological risk assessment. Pesticides in Surface Waters covers the results of actual studies, sources of pesticides to surface water, fate and transport, and environmental significance. Hundreds of data-packed tables, maps, charts, and drawings illustrate the key points, making research and application easy and cost effective.

  10. Aluminum in acidic surface waters: chemistry, transport, and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, C T

    1985-01-01

    Ecologically significant concentrations of Al have been reported in surface waters draining "acid-sensitive" watersheds that are receiving elevated inputs of acidic deposition. It has been hypothesized that mineral acids from atmospheric deposition have remobilized Al previously precipitated within the soil during soil development. This Al is then thought to be transported to adjacent surface waters. Dissolved mononuclear Al occurs as aquo Al, as well as OH-, F-, SO4(2-), and organic complexes. Although past investigations have often ignored non-hydroxide complexes of Al, it appears that organic and F complexes are the predominant forms of Al in dilute (low ionic strength) acidic surface waters. The concentration of inorganic forms of Al increases exponentially with decreases in solution pH. This response is similar to the theoretical pH dependent solubility of Al mineral phases. The concentration of organic forms of Al, however, is strongly correlated with variations in organic carbon concentration of surface waters rather than pH. Elevated concentrations of Al in dilute acidic waters are of interest because: Al is an important pH buffer; Al may influence the cycling of important elements like P, organic carbon, and trace metals; and Al is potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. An understanding of the aqueous speciation of Al is essential for an evaluation of these processes. PMID:3935428

  11. Energy Landscape of Water and Ethanol on Silica Surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Di; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Hui; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-06-26

    Fundamental understanding of small molecule–silica surface interactions at their interfaces is essential for the scientific, technological, and medical communities. We report direct enthalpy of adsorption (Δhads) measurements for ethanol and water vapor on porous silica glass (CPG-10), in both hydroxylated and dehydroxylated (hydrophobic) forms. Results suggest a spectrum of energetics as a function of coverage, stepwise for ethanol but continuous for water. The zero-coverage enthalpy of adsorption for hydroxylated silica shows the most exothermic enthalpies for both water (-72.7 ± 3.1 kJ/mol water) and ethanol (-78.0 ± 1.9 kJ/mol ethanol). The water adsorption enthalpy becomes less exothermic gradually until reachingmore » its only plateau (-20.7 ± 2.2 kJ/mol water) reflecting water clustering on a largely hydrophobic surface, while the enthalpy of ethanol adsorption profile presents two well separated plateaus, corresponding to strong chemisorption of ethanol on adsorbate-free silica surface (-66.4 ± 4.8 kJ/mol ethanol), and weak physisorption of ethanol on ethanol covered silica (-4.0 ± 1.6 kJ/mol ethanol). On the other hand, dehydroxylation leads to missing water–silica interactions, whereas the number of ethanol binding sites is not impacted. The isotherms and partial molar properties of adsorption suggest that water may only bind strongly onto the silanols (which are a minor species on silica glass), whereas ethanol can interact strongly with both silanols and the hydrophobic areas of the silica surface.« less

  12. Energy Landscape of Water and Ethanol on Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Hui; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-06-26

    Fundamental understanding of small molecule–silica surface interactions at their interfaces is essential for the scientific, technological, and medical communities. We report direct enthalpy of adsorption (Δhads) measurements for ethanol and water vapor on porous silica glass (CPG-10), in both hydroxylated and dehydroxylated (hydrophobic) forms. Results suggest a spectrum of energetics as a function of coverage, stepwise for ethanol but continuous for water. The zero-coverage enthalpy of adsorption for hydroxylated silica shows the most exothermic enthalpies for both water (-72.7 ± 3.1 kJ/mol water) and ethanol (-78.0 ± 1.9 kJ/mol ethanol). The water adsorption enthalpy becomes less exothermic gradually until reaching its only plateau (-20.7 ± 2.2 kJ/mol water) reflecting water clustering on a largely hydrophobic surface, while the enthalpy of ethanol adsorption profile presents two well separated plateaus, corresponding to strong chemisorption of ethanol on adsorbate-free silica surface (-66.4 ± 4.8 kJ/mol ethanol), and weak physisorption of ethanol on ethanol covered silica (-4.0 ± 1.6 kJ/mol ethanol). On the other hand, dehydroxylation leads to missing water–silica interactions, whereas the number of ethanol binding sites is not impacted. The isotherms and partial molar properties of adsorption suggest that water may only bind strongly onto the silanols (which are a minor species on silica glass), whereas ethanol can interact strongly with both silanols and the hydrophobic areas of the silica surface.

  13. Computer programs for modeling flow and water quality of surface water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorens, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A selection of available computer programs for modeling flow and water quality in surface water systems is described. The models include programs developed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Division hydrologic research activities and others developed by other agencies, universities, and consulting firms. Each model description includes a statement of program use; data requirements; computer costs; availability of documentation and reference material; and a contact person for additional information. The report is intended to assist the researcher by presenting a very brief description of the surface-water models which are readily available for project use. (USGS)

  14. Major carbon-14 deficiency in modern snail shells from southern Nevada springs

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, A.C.

    1984-04-06

    Carbon-14 contents as low as 3.3 +/- 0.2% modern (apparent age, 27,000 years) measured from the shells of snails Melanoides tuberculatus living in artesian springs in southern Nevada are attributed to fixation of dissolved HCO/sub 3//sup -/ with which the shells are in carbon isotope equilibrium. Recognition of the existence of such extreme deficiencies is necessary so that erroneous ages are not attributed to fresh water biogenic carbonates. 2 figures, 1 table.

  15. Identification of optimum scopes of environmental factors for snails using spatial analysis techniques in Dongting Lake Region, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Owing to the harmfulness and seriousness of Schistosomiasis japonica in China, the control and prevention of S. japonica transmission are imperative. As the unique intermediate host of this disease, Oncomelania hupensis plays an important role in the transmission. It has been reported that the snail population in Qiangliang Lake district, Dongting Lake Region has been naturally declining and is slowly becoming extinct. Considering the changes of environmental factors that may cause this phenomenon, we try to explore the relationship between circumstance elements and snails, and then search for the possible optimum scopes of environmental factors for snails. Methods Moisture content of soil, pH, temperature of soil and elevation were collected by corresponding apparatus in the study sites. The LISA statistic and GWR model were used to analyze the association between factors and mean snail density, and the values in high-high clustered areas and low-low clustered areas were extracted to find out the possible optimum ranges of these elements for snails. Results A total of 8,589 snail specimens were collected from 397 sampling sites in the study field. Besides the mean snail density, three environmental factors including water content, pH and temperature had high spatial autocorrelation. The spatial clustering suggested that the possible optimum scopes of moisture content, pH, temperature of the soil and elevation were 58.70 to 68.93%, 6.80 to 7.80, 22.73 to 24.23°C and 23.50 to 25.97 m, respectively. Moreover, the GWR model showed that the possible optimum ranges of these four factors were 36.58 to 61.08%, 6.541 to 6.89, 24.30 to 25.70°C and 23.50 to 29.44 m, respectively. Conclusion The results indicated the association between snails and environmental factors was not linear but U-shaped. Considering the results of two analysis methods, the possible optimum scopes of moisture content, pH, temperature of the soil and elevation were 58.70% to 68.93%, 6.6 to 7.0, 22.73°C to 24.23°C, and 23.5 m to 26.0 m, respectively. The findings in this research will help in making an effective strategy to control snails and provide a method to analyze other factors. PMID:24886456

  16. BIOMECHANICS. Jumping on water: Surface tension-dominated jumping of water striders and robotic insects.

    PubMed

    Koh, Je-Sung; Yang, Eunjin; Jung, Gwang-Pil; Jung, Sun-Pill; Son, Jae Hak; Lee, Sang-Im; Jablonski, Piotr G; Wood, Robert J; Kim, Ho-Young; Cho, Kyu-Jin

    2015-07-31

    Jumping on water is a unique locomotion mode found in semi-aquatic arthropods, such as water striders. To reproduce this feat in a surface tension-dominant jumping robot, we elucidated the hydrodynamics involved and applied them to develop a bio-inspired impulsive mechanism that maximizes momentum transfer to water. We found that water striders rotate the curved tips of their legs inward at a relatively low descending velocity with a force just below that required to break the water surface (144 millinewtons/meter). We built a 68-milligram at-scale jumping robotic insect and verified that it jumps on water with maximum momentum transfer. The results suggest an understanding of the hydrodynamic phenomena used by semi-aquatic arthropods during water jumping and prescribe a method for reproducing these capabilities in artificial systems. PMID:26228144

  17. Water Surface Ripples Generated by the Turbulent Boundary Layer of a Surface-Piercing Moving Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washuta, N.; Masnadi, N.; Duncan, J. H.

    2014-11-01

    Free surface ripples created by subsurface turbulence along a surface-piercing moving wall are studied experimentally. In this experiment, a meter-wide stainless steel belt travels horizontally in a loop around two rollers with vertically oriented axes, which are separated by 7.5 meters. One of the two 7.5-m-long belt sections between the rollers is in contact with the water in a large open-surface water tank and the water level is adjusted so that the top of the belt pierces the water free surface. The belt is launched from rest with a 3 g acceleration in order to quickly reach a steady state velocity. This belt motion creates a temporally evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially evolving boundary layer created along the side of a ship hull moving at the belt velocity, with a length equivalent to the length of belt that has passed the measurement region. The water surface ripples generated by the subsurface turbulence are measured in a plane normal to the belt using a cinematic LIF technique. It is found that the overall RMS surface fluctuations increase linearly with belt speed and that the spatial distributions of the fluctuations show a sharp increase near the wall. The support of the Office of Naval Research is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Groundwater - surface water interactions in the Ayeyarwady river delta, Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaoka, K.; Haruyama, S.; Kuzuha, Y.; Kay, T.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater is widely used as a water resource in the Ayeyarwady River delta. But, Groundwater has some chemical problem in part of the area. To use safety groundwater for health, it is important to make clear the actual conditions of physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater in this delta. Besides, Ayeyarwady River delta has remarkable wet and dry season. Surface water - groundwater interaction is also different in each season, and it is concerned that physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater is affected by the flood and high waves through cyclone or monsoon. So, it is necessary to research a good aquifer distribution for sustainable groundwater resource supply. The purposes of this study are evaluate to seasonal change of groundwater - surface water interactions, and to investigate the more safety aquifer to reduce the healthy risk. Water samples are collected at 49 measurement points of river and groundwater, and are analyzed dissolved major ions and oxygen and hydro-stable isotope compositions. There are some groundwater flow systems and these water qualities are different in each depth. These showed that physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater are closely related to climatological, geomorphogical, geological and land use conditions. At the upper Alluvium, groundwater quality changes to lower concentration in wet season, so Ayeyarwady River water is main recharge water at this layer in the wet season. Besides, in the dry season, water quality is high concentration by artificial activities. Shallower groundwater is affected by land surface conditions such as the river water and land use in this layer. At lower Alluvium, Arakan and Pegu mountains are main recharge area of good water quality aquifers. Oxygen18 value showed a little affected by river water infiltration in the wet season, but keep stable good water quality through the both seasons. In the wet season, the same groundwater exists and water quality changes through dry to wet season at the upper Irrawaddy formation which is distributed beneath the lower Alluvium. Local groundwater flow system which is not affected by river water in the wet season is distributed at the central delta. Land use changes from tropical forest to plantation at the Arakan mountains. So, it is necessary to monitor the physical and chemical characteristics change of groundwater.

  19. Interaction decay of nonionic surfactants at water surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang

    2003-07-01

    For large ether molecule surfactants with an alkane tail as the hydrophobic moiety and an ethylene oxide head (C 2H 4O) (POE) as the hydrophilic moiety, water surface tension drop in their presence is triggered by the attraction of water molecules to hydrophilic POE heads of surfactants at the air-water interface, which can be related to interactions between POE chains. It was found that interactions between POE chains decayed exponentially with respect to separation distance and increased with increase in POE chain length.

  20. Enhanced Water Splitting Efficiency Through Selective Surface State Removal.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Omid; Hamann, Thomas W

    2014-05-01

    Hematite (?-Fe2O3) thin film electrodes prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were employed to photocatalytically oxidize water under 1 sun illumination. It was shown that annealing at 800 C substantially improves the water oxidation efficiency of the ultrathin film hematite electrodes. The effect of high temperature treatment is shown to remove one of two surface states identified, which reduces recombination and Fermi level pinning. Further modification with Co-Pi water oxidation catalyst resulted in unprecedented photocurrent onset potential of ?0.6 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE; slightly positive of the flat band potential). PMID:26270090

  1. Water and Carbon Dioxide Adsorption at Olivine Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2013-11-14

    Plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate water and carbon dioxide adsorption at the (010) surface of five olivine minerals, namely, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), calcio-olivine (Ca2SiO4), tephroite (Mn2SiO4), fayalite (Fe2SiO4), and Co-olivine (Co2SiO4). Adsorption energies per water molecule obtained from energy minimizations varied from -78 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -128 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine at sub-monolayer coverage and became less exothermic as coverage increased. In contrast, carbon dioxide adsorption energies at sub-monolayer coverage ranged from -20 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -59 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine. Therefore, the DFT calculations show a strong driving force for carbon dioxide displacement by water at the surface of all olivine minerals in a competitive adsorption scenario. Additionally, adsorption energies for both water and carbon dioxide were found to be more exothermic for the alkaline-earth (AE) olivines than for the transition-metal (TM) olivines and to not correlate with the solvation enthalpies of the corresponding divalent cations. However, a correlation was obtained with the charge of the surface divalent cation indicating that the more ionic character of the AE cations in the olivine structure relative to the TM cations leads to greater interactions with adsorbed water and carbon dioxide molecules at the surface and thus more exothermic adsorption energies for the AE olivines. For calcio-olivine, which exhibits the highest divalent cation charge of the five olivines, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showed that this effect leads both water and carbon dioxide to react with the surface and form hydroxyl groups and a carbonate-like species, respectively.

  2. Distribution of tritium in precipitation and surface water in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Patrick A.; Visser, Ate; Moran, Jean E.; Esser, Brad K.

    2016-03-01

    The tritium concentration in the surface hydrosphere throughout California was characterized to examine the reasons for spatial variability and to enhance the applicability of tritium in hydrological investigations. Eighteen precipitation samples were analyzed and 148 samples were collected from surface waters across California in the Summer and Fall of 2013, with repeat samples from some locations collected in Winter and Spring of 2014 to examine seasonal variation. The concentration of tritium in present day precipitation varied from 4.0 pCi/L near the California coast to 17.8 pCi/L in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Concentrations in precipitation increase in spring due to the 'Spring Leak' phenomenon. The average coastal concentration (6.3 ± 1.2 pCi/L) in precipitation matches estimated pre-nuclear levels. Surface water samples show a trend of increasing tritium with inland distance. Superimposed on that trend, elevated tritium concentrations are found in the San Francisco Bay area compared to other coastal areas, resulting from municipal water imported from inland mountain sources and local anthropogenic sources. Tritium concentrations in most surface waters decreased between Summer/Fall 2013 and Winter/Spring 2014 likely due to an increased groundwater signal as a result of drought conditions in 2014. A relationship between tritium and electrical conductivity in surface water was found to be indicative of water provenance and anthropogenic influences such as agricultural runoff. Despite low initial concentrations in precipitation, tritium continues to be a valuable tracer in a post nuclear bomb pulse world.

  3. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 1998 Water Year

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    1999-02-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 19 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Caiion de Vane.

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC WASTEWATER CONTAMINANTS BETWEEN WATER AND SEDIMENT IN SURFACE WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace concentrations of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants have been determined in the surface waters of Europe and the United States. A preliminary report of substantially higher concentrations of pharmaceuticals in sediment suggests that bottom sediment ...

  5. Phenotypic Plasticity of the Introduced New Zealand Mud Snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, Compared to Sympatric Native Snails

    PubMed Central

    Levri, Edward P.; Krist, Amy C.; Bilka, Rachel; Dybdahl, Mark F.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is likely to be important in determining the invasive potential of a species, especially if invasive species show greater plasticity or tolerance compared to sympatric native species. Here in two separate experiments we compare reaction norms in response to two environmental variables of two clones of the New Zealand mud snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, isolated from the United States, (one invasive and one not yet invasive) with those of two species of native snails that are sympatric with the invader, Fossaria bulimoides group and Physella gyrina group. We placed juvenile snails in environments with high and low conductivity (300 and 800 mS) in one experiment, and raised them at two different temperatures (16°C and 22°C) in a second experiment. Growth rate and mortality were measured over the course of 8 weeks. Mortality rates were higher in the native snails compared to P. antipodarum across all treatments, and variation in conductivity influenced mortality. In both experiments, reaction norms did not vary significantly between species. There was little evidence that the success of the introduced species is a result of greater phenotypic plasticity to these variables compared to the sympatric native species. PMID:24699685

  6. The role of DDX3 in regulating Snail.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mianen; Song, Ling; Zhou, Tong; Gillespie, G Yancey; Jope, Richard S

    2011-03-01

    DDX3, a DEAD box protein family member, appears to promote the progression of some cancers, which may partly result from its impedance of death receptor-mediated apoptosis. We found that another mechanism by which DDX3 may aid cancer progression is by promoting increased levels of the transcription factor Snail. Snail represses expression of cellular adhesion proteins, leading to increased cell migration and metastasis of many types of cancer. Knockdown of DDX3 levels by shRNA reduced basal levels of Snail in HeLa and MCF-7 cells, and this was associated with reduced cell proliferation and migration. Snail protein and mRNA levels were increased by treatment with the HDAC inhibitors sodium butyrate or trichostatin A, and these increases were attenuated in cells with DDX3 knocked down. Treatment of cells with camptothecin was discovered to increase Snail protein levels, and this increase was diminished in cells with DDX3 knocked down. Analysis of 31 patient glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) samples revealed a significant correlation between the levels of DDX3 and Snail. Thus, DDX3 is required for basal Snail expression and increases in Snail induced by HDAC inhibitors or camptothecin, indicating that this action of DDX3 may contribute to its promotion of the progression of some cancers. PMID:21237216

  7. Water Resources Data for New Mexico; Part 1, Surface Water Records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1971-01-01

    Surface-water records for the 1970 water year for New Mexico, including records of streamflow or reservoir storage at gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites, are given in this report and their locations shown in figures 1, 2. Records for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States also are included. The records were collected arid computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey under the direction of W. E. Hale, district chief. These data represent that portion of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico. Through September 30, 1960, the records of discharge and stage of streams and canals and contents and stage of lakes or reservoirs were published in an annual series of U.S. Geological Survey water-supply papers entitled II Surface Water Supply of the United States." Beginning with the 1961 water year, surface-water records have been released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State-boundary basis. Distribution of these reports is limited; they are designed primarily for rapid release of data shortly after the end of the water year to meet local needs. The discharge and reservoir storage records for 1961-65 also are published in a Geological Survey water-supply paper series entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States 1961-65." There will be a similar series of water-supply papers for the water years 1966-70.

  8. North American Paleozoic land snails with a summary of other Paleozoic nonmarine snails

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solem, Alan; Yochelson, Ellis Leon

    1979-01-01

    Land snails from the Paleozoic of North America are known from the coal fields of eastern Canada, from the Dunkard basin west of the Allegheny Mountains, and from the western margin of the Illinois basin. The earliest finds were made about 125 years ago; essentially no new information has been recorded for a century. Large collections of Anthracopupa from the Dunkard basin sparked inquiry into the land snails from the other two areas. Studies using the SEM (scanning electron microscope) have provided considerable insight into microdetails of shell structure, which allow systematic assignment of these gastropods. All may be assigned to extant families, except one, for which insufficient material allows only superfamily assignment. The prosobranch Dawsonella is confirmed as being a terrestrial neritacean gastropod. To date, it is known only from the upper Middle Pennsylvanian of Illinois and Indiana. All the other Paleozoic land snails are stylommatophoran pulmonates; their current classification as nonmarine cyclophoraceans is not correct. Restudy of material from the Joggins section of Nova Scotia indicates that representatives of two ordinal groups of pulmonates appeared simultaneously in upper Lower Pennsylvanian strata; the oldest land prosobranch is found in only very slightly younger rocks. Zonites (Conulus) priscus is reassigned to the new genus Protodiscus in the extant family Discidae. Dendropupa is placed within the family Enidae, Anthraaopupa is placed in the family Tornatellinidae, and 'Pupa' bigsbii is assigned to the superfamily Pupillacea. All four of these family-level taxa are diverse and belong to two orders within the superorder Stylommatophora, heretofore considered a derived rather than an ancestral stock. Anthracopupa ohioensis Whitfield is a highly variable species, and two other species Naticopsis (?) diminuta and A.(?) dunkardona, both named by Stauffer and Schroyer, are placed in synonymy with it. To obtain taxonomic data to support the family placement of Anthracopupa, growth forms of modern pupillid and tornatellinid snails have been distinguished. The apertural barriers in Anthracopupa are identical in placement and growth pattern with those of living Tornatellinidae and independently confirm the family placement derived from study of the general form. One new species, A. sturgeoni, has been named. Anthracopupa is found most commonly in thin limestones interpreted as having been deposited in pools into which the small shells floated. Dendropupa is most commonly found in erect tree stumps that were covered by rapid sedimentation. Both environments are similar to those in which the shells of allied living species may be found today, and the fossils support environmental interpretations made entirely from lithology. A survey of the few European occurrences of Paleozoic land snails indicates that both Anthracopupa and Dendropupa occur in Lower Permian strata; Anthracopupa is known from beds as old as Westphalian B. These genera cannot be used for determining the Carboniferous-Permian boundary. Both the long local stratigraphic range of A. brittanica and D. vetusta reported in the literature and the moderately long range and great variability of A. ohioensis suggest that the land snails have little stratigraphic utility. On the other hand, the occurrence of these land snails in the late Paleozoic of the Northern Hemisphere provides further fossil evidence suggestive of a closed Atlantic Ocean at that time. A comparison of the Paleozoic and the present distributions of land -snail families on both sides of the Atlantic provides some interesting data on geographic shifts of organisms. Finally, the assignment of the earliest land snails to extant taxa at the family level indicates that the subclass Pulmonata has been very conservative in its evolution after initial radiation. A few notes on Paleozoic freshwater snails complete this survey.

  9. The hydrochemical framework of surface water basins in southern Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yidana, Sandow Mark

    2009-04-01

    Surface water resources play a crucial role in the domestic water delivery system in Ghana. In addition, sustainable food production is based on the quality and quantity of water resources available for irrigation purposes to supplement rain-fed agricultural activities in the country. The objective of this research was to determine the main controls on the hydrochemistry of surface water resources in the southern part of Ghana and assess the quality of water from these basins for irrigation activities in the area. R-mode factor and cluster analyses were applied to 625 data points from 6 river basins in southern Ghana after the data had been log transformed and standardized for homogeneity. This study finds that surface water chemistry in the south is controlled by the chemistry of silicate mineral weathering, chemistry of rainfall, fertilizers from agricultural activities in the area, as well as the weathering of carbonate minerals. A Gibb’s diagram plotted with total dissolved solids (TDS) on the vertical axis against (Na+ + K+)/(Ca2+ + K+ + Na+) on the horizontal axis indicates that rock weathering plays a significant role in the hydrochemistry. Activity diagrams for the CaO-Na2O-Al2O-SiO2-H2O and CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O systems suggest that kaolinite is the most stable clay mineral phase in the system. In addition, an assessment of the irrigation quality of water from these basins suggests that the basins are largely low sodium—low to medium salinity basins, delivering water of acceptable quality for irrigation purposes.

  10. PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR METALS IN SURFACE WATER, SOIL, AND WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents metal partition coefficients for the surface water pathway and for the source model used in the Multimedia, Multi-pathway, Multi-receptor Exposure and Risk Assessment (3MRA) technology under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Partition ...

  11. RATES, CONSTANTS, AND KINETICS FORMULATIONS IN SURFACE WATER QUALITY MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies are reviewed to provide a comprehensive volume on state-of-the-art formulations used in surface water quality modeling along with accepted values for rate constants and coefficients. Topics covered include system geometric representation (spatial and temporal), phy...

  12. Long-term trends in precipitation and surface water chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter shows long-term data and trends in precipitation and surface water chemistry for each site. It contains a brief introduction to the topic, and methods of measurements, selection of variables, and their data source. It consists primarily of a large number of figures showing long-term da...

  13. REMOTE MONITORING OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study shows that the intensity of the Raman normalized fluorescence emission induced in surface waters by ultraviolet radiation can be used to provide a unique remote sensing capability for airborne monitoring the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Trace concen...

  14. Wetlands and surface water discharge compliance workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Electric utility operation and maintenance activities have the potential to impact wetlands and surface water quality. These proceedings of the Wetlands and Surface Water Discharge Compliance Workshop provide a ready source of information on issues ranging from constructed wetland treatment systems to biodiversity policy and wetland management. The workshop also emphasized surface water topics such as permit relief options and permit compliance monitoring. The workshop was organized in two parts. The first part consisted of presentations by researchers on the present state of knowledge and research activities in the wetlands and surface water compliance areas. The second part of the workshop focused on identifying information and research needs of the electric utility representatives attending the workshop. This was an interactive session involving all the participants and was chaired by EPRI. In preparation for the discussion, background material was developed and presented to aid in the discussion. A list of 8 recommendations from this session are summarized. The proceedings contain 14 presentations made at the workshop.

  15. CONTROLLING STORM WATER RUNOFF WITH TRADABLE CREDITS FOR IMPERVIOUS SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Storm water flow off impervious surface in a watershed can lead to stream degradation, habitat alteration, low base flows and toxic leading. We show that a properly designed tradable runoff credit (TRC) system creates economic incentives for landowners to employ best management p...

  16. Zearalenone occurrence in surface waters in central Illinois, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is an estrogenic secondary metabolite produced by certain fungi that commonly infest important cereal crops, such as corn and wheat. The ability of ZEN to move from contaminated crops to surface waters has been demonstrated previously. This article reports the development of a meth...

  17. Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Sheila M; Muehlenbachs, Lucija A; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Chu, Ziyan; Krupnick, Alan J

    2013-03-26

    Concern has been raised in the scientific literature about the environmental implications of extracting natural gas from deep shale formations, and published studies suggest that shale gas development may affect local groundwater quality. The potential for surface water quality degradation has been discussed in prior work, although no empirical analysis of this issue has been published. The potential for large-scale surface water quality degradation has affected regulatory approaches to shale gas development in some US states, despite the dearth of evidence. This paper conducts a large-scale examination of the extent to which shale gas development activities affect surface water quality. Focusing on the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania, we estimate the effect of shale gas wells and the release of treated shale gas waste by permitted treatment facilities on observed downstream concentrations of chloride (Cl(-)) and total suspended solids (TSS), controlling for other factors. Results suggest that (i) the treatment of shale gas waste by treatment plants in a watershed raises downstream Cl(-) concentrations but not TSS concentrations, and (ii) the presence of shale gas wells in a watershed raises downstream TSS concentrations but not Cl(-) concentrations. These results can inform future voluntary measures taken by shale gas operators and policy approaches taken by regulators to protect surface water quality as the scale of this economically important activity increases. PMID:23479604

  18. PHOTOREACTIONS IN SURFACE WATERS AND THEIR ROLE IN BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade significant interest has developed in the influence of photochemical reactions on biogeochemical cycles in surface waters of lakes and the sea. A major portion of recent research on these photoreactions has focused on the colored component of dissolved org...

  19. Simulating the fate and transport of nanomaterials in surface waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    The unique properties of nanomaterials have resulted in their increased production. However, it is unclear how nanomaterials will move and react once released to the environment One approach for addressing possible exposure of nanomaterials in surface waters is by using numerical...

  20. Biphilic Surfaces for Enhanced Water Collection from Humid Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkoski, Jason; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Luedeman, William

    Surface wettability plays an important role in water recovery, distillation, dehumidification, and heat transfer. The efficiency of each process depends on the rate of droplet nucleation, droplet growth, and mass transfer. Unfortunately, hydrophilic surfaces are good at nucleation but poor at shedding. Hydrophobic surfaces are the reverse. Many plants and animals overcome this tradeoff through biphilic surfaces with patterned wettability. For example, the Stenocara beetle uses hydrophilic patches on a superhydrophobic background to collect fog from air. Cribellate spiders similarly collect fog on their webs through periodic spindle-knot structures. In this study, we investigate the effects of wettability patterns on the rate of water collection from humid air. The steady state rate of water collection per unit area is measured as a function of undercooling, angle of inclination, water contact angle, hydrophilic patch size, patch spacing, area fraction, and patch height relative to the hydrophobic background. We then model each pattern by comparing the potential and kinetic energy of a droplet as it rolls downwards at a fixed angle. The results indicate that the design rules for collecting fog differ from those for condensation from humid air. The authors gratefully acknowledge the Office of Naval Research for financial support through Grant Number N00014-15-1-2107.

  1. CHARACTERIZING SURFACE WATERS THAT MAY NOT REQUIRE FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A relatively clean raw surface water can be determined that is amenable to disinfection as the only controlling treatment process. The essential criteria and associated standards are: ecal coliform, 20 organisms/100 mL; Turbidity, 1.0 NTU; Color, 15 ACU; Chlorine Demand, 2 mg/L. ...

  2. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium concentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  3. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters, comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium concentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  4. Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Sheila M.; Muehlenbachs, Lucija A.; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Chu, Ziyan; Krupnick, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Concern has been raised in the scientific literature about the environmental implications of extracting natural gas from deep shale formations, and published studies suggest that shale gas development may affect local groundwater quality. The potential for surface water quality degradation has been discussed in prior work, although no empirical analysis of this issue has been published. The potential for large-scale surface water quality degradation has affected regulatory approaches to shale gas development in some US states, despite the dearth of evidence. This paper conducts a large-scale examination of the extent to which shale gas development activities affect surface water quality. Focusing on the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania, we estimate the effect of shale gas wells and the release of treated shale gas waste by permitted treatment facilities on observed downstream concentrations of chloride (Cl−) and total suspended solids (TSS), controlling for other factors. Results suggest that (i) the treatment of shale gas waste by treatment plants in a watershed raises downstream Cl− concentrations but not TSS concentrations, and (ii) the presence of shale gas wells in a watershed raises downstream TSS concentrations but not Cl− concentrations. These results can inform future voluntary measures taken by shale gas operators and policy approaches taken by regulators to protect surface water quality as the scale of this economically important activity increases. PMID:23479604

  5. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  6. Roles of surface water areas for water and solute cycle in Hanoi city, Viet Nam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Kuroda, Keisuke; Do Thuan, An; Tran Thi Viet, Nga; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2013-04-01

    Hanoi city, the capital of Viet Nam, has developed beside the Red river. Recent rapid urbanization of this city has reduced a large number of natural water areas such as lakes, ponds and canals not only in the central area but the suburban area. Contrary, the urbanization has increased artificial water areas such as pond for fish cultivation and landscaping. On the other hand, the urbanization has induced the inflow of waste water from households and various kinds of factories to these water areas because of delay of sewerage system development. Inflow of the waste water has induced eutrophication and pollution of these water areas. Also, there is a possibility of groundwater pollution by infiltration of polluted surface water. However, the role of these water areas for water cycle and solute transport is not clarified. Therefore, this study focuses on the interaction between surface water areas and groundwater in Hanoi city to evaluate appropriate land development and groundwater resource management. We are carrying out three approaches: a) understanding of geochemical characteristics of surface water and groundwater, b) monitoring of water levels of pond and groundwater, c) sampling of soil and pond sediment. Correlation between d18O and dD of precipitation (after GNIP), the Red River (after GNIR) and the water samples of this study showed that the groundwater is composed of precipitation, the Red River and surface water that has evaporation process. Contribution of the surface water with evaporation process was widely found in the study area. As for groundwater monitoring, the Holocene aquifers at two sites were in unconfined condition in dry season and the groundwater levels in the aquifer continued to increase through rainy season. The results of isotopic analysis and groundwater level monitoring showed that the surface water areas are one of the major groundwater sources. On the other hand, concentrations of dissolved Arsenic (filtered by 0.45um) in the pore water of the pond sediments were much higher than the pond water and closed to that of groundwater. Also, other metal elements showed the same trend. This result suggested that Arsenic and other metal elements recharged to these ponds is probably adsorbed and removed by sediments (including organic matters). That is, pond sediment plays an important role for solute transport as a filter of Arsenic and metal elements. The results of this study strongly suggest that the natural and artificial surface water areas have important roles for water cycle and solute transport in Hanoi city. Although the number of the natural water areas is decreasing, dredging of artificial water areas increases the infiltration from the surface to aquifers. Therefore, qualitative and quantitative preservation of the surface water areas is important for conservation of groundwater environment and contribute to sustainable groundwater management in Hanoi city.

  7. Surface water-groundwater connectivity in deltaic distributary channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Audrey H.; Edmonds, Douglas A.; Knights, Deon

    2015-12-01

    Delta distributary channel networks increase river water contact with sediments and provide the final opportunity to process nutrients and other solutes before river water discharges to the ocean. In order to understand surface water-groundwater interactions at the scale of the distributary channel network, we created three numerical deltas that ranged in composition from silt to sand using Delft3D, a morphodynamic flow and sediment transport model. We then linked models of mean annual river discharge to steady groundwater flow in MODFLOW. Under mean annual discharge, exchange rates through the numerical deltas are enhanced relative to a single-threaded river. We calculate that exchange rates across a <10 km2 network are equivalent to exchange through ~10-100 km of single-threaded river channel. Exchange rates are greatest in the coarse-grained delta due to its permeability and morphology. Groundwater residence times range from hours to centuries and have fractal tails. Deltas are vanishing due to relative sea level rise. River diversion projects aimed at creating new deltaic land should also aim to restore surface water-groundwater connectivity, which is critical for biogeochemical processing in wetlands. We recommend designing diversions to capture more sand and thus maximize surface water-groundwater connectivity.

  8. Appearance of aldehydes in the surface layer of lake waters.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, Agata; Nawrocki, Jacek; Szeląg-Wasielewska, Elżbieta

    2014-07-01

    The paper presents results concerning the changes in the content of aldehydes in samples of lake water collected near the lake surface. The study of lake waters was undertaken to explain which physicochemical parameters of the environment have the greatest influence on the level of aldehydes, which of the aldehydes are most often met in surface water and in what concentrations. We observed that formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and acetone were commonly present in surface water samples, while semi-volatile and poorly soluble aldehydes such as nonanal and decanal were observed seasonally. The contents of total aldehydes varied in a wide range, from 55 to 670 μg/l, and the concentration of total organic carbon varied significantly from 3 to 18 mg /l, but there was no evident correlation between them in all of samples. The total content of aldehydes did not depend on the meteorological parameters such as air temperature, UV radiation and ozone concentration; however, it was noted that the level of carbonyl concentration is related to the period of intense precipitation: in the period of very low precipitations, the highest contents of total aldehydes were determined in all of the water samples, and in the periods of intense precipitations, the content of total aldehydes was drastically smaller. PMID:24671617

  9. Excess densities and equimolar surfaces for spherical cavities in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floris, Franca Maria

    2007-02-01

    For hard spheres with a radius up to 10Å in TIP4P water under ambient conditions, the author studies how the excess number of molecules at the accessible surface depends on the radius of the cavity. Simulation results derived from excess volumes are discussed in terms of radial distribution functions (rdfs), which compare well with extended simple point charge and theoretical rdfs from the literature. The excess number of molecules at the accessible surface inserted in the expression which refers to an arbitrary dividing surface enables one to find the position of the equimolar surface. The surface tension corresponding to this dividing surface was obtained from values of the free energy of cavity formation. For radii in the range of the simulation data, its behavior with curvature is quite different from that usually shown in the literature. A model, which describes how the excess number of molecules at the accessible surface changes with the radius, is discussed in the large length limit by examining consistent rdfs described by a simple analytical form. The inclusion in the model of a logarithmic term has also been considered. Comparison with theoretical results from the literature shows a good agreement for a cavity with a radius of 20Å. For a radius of 100Å and beyond, the model predicts instead sharper density profiles. Such differences have a poor effect on the surface tension at the equimolar surface.

  10. Surface tension of water in the presence of perfluorocarbon vapors.

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, Vasiliy S; Skliar, Mikhail

    2014-03-28

    Fluorocarbons are highly hydrophobic, biocompatible compounds with a variety of medical applications. Despite significant interest, the study of interfacial properties of fluorocarbons in aqueous systems has received limited attention. In this study, we investigate the influence of perfluoropentane and perfluorohexane vapors on the surface tension of water at room temperature. The results show a substantial decrease in the surface tension of water in the presence of perfluorocarbon vapors. In the investigated range of partial pressures up to the saturation value, a linear correlation between the surface tension and the partial pressure was found. This suggests that an adsorbed perfluorocarbon layer is formed on the surface of water. For comparison, the effect of the perfluorocarbon vapor on the surface tension of methanol was also investigated and a similar dependence was observed. Our results indicate that the stability and dynamic transitions of fluorocarbon colloids, which may be dispersed under physiological conditions as microdroplets, bubbles, or their combination, are likely affected by the composition of liquid and gas phases. PMID:24652374

  11. Partitioning the land surface water simulated by a land?air surface scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailovi?, Dragutin T.; Rajkovi?, Borivoj; Lali?, Branislava; Jovi?, Duan; Deki?, Ljiljana

    1998-11-01

    This paper deals with the simulation of the water balance components in surface schemes for modeling of the land-air exchange processes, used for atmospheric, hydrological and ecological numerical models, where the incorrect parameterization of surface water fluxes and prescription of the soil parameters can result in wrong partitioning of the surface energy into latent and sensible heat fluxes. In that sense, the module of the soil hydrology in the land-air parameterization scheme (LAPS) was considered. In order to establish the performance of this scheme in partitioning the land-surface water into water balance components, during long term integration, several tests were performed. The corresponding forcing data and observations were inserted from the HAPEX-MOBILHY data set. Tests for establishing the sensitivity of partitioning of the land-surface water into corresponding components on: (i) calculating the ground temperature and the deep soil temperature used in the soil heat flux term of the `force-restore' equation; (ii) number of soil layers used in the scheme; and (iii) some wet reference parameters were also conducted. The analysis presented was supported by some simple statistics.

  12. Water surface modeling from a single viewpoint video.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Pickup, David; Saunders, Thomas; Cosker, Darren; Marshall, David; Hall, Peter; Willis, Philip

    2013-07-01

    We introduce a video-based approach for producing water surface models. Recent advances in this field output high-quality results but require dedicated capturing devices and only work in limited conditions. In contrast, our method achieves a good tradeoff between the visual quality and the production cost: It automatically produces a visually plausible animation using a single viewpoint video as the input. Our approach is based on two discoveries: first, shape from shading (SFS) is adequate to capture the appearance and dynamic behavior of the example water; second, shallow water model can be used to estimate a velocity field that produces complex surface dynamics. We will provide qualitative evaluation of our method and demonstrate its good performance across a wide range of scenes. PMID:23661014

  13. Water-mediated proton hopping on an iron oxide surface.

    PubMed

    Merte, Lindsay R; Peng, Guowen; Bechstein, Ralf; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A; Grabow, Lars C; Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Wendt, Stefan; Lægsgaard, Erik; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2012-05-18

    The diffusion of hydrogen atoms across solid oxide surfaces is often assumed to be accelerated by the presence of water molecules. Here we present a high-resolution, high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of the diffusion of H atoms on an FeO thin film. STM movies directly reveal a water-mediated hydrogen diffusion mechanism on the oxide surface at temperatures between 100 and 300 kelvin. Density functional theory calculations and isotope-exchange experiments confirm the STM observations, and a proton-transfer mechanism that proceeds via an H(3)O(+)-like transition state is revealed. This mechanism differs from that observed previously for rutile TiO(2)(110), where water dissociation is a key step in proton diffusion. PMID:22605771

  14. Rate Law Analysis of Water Oxidation on a Hematite Surface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Water oxidation is a key chemical reaction, central to both biological photosynthesis and artificial solar fuel synthesis strategies. Despite recent progress on the structure of the natural catalytic site, and on inorganic catalyst function, determining the mechanistic details of this multiredox reaction remains a significant challenge. We report herein a rate law analysis of the order of water oxidation as a function of surface hole density on a hematite photoanode employing photoinduced absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals a transition from a slow, first order reaction at low accumulated hole density to a faster, third order mechanism once the surface hole density is sufficient to enable the oxidation of nearest neighbor metal atoms. This study thus provides direct evidence for the multihole catalysis of water oxidation by hematite, and demonstrates the hole accumulation level required to achieve this, leading to key insights both for reaction mechanism and strategies to enhance function. PMID:25936408

  15. Water-Mediated Proton Hopping on an Iron Oxide Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Merte, L. R.; Peng, Guowen; Bechstein, Ralf; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A.; Grabow, Lars C.; Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Wendt, Stefen; Laegsgaard, E.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

    2012-05-18

    The diffusion of hydrogen atoms across solid oxide surfaces is often assumed to be accelerated by the presence of water molecules. Here we present a high-resolution, high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of the diffusion of H atoms on an FeO thin film. STM movies directly reveal a water-mediated hydrogen diffusion mechanism on the oxide surface at temperatures between 100 and 300 kelvin. Density functional theory calculations and isotope-exchange experiments confirm the STM observations, and a proton-transfer mechanism that proceeds via an H3O+-like transition state is revealed. This mechanism differs from that observed previously for rutile TiO2(110), where water dissociation is a key step in proton diffusion.

  16. Occurrence of Pharmaceuticals in Calgary's Wastewater and Related Surface Water.

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Cooper, V I; Deng, J; Amatya, P L; Ambrus, D; Dong, S; Stalker, N; Nadeau-Bonilla, C; Patel, J

    2015-05-01

    The influents/effluents from Calgary's water resource recovery facilities and the surface water were analyzed for pharmaceuticals in the present study. The median concentrations in the effluents for the 15 targeted pharmaceuticals were within the range of 0.006 to 3.32 ppb. Although the wastewater treatment facilities were not designed to remove pharmaceuticals, this study indicates that the wastewater treatment processes are effective in removing some of the pharmaceuticals from the aqueous phase. The removal rate estimated can be 99.5% for caffeine, whereas little or no removal was observed for carbamazepine. Biodegradation, chemical degradation, and sorption could be some of the mechanisms responsible for the removal of pharmaceuticals. The drug residues in downstream surface water could be associated with incomplete removal of pharmaceuticals during the treatment process and may lead to concerns in terms of potential impacts on the aquatic ecosystem. However, this study does not indicate any immediate risks to the downstream aquatic environment. PMID:26460461

  17. NAWQA RETROSPECTIVE DATABASE FOR NUTRIENTS IN GROUND WATER AND SURFACE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to describe the status and trends in the quality of the Nations ground- and surface-water resources and to provide a sound understanding of the natural and human factors that affect the quality of these resources. ...

  18. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2006 Water Year

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Romero, D. Ortiz, G. Kuyumjian

    2007-08-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 44 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data for 44 stations.

  19. Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, and Drinking Water from the Penobscot Indian Nation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, andDrinking Water from the Penobscot Indian NationSarah H. Warren, Larry D. Claxton,1, Thomas J. Hughes,*, Adam Swank,Janet Diliberto, Valerie Marshall, Daniel H. Kusnierz, Robert Hillger, David M. DeMariniNational Health a...

  20. Field Evaluation Of Arsenic Speciation In Sediments At The Ground Water/Surface Water Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciation and mineralogy of sediments contaminated with arsenic at the ground water/surface water interface of the Ft. Devens Super Fund Site in Ft. Devens, MA were determined using X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Speciation and mineralog...

  1. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2002 Water Year

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Shaull; D. Ortiz; M.R. Alexander; R.P. Romero

    2003-03-03

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 34 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data from 16 stations.

  2. Cold-induced Spreading of Water Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Faryar; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2013-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces received tremendous attention in recent years mainly due to their self-cleaning properties. Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter models for relating stable equilibrium contact angle to physical parameters of liquid and solid ignore tangible factors such as temperature and humidity. Here, we show a peculiar behavior of equilibrium contact angle on cold hydrophobic surfaces. Water drops were cooled by a peltier element to temperatures below the melting point of water and, surprisingly, substantial change in static contact angle and base diameter were observed during the cooling process. Physical variables such as substrate temperature, humidity, drop volume, and even fabrication type of hydrophobic surfaces are found to be detrimental to post-spreading shape.

  3. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

    2014-12-01

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed 1H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5-10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in faster surface water diffusivity. Another is the concurrent tightening of lipid packing that reduces passive, possibly unwanted, diffusion of ions and water across the bilayer.

  4. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi; Olijve, Luuk L. C.

    2014-12-14

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed {sup 1}H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5–10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in faster surface water diffusivity. Another is the concurrent tightening of lipid packing that reduces passive, possibly unwanted, diffusion of ions and water across the bilayer.

  5. How water meets a hydrophobic surface: Reluctantly and with flucuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poynor Torigoe, Adele Nichole

    By definition hydrophobic substances hate water. Water placed on a hydrophobic surface will form a drop in order to minimize its contact area. What happens when water is forced into contact with a hydrophobic surface? One theory is that an ultra-thin low density region forms near the surface. This depleted region would have implications in such diverse areas as colloidal self-assembly, and the boundary conditions of fluid flow. However, the literature still remains divided as to whether or not such a depleted region exists. To investigate the existence of this layer, we have employed three surface-sensitive techniques, time-resolved phase-modulated ellipsometry, surface plasmon resonance, and X-ray reflectivity. Both ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity provide strong evidence for the low-density layer and illuminate unexpected temporal behavior. Using all three techniques, we found surprising fluctuations at the interface with a non-Gaussian distribution and a single characteristic time on the order of tenths of seconds. This information supports the idea that the boundary fluctuates with something akin to capillary waves. We have also investigated the dependence of the static and dynamic properties of the hydrophobic/water interface on variables such as temperature, contact angle, pH, dissolved gasses, and sample quality, among others, in a hope to discover the root of the controversy in the literature. We found that the depletion layer is highly dependent on temperature, contact angle and sample quality. This dependence might explain some of the discrepancies in the literature as different groups often use hydrophobic surfaces with different properties.

  6. Diminished Mercury Emission From Water Surfaces by Duckweed (Lemna minor)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollenberg, J. L.; Peters, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    Aquatic plants of the family Lemnaceae (generally referred to as duckweeds) are a widely distributed type of floating vegetation in freshwater systems. Under suitable conditions, duckweeds form a dense vegetative mat on the water surface, which reduces light penetration into the water column and decreases the amount of exposed water surface. These two factors would be expected to reduce mercury emission by limiting a) direct photoreduction of Hg(II), b) indirect reduction via coupled DOC photooxidation-Hg(II) reduction, and c) gas diffusion across the water-air interface. Conversely, previous studies have demonstrated transpiration of Hg(0) by plants, so it is therefore possible that the floating vegetative mat would enhance emission via transpiration of mercury vapor. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether duckweed limits mercury flux to the atmosphere by shading and the formation of a physical barrier to diffusion, or whether it enhances emission from aquatic systems via transpiration of Hg(0). Deionized water was amended with mercury to achieve a final concentration of approximately 35 ng/L and allowed to equilibrate prior to the experiment. Experiments were conducted in rectangular polystyrene flux chambers with measured UV-B transmittance greater than 60% (spectral cutoff approximately 290 nm). Light was able to penetrate the flux chamber from the sides as well as the top throughout the experiment, limiting the effect of shading by duckweed on the water surface. Flux chambers contained 8L of water with varying percent duckweed cover, and perforated plastic sheeting was used as an abiotic control. Exposures were conducted outside on days with little to no cloud cover. Real time mercury flux was measured using atomic absorption (Mercury Instruments UT-3000). Total solar and ultraviolet radiation, as well as a suite of meteorological parameters, were also measured. Results indicate that duckweed diminishes mercury emission from the water surface as compared to open water controls. Decreases in emission rate varied linearly with percent duckweed cover, with lower fluxes occurring at higher percent cover. Mercury flux in the duckweed treatments as compared to open water treatments decreased from 17% in the lowest percent cover treatment to 67% in the highest percent cover treatment. The observed decrease in mercury emission suggests that duckweed limits emission via the formation of a physical barrier to diffusion.

  7. Hydraulic exchange between a coral reef and surface sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, G.W.; Sansone, F.J.; Li, Yuan-Hui

    1992-10-01

    Hydraulic exchange between overlying sea water and the internal structure of a patch reef in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, was studied with an array of wells, 1, 2, and 4 m deep. Two natural chemical tracers, radon, and salinity, were used to calculate the exchange rate between surface sea water and reef interstitial waters. Dissolved radon concentrations are substantially higher in interstitial waters than is surface water. The degree of radon enrichment is quantitatively related to the time elapsed since interstitial water had equilibrated with the atmosphere. Residence time estimates are 1-40 days, with deeper wells having slower exchange. The average residence time for 1-m-deep wells was 2.1 days. A rainstorm-induced dilution of the salinity of Kaneohe Bay provides the second tracer. Samples of surface and reef interstitial waters following this salinity perturbation are used to calculate an average residence time of 2.6 days at a depth of 1 m and 42 days at a depth of 2 m. Three types of physical forces thought to cause exchange between surface and interstitial water are considered by measurement of the forcing functions and reef permeability. Hydraulic conductivities are about 50 m/d, with lower values near the seaward side of the reef. Most exchange seems to be caused by high-frequency, wave-driven oscillatory pumping and by unidirectional hydraulic head gradients (of uncertain origin) that are stable for at least 3-4 days. Wave-driven mixing is probably more important shallower in the reef, whereas head-driven flow may dominate deeper in the reef. Tidal pumping does not seem to contribute to exchange. All methods indicate that exchange in the upper part of Checker Reef is primarily through vertical exchange. The best estimate for the residence time of water at a depth of 1 m is 2 days. Water at depths of 204 m probably has a residence time of weeks to months. 49 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Sea, ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan Continental Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F. (Principal Investigator); Sharma, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Two cruises were conducted in Cook Inlet to obtain ground truth. Forty-seven stations during 22-23 August and 68 stations during 25-29 September 1972 were occupied and temperature, salinity, percent light transmission, and suspended load of surface waters obtained. Similar data at various depths was also obtained at selected stations. Cook Inlet is an estuary with complex mixing of river discharges and ocean water. The Upper Cook Inlet shows a gradual and systematic decrease in salinity, however, west of Kenai the mixing of waters is complex. The sediments in suspension originating at the head of the inlet generally settle out east of Kenai and Drift River. Sediment load in suspension decreased gradually from 1700 mg/1 near Anchorage to about 50 mg/1 in the Narrows. In the Lower Cook Inlet the suspended load varied between 1-10 mg/1. Surface waters with sediments in suspension and ocean water with relatively lower sediment concentration are clearly discernible in ERTS-1 images obtained during September 18, 1972 pass over Cook Inlet. The movement and mixing of these waters can also be delineated in the images.

  9. Surface Water and Ground Water Interactions in an Irrigated Valley in Northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, C.; Fernald, A.; Guldan, S.; Tidwell, V.; King, P.; Cevik, Y.; Cusack, C.

    2008-12-01

    Interactions between surface water and ground water can provide many benefits like terrestrial and aquatic species habitat, aquifer recharge, and shallow ground water return flow. In northern New Mexico, the use of traditional irrigation systems has effectively expanded riparian functions to encompass full irrigated valley width. The objective of this study was to characterize the surface water and ground water interactions occurring in an irrigated valley along the Rio Grande in northern New Mexico. We used a combination of field measurements and modeling for determining different components of the water budget. Our results show that on average ditch flow is 0.9 cms, ditch seepage is 10%, irrigated field deep percolation is 30%, and ground water level rise is 0.4 m over the entire valley after the irrigation season started. We calculated that on average, 50% of the water diverted into the main irrigation ditch returns back to the river as surface return flow and about 10% of the total ditch inflow returns as groundwater flow. Results from this study show that a significant amount of water being diverted into the valley returns back to the river after completing its task of supporting important production and ecological functions in this expanded riverine valley.

  10. Water Surface and Velocity Measurement-River and Flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, J. H.; Ferreira, E.; Wackrow, R.; Shiono, K.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the flow of water in natural watercourses has become increasingly important as climate change increases the incidence of extreme rainfall events which cause flooding. Vegetation in rivers and streams reduce water conveyance and natural vegetation plays a critical role in flood events which needs to be understood more fully. A funded project at Loughborough University is therefore examining the influence of vegetation upon water flow, requiring measurement of both the 3-D water surface and flow velocities. Experimental work therefore requires the measurement of water surface morphology and velocity (i.e. speed and direction) in a controlled laboratory environment using a flume but also needs to be adaptable to work in a real river. Measuring the 3D topographic characteristics and velocity field of a flowing water surface is difficult and the purpose of this paper is to describe recent experimental work to achieve this. After reviewing past work in this area, the use of close range digital photogrammetry for capturing both the 3D water surface and surface velocity is described. The selected approach uses either two or three synchronised digital SLR cameras in combination with PhotoModeler for data processing, a commercial close range photogrammetric package. One critical aspect is the selection and distribution of appropriate floating marker points, which are critical if automated and appropriate measurement methods are to be used. Two distinct targeting approaches are available: either large and distinct specific floating markers or some fine material capable of providing appropriate texture. Initial work described in this paper uses specific marker points, which also provide the potential measuring surface velocity. The paper demonstrates that a high degree of measurement and marking automation is possible in a flume environment, where lighting influences can be highly controlled. When applied to a real river it is apparent that only lower degrees of automation are practicable. The study has demonstrated that although some automation is possible for point measurement, point matching needs to be manually guided in a natural environment where lighting cannot be controlled.

  11. Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaokang Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold

    2014-05-15

    Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12 μm{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

  12. The ecology of vector snail habitats and mosquito breeding-places

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead-Thomson, R. C.

    1958-01-01

    The ecology of freshwater snails—in particular those which act as intermediate hosts of bilharziasis—is reviewed in the light of the much more extensive knowledge available on the breeding-places of anopheline mosquitos. Experimental ecological methods are recommended for the field and laboratory investigation of a number of common problems involved in the study of snail habitats and mosquito breeding-places. Among the environmental factors discussed are temperature, oxygen concentration, water movement, pollution and salinity. Sampling methods for estimating populations of both snails and mosquito larvae are also described. An attempt is made to show how malacologists and entomologists alike would benefit from improved facilities for keeping abreast of general developments in the wider field of freshwater ecology. PMID:13596888

  13. Tissue accumulation of aluminium is not a predictor of toxicity in the freshwater snail, Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Walton, Rachel C; McCrohan, Catherine R; Livens, Francis R; White, Keith N

    2009-07-01

    The amount of toxic metal accumulated by an organism is often taken as an indicator of potential toxicity. We investigated this relationship in the freshwater snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, exposed to 500 microg l(-1) Al over 30 days, either alone or in the presence of phosphate (500 microg l(-1) P) or a fulvic acid surrogate (FAS; 10 mg l(-1) C). Behavioural activity was assessed and tissue accumulation of Al quantified. Lability of Al within the water column was a good predictor of toxicity. FAS increased both Al lability and behavioural dysfunction, whereas phosphate reduced Al lability, and completely abolished Al-induced behavioural toxicity. Tissue accumulation of Al was not linked to toxicity. Higher levels of Al were accumulated in snails exposed to Al + P, compared to those exposed to Al alone, whereas FAS reduced Al accumulation. These findings demonstrate that the degree of tissue accumulation of a metal can be independent of toxicity. PMID:19285770

  14. Sensitivity of freshwater pulmonate snails, Lymnaea luteolo L. , to heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Khangarot, B.S.; Ray, P.K.

    1988-08-01

    The current alarm of the impacts of metal pollution on living organisms has received much attention with the tragedy of Minimata and later Niigata, in Japan. Although there has been a great deal of the concern about the acute and chronic toxicities of heavy metals to freshwater fishes and crustaceans but little information is available on the effects of heavy metals to freshwater snails, which are widely distributed in the aquatic environment. The present study was undertaken to determine the acute toxicities of selected heavy metals to a freshwater pond snail Lymnaea luteolo Lamarck; a locally abundant species and play an important role in the aquatic food chain(s). Static bioassays were conducted with the salts of cadmium, copper, chromium, mercury, nickel, silver and zinc in hard water.

  15. Effects of sewage sludge amendment on snail growth and trace metal transfer in the soil-plant-snail food chain.

    PubMed

    Bourioug, Mohamed; Gimbert, Frédéric; Alaoui-Sehmer, Laurence; Benbrahim, Mohammed; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Alaoui-Sossé, Badr; Aleya, Lotfi

    2015-11-01

    Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd concentrations in a soil plant (Lactuca sativa) continuum were measured after sewage sludge amendment. The effects of sewage sludge on growth and trace metal bioaccumulation in snails (Cantareus aspersus) were investigated in a laboratory experiment specifically designed to identify contamination sources (e.g., soil and leaves). Application of sewage sludge increased trace metal concentrations in topsoil. However, except Zn, metal concentrations in lettuce leaves did not reflect those in soil. Lettuce leaves were the main source of Zn, Cu, and Cd in exposed snails. Bioaccumulation of Pb suggested its immediate transfer to snails via the soil. No apparent toxic effects of trace metal accumulation were observed in snails. Moreover, snail growth was significantly stimulated at high rates of sludge application. This hormesis effect may be due to the enhanced nutritional content of lettuce leaves exposed to sewage sludge. PMID:26165994

  16. Experimental Study of Water Droplet Vaporization on Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Jorge, Jr.

    This dissertation summarizes results of an experimental exploration of heat transfer during vaporization of a water droplet deposited on a nanostructured surface at a temperature approaching and exceeding the Leidenfrost point for the surface and at lower surface temperatures 10-40 degrees C above the saturated temperature of the water droplet at approximately 101 kPa. The results of these experiments were compared to those performed on bare smooth copper and aluminum surfaces in this and other studies. The nanostructured surfaces were composed of a vast array of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals grown by hydrothermal synthesis on a smooth copper substrate having an average surface roughness of approximately 0.06 micrometer. Various nanostructured surface array geometries were produced on the copper substrate by performing the hydrothermal synthesis for 4, 10 and 24 hours. The individual nanostructures were randomly-oriented and, depending on hydrothermal synthesis time, had a mean diameter of about 500-700 nm, a mean length of 1.7-3.3 micrometers,and porosities of approximately 0.04-0.58. Surface wetting was characterized by macroscopic measurements of contact angle based on the droplet profile and calculations based on measurements of liquid film spread area. Scanning electron microscope imaging was used to document the nanoscale features of the surface before and after the experiments. The nanostructured surfaces grown by hydrothermal synthesis for 4 and 24 hours exhibited contact angles of approximately 10, whereas the surfaces grown for 10 hours were superhydrophilic, exhibiting contact angles typically less than 3 degrees. In single droplet deposition experiments at 101 kPa, a high-speed video camera was used to document the droplet-surface interaction. Distilled and degassed water droplets ranging in size from 2.5-4.0 mm were deposited onto the surface from heights ranging from approximately 0.2-8.1 cm, such that Weber numbers spanned a range of approximately 0-99. Heat transfer coefficients were determined from thermal measurements in the test apparatus. All experiments were conducted inside an ISO Class 5 clean room enclosure. It was observed that when a liquid water droplet impinged upon the ZnO nanostructured at surface temperatures less than 140 degrees C, the nominally spherical droplet spread into a thin film over the surface. The film thickness depended on many parameters but in general it measured approximately 100-400 micrometers. As a result, it was found that the droplet evaporated by film evaporation without initiating nucleate boiling. At wall superheat levels of 10-20 degrees C, it was found in some cases that the heat transfer coefficients were nearly 4 times greater than for those of nucleate boiling at the same superheat level. For these conditions, no bubble nucleation was observed visually, and, nevertheless, extremely high heat transfer coefficients resulting from rapid evaporation of the thin liquid film formed by the spreading droplet were observed. At high wall superheat levels, the vaporization process exhibited Leidenfrost droplet vaporization. The extreme wetting of the nanostructured surfaces resulted in high Leidenfrost transition temperatures in the range of 310-376 degrees C, among the highest in the literature, exceeding those exhibited by bare metal surfaces by 100 degrees C or more. The Leidenfrost transition was detected from a recording of the acoustic signal generated from each experiment during the deposition and subsequent evaporation process. It was defined as the first point for which there is no disturbance to the acoustical signal in the form of a sizzling sound beyond the initial violent popping generated during the droplet deposition. The results document a trend of increasing Leidenfrost temperature with decreasing contact angle, which is consistent with earlier studies. The results of this study are compared with earlier work in this area and the implications for applications are discussed.

  17. Surface Seal in the Water-Entry of Hydrophobic Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Benjamin; Jung, Sunghwan; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2011-11-01

    We examine the surface seal phenomenon observed in the water entry of hydrophobic spheres. Using high speed shadowgraph imaging we experimentally investigate the dependence of surface seal time and critical pressure on projectile size, density, and impact velocity. In the initial stage of impact the projectile slams into the free surface projecting a splash curtain upward. As the projectile descends into the fluid, an air cavity forms behind it and eventually pinches off from the atmosphere. Previous studies have primarily focused on the low velocity case where surface seal does not occur and the events above the free surface are often ignored. As the projectile velocity increases, the pressure drop within the cavity increases. Surface seal occurs when this pressure drop exceeds a critical pressure and is characterized by the closure of the splash curtain. The splash curtain domes over and seals the cavity above the free surface. This dome closure emits a downward jet which propagates into the air cavity from above and affects the later cavity dynamics. We present scaling arguments for critical pressure and surface seal time based on our observations.

  18. Investigating surface water-well interaction using stable isotope ratios of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, R.J.; Coplen, T.B.; Haas, N.L.; Saad, D.A.; Borchardt, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Because surface water can be a source of undesirable water quality in a drinking water well, an understanding of the amount of surface water and its travel time to the well is needed to assess a well's vulnerability. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen in river water at the City of La Crosse, Wisconsin, show peak-to-peak seasonal variation greater than 4??? in 2001 and 2002. This seasonal signal was identified in 7 of 13 city municipal wells, indicating that these 7 wells have appreciable surface water contributions and are potentially vulnerable to contaminants in the surface water. When looking at wells with more than 6 sampling events, a larger variation in ??18O compositions correlated with a larger fraction of surface water, suggesting that samples collected for oxygen isotopic composition over time may be useful for identifying the vulnerability to surface water influence even if a local meteoric water line is not available. A time series of ??18O from one of the municipal wells and from a piezometer located between the river and the municipal well showed that the travel time of flood water to the municipal well was approximately 2 months; non-flood arrival times were on the order of 9 months. Four independent methods were also used to assess time of travel. Three methods (groundwater temperature arrival times at the intermediate piezometer, virus-culture results, and particle tracking using a numerical groundwater-flow model) yielded flood and non-flood travel times of less than 1 year for this site. Age dating of one groundwater sample using 3H-3He methods estimated an age longer than 1 year, but was likely confounded by deviations from piston flow as noted by others. Chlorofluorocarbons and SF6 analyses were not useful at this site due to degradation and contamination, respectively. This work illustrates the utility of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of water to determine the contribution and travel time of surface water in groundwater, and demonstrates the importance of using multiple methods to improve estimates for time of travel of 1 year or less. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing metaldehyde concentrations in surface water catchments and implications for drinking water abstraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Alemayehu; Shucksmith, James; Smith, Andrea; Cherry, Katherine

    2015-04-01

    Metaldehyde is an active ingredient in agricultural pesticides such as slug pellets, which are heavily applied to UK farmland during the autumn application season. There is current concern that existing drinking water treatment processes may be inadequate in reducing potentially high levels of metaldehyde in surface waters to below the UK drinking water quality regulation limit of 0.1 µg/l. In addition, current water quality monitoring methods can miss short term fluctuations in metaldehyde concentration caused by rainfall driven runoff, hampering prediction of the potential risk of exposure. Datasets describing levels, fate and transport of metaldehyde in river catchments are currently very scarce. This work presents results from an ongoing study to quantify the presence of metaldehyde in surface waters within a UK catchment used for drinking water abstraction. High resolution water quality data from auto-samplers installed in rivers are coupled with radar rainfall, catchment characteristics and land use data to i) understand which hydro-meteorological characteristics of the catchment trigger the peak migration of metaldehyde to surface waters; ii) assess the relationship between measured metaldehyde levels and catchment characteristics such as land use, topographic index, proximity to water bodies and runoff generation area; iii) describe the current risks to drinking water supply and discuss mitigation options based on modelling and real-time control of water abstraction. Identifying the correlation between catchment attributes and metaldehyde generation will help in the development of effective catchment management strategies, which can help to significantly reduce the amount of metaldehyde finding its way into river water. Furthermore, the effectiveness of current water quality monitoring strategy in accurately quantifying the generation of metaldehyde from the catchment and its ability to benefit the development of effective catchment management practices has also been investigated.

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman for monitoring toxins in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Sylvia, James M.; Clauson, Susan L.; Bertone, Jane F.; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-02-01

    Protection of the drinking water supply from a terrorist attack is of critical importance. Since the water supply is vast, contamination prevention is difficult. Therefore, rapid detection of contaminants, whether a military chemical/biological threat, a hazardous chemical spill, naturally occurring toxins, or bacterial build-up is a priority. The development of rapid environmentally portable and stable monitors that allow continuous monitoring of the water supply is ideal. EIC Laboratories has been developing Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) to detect chemical agents, toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), viruses, cyanotoxins and bacterial agents. SERS is an ideal technique for the Joint Service Agent Water Monitor (JSAWM). SERS uses the enhanced Raman signals observed when an analyte adsorbs to a roughened metal substrate to enable trace detection. Proper development of the metal substrate will optimize the sensitivity and selectivity towards the analytes of interest.

  1. Ionization dynamics of water dimer on ice surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2016-05-01

    The solid surface provides an effective two-dimensional reaction field because the surface increases the encounter probability of bi-molecular collision reactions. Also, the solid surface stabilizes a reaction intermediate because the excess energy generated by the reaction dissipates into the bath modes of surface. The ice surface in the universe is one of the two dimensional reaction fields. However, it is still unknown how the ice surface affects to the reaction mechanism. In the present study, to elucidate the specific property of the ice surface reaction, ionization dynamics of water dimer adsorbed on the ice surface was theoretically investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method combined with ONIOM (our own n-layered integrated molecular orbital and molecular mechanics) technique, and the result was compared with that of gas phase reaction. It was found that a proton is transferred from H2O+ to H2O within the dimer and the intermediate complex H3O+(OH) is formed in both cases. However, the dynamic features were different from each other. The reaction rate of the proton transfer on the ice surface was three times faster than that in the gas phase. The intermediate complex H3O+(OH) was easily dissociated to H3O+ and OH radical on the ice surface, and the lifetime of the complex was significantly shorter than that of gas phase (100 fs vs. infinite). The reason why the ice surface accelerates the reaction was discussed in the present study.

  2. Mitigation of acid deposition: Liming of surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoshesky, J.; Price, R.; DeMuro, J.

    1989-05-01

    In recent years acid deposition has become a serious concern internationally. Scientific literature has documented the acidification of numerous lakes and streams in North America and Scandinavia resulting in the depletion or total loss of fisheries and other aquatic biota. Liming represents the only common corrective practice aimed specifically at remediating an affected acid receptor. This report reviews a range of liming technologies and liming materials, as well as the effect of surface-water liming on water quality and aquatic biota. As background to the liming discussion, the hydrologic cycle and the factors that make surface waters sensitive to acid deposition are also discussed. Finally, a brief review of some of the liming projects that have been conducted, or are currently in operation is presented, giving special emphasis to mitigation efforts in Maryland. Liming has been effectively used to counteract surface-water acidification in parts of Scandinavia, Canada, and the U.S. To date, liming has generally been shown to improve physical and chemical conditions and enhance the biological recovery of aquatic ecosystems affected by acidification.

  3. Pesticide monitoring in surface water and groundwater using passive samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodes, V.; Grabic, R.

    2009-04-01

    Passive samplers as screening devices have been used within a czech national water quality monitoring network since 2002 (SPMD and DGT samplers for non polar substances and metals). The passive sampler monitoring of surface water was extended to polar substances, in 2005. Pesticide and pharmaceutical POCIS samplers have been exposed in surface water at 21 locations and analysed for polar pesticides, perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Pesticide POCIS samplers in groundwater were exposed at 5 locations and analysed for polar pesticides. The following active substances of plant protection products were analyzed in surface water and groundwater using LC/MS/MS: 2,4,5-T, 2,4-D, Acetochlor, Alachlor, Atrazine, Atrazine_desethyl, Azoxystrobin, Bentazone, Bromacil, Bromoxynil, Carbofuran, Clopyralid, Cyanazin, Desmetryn, Diazinon, Dicamba, Dichlobenil, Dichlorprop, Dimethoat, Diuron, Ethofumesate, Fenarimol, Fenhexamid, Fipronil, Fluazifop-p-butyl, Hexazinone, Chlorbromuron, Chlorotoluron, Imazethapyr, Isoproturon, Kresoxim-methyl, Linuron, MCPA, MCPP, Metalaxyl, Metamitron, Methabenzthiazuron, Methamidophos, Methidathion, Metobromuron, Metolachlor, Metoxuron, Metribuzin, Monolinuron, Nicosulfuron, Phorate, Phosalone, Phosphamidon, Prometryn, Propiconazole, Propyzamide, Pyridate, Rimsulfuron, Simazine, Tebuconazole, Terbuthylazine, Terbutryn, Thifensulfuron-methyl, Thiophanate-methyl and Tri-allate. The POCIS samplers performed very well being able to provide better picture than grab samples. The results show that polar pesticides and also perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals as well occur in hydrosphere of the Czech republic. Acknowledgment: Authors acknowledge the financial support of grant No. 2B06095 by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.

  4. Reduction of water surface tension significantly impacts gecko adhesion underwater.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; McClung, Brandon; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-12-01

    The gecko adhesive system is dependent on weak van der Waals interactions that are multiplied across thousands of fine hair-like structures (setae) on geckos' toe pads. Due to the requirements of van der Waals forces, we expect that any interruption between the setae and substrate, such as a water layer, will compromise adhesion. Our recent results suggest, however, that the air layer (plastron) surrounding the superhydrophobic toe pads aid in expelling water at the contact interface and create strong shear adhesion in water when in contact with hydrophobic surfaces. To test the function of the air plastron, we reduced the surface tension of water using two surfactants, a charged anionic surfactant and a neutral nonionic surfactant. We tested geckos on three substrates: hydrophilic glass and two hydrophobic surfaces, glass with a octadecyl trichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer (OTS-SAM) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). We found that the anionic surfactant inhibited the formation of the air plastron layer and significantly reduced shear adhesion to all three substrates. Interestingly, the air plastron was more stable in the nonionic surfactant treatments than the anionic surfactant treatments and we found that geckos adhered better in the nonionic surfactant than in the anionic surfactant on OTS-SAM and PTFE but not on glass. Our results have implications for the evolution of a superhydrophobic toe pad and highlight some of the challenges faced in designing synthetic adhesives that mimic geckos' toes. PMID:24944119

  5. The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

  6. Determination of antibiotic residues in manure, soil, and surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christian, T.; Schneider, R.J.; Farber, H.A.; Skutlarek, D.; Meyer, M.T.; Goldbach, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    In the last years more and more often detections of antimicrobially active compounds ("antibiotics") in surface waters have been reported. As a possible input pathway in most cases municipal sewage has been discussed. But as an input from the realm of agriculture is conceivable as well, in this study it should be investigated if an input can occur via the pathway application of liquid manure on fields with the subsequent mechanisms surface run-off/interflow, leaching, and drift. For this purpose a series of surface waters, soils, and liquid manures from North Rhine-Westphalia (Northwestern Germany) were sampled and analyzed for up to 29 compounds by HPLC-MS/MS. In each of the surface waters antibiotics could be detected. The highest concentrations were found in samples from spring (300 ng/L of erythromycin). Some of the substances detected (e.g., tylosin), as well as characteristics in the landscape suggest an input from agriculture in some particular cases. In the investigation of different liquid manure samples by a fast immunoassay method sulfadimidine could be detected in the range of 1...2 mg/kg. Soil that had been fertilized with this liquid manure showed a content of sulfadimidine extractable by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of 15 ??g/kg dry weight even 7 months after the application. This indicates the high stability of some antibiotics in manure and soil.

  7. Home-built Surface Plasmon Resonance Apparatus for Studying Interactions Between Water and a Hydrophobic Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNany, Dylan; Brown, Erin; Petersen, Shannon; Poynor, Adele

    2014-03-01

    Water acts in many anomalous ways, especially when near a hydrophobic surface. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR), a quantum optical method is used to study these unusual effects. Through the use of SPR, studies of the depletion layer (a very thin low-density layer, only a few nanometers thick) can be conducted. Employing a home-built SPR device, along with a monolayer coated gold slide, studies are conducted using a variety of differing dielectrics (water, air, methanol). Modifications of the SPR apparatus allow us to find the assumed thickness of the depleted region.

  8. Relationships between nutrient enrichment, pleurocerid snail density and trematode infection rate in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciparis, Serena; Iwanowicz, Deborah D.; Voshell, J. Reese, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Summary 1. Nutrient enrichment is a widespread environmental problem in freshwater ecosystems. Eutrophic conditions caused by nutrient enrichment may result in a higher prevalence of infection by trematode parasites in host populations, due to greater resource availability for the molluscan first intermediate hosts. 2. This study examined relationships among land use, environmental variables indicating eutrophication, population density of the pleurocerid snail, Leptoxis carinata, and trematode infections. Fifteen study sites were located in streams within the Shenandoah River catchment (Virginia, U.S.A.), where widespread nutrient enrichment has occurred. 3. Snail population density had a weak positive relationship with stream water nutrient concentration. Snail population density also increased as human activities within stream catchments increased, but density did not continue to increase in catchments where anthropogenic disturbance was greatest. 4. Cercariae from five families of trematodes were identified in L. carinata, and infection rate was generally low (<10%). Neither total infection rate nor the infection rate of individual trematode types showed a positive relationship with snail population density, nutrients or land use. 5. There were statistically significant but weak relationships between the prevalence of infection by two trematode families and physical and biological variables. The prevalence of Notocotylidae was positively related to water depth, which may be related to habitat use by definitive hosts. Prevalence of Opecoelidae had a negative relationship with orthophosphate concentration and a polynomial relationship with chlorophyll a concentration. Transmission of Opecoelid trematodes between hosts may be inhibited by eutrophic conditions. 6. Leptoxis carinata appears to be a useful species for monitoring the biological effects of eutrophication and investigating trematode transmission dynamics in lotic systems.

  9. Sensors and OBIA synergy for operational monitoring of surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Eric; Thenard, Lucas

    2010-05-01

    This contribution will focus on combining Object Based Image Analysis (i.e. OBIA with e-Cognition 8) and recent sensors (i.e. Spot 5 XS, Pan and ALOS Prism, Avnir2, Palsar) to address the technical feasibility for an operational monitoring of surface water. Three cases of river meandering (India), flood mapping (Nepal) and dam's seasonal water level monitoring (Morocco) using recent sensors will present various application of surface water monitoring. The operational aspect will be demonstrated either by sensor properties (i.e. spatial resolution and bandwidth), data acquisition properties (i.e. multi sensor, return period and near real-time acquisition) but also with OBIA algorithms (i.e. fusion of multi sensors / multi resolution data and batch processes). In the first case of river meandering (India) we will address multi sensor and multi date satellite acquisition to monitor the river bed mobility within a floodplain using an ALOS dataset. It will demonstrate the possibility of an operational monitoring system that helps the geomorphologist in the analysis of fluvial dynamic and sediment budget for high energy rivers. In the second case of flood mapping (Nepal) we will address near real time Palsar data acquisition at high spatial resolution to monitor and to map a flood extension. This ALOS sensor takes benefit both from SAR and L band properties (i.e. atmospheric transparency, day/night acquisition, low sensibility to surface wind). It's a real achievement compared to optical imagery or even other high resolution SAR properties (i.e. acquisition swath, bandwidth and data price). These advantages meet the operational needs set by crisis management of hydrological disasters but also for the implementation of flood risk management plans. The last case of dam surface water monitoring (Morocco) will address an important issue of water resource management in countries affected by water scarcity. In such countries water users have to cope with over exploitation, frequent drought period and now with foreseen climate change impacts. This third case will demonstrate the efficiency of SPOT 5 programming in synergy with OBIA methodology to assess the evolution of dam surface water within a complete water cycle (i.e. 2008-09). In all those three cases image segmentation and classification algorithms developed with e-Cognition 8 software allow an easy to use implementation of simple to highly sophisticate OBIA rulsets fully operational in batch processes. Finally this contribution foresees the new opportunity of integration of Worldview 2 multispectral imagery (i.e. 8 bands) including its "coastal" band that will also find an application in continental surface water bathymetry. Worldview 2 is a recently launch satellite (e.g. October 2009) that starts to collect earth observation data since January 2010. It is therefore a promising new remote sensing tool to develop operational hydrology in combination high resolution SAR imagery and OBIA methodology. This contribution will conclude on the strong potential for operationalisation in hydrology and water resources management that recent and future sensors and image analysis methodologies are offering to water management and decision makers.

  10. Snails and their trails: the multiple functions of trail-following in gastropods.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terence P T; Saltin, Sara H; Davies, Mark S; Johannesson, Kerstin; Stafford, Richard; Williams, Gray A

    2013-08-01

    Snails are highly unusual among multicellular animals in that they move on a layer of costly mucus, leaving behind a trail that can be followed and utilized for various purposes by themselves or by other animals. Here we review more than 40 years of experimental and theoretical research to try to understand the ecological and evolutionary rationales for trail-following in gastropods. Data from over 30 genera are currently available, representing a broad taxonomic range living in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. The emerging picture is that the production of mucus trails, which initially was an adaptation to facilitate locomotion and/or habitat extension, has evolved to facilitate a multitude of additional functions. Trail-following supports homing behaviours, and provides simple mechanisms for self-organisation in groups of snails, promoting aggregation and thus relieving desiccation and predation pressures. In gastropods that copulate, trail-following is an important component in mate-searching, either as an alternative, or in addition to the release of water- or air-borne pheromones. In some species, this includes a capacity of males not only to identify trails of conspecifics but also to discriminate between trails laid by females and males. Notably, trail discrimination seems important as a pre-zygotic barrier to mating in some snail species. As production of a mucus trail is the most costly component of snail locomotion, it is also tempting to speculate that evolution has given rise to various ways to compensate for energy losses. Some snails, for example, increase energy intake by eating particles attached to the mucus of trails that they follow, whereas others save energy through reducing the production of their own mucus by moving over previously laid mucus trails. Trail-following to locate a prey item or a mate is also a way to save energy. While the rationale for trail-following in many cases appears clear, the basic mechanisms of trail discrimination, including the mechanisms by which many snails determine the polarity of the trail, are yet to be experimentally determined. Given the multiple functions of trail-following we propose that future studies should adopt an integrated approach, taking into account the possibility of the simultaneous occurrence of many selectively advantageous roles of trail-following behaviour in gastropods. We also believe that future opportunities to link phenotypic and genotypic traits will make possible a new generation of research projects in which gastropod trail-following, its multitude of functions and evolutionary trade-offs can be further elucidated. PMID:23374161

  11. Near-field Oblique Remote Sensing of Stream Water-surface Elevation, Slope, and Surface Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minear, J. T.; Kinzel, P. J.; Nelson, J. M.; McDonald, R.; Wright, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge for estimating discharges during flood events or in steep channels is the difficulty and hazard inherent in obtaining in-stream measurements. One possible solution is to use near-field remote sensing to obtain simultaneous water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities. In this test case, we utilized Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to remotely measure water-surface elevations and slope in combination with surface velocities estimated from particle image velocimetry (PIV) obtained by video-camera and/or infrared camera. We tested this method at several sites in New Mexico and Colorado using independent validation data consisting of in-channel measurements from survey-grade GPS and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instruments. Preliminary results indicate that for relatively turbid or steep streams, TLS collects tens of thousands of water-surface elevations and slopes in minutes, much faster than conventional means and at relatively high precision, at least as good as continuous survey-grade GPS measurements. Estimated surface velocities from this technique are within 15% of measured velocity magnitudes and within 10 degrees from the measured velocity direction (using extrapolation from the shallowest bin of the ADCP measurements). Accurately aligning the PIV results into Cartesian coordinates appears to be one of the main sources of error, primarily due to the sensitivity at these shallow oblique look angles and the low numbers of stationary objects for rectification. Combining remotely-sensed water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities produces simultaneous velocity measurements from a large number of locations in the channel and is more spatially extensive than traditional velocity measurements. These factors make this technique useful for improving estimates of flow measurements during flood flows and in steep channels while also decreasing the difficulty and hazard associated with making measurements in these conditions.

  12. The need for satellite based observations of global surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettenmaier, D.; Alsdorf, D.; Vörösmarty, C.; Birkett, C.

    2003-04-01

    River discharge as well as lake and wetland storage of water are critical elements of land surface hydrology, yet they are poorly observed globally and the prospects for improvement from in-situ networks are bleak. Considering this, our NASA Surface Water working group is focused on the following science and applications questions: (1) What are the observational and data assimilation requirements for measuring natural and manmade surface storage and river discharge that will allow us to (a) understand the land surface branch of the global hydrologic cycle, (b) predict the consequences of global change, and (c) make assessments for water resources management? (2) What are the roles of wetlands, lakes, and rivers (a) as regulators of biogeochemical and constituent cycles (e.g., carbon, nutrients, and sediments) and (b) in creating or ameliorating water-related hazards of relevance to society? Global models of weather and climate could be constrained spatially and temporally by stream discharge and surface storage measurements. Yet this constraint is rarely applied, despite weather and climate modeling results showing that predicted precipitation is often inconsistent with observed discharge. Thus, as satellite missions are developed for global observations of critical hydrologic parameters such as soil moisture (i.e., HYDROS) and precipitation (i.e., GPM), the lack of concomitant measurements of runoff and surface water storage at compatible spatial and temporal scales may well result in inconsistent parameterizations of global hydrologic, weather, and climate models. Although off-river-channel environments, such as wetlands, floodplains, and anabranches (e.g., braided channels) are increasingly recognized for their important roles in delaying continental runoff, in biogeochemical cycling of waterborne constituents, and in trace gas exchange with the atmosphere, these environments are not gauged because flow is diffusive (non-channelized). Rather than fixed station measurements, remote sensing offers the only practical way to determine the spatial and temporal patterns of inundation and water storage of these areas over large spatial domains. Our NASA working group invites participation from everyone interested in helping to solve these questions.

  13. Measuring surface water in soil with light reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Michael L.

    2009-08-01

    The light absorbed by water in soil and plants is readily determined using hyperspectral full-range imagery and field spectrometers. The full absorption of light can be accounted for by fitting the shape of water absorptions at the same time as other diagnostic bands using multiple Gaussian functions. This research is particularly important in soils due to the loss of mineral band depth with the spread of the fundamental water just beyond the SWIR. The relationship of the albedo lost to band depth, for the same mineral media, is nonlinear. By including water and mineral absorptions in the same fitting, the accuracy of the mineral abundance estimates are shown substantially improved. In addition, measurements of absorption change within the soil surface are so sensitive to water content that these bands as indexes and absorption fitting are excellent predictors of the amount of organic matter. Spectral model is shown for determining water content based water indexes and the fitted SWIR band as a good predictors of soil biological crust, such as lichen and cyanobacteria, in hyperarid soils of the Mojave Desert.

  14. A "First Principles" Potential Energy Surface for Liquid Water from VRT Spectroscopy of Water Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Leforestier, C; Saykally, R J

    2004-05-25

    We present results of gas phase cluster and liquid water simulations from the recently determined VRT(ASP-W)III water dimer potential energy surface. VRT(ASP-W)III is shown to not only be a model of high ''spectroscopic'' accuracy for the water dimer, but also makes accurate predictions of vibrational ground-state properties for clusters up through the hexamer. Results of ambient liquid water simulations from VRT(ASP-W)III are compared to those from ab initio Molecular Dynamics, other potentials of ''spectroscopic'' accuracy, and to experiment. The results herein represent the first time that a ''spectroscopic'' potential surface is able to correctly model condensed phase properties of water.

  15. Storm water contamination and its effect on the quality of urban surface waters.

    PubMed

    Barałkiewicz, Danuta; Chudzińska, Maria; Szpakowska, Barbara; Świerk, Dariusz; Gołdyn, Ryszard; Dondajewska, Renata

    2014-10-01

    We studied the effect of storm water drained by the sewerage system and discharged into a river and a small reservoir, on the example of five catchments located within the boundaries of the city of Poznań (Poland). These catchments differed both in terms of their surface area and land use (single- and multi-family housing, industrial areas). The aim of the analyses was to explain to what extent pollutants found in storm water runoff from the studied catchments affected the quality of surface waters and whether it threatened the aquatic organisms. Only some of the 14 studied variables and 22 chemical elements were important for the water quality of the river, i.e., pH, TSS, rain intensity, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, organic matter content, Al, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, Cd, Ni, Se, and Tl. The most serious threat to biota in the receiver came from the copper contamination of storm water runoff. Of all samples below the sewerage outflow, 74% exceeded the mean acute value for Daphnia species. Some of them exceeded safe concentrations for other aquatic organisms. Only the outlet from the industrial area with the highest impervious surface had a substantial influence on the water quality of the river. A reservoir situated in the river course had an important influence on the elimination of storm water pollution, despite the very short residence time of its water. PMID:24981877

  16. What can be learnt from a snail?

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The marine snail Littorina saxatilis is a common inhabitant of intertidal shores of the north Atlantic. It is amazingly polymorphic and forms reproductively isolated ecotypes in microhabitats where crabs are either present and wave action is less furious, or where waves are strong and crabs are absent. Decades of research have unveiled much of the ecological and demographic context of the formation of crab- and wave-ecotype snails showing important phenotypic differences being inherited, differential selection being strong over adjacent microhabitats, local dispersal being restricted, and long-distance transports of individuals being rare. In addition, strong assortative mating of ecotypes has been shown to include a component of male mate preference based on female size. Several studies support ecotypes being diverged locally and under gene flow in a parallel and highly replicated fashion. The high level of replication at various levels of independence (from local to pan-European scale) provides excellent opportunities to investigate the detailed mechanisms of microevolution, including the formation of barriers to gene flow. Current investigations benefit from a draft reference genome and an integration of genomic approaches, modelling and experiments to unveil molecular and ecological components of speciation and their interactions. PMID:27087845

  17. Chiral Speciation in Terrestrial Pulmonate Snails

    PubMed Central

    Gittenberger, Edmund; Hamann, Thomas D.; Asami, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of data in the literature, the percentages of dextral versus sinistral species of snails have been calculated for western Europe, Turkey, North America (north of Mexico), and Japan. When the family of Clausiliidae is represented, about a quarter of all snail species may be sinistral, whereas less than one per cent of the species may be sinistral where that family does not occur. The number of single-gene speciation events on the basis of chirality, resulting in the origin of mirror image species, is not closely linked to the percentage of sinistral versus dextral species in a particular region. Turkey is nevertheless exceptional by both a high percentage of sinistral species and a high number of speciation events resulting in mirror image species. Shell morphology and genetic background may influence the ease of chirality-linked speciation, whereas sinistrality may additionally be selected against by internal selection. For the Clausiliidae, the fossil record and the recent fauna suggest that successful reversals in coiling direction occurred with a frequency of once every three to four million years. PMID:22532825

  18. The impact of land use on microbial surface water pollution.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Christiane; Rechenburg, Andrea; Rind, Esther; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Our knowledge relating to water contamination from point and diffuse sources has increased in recent years and there have been many studies undertaken focusing on effluent from sewage plants or combined sewer overflows. However, there is still only a limited amount of microbial data on non-point sources leading to diffuse pollution of surface waters. In this study, the concentrations of several indicator micro-organisms and pathogens in the upper reaches of a river system were examined over a period of 16 months. In addition to bacteria, diffuse pollution caused by Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. was analysed. A single land use type predestined to cause high concentrations of all microbial parameters could not be identified. The influence of different land use types varies between microbial species. The microbial concentration in river water cannot be explained by stable non-point effluent concentrations from different land use types. There is variation in the ranking of the potential of different land use types resulting in surface water contamination with regard to minimum, median and maximum effects. These differences between median and maximum impact indicate that small-scale events like spreading manure substantially influence the general contamination potential of a land use type and may cause increasing micro-organism concentrations in the river water by mobilisation during the next rainfall event. PMID:25456147

  19. Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    1981-04-01

    The study objective of "The Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters" is to synthesize and test radionuclide transport models capable of realistically assessing radionuclide transport in various types of surface water bodies by including the sediment-radionuclide interactions. These interactions include radionuclide adsorption by sediment; desorption from sediment into water; and transport, deposition, and resuspension of sorbed radionuclides controlled by the sediment movements. During FY-1979, the modification of sediment and contaminant (radionuclide) transport model, FETRA, was completed to make it applicable to coastal waters. The model is an unsteady, two-dimensional (longitudinal and lateral) model that consists of three submodels (for sediment, dissolved-contaminant, and particulate-contaminant transport), coupled to include the sediment-contaminant interactions. In estuaries, flow phenomena and consequent sediment and radionuclide migration are often three-dimensional in nature mainly because of nonuniform channel cross-sections, salinity intrusion, and lateral-flow circulation. Thus, an unsteady, three-dimensional radionuclide transport model for estuaries is also being synthesized by combining and modifying a PNL unsteady hydrothermal model and FETRA. These two radionuclide transport models for coastal waters and estuaries will be applied to actual sites to examine the validity of the codes.

  20. Input dynamics of pesticide transformation products into surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Susanne; Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane; Schwarzenbach, René P.; Fenner, Kathrin

    2010-05-01

    Some pesticide transformation products have been observed to occur in higher concentrations and more frequently than the parent active pesticide in surface water and groundwater. These products are often more mobile and sometimes more stable than the parent pesticide. If they also represent the major product into which the parent substance is transformed, these transformation products may dominate observed pesticide occurrences in surface water and groundwater. Their potential contribution to the overall risk to the aquatic environment caused by the use of the parent pesticide should therefore not be neglected in chemical risk and water quality assessments. The same is true for transformation products of other compound classes that might reach the soil environment, such as veterinary pharmaceuticals. However, the fate and input pathways of transformation products of soil-applied chemicals into surface water are not yet well understood, which largely prevents their appropriate inclusion into chemical risk and water quality assessments. Here, we studied whether prioritization methods based on available environmental fate data from pesticide registration dossiers in combination with basic fate models could help identify transformation products which can be found in relevant concentrations in surface and groundwater and which should therefore be included into monitoring programs. A three-box steady state model containing air, soil, and surface water compartments was used to predict relative inputs of pesticide transformation products into surface waters based on their physico-chemical and environmental fate properties. The model predictions were compared to monitoring data from a small Swiss river located in an intensely agricultural catchment (90 km2) which was flow-proportionally sampled from May to October 2008 and screened for 74 pesticides as well as 50 corresponding transformation products. Sampling mainly occurred during high discharge, but additional samples during baseflow conditions were also taken. The analytical measurements included solid phase extraction, liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-HR-MS/MS). Quantification was achieved using reference standards and internal standards. Besides the well-known transformation products of triazine and chloroacetanilide herbicides, transformation products of other compound classes such as azoxystrobin acid (from azoxystrobin, strobilurin fungicide), chloridazon-desphenyl and chloridazon-methyl-desphenyl (from chloridazon, pyridazinone herbicide), and metamitron-desamino (from metamitron, triazinone herbicide) were analyzed in surface water. For a selection of widely used pesticides in the catchment, modelled ratios of transformation product versus parent pesticide concentrations were compared to the measured concentration ratios in the river for the application period and for two 2-month periods following application. Concentration ratios agreed within a factor of 10 for all pairs of parent pesticides and transformation products, and for all seasons, with a single exception. The ratio of chloridazon-desphenyl to chloridazon was under-predicted by a factor of approximately 20. The data revealed that chloridazon-desphenyl was also found in elevated concentrations in all baseflow samples, indicating its presence in the groundwater component of the catchment. The same was true for other transformation products (e.g., metamitron-desamino, chloridazon-methly-desphenyl, metolachlor-ESA), but to a lesser degree. Based on baseflow separation of the hydrograph, the concentration ratio estimation model was supplemented with an additional baseflow component. The concentrations in the baseflow component were estimated with a simple leaching relationship that was compared against measured baseflow concentrations and groundwater findings in Switzerland. The final model yielded good agreement for all compounds and is therefore deemed suitable for prioritization of transformation products with a relevant exposure potential. It also clearly indicated the contribution of groundwater to the overall occurrence of pesticides and their transformation products in Swiss surface waters.

  1. The surface energy of water: functional implications of hexagonal/cuboidal transformations in the surface arrays.

    PubMed

    Widdas, W F

    2006-01-01

    Hyde's scientific book The Language of Shape has emphasized the importance of minimum surfaces in the structure of biological membranes. Minimum surfaces can be visualized as the property which brings many droplets of liquids to spherical bubbles, since a sphere has the minimum surface to volume ratio. Thus, a sphere with a surface of 4pir2 and volume of 4/3pir3 has a surface to volume ratio of 3/r, that is, the ratio is dependent upon the reciprocal of the radius. The chemistry of water as dihydrides of the electronegative element oxygen is fundamentally dependent upon its polar properties and particularly the delta positive charges on the hydrogen atoms and the double delta negative charge on the larger oxygen atom, which from its mass (16 Da) is regarded as the centre of the water molecules. The cohesion of water as a liquid or as semi-crystal like structures in the surface depends upon electrostatic forces that are comparable in strength to covalent bonds. This review discusses the functional implications of some unexpected properties which have been evinced by model building and illustrated as a Poster in the 4th World Congress of Cellular and Molecular Biology. PMID:17543223

  2. Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water

    PubMed Central

    Umeki, Takahiro; Ohata, Masahiko; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 μm; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ~ 100 μm; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ~ 2 m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet. PMID:25623086

  3. The Whitham Equation as a model for surface water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldabayev, Daulet; Kalisch, Henrik; Dutykh, Denys

    2015-08-01

    The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. A Hamiltonian system of Whitham type allowing for two-way wave propagation is also derived. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to different free surface models: the KdV equation, the BBM equation, and the Padé (2,2) model. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better than the three considered models.

  4. Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeki, Takahiro; Ohata, Masahiko; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 μm ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ~ 100 μm iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ~ 2 m/s and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet.

  5. The surface composition of Charon - Tentative identification of water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcialis, Robert L.; Lebofsky, Larry A.; Rieke, George H.

    1987-01-01

    The Mar. 3, 1987, Charon occultation by Pluto was observed in the infrared at 1.5, 1.7, 2.0, and 2.35 micrometers. Subtraction of fluxes measured between second and third contacts from measurements made before and after the event has yielded individual spectral signatures for each body at these wavelengths. Charon's surface appears depleted in methane relative to Pluto. Constancy of flux at 2.0 micrometers throughout the event shows that Charon is effectively black at this wavelength, which is centered on a very strong water absorption band. Thus, the measurements suggest the existence of water ice on Pluto's moon.

  6. Soil Moisture: The Hydrologic Interface Between Surface and Ground Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    A hypothesis is presented that many hydrologic processes display a unique signature that is detectable with microwave remote sensing. These signatures are in the form of the spatial and temporal distributions of surface soil moisture. The specific hydrologic processes that may be detected include groundwater recharge and discharge zones, storm runoff contributing areas, regions of potential and less than potential evapotranspiration (ET), and information about the hydrologic properties of soils. In basin and hillslope hydrology, soil moisture is the interface between surface and ground waters.

  7. Water resources data Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C.,water year 2005, Volume 1. Surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Tallman, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2005 water year for Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 145 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; stage only for 2 tidal gaging station; and water quality at 19 gaging stations. Also included are stage only for 11 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C.

  8. Water resources data, Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C., water year 2000, volume 1. surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Robert W., Jr.; Saffer, Richard W.; Tallman, Anthony J.

    2001-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2000 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 21 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations, discharge only for 27 low-flow partial-record stations, and stage only for 5 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

  9. Water resources data for Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C, water year 2002, Volume 1. surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Robert W., Jr.; Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Tallman, Anthony J.

    2003-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 137 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 28 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 crest-stage partial-record stations and stage only for 8 tidal crest-stage partialrecord stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C.

  10. Water resources data for Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C, water year 2003, volume 1. surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Robert W., Jr.; Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Tallman, Anthony J.

    2003-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 140 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 17 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 crest-stage partial-record stations and stage only for 10 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C.

  11. Shallow Alluvial Aquifer Ground Water System and Surface Water/Ground Water Interaction, Boulder Creek, Boulder, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, K. P.; Ge, S.; Crifasi, R. R.

    2006-12-01

    Water chemistry in Boulder Creek, Colorado, shows significant variation as the Creek flows through the City of Boulder [Barber et al., 2006]. This variation is partially due to ground water inputs, which are not quantitatively understood. The purpose of this study is (1) to understand ground water movement in a shallow alluvial aquifer system and (2) to assess surface water/ground water interaction. The study area, encompassing an area of 1 mi2, is located at the Sawhill and Walden Ponds area in Boulder. This area was reclaimed by the City of Boulder and Boulder County after gravel mining operations ceased in the 1970's. Consequently, ground water has filled in the numerous gravel pits allowing riparian vegetation regrowth and replanting. An integrated approach is used to examine the shallow ground water and surface water of the study area through field measurements, water table mapping, graphical data analysis, and numerical modeling. Collected field data suggest that lateral heterogeneity exists throughout the unconsolidated sediment. Alluvial hydraulic conductivities range from 1 to 24 ft/day and flow rates range from 0.01 to 2 ft/day. Preliminary data analysis suggests that ground water movement parallels surface topography and does not noticeably vary with season. Recharge via infiltrating precipitation is dependent on evapotranspiration (ET) demands and is influenced by preferential flow paths. During the growing season when ET demand exceeds precipitation rates, there is little recharge; however recharge occurs during cooler months when ET demand is insignificant. Preliminary data suggest that the Boulder Creek is gaining ground water as it traverses the study area. Stream flow influences the water table for distances up to 400 feet. The influence of stream flow is reflected in the zones relatively low total dissolved solids concentration. A modeling study is being conducted to synthesize aquifer test data, ground water levels, and stream flow data. The model will quantitatively assess the interaction between surface water and ground water, particularly the amount of exchange between the creek and ground water and to what extent these systems influence each other. Model sensitivity study will help identify important system parameters. A comprehensive model of the study area will serve as a tool for efficiently allocating water throughout the study area (from Boulder Creek). Water allocation is needed to prevent the eutrophication of the ponds, improve fishery management, and efficiently meet the water rights obligations in the watershed.

  12. Multiple sources of boron in urban surface waters and groundwaters.

    PubMed

    Hasenmueller, Elizabeth A; Criss, Robert E

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies attribute abnormal boron (B) levels in streams and groundwaters to wastewater and fertilizer inputs. This study shows that municipal drinking water used for lawn irrigation contributes substantial non-point loads of B and other chemicals (S-species, Li, and Cu) to surface waters and shallow groundwaters in the St. Louis, Missouri, area. Background levels and potential B sources were characterized by analysis of lawn and street runoff, streams, rivers, springs, local rainfall, wastewater influent and effluent, and fertilizers. Urban surface waters and groundwaters are highly enriched in B (to 250μg/L) compared to background levels found in rain and pristine, carbonate-hosted streams and springs (<25μg/L), but have similar concentrations (150 to 259μg/L) compared to municipal drinking waters derived from the Missouri River. Other data including B/SO4(2-)-S and B/Li ratios confirm major contributions from this source. Moreover, sequential samples of runoff collected during storms show that B concentrations decrease with increased discharge, proving that elevated B levels are not primarily derived from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) during flooding. Instead, non-point source B exhibits complex behavior depending on land use. In urban settings B is rapidly mobilized from lawns during "first flush" events, likely representing surficial salt residues from drinking water used to irrigate lawns, and is also associated with the baseflow fraction, likely derived from the shallow groundwater reservoir that over time accumulates B from drinking water that percolates into the subsurface. The opposite occurs in small rural watersheds, where B is leached from soils by recent rainfall and covaries with the event water fraction. PMID:23384647

  13. How much surface water can gilgai microtopography capture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishné, A. Sz.; Morgan, C. L. S.; Neely, H. L.

    2014-05-01

    Gilgai microtopography is associated with landscapes of strongly shrinking-swelling soils (Vertisols) and affects spatial and temporal variability of runoff, and thus the generation of stream flow and plant-available water. However, no report is available on the amount of surface water that a landscape with gilgai depressions can retain. Our objective was to assess water capturing capacity of a typical Vertisol landscape with gilgai depressions in the Blackland Prairie Major Land Resource Area of Texas. The 45 by 40 m study site was located on a Vertisol with circular gilgai covered by improved pasture on a summit with slope of less than 3%. A digital elevation model (DEM) with 0.25 m2 cell size was created from elevation data acquired by using GPS. Water capturing capacity of gilgai depressions was estimated at 10 randomly selected local gilgai basins by analyzing spatial distribution of Topographic Wetness Index (TWI). Our findings indicate that the average circular gilgai depression can hold 0.78 m3 of water leading to an estimate of 0.024 m3 m-2 water capturing capacity in a circular gilgai landscape, assuming no infiltration. The gilgai could capture a maximum of 43.74 m3 of rain and runoff water at the 1800 m2 study site. Consequently, if the soil were saturated and not infiltrating any water, no runoff would be expected following a 24.3 mm m-2, 1 h precipitation, affecting estimates of streamflow (runoff) and plant available water (redistribution and infiltration) at the m to km scale.

  14. Impact of river restoration on groundwater - surface water - interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, Anne-Marie; Schirmer, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Since the end of the 19th century, flood protection was increasingly based on the construction of impermeable dams and side walls (BWG, 2003). In spite of providing flood protection, these measures also limited the connectivity between the river and the land, restricted the area available for flooding, and hampered the natural flow dynamics of the river. Apart from the debilitating effect on riverine ecosystems due to loss of habitats, these measures also limited bank filtration, inhibited the infiltration of storm water, and affected groundwater-surface water-interactions. This in turn had a profound effect on ecosystem health, as a lack of groundwater-surface water interactions led to decreased cycling of pollutants and nutrients in the hyporheic zone and limited the moderation of the water temperature (EA, 2009). In recent decades, it has become apparent that further damages to riverine ecosystems must be prohibited, as the damages to ecology, economy and society surmount any benefits gained from exploiting them. Nowadays, the restoration of rivers is a globally accepted means to restore ecosystem functioning, protect water resources and amend flood protection (Andrea et al., 2012; Palmer et al., 2005; Wortley et al., 2013). In spite of huge efforts regarding the restoration of rivers over the last 30 years, the question of its effectiveness remains, as river restorations often reconstruct a naturally looking rather than a naturally functioning stream (EA, 2009). We therefore focussed our research on the effectiveness of river restorations, represented by the groundwater-surface water-interactions. Given a sufficiently high groundwater level, a lack of groundwater-surface water-interactions after restoration may indicate that the vertical connectivity in the stream was not fully restored. In order to investigate groundwater-surface water-interactions we determined the thermal signature on the stream bed and in +/- 40 cm depth by using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS), a fibre optical method for temperature determination over long distances (Selker et al., 2006). Thermal signatures were determined in a small urban stream before and after restoration and compared to streams in natural and near-natural settings. BWG BUNDESAMT FÜR WASSER UND GEOLOGIE, 2003. Die Geschichte des Hochwasserschutzes in der Schweiz. Bericht des BWG, Serie Wasser. Biel. 208 p. EA ENVIRONMENT AGENCY (UK), 2009. The Hyporheic Handbook: A handbook on the groundwater-surface water interface and hyporheic zone for environment managers. Bristol. 280 p. ANDREA, F., GSCHÖPF, C., BLASCHKE, A.P., WEIGELHOFER, G., AND RECKENDORFER, W., 2012. Ecological niche models for the evaluation of management options in urban floodplain - conservation vs. restoration purposes. Environ. Sci. Policy, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2012.08.011. PALMER, M.A., BERNHARDT, E.S., ALLAN, J.D., LAKE, P.S., ALEXANDER, G., BROOKS, S., CARR, J., CLAYTON, S., DAHM, C.N., FOLLSTAD SHAH, J., GALAT, D.L., LOSS, S.G., GOODWIN, P., HART, D.D., HASSETT, B., JENKINSON, R., KONDOLF, G.M., LAVE, R., MEYER, J.L., O`DONNELL, T.K., PAGANO, L. AND SUDDUTH, E., 2005. Standards for ecologically successful river restoration. Journal of Applied Ecology, 42, pp. 208 - 217. DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2005.01004.x. WORTLEY, L., HERO, J-M., HOWES, M., 2013. Evaluating Ecological Restoration Success: A Review of the Literature. Restoration Ecology, 21 (5), pp. 537 - 543. DOI 10.1111/rec.12028. SELKER, J.S., THEVENAZ, L., HUWALD, H., MALLET, A., LUXEMBURG, W., VAN DE GIESEN, N., STEJSKAL, M., ZEMAN, J., WESTHOFF, M., AND PARLANGE, M.B., 2006. Distributed fibre-optic temperature sensing for hydrologic systems. Water Resources Research, 42(12), W12202.

  15. Experimental Study of Fine Structures of Wind - Water Surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng

    A two-dimensional Scanning Laser Slope Gauge (SLSG) was developed to measure the slopes of water surface covered with ripples. Measurements under fourteen wind velocities from 1 to 10 m s^{-1} were performed in the Wind-Wave-Current Research Facility to study the fine structure of water surface. Wavenumber slope spectra in the wavelength range from 4.5 to 81 mm were obtained. These spectra at light, medium and high winds are observed to have different features, indicating that the energy balance of short waves is dominated by different physical processes. At 1-m s^ {-1} wind velocity, a spectral peak in the omnidirectional wavenumber slope spectrum at about lambda = 3.5 cm was observed corresponding to initial wind waves, where lambda is the wavelength. A 'dip' in the spectra near lambda = 1.73 cm and a cutoff of capillary waves starting at lambda = 0.87 cm were observed at medium winds. At high winds, the spectral density was observed to saturate. Based on the observed wavenumber slope spectra, the power laws in wavenumber and wind dependence of wavenumber spectrum are proposed. It is found that the exponents of the power laws are not constant. Spatial features of the wind-disturbed water surface under different wind velocities were observed. Streaks parallel to the wind direction were first observed at low wind speeds. Parasitic capillary waves characterized by a sharp trough and flat crest were observed to be the dominant ripple patterns at medium wind speeds. Structures caused by breaking waves are more common at high wind speeds. The probability density distributions of crosswind slopes and curvatures of the water surface can be represented by Gaussian distributions, while that of upwind-downwind slopes deviate from the Gaussian but can be described by a Gram-Charlier series. Joint probability density functions of slopes and curvatures are examined for the first time. A series of Chi-square tests indicated that the jointed Gaussian model cannot represent the observed joint distribution well. The joint distributions of slopes and curvatures are valuable not only for the description of ocean surface waves, but also for understanding of microwave backscattering from the wind-disturbed water surface.

  16. Surface Tension Mediated Under-Water Adhesion of Rigid Spheres on Soft, Charged Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of surface-tension-mediated under-water adhesion is necessary for studying a plethora of physiological and technical phenomena, such as the uptake of bacteria or nanoparticle by cells, attachment of virus on bacterial surfaces, biofouling on large ocean vessels and marine devices, etc. This adhesion phenomenon becomes highly non-trivial in case the soft surface where the adhesion occurs is also charged. Here we propose a theory for analyzing such an under-water adhesion of a rigid sphere on a soft, charged surface, represented by a grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). We develop a model based on the minimization of free energy that, in addition to considering the elastic and the surface-tension-mediated adhesion energies, also accounts for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. We show that in the presence of surface charges, adhesion gets enhanced. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in the elastic energy is better balanced by the lowering of the EDL energy associated with the adhesion process. The entire behaviour is further dictated by the surface tension components that govern the adhesion energy.

  17. Reactivity of Tc at the Groundwater-Surface Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, J. M.; Fredrickson, J.; McKinley, J.

    2014-12-01

    Technetium-99 (t1/2 =211,000y) is environmentally mobile as the pertechnetate oxyanion [99Tc(VII)O4-(aq)]. Tc(VII) may react to less soluble Tc(IV) at intermediate redox potentials (Eo = -0.36 V) through heterogeneous reduction with solid-phase biogenic reaction products. 99Tc is forecast to migrate through groundwater to the Columbia River at the U.S. DOE Hanford site in Washington State. Discharge to surface water will occur through a groundwater-surface water interaction zone with complex hydrogeology and biogeochemistry that is stimulated by the overlapping nutrient regimes of groundwater and surface water. The reactivity of pertechnetate in reduced sediments from this zone was investigated to determine effects of biogenic ferrous-Fe and sulfide-S on Tc(VII) reduction rate; and the resulting speciation, mineral association, and physical location of Tc(IV). 99Tc(VII) was reduced to near detection (<10-9 Mol/L) over periods of days to months. Tc(VII) reduction rate was first order in [Tc(VII)]aq and sediment mass, but correlations with specific biogenic reductant concentrations [(Fe(II), ferrous mono-sulfide] were not found. Tc(IV) was isolated to fine-grained aggregates (0.1 to 0.5 mm) of "mud", consisting of primary mineral material embedded within a phyllosilicate or clay matrix. EXAFS revealed that product Tc(IV) existed as combinations of a Tc(IV)O2-like phase ,Tc(IV)-Fe surface clusters, and/or TcSx. Ferrous mono-sulfide was implicated as a more selective reductant. Migration of Tc(VII) through the interaction zone will be controlled by water residence time and the density and spatial distribution of fine-grained aggregates that host reductive biogeochemical processes in otherwise coarse-textured, partially oxygenated sediments.

  18. Surface potential of the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of an extended molecular dynamics calculation of the surface potential (SP) of the water liquid-vapor interface is presented. The SP predicted by the TIP4P model is -(130 + or - 50) mV. This value is of reasonable magnitude but of opposite sign to the expectations based on laboratory experiments. The electrostatic potential shows a nonmonotonic variation with depth into the liquid.

  19. High Surface Area Inorganic Membrane for Water Removal

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to demonstrate the fabrication and performance advantages of minichannel planar membrane modules made of porous metallic supports of surface area packing density one order of magnitude higher than the conventional membrane tube. The new, transformational, ceramic/metallic, hybrid membrane technology will be used for water/ethanol separations and reduce energy consumption by >20% over distillation and adsorption.

  20. Simulating piecewise-linear surface water and ground water interactions with MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan

    2009-01-01

    The standard MODFLOW packages offer limited capabilities to model piecewise-linear boundary conditions to describe ground water-surface water interaction. Specifically, MODFLOW is incapable of representing a Cauchy-type boundary with different resistances for discharge or recharge conditions. Such a more sophisticated Cauchy boundary condition is needed to properly represent surface waters alternatively losing water through the bottom (high resistance) or gaining water mostly near the water surface (low resistance). One solution would be to create a new package for MODFLOW to accomplish this. However, it is also possible to combine multiple instances of standard packages in a single cell to the same effect. In this specific example, the general head boundary package is combined with the drain package to arrive at the desired piecewise-linear behavior. In doing so, the standard USGS MODFLOW version can be used without any modifications at the expense of a minor increase in preprocessing and postprocessing and computational effort. The extra preprocessing for creating the input and extra postprocessing to determine the water balance in terms of the physical entities from the MODFLOW cell fluxes per package can be taken care of by a user interface. PMID:19473274

  1. Macro-Invertebrate Decline in Surface Water Polluted with Imidacloprid

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijk, Tessa C.; Van Staalduinen, Marja A.; Van der Sluijs, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expected that surface water pollution with imidacloprid would negatively impact aquatic ecosystems. Availability of extensive monitoring data on the abundance of aquatic macro-invertebrate species, and on imidacloprid concentrations in surface water in the Netherlands enabled us to test this hypothesis. Our regression analysis showed a significant negative relationship (P<0.001) between macro-invertebrate abundance and imidacloprid concentration for all species pooled. A significant negative relationship was also found for the orders Amphipoda, Basommatophora, Diptera, Ephemeroptera and Isopoda, and for several species separately. The order Odonata had a negative relationship very close to the significance threshold of 0.05 (P = 0.051). However, in accordance with previous research, a positive relationship was found for the order Actinedida. We used the monitoring field data to test whether the existing three water quality norms for imidacloprid in the Netherlands are protective in real conditions. Our data show that macrofauna abundance drops sharply between 13 and 67 ng l−1. For aquatic ecosystem protection, two of the norms are not protective at all while the strictest norm of 13 ng l−1 (MTR) seems somewhat protective. In addition to the existing experimental evidence on the negative effects of imidacloprid on invertebrate life, our study, based on data from large-scale field monitoring during multiple years, shows that serious concern about the far-reaching consequences of the abundant use of imidacloprid for aquatic ecosystems is justified. PMID:23650513

  2. Stable isotope values of Costa Rican surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachniet, Matthew S.; Patterson, William P.

    2002-03-01

    Stable isotope data of surface waters from the humid tropics in general, and Costa Rica in particular, are scarce. To improve our understanding of the spatial distribution of stable isotopes in surface waters, we measured δ18O and δD in river and lake ( n=63) and precipitation ( n=3) samples from Costa Rica. We also present data from the IAEA/WMO isotopes in precipitation network as context for our study. Surface water isotope values do not strongly correlate with elevation, stream head elevation, stream length, distance from Caribbean Sea, or estimated mean annual precipitation for the country as a whole. However, the data show distinct regional trends. The δ18O and δD values downwind of mountain ranges are inversely related to the altitude of the ranges the air masses traverse. In the lee of the high Talamanca Range, δ18O values are ˜6-8‰ lower, while in the lee of the lower Tilarán Range δ18O values are 2-3‰ lower than upwind sites along the Caribbean Slope. An altitude effect of -1.4‰ δ18O/km is present on the Pacific slope of southern Costa Rica, equivalent to a temperature effect of -0.3‰/°C. The Nicoya and Osa Peninsulas have higher values than upwind sites, suggesting input of Pacific-sourced moisture, evaporative enrichment, or decreased condensation temperatures. Elevated and increasing d-excess values inland along the Nicaragua Trough suggest a recycled component may be an important contributor to the water budget. These data provide preliminary stable isotope information for Costa Rica, and will benefit paleoclimatic research in the region. More detailed studies would be beneficial to our understanding of the controls on stable isotope composition of tropical waters.

  3. Macro-invertebrate decline in surface water polluted with imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, Tessa C; Van Staalduinen, Marja A; Van der Sluijs, Jeroen P

    2013-01-01

    Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expected that surface water pollution with imidacloprid would negatively impact aquatic ecosystems. Availability of extensive monitoring data on the abundance of aquatic macro-invertebrate species, and on imidacloprid concentrations in surface water in the Netherlands enabled us to test this hypothesis. Our regression analysis showed a significant negative relationship (P<0.001) between macro-invertebrate abundance and imidacloprid concentration for all species pooled. A significant negative relationship was also found for the orders Amphipoda, Basommatophora, Diptera, Ephemeroptera and Isopoda, and for several species separately. The order Odonata had a negative relationship very close to the significance threshold of 0.05 (P = 0.051). However, in accordance with previous research, a positive relationship was found for the order Actinedida. We used the monitoring field data to test whether the existing three water quality norms for imidacloprid in the Netherlands are protective in real conditions. Our data show that macrofauna abundance drops sharply between 13 and 67 ng l(-1). For aquatic ecosystem protection, two of the norms are not protective at all while the strictest norm of 13 ng l(-1) (MTR) seems somewhat protective. In addition to the existing experimental evidence on the negative effects of imidacloprid on invertebrate life, our study, based on data from large-scale field monitoring during multiple years, shows that serious concern about the far-reaching consequences of the abundant use of imidacloprid for aquatic ecosystems is justified. PMID:23650513

  4. Probing the hydration water diffusion of macromolecular surfaces and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortony, Julia H.; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Franck, John M.; Kausik, Ravinath; Pavlova, Anna; Hunt, Jasmine; Han, Songi

    2011-01-01

    We probe the translational dynamics of the hydration water surrounding the macromolecular surfaces of selected polyelectrolytes, lipid vesicles and intrinsically disordered proteins with site specificity in aqueous solutions. These measurements are made possible by the recent development of a new instrumental and methodological approach based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This technique selectively amplifies 1H NMR signals of hydration water around a spin label that is attached to a molecular site of interest. The selective 1H NMR amplification within molecular length scales of a spin label is achieved by utilizing short-distance range (~r-3) magnetic dipolar interactions between the 1H spin of water and the electron spin of a nitroxide radical-based label. Key features include the fact that only minute quantities (<10 μl) and dilute (>=100 μM) sample concentrations are needed. There is no size limit on the macromolecule or molecular assembly to be analyzed. Hydration water with translational correlation times between 10 and 800 ps is measured within ~10 Å distance of the spin label, encompassing the typical thickness of a hydration layer with three water molecules across. The hydration water moving within this time scale has significant implications, as this is what is modulated whenever macromolecules or molecular assemblies undergo interactions, binding or conformational changes. We demonstrate, with the examples of polymer complexation, protein aggregation and lipid-polymer interaction, that the measurements of interfacial hydration dynamics can sensitively and site specifically probe macromolecular interactions.

  5. Organic polar pollutants in surface waters of inland seas.

    PubMed

    Orlikowska, Anna; Fisch, Kathrin; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E

    2015-12-30

    Available data about contamination by polar substances are mostly reported for rivers and near-shore waters and only limited studies exists about their occurrence in marine waters. We present concentrations and distribution of several polar pesticides and UV-filters in surface waters of three inland seas, the Baltic, Black and Mediterranean Sea. Many of the investigated compounds were below detection limits, however, those found in off-shore waters raise a concern about their persistence and possible adverse effect on the ecosystem. Despite a longstanding EU-wide ban we were able to detect atrazine in the Mediterranean and the Baltic Sea. Concentrations in the Black Sea were substantially higher. Runoff from agricultural and urban areas was the main transport route to marine ecosystems for investigated compounds, though irgarol in Mediterranean waters was attributed to intense maritime traffic. 2-Phenylbenzimidazole-5-sulfonic acid was the only UV-filter detected in marine waters, while benzophenone-4 was observed in the estuaries. Occurrence of UV-filters was seasonal. PMID:26581813

  6. Hot water surface pasteurization for inactivating Salmonella on surfaces of mature green tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Outbreaks of salmonellosis have been associated with the consumption of tomatoes contaminated with Salmonella. Commercial washing processes for tomatoes are limited in their ability to inactivate and/or remove this human pathogen. Our objective was to develop a hot water surface pasteurization pro...

  7. Water Protects Graphitic Surface from Airborne Hydrocarbon Contamination.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiting; Kozbial, Andrew; Nioradze, Nikoloz; Parobek, David; Shenoy, Ganesh Jagadeesh; Salim, Muhammad; Amemiya, Shigeru; Li, Lei; Liu, Haitao

    2016-01-26

    The intrinsic wettability of graphitic materials, such as graphene and graphite, can be readily obscured by airborne hydrocarbon within 5-20 min of ambient air exposure. We report a convenient method to effectively preserve a freshly prepared graphitic surface simply through a water treatment technique. This approach significantly inhibits the hydrocarbon adsorption rate by a factor of ca. 20×, thus maintaining the intrinsic wetting behavior for many hours upon air exposure. Follow-up characterization shows that a nanometer-thick ice-like water forms on the graphitic surface, which remains stabilized at room temperature for at least 2-3 h and thus significantly decreases the adsorption of airborne hydrocarbon on the graphitic surface. This method has potential implications in minimizing hydrocarbon contamination during manufacturing, characterization, processing, and storage of graphene/graphite-based devices. As an example, we show that a water-treated graphite electrode maintains a high level of electrochemical activity in air for up to 1 day. PMID:26673269

  8. Nitrate reducing activity pervades surface waters during upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Halarnekar, Reena; Malik, Ashish; Vijayan, Vijitha; Varik, Sandesh; Kumari, Ritu; V. K., Jineesh; Gauns, Manguesh U.; Nair, Shanta; LokaBharathi, P. A.

    2014-09-01

    Nitrate reducing activity (NRA) is known to be mediated by microaerophilic to anaerobic bacteria and generally occurs in the sub-surface waters. However, we hypothesize that NRA could become prominent in the surface waters during upwelling. Hence, we examined nitrification and nitrate reduction along with hydrographic and environmental parameters off Trivandrum and Kochi, south-west-India in June 2010. Shoaling isolines of temperature, density, and nutrients revealed the onset of upwelling off Trivandrum. Shoaling of these signatures was absent in the northern transect off Kochi. The degree of nutrient consumption (DNC) was low emphasizing the presence of newly upwelled water off Trivandrum. A significant increase in NRA (df = 1, p < 0.05) was observed off Trivandrum than at Kochi. Moreover, as hypothesized, NRA at Trivandrum was pronounced at the surface with a maximum rate of 0.85 (± 0.02) μmol L1 h- 1 nearshore which was ~ 29 × higher than that at Kochi. Further, an inverse relationship between NRA and NO3- concentration (n = 34, r = - 0.415, p < 0.01) suggested transformation of the upwelled nutrient. Nitrification/NRA was ~ 10 × lower at 0.28 off Trivandrum indicating a discernible shift towards reduction. Such contribution from bacterial activity could be a response towards restoration of homeostasis.

  9. Excess pore water pressure due to ground surface erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn Smith, Stefan; Gagniere, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Erosional unloading is the process whereby surface rocks and soil are removed by external processes, resulting in changes to water pressure within the underlying aquifer. We consider a mathematical model of changes in excess pore water pressure as a result of erosional unloading. Neuzil and Pollock (1983) studied this process in the case where the water table initially coincides with the surface. In contrast, we analyze an ideal aquifer which is initially separated from the ground surface by an unsaturated zone. The model is solved using Laplace Transform methods in conjunction with a boost operator derived by King (1985). The boost operator is used to boost the solution (in the Laplace domain) to a frame of reference moving at constant velocity with respect to the original frame. We use our solution to analyze the evolution of the pressure during erosion of the aquifer itself for small and large erosion rates. We also examine the flux at the upper boundary as a function of time and present a quasi-steady approximation valid for very small erosion rates in the appendix.

  10. ERTS imagery applied to Alaskan coastal problems. [surface water circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F.; Sharma, G. D.; Burbank, D. C.; Burns, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    Along the Alaska coast, surface water circulation is relatively easy to study with ERTS imagery. Highly turbid river water, sea ice, and fluvial ice have proven to be excellent tracers of the surface waters. Sea truth studies in the Gulf of Alaska, Cook Inlet, Bristol Bay, and the Bering Strait area have established the reliability of these tracers. ERTS imagery in the MSS 4 and 5 bands is particularly useful for observing lower concentrations of suspended sediment, while MSS 6 data is best for the most concentrated plumes. Ice features are most clearly seen on MSS 7 imagery; fracture patterns and the movement of specific floes can be used to map circulation in the winter when runoff is restricted, if appropriate allowance is made for wind influence. Current patterns interpreted from satellite data are only two-dimensional, but since most biological activity and pollution are concentrated near the surface, the information developed can be of direct utility. Details of Alaska inshore circulation of importance to coastal engineering, navigation, pollution studies, and fisheries development have been clarified with satellite data. ERTS has made possible the analysis of circulation in many parts of the Alaskan coast.

  11. Oil capture from a water surface by a falling sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Linda; McLaughlin, Clare; Witelski, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    When a spherical particle is dropped from rest into an oil lens that floats on top of a water surface, a portion of the oil adheres to the sphere. Once the sphere comes to rest at the subsurface, the oil forms a pendant drop that remains attached in equilibrium to the sphere effectively removing oil from the water surface. Best fit solutions of the Laplace equation to experimental profiles are used to investigate the parameter dependence of the radius of curvature and the filling and contact angles at the three-phase contact line of the pendant drop for spheres with different wetting properties, densities and radii. The volume of oil captured by a sphere increases with a sphere's mass and diameter. However, lighter and smaller spheres capture more oil relative to their own volume than do heavier and larger spheres (scaling with the sphere mass ~M - 0 . 544) and are thus more efficient at removing oil from a water surface. The authors wish to acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation Grant Nos. DMS-0707755 and DMS-0968252.

  12. Recovery of energetically overexploited urban aquifers using surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Sánchez-Navarro, José Ángel; Mateo Lázaro, Jesús

    2015-12-01

    Shallow aquifers have an important role in reducing greenhouse gases through helping manage the temperature of urban environments. Nevertheless, the uncontrolled rapid use of shallow groundwater resources to heat or cool urban environments can cause thermal pollution that will limit the long term sustainability of the resource. Therefore, there is a need for appropriate mitigation/remediation strategies capable of recovering energetically overexploited aquifers. In this work, a novel remediation strategy based on surface water recharge into aquifers is presented. To evaluate the capabilities of such measures for effective remediation, this strategy is optimized for a management problem raised in the overheated "Urban Alluvial Aquifer of Zaragoza" (Spain). The application of a transient groundwater flow and heat transport model under 512 different mitigation scenarios has enabled to quantify and discuss the magnitude of the remediation effect as a respond to injection rates of surface water, seasonal schedule of the injection and location of injection. The quantification of the relationship between these variables together with the evaluation of the amount of surface water injected per year in each scenario proposed have provided a better understanding of the system processes and an optimal management alternative. This work also makes awareness of the magnitude of the remediation procedure which is in an order of magnitude of tenths of years.

  13. Effective modification of particle surface properties using ultrasonic water mist.

    PubMed

    Genina, Natalja; Räikkönen, Heikki; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Antikainen, Osmo; Siiriä, Simo; Veski, Peep; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to design a new technique to modify particle surface properties and, through that, to improve flowability of poorly flowing drug thiamine hydrochloride and pharmaceutical sugar lactose monohydrate of two different grades. The powdered particles were supplied by a vibratory feeder and exposed to an instantaneous effect of water mist generated from an ultrasound nebulizer. The processed and original powders were evaluated with respect to morphology (scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and spatial filtering technique), flow, and solid state properties. It was found that rapid exposition of pharmaceutical materials by water mist resulted in the improvement of powder technical properties. The evident changes in flowability of coarser lactose were obviously due to smoothing of particle surface and decreasing in the level of fines with very slight increment in particle size. The changes in thiamine powder flow were mainly due to narrowing in particle size distribution where the tendency for better flow of finer lactose was related to surface and size modifications. The aqueous mist application did not cause any alteration of the crystal structures of the studied materials. The proposed water mist treatment technique appears to be a robust, rapid, and promising tool for the improvement of the technological properties of pharmaceutical powders. PMID:19288203

  14. Wavefront modulation of water surface wave by a metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hai-Tao; Cheng, Ying; Wang, Jing-Shi; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-10-01

    We design a planar metasurface to modulate the wavefront of a water surface wave (WSW) on a deep sub-wavelength scale. The metasurface is composed of an array of coiling-up-space units with specially designed parameters, and can take on the work of steering the wavefront when it is pierced into water. Like their acoustic counterparts, the modulation of WSW is ascribed to the gradient phase shift of the coiling-up-space units, which can be perfectly tuned by changing the coiling plate length and channel number inside the units. According to the generalized Snell’s law, negative refraction and ‘driven’ surface mode of WSW are also demonstrated at certain incidences. Specially, the transmitted WSW could be efficiently guided out by linking a symmetrically-corrugated channel in ‘driven’ surface mode. This work may have potential applications in water wave energy extraction and coastal protection. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474162, 11274171, 11274099, and 11204145), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant Nos. 20110091120040 and 20120091110001).

  15. Utilizing an Automated Home-Built Surface Plasmon Resonance Apparatus to Investigate How Water Interacts with a Hydrophobic Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poynor, Adele

    2011-03-01

    By definition hydrophobic substances hate water. Water placed on a hydrophobic surface will form a drop in order to minimize its contact area. What happens when water is forced into contact with a hydrophobic surface? One theory is that an ultra-thin low- density region forms near the surface. We have employed an automated home-built Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) apparatus to investigate this boundary.

  16. Mean surface water balance over Africa and its interannual variability

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, S.E.; Kim, J.; Ba, M.B.; Lare, A.R.

    1997-12-01

    This article presents calculations of surface water balance for the African continent using a revised version of the Lettau climatonomy. Calculations are based on approximately 1400 rainfall stations, with records generally covering 60 yr or longer. Continental maps of evapotranspiration. runoff, and soil moisture are derived for January, July, and the annual mean. The model is also used to provide a gross estimate of the interannual variability of these parameters over most of the continent and local water balance calculations for a variety of locations in Africa. The results are compared with four other comprehensive global water balance studies. The results of this study are being used to produce a gridded dataset for the continent, with potential applications for numerical modeling studies. 50 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Sea ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F. (Principal Investigator); Sharma, G. D.; Burns, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Sediments contributed by the Copper River in the Gulf of Alaska are carried westward along the shore as a distinct plume. Oceanic water relatively poor in suspended material appears to intrude near Montague Island, and turbid water between Middleton Island and Kayak Island is the result of Ekman between transport. An anticlockwise surface water circulation is observed in this region. Ground truth data indicate striking similarity with ERTS-1 imagery obtained on October 12, 1972. Observations of ERTS-1 imagery reveal that various characteristics and distribution of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean can be easily studied. Formation of different types of sea ice and their movement is quite discrenible. Sea ice moves parallel to the cost in near shore areas and to the northerly direction away from the coast.

  18. Evaporating behaviors of water droplet on superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, PengFei; Lv, CunJing; He, Feng

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the dynamic evaporating behaviors of water droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces with micropillars. Our experimental data showed that receding contact angles of the water droplet increased with the decreasing of the scale of the micropillars during evaporation, even though the solid area fractions of the microstructured substrates remained constant. We also experimentally found that the critical contact diameters of the transition between the Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel states are affected not only by the geometrical parameters of the microstructures, but also by the initial volume of the water droplet. The measured critical pressure is consistent with the theoretical model, which validated the pressure-induced impalement mechanism for the wetting state transition.

  19. Sea, ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, G. D.; Wright, F. F.; Burns, J. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery has been extremely useful in understanding the tidal water movements in a large estuary such as Cook Inlet. As more imagery obtained during various tidal stages become available it appears that complex and fast changing micro-circulation patterns develop in various regions of Cook Inlet during each advancing and receding tide. More ERTS-1 synoptic imagery is needed to fully understand the effect of the approach of tidal front on the water movements in the various regions through the estuary. The conventional onboard ship data gathered during various cruises although revealed the overall circulation pattern in Cook Inlet but failed to show micro-subgyres which develop in various regions during each tide which are discernible on ther ERTS-1 imagery. Suspended load distribution in the Bering Sea during summer varies significantly. In areas of phytoplankton bloom and at the river mouths the suspended load is higher than the 1 mg/1 which is found over most areas. The influence of major rivers on temperature, salinity, and suspended load in surface water as well as at shallow depth is apparent. On the Bering shelf a strong pycnocline generally at depth 10-20 m is formed by surface fresh water flow which retains sediment in suspension over extended periods.

  20. Reconnaissance of selected PPCP compounds in Costa Rican surface waters.

    PubMed

    Spongberg, Alison L; Witter, Jason D; Acuña, Jenaro; Vargas, José; Murillo, Manuel; Umaña, Gerardo; Gómez, Eddy; Perez, Greivin

    2011-12-15

    Eighty-six water samples were collected in early 2009 from Costa Rican surface water and coastal locations for the analysis of 34 pharmaceutical and personal care product compounds (PPCPs). Sampling sites included areas receiving treated and untreated wastewaters, and urban and rural runoff. PPCPs were analyzed using a combination of solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The five most frequently detected compounds were doxycycline (77%), sulfadimethoxine (43%), salicylic acid (41%), triclosan (34%) and caffeine (29%). Caffeine had the maximum concentration of 1.1 mg L(-1), possibly due to coffee bean production facilities upstream. Other compounds found in high concentrations include: doxycycline (74 μg L(-1)), ibuprofen (37 μg L(-1)), gemfibrozil (17 μg L(-1)), acetominophen (13 μg L(-1)) and ketoprofen (10 μg L(-1)). The wastewater effluent collected from an oxidation pond had similar detection and concentrations of compounds compared to other studies reported in the literature. Waters receiving runoff from a nearby hospital showed higher concentrations than other areas for many PPCPs. Both caffeine and carbamazepine were found in low frequency compared to other studies, likely due to enhanced degradation and low usage, respectively. Overall concentrations of PPCPs in surface waters of Costa Rica are inline with currently reported occurrence data from around the world, with the exception of doxycycline. PMID:22048020

  1. Identification and characterization of a goose-type lysozyme from sewage snail Physa acuta.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yunhai; He, Hongxuan

    2014-08-01

    Freshwater snail Physa acuta has been considered as an important invasive species and medical mollusc. Field investigation has shown that this snail could survive better than other snails in polluted water bodies. To understand the immune mechanisms of P. acuta, suppression subtractive hybridization hepatopancreas cDNA library has been constructed with bacterial challenge. In this study, a full-length cDNA of a novel goose-type lysozyme (PALysG) has been identified from P. acuta by EST and RACE technique. The conservative structure domains share high homology with other molluscan g-type lysozymes including the SLT domain, the substrate binding sites, the catalytic residues, three alpha-helices structures and six molluscan specific cysteines. Meanwhile, PALysG is the first record of goose-type lysozyme in Gastropoda. Real-time PCR indicated that PALysG mRNA had been expressed significantly at high levels in hepatopancreas for 8-48 h. PALysG recombinant protein displayed the lytic activity of g-type lysozyme with other organisms against Micrococcus lysodikicus. PMID:24882016

  2. Adjustment of metabolite composition in the haemolymph to seasonal variations in the land snail Helix pomatia.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, Annegret; Filser, Juliane; Lenz, Roman; Bertrand, Carole; Charrier, Maryvonne

    2011-05-01

    In temperate regions, land snails are subjected to subzero temperatures in winter and hot temperatures often associated to drought in summer. The response to these environmental factors is usually a state of inactivity, hibernation and aestivation, respectively, in a temperature and humidity buffered refuge, accompanied by physiological adjustments to resist cold or heat stress. We investigated how environmental factors in the microhabitat and body condition influence the metabolite composition of haemolymph of the endangered species Helix pomatia. We used UPLC and GC-MS techniques and analyzed annual biochemical variations in a multivariate model. Hibernation and activity months differed in metabolite composition. Snails used photoperiod as cue for seasonal climatic variations to initiate a physiological state and were also highly sensitive to temperature variations, therefore constantly adjusting their physiological processes. Galactose levels gave evidence for the persistence of metabolic activity with energy expenditure during hibernation and for high reproductive activity in June. Triglycerides accumulated prior to hibernation might act as cryoprotectants or energy reserves. During the last month of hibernation snails activated physiological processes related to arousal. During activity, protein metabolism was reflected by high amino acid level. An exceptional aestivation period was observed in April giving evidence for heat stress responses, like the protection of cells from dehydration by polyols and saccharides, the membrane stabilization by cholesterol and enhanced metabolism using the anaerobic succinic acid pathway to sustain costly stress responses. In conclusion, physiological adjustments to environmental variations in Helix pomatia involve water loss regulation, cryoprotectant or heatprotectant accumulation. PMID:21136264

  3. Distribution and abundance of the Japanese snail, Viviparus japonicus, and associated macrobenthos in Sandusky Bay, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfert, David R.; Hiltunen, Jarl K.

    1968-01-01

    A survey of the macrobenthos of Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie, in June, 1963, provided information on the abundance and distribution of the introduced Japanese snail, Viviparus japonicus, which has become a nuisance to commercial seine fishermen. The abundance and distribution varied considerably within the bay; at the time of the survey, most snails were found near the north-central shore. Environmental characteristics were nearly uniform and had no apparent effect on the distribution; concentrations in different areas at different times appeared to result from water movements induced by winds. The time of the study coincided with a period of reproduction; young-of-the-year snails were most abundant in areas where adults were most common. The frequency distributions of shell height and diameter suggested the presence of two age groups of adults in the population. Considerable natural mortality was seen, both at the time of the study and in other seasons. Only three other gastropods were observed in the bay; the most abundant was another viviparid, Campeloma decisum. Other mollusks present were four species of Sphaeriidae and 18 species of Unionidae. A summary of invertebrates found, other than the mollusks, is also presented.

  4. Lectin-binding glycoproteins in the developing and adult snail CNS.

    PubMed

    Serfozo, Zoltán; Elekes, Károly

    2009-12-01

    Glycoproteins are complex molecules of the cell surface and the extracellular matrix (ECM) playing a fundamental role in the migration, guidance and synapse formation of neurons. In the present study, the glycosylated protein composition and localization were investigated in the adult and developing CNS of an aquatic (Lymnaea stagnalis) and a terrestrial (Helix pomatia) snail species, applying lectin histochemistry and blotting. Lectin probes that are specific for N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) oligomers frequently appeared in anatomically different regions of the adult ganglia of both species, such as, the periganglionic sheath, the interperikaryonal space and the neuropil. Different GlcNAc residues were found to intensively glycosylate five, high-molecular weight proteins characteristic for the ECM of Lymnaea CNS and localized mainly in the interperikaryonal space. N-acetyl-galactosamine oligomers were less pronounced in the adult snail ganglia, they were detected only in the periganglionic sheath and the attached basement lamina. Apart from some similarities, the glycosylation pattern of proteins and the distribution of glycoproteins in the neuropil displayed significant differences in Lymnaea and Helix. All continuous and increasing level of and also transient presence of glycoproteins were detected during Lymnaea CNS development. Our results indicate a rich glycosylated pattern of specific proteins in the snail CNS, displaying remarkable species- and age-dependent changes which suggest the wide importance of protein glycosylation in the CNS of invertebrates. PMID:19916020

  5. Remote sensing of surface water for environmental flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulbure, M. G.; Kingsford, R.; Lucas, R.; Keith, D.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental flows represent water management activities that release flushes of water stored in dams on regulated rivers during dry periods. These flows aim to mimic natural flow and inundation regimes to maintain ecological health and function of rivers and wetlands. Assessment and understanding of the effectiveness of environmental flows requires quantification of temporal and spatial pattern of surface water and inundation dynamic in a synoptic yet detailed way and understanding dynamics of vegetation response to flooding. Here we focused on the on the entire Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia as a case study. The MDB is a large semi-arid region with scarce water resources, high hydroclimatic variability and competing water demands, impacted by climate change, altered flow regimes and land use changes. Th