Sample records for surface-subsurface biogeochemical coupling

  1. Quantifying the surface subsurface biogeochemical coupling during the VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Gall, Mark P.; Silver, Mary W.; Coale, Susan L.; Bidigare, Robert R.; Bishop, James L. K. B.

    2008-07-01

    A central question addressed by the VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) study was 'What controls the efficiency of particle export between the surface and subsurface ocean'? Here, we present data from sites at ALOHA (N Central Pacific Gyre) and K2 (NW subarctic Pacific) on phytoplankton processes, and relate them via a simple planktonic foodweb model, to subsurface particle export (150-500 m). Three key factors enable quantification of the surface-subsurface coupling: a sampling design to overcome the temporal lag and spatial displacement between surface and subsurface processes; data on the size partitioning of net primary production (NPP) and subsequent transformations prior to export; estimates of the ratio of algal- to faecal-mediated vertical export flux. At ALOHA, phytoplankton were characterized by low stocks, NPP, Fv/ Fm (N-limited), and were dominated by picoplankton. The HNLC waters at K2 were characterized by both two-fold changes in NPP and floristic shifts (high to low proportion of diatoms) between deployment 1 and 2. Prediction of export exiting the euphotic zone was based on size partitioning of NPP, a copepod-dominated foodweb and a ratio of 0.2 (ALOHA) and 0.1 (K2) for algal:faecal particle flux. Predicted export was 20-22 mg POC m -2 d -1 at ALOHA (i.e. 10-11% NPP (0-125 m); 1.1-1.2×export flux at 150 m ( E150). At K2, export was 111 mg C m -2 d -1 (21% NPP (0-50 m); 1.8× E150) and 33 mg POC m -2 d -1 (11% NPP, 0-55 m); 1.4× E150) for deployments 1 and 2, respectively. This decrease in predicted export at K2 matches the observed trend for E150. Also, the low attenuation of export flux from 60 to 150 m is consistent with that between 150 and 500 m. This strong surface-subsurface coupling suggests that phytoplankton productivity and floristics play a key role at K2 in setting export flux, and moreover that pelagic particle transformations by grazers strongly influence to what extent sinking particles are further broken down in the underlying waters of the Twilight Zone.

  2. A Coupled Surface/Subsurface Model for Hydrological Drought Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musuuza, J. L.; Kumar, R.; Samaniego, L. E.; Fischer, T.; Kolditz, O.; Attinger, S.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrological droughts occur when storage in the ground and surface-water bodies falls below statistical average. Due to the inclusion of regional groundwater, hydrological droughts evolve relatively slowly. The atmospheric and surface components of the hydrological cycle have been widely studied, are well understood, and their prognoses are fairly accurate. In large-scale land surface models on the other hand, subsurface (groundwater) flow processes are usually assumed unidirectional and limited to the vertically-downward percolation and the horizontal runoffs. The vertical feedback from groundwater to the unsaturated zone as well as the groundwater recharge from surface waters are usually misrepresented, resulting in poor model performance during low-flow periods. The feedback is important during meteorological droughts because it replenishes soil moisture from ground- and surface water, thereby delaying the onset of agricultural droughts. If sustained for long periods however, the depletion can significantly reduce surface and subsurface storage and lead to severe hydrological droughts. We hypothesise that an explicit incorporation of the groundwater component into an existing land surface model would lead to better representation of low flows, which is critical for drought analyses. It would also improve the model performance during low-flow periods. For this purpose, we coupled the process-based mHM surface model (Samaniego et al. 2010) with MODFLOW (Harbaugh 2005) to analyse droughts in the Unstrut catchment, one of the tributaries of the Elbe. The catchment is located in one of the most drought-prone areas of Germany. We present results for stand-alone and coupled mHM simulations for the period 1970-2000. References Arlen W. Harbaugh. MODFLOW-2005, The U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-water Model-the Ground-water Flow Process, chapter Modelling techniques, sec. A. Ground water, pages 1:1-9:62. USGS, 2005. Luis Samaniego, Rohini Kumar, and Sabine Attinger. Multiscale parameter regionalization of a grid-based hydrologic model at the mesoscale. Water Resour. Res., 46(W05523), 2010. doi: 10.1029/2008WR007327.

  3. External iterative coupling strategy for surface-subsurface flow calculations in surface irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coupling the unsteady open-channel flow equations of surface irrigation with the equation of variably saturated porous media flow is a computationally complex problem, because of the dependence of infiltration on flow depths. Several models of this coupled process have been developed, all of which ...

  4. Modelling the effects of tides and storm surges on coastal aquifers using a coupled surface-subsurface approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Graf, Thomas; Herold, Maria; Ptak, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Coastal aquifers are complex hydrologic systems because many physical processes interact: (i) variably saturated flow, (ii) spatial-temporal fluid density variations, (iii) tidal fluctuations, (iv) storm surges overtopping dykes, and (v) surface runoff of storm water. The HydroGeoSphere model is used to numerically simulate coastal flow dynamics, assuming a fully coupled surface-subsurface approach, accounting for all processes listed above. The diffusive wave approximation of the St. Venant equation is used to describe surface flow. Surface flow and salt transport are fully coupled with subsurficial variably saturated, variable-density flow and salt transport through mathematical terms that represent exchange of fluid mass and solute mass, respectively. Tides and storm surges induce a time-variant head that is applied to nodes of the surface domain. The approach is applied to real cases of tide and storm surge events. Tide simulation results confirm the existence of a recirculating zone, forming beneath the upper part of the intertidal zone. By monitoring the exchange fluid flux rates through the beach, it was found that the major inflow to the aquifer takes place at the upper part of the intertidal zone, which explains the formation of the recirculating zone. The recirculating zone is forming particularly during rising tide. Results from a storm surge simulation show that plume fingers develop below the flooded land surface. Natural remediation by seaward flowing freshwater is relatively slow, such that reducing the salt concentration in the aquifer down to drinking water standards takes up to 10 years.

  5. Progress Towards Coupled Simulation of Surface/Subsurface Hydrologic Processes and Terrestrial Ecosystem Dynamics Using the Community Models PFLOTRAN and CLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. T.; Bisht, G.; Karra, S.; Hoffman, F. M.; Hammond, G. E.; Kumar, J.; Painter, S.; Thornton, P. E.; Lichtner, P. C.

    2012-12-01

    Accurately simulating regional water cycle dynamics is challenging because of strong soil moisture-rainfall feedbacks and large uncertainties associated with vegetation and energy interactions. Earth system models of today cannot accurately capture such interactions, because current-generation land surface models (LSMs) 1) do not explicitly represent the fine-scale spatial variability of topography, soils, and vegetation that play a significant role in determining the response of hydrologic states (soil moisture) and fluxes (interception, infiltration, runoff, evapotranspiration) and 2) over-simplify or completely omit some key physical processes, such as lateral flow of water and heat, surface-subsurface interactions, realistic groundwater-vadose zone interactions, and freeze-thaw dynamics. Capturing such processes is critically important for predicting regional precipitation, vegetation productivity, and the disposition of carbon stored in potentially vulnerable permafrost under scenarios of climate change. Towards this end, we have added coupled surface water-groundwater interactions to the the open-source, massively parallel flow and reactive transport model PFLOTRAN, and have been developing a framework for coupling PFLOTRAN with the Community Land Model (CLM). PFLOTRAN is an open-source (LGPL-licensed) code -- with a growing community of users -- developed for simulation of multiscale, multiphase, multicomponent subsurface flow and reactive transport problems on machines ranging from laptops to leadership-class supercomputers. It has been applied in studies of contaminant fate and transport, geologic CO2 sequestration, and geothermal energy production, among others, and has been run using up to 262,144 processor cores on Jaguar, the Cray XK6 supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We have recently added a surface flow component in PFLOTRAN that is integrated with the subsurface. The underlying solver framework employed allows significant flexibility in how the governing equations are solved, and we will compare different surface flow formulations as well as coupling strategies between the surface and subsurface domains. Additionally, for studies of hydrology in Arctic regions, we have added a three-phase ice model. We will present some demonstrations of this capability and discuss solver strategies for handling the strong nonlinearities that arise. To provide a unified treatment of the unsaturated and saturated zones and to enable lateral redistribution of soil moisture (and eventually surface water, heat, and nutrients) in regional climate models, we have developed an approach for coupling PFLOTRAN with CLM. CLM is the global land model component used within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) to simulate an extensive set of biogeophysical and biogeochemical processes occurring at or near the terrestrial surface. We will describe our approach for replacing the existing CLM hydrology using PFLOTRAN and present some preliminary simulations undertaken with the CLM-PFLOTRAN coupled model.

  6. Darcy multi-domain approach for coupling surface-subsurface flows: application to benchmark problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugler, Claude; Mouche, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    A fully integrated coupling between surface and subsurface flows has been implemented during these last years (Weill et al., J. Hydrol., 2009). This model unifies the Richards and the diffusive wave equations into a single generalized Richards equation defined in a single domain composed of surface and subsurface subdomains. The unified equation is solved with a Picard iterative scheme in the Cast3M numerical framework (www-cast3m.cea.fr). This model has been applied successfully to 2D configurations (Abdul and Gilham, Water Resour. Res. 1984; Ogden and Watts, Water Resour. Res. 2000). It also allowed us to simulate several theoretical benchmark test cases involving the runoff production by excess saturation or by excess infiltration, and the runon-runoff processes on a heterogeneous soil (Kollet and Maxwell, Adv. Water Res. 2006; Sulis et al., Adv. Water Res. 2010, Maxwell et al., Water Resour. Res. 2014). We will present our last simulation results of benchmark problems proposed by S.J. Kollet and R.M. Maxwell during the 2nd Integrated Hydrologic Model Intercomparison Workshop which was held at the University of Bonn on June 2013: the 3D tilted V-catchment and the Super-slab case.

  7. Darcy multi-domain approach for coupling surface-subsurface flows: application to heterogeneous configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugler, Claude; Mouche, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    A fully integrated coupling between surface and subsurface flows has been implemented during these last years (Weill et al., J. Hydrol. 2009). This model unifies the Richards and the diffusive wave equations into a single generalized Richards equation defined in a single domain composed of surface and subsurface subdomains. The unified equation is solved with a Picard iterative scheme in the Cast3M numerical framework (www-cast3m.cea.fr). This model has been applied successfully to 2D configurations (Abdul and Gilham, Water Resour. Res. 1984; Ogden and Watts, Water Resour. Res. 2000). It also allowed us to simulate several theoretical benchmark test cases involving the runoff production by excess saturation or by excess infiltration, and the runon-runoff processes on a heterogeneous soil (Kollet and Maxwell, Adv. Water Resour. 2006; Sulis et al., Adv. Water Resour. 2010). However, the model must still be improved to simulate 3D configurations (Govindaraju and Kavvas, Water Resour. Res. 1991; Panday and Huyakorn, Adv. Water Resour. 2004). We will show the developments performed to simulate such configurations.

  8. Adaptive Coupled Physical and Biogeochemical Ocean Predictions: A Conceptual Basis

    E-print Network

    Robinson, Allan R.

    Adaptive Coupled Physical and Biogeochemical Ocean Predictions: A Conceptual Basis P of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, U.S.A. Abstract. Physical and biogeochemical ocean dynamics can be inter- mittent and highly variable, and involve interactions on multiple scales. In general, the oceanic fields

  9. Measuring groundwater flow at the Sanford Laboratory with coupled surface/subsurface time-lapse gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Murdoch, L.; Long, A. J.; Koth, K.

    2011-12-01

    Limited options exist to measure groundwater processes, particularly at large depths. Coupled time-lapse gravity measurements at the surface and underground are one possibility, but despite recent advances in borehole instruments, no repeat underground gravity measurements of water-mass change have been reported. At the Sanford Laboratory-located at the Homestake Mine in Lead, South Dakota, and site of the proposed Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL)-the U.S. Geological Survey has established a network of 19 surface and 5 underground gravity stations to monitor groundwater-storage change over the projected 20-year existence of the underground laboratory. Continuous pumping is planned to dewater the mine to a depth of 2,500 m; the current pumping regime began in 2007 and current water levels (2011) are at a depth of about 1,700 m. Measurements using a field-portable A-10 absolute gravimeter have been made approximately annually at surface stations since 2007. Underground stations forming a vertical profile along the Ross Shaft on the 300, 800, 2000, 4100, and 4850 levels (numbers indicate approximate depth in feet) were established in 2011, and it is expected all stations will be surveyed annually. To date, surface time-lapse measurements show gravity increases of 50 to 100 nm/s^2 (10 nm/s^2 = 1 microgal) at some stations and equivalent decreases at others, indicating little evidence of water-mass change from pumping. Preliminary modeling, in which the dewatered zone is represented by a series of horizontal prisms that undergo mass change equal to the porosity (assumed 0.005, an average of rock porosity and mined-out voids), indicates that this is the expected result. At pumping rates required to maintain drawdown to a depth of 2,500 m, however, the expected gravity change increases from about 50 nm/s^2 at the surface to 250 nm/s^2 at the 4850 level. Gravity stations in the subsurface are advantageous because they are both closer to the water-mass change from pumping and removed from water-mass change at the surface caused by inter-annual climate variability. Furthermore, the predicted gravity response varies along the vertical profile depending on the distribution of water-mass change in the deep subsurface, indicating the subsurface measurements will be useful for calibrating and validating a groundwater flow model. A tunnel on the 300 level that traverses beneath a forested hillslope and exits at the land surface is a significant future opportunity for monitoring hydrologic processes; concurrent surface and subsurface gravity profiles above and below this hillslope, combined with other measurements, would likely lead to new advances in hillslope-scale hydrology.

  10. A 3-D variational assimilation scheme in coupled transport-biogeochemical models: Forecast of Mediterranean biogeochemical properties

    PubMed Central

    Teruzzi, Anna; Dobricic, Srdjan; Solidoro, Cosimo; Cossarini, Gianpiero

    2014-01-01

    [1] Increasing attention is dedicated to the implementation of suitable marine forecast systems for the estimate of the state of the ocean. Within the framework of the European MyOcean infrastructure, the pre-existing short-term Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry operational forecast system has been upgraded by assimilating remotely sensed ocean color data in the coupled transport-biogeochemical model OPATM-BFM using a 3-D variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) procedure. In the present work, the 3D-VAR scheme is used to correct the four phytoplankton functional groups included in the OPATM-BFM in the period July 2007 to September 2008. The 3D-VAR scheme decomposes the error covariance matrix using a sequence of different operators that account separately for vertical covariance, horizontal covariance, and covariance among biogeochemical variables. The assimilation solution is found in a reduced dimensional space, and the innovation for the biogeochemical variables is obtained by the sequential application of the covariance operators. Results show a general improvement in the forecast skill, providing a correction of the basin-scale bias of surface chlorophyll concentration and of the local-scale spatial and temporal dynamics of typical bloom events. Further, analysis of the assimilation skill provides insights into the functioning of the model. The computational costs of the assimilation scheme adopted are low compared to other assimilation techniques, and its modular structure facilitates further developments. The 3D-VAR scheme results especially suitable for implementation within a biogeochemistry operational forecast system.

  11. Simulation of land-atmosphere gaseous exchange using a coupled land surface-biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Riley, W. J.; Perez, T. J.; Pan, L.

    2009-12-01

    It is important to develop and evaluate biogeochemical models that on the one hand represent vegetation and soil dynamics and on the other hand provide energy and water fluxes in a temporal resolution suitable for biogeochemical processes. In this study, we present a consistent coupling between a common land surface model (CLM3.0) and a recently developed biogeochemical model (TOUGHREACT-N). The model TOUGHREACT-N (TR-N) is one of the few process-based models that simulate green house gases fluxes by using an implicit scheme to solve the diffusion equations governing soil heat and water fluxes. By coupling with CLM3.0, we have significantly improved TR-N by including realistic representations of surface water, energy, and momentum exchanges, through the use of improved formulations for soil evaporation, plant transpiration, vegetation growth, and plant nitrogen uptake embedded in CLM3.0. The coupled CLMTR-N model is a first step for a full coupling of land surface and biogeochemical processes. The model is evaluated with measurements of soil temperature, soil water content, and N2O and N2 gaseous emission data from fallow, corn, and forest sites in Venezuela. The results demonstrate that the CLMTR-N model simulates realistic diurnal variation of soil temperature, soil water content, and N gaseous fluxes. For example, mean differences between predicted and observed midday near-surface soil water content were 8, 11, and 4 % in July, August, and September. The sensitivity of the biogeochemical processes and resulting N emissions to variation in environmental drivers is high, which indicates the need to calculate biogeochemical processes in, at least, two hourly time steps using dynamically updated (rather than daily averaged) soil environmental conditions. The development in CLMTR-N of such a complex representation of processes will allow us to characterize relevant processes and simplifications appropriate for regional to global-scale coupled biogeochemical and climate models.

  12. Surface-subsurface model intercomparison: A first set of benchmark results to diagnose integrated hydrology and feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Putti, Mario; Meyerhoff, Steven; Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Ferguson, Ian M.; Ivanov, Valeriy; Kim, Jongho; Kolditz, Olaf; Kollet, Stefan J.; Kumar, Mukesh; Lopez, Sonya; Niu, Jie; Paniconi, Claudio; Park, Young-Jin; Phanikumar, Mantha S.; Shen, Chaopeng; Sudicky, Edward A.; Sulis, Mauro

    2014-02-01

    There are a growing number of large-scale, complex hydrologic models that are capable of simulating integrated surface and subsurface flow. Many are coupled to land-surface energy balance models, biogeochemical and ecological process models, and atmospheric models. Although they are being increasingly applied for hydrologic prediction and environmental understanding, very little formal verification and/or benchmarking of these models has been performed. Here we present the results of an intercomparison study of seven coupled surface-subsurface models based on a series of benchmark problems. All the models simultaneously solve adapted forms of the Richards and shallow water equations, based on fully 3-D or mixed (1-D vadose zone and 2-D groundwater) formulations for subsurface flow and 1-D (rill flow) or 2-D (sheet flow) conceptualizations for surface routing. A range of approaches is used for the solution of the coupled equations, including global implicit, sequential iterative, and asynchronous linking, and various strategies are used to enforce flux and pressure continuity at the surface-subsurface interface. The simulation results show good agreement for the simpler test cases, while the more complicated test cases bring out some of the differences in physical process representations and numerical solution approaches between the models. Benchmarks with more traditional runoff generating mechanisms, such as excess infiltration and saturation, demonstrate more agreement between models, while benchmarks with heterogeneity and complex water table dynamics highlight differences in model formulation. In general, all the models demonstrate the same qualitative behavior, thus building confidence in their use for hydrologic applications.

  13. Study of the oxygen budget of the Black Sea waters using a 3D coupled hydrodynamical–biogeochemical model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Grégoire; G. Lacroix

    2001-01-01

    The ventilation of the Black Sea waters by physical and biogeochemical processes is investigated using the Geohydrodynamics and Environment Research (GHER) laboratory 3D coupled hydrodynamical–biogeochemical model. In particular, the penetration at depth of the winter mixing, the generation of unstable motions by frontal instabilities, the exchanges between the north-western shelf and the open sea along the shelf break, the primary

  14. Exploring the Influence of Topography on Belowground C Processes Using a Coupled Hydrologic-Biogeochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Davis, K. J.; Eissenstat, D. M.; Kaye, J. P.; Duffy, C.; Yu, X.; He, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Belowground carbon processes are affected by soil moisture and soil temperature, but current biogeochemical models are 1-D and cannot resolve topographically driven hill-slope soil moisture patterns, and cannot simulate the nonlinear effects of soil moisture on carbon processes. Coupling spatially-distributed physically-based hydrologic models with biogeochemical models may yield significant improvements in the representation of topographic influence on belowground C processes. We will couple the Flux-PIHM model to the Biome-BGC (BBGC) model. Flux-PIHM is a coupled physically-based land surface hydrologic model, which incorporates a land-surface scheme into the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM). The land surface scheme is adapted from the Noah land surface model. Because PIHM is capable of simulating lateral water flow and deep groundwater, Flux-PIHM is able to represent the link between groundwater and the surface energy balance, as well as the land surface heterogeneities caused by topography. The coupled Flux-PIHM-BBGC model will be tested at the Susquehanna/Shale Hills critical zone observatory (SSHCZO). The abundant observations, including eddy covariance fluxes, soil moisture, groundwater level, sap flux, stream discharge, litterfall, leaf area index, above ground carbon stock, and soil carbon efflux, make SSHCZO an ideal test bed for the coupled model. In the coupled model, each Flux-PIHM model grid will couple a BBGC cell. Flux-PIHM will provide BBGC with soil moisture and soil temperature information, while BBGC provides Flux-PIHM with leaf area index. Preliminary results show that when Biome- BGC is driven by PIHM simulated soil moisture pattern, the simulated soil carbon is clearly impacted by topography.

  15. Effects of Coupled Biogeochemical and Transport Processes on Soil Aggregate-Scale Selenium Speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallud, C. E.; Kausch, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes controlling elemental cycling in soil are heterogeneously distributed due to its complex physical structure. The aggregate scale (mm-cm) is of particular interest due to the sharp transition in pore size between the aggregates themselves and the macropores surrounding them, which can lead to mass-transfer limitations and to chemical gradients over short distances. The objective of this study is to investigate how the coupled transport and biogeochemical processes that occur at the soil-aggregate scale affect selenium speciation and immobilization within soils. We present a combined experimental and modelling study on artificial soil aggregates using a complex, but controlled, setting representative of natural systems. Circumventing byproduct accumulation and substrate exhaustion common in batchs and avoiding the poor physical analogy to soils of homogenously packed columns, our experiments mimic soils using constructed cm-scale aggregates in flow-through reactors, which results in diffusively and advectively controlled regions. A reactive transport model is used to delineate transport regimes, identify reaction zones, and estimate kinetic parameters and reaction rates at the aggregate scale. Model simulations showed extensive intra-aggregate, mm-scale radial variations in selenium distribution, reproducing the trends observed experimentally. Anoxic microzones developed over time within soil aggregates, both under oxic and anoxic conditions. We showed that those chemical gradients are mainly controlled by the coupling and respective importance of transport and microbial selenium reduction. Furthermore, we found that solid-phase concentrations of reduced selenium increased from the advection boundary (macropore) toward the aggregate cores, which would imply that more selenium can be sequestered in soils with larger aggregates. Simulations predict that selenium retention is positively correlated with aggregate size. Overall, this work highlights the importance of the spatial connection between reaction and transport fronts. It points out to the importance of obtaining information on transport-limited, intra-aggregate biogeochemical dynamics to better understand reactive transport of redox-sensitive species in structured soils.

  16. Study of the plankton ecosystem variability using a coupled hydrodynamics biogeochemical modelling in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessouri, Fayçal; Ulses, Caroline; Estournel, Claude; Marsaleix, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean Sea presents a wide variety of trophic regimes since the large and intense spring bloom of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea (NWMS) that follows winter convection to the extreme oligotrophic regions of the South-eastern basin. The Mediterranean Sea displays a strong time variability revealing its high sensitivity to climate and anthropic pressures. In this context, it is crucial to develop tools allowing to understand the evolution of the Mediterranean hydrology and marine ecosystem as a response to external forcing. Numerical coupled hydrodynamic and biogeochemical modelling carefully calibrated in the different regions of the basin is the only tool that can answer this question. However, this important step of calibration is particularly difficult because of the lack of coherent sets of data describing the seasonal evolution of the main parameters characterizing the physical and biogeochemical environment in the different sub-basins. The chlorophyll satellite data from 4km MODIS products, a multiple in situ data from MerMEX MOOSE and DEWEX cruises and Bio-Argo floats from NAOS project are believed to be an opportunity to strongly improve the realism of ecosystem models. The model is a 3D coupled simulation using NemoMed12 for hydrodynamics and ECO 3MS for biogeochemistry and covers the whole Mediterranean Sea and runs at 1/12°. The relevant variables mentioned are phytoplankton, organic and inorganic matters faced to water masses dynamics, over ten years since summer 2003. After a short validation, we will expose two topics: First, through this coupling we quantify the nutrients fluxes across the Mediterranean straits over the years. For example, we found an annual net average around 150 Giga moles NO3 per year at Gibraltar, where we expect low annual fluctuations. In contrast, the Strait of Sicily shows greater annual variability going from 70 to 92 Giga moles NO3 per year. All the fluxes are resumed in a detailed diagram of the transport for organic matters and the nutrients. Second, we described for each basin the particularities with evoking the main dynamics and biogeochemical aspects affecting primary production and export of particulate carbon outside the photic zone.

  17. Evaluation of an operational ocean configuration at 1/12° on the Indonesian seas: Physical/Biogeochemical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, Elodie; Reffray, Guillaume; Gehlen, Marion

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the INDESO (Infrastructure Development of Space Oceanography) project, an operational ocean forecasting center has been developed to monitor the state of the Indonesian seas in terms of circulation, biogeochemistry and fisheries. The forecasting system combines a suite of numerical models connecting physical and biogeochemical parameters to population dynamics of large marine predators. Developed by Mercator Ocean and CLS, the physical/biogeochemical coupled component (INDO12BIO configuration) covers a large region extending from the western Pacific Ocean to the Eastern Indian Ocean at 1/12° resolution. The OPA/NEMO physical ocean model and the PISCES biogeochemical model are coupled in mode "on-line" without degradation in space and time. The operational global ocean forecasting system (1/4°) operated by Mercator Ocean provides the physical forcing while climatological open boundary conditions are prescribed for the biogeochemistry. This poster describes the performances of the INDO12BIO configuration. They are assessed by the evaluation of a reference hindcast simulation covering the last 8 years (2007-2014). Confrontations to satellite, in-situ and climatological observations are commented. Diagnostics are performed on chlorophyll-a, primary production, nutrients and oxygen. The model catches the main characteristics of the biogeochemical tracers in space and time. The seasonal cycle of chlorophyll-a and primary production is in phase with satellite-based products. The northern and southern parts of the archipelago present a distinct seasonal cycle, with higher chlorophyll biomass and production rates in the southern (northern) part during SE (NW) monsoon. Nutrient and oxygen concentrations are correctly reproduced in terms of horizontal and vertical distributions. The biogeochemical content of water masses entering in the archipelago as well as the water mass transformation across the archipelago conserves realistic vertical distribution in Banda sea and at the exit of the archipelago.

  18. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Gwo, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

  19. Coupling Isotopic Fractionation to Multiple-Continuum Reactive Transport Models of Biogeochemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenthal, E. L.; Wanner, C.

    2014-12-01

    Stable isotopic systems often show an unexpected range in observed fractionation factors associated with biogeochemical systems. In particular, the ranges in such isotopic systems as Cr, Ca, Li, and C have often been attributed to kinetic effects as well as different biogeochemical mechanisms. Reactive transport models developed to capture the sub-micron-scale transport and reaction processes within the macroscale system (e.g., biofilm to cm-scale) have been successful in simulating the biogeochemical processes associated with bacterial growth and the resultant changes in pore-fluid chemistry and redox conditions. Once such multicontinuum reactive transport models are extended to include equilibrium and kinetic isotopic fractionation, diffusive transport, and fluid-gas equilibria, it becomes possible to quantitatively interpret the isotopic changes observed in experimental and natural or engineered biogeochemical systems. We combine a solid-solution approach for isotopic substitution in minerals with the multiple-continuum reactive-transport approach to interpret the effective fractionation factor observed in experimental systems. Although such systems often have poorly constrained inputs (such as the equilibrium fractionation factor and many of the parameters associated with bacterial growth), by combining several independent contraints on reaction rates (such as lactate consumption, 13C/12C and 87Sr/86Sr in calcite), the range of possible interpretations can often be greatly narrowed. Here we present examples of the modeling approaches and their application to experimental systems to examine why the observed fractionation factors are often different from the theoretical values.

  20. Three-dimensional approach using two coupled models for description of hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesca, Ina; Kraft, Philipp; Haas, Edwin; Klatt, Steffen; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Frede, Hans-Georg; Breuer, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological and biogeochemical transport through changing landscapes has been well described during the past years in literature. However, the uncertainties of combined water quality and water quantity models are still challenging, both due to a lack in process understanding as well to spatiotemporal heterogeneity of environmental conditions driving the processes. In order to reduce the uncertainty in water quality and runoff predictions at the catchment scale, a variety of different model approaches from empirical-conceptual to fully physical and process based models have been developed. In this study we present a new modelling approach for the investigation of hydrological processes and nutrient cycles, with a focus on nitrogen in a small catchment from Hessen, Germany. A hydrological model based on the model toolbox Catchment Modelling Framework (CMF) has been coupled with the process based biogeochemical model LandscapeDNDC. States, fluxes and parameters are exchanged between the models at high temporal and spatial resolution using the Python scripting language in order to obtain a 3-dimensional model application. The transport of water and nutrients through the catchment is modelled using a 3D Richards/Darcy approach for subsurface fluxes, a kinematic wave approach for surface runoff and a Penman-Monteith based calculation of evapotranspiration. Biogeochemical processes are modelled by Landscape-DNDC, including plant growth and biomass allocation, organic matter mineralisation, nitrification, denitrification and associated nitrous oxide emissions. The interactions and module connectivity between the two coupled models, as well as the model application on a 3.7 km² catchment with the runoff results and nitrogen quantification will be presented in this study.

  1. Study of the Tagus estuarine plume using coupled hydro and biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Nuno; Leitão, Paulo C.; Juliano, Manuela; Mateus, Marcos; Dias, João. Miguel; Neves, Ramiro

    2010-05-01

    Plumes of buoyant water produced by inflow from rivers and estuaries are common on the continental shelf. Buoyancy associated with estuarine waters is a key mediating factor in the transport and transformation of dissolved and particulate materials in coastal margins. The offshore displacement of the plume is influenced greatly by the local alongshore wind, which will tend to advect the plume either offshore or onshore, consistently with the Ekman transport. Other factor affecting the propagation of an estuarine plume is the freshwater inflow on the landward boundary. In this paper, a coupled three-dimensional ocean circulation and biogeochemical model with realistic high and low frequency forcing is used to get insight on how the Tagus River plume responds to wind and freshwater discharge during winter and spring. A nesting approach based on the MOHID numerical system was implemented for the Tagus estuary near shelf. Realistic hindcast simulations were performed, covering a period from January to June 2007. Model results were evaluated using in-situ and satellite imagery data. The numerical model was implemented using a three level nesting model. The model domain includes the whole Portuguese coast, the Tagus estuary near shelf and the Tagus River estuary, using a realistic coastline and bottom topography. River discharge and wind forcing are considered as landward and surface boundary conditions, respectively. Initial ocean stratification is from the MERCATOR solution. Ambient shelf conditions include tidal motion. As a prior validation, models outputs of salinity and water temperature were compared to available data (January 30th and May 30th, 2007) and were found minor differences between model outputs and data. On January 30th, outside the estuary, the model results reveal a stratified water column, presenting salinity stratification of the order of 3-4. The model also reproduces the hydrography for the May 30th observations. In May, near the Tagus mouth, measurements show low salinity stratification (when compared to the January observations). During this month, stratification is mainly due to water temperature. In general, the correlation between water temperature from the model and satellite data, reveals values higher than 0.5 (significant values) for the whole simulation period, presenting high correlations (about 0.8) in January and February, when the plume propagation is mainly controlled by the estuarine discharge. The correlation between the model results of suspended sediments and the satellite data (suspended matter) presents significant values (higher than 0.5) for almost the whole simulation period. On the shelf, near the Tagus mouth, the export of estuarine waters forms a plume which is highly influenced by the geography of the coastline, inducing a plume trajectory very close to shore. Northern winds events cause a displacement of the coastally trapped plume, driving a new offshore plume. The relaxation of the northern wind regime pushes back the coastal jet toward the coast, propagating estuarine water to the north along the coastline. The model was also able to reproduce the effect of the estuary plume over the coastal surface chlorophyll patterns observed remotely and the in situ chlorophyll and nutrient profiles, especially in the periods of low wind intensity. In periods of persistent Northerly winds the effect of the Sintra Mountains Ridge over the wind field tend to be underestimated. This leads to a southerly transport by the model slightly more intense than the one observed remotely.

  2. Coupled physical/biogeochemical modeling including O2-dependent processes in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems: application in the Benguela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, E.; Dadou, I.; Le Vu, B.; Cambon, G.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Machu, E.; Rixen, T.; Kock, A.; Flohr, A.; Paulmier, A.; Lavik, G.

    2013-06-01

    The Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) contribute to one fifth of the global catches in the ocean. Often associated with Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs), EBUS represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N) cycle. Important bioavailable N loss due to denitrification and anammox processes as well as greenhouse gas emissions (e.g, N2O) occur also in these EBUS. However, their dynamics are currently crudely represented in global models. In the climate change context, improving our capability to properly represent these areas is crucial due to anticipated changes in the winds, productivity, and oxygen content. We developed a biogeochemical model (BioEBUS) taking into account the main processes linked with EBUS and associated OMZs. We implemented this model in a 3-D realistic coupled physical/biogeochemical configuration in the Namibian upwelling system (northern Benguela) using the high-resolution hydrodynamic ROMS model. We present here a validation using in situ and satellite data as well as diagnostic metrics and sensitivity analyses of key parameters and N2O parameterizations. The impact of parameter values on the OMZ off Namibia, on N loss, and on N2O concentrations and emissions is detailed. The model realistically reproduces the vertical distribution and seasonal cycle of observed oxygen, nitrate, and chlorophyll a concentrations, and the rates of microbial processes (e.g, NH4+ and NO2- oxidation, NO3- reduction, and anammox) as well. Based on our sensitivity analyses, biogeochemical parameter values associated with organic matter decomposition, vertical sinking, and nitrification play a key role for the low-oxygen water content, N loss, and N2O concentrations in the OMZ. Moreover, the explicit parameterization of both steps of nitrification, ammonium oxidation to nitrate with nitrite as an explicit intermediate, is necessary to improve the representation of microbial activity linked with the OMZ. The simulated minimum oxygen concentrations are driven by the poleward meridional advection of oxygen-depleted waters offshore of a 300 m isobath and by the biogeochemical activity inshore of this isobath, highlighting a spatial shift of dominant processes maintaining the minimum oxygen concentrations off Namibia. In the OMZ off Namibia, the magnitude of N2O outgassing and of N loss is comparable. Anammox contributes to about 20% of total N loss, an estimate lower than currently assumed (up to 50%) for the global ocean.

  3. Coupled physical/biogeochemical modeling including O2-dependent processes in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems: application in the Benguela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, E.; Dadou, I.; Le Vu, B.; Cambon, G.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Machu, E.; Rixen, T.; Kock, A.; Flohr, A.; Paulmier, A.; Lavik, G.

    2012-10-01

    The Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) contribute to one fifth of the global catches in the ocean. Often associated with Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs), EBUS represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N) cycle. Important bioavailable N loss due to denitrification and anammox processes as well as greenhouse gas emissions (e.g, N2O) occur also in these EBUS. However, their dynamics are currently crudely represented in global models. In the climate change context, improving our capability to properly represent these areas is crucial, due to anticipated changes in the winds, productivity, and oxygen content. We developed a biogeochemical model (BioEBUS) taking into account the main processes linked with EBUS and associated OMZs. We implemented this model in a 3-D realistic coupled physical/biogeochemical configuration in the Namibian upwelling system (Northern Benguela) using the high-resolution hydrodynamical model ROMS. We present here a validation using in situ and satellite data as well as diagnostic metrics, and sensitivity analyses of key parameters and N2O parameterizations. The impact of parameter values on the OMZ off Namibia, on N loss, and on N2O concentrations and emissions is detailed. The model realistically reproduces the vertical distribution and seasonal cycle of observed oxygen, nitrate and Chl a concentrations, and the rates of microbial processes (e.g. NH4+ and NO2- oxidation, NO3- reduction and anammox) as well. Based on our sensitivity analyses, biogeochemical parameter values associated with organic matter decomposition, vertical sinking and nitrification play a key role for the low-oxygen water content, N loss and N2O concentrations in the OMZ. Moreover, the importance of both steps of nitrification, ammonium oxidation to nitrate with nitrite as an explicit intermediate, is highlighted to improve the representation of microbial activity linked with OMZ. The simulated minimum oxygen concentrations are driven by the poleward meridional advection of oxygen-depleted waters offshore of 300 m isobath and by the biogeochemical activity inshore of this isobath, highlighting a spatial shift of dominant processes maintaining the minimum oxygen concentrations off Namibia. In the OMZ off Namibia, N2O emissions to the atmosphere are comparable with N loss. Anammox contributes to about 20% of total N loss, an estimate lower than currently assumed (up to 50%) for the global ocean.

  4. A Coupled Ocean General Circulation, Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model of the Global Oceans: Seasonal Distributions of Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Busalacchi, Antonio (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ocean general circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. Biogeochemical processes in the model are determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability. and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms. chlorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Basin scale (greater than 1000 km) model chlorophyll results are in overall agreement with CZCS pigments in many global regions. Seasonal variability observed in the CZCS is also represented in the model. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of imagery are generally in conformance although occasional departures are apparent. Model nitrate distributions agree with in situ data, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The overall agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicates that the model dynamics offer a reasonably realistic simulation of phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on synoptic scales. This is especially true given that initial conditions are homogenous chlorophyll fields. The success of the model in producing a reasonable representation of chlorophyll and nutrient distributions and seasonal variability in the global oceans is attributed to the application of a generalized, processes-driven approach as opposed to regional parameterization and the existence of multiple phytoplankton groups with different physiological and physical properties. These factors enable the model to simultaneously represent many aspects of the great diversity of physical, biological, chemical, and radiative environments encountered in the global oceans.

  5. The CO2 system in the Mediterranean Sea inferred from a 3D coupled physical-biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulses, Caroline; Kessouri, Fayçal; Estournel, Claude; Marsaleix, Patrick; Beuvier, Jonathan; Somot, Samuel; Touratier, Frank; Goyet, Catherine; Coppola, Laurent; Diamond, Emilie; Metzl, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The semi-enclosed Mediterranean Sea characterized by short residence times is considered as a region particularly sensitive to natural and anthropogenic forcing. Due to scarce CO2 measurements in the whole basin, the CO2 system, for instance the air-sea CO2 exchanges and the effects of the increase of atmospheric CO2, are poorly characterized. 3D physical-biogeochemical coupled models are unique tools that can provide integrated view and gain understanding in the temporal and spatial variation of the CO2 system variables (dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, partial pressure of CO2 and pH). An extended version of the biogeochemical model Eco3m-S (Auger et al., 2014), that describes the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and silica, was forced by a regional circulation model (Beuvier et al., 2012) to investigate the CO2 system in the Mediterranean Sea over a 13-years period (2001-2013). First, the quality of the modelling was evaluated through comparisons with satellite and in situ observations collected in the whole basin over the study period (Touratier and Goyet, 2009; 2011 ; Rivaro et al., 2010 ; Pujo-Pay et al., 2011 ; Alvarez et al, 2014). The model reasonably reproduced the various biological regimes (north-western phytoplanctonic bloom regime, oligotrophic eastern regime, etc.) as well as the recorded spatial distribution and temporal variations of the carbonate system variables. The coupled model was then used to estimate the air-sea pCO2 exchanges and the transport of DIC and TA towards the Atlantic Ocean at the Strait of Gibraltar.

  6. Submesoscale physical-biogeochemical coupling across the Ligurian Current (northwestern Mediterranean) using a bio-optical glider

    E-print Network

    Claustre, Hervé

    Mediterranean) using a bio-optical glider Katarzyna Niewiadomska, Herve´ Claustre, Louis Prieur, and Fabrizio d from subsequent glider deployments. Such biogeochemical signatures enable the identification of upward

  7. Coupling between Pentachlorophenol Dechlorination and Soil Redox As Revealed by Stable Carbon Isotope, Microbial Community Structure, and Biogeochemical Data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; He, Yan; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Jianming; Crowley, David

    2015-05-01

    Carbon isotopic analysis and molecular-based methods were used in conjunction with geochemical data sets to assess the dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) when coupled to biogeochemical processes in a mangrove soil having no prior history of anthropogenic contamination. The PCP underwent 96% dechlorination in soil amended with acetate, compared to 21% dehalogenation in control soil. Carbon isotope analysis of residual PCP demonstrated an obvious enrichment of 13C (?C, -3.01±0.1%). Molecular and statistical analyses demonstrated that PCP dechlorination and Fe(III) reduction were synergistically combined electron-accepting processes. Microbial community analysis further suggested that enhanced dechlorination of PCP during Fe(III) reduction was mediated by members of the multifunctional family of Geobacteraceae. In contrast, PCP significantly suppressed the growth of SO4(2-) reducers, which, in turn, facilitated the production of CH4 by diversion of electrons from SO4(2-) reduction to methanogenesis. The integrated data regarding stoichiometric alterations in this study gives direct evidence showing PCP, Fe(III), and SO4(2-) reduction, and CH4 production are coupled microbial processes during changes in soil redox. PMID:25853431

  8. Emergent biological patterns and surface-subsurface interactions at landscape scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pringle, C.M.; Triska, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    In this chapter, we focus on emergent biological patterns in riverine ecosystems at landscape scales resulting from surface-subsurface water interaction. Our objectives are to examine (1) how the balance of physical and chemical factors on the "natural" geologic template affects biological patterns, (2) how natural hydrothermal systems can be used as a model for understanding surface-subsurface interactions and biological patterns in streams, and (3) how anthropogenic influences decouple the stream from the landscape by altering the nature of surface-subsurface water interactions and affecting biological patterns. We conclude with a synthesis and recommendations for further studies.

  9. Coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes controlling variability of nitrogen species in streamflow during autumn in an upland forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Shanley, James B.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Kendall, Carol; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Autumn is a season of dynamic change in forest streams of the northeastern United States due to effects of leaf fall on both hydrology and biogeochemistry. Few studies have explored how interactions of biogeochemical transformations, various nitrogen sources, and catchment flow paths affect stream nitrogen variation during autumn. To provide more information on this critical period, we studied (1) the timing, duration, and magnitude of changes to stream nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and ammonium concentrations; (2) changes in nitrate sources and cycling; and (3) source areas of the landscape that most influence stream nitrogen. We collected samples at higher temporal resolution for a longer duration than typical studies of stream nitrogen during autumn. This sampling scheme encompassed the patterns and extremes that occurred during base flow and stormflow events of autumn. Base flow nitrate concentrations decreased by an order of magnitude from 5.4 to 0.7 µmol L?1 during the week when most leaves fell from deciduous trees. Changes to rates of biogeochemical transformations during autumn base flow explained the low nitrate concentrations; in-stream transformations retained up to 72% of the nitrate that entered a stream reach. A decrease of in-stream nitrification coupled with heterotrophic nitrate cycling were primary factors in the seasonal nitrate decline. The period of low nitrate concentrations ended with a storm event in which stream nitrate concentrations increased by 25-fold. In the ensuing weeks, peak stormflow nitrate concentrations progressively decreased over closely spaced, yet similarly sized events. Most stormflow nitrate originated from nitrification in near-stream areas with occasional, large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate, which has rarely been reported for nonsnowmelt events. A maximum input of 33% unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to the stream occurred during one event. Large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate show direct and rapid effects on forest streams that may be widespread, although undocumented, throughout nitrogen-polluted temperate forests. In contrast to a week-long nitrate decline during peak autumn litterfall, base flow DON concentrations increased after leaf fall and remained high for 2 months. Dissolved organic nitrogen was hydrologically flushed to the stream from riparian soils during stormflow. In contrast to distinct seasonal changes in base flow nitrate and DON concentrations, ammonium concentrations were typically at or below the detection limit, similar to the rest of the year. Our findings reveal couplings among catchment flow paths, nutrient sources, and transformations that control seasonal extremes of stream nitrogen in forested landscapes.

  10. Coupled biogeochemical cycles in riparian zones with contrasting hydrogeomorphic characteristics in the US Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we aims to understand what drives the fate and transport of multiple contaminants sensitive to soil redox condition across hydrogeomorphic (HGM) gradient and evaluate overall biogeochemical functions of riparian zones regarding those contaminants. We conducted monthly field work for 19 consecutive months from November 2009 to May 2011 at three study sites representative for main HGM types at the US Midwest. We collected the parameters from different sources which include field parameters, such as topography, water table depth, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and dissolved oxygen (DO), and groundwater chemistry, such as NH4+, NO3-, PO43-, SO42-, CI- , and Hg and MeHg. Our results demonstrated that seasonal water table fluctuations and groundwater flows characteristics at three sites are strongly affected by their HGM setting. Specifically, the convergence of quick rise of water table, high ORP and sharp decrease in concentrations of NO3- and SO42 from field edge to stream edge (60-90% at LWD and 90% at WR) in spring after snowmelt and early May, which could be explained by that snow melt and early summer rainfall are major drivers of fluctuations of water table, variations of ORP and transport and transformation of contaminants. Riparian zones removed NO3- and SO42- during high water table but released Mercury in summer at both LWD and WR, and sulfate reduction, ammonia production and MeHg production all occurred when ORP and water tables were low in summer. These results might reflect the strong ORP control on these processes at landscape scale. These findings supported our hypothesis. Other findings however contrast to our hypothesis. For instances, unusual high concentrations of nitrate and Hg at WR suggest that the transport and fate of multiple contaminants relate not only to HGM settings but geographic location and land use. Negligible variations of P concentration in groundwater indicate that the transformation of P is not sensitive to soil redox condition, while relatively higher P concentration in surface water suggests that surface runoff may be more responsible for the transport of P. Therefore, the value of this study is that it confirmed the connection of HGM and transport and fate of some contaminants, and also revealed that land use manner plays an important role in aquatic ecosystem sustainability and it should be considered in water resource management.

  11. Control of mass balance error in a detailed model of surface-subsurface flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentini, Marcello; Orlandini, Stefano; Paniconi, Claudio; Putti, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Several process-based catchment-scale hydrologic models have been developed in recent years to describe the interactions and feedbacks between different components of the water cycle, but few studies have considered the sources of coupling error in these models. In this work we analyze the sequential iterative coupling scheme of the distributed model CATHY (CATchment HYdrology) in order to identify the different sources of mass balance error and to examine how these are influenced by topography, hydraulic properties, and atmospheric forcing. A pair of adimensional indices that quantify the degree of coupling and of flux partitioning is presented. Our analysis shows that mass balance errors increase during the flood recession limb because of the exchange of information between surface and subsurface water flow. Surface water propagation is cell centered, while the subsurface flow equation is solved on the vertices of surface cells. Evaluation of surface pressure heads and exchange fluxes is critical on this staggered surface-subsurface mesh, especially during transitions from unsaturated to saturated conditions and vice versa. A modified version of the flux exchange algorithm is introduced that considers the effective availability of water on surface cells. The performance of the model is also improved by introducing a heuristic procedure to control and adapt the time step interval. Starting from numerical stability and convergence constraints, this procedure varies the computational interval as a function of the rate of change of surface saturation via the coupling degree index. A final improvement made to the sequential coupling scheme in CATHY is to solve the surface routing equation after rather than before the subsurface module. We find that the modified version improves the water balance by more than 50% in most of the tests considered for a simple v-shaped catchment. The results so far obtained for the synthetic v-catchment indicate the need for a more comprehensive analysis including real catchments.

  12. Modeling greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient transport in managed arable soils with a fully coupled hydrology-biogeochemical modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Edwin; Klatt, Steffen; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kraft, Philipp; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    The use of mineral nitrogen fertilizer sustains the global food production and therefore the livelihood of human kind. The rise in world population will put pressure on the global agricultural system to increase its productivity leading most likely to an intensification of mineral nitrogen fertilizer use. The fate of excess nitrogen and its distribution within landscapes is manifold. Process knowledge on the site scale has rapidly grown in recent years and models have been developed to simulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in managed ecosystems on the site scale. Despite first regional studies, the carbon and nitrogen cycling on the landscape or catchment scale is not fully understood. In this study we present a newly developed modelling approach by coupling the fully distributed hydrology model CMF (catchment modelling framework) to the process based regional ecosystem model LandscapeDNDC for the investigation of hydrological processes and carbon and nitrogen transport and cycling, with a focus on nutrient displacement and resulting greenhouse gas emissions in various virtual landscapes / catchment to demonstrate the capabilities of the modelling system. The modelling system was applied to simulate water and nutrient transport at the at the Yanting Agro-ecological Experimental Station of Purple Soil, Sichuan province, China. The catchment hosts cypress forests on the outer regions, arable fields on the sloping croplands cultivated with wheat-maize rotations and paddy rice fields in the lowland. The catchment consists of 300 polygons vertically stratified into 10 soil layers. Ecosystem states (soil water content and nutrients) and fluxes (evapotranspiration) are exchanged between the models at high temporal scales (hourly to daily) forming a 3-dimensional model application. The water flux and nutrients transport in the soil is modelled using a 3D Richards/Darcy approach for subsurface fluxes with a kinematic wave approach for surface water runoff and the evapotranspiration is based on Penman-Monteith. Biogeochemical processes are modelled by LandscapeDNDC, including soil microclimate, plant growth and biomass allocation, organic matter mineralisation, nitrification, denitrification, chemodenitrification and methanogenesis producing and consuming soil based greenhouse gases. The model application will present first results of the coupled model to simulate soil based greenhouse gas emissions as well as nitrate discharge from the Yanting catchment. The model application will also present the effects of different management practices (fertilization rates and timings, tilling, residues management) on the redistribution of N surplus within the catchment causing biomass productivity gradients and different levels of indirect N2O emissions along topographical gradients.

  13. Denitrification versus Anammox in the Eastern Tropical Pacific in a high-resolution coupled physical-biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, I.; Oschlies, A.; Gutknecht, E.; Dadou, I.; Garcon, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Eastern Tropical Pacific hosts one of the most productive eastern boundary upwelling of the world oceans, encompassing an extended Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ), which is maintained by sluggish oceanic circulation and high rates of organic matter decomposition consuming dissolved oxygen. This OMZ is also recognized as a major region of marine nitrogen loss, brought about by the two processes denitrification and anammox. The relative importance of these processes has, however, been subject to some debate. Here, we use a high-resolution physical-biogeochemical model (ROMS-BioBus) of the Peruvian upwelling system that has been calibrated to achieve good agreement with observed biogeochemical tracer distributions. By varying biogeochemical model parameters, we specifically construct different model configurations with either anammox or denitrification being the dominant nitrogen loss process. Biogeochemical and physical conditions governing the relative contributions of the two processes in our model are analysed and, by comparison with field data, used to make inferences about the relative contributions of anammox and denitrification in the OMZ off Peru.

  14. Coupled physical and biogeochemical data-driven simulations of Massachusetts Bay in late summer: real-time and postcruise

    E-print Network

    Leonard, John J.

    are assimilated using an optimal interpolation scheme. Within this scheme, an approximate biogeochemical balance and dynamical adjustments are utilized to derive the non-observed ecosystem variables from the observed ones ecosystem; Summer to fall blooms 1. Introduction The Massachusetts Bay Sea Trial I (MBST-98) was conducted

  15. A skill assessment of the biogeochemical model REcoM2 coupled to the Finite Element Sea Ice-Ocean Model (FESOM 1.3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schourup-Kristensen, V.; Sidorenko, D.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.; Völker, C.

    2014-11-01

    In coupled biogeochmical-ocean models, the choice of numerical schemes in the ocean circulation component can have a large influence on the distribution of the biological tracers. Biogeochemical models are traditionally coupled to ocean general circulation models (OGCMs), which are based on dynamical cores employing quasi-regular meshes, and therefore utilize limited spatial resolution in a global setting. An alternative approach is to use an unstructured-mesh ocean model, which allows variable mesh resolution. Here, we present initial results of a coupling between the Finite Element Sea Ice-Ocean Model (FESOM) and the biogeochemical model REcoM2 (Regulated Ecosystem Model 2), with special focus on the Southern Ocean. Surface fields of nutrients, chlorophyll a and net primary production (NPP) were compared to available data sets with a focus on spatial distribution and seasonal cycle. The model produces realistic spatial distributions, especially regarding NPP and chlorophyll a, whereas the iron concentration becomes too low in the Pacific Ocean. The modelled NPP is 32.5 Pg C yr-1 and the export production 6.1 Pg C yr-1, which is lower than satellite-based estimates, mainly due to excessive iron limitation in the Pacific along with too little coastal production. The model performs well in the Southern Ocean, though the assessment here is hindered by the lower availability of observations. The modelled NPP is 3.1 Pg C yr-1 in the Southern Ocean and the export production 1.1 Pg C yr-1. All in all, the combination of a circulation model on an unstructured grid with a biogeochemical-ocean model shows similar performance to other models at non-eddy-permitting resolution. It is well suited for studies of the Southern Ocean, but on the global scale deficiencies in the Pacific Ocean would have to be taken into account.

  16. In situ response of bay productivity to nutrient loading from a small tributary: The Delaware Bay-Murderkill Estuary tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voynova, Yoana G.; Lebaron, Karine C.; Barnes, Rebecca T.; Ullman, William J.

    2015-07-01

    A small, turbid and nutrient-rich tributary, the Murderkill Estuary, and a large estuarine ecosystem, the Delaware Bay, are tightly linked and form an efficient, tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor during the summer. Nitrate loading from the Murderkill Estuary generates an instantaneous increase in biological oxygen production in the adjacent Delaware Bay. We are able to capture this primary production response with continuous hourly measurements of dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and nitrate. The nitrate influxes from the Murderkill support primary production rates in the Delaware Bay margins that are twice as high as the average production rates measured in the central Bay regions. This elevates chlorophyll in the Bay margins in the summer and fuels metabolism. Tidal transport of the newly produced autochthonous chlorophyll particles from the Bay into the Estuary could also provide a source of labile material to the marshes surrounding the Murderkill, thus perhaps fueling marsh respiration. As a consequence of the tidal coupling between Delaware Bay and the Murderkill Estuary, ecosystem productivity and metabolism in the Bay and Estuary are linked, generating an ecosystem feedback mechanism. Storms modulate this tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor, by generating significant nitrate and salinity changes. Depending on their magnitude and duration, storms induce large phytoplankton blooms in the Delaware Bay. Such large phytoplankton blooms may occur more often with climate change, since century-long discharge records document an increase in storm frequency.

  17. A parallel computational framework for integrated surface-subsurface flow and transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Hwang, H.; Sudicky, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    HydroGeoSphere is a 3D control-volume finite element hydrologic model describing fully-integrated surface and subsurface water flow and solute and thermal energy transport. Because the model solves tighly-coupled highly-nonlinear partial differential equations, often applied at regional and continental scales (for example, to analyze the impact of climate change on water resources), high performance computing (HPC) is essential. The target parallelization includes the composition of the Jacobian matrix for the iterative linearization method and the sparse-matrix solver, a preconditioned Bi-CGSTAB. The matrix assembly is parallelized by using a coarse-grained scheme in that the local matrix compositions can be performed independently. The preconditioned Bi-CGSTAB algorithm performs a number of LU substitutions, matrix-vector multiplications, and inner products, where the parallelization of the LU substitution is not trivial. The parallelization of the solver is achieved by partitioning the domain into equal-size subdomains, with an efficient reordering scheme. The computational flow of the Bi-CGSTAB solver is also modified to reduce the parallelization overhead and to be suitable for parallel architectures. The parallelized model is tested on several benchmark simulations which include linear and nonlinear flow problems involving various domain sizes and degrees of hydrologic complexities. The performance is evaluated in terms of computational robustness and efficiency, using standard scaling performance measures. The results of simulation profiling indicate that the efficiency becomes higher with an increasing number of nodes/elements in the mesh, for increasingly nonlinear transient simulations, and with domains of irregular geometry. These characteristics are promising for the large-scale analysis water resources problems involved integrated surface/subsurface flow regimes.

  18. Nitrogen transfers off Walvis Bay: a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical modeling approach in the Namibian upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, E.; Dadou, I.; Marchesiello, P.; Cambon, G.; Le Vu, B.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Machu, E.; Rixen, T.; Kock, A.; Flohr, A.; Paulmier, A.; Lavik, G.

    2013-06-01

    Eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS) are regions of high primary production often associated with oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). They represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N) cycle. By exporting organic matter (OM) and nutrients produced in the coastal region to the open ocean, EBUS can play an important role in sustaining primary production in subtropical gyres. However, losses of fixed inorganic N through denitrification and anammox processes take place in oxygen depleted environments such as EBUS, and can potentially mitigate the role of these regions as a source of N to the open ocean. EBUS can also represent a considerable source of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, affecting the atmospheric budget of N2O. In this paper a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical model (ROMS/BioEBUS) is used to investigate the N budget in the Namibian upwelling system. The main processes linked to EBUS and associated OMZs are taken into account. The study focuses on the northern part of the Benguela upwelling system (BUS), especially the Walvis Bay area (between 22° S and 24° S) where the OMZ is well developed. Fluxes of N off the Walvis Bay area are estimated in order to understand and quantify (1) the total N offshore export from the upwelling area, representing a possible N source that sustains primary production in the South Atlantic subtropical gyre; (2) export production and subsequent losses of fixed N via denitrification and anammox under suboxic conditions (O2 < 25 mmol O2 m-3); and (3) the N2O emission to the atmosphere in the upwelling area. In the mixed layer, the total N offshore export is estimated as 8.5 ± 3.9 × 1010 mol N yr-1 at 10° E off the Walvis Bay area, with a mesoscale contribution of 20%. Extrapolated to the whole BUS, the coastal N source for the subtropical gyre corresponds to 0.1 ± 0.04 mol N m-2 yr-1. This N flux represents a major source of N for the gyre compared with other N sources, and contributes 28% of the new primary production estimated for the South Atlantic subtropical gyre. Export production (16.9 ± 1.3 × 1010 mol N yr-1) helps to maintain an OMZ off Namibia in which coupled nitrification, denitrification and anammox processes lead to losses of fixed N and N2O production. However, neither N losses (0.04 ± 0.025 × 1010 mol N yr-1) nor N2O emissions (0.03 ± 0.002 × 1010 mol N yr-1) significantly impact the main N exports of the Walvis Bay area. The studied area does not significantly contribute to N2O emissions (0.5 to 2.7%) compared to the global coastal upwelling emissions. Locally produced N2O is mostly advected southward by the poleward undercurrent.

  19. Improving surface–subsurface water budgeting using high resolution satellite imagery applied on a brownfield

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Dujardin; O. Batelaan; F. Canters; S. Boel; C. Anibas; J. Bronders

    2011-01-01

    The estimation of surface–subsurface water interactions is complex and highly variable in space and time. It is even more complex when it has to be estimated in urban areas, because of the complex patterns of the land-cover in these areas. In this research a modeling approach with integrated remote sensing analysis has been developed for estimating water fluxes in urban

  20. Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the coupled effects of hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Boyer, E.W.; David, M.B.; Harvey, J.W.; Mulholland, P.J.; Seitzinger, S.P.; Tobias, C.R.; Tonitto, C.; Wollheim, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of lotic systems as sinks for nitrogen inputs is well recognized. A fraction of nitrogen in streamflow is removed to the atmosphere via denitrification with the remainder exported in streamflow as nitrogen loads. At the watershed scale, there is a keen interest in understanding the factors that control the fate of nitrogen throughout the stream channel network, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We use a dynamic stream transport model to assess biogeochemical (nitrate loadings, concentration, temperature) and hydrological (discharge, depth, velocity) effects on reach-scale denitrification and nitrate removal in the river networks of two watersheds having widely differing levels of nitrate enrichment but nearly identical discharges. Stream denitrification is estimated by regression as a nonlinear function of nitrate concentration, streamflow, and temperature, using more than 300 published measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model to characterize nitrate dynamics related to denitrification at a monthly time scale in the stream reaches of the two watersheds. Results indicate that the nitrate removal efficiency of streams, as measured by the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed via denitrification per unit length of channel, is appreciably reduced during months with high discharge and nitrate flux and increases during months of low-discharge and flux. Biogeochemical factors, including land use, nitrate inputs, and stream concentrations, are a major control on reach-scale denitrification, evidenced by the disproportionately lower nitrate removal efficiency in streams of the highly nitrate-enriched watershed as compared with that in similarly sized streams in the less nitrate-enriched watershed. Sensitivity analyses reveal that these important biogeochemical factors and physical hydrological factors contribute nearly equally to seasonal and stream-size related variations in the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed in each watershed. ?? 2008 The Author(s).

  1. Quantifying the dynamic coupling of hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in stream ecosystems: examples from streams in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D. M.; Lyons, W. B.; Gooseff, M. N.; Koch, J. C.; Neupauer, R.; Cozzetto, K.; Bencala, K.; Cullis, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    While continuous monitoring of stream flow and stream temperature has been a widely used resource for some time, currently there is great potential to expand continuous monitoring to include important water quality parameters such as nutrients and dissolved organic material. In many systems distinguishing between watershed and stream ecosystem controls can be challenging, and the usefulness of such monitoring can be enhanced by application of quantitative models to interpret observed patterns. The glacial meltwater streams of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, are surrounded by large expanses of patterned ground devoid of plants. In contrast, many streams have thriving cyanobacterial mats that are freeze-dried through the winter and begin photosynthesis with the onset of flow. Thus, the daily signal in terms of biogeochemical processes controlling water quality is generated within the stream. As part of the McMurdo Dry Valleys Long Term Ecological Research project, we have conducted field experiments and developed coupled biogeochemical transport models for the role of hyporheic exchange in controlling weathering of major ions, microbial cycling of nitrogen species, and streams temperature regulation. We have also adapted modelling approaches from sediment transport to understand mobilization of stream biomass with increasing flows. These models are relevant to understanding the role of in-stream processes in diverse stream systems where watershed processes also contribute to observed patterns.

  2. Significant Findings: Seasonal Distributions of Global Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients With a Coupled Ocean General Circulation, Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model. 2; Comparisons With Satellite and In Situ Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Busalacchi, Antonio (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ocean general circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. Biogeochemical processes in the model were determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability, and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms, chlorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Basin scale (>1000 km) model chlorophyll seasonal distributions were statistically positively correlated with CZCS chlorophyll in 10 of 12 major oceanographic regions, and with SeaWiFS in all 12. Notable disparities in magnitudes occurred, however, in the tropical Pacific, the spring/summer bloom in the Antarctic, autumn in the northern high latitudes, and during the southwest monsoon in the North Indian Ocean. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of satellite and in situ data exhibited broad agreement, although occasional departures were apparent. Model nitrate distributions agreed with in situ data, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The overall agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicated that the model dynamics offer a reasonably realistic simulation of phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on basin and synoptic scales.

  3. Biogeochemical Coupling of Fe and Tc Speciation in Subsurface Sediments: Implications to Long-Term Tc Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Jim K. Fredrickson; C. I. Steefel; R. K. Kukkadapu; S. M. Heald

    2006-06-01

    The project has been focused on biochemical processes in subsurface sediments involving Fe that control the valence state, solubility, and effective mobility of 99Tc. Our goal has been to understand the Tc biogeochemistry as it may occur in suboxic and biostimulated subsurface environments. Two objectives have been pursued: (1) To determine the relative reaction rates of 99Tc(VII)O2(aq) with metal reducing bacteria and biogenic Fe(II); and to characterize the identity, structure, and molecular speciation of Tc(IV) products formed through reaction with both biotic and abiotic reductants. (2) To quantify the biogeochemical factors controlling the reaction rate of O2 with Tc(IV)O2?nH2O in sediment resulting from the direct enzymatic reduction of Tc(VII) by DIRB and/or the reaction of Tc(VII) with the various types of biogenic Fe(II) produced by DIRB.

  4. Using coupled models to study the effects of river discharge on biogeochemical cycling and hypoxia in the northern Gulf Of Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Penta; D. Ko; R. Gould; R. Arnone; R. Greene; J. Lehrter; J. Hagy; B. Schaeffer; M. Murrell; J. Kurtz; B. Herchenroder; R. Green; P. Eldridge

    2009-01-01

    We describe emerging capabilities to understand physical processes and biogeochemical cycles in coastal waters through the use of satellites, numerical models, and ship observations. Emerging capabilities provide significantly improved ability to model ecological systems and the impact of environmental management actions on them. The complex interaction of physical and biogeochemical processes responsible for hypoxic events requires an integrated approach to

  5. Topographic controls on scaling of hydrologic and thermal processes in polygonal ground features of an Arctic ecosystem: A case study using idealized non-isothermal surface-subsurface simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.; Collier, N.; Kumar, J.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic and sub-Arctic soils currently contain approximately 1700 billion metric tones of frozen organic carbon, approximately 200 times current annual anthropogenic emissions. This carbon is vulnerable to release to the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4 as high-latitude temperatures warm. Microtopographic features, such as polygonal ground, are characteristic sources of landscape heterogeneity in the Alaskan Arctic coastal plain. In a future warmer climate, the spatial distribution of soil moisture and active layer depth are expected to be key factors controlling the fate of thawed permafrost carbon. Polygonal ground structures, with high or low centers, dominate the local hydrologic environment, thereby impacting the energy balance, biogeochemical dynamics, vegetation communities, and carbon releases from the subsurface. In spite of their importance to local hydrologic and thermal processes, the impact of these microtopographic features at larger spatial scales is not well understood. Our previous work from isothermal surface-subsurface simulations has indicated that statistical moments of soil moisture follow a non-linear scaling relationship. In this study, we perform surface-subsurface non-isothermal flow simulations using PFLOTRAN for four study sites located near Barrow, AK. Simulations are performed on domains at multiple horizontal resolutions for several years. We describe the statistical moments of simulated soil moisture and soil temperature fields across spatial resolutions.

  6. The Role of Biogeochemical Cycling of Atmosphere-surface Exchangeable Pollutants (ASEPs) in the Dynamic Coupled Human-Natural ASEP System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlinger, J. A.; Urban, N. R.; Obrist, D.; Wu, S.

    2014-12-01

    Thousands of toxic pollutants that we term "atmosphere-surface exchangeable pollutants", or ASEPs, pass readily in both directions between the atmosphere and environmental surfaces and exhibit three characteristic tendencies when emitted to the environment: resistance to rapid degradation, accumulation in organic-rich biotic and abiotic surface reservoirs, and semivolatility causing re-emission to the atmosphere. ASEPs are emitted into the environment in part or in total through human activities, are transported and processed in the environment, and often deposited in locations distant from their original use or release. This characteristic separation of use and harm limits the capacity of communities affected by ASEPs to mitigate them. Incomplete understanding of the dynamic behavior of these pollutants in the environment has resulted in efforts to regulate them that do not fully protect human and ecosystem health from risks. To demonstrate this characteristic separation of use and harm, we compare and contrast the role that biogeochemical cycling plays in the dynamic coupled human-natural ASEP system for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and mercury. We highlight remobilization effects related to land use and climate change, and demonstrate the ecosystem service provided by natural organic matter through sequestration of ASEPs in terrestrial environments.

  7. Quantifying the effects of nutrient loading on dissolved O2 cycling and hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay using a coupled hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Jeremy M.; Li, Yun; Lee, Younjoo J.; Li, Ming; Brady, Damian C.; Di Toro, Dominic M.; Kemp, W. Michael; Fitzpatrick, James J.

    2014-11-01

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) was coupled to a biogeochemical model (RCA) to understand the controls on dissolved oxygen (O2) depletion in Chesapeake Bay. The model was calibrated to observational data in the year 2000 and subsequent simulations were performed for a 10-year period, where water-column state variables were validated against observations using multiple error metrics and model-simulated rate processes were compared to available measurements. ROMS-RCA captured observed seasonal and regional dynamics of water-column chlorophyll-a, dissolved O2, and nutrient concentrations, as well as sediment-water nutrient and oxygen fluxes and community respiration rates, but for the year 2000, the model over-predicted surface-water chlorophyll-a and bottom-water O2 in some regions. A series of model experiments were made using the physical regime for the year 2000 to understand ecosystem responses to altered loads of nitrogen and phosphorus and to quantify the spatial and temporal response of Chesapeake Bay to altered nutrient loading. Nutrient loading experiments revealed a non-linear response of hypoxia to nitrogen load, where hypoxic-volume-days maximized at nitrogen loads twice of that observed in the year 2000. O2 levels were more sensitive to nitrogen loads than phosphorus loads, consistent with the preponderance of nitrogen limitation in Chesapeake Bay in late spring and summer months. Expanded hypoxic volumes under higher nitrogen loads were associated with increases in water-column production and respiration in seaward regions of Chesapeake Bay during summer (June to August) months. Analysis of the 10-year model run with realistic hydrodynamics and nutrient loading revealed a similar pattern, emphasizing phytoplankton growth during summer in more nitrogen-limited, lower-Bay regions as a mechanism supporting elevated summer hypoxic volumes. This analysis (1) presents ROMS-RCA as a tool for investigating linked biogeochemical processes in coastal ecosystems, (2) identifies phytoplankton growth in seaward Bay regions as a key link between nitrogen loading and hypoxic volume, and (3) suggests that given similar climatic conditions, nutrient load reductions will lead to reduced hypoxic volumes.

  8. GIS-based recharge estimation by coupling surface–subsurface water balances

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Batelaan; F. De Smedt

    2007-01-01

    A spatially distributed water balance model is developed to simulate long-term average recharge depending on land cover, soil texture, topography and hydrometeorological parameters. The model simulates recharge iteratively connected to a groundwater model, such that the recharge estimate is also influenced by the groundwater depth and vice versa. Parameter estimation for the model is performed on the basis of literature

  9. Drainflow: a fully distributed integrated surface/subsurface flow model for drainage studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Ali; Bardsley, William Earl

    2015-04-01

    The scale of drainage studies may vary from high-resolution small scale investigations through to comprehensive catchment or regional-scale studies. This wide range of scales poses a significant challenge for the development of a suitable drainage model. To meet this demand, a fully distributed surface/subsurface interactive flow model named henceforth Drainflow has been developed. Drainflow includes both the Saint Venant equations for surface flow components and the Richards equation for saturated and unsaturated zones. To develop the model, surface and subsurface flow modules are formulated separately, then each component is connected to the other parts. All modules simultaneously interact to calculate water level and discharge in tile drains, channel networks, and overland flow. In the subsurface domain, the model also yields soil moisture and water table elevation. A smoothed Heaviside function is introduced to give a continuous transition of the model between Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions for tile drains and surface/subsurface flow interface boundaries. Compared to traditional drainage studies, Drainflow has the advantage of estimating the land surface recharge (LSR) directly from the partial differential Richards equation rather than via an analytical or empirical drainage method like the Green and Ampt equation. To test the model's accuracy, comparisons are made between Drainflow and a range of surface/subsurface flow models for five published integrated surface and subsurface problems. The comparison indicates Drainflow has a reasonably good agreement with the other integrated models. Furthermore, it is shown that the smoothed Heaviside functions technique is a very effective method to overcome the non-linearity problem created from switching between dry and wet boundary conditions. In addition, Drainflow was run for some drainage study examples and was found to be fairly flexible in terms of changing all or part of the model dimensions as required by problem complexity, scale, and data availability. Drainflow can be easily simplified dimensionally or methodologically to a less comprehensive and less complex model if required. This flexibility gives Drainflow the capacity to be modified to meet the specific requirements of the varying scale and boundary conditions often encountered in drainage studies.

  10. Temporal coupling between surface and deep ocean biogeochemical processes in contrasting subtropical and subantarctic water masses, southwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodder, Scott D.; Boyd, Philip W.; Chiswell, Stephen M.; Pinkerton, Matthew H.; Bradford-Grieve, Janet M.; Greig, Malcolm J. N.

    2005-12-01

    Surface to deep-ocean coupling was investigated in subtropical (STW) and subantarctic (SAW) waters off eastern New Zealand. Moorings, comprising a near-surface fluorometer, temperature loggers, current meters, and sediment trap at 1500 m depth, were deployed at 41° and 46°40'S along 178°30'E between October 2000 and October 2001. Locally validated, remotely sensed data provided areal estimates of surface chlorophyll that were representative of 1997-2004 annual cycles. In STW, early spring chlorophyll peaks were coupled with deposition of labile (molar C:N˜7-8), bio-siliceous organic matter. Low winter chlorophyll concentrations were associated with high particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes of moderately refractory material (C:N˜9-10). This indicates that winter flux was affected by heterotrophic recycling processes (zooplankton exuviae, fecal pellets) and/or slowly sinking particles from the preceding autumn. Deep-ocean POC fluxes off New Zealand were similar to global estimates and Tasman Sea (0.8 cf. 1.0 g C m-2 yr-1). Elevated biogenic silica and lithogenic fluxes probably reflect processes within a warm-core eddy near an eroding landmass, rather than STW in general. In SAW, POC and biogenic silica flux peaks occurred in spring with moderate surface chlorophyll concentrations. Decoupling between high chlorophyll and low flux in summer may reflect near-surface organic matter recycling by the microbial-dominated ecosystem. In spring, moderate chlorophyll levels in SAW, high POC and silica flux, and high C:N ratios (9-13) indicate some coupling with upper water column processes. SAW, east of New Zealand, was characterized by low POC (0.2 g C m-2 yr-1), high biogenic silica, and low carbonate fluxes, unlike other subantarctic sites, which are dominated by carbonate deposition with fivefold higher POC flux.

  11. One-Dimensional Coupled Ecosystem-Carbon Flux Model for the Simulation of Biogeochemical Parameters at Ocean Weather Station P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorini, S.; McClain, C.; Christian, J.; Wong, C. S.

    2000-01-01

    In this Technical Publication, we describe the model functionality and analyze its application to the seasonal and interannual variations of phytoplankton, nutrients, pCO2 and CO2 concentrations in the eastern subarctic Pacific at Ocean Weather Station P (OWSP, 50 deg. N 145 deg. W). We use a verified one-dimensional ecosystem model, coupled with newly incorporated carbon flux and carbon chemistry components, to simulate 22 years (1958-1980) of pCO2 and CO2 variability at Ocean Weather Station P (OWS P). This relatively long period of simulation verifies and extends the findings of previous studies using an explicit approach for the biological component and realistic coupling with the carbon flux dynamics. The slow currents and the horizontally homogeneous ocean in the subarctic Pacific make OWS P one of the best available candidates for modeling the chemistry of the upper ocean in one dimension. The chlorophyll and ocean currents composite for 1998 illustrates this premise. The chlorophyll concentration map was derived from SeaWiFS data and the currents are from an OGCM simulation (from R. Murtugudde).

  12. Biogeochemical modelling of the tropical Pacific Ocean. II: Iron biogeochemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Christian; M. A. Verschell; R. Murtugudde; A. J. Busalacchi; C. R. McClain

    2001-01-01

    A coupled physical–biogeochemical model of the tropical Pacific Ocean with simultaneous iron and nitrogen limitation was developed to study questions of iron biogeochemistry, its effects on upper ocean production, and ultimately the biogeochemical cycles of the other elements. The model results suggest that iron limitation is ubiquitous in the equatorial Pacific, and extends further west than is generally believed unless

  13. Improving surface-subsurface water budgeting using high resolution satellite imagery applied on a brownfield.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, J; Batelaan, O; Canters, F; Boel, S; Anibas, C; Bronders, J

    2011-01-15

    The estimation of surface-subsurface water interactions is complex and highly variable in space and time. It is even more complex when it has to be estimated in urban areas, because of the complex patterns of the land-cover in these areas. In this research a modeling approach with integrated remote sensing analysis has been developed for estimating water fluxes in urban environments. The methodology was developed with the aim to simulate fluxes of contaminants from polluted sites. Groundwater pollution in urban environments is linked to patterns of land use and hence it is essential to characterize the land cover in a detail. An object-oriented classification approach applied on high-resolution satellite data has been adopted. To assign the image objects to one of the land-cover classes a multiple layer perceptron approach was adopted (Kappa of 0.86). Groundwater recharge has been simulated using the spatially distributed WetSpass model and the subsurface water flow using MODFLOW in order to identify and budget water fluxes. The developed methodology is applied to a brownfield case site in Vilvoorde, Brussels (Belgium). The obtained land use map has a strong impact on the groundwater recharge, resulting in a high spatial variability. Simulated groundwater fluxes from brownfield to the receiving River Zenne were independently verified by measurements and simulation of groundwater-surface water interaction based on thermal gradients in the river bed. It is concluded that in order to better quantify total fluxes of contaminants from brownfields in the groundwater, remote sensing imagery can be operationally integrated in a modeling procedure. PMID:21112074

  14. Simulating temporal variations of nitrogen losses in river networks with a dynamic transport model unravels the coupled effects of hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Alexander, Richard [U.S. Geological Survey; Bohlke, John [U.S. Geological Survey; Boyer, Elizabeth [Pennsylvania State University; Harvey, Judson [U.S. Geological Survey; Seitzinger, Sybil [Rutgers University; Tobias, Craig [University of North Carolina, Wilmington; Tonitto, Christina [Cornell University; Wollheim, Wilfred [University of New Hampshire

    2009-01-01

    The importance of lotic systems as sinks for nitrogen inputs is well recognized. A fraction of nitrogen in streamflow is removed to the atmosphere via denitrification with the remainder exported in streamflow as nitrogen loads. At the watershed scale, there is a keen interest in understanding the factors that control the fate of nitrogen throughout the stream channel network, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We use a dynamic stream transport model to assess biogeochemical (nitrate loadings, concentration, temperature) and hydrological (discharge, depth, velocity) effects on reach-scale denitrification and nitrate removal in the river networks of two watersheds having widely differing levels of nitrate enrichment but nearly identical discharges. Stream denitrification is estimated by regression as a nonlinear function of nitrate concentration, streamflow, and temperature, using more than 300 published measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model to characterize nitrate dynamics related to denitrification at a monthly time scale in the stream reaches of the two watersheds. Results indicate that the nitrate removal efficiency of streams, as measured by the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed via denitrification per unit length of channel, is appreciably reduced during months with high discharge and nitrate flux and increases during months of low-discharge and flux. Biogeochemical factors, including land use, nitrate inputs, and stream concentrations, are a major control on reach-scale denitrification, evidenced by the disproportionately lower nitrate removal efficiency in streams of the highly nitrate-enriched watershed as compared with that in similarly sized streams in the less nitrate-enriched watershed. Sensitivity analyses reveal that these important biogeochemical factors and physical hydrological factors contribute nearly equally to seasonal and stream-size related variations in the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed in each watershed.

  15. A dynamic marine iron cycle module coupled to the University of Victoria Earth System Model: the Kiel Marine Biogeochemical Model 2 (KMBM2) for UVic 2.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickelsen, L.; Keller, D. P.; Oschlies, A.

    2014-12-01

    Marine biological production and the associated biotic uptake of carbon in many ocean regions depend on the availability of nutrients in the euphotic zone. While large areas are limited by nitrogen and/or phosphorus, the micronutrient iron is considered the main limiting nutrient in the North Pacific, equatorial Pacific and Southern Ocean. Changes in iron availability via changes in atmospheric dust input are discussed to play an important role in glacial/interglacial cycles via climate feedbacks caused by changes in biological ocean carbon sequestration. Although many aspects of the iron cycle remain unknown, its incorporation into marine biogeochemical models is needed to test our current understanding and better constrain its role in the Earth system. In the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic) iron limitation in the ocean was, until now, simulated pragmatically with an iron concentration masking scheme that did not allow a consistent interactive response to perturbations of ocean biogeochemistry or iron cycling sensitivity studies. Here, we replace the iron masking scheme with a dynamic iron cycle and compare the results to available observations and the previous marine biogeochemical model. Sensitivity studies are also conducted with the new model to test the importance of considering the variable solubility of iron in dust deposition, the importance of considering high resolution bathymetry for the sediment release of iron, the effect of scaling the sedimentary iron release with temperature and the sensitivity of the iron cycle to a climate change scenario.

  16. Soil Biogeochemical Cycles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Colin Robins

    This group activity charges students with teaching their colleagues about the biogeochemical cycle of one key soil element (e.g., either C, N, S, P, Ca, or Fe). Students are given a single class period to summarize their knowledge and to develop a lesson that includes (1) an organized, 5-8 minute oral presentation, (2) a graphical, conceptual model of their assigned element's soil-biogeochemical cycle, and (3) a list of discussion questions with which to engage their colleagues on the other teams. A second class session is used to refine and to expand upon the submitted models as necessary.

  17. 5, 6581, 2008 biogeochemical

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 5, 65­81, 2008 Modeling biogeochemical responses to storms M. Fujii and Y. Yamanaka Title Page: a modeling study M. Fujii1 and Y. Yamanaka2,3 1 Sustainability Governance Project, Creative Research. Fujii and Y. Yamanaka Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References Tables Figures Back

  18. Cave Formation: Biogeochemical Cycles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This video explores the role of biogeochemical cycles in the formation of caves. It discusses a radical new theory that identifies sulfuric acid as a cave-forming agent. The video, adapted from a NOVA broadcast, identifies the source of the sulfuric acid, which, unlike carbonic acid, the typical cave-forming agent, does not readily form in nature. The segment is 5 minutes and forty seconds in length.

  19. A Coupled Finite-Volume Model for 2-D Surface and 3-D Subsurface Flows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface-subsurface interactions are an intrinsic component of the hydrologic response within a watershed; therefore, hydrologic modeling tools should consider these interactions to provide reliable predictions, especially during rainfall-runoff processes. This paper presents a fully implicit coupled...

  20. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boano, Fulvio; Harvey, Judson W.; Marion, Andrea; Packman, Aaron I.; Revelli, Roberto; Ridolfi, Luca; Anders, Wörman

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed."

  1. The influence of the groundwater table dynamics on the land surface-subsurface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mostaquimur; Kollet, Stefan; Sulis, Mauro

    2014-05-01

    The terrestrial hydrological cycle comprises complex processes in the subsurface, land surface and atmosphere. These processes interact at different space-time scales, resulting in a non-linear system behavior with two-way feedback between different compartments. In order to understand the overall mechanisms of the hydrological cycle, it is important to study the space-time variance of different processes and their influence on the mass and energy balance components of the coupled water and energy cycles. In this study, the coupled subsurface-land surface model ParFlow.CLM is applied over a ~28,000 km2 model domain encompassing the Rur catchment, Germany, to simulate the fluxes and states of the coupled water and energy cycles. The model is forced by hourly atmospheric data from the COSMO-DE model (numerical weather prediction system of the German Weather Service) over the years 2009 and 2010. The space-time variability in different processes of the coupled water and energy cycles over the Rur catchment has been studied previously using the same modeling platform. The simulation results demonstrate that the land surface is exposed to a dual boundary forcing of the atmosphere and the free groundwater transforming the spatial and temporal structures of both forcings, which is reflected in distinct patterns in the moisture and energy fluxes. In this study, we perform multiple model runs considering different temporal variations in the lower boundary condition (e.g., monthly, seasonally, and yearly) conserving the average spatial heterogeneity to study explicitly the influence of temporal groundwater table dynamics on the land surface mass and energy balance components. Analyzing the model results across different time scales using statistical, geostatistical, and wavelet transform techniques demonstrate that the temporal variation in the lower boundary condition influences the land surface mass and energy balance components, especially under moisture limited conditions. The lower boundary condition is influenced by the processes in the atmosphere, as the variance in the atmospheric forcing affects the groundwater table dynamics after being filtered for smaller scale variability by the land surface and subsurface. The time series analysis suggests that the variability in the lower boundary condition and land surface processes (e.g., evaportanspiration) are generally in phase for a shallow groundwater table, while a phase shift is evident for deeper water tables, which has been discussed in a number of previous studies. Utilizing multi-year simulation results, we test the hypothesis that for increasing phase shifts and amplitudes in water table fluctuations, seasonal impacts of groundwater dynamics on the land surface energy fluxes can be predicted quantitatively at the yearly time scale.

  2. Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State University; Timothy, Ginn R. [University of California Davis; Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

    2013-08-14

    Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 µM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 ?M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5?M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS– by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS– preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ –1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

  3. Multi-constraint calibration of a surface-subsurface-atmosphere model at the catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stisen, Simon; Obel Sonnenborg, Torben; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Koch, Julian; Bircher, Simone; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    A complex distributed numerical modelling framework including both groundwater- surface-water flow and heat flux exchange with the atmosphere, combined with a unique observational data set from the HOBE hydrological observatory in Western Denmark, enables a comprehensive application of multiple independent constraints to the model parameter optimization at the catchment scale (1050 km2). Five independent observational data sets consisting of stream discharge (8 stations), groundwater head (361 stations), latent heat flux (2 stations), soil moisture (28 stations) and remotely sensed land surface temperature (full spatial coverage on 28 days) are the basis for formulating 11 objective functions focussing on bias and RMSE of time series from multiple stations. In contrast to many multiple objective studies, where objective functions essentially originate from the same observational dataset (typically discharge time series), the dataset used in this study enables a truly multi-constraint evaluation of the states and fluxes simulated by the model. A preliminary sensitivity analysis of 35 model parameters reveals that even surface fluxes and states such as soil moisture, heat fluxes and land surface temperatures are highly sensitive to parameters that are typically associated with the groundwater components of the model. This indicates the importance of using fully coupled modelling approaches also in detailed studies of the near surface-atmosphere exchanges. The model parameter optimization, conducted using the gradient based search algorithm in PEST, has been carried out for three separate assumptions of available evaluation data. The first calibration uses only traditional observations of stream discharge and groundwater head, the second uses observations associated mainly with the land surface component, specifically latent heat flux, soil moisture and remotely sensed surface temperature. As a third scenario the model is calibrated using all available observational data sets, and finally each of the calibrated models are evaluated against the observations that were not used during calibration and for all observations for a validation period. The results illustrate the importance of multiple constraints to complex coupled models and the potential consequences of using model predictions of output that the model has not been constrained against. The study also highlights the need to develop spatial model calibration through new spatial performance metrics and new parameterisation and optimization frameworks that explicitly allow the models to improve their spatial pattern predictions while maintaining a reasonable number of free calibration parameters.

  4. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation] [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

    2013-09-30

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  5. Effects of the Tide on the Marine Ecosystem in the Northwestern Pacific Marginal Seas using a 3-dimensional Coupled Physico-Biogeochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyoun-Woo; Kim, Hanna; Kwi So, Jae; Butenschon, Momme; Allen, Icarus

    2014-05-01

    Tide is a crucial factor for the proper simulation of the ocean circulation in the Northwestern Pacific Marginal Seas, especially in the Yellow Sea. The different physical status due to the inclusion (or exclusion) of tide in the coupled ocean physics and biogeochemistry system also produces a different ecosystem. In this study, we have applied 3-dimensional coupled ocean system model based on POLCOMS (Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Coastal Ocean Modelling System) and ERSEM (European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model) to the Northwestern Pacific Marginal Seas and have investigated the influences of the tide in the marine system model on the ecosystem. The model covers the Yellow and the East China Seas (YES), the East/Japan Sea (EJS) and the Okhotsk Sea (OS) as well as the major western boundary currents, the Kuroshio and the Oyashio currents. The effects of tide in the physical system, as expected, are prominent in the YES circulation pattern change in terms of the Changiang Diluted Water (CDW) dispersion path, the Yellow Sea Warm Current (YSWC), the Yellow Sea Bottom Cold Water (YSBCW) distribution as well as local influences driven by tidal mixing. These changes of physical status control the changes of nutrients as well as plankton distributions in the YES. It is noteworthy that the ecosystem in the southern EJS is also highly affected by the lateral transport of different nutrients conditions and changed ecosystem from the YES. The changes of the OS ecosystem and physical status due to the tide are not notable compared to the YES but there are local changes especially in the northern shelf region. It is concluded that the tide is very important not only for the local ecosystem but also for the remote ecosystem, though the local tide seems not so much crucial, if it is linked with the strong tidal regime inflow region.

  6. Numerical simulation of in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons using a coupled model for bio-geochemical reactive transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, I. S.; Molson, J. W.

    2013-05-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) are a major source of groundwater contamination, being a worldwide and well-known problem. Formed by a complex mixture of hundreds of organic compounds (including BTEX - benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes), many of which are toxic and persistent in the subsurface and are capable of creating a serious risk to human health. Several remediation technologies can be used to clean-up PHC contamination. In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and intrinsic bioremediation (IBR) are two promising techniques that can be applied in this case. However, the interaction of these processes with the background aquifer geochemistry and the design of an efficient treatment presents a challenge. Here we show the development and application of BIONAPL/Phreeqc, a modeling tool capable of simulating groundwater flow, contaminant transport with coupled biological and geochemical processes in porous or fractured porous media. BIONAPL/Phreeqc is based on the well-tested BIONAPL/3D model, using a powerful finite element simulation engine, capable of simulating non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) dissolution, density-dependent advective-dispersive transport, and solving the geochemical and kinetic processes with the library Phreeqc. To validate the model, we compared BIONAPL/Phreeqc with results from the literature for different biodegradation processes and different geometries, with good agreement. We then used the model to simulate the behavior of sodium persulfate (NaS2O8) as an oxidant for BTEX degradation, coupled with sequential biodegradation in a 2D case and to evaluate the effect of inorganic geochemistry reactions. The results show the advantages of a treatment train remediation scheme based on ISCO and IBR. The numerical performance and stability of the integrated BIONAPL/Phreeqc model was also verified.

  7. National Wetlands Biogeochemical Database (NWBD)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Wetland Biogeochemical Database (NWBD) is "an effort to locate, collect and compile existing biogeochemical information on wetlands of the United States including Hawaii and Alaska." Funded in part by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the database will be used to develop a Nutrient Criteria Technical Guidance Manual for US Wetlands -- for use in assessing potential nutrient-related trophic state impairment and pollution problems. Presently focused on water column and soil biogeochemical parameters (e.g., N, P, C, Metals, temp., DO, pH, etc.), the completed NWBD will act as a reference data set for biogeochemical parameters at different regional, community, and temporal scales. Data contributors are invited to participate using NWBD's on-site contact information.

  8. Biogeochemical Cycles in Degraded Lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Vieira, Ima Celia G.; ReisdeCarvalho, Claudio Jose; DeanedeAbreuSa, Tatiana; deSouzaMoutinho, Paulo R.; Figueiredo, Ricardo O.; Stone, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to define and describe the types of landscapes that fall under the broad category of "degraded lands" and to study biogeochemical cycles across this range of degradation found in secondary forests. We define degraded land as that which has lost part of its capacity of renovation of a productive ecosystem, either in the context of agroecosystems or as native communities of vegetation. This definition of degradation permits evaluation of biogeochemical constraints to future land uses.

  9. Topographic controls on soil moisture scaling properties in polygonal ground using idealized high-resolution surface-subsurface simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.

    2014-11-01

    Microtopographic features, such as polygonal ground, are characteristic sources of landscape heterogeneity in the Alaskan Arctic coastal plain. Here, we analyze the hypothesis that microtopography is a dominant controller of soil moisture in polygonal landscapes. We perform multi-year surface-subsurface isothermal flow simulations using the PFLOTRAN model for summer months at six spatial resolutions (0.25-8 m, in increments of a factor of 2). Simulations are performed for four study sites near Barrow, Alaska that are part of the NGEE-Arctic project. Results indicate a non-linear scaling relationship for statistical moments of soil moisture. Mean soil moisture for all study sites is accurately captured in coarser resolution simulations, but soil moisture variance is significantly under-estimated in coarser resolution simulations. The decrease in soil moisture variance in coarser resolution simulations is greater than the decrease in soil moisture variance obtained by coarsening out the fine resolution simulations. We also develop relationships to estimate the fine-resolution soil moisture probability distribution function (PDF) using coarse resolution simulations and topography. Although the estimated soil moisture PDF is underestimated during very wet conditions, the moments computed from the inferred soil moisture PDF had good agreement with the full model solutions (bias < ± 4 % and correlation > 0.99) for all four sites. Lastly, we develop two spatially-explicit methods to downscale coarse-resolution simulations of soil moisture. The first downscaling method requires simulation of soil moisture at fine and coarse resolution, while the second downscaling approach uses only topographical information at the two resolutions. Both downscaling approaches are able to accurately estimate fine-resolution soil moisture spatial patterns when compared to fine-resolution simulations (mean error for all study sites are < ± 1 %), but the first downscaling method more accurately estimates soil moisture variance.

  10. Biogeochemical modeling at mass extinction boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, M. R.; Caldeira, K. G.

    1991-01-01

    The causes of major mass extinctions is a subject of considerable interest to those concerned with the history and evolution of life on earth. The primary objectives of the proposed plan of research are: (1) to develop quantitative time-dependent biogeochemical cycle models, coupled with an ocean atmosphere in order to improve the understanding of global scale physical, chemical, and biological processes that control the distribution of elements important for life at times of mass extinctions; and (2) to develop a comprehensive data base of the best available geochemical, isotopic, and other relevant geologic data from sections across mass extinction boundaries. These data will be used to constrain and test the biogeochemical model. These modeling experiments should prove useful in: (1) determining the possible cause(s) of the environmental changes seen at bio-event boundaries; (2) identifying and quantifying little-known feedbacks among the oceans, atmosphere, and biosphere; and (3) providing additional insights into the possible responses of the earth system to perturbations of various timescales. One of the best known mass extinction events marks the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary (66 Myr ago). Data from the K/T boundary are used here to constrain a newly developed time-dependent biogeochemical cycle model that is designed to study transient behavior of the earth system. Model results predict significant fluctuations in ocean alkalinity, atmospheric CO2, and global temperatures caused by extinction of calcareous plankton and reduction in the sedimentation rates of pelagic carbonates and organic carbon. Oxygen-isotome and other paleoclimatic data from K/T time provide some evidence that such climatic fluctuations may have occurred, but stabilizing feedbacks may have acted to reduce the ocean alkalinity and carbon dioxide fluctuations.

  11. Surface-subsurface flow modeling: an example of large-scale research at the new NEON user facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, H.; McKnight, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to alter surface-subsurface interactions in freshwater ecosystems. These interactions are hypothesized to control nutrient release at diel and seasonal time scales, which may then exert control over epilithic algal growth rates. The mechanisms underlying shifts in complex physical-chemical-biological patterns can be elucidated by long-term observations at sites that span hydrologic and climate gradients across the continent. Development of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will provide researchers the opportunity to investigate continental-scale patterns by combining investigator-driven measurements with Observatory data. NEON is a national-scale research platform for analyzing and understanding the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on ecology. NEON features sensor networks and experiments, linked by advanced cyberinfrastructure to record and archive ecological data for at least 30 years. NEON partitions the United States into 20 ecoclimatic domains. Each domain hosts one fully instrumented Core Aquatic site in a wildland area and one Relocatable site, which aims to capture ecologically significant gradients (e.g. landuse, nitrogen deposition, urbanization). In the current definition of NEON there are 36 Aquatic sites: 30 streams/rivers and 6 ponds/lakes. Each site includes automated, in-situ sensors for groundwater elevation and temperature; stream flow (discharge and stage); pond water elevation; atmospheric chemistry (Tair, barometric pressure, PAR, radiation); and surface water chemistry (DO, Twater, conductivity, pH, turbidity, cDOM, nutrients). Groundwater and surface water sites shall be regularly sampled for selected chemical and isotopic parameters. The hydrologic and geochemical monitoring design provides basic information on water and chemical fluxes in streams and ponds and between groundwater and surface water, which is intended to support investigator-driven modeling studies. Theoretical constructs, such as the River Continuum Concept, that aim to elucidate general mechanistic underpinnings of freshwater ecosystem function via testable hypotheses about relative rates of photosynthesis and respiration, for example, may be readily examined using data collected at hourly time scales at the NEON facility once constructed. By taking advantage of NEON data and adding PI-driven research to the Observatory, we can further our understanding of the relative roles of water flow, nutrients, temperature, and light on freshwater ecosystem function and structure.

  12. Emergent Archetype Hydrological-Biogeochemical Response Patterns in Heterogeneous Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawitz, J. W.; Gall, H. E.; Rao, P.

    2013-12-01

    What can spatiotemporally integrated patterns observed in stream hydrologic and biogeochemical signals generated in response to transient hydro-climatic and anthropogenic forcing tell us about the interactions between spatially heterogeneous soil-mediated hydrological and biogeochemical processes? We seek to understand how the spatial structure of solute sources coupled with hydrologic responses affect observed concentration-discharge (C-Q) patterns. These patterns are expressions of the spatiotemporal structure of solute loads exported from managed catchments, and their likely ecological consequences manifested in receiving water bodies (e.g., wetlands, rivers, lakes, and coastal waters). We investigated the following broad questions: (1) How does the correlation between flow-generating areas and biogeochemical source areas across a catchment evolve under stochastic hydro-climatic forcing? (2) What are the feasible hydrologic and biogeochemical responses that lead to the emergence of the observed archetype C-Q patterns? and; (3) What implications do these coupled dynamics have for catchment monitoring and implementation of management practices? We categorize the observed temporal signals into three archetypical C-Q patterns: dilution; accretion, and constant concentration. We introduce a parsimonious stochastic model of heterogeneous catchments, which act as hydrologic and biogeochemical filters, to examine the relationship between spatial heterogeneity and temporal history of solute export signals. The core concept of the modeling framework is considering the types and degree of spatial correlation between solute source zones and flow generating zones, and activation of different portions of the catchments during rainfall events. Our overarching hypothesis is that each of the archetype C-Q patterns can be generated by explicitly linking landscape-scale hydrologic responses and spatial distributions of solute source properties within a catchment. The model simulations reproduce the three major C-Q patterns observed in published data, offering valuable insight into coupled catchment processes. The findings have important implications for effective catchment management for water quality improvement, and stream monitoring strategies.

  13. Biogeochemical and Hydrological Heterogeneity and Emergent Archetypical Catchment Response Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawitz, J. W.; Gall, H. E.; Rao, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    What can stream hydrologic and biogeochemical signals tell us about interactions among spatially heterogeneous hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the catchment-scale? We seek to understand how the spatial structure of solute sources coupled with both stationary and nonstationary hydroclimatic drivers affect observed archetypes of concentration-discharge (C-Q) patterns. These response patterns are the spatially integrated expressions of the spatiotemporal structure of solutes exported from managed catchments, and can provide insight into likely ecological consequences of receiving water bodies (e.g., wetlands, rivers, lakes, and coastal waters). We investigated the following broad questions: (1) How does the spatial correlation between the structure of flow-generating areas and biogeochemical source areas across a catchment evolve under stochastic hydro-climatic forcing? (2) What are the feasible hydrologic and biogeochemical responses that lead to the emergence of archetypical C-Q patterns? and; (3) What implications do these coupled dynamics have for catchment monitoring and implementation of management practices? We categorize the observed temporal signals into three archetypical C-Q patterns: dilution; accretion, and constant concentration. We applied a parsimonious stochastic model of heterogeneous catchments, which act as hydrologic and biogeochemical filters, to examine the relationship between spatial heterogeneity and temporal history of solute export signals. The core concept of the modeling framework is considering the type and degree of spatial correlation between solute source zones and flow generating zones, and activation of different portions of the catchments during rainfall events. Our overarching hypothesis is that each archetype C-Q pattern can be generated by explicitly linking landscape-scale hydrologic responses and spatial distributions of solute source properties within a catchment. We compared observed multidecadal data to simulation results and find that the model simulations reproduce the three major C-Q patterns observed in published data, offering valuable insight into coupled catchment processes. The findings can be used to develop effective catchment management and stream monitoring strategies.

  14. The Global Biogeochemical Silicon Cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Struyf; Adriaan Smis; Stefan Van Damme; Patrick Meire; Daniel J. Conley

    2009-01-01

    Silicon is one of the most important elements in the current age of the anthropocene. It has numerous industrial applications,\\u000a and supports a high-tech multi-billion Euro industry. Silicon has a fascinating biological and geological cycle, interacting\\u000a with other globally important biogeochemical cycles. In this review, we bring together both biological and geological aspects\\u000a of the silicon cycle to provide a

  15. Ocean fronts drive marine fishery production and biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Woodson, C Brock; Litvin, Steven Y

    2015-02-10

    Long-term changes in nutrient supply and primary production reportedly foreshadow substantial declines in global marine fishery production. These declines combined with current overfishing, habitat degradation, and pollution paint a grim picture for the future of marine fisheries and ecosystems. However, current models forecasting such declines do not account for the effects of ocean fronts as biogeochemical hotspots. Here we apply a fundamental technique from fluid dynamics to an ecosystem model to show how fronts increase total ecosystem biomass, explain fishery production, cause regime shifts, and contribute significantly to global biogeochemical budgets by channeling nutrients through alternate trophic pathways. We then illustrate how ocean fronts affect fishery abundance and yield, using long-term records of anchovy-sardine regimes and salmon abundances in the California Current. These results elucidate the fundamental importance of biophysical coupling as a driver of bottom-up vs. top-down regulation and high productivity in marine ecosystems. PMID:25624488

  16. Proterozoic ocean redox and biogeochemical stasis

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Christopher T.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Partin, Camille A.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Bekker, Andrey; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    The partial pressure of oxygen in Earth’s atmosphere has increased dramatically through time, and this increase is thought to have occurred in two rapid steps at both ends of the Proterozoic Eon (?2.5–0.543 Ga). However, the trajectory and mechanisms of Earth’s oxygenation are still poorly constrained, and little is known regarding attendant changes in ocean ventilation and seafloor redox. We have a particularly poor understanding of ocean chemistry during the mid-Proterozoic (?1.8–0.8 Ga). Given the coupling between redox-sensitive trace element cycles and planktonic productivity, various models for mid-Proterozoic ocean chemistry imply different effects on the biogeochemical cycling of major and trace nutrients, with potential ecological constraints on emerging eukaryotic life. Here, we exploit the differing redox behavior of molybdenum and chromium to provide constraints on seafloor redox evolution by coupling a large database of sedimentary metal enrichments to a mass balance model that includes spatially variant metal burial rates. We find that the metal enrichment record implies a Proterozoic deep ocean characterized by pervasive anoxia relative to the Phanerozoic (at least ?30–40% of modern seafloor area) but a relatively small extent of euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic) seafloor (less than ?1–10% of modern seafloor area). Our model suggests that the oceanic Mo reservoir is extremely sensitive to perturbations in the extent of sulfidic seafloor and that the record of Mo and chromium enrichments through time is consistent with the possibility of a Mo–N colimited marine biosphere during many periods of Earth’s history. PMID:23515332

  17. The global troposphere - Biogeochemical cycles, chemistry, and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Allario, F.

    1982-01-01

    The chemical composition of the troposphere is controlled by various biogeochemical cycles that couple the atmosphere with the oceans, the solid earth and the biosphere, and by atmospheric photochemical/chemical reactions. These cycles and reactions are discussed and a number of key questions concerning tropospheric composition and chemistry for the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur species are identified. Next, various remote sensing techniques and instruments capable of measuring and monitoring tropospheric species from the ground, aircraft and space to address some of these key questions are reviewed. Future thrusts in remote sensing of the troposphere are also considered.

  18. Ecological and Biogeochemical Interactions Constrain Planktonic

    E-print Network

    Pace, Michael L.

    Ecological and Biogeochemical Interactions Constrain Planktonic Nitrogen Fixation in Estuaries nitrogen (N) is strongly limiting to primary production. Estuaries generally fit this pat- tern-limited estuaries. Heterocystic cyanobacteria capable of N2 fixation are seldom observed in estuaries where

  19. Factors driving the biogeochemical budget of the Amazon River and its statistical modelling

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Factors driving the biogeochemical budget of the Amazon River and its statistical modelling the period 1982­1984 during the Carbon in the AMazon River Experiment (CAMREX) project. The relevant factors-regressive model coupled to variance analysis. Basically, the compositional fluctuations in the Amazon River

  20. Western North Pacific Integrated Physical-Biogeochemical Ocean Observation Experiment (INBOX): Biogeochemical impact of mesoscale disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, T.; Hosoda, S.; Sato, K.; Kita, T.; Inoue, R.; Kouketsu, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobashi, F.; Toyama, K.; Honda, M. C.; Kawano, T.; Saino, T.

    2012-12-01

    Combination of autonomous float and biogeochemical sensor technologies has enabled concurrent measurements of physical and biogeochemical parameters for wide spatial and temporal ranges, which could open a new world of synergistic use of those data to advance not only each discipline but also a holistic understanding of the ocean. Study of mesoscale processes is one of those areas greatly benefitted from the synergistic use of physical and biogeochemical data acquired by autonomous platforms, because our understanding of those processes is still limited mainly due to the difficulty in measuring them despite their importance widely recognized. To acquire physical-biogeochemical data which could resolve mesoscale phenomena in the western North Pacific, JAMSTEC launched an interdisciplinary project "Western North Pacific Integrated Physical-Biogeochemical Ocean Observation Experiment (INBOX)" in 2010. INBOX aims to quantify impacts of physical processes on biogeochemical phenomena, so that we could also ultimately utilize biogeochemical information for understanding physical processes. Through a series of field experiments, we also hope that INBOX could contribute to designing effectively sustained biogeochemical observing system. As the first phase of INBOX, profiling floats with oxygen sensors were intensively deployed around the biogeochemical mooring station S1 maintained since spring 2010 at 30N, 145E, further south of the Kuroshio Extension. We have deployed 5 floats in fall 2010 and 25 floats in summer 2011 with profiling cycles of 2-3 days in the 150 km-square area centered at the S1. In this presentation, following the overall description of INBOX, we will highlight cyclonic eddies captured by the INBOX float array and impacts of their passage on primary production. In order to fully utilize data from the float array with a nominal resolution of "30 km x 2 days" for describing mesoscale physical-biogeochemical fields, oxygen sensors should be calibrated appropriately. The calibration procedure will be also presented briefly.

  1. Reconstructing the biogeochemical consequences of disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Joseph; Morris, Jesse; Perakis, Steven

    2012-11-01

    Paleo Reconstructions of Biogeochemical Environments (PROBE) Workshop;Manhattan, Kansas; 19-21 April 2012 Disturbances—discrete events that reduce plant biomass—commonly regulate material and energy flow in terrestrial ecosystems. Recent studies document an increase in the size and/or severity of disturbances such as native bark beetle outbreaks and large fires compared to the recent past. However, scientists cannot evaluate the potential consequences of these events for ecosystem dynamics without decadal to multimillennial records of disturbances and ecosystem response. The Paleo Reconstructions of Biogeochemical Environments (PROBE) workshop brought together ecosystem ecologists and paleoecologists for a 3-day workshop at the Konza Prairie Biological Station in Manhattan, Kansas. The focus of the meeting was the reconstruction of the biogeochemical consequences of disturbances (e.g., beetle outbreaks, wildfires, windstorms, and droughts) on different timescales, the assessment of the state of current knowledge, and identification of challenges and opportunities for future research.

  2. Managing biogeochemical cycles to reduce greenhouse gases

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Venterea, Rodney [United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Soil and Water

    2012-01-01

    This special issue focuses on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles as they relate to North America-wide budgeting and future projection of biogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs). Understanding the current magnitude and providing guidance on the future trajectories of atmospheric concentrations of these gases requires investigation of their (i) biogeochemical origins, (ii) response to climate feedbacks and other environmental factors, and (iii) susceptibility to management practices. This special issue provides a group of articles that present the current state of continental scale sources and sinks of biogenic GHGs and the potential to better manage them in the future.

  3. Soil property control of biogeochemical processes beneath two subtropical stormwater infiltration basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Wanielista, Martin P.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Harris, Willie G.; Xuan, Zhemin

    2012-01-01

    Substantially different biogeochemical processes affecting nitrogen fate and transport were observed beneath two stormwater infiltration basins in north-central Florida. Differences are related to soil textural properties that deeply link hydroclimatic conditions with soil moisture variations in a humid, subtropical climate. During 2008, shallow groundwater beneath the basin with predominantly clayey soils (median, 41% silt+clay) exhibited decreases in dissolved oxygen from 3.8 to 0.1 mg L-1 and decreases in nitrate nitrogen (NO3-–N) from 2.7 mg L-1 to -1, followed by manganese and iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. In contrast, beneath the basin with predominantly sandy soils (median, 2% silt+clay), aerobic conditions persisted from 2007 through 2009 (dissolved oxygen, 5.0–7.8 mg L-1), resulting in NO3-–N of 1.3 to 3.3 mg L-1 in shallow groundwater. Enrichment of d15N and d18O of NO3- combined with water chemistry data indicates denitrification beneath the clayey basin and relatively conservative NO3- transport beneath the sandy basin. Soil-extractable NO3-–N was significantly lower and the copper-containing nitrite reductase gene density was significantly higher beneath the clayey basin. Differences in moisture retention capacity between fine- and coarse-textured soils resulted in median volumetric gas-phase contents of 0.04 beneath the clayey basin and 0.19 beneath the sandy basin, inhibiting surface/subsurface oxygen exchange beneath the clayey basin. Results can inform development of soil amendments to maintain elevated moisture content in shallow soils of stormwater infiltration basins, which can be incorporated in improved best management practices to mitigate NO3- impacts.

  4. Towards bridging biogeochemical and fish-production models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennel, Wolfgang

    The paper presents a theoretical approach to formulate a model which comprises the full food web. The lower part of the food web is represented by a biogeochemical model which interacts explicitly with a fish-production model. The fish-production model component builds on existing theories but was substantially reformulated in order to facilitate the model coupling. The dynamics of the fish-production model is basically driven by the predator-prey interaction. We use the example of the Baltic Sea, which has a relatively simple foodweb structure. The fish biomass is dominated by three groups, sprat, herring and cod, which represent about 80% of fish biomass in the Baltic. The zooplanktivors sprat and herring are eaten by cod. In this paper we start the construction of the model as a simple box system, which can be considered as an isolated water column of 10 × 10 km 2 times the water depth in the central Bornholm basin of the Baltic Sea. The stepwise building up of the model is illustrated by example simulations, which allow to assess the consistence of the theoretical approach and the choices of parameters. As last step we introduce a simple biogeochemical model and link it with the fish model. The resulting model system is strictly mass conserving without unspecified sources of food or so. We conduct experiments with the model system and show that it can reproduce features such as interannual variation in fish catches and trophic cascades.

  5. Nutrient removal using biosorption activated media: preliminary biogeochemical assessment of an innovative stormwater infiltration basin.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Andrew M; Wanielista, Martin P; Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin; Harris, Willie G

    2012-08-15

    Soil beneath a stormwater infiltration basin receiving runoff from a 23 ha predominantly residential watershed in north-central Florida, USA, was amended using biosorption activated media (BAM) to study the effectiveness of this technology in reducing inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus to groundwater. The functionalized soil amendment BAM consists of a 1.0:1.9:4.1 mixture (by volume) of tire crumb (to increase sorption capacity), silt and clay (to increase soil moisture retention), and sand (to promote sufficient infiltration), which was applied to develop an innovative stormwater infiltration basin utilizing nutrient reduction and flood control sub-basins. Comparison of nitrate/chloride (NO(3)(-)/Cl(-)) ratios for the shallow groundwater indicates that prior to using BAM, NO(3)(-) concentrations were substantially influenced by nitrification or variations in NO(3)(-) input. In contrast, for the new basin utilizing BAM, NO(3)(-)/Cl(-) ratios indicate minor nitrification and NO(3)(-) losses with the exception of one summer sample that indicated a 45% loss. Biogeochemical indicators (denitrifier activity derived from real-time polymerase chain reaction and variations in major ions, nutrients, dissolved and soil gases, and stable isotopes) suggest that NO(3)(-) losses are primarily attributable to denitrification, whereas dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium is a minor process. Denitrification was likely occurring intermittently in anoxic microsites in the unsaturated zone, which was enhanced by the increased soil moisture within the BAM layer and resultant reductions in surface/subsurface oxygen exchange that produced conditions conducive to increased denitrifier activity. Concentrations of total dissolved phosphorus and orthophosphate (PO(4)(3-)) were reduced by more than 70% in unsaturated zone soil water, with the largest decreases in the BAM layer where sorption was the most likely mechanism for removal. Post-BAM PO(4)(3-)/Cl(-) ratios for shallow groundwater indicate predominantly minor increases and decreases in PO(4)(3-) with the exception of one summer sample that indicated a 50% loss. Differences in nutrient variations between the unsaturated zone and shallow groundwater may be the result of the intensity and duration of nutrient removal processes and mixing ratios with water that had undergone little biogeochemical transformation. Observed nitrogen and phosphorus losses demonstrate the potential, as well as the future research needs to improve performance, of the innovative stormwater infiltration basin using BAM for providing passive, economical, stormwater nutrient-treatment technology to support green infrastructure. PMID:22742948

  6. Gaussian process emulation in biogeochemical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeptien, Ulrike; Dietze, Heiner; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    In a changing climate, marine pelagic biogeochemistry may modulate the atmospheric concentrations of climate-relevant species such as CO2. Among the main tools suited to explore this effect are earth system model which comprise a pelagic biogeochemical model component typically embedded into a computationally expensive 3-dimensional ocean circulation model. The biogeochemical models rely on a set of poorly constrained parameters (such as, e.g., the maximum growth rate of phytoplankton). Ideally the parameters would be known per se - which they are not - or could be assigned by employing optimization techniques that assign parameters such that the misfit between the model and observations is minimised. So far, however, the optimization process has been forestalled by the high computational cost that is associated to conventional numerical parameter optimization techniques. Here we explore the capacity of recent developments in statistical meta-models to overcome the computational limitations. The idea is that by approximating the original biogeochemical model with an emulator the associated computational cost is reduced rendering an optimization possible. We present first trials and report on the applicability of a Gaussian Process Emulator for biogeochemical ocean modeling.

  7. An Integrated Biogeochemical, Biophysical, and Economic Analysis

    E-print Network

    Jain, Atul K.

    An Integrated Biogeochemical, Biophysical, and Economic Analysis of Bioenergy Crops Yang Song bioenergy crops Determines spatial variability of this potential in the US. Integrate biophysical model of bioenergy crop yields with economic analysis of the costs of bioenergy crops Assess how the yields and costs

  8. BIOGEOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC MICROBIAL MATS AND THEIR BIOTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David; Discipulo, M.; Turk, K.; Londry, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats offer an opportunity to define holistic functionality at the millimeter scale. At the same time. their biogeochemistry contributes to environmental processes on a planetary scale. These mats are possibly direct descendents of the most ancient biological communities; communities in which oxygenic photosynthesis might have been invented. Mats provide one of the best natural systems to study how microbial populations associate to control dynamic biogeochemical gradients. These are self- sustaining, complete ecosystems in which light energy absorbed over a dial (24 hour) cycle drives the synthesis of spatially-organized, diverse biomass. Tightly-coupled microorganisms in the mat have specialized metabolisms that catalyze transformations of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and a host of other elements.

  9. Spatial and temporal controls on biogeochemical indicators at the small-scale interface between a contaminated aquifer and wetland surface water 

    E-print Network

    Baez-Cazull, Susan Enid

    2009-05-15

    on small spatial and temporal scales (Brune et al., 2000; Hunt et al., 1997; Kappler et al., 2005). In biogeochemical studies, these processes are often interpreted from the analysis of geochemical parameters such as redox couples (e.g. H2S and SO42.... Applied Geochemistry 2007 in press. Copyright ? 2007, Elsevier, DOI: 10.1016/j.apgeochem.2007.06.003 8 These findings support the hypothesis that increased biogeochemical cycling occurs at interfaces between environments of differing redox...

  10. Biogeochemical modelling of the tropical Pacific Ocean. I: Seasonal and interannual variability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Christian; M. A. Verschell; R. Murtugudde; A. J. Busalacchi; C. R. McClaine

    2001-01-01

    A coupled physical–biogeochemical model has been developed in order to study physical–biological interactions in the tropical Pacific Ocean on seasonal-to-interannual timescales. The model incorporates both iron- and nitrogen-limited phytoplankton growth, and succession of phytoplankton size classes in accordance with the “ecumenical” iron hypothesis. The model shows a strong El Niño–Southern Oscillation component to phytoplankton variability in the central equatorial Pacific

  11. Calcium Isotopes as Tracers of Biogeochemical Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura C. Nielsen; Jennifer L. Druhan; Wenbo Yang; Shaun T. Brown; Donald J. DePaolo

    \\u000a The prevalence of calcium as a major cation in surface and oceanic environments, the necessity of calcium in the functioning\\u000a of living cells and bone growth, and the large spread in mass between calcium isotopes all suggest that calcium isotope biogeochemistry\\u000a can be an important avenue of insight into past and present biogeochemical cycling processes. In the following chapter, we

  12. Solving the equation for the Iberian upwelling biogeochemical dynamics: an optimization experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboreda, R.; Santaren, D.; Castro, C. G.; Alvarez-Salgado, X. A.; Nolasco, R.; Queiroga, H.; Dubert, J.

    2012-04-01

    Trying to find a set of parameters to properly reproduce the biogeochemical dynamics of the region of study is a major concern in biogeochemical ocean modelling. Model parameters are constant values introduced in the equations that calculate the time and space evolution of the state variables of the biogeochemical model. A good set of parameters allows for a better representation of the biological and chemical processes in the system, and thus to model results more approximated to reality. However, it is not a straightforward task, because many parameters are not well constrained in the literature, or they may be unknown or vary considerably between different regions. Usually, the approach to find the appropriate values is running several simulations, after some sensitivity test to individual parameters, until a satisfactory result is obtained. This may be very time consuming and quite subjective. A more systematic way to find this set of parameters has arisen over the last years by using mathematical optimization techniques. The basic principle under optimization is to minimize the difference between an observed and a simulated data series by using a cost function. We have applied an optimization technique to find an appropriate set of parameters for modelling the biogeochemical dynamics of the western Iberian shelf, off the Atlantic coast of Portugal and Galicia (NW Spain), which is characterized by a conspicuous seasonal upwelling. The ocean model is a high resolution 3D regional configuration of ROMS coupled to a N2PZD2 biogeochemical model. Results using the a priori parameters and the optimized parameters are compared and discussed. The study is the result of a multidisciplinary collaborative effort between the University of Aveiro ocean modelling group (Portugal), the ETHZ (Switzerland) and the IIM-CSIC Vigo oceanography group (Spain).

  13. Modelling physical and biogeochemical state of the Mediterranean Sea under contemporary and future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solidoro, Cosimo; Lazzari, Paolo; Cossarini, Gianpiero; Melaku Canu, Donata; Lovato, Tomas; Vichi, Marcello

    2014-05-01

    A validated 3D coupled transport-biogeochemical model is used to assess the impact of future climatic and management scenarios on biogeochemical and ecological properties of the Mediterranean Sea. Results are discussed in term of temporal and spatial distribution of parameters and indicators related to the carbonate system and the cycles of carbon and inorganic nutrients through dissolved and particulate phases, as simulated by a multi nutrient multi plankton numerical model under current and future conditions. Simulations span the period 2000-2040 and are performed by forcing a three-dimensional off-line coupled eco-hydrodynamical model (BFM and OPA-tracer model, http://bfm-community.eu/) with marine circulation fields produced by ad hoc implementation of the NEMO modelling system and with river input of nutrient and freshwater computed in recent European fp7 projects. The model properly describes available experimental information on contemporary seasonal dynamic and spatial distribution at the basin and sub-basin scale of major biogeochemical parameters, as well as primary production and carbon fluxes at the air-ocean interface. Model projections suggest that future Mediterranean sea will be globally warmer, more productive, and more acidic, but with significant space variability. The relative importance of different biotic and abiotic parameters in defining such a change is explored through several numerical experiments. Potential implications in terms of ecological and higher trophic level organisms dynamics are explored as well, by integrating niche properties of selected organisms and suggestions provided by food web models.

  14. Monterey Bay Time Series Biogeochemical Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This dataset includes a broad suite of biogeochemical measurements, particularly dissolvable iron. The measurements span the time period from August 1998 to December 2004 and were taken at the most inshore station of a set of three which are maintained by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). The data show a large pulse of dissolvable iron consistently occurring during the first spring upwelling event of each year that is derived from resuspended sediment. Iron concentrations then drop rapidly at all three stations. During the summer months, only the most inshore station (C1) maintains iron concentrations in excess of nitrate.

  15. The NEON Aquatic Network: Expanding the Availability of Biogeochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Bohall, C.; Fitzgerald, M.; Utz, R.; Parker, S. M.; Roehm, C. L.; Goodman, K. J.; McLaughlin, B.

    2013-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are facing unprecedented pressure from climate change and land-use practices. Invasive species, whether plant, animal, insect or microbe present additional threat to aquatic ecosystem services. There are significant scientific challenges to understanding how these forces will interact to affect aquatic ecosystems, as the flow of energy and materials in the environment is driven by multivariate and non-linear biogeochemical cycles. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect and provide observational data across multiple scales. Sites were selected to maximize representation of major North American ecosystems using a multivariate geographic clustering method that partitioned the continental US, AK, HI, and Puerto Rico into 20 eco-climatic domains. The NEON data collection systems and methods are designed to yield standardized, near real-time data subjected to rigorous quality controls prior to public dissemination through an online data portal. NEON will collect data for 30 years to facilitate spatial-temporal analysis of environmental responses and drivers of ecosystem change, ranging from local through continental scales. Here we present the NEON Aquatic Network, a multi-parameter network consisting of a combination of in situ sensor and observational data. This network will provide data to examine biogeochemical, biological, hydrologic and geomorphic metrics at 36 sites, which are a combination of small 1st/2nd order wadeable streams, large rivers and lakes. A typical NEON Aquatic site will host up to two in-stream sensor sets designed to collect near-continuous water quality data (e.g. pH/ORP, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, CDOM) along with up to 8 shallow groundwater monitoring wells (level, temp., cond.), and a local meteorological station (e.g. 2D wind speed, PAR, barometric pressure, temperature, net radiation). These coupled sensor suites will be complemented by observational data (e.g. water/sediment chemistry, aquatic organisms, geomorphology). The aquatic network will produce ~212 low-level data products for each site. NEON will produce several higher level data products such as measurements of whole-stream metabolism, gross primary productivity, ecosystem respiration, and fluxes of nitrogen, phosphorous and carbon that will enable users to analyze processes on a gross scale. These data may be integrated with NEON's terrestrial and airborne networks to bridge the gap between aquatic and terrestrial biogeochemical research. The NEON Aquatic Network is poised to greatly expand our ability to create more robust biogeochemical models. For example, hydrologic and stable isotope data will allow investigation of terrestrial-aquatic carbon flux. Constraints provided by NEON's terrestrial and atmospheric data concurrent with remotely sensed data will facilitate the scaling to regional and continental scales, potentially leading to greater accuracy in the global carbon budget. The NEON Aquatic Network represents a powerful tool that will give the scientific community access to standardized data over spatiotemporal scales that are needed to answer fundamental questions about natural ecological variability and responses to changes in the environment.

  16. Biogeochemical Controls on Technetium Mobility in Biogeochemical Controls on Technetium Mobility in FRC Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, J.R.; McBeth, J.M.; Livens, F.R.; Bryan, N.D.; Ellis, B.; Sharma, H.; Burke, I.T.; Morris, K.

    2004-03-17

    Technetium-99 is a priority pollutant at numerous DOE sites, due to its long half-life (2.1 x 10{sup 5} years), high mobility as Tc(VII) in oxic waters, and bioavailability as a sulfate analog. {sup 99}Tc is far less mobile under anaerobic conditions, forming insoluble Tc(IV) precipitates. As anaerobic microorganisms can reduce soluble Tc(VII) to insoluble Tc(IV), microbial metabolism may have the potential to treat sediments and waters contaminated with Tc. Baseline studies of fundamental mechanisms of Tc(VII) bioreduction and precipitation (reviewed by Lloyd et al, 2002) have generally used pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, in order to develop conceptual models for the biogeochemical cycling of Tc. There is, however, comparatively little known about interactions of metal-reducing bacteria with environmentally relevant trace concentrations of Tc, against a more complex biogeochemical background provided by mixed microbial communities in the subsurface. The objective of this new NABIR project is to probe the site specific biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC (Oak Ridge, TN). This information is required for the rational design of in situ bioremediation strategies for technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. We will use a combination of geochemical, mineralogical, microbiological and spectroscopic techniques to determine the solubility and phase associations of Tc in FRC sediments, and characterize the underpinning biogeochemical controls. A key strength of this project is that many of the techniques we are using have already been optimized by our research team, who are also studying the biogeochemical controls on Tc mobility in marine and freshwater sediments in the UK in a NERC funded companion study.

  17. Scaling analysis of biogeochemical parameters in coastal waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sylvie Zongo; François Schmitt

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring data are very useful for rapidly providing quality controlled measurements of many environmental aquatic, and thus understanding the spatio-temporal structure which governs the dynamics. We consider here the long time biogeochemical time series from automatic continuous monitoring. These biogeochemical time series from in Eastern English Channel: coastal waters, estuarine waters and river waters. In the first analysis, we consider

  18. Nutrient removal using biosorption activated media: preliminary biogeochemical assessment of an innovative stormwater infiltration basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Wanielista, Martin P.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin; Harris, Willie G.

    2012-01-01

    Soil beneath a stormwater infiltration basin receiving runoff from a 22.7 ha predominantly residential watershed in central Florida, USA, was amended using biosorption activated media (BAM) to study the effectiveness of this technology in reducing inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus to groundwater. The functionalized soil amendment BAM consists of a 1.0:1.9:4.1 mixture (by volume) of tire crumb (to increase sorption capacity), silt and clay (to increase soil moisture retention), and sand (to promote sufficient infiltration), which was applied to develop a prototype stormwater infiltration basin utilizing nutrient reduction and flood control sub-basins. Comparison of nitrate/chloride (NO3-/Cl-) ratios for the shallow groundwater indicate that prior to using BAM, NO3- concentrations were substantially influenced by nitrification or variations in NO3- input. In contrast, for the prototype basin utilizing BAM, NO3-/Cl- ratios indicate minor nitrification and NO3- losses with the exception of one summer sample that indicated a 45% loss. Biogeochemical indicators (denitrifier activity derived from real-time polymerase chain reaction and variations in major ions, nutrients, dissolved and soil gases, and stable isotopes) suggest NO3- losses are primarily attributable to denitrification, whereas dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium is a minor process. Denitrification was likely occurring intermittently in anoxic microsites in the unsaturated zone, which was enhanced by increased soil moisture within the BAM layer and resultant reductions in surface/subsurface oxygen exchange that produced conditions conducive to increased denitrifier activity. Concentrations of total dissolved phosphorus and orthophosphate (PO43-) were reduced by more than 70% in unsaturated zone soil water, with the largest decreases in the BAM layer where sorption was the most likely mechanism for removal. Post-BAM PO43-/Cl- ratios for shallow groundwater indicate predominantly minor increases and decreases in PO43- with the exception of one summer sample that indicated a 50% loss. Differences in nutrient variations between the unsaturated zone and shallow groundwater may be the result of the intensity and duration of nutrient removal processes and mixing ratios with water that had not undergone significant chemical changes. Observed nitrogen and phosphorus losses demonstrate the potential, as well as future research needs to improve performance, of the prototype stormwater infiltration basin using BAM for providing passive, economical, stormwater nutrient-treatment technology to support green infrastructure.

  19. Biogeochemical Filtering of Solute Signals Explored as a Function of Transport and Reaction Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanardo, S.; Basu, N. B.; Rao, P. C.

    2009-12-01

    Catchment biogeochemical responses are the result of superposition of diverse dynamic components, which can be related to climate forcing, water flow, and biogeochemical reactions. The interactions among these components are highly non-linear and contribute to the generation of emergent patterns at multiple spatial and temporal scales. The aim of this work is to explore the following biogeochemical signatures arising from such interactions: (1) the relationship between contaminant loads (L) and discharge (Q) at the annual timescale, leading to an apparent chemostatic relationship (i.e., linear L-Q plots) for different contaminants and at different spatial scales; (2) spatial patterns in the slope and the scatter of the L-Q relationships; and (3) correlation between the intra-annual flow duration curves (FDC) and the load duration curves (LDC). Exploring this relationship necessitates the use of a parsimonious model, with few spatially uniform time constants, that can generate synthetic time series of load and flow at the outlet of river basins. The Mass Response Functions (MRF) approach (Rinaldo et al., 2006), lends itself suitable for the purpose since it relies on the assumption that the evolution of solute concentration in the water pulses depends only on the residence time, and not on its trajectory - thus space is replaced by time. The model simulates the episodic delivery of water and contaminant pulses from the hillslopes to the stream network in response to temporally random but spatially uniform effective rainfall patterns. The domain is described by an immobile source zone in which first order biogeochemical reactions (degradation rate constant ke) alter the solute mass, while multiple mobile rainfall pulses exchange mass with the source zone following linear kinetics (mass transfer rate constant ?). The biogeochemical module of MRF, that was originally written to simulate non-reactive tracer and nitrate transport, was modified to include the more complex biogeochemistry of pesticides. We calibrated and validated the model against nitrate and atrazine data collected in the Little Vermillion River basin (~400 km2; Illinois, IN). Comparison with data showed an excellent agreement of the model outputs with the observed hydrographs and chemographs. The model was then used to explore the effect of time constants on biogeochemical signatures. Four time constants were used to characterize the coupling of hydrologic and biogeochemical processes considered in the model: 1) mean rainfall frequency; 2) mean residence time; 3) mass-transfer rate constant; 4) degradation rate constant. The effect of the four temporal constants on the hillslope biogeochemical response was explored through a sesnsitivity analyses. We hypothesize that a single dimensionless number, a combination of all four temporal constants, could explain the observed patterns. Because this dimensionless number embeds all of the relevant time scales, relative significance of the hydrologic and biogeochemical processes can be examined.

  20. Biogeochemical Reactions Under Simulated Europa Ocean Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amashukeli, X.; Connon, S. A.; Gleeson, D. F.; Kowalczyk, R. S.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2007-12-01

    Galileo data have demonstrated the probable presence of a liquid water ocean on Europa, and existence of salts and carbon dioxide in the satellite's surface ice (e.g., Carr et al., 1998; McCord et al., 1999, Pappalardo et al., 1999; Kivelson et al., 2000). Subsequently, the discovery of chemical signatures of extinct or extant life in Europa's ocean and on its surface became a distinct possibility. Moreover, understanding of Europa's potential habitability is now one of the major goals of the Europa Orbiter Flagship mission. It is likely, that in the early stages of Europa's ocean formation, moderately alkaline oceanic sulfate-carbonate species and a magnetite-silicate mantel could have participated in low-temperature biogeochemical sulfur, iron and carbon cycles facilitated by primitive organisms (Zolotov and Shock, 2004). If periodic supplies of fresh rock and sulfate-carbonate ions are available in Europa's ocean, then an exciting prospect exists that life may be present in Europa's ocean today. In our laboratory, we began the study of the plausible biogeochemical reactions under conditions appropriate to Europa's ocean using barophilic psychrophilic organisms that thrive under anaerobic conditions. In the near absence of abiotic synthetic pathways due to low Europa's temperatures, the biotic synthesis may present a viable opportunity for the formation of the organic and inorganic compounds under these extreme conditions. This work is independent of assumptions regarding hydrothermal vents at Europa's ocean floor or surface-derived oxidant sources. For our studies, we have fabricated a high-pressure (5,000 psi) reaction vessel that simulates aqueous conditions on Europa. We were also successful at reviving barophilic psychrophilic strains of Shewanella bacterium, which serve as test organisms in this investigation. Currently, facultative barophilic psychrophilic stains of Shewanella are grown in the presence of ferric food source; the strains exhibiting iron reduction capability will be later selected and used to facilitate biogeochemical reduction of iron under simulated temperature and pressure of Europa's ocean. The results of this work will enable us to ascertain whether Europa's cold, high-pressure ocean is capable of supporting life. In addition, the data from this study will help in generating a list of organic and inorganic target molecules for future remote sensing and in situ exploration missions.

  1. The biogeochemical footprint of agricultural soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, Gerard; Van Oost, Kristof; Wang, Zhengang

    2015-04-01

    Global biogeochemical cycles are a key component of the functioning of the Earth System: these cycles are all, to a varying extent, disturbed by human activities which not only has dramatic consequences for the global climate but also for the acidity of the world's oceans. It is only relatively recently that the role of lateral fluxes related to surface water movement and soil erosion and deposition (and the way those fluxes are modified by human action) is explicitly considered by the scientific community. In this paper we present an overview of our present-day understanding of the role of agricultural soil erosion in the global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous and silica. We discuss the major processes through which erosion affects these global cycles and pay particular attention to the knowledge gaps that prevent us from accurately assessing the impact of soil erosion on global biogeochemical cycling at different temporal scales. Furthering our understanding (and better constraining our estimates) will require progress both in terms of model development and process understanding. Research needs can be most clearly identified with respect to soil organic carbon: (i) at present, large-scale soil erosion (and deposition) models are poorly constrained so that the amount of carbon mobilised by erosion (and its fate) cannot be accurately estimated and (ii) the fate of soil organic carbon buried by deposition or delivered to river network is poorly understood. Uncertainties for N, P and Si are larger than those for C as we have less information on the amount of these elements stored in agricultural soils and/or do not fully understand how these elements cycle through the soil/plant system. Agricultural soil erosion does not affect soil functioning through its effect on biogeochemical cycling. Erosion directly affects soil hydrological functioning and is likely to affect weathering processes and soil production. Addressing all these issues requires the combination of a wide range of approaches, allowing not only to assess current processes, but also their cumulative effects over long time spans.

  2. Biogeochemical cycling in the Strait of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, S C; Macdonald, R W; Burd, B; van Roodselaar, A

    2008-12-01

    The papers in this special issue present the results of a five-year project to study sedimentary biogeochemical processes in the Strait of Georgia, with special emphasis on the near-field of a large municipal outfall. Included in this special issue are overviews of the sedimentology, benthic biology, status of siliceous sponge reefs and distribution of organic carbon in the water column. Other papers address the cycling of contaminants (PCBs, PBDEs) and redox metals in the sediment, a method to map the extent of the influence of municipal effluent from staining on benthic bivalves, and the relationships among geochemical conditions and benthic abundance and diversity. The latter set of papers addresses the role of municipal effluent as a pathway of organic carbon and other contaminants into the Strait of Georgia and the effect of the effluent on benthic geochemistry and biology. PMID:19022498

  3. River restoration: morphological, hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological changes and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Luster, J.; Linde, N.; Perona, P.; Mitchell, E. A. D.; Barry, D. A.; Cirpka, O. A.; Schneider, P.; Vogt, T.; Durisch-Kaiser, E.

    2013-08-01

    River restoration is essential as a means to enhance river dynamics, environmental heterogeneity and biodiversity. The underlying processes governing the dynamic changes need to be understood thoroughly to ensure that restoration projects meet their goals. In particular, we need to understand quantitatively how hydromorphological variability relates to ecosystem functioning and services, biodiversity and (ground)water quality in restored river corridors. Here, we provide a short overview on the literature and present a study of a restored river corridor in Switzerland combining physical, chemical, and biological observations with modeling. The results show complex spatial patterns of bank infiltration, habitat-type, biotic communities and biogeochemical processes. In particular, we found an increase in taxonomic and functional diversity for earthworms, testate amoebae and bacteria in the restored part of the river. This complexity is driven by river hydrology and morphodynamics, which are in turn actively coupled to riparian vegetation processes. Given this complexity and the multiple constraints on the uses and management of floodplains, a multi-disciplinary approach is needed to monitor the success of restoration measures and to make recommendations for future restoration projects.

  4. Doctoral Defense "Biogeochemical evaluation of disposal options for arsenic-

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Biogeochemical evaluation of disposal options for arsenic- bearing wastes Lutgarde Raskin Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering Arsenic contamination of drinking water of arsenic removal technologies requires disposal options for produced wastes that limit the release

  5. Climate change effects on watershed hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Projected changes in climate are widely expected to alter watershed processes. However, the extent of these changes is difficult to predict because complex interactions among affected hydrological and biogeochemical processes will likely play out over many decades and spatial sc...

  6. Assessment of climate change impacts at the catchment scale with a detailed hydrological model of surface-subsurface interactions and comparison with a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulis, M.; Paniconi, C.; Rivard, C.; Harvey, R.; Chaumont, D.

    2011-01-01

    A process-based model that incorporates hydrodynamic feedbacks between the land surface, soil, and groundwater zones is used to assess the sensitivity of the hydrological response (river discharge, aquifer recharge, and soil water storage) to future climate conditions. The analysis is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenario A2 and the des Anglais catchment in southwestern Quebec (Canada). Application of the coupled hydrological model (CATHY) to the study basin revealed significant spatiotemporal variations in the river discharge response to climate change owing to a different partitioning between the overland runoff and base flow components of the hydrograph, with the latter alleviating the marked decrease in discharge during the summer period. A spatial analysis of recharge patterns shows that the greatest variations are expected to occur, throughout the year, in the southern portion of the catchment, where the elevations are highest. Compared to river discharge and aquifer recharge, the soil water storage volumes are less sensitive to climate changes. From a spatial analysis of soil moisture variations it was possible to observe organizational patterns that follow the topographic and pedologic characteristics of the catchment. In addition to these analyses, we also compare predictions obtained with the land surface scheme (CLASS) that is coupled to the regional climate model (CRCM) to those from the detailed catchment model for past and future climate change projections. An examination of the runoff revealed that CLASS produces higher estimates than CATHY of surface and subsurface runoff throughout the annual cycle for both past and future projections. For soil water storage, the two models are in general agreement in terms of the intra-annual variability of moisture content at shallower soil layers, whereas a larger difference is found for the deepest layer, with CATHY predicting wetter soil conditions over the entire simulation period and moisture fluctuations of much smaller amplitude.

  7. Searching for Biogeochemical Cycles on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The search for life on Mars clearly benefits from a rigorous, yet broad, definition of life that compels us to consider all possible lines of evidence for a martian biosphere. Recent studies in microbial ecology illustrate that the classic definition of life should be expanded beyond the traditional definition of a living cell. The traditional defining characteristics of life are threefold. First, life is capable of metabolism, that is, it performs chemical reactions that utilize energy and also synthesize its cellular constituents. Second, life is capable of self-replication. Third, life can evolve in order to adapt to environmental changes. An expanded, ecological definition of life also recognizes that life is a community of organisms that must interact with their nonliving environment through processes called biogeochemical cycles. This regenerative processing maintains, in an aqueous conditions, a dependable supply of nutrients and energy for growth. In turn, life can significantly affect those processes that control the exchange of materials between the atmosphere, ocean, and upper crust. Because metabolic processes interact directly with the environment, they can alter their surroundings and thus leave behind evidence of life. For example, organic matter is produced from single-carbon-atom precursors for the biosynthesis of cellular constituents. This leads to a reservoir of reduced carbon in sediments that, in turn, can affect the oxidation state of the atmosphere. The harvesting of chemical energy for metabolism often employs oxidation-reduction reactions that can alter the chemistry and oxidation state of the redox-sensitive elements carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, iron, and manganese. Have there ever been biogeochemical cycles on Mars? Certain key planetary processes can offer clues. Active volcanism provides reduced chemical species that biota can use for organic synthesis. Volcanic carbon dioxide and methane can serve as greenhouse gases. Thus the persistence of volcanism on Mars may well have influenced the persistence of a martian biosphere. The geologic processing of the crust can affect the availability of nutrients and also control the deposition of minerals that could have served as a medium for the preservation of fossil information. Finally, the activity of liquid water is crucial to life. Was there ever an Earth-like hydrologic cycle with rainfall? Has aqueous activity instead been restricted principally to hydrothermal activity below the surface? To what extent did the inorganic chemistry driven by sunlight and hydrothermal activity influence organic chemistry (prebiotic chemical evolution)? This paper addresses these and other key questions.

  8. Temporal Scaling of Biogeochemical Reaction Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, D. H.; Forney, D. C.

    2007-12-01

    In at least two disparate areas of organic and inorganic geochemistry---the microbial degradation of detritus and the dissolution of minerals in sediments and soils---apparent rate constants k have been observed to diminish with the "age" t of the substrate like k(t) ~eq a t-b, where a ~eq 0.2 and b ~eq 1.0. Published reports display up to ten orders of magnitude in time [1,2]. Because the accuracy of biogeochemical models typically depends crucially on the specification of such rates, an understanding of this scaling law has important implications for predicting the evolution of biogeochemical cycles, especially the cycles of carbon and oxygen. The power-law decay of rates likely derives from a combination of chemical and physical heterogeneity. In a purely chemical scenario, an intrinsically heterogeneous substrate (e.g., a mixture of organic matter ranging from "labile" to "recalcitrant") is assumed to produce the observed slowdown of k(t). In contrast, a physical model assumes a homogeneous substrate in which rates nevertheless vary microscopically due to spatially varying physical constraints. Here we consider the extreme case of a purely physical origin and test its consistency with observations [3]. We first show how a diffusion-limited reaction-diffusion system leads to a logarithmic decay of the substrate. We then show how the power-law for k(t) derives from this logarithmic decay. We obtain not only the correct exponent b=1 but also a good approximation of the prefactor a. By constructing an extensive database of previously published measurements, we show that observations compare well to predictions. The particular way in which diffusion-limitation manifests itself varies from problem to problem. In the case of detrital decay in sediments, we suggest that rates are limited by contact of substrate with extracellular enzymes [3]. Mechanisms in soils are likely similar. For mineral dissolution is sediments, we suggest that rates are limited by diffusion of reactants from the seafloor. [1] J.~J.~Middelburg, Geochim.~Cosmochim.~Acta 53, 1577 (1989). [2] K.~Maher, D.~J.~DePaolo, J.~C.-F.~Lin, Geochim.~Cosmochim.~Acta 68, 4629. [3] D.~H.~Rothman and D.~C.~Forney, Science 316, 1325 (2004).

  9. Seasonal biogeochemical hotspots in the streambed around restoration structures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. K. Lautz; R. M. Fanelli

    2008-01-01

    Rapid exchange of stream water and groundwater in streambeds creates hotspots of biogeochemical cycling of redox-sensitive\\u000a solutes. Although stream–groundwater interaction can be increased through stream restoration, there are few detailed studies\\u000a of the increased heterogeneity of water and solute fluxes through the streambed and associated patterns of biogeochemical\\u000a processes around stream restoration structures. In this study, we examined the seasonal

  10. Redox regime shifts in microbially mediated biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, T.; Butler, I. B.; Free, A.; Allen, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how the Earth's biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change is a prerequisite for the prediction and mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic perturbations. Microbial populations mediate key steps in these cycles, yet they are often crudely represented in biogeochemical models. Here, we show that microbial population dynamics can qualitatively affect the response of biogeochemical cycles to environmental change. Using simple and generic mathematical models, we find that nutrient limitations on microbial population growth can lead to regime shifts, in which the redox state of a biogeochemical cycle changes dramatically as the availability of a redox-controlling species, such as oxygen or acetate, crosses a threshold (a "tipping point"). These redox regime shifts occur in parameter ranges that are relevant to the present-day sulfur cycle in the natural environment and the present-day nitrogen cycle in eutrophic terrestrial environments. These shifts may also have relevance to iron cycling in the iron-containing Proterozoic and Archean oceans. We show that redox regime shifts also occur in models with physically realistic modifications, such as additional terms, chemical states, or microbial populations. Our work reveals a possible new mechanism by which regime shifts can occur in nutrient-cycling ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, and highlights the importance of considering microbial population dynamics in models of biogeochemical cycles.

  11. Redox regime shifts in microbially-mediated biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, T.; Butler, I. B.; Free, A.; Allen, R. J.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding how the Earth's biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change is a prerequisite for the prediction and mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic perturbations. Microbial populations mediate key steps in these cycles, yet are often crudely represented in biogeochemical models. Here, we show that microbial population dynamics can qualitatively affect the response of biogeochemical cycles to environmental change. Using simple and generic mathematical models, we find that nutrient limitations on microbial population growth can lead to regime shifts, in which the redox state of a biogeochemical cycle changes dramatically as the availability of a redox-controlling species, such as oxygen or acetate, crosses a threshold (a "tipping point"). These redox regime shifts occur in parameter ranges that are relevant to the sulfur and nitrogen cycles in the present-day natural environment, and may also have relevance to iron cycling in the iron-containing Proterozoic and Archean oceans. We show that redox regime shifts also occur in models with physically realistic modifications, such as additional terms, chemical states, or microbial populations. Our work reveals a possible new mechanism by which regime shifts can occur in nutrient-cycling ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, and highlights the importance of considering microbial population dynamics in models of biogeochemical cycles.

  12. Redox chemistry in the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle

    PubMed Central

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Sampson, Jacqueline M.; Atlas, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    The element phosphorus (P) controls growth in many ecosystems as the limiting nutrient, where it is broadly considered to reside as pentavalent P in phosphate minerals and organic esters. Exceptions to pentavalent P include phosphine—PH3—a trace atmospheric gas, and phosphite and hypophosphite, P anions that have been detected recently in lightning strikes, eutrophic lakes, geothermal springs, and termite hindguts. Reduced oxidation state P compounds include the phosphonates, characterized by C?P bonds, which bear up to 25% of total organic dissolved phosphorus. Reduced P compounds have been considered to be rare; however, the microbial ability to use reduced P compounds as sole P sources is ubiquitous. Here we show that between 10% and 20% of dissolved P bears a redox state of less than +5 in water samples from central Florida, on average, with some samples bearing almost as much reduced P as phosphate. If the quantity of reduced P observed in the water samples from Florida studied here is broadly characteristic of similar environments on the global scale, it accounts well for the concentration of atmospheric phosphine and provides a rationale for the ubiquity of phosphite utilization genes in nature. Phosphine is generated at a quantity consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium established by the disproportionation reaction of reduced P species. Comprising 10–20% of the total dissolved P inventory in Florida environments, reduced P compounds could hence be a critical part of the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle, and in turn may impact global carbon cycling and methanogenesis. PMID:25313061

  13. The impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huai; Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui; Wu, Ning; Wang, Yanfen; Fang, Xiuqing; Gao, Yongheng; Zhu, Dan; Yang, Gang; Tian, Jianqing; Kang, Xiaoming; Piao, Shilong; Ouyang, Hua; Xiang, Wenhua; Luo, Zhibin; Jiang, Hong; Song, Xingzhang; Zhang, Yao; Yu, Guirui; Zhao, Xinquan; Gong, Peng; Yao, Tandong; Wu, Jianghua

    2013-10-01

    With a pace of about twice the observed rate of global warming, the temperature on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (Earth's 'third pole') has increased by 0.2 °C per decade over the past 50 years, which results in significant permafrost thawing and glacier retreat. Our review suggested that warming enhanced net primary production and soil respiration, decreased methane (CH(4)) emissions from wetlands and increased CH(4) consumption of meadows, but might increase CH(4) emissions from lakes. Warming-induced permafrost thawing and glaciers melting would also result in substantial emission of old carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and CH(4). Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emission was not stimulated by warming itself, but might be slightly enhanced by wetting. However, there are many uncertainties in such biogeochemical cycles under climate change. Human activities (e.g. grazing, land cover changes) further modified the biogeochemical cycles and amplified such uncertainties on the plateau. If the projected warming and wetting continues, the future biogeochemical cycles will be more complicated. So facing research in this field is an ongoing challenge of integrating field observations with process-based ecosystem models to predict the impacts of future climate change and human activities at various temporal and spatial scales. To reduce the uncertainties and to improve the precision of the predictions of the impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles, efforts should focus on conducting more field observation studies, integrating data within improved models, and developing new knowledge about coupling among carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus biogeochemical cycles as well as about the role of microbes in these cycles. PMID:23744573

  14. A GIS-based Framework for Examining the Effects of Water-Driven Erosion on Soil Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abban, B. K.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wacha, K.; Wilson, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Soil erosion has long been identified as one of the key mechanisms affecting biogeochemical processes in the soil, through the transport and delivery of carbon and nutrients adsorbed to soil particles in the soil active layer. However, most biogeochemical models treat soil erosion contributions simplistically and lack the capacity to accurately account for the mechanisms that control soil erosion and deposition on the landscape. This stems from the fact that the majority of the biogeochemical models have traditionally been employed on landscapes where lateral and downslope fluxes due to soil erosion have been less significant compared to other vertical fluxes and processes occurring at a fixed location on the landscape. In intensely managed landscapes, however, this may not be the case since land management practices such as tillage and exposed land cover can lead to copious amounts of erosion on the landscape. Therefore, to better understand the role of soil erosion on soil biogeochemical cycling in IMLs, we present a framework for simulating the spatiotemporal effects of soil erosion and deposition on soil biogeochemical cycling. We focus specifically on tillage- and runoff-induced erosion since these are prevalent in IMLs. The framework employs a geospatial approach that loosely couples a GIS-based upland water erosion model, GeoWEPP, with a soil biogeochemistry model, Century, to predict downslope and lateral fluxes of soil erosion and the resultant impacts on soil biogeochemical cycling. The use of a geospatial approach allows us to better capture the effects of topography, soil type, land use/land cover, and climate on soil erosion fluxes as well as soil biogeochemical cycling. The spatiotemporal resolution of the framework makes it particularly beneficial for identifying hotspots in fields and hot moments at scales ranging from daily to annual time scales. We employ the framework to study the monthly redistribution of soil organic carbon over the course of a year in the South Amana Sub-Watershed, located in the headwaters of Clear Creek, Iowa, USA. Preliminary results indicate that the framework is able to capture observed erosional and depositional patterns in the watershed and can provide insight into soil carbon redistribution and sequestration.

  15. A Generic Biogeochemical Module for Earth System Models: Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module (NGBGC), Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yilin; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-13

    Physical and biogeochemical processes regulate soil carbon dynamics and CO2 flux to and from atmosphere, influencing global climate changes. Integration of these processes into earth system models (e.g., community land models (CLM)), however, currently faces three major challenges: 1) extensive efforts are required to modify modeling structures and to rewrite computer programs to incorporate new or updated processes as new knowledge is being generated, 2) computational cost is prohibitively expensive to simulate biogeochemical processes in land models due to large variations in the rates of biogeochemical processes, and 3) various mathematical representations of biogeochemical processes exist to incorporate different aspects of fundamental mechanisms, but systematic evaluation of the different mathematical representations is difficult, if not possible. To address these challenges, we propose a new computational framework to easily incorporate physical and biogeochemical processes into land models. The new framework consists of a new biogeochemical module with a generic algorithm and reaction database so that new and updated processes can be incorporated into land models without the need to manually set up the ordinary differential equations to be solved numerically. The reaction database consists of processes of nutrient flow through the terrestrial ecosystems in plants, litter and soil. This framework facilitates effective comparison studies of biogeochemical cycles in an ecosystem using different conceptual models under the same land modeling framework. The approach was first implemented in CLM and benchmarked against simulations from the original CLM-CN code. A case study was then provided to demonstrate the advantages of using the new approach to incorporate a phosphorus cycle into the CLM model. To our knowledge, the phosphorus-incorporated CLM is a new model that can be used to simulate phosphorus limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  16. Geophysical monitoring of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations associated with Cr(VI) bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Susan S; Williams, Ken; Conrad, Mark E; Faybishenko, Boris; Peterson, John; Chen, Jinsong; Long, Phil; Hazent, Terry

    2008-05-15

    Understanding how hydrological and biogeochemical properties change over space and time in response to remedial treatments is hindered by our ability to monitor these processes with sufficient resolution and over field relevant scales. Here, we explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations associated with a Cr(VI) bioremediation experiment performed at Hanford, WA. We first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological zonation at the study site. Using results from laboratory biogeophysical experiments and constraints provided by field geochemical data sets, we then interpreted time-lapse seismic and radar tomographic data sets, collected during thirteen acquisition campaigns over a three year experimental period, in terms of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations. The geophysical monitoring data sets were used to infer: the spatial distribution of injected electron donor; the evolution of gas bubbles; variations in total dissolved solids (nitrate and sulfate) as a function of pumping activity; the formation of precipitates and dissolution of calcites; and concomitant changes in porosity. Although qualitative in nature, the integrated interpretation illustrates how geophysical techniques have the potential to provide a wealth of information about coupled hydrobiogeochemical responses to remedial treatments in high spatial resolution and in a minimally invasive manner. Particularly novel aspects of our study include the use of multiple lines of evidence to constrain the interpretation of a long-term, field-scale geophysical monitoring data set and the interpretation of the transformations as a function of hydrological heterogeneity and pumping activity. PMID:18546719

  17. Evaluation of the Current State of Mechanistic Aquatic Biogeochemical Modeling: Citation Analysis and Future

    E-print Network

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    Evaluation of the Current State of Mechanistic Aquatic Biogeochemical Modeling: Citation Analysis that determine the citations of 153 mechanistic aquatic biogeochemical modeling papers published from 1990 of the published modeling literature and receive lower citations. Given the critical planning information

  18. A Model-based estimate of Biogeophysical and Biogeochemical effect of deforestation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, G.; Narayanappa, D.

    2013-12-01

    Since 1750, changes in land cover change have contributed almost a third of anthropogenic carbon emissions (~180 PgC out of 550 PgC) and hence altered both the global climate and carbon cycle. The change in atmospheric CO2 concentration from land cover change and the consequent climate change from the 'greenhouse' effect of CO2 is called the biogeochemical effect. Changes in land cover could also have biophysical climatic consequences: changes in roughness length, surface albedo and turbulent heat fluxes. Latent and sensible heat fluxes changes could alter evapotranspiration, water vapour content, cloud and precipitation. Surface albedo changes could potentially warm or cool the surface depending on the changes in solar absorption after land cover change. Therefore, when considering the effects of land cover and land use changes, it is also important to account for biophysical effects on climate in addition to the biogeochemical effects of CO2 emissions. Modelling studies in recent years have shown that deforestation in seasonally snow covered boreal and temperate regions is likely to increase the land surface albedo and have a net (biophysical plus biogeochemical) cooling effect, whereas deforestation in tropics is likely to decrease latent heat flux from evapotranspiration and consequently have a net warming effect in association with decreased cloudiness and precipitation. Consequently, the location of afforestation (opposite of deforestation) needs to be considered carefully when evaluating the net effects on climate. A useful quantitative metric for assessing the effectiveness of afforestation would be the net climate change per unit afforested area. A recent modelling study estimates that the warming reductions per unit afforested area as three times higher in the tropics than in the boreal and northern temperate regions, suggesting that afforestation in the tropics are effective forest management strategies from a climate perspective. In our present work, we use an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed layer ocean to estimate the individual contributions (climate change per unit area of deforestation) of biogeophysical and biogeochemical effects to net climate change from deforestation in the tropics, mid-latitudes and high latitudes.

  19. Modelling biogeochemical tracer transport in sea ice due to gravity drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchen, Joseph; Wells, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Sea ice is a porous material, formed of an evolving array of solid ice crystals bathed in liquid brine. The liquid-filled pore space provides a habitat for life within the ice, and, when the ice is permeable, provides a pathway for exchange of gases and other chemicals between the ice, ocean, and atmosphere. This coupling between the physical, chemical, and biological evolution of sea ice has poorly constrained implications for biogeochemical processes, such as the impact of sea ice on the carbon cycle. During winter ice growth, so-called gravity drainage drives a convective exchange of brine between the ocean and the porous interior of sea ice. Here, we use two-dimensional mushy-layer simulations of convective flow to provide insight into the resulting transport of passive biogeochemical tracers through the ice. We quantify the chemical concentration in the liquid during periods of quasi-steady growth rate, and determine a scaling law for the total chemical tracer fluxes through the region of active convection inside the ice. Chemical concentrations show spatial heterogeneity, and our results predict enhanced chemical concentrations in the pore space near to brine channels. These results may provide useful insight for interpreting studies of sea-ice biogeochemistry, and offer a framework to develop models of physical, chemical, and biological interactions.

  20. Integrating turbulent flow, biogeochemical, and poromechanical processes in rippled coastal sediment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. B.; Cook, P. L.; Jiang, H.; Traykovski, P.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal sediments are the locus of multiple coupled processes. Turbulent flow associated with waves and currents induces porewater flow through sediment leading to fluid exchange with the water column. This porewater flow is determined by the hydraulic and elastic properties of the sediment. Porewater flow also ultimately controls biogeochemical reactions in the sediment whose rates depend on delivery of reactants and export of products. We present results from numerical modeling studies directed at integrating these processes with the goal of shedding light on these complex environments. We show how denitrification rates inside ripples are largest at intermediate permeability which represents the optimal balance of reactant delivery and anoxic conditions. It is clear that nutrient cycling and distribution within the sediment is strongly dependent on the character of the multidimensional flow field inside of sediment. More recent studies illustrate the importance of the elastic properties of the saturated sediment on modulating fluid exchange between the water column and the sediment when pressure fluctuations along the sediment-water interface occur at the millisecond scale. Pressure fluctuations occur at this temporal scale due to turbulence and associated shedding of vortices due to the ripple geometry. This suggests that biogeochemical cycling may also be affected by these high-frequency elastic effects. Future studies should be directed towards this and should take advantage of modeling tools such as those we present.

  1. Modeling ocean circulation and biogeochemical variability in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Z.; He, R.; Fennel, K.; Cai, W.-J.; Lohrenz, S.; Hopkinson, C.

    2013-05-01

    A three-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied to simulate and examine temporal and spatial variability of circulation and biogeochemical cycling in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The model is driven by realistic atmospheric forcing, open boundary conditions from a data assimilative global ocean circulation model, and observed freshwater and terrestrial nutrient input from major rivers. A 7 yr model hindcast (2004-2010) was performed, and validated against satellite observed sea surface height, surface chlorophyll, and in-situ observations including coastal sea-level, ocean temperature, salinity, and nutrient concentration. The model hindcast revealed clear seasonality in nutrient, phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions in the GoM. An Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis indicated a phase-locked pattern among nutrient, phytoplankton and zooplankton concentrations. The GoM shelf nutrient budget was also quantified, revealing that on an annual basis ~80% of nutrient input was denitrified on the shelf and ~17% was exported to the deep ocean.

  2. Modeling ocean circulation and biogeochemical variability in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Z.; He, R.; Fennel, K.; Cai, W.-J.; Lohrenz, S.; Hopkinson, C.

    2013-11-01

    A three-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied to simulate and examine temporal and spatial variability of circulation and biogeochemical cycling in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The model is driven by realistic atmospheric forcing, open boundary conditions from a data assimilative global ocean circulation model, and observed freshwater and terrestrial nitrogen input from major rivers. A 7 yr model hindcast (2004-2010) was performed, and validated against satellite observed sea surface height, surface chlorophyll, and in situ observations including coastal sea level, ocean temperature, salinity, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentration. The model hindcast revealed clear seasonality in DIN, phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions in the GoM. An empirical orthogonal function analysis indicated a phase-locked pattern among DIN, phytoplankton and zooplankton concentrations. The GoM shelf nitrogen budget was also quantified, revealing that on an annual basis the DIN input is largely balanced by the removal through denitrification (an equivalent of ~ 80% of DIN input) and offshore exports to the deep ocean (an equivalent of ~ 17% of DIN input).

  3. Modeling Biogeochemical Cycling of Heavy Metals in Lake Coeur d'Alene Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengor, S. S.; Spycher, N.; Belding, E.; Curthoys, K.; Ginn, T. R.

    2005-12-01

    Mining of precious metals since the late 1800's have left Lake Coeur d'Alene (LCdA) sediments heavily enriched with toxic metals, including Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Indigenous microbes however are capable of catalyzing reactions that detoxify the benthic and aqueous lake environments, and thus constitute an important driving component in the biogeochemical cycles of these metals. Here we report on the development of a quantitative model of transport, fate, exposure and effects of toxic compounds on benthic microbial communities at LCdA. First, chemical data from the LCdA area have been compiled from multiple sources to investigate trends in chemical occurrence, as well as to define model boundary conditions. The model is structured as 1-D diffusive reactive transport model to simulate spatial and temporal distribution of metals through the benthic sediments. Inorganic reaction processes included in the model are aqueous speciation, surface complexation, mineral precipitation/dissolution and abiotic redox reactions. Simulations with and without surface complexation are carried out to evaluate the effect of sorption and the conservative behaviour of metals within the benthic sediments under abiotic and purely diffusive transport. The 1-D inorganic diffusive transport model is then coupled to a biotic reaction network including consortium biodegradation kinetics with multiple electron acceptors, product toxicity, and energy partitioning. Multiyear simulations are performed, with water column chemistry established as a boundary condition from extant data, to explore the role of biogeochemical dynamics on benthic fluxes of metals in the long term.

  4. Modeling carbon cycle responses to tree mortality: linking microbial and biogeochemical changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. J.; Trahan, N. A.; Dynes, E. L.; Zobitz, J. M.; Gallery, R.

    2013-12-01

    Amid a worldwide increase in tree mortality, mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) have killed billions of trees from Mexico to Alaska in the last 13 years. This mortality is predicted to influence important carbon, water and energy balance feedbacks on the Earth system. We studied changes in soil biogeochemical cycling and microbial community structure after tree mortality. We show, using a decade long chronosequence, that tree mortality causes no increase in total respiration from local to watershed scales, with corresponding changes in biogeochemical pools of nitrogen and phosphorus. We also found comparable declines in both gross primary productivity and respiration suggesting little change in net flux. We tested the mechanisms controlling these patterns using an ecosystem model; contrasting a simplified microbial subroutine with a 'dead soil' model. We coupled our modeling work with direct measurements of microbial biomass, enzyme kinetics and community structure. The transitory recovery of respiration 6-7 years after mortality was associated with increased microbial biomass, increased incorporation of leaf litter carbon into soil organic matter, and was followed by a secondary decline in respiration during years 8-10. Our findings are consistent with the mechanism of reduced input of new carbon causing a decline in microbial biomass rather than an increased output of older carbon.

  5. Coupled assimilation for an intermediated coupled ENSO prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fei; Zhu, Jiang

    2010-10-01

    The value of coupled assimilation is discussed using an intermediate coupled model in which the wind stress is the only atmospheric state which is slavery to model sea surface temperature (SST). In the coupled assimilation analysis, based on the coupled wind-ocean state covariance calculated from the coupled state ensemble, the ocean state is adjusted by assimilating wind data using the ensemble Kalman filter. As revealed by a series of assimilation experiments using simulated observations, the coupled assimilation of wind observations yields better results than the assimilation of SST observations. Specifically, the coupled assimilation of wind observations can help to improve the accuracy of the surface and subsurface currents because the correlation between the wind and ocean currents is stronger than that between SST and ocean currents in the equatorial Pacific. Thus, the coupled assimilation of wind data can decrease the initial condition errors in the surface/subsurface currents that can significantly contribute to SST forecast errors. The value of the coupled assimilation of wind observations is further demonstrated by comparing the prediction skills of three 12-year (1997-2008) hindcast experiments initialized by the ocean-only assimilation scheme that assimilates SST observations, the coupled assimilation scheme that assimilates wind observations, and a nudging scheme that nudges the observed wind stress data, respectively. The prediction skills of two assimilation schemes are significantly better than those of the nudging scheme. The prediction skills of assimilating wind observations are better than assimilating SST observations. Assimilating wind observations for the 2007/2008 La Niña event triggers better predictions, while assimilating SST observations fails to provide an early warning for that event.

  6. PHOTOREACTIONS IN SURFACE WATERS AND THEIR ROLE IN BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade significant interest has developed in the influence of photochemical reactions on biogeochemical cycles in surface waters of lakes and the sea. A major portion of recent research on these photoreactions has focused on the colored component of dissolved org...

  7. Incorporating nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria in the global biogeochemical model HAMOCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Hanna; Ilyina, Tatiana; Six, Katharina

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen fixation by marine diazotrophs plays a fundamental role in the oceanic nitrogen and carbon cycle as it provides a major source of 'new' nitrogen to the euphotic zone that supports biological carbon export and sequestration. Since most global biogeochemical models include nitrogen fixation only diagnostically, they are not able to capture its spatial pattern sufficiently. Here we present the incorporation of an explicit, dynamic representation of diazotrophic cyanobacteria and the corresponding nitrogen fixation in the global ocean biogeochemical model HAMOCC (Hamburg Ocean Carbon Cycle model), which is part of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth system model (MPI-ESM). The parameterization of the diazotrophic growth is thereby based on available knowledge about the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium spp., which is considered as the most significant pelagic nitrogen fixer. Evaluation against observations shows that the model successfully reproduces the main spatial distribution of cyanobacteria and nitrogen fixation, covering large parts of the tropical and subtropical oceans. Besides the role of cyanobacteria in marine biogeochemical cycles, their capacity to form extensive surface blooms induces a number of bio-physical feedback mechanisms in the Earth system. The processes driving these interactions, which are related to the alteration of heat absorption, surface albedo and momentum input by wind, are incorporated in the biogeochemical and physical model of the MPI-ESM in order to investigate their impacts on a global scale. First preliminary results will be shown.

  8. Biogeochemical Changes Accompanying Woody Plant Encroachment in a Subtropical Savanna

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Hibbard; S. Archer; D. S. Schimel; D. W. Valentine

    2001-01-01

    Ecosystem properties of surficial (0-10 cm) soils in remnant herbaceous patches were compared to those of contrasting woody plant patch types (upland discrete cluster, upland grove, and lowland woodland) where shifting land cover is known to have occurred over the past 50-77 yr. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and quantify the biogeochemical consequences and subsequent developmental rates

  9. The identification and biogeochemical interpretation of fossil magnetotactic bacteria

    E-print Network

    The identification and biogeochemical interpretation of fossil magnetotactic bacteria Robert E. Available online 14 August 2007. Abstract Magnetotactic bacteria, which most commonly live within the oxic, specifically magnetite or greigite. The crystals cause the bacteria to orient themselves passively with respect

  10. USELESS ARITHMETIC? LESSONS LEARNT FROM AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMICAL MODELING

    E-print Network

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    USELESS ARITHMETIC? LESSONS LEARNT FROM AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMICAL MODELING George B. Arhonditsis), land use planning, climate change on global, regional and local scales, and system adaptation. In all these disciplines, the appeal of models mainly stems from their ability to synthesize among different types

  11. EFFECTS OF INCREASED SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increases in solar UV radiation could affect terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical cycles thus altering both sources and sinks of greenhouse and chemically important trace gases (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), carbonyl sulfide (COS)). n terrestrial ecosystems,...

  12. Microbial and biogeochemical processes in Big Soda Lake, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. S. Oremland; J. E. Cloern; R. L. Smith; C. W. Culbertson; J. Zehr; L. Miller; B. Cole; R. Harvey; Z. Sofer; N. Iversen; M. Klug; D. J. Des Marais; G. Rau

    1988-01-01

    SUMMA R Y : Meromictic, alkaline lakes represent modern-day analogues of lacustrine source rock depositional environments. In order to further our understanding of how these lakes function in terms of limnological and biogeochemical processes, we have conducted an interdisciplinary study of Big Soda Lake. Annual mixolimnion productivity (ca. 500 g m-') is dominated by a winter diatom bloom (60% of

  13. BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING OF MERCURY: Insights from global modeling

    E-print Network

    Selin, Noelle Eckley

    ; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science to Achieve Results (STAR) Graduate Fellowship; U.S. National Science Foundation Atmospheric Chemistry Program #12;FROM ATMOSPHERE TO FISH: MERCURY RISING Ice leads to high fish methylmercury #12;GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLE OF MERCURY [Selin et al. GBC 2008

  14. The role of phytoplankton photosynthesis in global biogeochemical cycles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul G. Falkowski

    1994-01-01

    Phytoplankton biomass in the world's oceans amounts to only ?1–2% of the total global plant carbon, yet these organisms fix between 30 and 50 billion metric tons of carbon annually, which is about 40% of the total. On geological time scales there is profound evidence of the importance of phytoplankton photosynthesis in biogeochemical cycles. It is generally assumed that present

  15. Biogeochemical study of organic substances in Antarctic lakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Genki I. Matsumoto

    1989-01-01

    The features of organic constituents in Antarctic lakes and ponds of the McMurdo, Syowa and Vestfold oases are summarised from a biogeochemical viewpoint. Total organic carbon or dissolved organic carbon contents in saline lakewaters are generally extremely high and much higher than those in freshwater lakes. The concentrations and\\/or compositions of hydrocarbons, fatty acids, sterols, phenolic acids and hydroxy acids

  16. Biogeochemical Process Comparison of the Five USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, J. B.; Peters, N. E.; Aulenbach, B. T.; Blum, A. E.; Campbell, D. H.; Clow, D. W.; Larsen, M. C.; Mast, M. A.; Stallard, R. F.; Troester, J. W.; Walker, J. F.; Webb, R. M.; White, A. F.

    2001-12-01

    Input - output budgets (in wet deposition and streamwater) have been constructed for water and major solutes at the five USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) sites for the period 1992-97 (Peters et al., 2000). In this poster we interpret the net chemical fluxes to identify the controlling biogeochemical processes, as influenced by the strong physical and biological contrasts (climate, geology, physiography, and vegetation types) in the five diverse environments. The five sites are: Allequash Creek, Wisconsin (low-relief humid continental forest); Andrews Creek, Colorado (cold alpine, taiga/tundra, and subalpine boreal forest); Icacos River, Puerto Rico (lower montane, wet tropical forest); Panola Mountain, Georgia (humid subtropical piedmont forest); and Sleepers River, Vermont (humid northern hardwood forest). Base cations and Si produced by chemical weathering displayed a net export at each site. The magnitude and stoichiometry of export reflects mineralogy, climate (temperature and rainfall), and water residence time in the subsurface. The lowest and highest mass export generally was for Andrews Creek and Icacos River, respectively, consistent with their extreme mean annual temperatures (0/degC in Colorado to 21/degC in Puerto Rico) and the limited residence time of meltwater at Andrews Creek. Calcite in bedrock at the three coldest watersheds caused somewhat higher relative export of Ca, especially at Sleepers River where calcite weathering is a dominant control on stream chemistry. In contrast, the high Mg content of the volcaniclastic rocks at Icacos River and glacial deposits at Allequash Creek caused disproportionately high Mg export relative to the other sites. Relatively high Na export at Panola Mountain and K export at Sleepers River are probably caused by plagioclase and biotite weathering, respectively. SO4 is retained at the two warmest sites, Panola Mountain and Icacos River. SO4 adsorption is known to limit SO4- export in highly weathered subtropical and tropical soils. At Sleepers River, net SO4 export occurs as a result of weathering of sulfide minerals in the bedrock, and correspondingly limited soil SO4 adsorption capacity. A small net export of SO4 occurs at Allequash Creek and Andrews Creek, but the SO4 may be in balance if dry deposition were added to the inputs. All sites except Icacos River retain NO3. At Andrews Creek and Sleepers River, net export of NO3 occurs during the peak snowmelt months, as soils are flushed during a time of low biological uptake. Additional analysis will be performed to evaluate the relative importance of temperature (affecting weathering rates and biological uptake) and water yield (i.e., the amount of water flushing through a catchment) in controlling solute fluxes.

  17. Developing biogeochemical tracers of apatite weathering by ectomycorrhizal fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadeboncoeur, M. A.; Bryce, J. G.; Hobbie, E. A.; Meana-Prado, M. F.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2012-12-01

    Chronic acid deposition has depleted calcium (Ca) from many New England forest soils, and intensive harvesting may reduce phosphorus (P) available to future rotations. Thin glacial till soils contain trace amounts of apatite, a primary calcium phosphate mineral, which may be an important long-term source of both P and Ca to ecosystems. The extent to which ECM fungi enhance the weathering rate of primary minerals in soil which contain growth-limiting nutrients remains poorly quantified, in part due to biogeochemical tracers which are subsequently masked by within-plant fractionation. Rare earth elements (REEs) and Pb isotope ratios show some potential for revealing differences in soil apatite weathering rates across forest stands and silvicultural treatments. To test the utility of these tracers, we grew birch seedlings semi-hydroponically under controlled P-limited conditions, supplemented with mesh bags containing granite chips. Our experimental design included nonmycorrhizal (NM) as well as ectomycorrhizal cultures (Cortinarius or Leccinum). Resulting mycorrhizal roots and leachates of granite chips were analyzed for these tracers. REE concentrations in roots were greatly elevated in treatments with granite relative to those without granite, demonstrating uptake of apatite weathering products. Roots with different mycorrhizal fungi accumulated similar concentrations of REEs and were generally elevated compared to the NM cultures. Ammonium chloride leaches of granite chips grown in contact with mycorrhizal hyphae show elevated REE concentrations and significantly radiogenic Pb isotope signatures relative to bulk rock, also supporting enhanced apatite dissolution. Our results in culture are consistent with data from field-collected sporocarps from hardwood stands in the Bartlett Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, in which Cortinarius sporocarp Pb isotope ratios were more radiogenic than those of other ectomycorrhizal sporocarps. Taken together, the experimental and field results imply that the coupled approach of REE and Pb isotopic values afford a means to quantify the degree to which primary mineral weathering inputs are contributing to ecosystem nutrient budgets and potentially the role of different types of ECM fungi in the weathering process.

  18. Development of interactive graphic user interfaces for modeling reaction-based biogeochemical processes in batch systems with BIOGEOCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Li, M.; Yeh, G.

    2010-12-01

    The BIOGEOCHEM numerical model (Yeh and Fang, 2002; Fang et al., 2003) was developed with FORTRAN for simulating reaction-based geochemical and biochemical processes with mixed equilibrium and kinetic reactions in batch systems. A complete suite of reactions including aqueous complexation, adsorption/desorption, ion-exchange, redox, precipitation/dissolution, acid-base reactions, and microbial mediated reactions were embodied in this unique modeling tool. Any reaction can be treated as fast/equilibrium or slow/kinetic reaction. An equilibrium reaction is modeled with an implicit finite rate governed by a mass action equilibrium equation or by a user-specified algebraic equation. A kinetic reaction is modeled with an explicit finite rate with an elementary rate, microbial mediated enzymatic kinetics, or a user-specified rate equation. None of the existing models has encompassed this wide array of scopes. To ease the input/output learning curve using the unique feature of BIOGEOCHEM, an interactive graphic user interface was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio and .Net tools. Several user-friendly features, such as pop-up help windows, typo warning messages, and on-screen input hints, were implemented, which are robust. All input data can be real-time viewed and automated to conform with the input file format of BIOGEOCHEM. A post-processor for graphic visualizations of simulated results was also embedded for immediate demonstrations. By following data input windows step by step, errorless BIOGEOCHEM input files can be created even if users have little prior experiences in FORTRAN. With this user-friendly interface, the time effort to conduct simulations with BIOGEOCHEM can be greatly reduced.

  19. SYM01or -Arsenic in Soil and Groundwater Environment:Biogeochemical Interactions Proc. 7th Intern. Conf. on the Biogeochem. of Trace Elements; Uppsala '03

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    #12;SYM01or - Arsenic in Soil and Groundwater Environment:Biogeochemical Interactions Proc. 7th Intern. Conf. on the Biogeochem. of Trace Elements; Uppsala '03 In-Situ Speciation of Arsenic (E-mail: mamarcus@als.gov). INTRODUCTION Arsenic (As) contamination often occurs in areas

  20. Biogeochemical implications of climate change for tropical rivers and floodplains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen K. Hamilton

    2010-01-01

    Large rivers of the tropics, many of which have extensive floodplains and deltas, are important in the delivery of nutrients\\u000a and sediments to marine environments, in methane emission to the atmosphere and in providing ecosystem services associated\\u000a with their high biological productivity. These ecosystem functions entail biogeochemical processes that will be influenced\\u000a by climate change. Evidence for recent climate-driven changes

  1. Aquifer/aquitard interfaces: Mixing zones that enhance biogeochemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.

    2001-01-01

    Several important biogeochemical reactions are known to occur near the interface between aquifer and aquitard sediments. These reactions include O2 reduction; denitrification; and Fe3+, SO42-, and CO2 (methanogenesis) reduction. In some settings, these reactions occur on the aquitard side of the interface as electron acceptors move from the aquifer into the electron-donor-enriched aquitard. In other settings, these reactions occur on the aquifer side of the interface as electron donors move from the aquitard into the electron-acceptor-enriched, or microorganism-enriched, aquifer. Thus, the aquifer/aquitard interface represents a mixing zone capable of supporting greater microbial activity than either hydrogeologic unit alone. The extent to which biogeochemical reactions proceed in the mixing zone and the width of the mixing zone depend on several factors, including the abundance and solubility of electron acceptors and donors on either side of the interface and the rate at which electron acceptors and donors react and move across the interface. Biogeochemical reactions near the aquifer/aquitard interface can have a substantial influence on the chemistry of water in aquifers and on the chemistry of sediments near the interface.

  2. A Unified Multi-scale Model for Cross-Scale Evaluation and Integration of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Yang, X.; Bailey, V. L.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Hinkle, C.

    2013-12-01

    Mathematical representations of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in soil, plant, aquatic, and atmospheric systems vary with scale. Process-rich models are typically used to describe hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the pore and small scales, while empirical, correlation approaches are often used at the watershed and regional scales. A major challenge for multi-scale modeling is that water flow, biogeochemical processes, and reactive transport are described using different physical laws and/or expressions at the different scales. For example, the flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations at the pore-scale in soils, by the Darcy law in soil columns and aquifer, and by the Navier-Stokes equations again in open water bodies (ponds, lake, river) and atmosphere surface layer. This research explores whether the physical laws at the different scales and in different physical domains can be unified to form a unified multi-scale model (UMSM) to systematically investigate the cross-scale, cross-domain behavior of fundamental processes at different scales. This presentation will discuss our research on the concept, mathematical equations, and numerical execution of the UMSM. Three-dimensional, multi-scale hydrological processes at the Disney Wilderness Preservation (DWP) site, Florida will be used as an example for demonstrating the application of the UMSM. In this research, the UMSM was used to simulate hydrological processes in rooting zones at the pore and small scales including water migration in soils under saturated and unsaturated conditions, root-induced hydrological redistribution, and role of rooting zone biogeochemical properties (e.g., root exudates and microbial mucilage) on water storage and wetting/draining. The small scale simulation results were used to estimate effective water retention properties in soil columns that were superimposed on the bulk soil water retention properties at the DWP site. The UMSM parameterized from smaller scale simulations were then used to simulate coupled flow and moisture migration in soils in saturated and unsaturated zones, surface and groundwater exchange, and surface water flow in streams and lakes at the DWP site under dynamic precipitation conditions. Laboratory measurements of soil hydrological and biogeochemical properties are used to parameterize the UMSM at the small scales, and field measurements are used to evaluate the UMSM.

  3. Biogeochemical mass balances in a turbid tropical reservoir. Field data and modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong Doan, Thuy Kim; Némery, Julien; Gratiot, Nicolas; Schmid, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The turbid tropical Cointzio reservoir, located in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), behaves as a warm monomictic water body (area = 6 km2, capacity 66 Mm3, residence time ~ 1 year). It is strategic for the drinking water supply of the city of Morelia, capital of the state of Michoacán, and for downstream irrigation during the dry season. This reservoir is a perfect example of a human-impacted system since its watershed is mainly composed of degraded volcanic soils and is subjected to high erosion processes and agricultural loss. The reservoir is threatened by sediment accumulation and nutrients originating from untreated waters in the upstream watershed. The high content of very fine clay particles and the lack of water treatment plants lead to serious episodes of eutrophication (up to 70 ?g chl. a L-1), high levels of turbidity (Secchi depth < 30 cm) and a long period of anoxia (from May to October). Based on intensive field measurements in 2009 (deposited sediment, benthic chamber, water vertical profiles, reservoir inflow and outflow) we determined suspended sediment (SS), carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) mass balances. Watershed SS yields were estimated at 35 t km2 y-1 of which 89-92 % were trapped in the Cointzio reservoir. As a consequence the reservoir has already lost 25 % of its initial storage capacity since its construction in 1940. Nutrient mass balances showed that 50 % and 46 % of incoming P and N were retained by sedimentation, and mainly eliminated through denitrification respectively. Removal of C by 30 % was also observed both by sedimentation and through gas emission. To complete field data analyses we examined the ability of vertical one dimensional (1DV) numerical models (Aquasim biogeochemical model coupled with k-? mixing model) to reproduce the main biogeochemical cycles in the Cointzio reservoir. The model can describe all the mineralization processes both in the water column and in the sediment. The values of the entire mass balance of nutrients and of the mineralization rates (denitrification and aerobic benthic mineralization) calculated from the model fitted well to the field measurements. Furthermore, this analysis indicates that the benthic mineralizations are the dominant processes involved in the nutrients release. This is the first implementation of a biogeochemical model applied to a highly productive reservoir in the TMVB in order to estimate nutrients release from sediments. It could be used for scenarios of reduction of eutrophication in the reservoir. This study provides a good example of the behavior of a small tropical reservoir under intense human pressure and it will help stakeholders to adopt appropriate strategies for the management of turbid tropical reservoirs.

  4. Variably saturated flow and multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a uranium bioremediation field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Andy L.; Dayvault, Richard D.; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional, coupled variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport and biogeochemical reactions controlling uranium behavior under pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. While the simulation of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado was generally consistent with behaviors identified in previous field experiments at the Rifle IFRC site, the additional process and property detail provided several new insights. A principal conclusion from this work is that uranium bioreduction is most effective when acetate, in excess of the sulfate-reducing bacteria demand, is available to the metal-reducing bacteria. The inclusion of an initially small population of slow growing sulfate-reducing bacteria identified in proteomic analyses led to an additional source of Fe(II) from the dissolution of Fe(III) minerals promoted by biogenic sulfide. The falling water table during the experiment significantly reduced the saturated thickness of the aquifer and resulted in reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted in higher concentrations of TEAP reaction products when terminal electron donors and acceptors were not limiting. Finally, facies-based porosity and reactive surface area variations were shown to affect aqueous uranium concentration distributions with localized effects of the fine lithofacies having the largest impact on U(VI) surface complexation. The ability to model the comprehensive biogeochemical reaction network, and spatially and temporally variable processes, properties, and conditions controlling uranium behavior during engineered bioremediation in the naturally complex Rifle IFRC subsurface system required a subsurface simulator that could use the large memory and computational performance of a massively parallel computer. In this case, the eSTOMP simulator, operating on 128 processor cores for 12 h, was used to simulate the 110-day field experiment and 50 days of post-biostimulation behavior.

  5. Operator-splitting errors in coupled reactive transport codes for flow and transport under atmospheric boundary conditions or layered soil profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One possible way of integrating subsurface flow and transport processes with (bio)geochemical reactions is to couple by means of an operator-splitting approach two completely separate codes, one for variably-saturated flow and solute transport and one for equilibrium and kinetic biogeochemical react...

  6. Hyporheic transport and biogeochemical reactions in pool-riffle systems under varying ambient groundwater flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Vieweg, Michael; Maier, Uli; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    At the interface between stream water, groundwater, and the hyporheic zone (HZ), important biogeochemical processes that play a crucial role in fluvial ecology occur. Solutes that infiltrate into the HZ can react with each other and possibly also with upwelling solutes from the groundwater. In this study, we systematically evaluate how variations of gaining and losing conditions, stream discharge, and pool-riffle morphology affect aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. For this purpose, a computational fluid dynamics model of stream water flow is coupled to a reactive transport model. Scenarios of variations of the solute concentration in the upwelling groundwater were conducted. Our results show that solute influx, residence time, and the size of reactive zones strongly depend on presence, magnitude, and direction of ambient groundwater flow. High magnitudes of ambient groundwater flow lower AR efficiency by up to 4 times and DN by up to 3 orders of magnitude, compared to neutral conditions. The influence of stream discharge and morphology on the efficiency of AR and DN are minor, in comparison to that of ambient groundwater flow. Different scenarios of O2 and NO3 concentrations in the upwelling groundwater reveal that DN efficiency of the HZ is highest under low upwelling magnitudes accompanied with low concentrations of O2 and NO3. Our results demonstrate how ambient groundwater flow influences solute transport, AR, and DN in the HZ. Neglecting groundwater flow in stream-groundwater interactions would lead to a significant overestimation of the efficiency of biogeochemical reactions in fluvial systems.

  7. Using isotopes to understand linked hydrological, biological, and biogeochemical processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, B. D.; Aggarwal, P. K.; Araguas-Araguas, L.; Groening, M.; Poeltenstein, L.; Tanweer, A.

    2010-12-01

    Isotopes have many applications for understanding linked processes in ecosystems. Stable isotopes in particular are powerful tools because of their sensitivity to particular sources, transformations, and flow processes. Although less commonly used in an ecohydrological context, radioactive isotopes can also be valuable especially when questions related to groundwater or catchment residence times are involved. In this presentation, we will illustrate how isotopes can improve understanding of linked processes in ecosystems. For example, investigations of linked vadose zone/plant/atmosphere systems using deuterium and oxygen-18 show that both vertical and horizontal spatial variability of isotope values can provide important clues to understand how evaporation and transpiration partitioning varies across the landscape and how these processes impact water flow and pore water chemistry. The links to pore water chemistry are important because they show how strongly coupled vadose zone flow and transport, plant water use, and biogeochemical processes can be. Over the last few decades the use of isotopes has transformed understanding of linked hydrological, biological, and biogeochemical processes from both conceptual and quantitative viewpoints. In addition, recent advances in laboratory- and field-analysis methods for stable isotopes using laser absorption based methods have already had large impacts on scientific research and such impacts will almost certainly grow in the next few years. However, there are still important research questions and deficiencies in our sampling and analytical capabilities remain. These issues significantly hamper efforts to make better quantitative estimates of important fluxes (evaporation being one example). We conclude by discussing some of the key areas that require further development including issues related to the use of isotopes to quantify evaporation and evaporation/transpiration partitioning.

  8. The significance of GW-SW interactions for biogeochemical processes in sandy streambeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, Shai; De Falco, Natalie; Fox, Aryeh; Laube, Gerrit; Schmidt, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jan; Boano, Fulvio

    2015-04-01

    Stream-groundwater interactions have a major impact on hyporheic exchange fluxes in sandy streambeds. However, the physical complexity of natural streams has limited our ability to study these types of interactions systematically, and to evaluate their importance to biogeochemical processes and nutrient cycling. In this work we were able to quantify the effect of losing and gaining fluxes on hyporheic exchange and nutrient cycling in homogeneous and heterogeneous streambeds by combining experiments in laboratory flumes and modeling. Tracer experiments for measuring hyporheic exchange were done using dyes and NaCl under various combinations of overlying water velocity and losing or gaining fluxes. Nutrient cycling experiments were conducted after growing a benthic biofilm by spiking with Sodium Benzoate (as a source of labile dissolved organic carbon, DOC) and measuring DOC and oxygen dynamics. The combination of experimental observations and modeling revealed that interfacial transport increases with the streambed hydraulic conductivity and proportional to the square of the overlying water velocity. Hyporheic exchange fluxes under losing and gaining flow conditions were similar, and became smaller when the losing or gaining flux increases. Increasing in streambed hydraulic conductivity led to higher hyporheic fluxes and reduction in the effects of losing and gaining flow conditions to constrain exchange. Despite the evident effect of flow conditions on hyporheic exchange, labile DOC uptake was positively linked to increasing overlying water velocity but was not affected by losing and gaining fluxes. This is because microbial aerobic activity was taking place at the upper few millimeters of the streambed as shown by local oxygen consumption rates, which was measured using microelectrodes. Based on modeling work, it is expected that GW-SW interaction will be more significant for less labile DOC and anaerobic processes. Our results enable us to study systematically the coupling between flow conditions and biogeochemical processes under highly controlled physical and chemical conditions and are expected to improve our understanding of nutrient cycling in streams.

  9. Pre-treatments, characteristics, and biogeochemical dynamics of dissolved organic matter in sediments: A review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meilian; Hur, Jin

    2015-08-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in sediments, termed here sediment DOM, plays a variety of important roles in global biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients as well as in the fate and transport of xenobiotics. Here we reviewed sediment DOM, including pore waters and water extractable organic matter from inland and coastal sediments, based on recent literature (from 1996 to 2014). Sampling, pre-treatment, and characterization methods for sediment DOM were summarized. The characteristics of sediment DOM have been compared along an inland to coastal ecosystems gradient and also with the overlying DOM in water column to distinguish the unique nature of it. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from inland sediment DOM was generally higher than coastal areas, while no notable differences were found for their aromaticity and apparent molecular weight. Fluorescence index (FI) revealed that mixed sources are dominant for inland sediment DOM, but marine end-member prevails for coastal sediment DOM. Many reports showed that sediments operate as a net source of DOC and chromophoric DOM (CDOM) to the water column. Sediment DOM has shown more enrichment of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds in the elemental signature than the overlying DOM. Fluorescent fingerprint investigated by excitation-emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) further demonstrated the characteristics of sediment DOM lacking in the photo-oxidized and the intermediate components, which are typically present in the overlying surface water. In addition, the biogeochemical changes in sediment DOM and the subsequent environmental implications were discussed with the focus on the binding and the complexation properties with pollutants. PMID:25965884

  10. BIOGEOCHEMICAL ECOLOGY OF AQUACULTURE PONDS A DISSERTATION SUBMITIED TO THE GRADUATE DIVISION OF THE

    E-print Network

    Luther, Douglas S.

    BIOGEOCHEMICAL ECOLOGY OF AQUACULTURE PONDS A DISSERTATION SUBMITIED TO THE GRADUATE DIVISION production and consumption were applied in shrimp aquaculture ponds which served as convenient model systems

  11. Mangrove forests: a potent nexus of coastal biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, J. G.; Fuentes, J. D.; Shoemaker, B.; O'Halloran, T. L.; Lin, G., Sr.; Engel, V. C.

    2014-12-01

    Mangrove forests cover just 0.1% of the Earth's terrestrial surface, yet they provide a disproportionate source (~10 % globally) of terrestrially derived, refractory dissolved organic carbon to the oceans. Mangrove forests are biogeochemical reactors that convert biomass into dissolved organic and inorganic carbon at unusually high rates, and many studies recognize the value of mangrove ecosystems for the substantial amounts of soil carbon storage they produce. However, questions remain as to how mangrove forest ecosystem services should be valuated and quantified. Therefore, this study addresses several objectives. First, we demonstrate that seasonal and annual net ecosystem carbon exchange in three selected mangrove forests, derived from long-term eddy covariance measurements, represent key quantities in defining the magnitude of biogeochemical cycling and together with other information on carbon cycle parameters serves as a proxy to estimate ecosystem services. Second, we model ecosystem productivity across the mangrove forests of Everglades National Park and southern China by relating net ecosystem exchange values to remote sensing data. Finally, we develop a carbon budget for the mangrove forests in the Everglades National Park for the purposes of demonstrating that these forests and adjacent estuaries are sites of intense biogeochemical cycling. One conclusion from this study is that much of the carbon entering from the atmosphere as net ecosystem exchange (~1000 g C m-2 yr-1) is not retained in the net ecosystem carbon balance. Instead, a substantial fraction of the carbon entering the system as net ecosystem exchange is ultimately exported to the oceans or outgassed as reaction products within the adjacent estuary.

  12. Using Geochemical Indicators to Distinguish High Biogeochemical Activity in Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenwell, A. M.; Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Prugue, R.; Spear, J. R.; Williams, K. H.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    A better understanding of how microbial communities interact with their surroundings in physically and chemically heterogeneous subsurface environments will lead to improved quantification of biogeochemical reactions and associated nutrient cycling. This study develops a methodology to predict elevated rates of biogeochemical activity (microbial "hotspots") in subsurface environments by correlating microbial community structure with the spatial distribution of geochemical indicators in subsurface sediments. Statistical hierarchical cluster analyses (HCA) of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), simulated precipitation leachate, bioavailable Fe and Mn, total organic carbon (TOC), microbial community structure, grain size, bulk density and moisture content data were used to identify regions of the subsurface characterized by biogeochemical hotspots and sample characteristics indicative of these hotspots within fluvially-derived aquifer sediments. The methodology has been applied to (a) alluvial materials collected at a former uranium mill site near Rifle, Colorado and (b) relatively undisturbed floodplain deposits (soils and sediments) collected along the East River near Crested Butte, Colorado. At Rifle, 33 sediment samples were taken from 8 sediment cores and at the East River 33 soil/sediment samples were collected across and perpendicular to 3 active meanders. The East River watershed exhibits characteristic fluvial progression and serves as a representative example of many headwater catchments with the upper Colorado River basin. Initial clustering revealed that operationally defined hotspots were characterized by high organic carbon, bioavailable iron and dark colors but not necessarily low hydraulic conductivity. Applying the method to identify hotspots in both contaminated and natural floodplain deposits and their associated alluvial aquifers demonstrates the broad applicability of a geochemical indicator based approach.

  13. Remote analysis of biological invasion and biogeochemical change

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Gregory P.; Vitousek, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    We used airborne imaging spectroscopy and photon transport modeling to determine how biological invasion altered the chemistry of forest canopies across a Hawaiian montane rain forest landscape. The nitrogen-fixing tree Myrica faya doubled canopy nitrogen concentrations and water content as it replaced native forest, whereas the understory herb Hedychium gardnerianum reduced nitrogen concentrations in the forest overstory and substantially increased aboveground water content. This remote sensing approach indicates the geographic extent, intensity, and biogeochemical impacts of two distinct invaders; its wider application could enhance the role of remote sensing in ecosystem analysis and management. PMID:15761055

  14. Rivers and Stable Isotopes as Indicators of Biogeochemical Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Consideration of processes on very small (microbe) to large (catchment) scales become increasingly important in biogeochemical gradient work. In this context, rivers are ideal indicators of biogeochemical gradients for large continental scales when geochemical- and discharge data are combined for flux evaluations. If these are further combined with isotope measurements, sources and turnover of water and dissolved constituents can be quantified. An example study is the combination of GIS-, discharge- and water stable isotope data on the in Clyde River basin in Scotland. Here we determined transpiration with an annual average of 0.489 km3 a-1. When combining this rate with the water use efficiency, the CO2 uptake of the entire basin yielded an annual net primary production (NPP) of 185.2 g C m-2. Compared to other temperate areas this is about half the NPP than expected, which is most likely caused by the predominant cover of grasslands. Therefore, agricultural and forest vegetation schemes could influence continental water balances on time scales of years to decades. In another study on the Lagan River in N. Ireland, stable isotope methods were applied to evaluate the role of carbonate versus silicate dissolution. Of these two types of weathering only silicate dissolution withdraws atmospheric CO2 to be stored in the continental crust over long time periods. A downstream evolution with increasing pH- and ?13CDIC values revealed carbonate dissolution despite their minor abundance in the catchment of less than 5 %. This dominant carbonate signal on the riverine carbon cycle outlines the capacity of buffering anthropogenic influences and CO2 turnover. It should be even more pronounced in other rivers where carbonates usually occupy a larger proportion of the basin geology. Future biogeochemical gradient work on rivers should apply particulate and dissolved organic constituent fluxes. This includes more refined compound specific isotope work on selected pollutants such as TCE, PAH, PCB as well as riverine microbiological considerations. Such expansions meet the challenge of measuring much smaller concentrations compared to groundwater contaminant plumes. Further combinations of stable N, H, O, and S isotope systems would also help to resolve overlapping trends when only carbon isotopes are measured. Apart from combining traditional light stable isotope systems, addition of newly accessible isotope groups by multicollector ICP-MS (i.e. Fe, Cr, Zn) and radioisotope techniques can provide innovative tools for resolving gradients and their biogeochemical cycling within rivers.

  15. Enhanced biogeochemical cycling and subsequent reduction of hydraulic conductivity associated with soil-layer interfaces in the vadose zone

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, David J.; McGuire, Jennifer T.; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2013-01-01

    Biogeochemical dynamics in the vadose zone are poorly understood due to the transient nature of chemical and hydrologic conditions, but are nonetheless critical to understanding chemical fate and transport. This study explored the effects of a soil layer on linked geochemical, hydrological, and microbiological processes. Three laboratory soil columns were constructed: a homogenized medium-grained sand, a homogenized organic-rich loam, and a sand-over-loam layered column. Upward and downward infiltration of water was evaluated during experiments to simulate rising water table and rainfall events respectively. In-situ collocated probes measured soil water content, matric potential, and Eh while water samples collected from the same locations were analyzed for Br?, Cl?, NO3?, SO42?, NH4+, Fe2+, and total sulfide. Compared to homogenous columns, the presence of a soil layer altered the biogeochemistry and water flow of the system considerably. Enhanced biogeochemical cycling was observed in the layered column over the texturally homogeneous soil columns. Enumerations of iron and sulfate reducing bacteria showed 1-2 orders of magnitude greater community numbers in the layered column. Mineral and soil aggregate composites were most abundant near the soil-layer interface; the presence of which, likely contributed to an observed order-of-magnitude decrease in hydraulic conductivity. These findings show that quantifying coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes occurring at small-scale soil interfaces is critical to accurately describing and predicting chemical changes at the larger system scale. Findings also provide justification for considering soil layering in contaminant fate and transport models because of its potential to increase biodegradation and/or slow the rate of transport of contaminants. PMID:22031578

  16. Circulation and biogeochemical processes in the East China Sea and the vicinity of Taiwan: an overview and a brief synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kon-Kee; Peng, Tsung-Hung; Shaw, Ping-Tung; Shiah, Fuh-Kwo

    2003-03-01

    The East China Sea shelf (including the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea) is a very challenging system for hydrodynamic and biogeochemical studies due to its complicated physical and chemical forcing. It receives much attention because of its capacity for absorbing atmospheric CO 2 in spite of large riverine fluxes of terrigenous carbon. This volume reports field observations and modeling studies during the Kuroshio Edge Exchange Processes and ensuing projects, which are a part of the continental margins study in the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study. A 3-D numerical model has been developed to simulate the climatological circulation in the East China Sea. The model result is supported by observations in the seas around Taiwan. The significance of inflow from the Taiwan Strait is emphasized. Geochemical tracers prove useful in understanding the water and material transport. Biogeochemical studies suggest very efficient recycling of organic carbon by bacterial and protozoan consumption in the shelf water, but a finite amount of particulate organic carbon with a significant terrigenous fraction is exported from the shelf. The fine-grained sediments in the inner shelf appear to be an important source of organic carbon for export. Future studies are needed to improve our understanding of key physical and biogeochemcial processes, to develop coupled physical-biogeochemical models, and to catch and survey the elusive spring algal bloom. A tantalizing goal of our ongoing effort is to document or even to predict future changes in the East China Sea shelf caused by the operation of the Three-Gorge Dam, which is under construction in the middle reach of the Yangtze River.

  17. Western North Pacific Integrated Physical-Biogeochemical Ocean Observation Experiment: Summary of the Intensive Observation Around the Biogeochemical Mooring S1 (S1-INBOX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, T.; Inoue, R.; Kouketsu, S.; Hosoda, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Sato, K.; Nakajima, H.; Honda, M. C.; Fujiki, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Kawano, T.; Saino, T.

    2014-12-01

    The interdisciplinary project called the Western North Pacific Integrated Physical-Biogeochemical Experiment (INBOX) has been conducted since 2011. As the first phase of INBOX, more than 20 profiling floats with a dissolved oxygen sensor were deployed in late July 2011 within the 150-km square area centered at the biogeochemical mooring site S1 (30N, 145E) in the oligotrophic subtropics. The horizontal (30 km) and temporal (2 days) resolutions of the float array were set in order to capture relationship between biogeochemical phenomena and physical processes such as westward propagating eddies and atmospheric disturbances. The observations of large mass flux at 200 m, a high chlorophyll-a concentration in the deep chlorophyll maximum layer, large Fv/Fm ration and high dissolved oxygen concentration in the shallow oxygen maximum layer will be summarized and interpreted as biogeochemical responses to physical processes in and around mesoscale eddies including submesoscale motions, diapycnal mixing and surface wind forcing.

  18. BIOGEOCHEMICAL GRADIENTS AS A FRAMEWORK FOR UNDERSTANDING WASTE SITE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, M; Karen Vangelas, K

    2008-10-17

    The migration of biogeochemical gradients is a useful framework for understanding the evolution of biogeochemical conditions in groundwater at waste sites contaminated with metals and radionuclides. This understanding is critical to selecting sustainable remedies and evaluating sites for monitored natural attenuation, because most attenuation mechanisms are sensitive to geochemical conditions such as pH and redox potential. Knowledge of how gradients in these parameters evolve provides insights into the behavior of contaminants with time and guides characterization, remedy selection, and monitoring efforts. An example is a seepage basin site at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina where low-level acidic waste has seeped into groundwater. The remediation of this site relies, in part, on restoring the natural pH of the aquifer by injecting alkaline solutions. The remediation will continue until the pH up-flow of the treatment zone increases to an acceptable value. The time required to achieve this objective depends on the time it takes the trailing pH gradient, the gradient separating the plume from influxing natural groundwater, to reach the treatment zone. Predictions of this length of time will strongly influence long-term remedial decisions.

  19. Oceanic biogeochemical controls on global dynamics of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Dachs, Jordi; Lohmann, Rainer; Ockenden, Wendy A; Méjanelle, Laurence; Eisenreich, Steven J; Jones, Kevin C

    2002-10-15

    Understanding and quantifying the global dynamics and sinks of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is important to assess their environmental impact and fate. Air-surface exchange processes, where temperature plays a central role in controlling volatilization and deposition, are of key importance in controlling global POP dynamics. The present study is an assessment of the role of oceanic biogeochemical processes, notably phytoplankton uptake and vertical fluxes of particles, on the global dynamics of POPs. Field measurements of atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), and furans (PCDFs) are combined with remote sensing estimations of oceanic temperature, wind speed, and chlorophyll, to model the interactions between air-water exchange, phytoplankton uptake, and export of organic matter and POPs out of the mixed surface ocean layer. Deposition is enhanced in the mid-high latitudes and is driven by sinking marine particulate matter, rather than by a cold condensation effect. However, the relative contribution of the biological pump is a function of the physical-chemical properties of POPs. It is concluded that oceanic biogeochemical processes play a critical role in controlling the global dynamics and the ultimate sink of POPs. PMID:12387392

  20. Global changes in biogeochemical cycles in response to human activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III; Melillo, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of our research was to characterize biogeochemical cycles at continental and global scales in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This characterization applied to both natural ecosystems and those disturbed by human activity. The primary elements of interest were carbon and nitrogen and the analysis sought to quantify standing stocks and dynamic cycling processes. The translocation of major nutrients from the terrestrial landscape to the atmosphere (via trace gases) and to fluvial systems (via leaching, erosional losses, and point source pollution) were of particular importance to this study. Our aim was to develop the first generation of Earth System Models. Our research was organized around the construction and testing of component biogeochemical models which treated terrestrial ecosystem processes, aquatic nutrient transport through drainage basins, and trace gas exchanges at the continental and global scale. A suite of three complementary models were defined within this construct. The models were organized to operate at a 1/2 degree latitude by longitude level of spatial resolution and to execute at a monthly time step. This discretization afforded us the opportunity to understand the dynamics of the biosphere down to subregional scales, while simultaneously placing these dynamics into a global context.

  1. Biogeochemical ocean-atmosphere transfers in the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, S. Wajih A.; Bange, Hermann W.; Gibb, Stuart W.; Goyet, Catherine; Hatton, Angela D.; Upstill-Goddard, Robert C.

    2005-05-01

    Transfers of some important biogenic atmospheric constituents, carbon dioxide (CO 2), methane (CH 4), molecular nitrogen (N 2), nitrous oxide (N 2O), nitrate (NO3-), ammonia (NH 3), methylamines (MAs) and dimethylsulphide (DMS), across the air-sea interface are investigated using published data generated mostly during the Arabian Sea Process Study (1992-1997) of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS). The most important contribution of the region to biogeochemical fluxes is through the production of N 2 and N 2O facilitated by an acute, mid-water deficiency of dissolved oxygen (O 2); emissions of these gases to the atmosphere from the Arabian Sea are globally significant. For the other constituents, especially CO 2, even though the surface concentrations and atmospheric fluxes exhibit extremely large variations both in space and time, arising from the unique physical forcing and associated biogeochemical environment, the overall significance in terms of their global fluxes is not much because of the relatively small area of the Arabian Sea. Distribution and air-sea exchanges of some of these constituents are likely to be greatly influenced by alterations of the subsurface O 2 field forced by human-induced eutrophication and/or modifications to the regional hydrography.

  2. A GEOCLIM simulation of climatic and biogeochemical consequences of Pangea breakup

    E-print Network

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    A GEOCLIM simulation of climatic and biogeochemical consequences of Pangea breakup Y. Donnadieu. Pierrehumbert, G. Dromart, F. Fluteau, and R. Jacob (2006), A GEOCLIM simulation of climatic and biogeochemical Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, CNRS-CEA, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, Bat. 701

  3. Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst Adrian L. Melott,1

    E-print Network

    Jackman, Charles H.

    Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst Adrian L. Melott,1 Brian C. Jackman (2005), Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L14808, doi:10.1029/2005GL023073. 1. Terrestrial Implications of Gamma Ray Bursts in Our Galaxy [2

  4. Biogeochemical responses of the carbon cycle to natural and human perturbations: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Ver, L.M.B.; Mackenzie, F.T.; Lerman, A.

    1999-07-01

    In the past three centuries, human perturbations of the environment have affected the biogeochemical behavior of the global carbon cycle and that of the other three nutrient elements closely coupled to carbon: nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur. The partitioning of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} among its various sinks in the past, for the present, and for projections into the near future is controlled by the interactions of these four elemental cycles within the major environmental domains of the land, atmosphere, coastal oceanic zone, and open ocean. The authors analyze the past, present, and future behavior of the global carbon cycle using the Terrestrial-Ocean-aTmosphere Ecosystem Model (TOTEM), a unique process-based model of the four global coupled biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur. They find that during the past 300 yrs, anthropogenic CO{sub 2} was mainly stored in the atmosphere and in the open ocean. Human activities on land caused an enhanced loss of mass from the terrestrial organic matter reservoirs (phytomass and humus) mainly through deforestation and consequently increased humus remineralization, erosion, and transport to the coastal margins by rivers and runoff. Photosynthetic uptake by the terrestrial phytomass was enhanced owing to fertilization by increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations and supported by nutrients remineralized from organic matter. TOTEM results indicate that through most of the past 300 yrs, the loss of C from deforestation and other land-use activities was greater than the gain from the enhanced photosynthetic uptake. Since pre-industrial time (since 1700), the net flux of CO{sub 2} from the coastal waters has decreased by 40%, from 0.20 Gt C/yr to 0.12 Gt C/yr. TOTEM analyses of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations for the 21st century were based on the fossil-fuel emission projections of IPCC (business as usual scenario) and of the more restrictive UN 1997 Kyoto Protocol. By the mid-21st century, the projected atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations range from about 550 ppmv (TOTEM, based on IPCC projected emissions) to 510 ppmv (IPCC projection) and to 460 ppmv (TOTEM, based on the Kyoto Protocol reduced emissions).

  5. The general ensemble biogeochemical modeling system (GEMS) and its applications to agriculture systems in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The General Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS) was developed for a proper integration of well-established ecosystem biogeochemical models with various spatial databases to simulate biogeochemical cycles over large areas. Major driving variables include land cover and land use, climate, s...

  6. Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namocatcat, J. A.; Fang, J.; Barcelona, M. J.; Quibuyen, A. T. O.; Abrajano, T. A.

    2003-12-01

    Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and 2,3,5-trimethylbenzoic acids temporally and between multilevel wells reflect processes indicative of an actively evolving contaminant plume. The concentration levels of trimethylbenzoic acids were 3-10 orders higher than their tetramethylbenzene precursors, a condition attributed to slow metabolite turnover under sulfidogenic conditions. The observed degradation of tetramethylbenzenes into trimethylbenzoic acids obviates the use of these alkylbenzenes as non-labile tracers for other degradable aromatic hydrocarbons, but provides rare field evidence on the range of high molecular weight alkylbenzenes and isomeric assemblages amenable to anaerobic degradation in situ. The coupling of actual tetramethylbenzene loss with trimethylbenzoic acid production and the general decline in the concentrations of these compounds demonstrate the role of microbially mediated processes in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons and may be a key indicator in the overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation and the biogeochemical evolution of the KC-135 aquifer.

  7. Simulation of a Storm Surge Event at the North Sea (Germany) Using a Fully Coupled Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Graf, T.

    2012-04-01

    Tidal fluctuation and storm surge events lead to saltwater intrusion into a coastal aquifer. Tidal fluctuation causes dynamic boundary conditions of the seaside boundary, where submerged zones are of Dirichlet-type, and where aerial zones are of Neumann type. In a storm surge event, saltwater will flow on the land surface towards the inland and cover parts of the land surface. Saltwater will eventually infiltrate the unsaturated soil and percolate downwards towards the groundwater table. To simulate that dynamic coastal flow system, a fully integrated approach based on the numerical "HydroGeoSphere" model is being developed, where the coastal zone is treated as a hydraulically coupled surface-subsurface system. That new approach will allow simulation of: (i) surface flow, (ii) variably saturated, density-dependent groundwater flow, (iii) salt transport in the surface and in the subsurface, and (iv) water and salt interaction between surface and subsurface. In the new approach, tide and storm surge events induce a time variant head that is applied to nodes of the surface domain thus tide or storm surge force will be applied to the system through surface domain. The hydraulic interaction between the surface domain and the subsurface domain simplify the flow and transport boundary conditions caused by tidal fluctuation and storm surge events. This newly proposed approach is the first conceptual model of a fully coupled surface-subsurface coastal flow domain. It allows simulation of tidal activity and storm surges at a heretofore impossible complexity.

  8. Variably Saturated Flow and Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling of a Uranium Bioremediation Field Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Dayvault, Richard; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

    2011-11-01

    Field experiments at a former uranium mill tailings site have identified the potential for stimulating indigenous bacteria to catalyze the conversion of aqueous uranium in the +6 oxidation state to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. This effectively removes uranium from solution resulting in groundwater concentrations below actionable standards. Three-dimensional, coupled variably-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport rates and biogeochemical reaction rates that determine the location and magnitude of key reaction products. A comprehensive reaction network, developed largely through previous 1-D modeling studies, was used to simulate the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. A principal challenge is the mechanistic representation of biologically-mediated terminal electron acceptor process (TEAP) reactions whose products significantly alter geochemical controls on uranium mobility through increases in pH, alkalinity, exchangeable cations, and highly reactive reduction products. In general, these simulations of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado confirmed previously identified behaviors including (1) initial dominance by iron reducing bacteria that concomitantly reduce aqueous U(VI), (2) sulfate reducing bacteria that become dominant after {approx}30 days and outcompete iron reducers for the acetate electron donor, (3) continuing iron-reducer activity and U(VI) bioreduction during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions, and (4) lower apparent U(VI) removal from groundwater during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions. New knowledge on simultaneously active metal and sulfate reducers has been incorporated into the modeling. In this case, an initially small population of slow growing sulfate reducers is active from the initiation of biostimulation. Three-dimensional, variably saturated flow modeling was used to address impacts of a falling water table during acetate injection. These impacts included a significant reduction in aquifer saturated thickness and isolation of residual reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted in higher concentrations of TEAP products when terminal electron donors and acceptors were not limiting. Finally, facies-based porosity and reactive surface area variations were shown to affect aqueous uranium concentration distributions; however, the ranges were sufficiently small to preserve general trends. Large computer memory and high computational performance were required to simulate the detailed coupled process models for multiple biogeochemical components in highly resolved heterogeneous materials for the 110-day field experiment and 50 days of post-biostimulation behavior. In this case, a highly-scalable subsurface simulator operating on 128 processor cores for 12 hours was used to simulate each realization. An equivalent simulation without parallel processing would have taken 60 days, assuming sufficient memory was available.

  9. Impact of climate change on ecological quality indicators and biogeochemical fluxes in the Baltic sea: a multi-model ensemble study.

    PubMed

    Meier, H E Markus; Müller-Karulis, Bärbel; Andersson, Helén C; Dieterich, Christian; Eilola, Kari; Gustafsson, Bo G; Höglund, Anders; Hordoir, Robinson; Kuznetsov, Ivan; Neumann, Thomas; Ranjbar, Zohreh; Savchuk, Oleg P; Schimanke, Semjon

    2012-09-01

    Multi-model ensemble simulations using three coupled physical-biogeochemical models were performed to calculate the combined impact of projected future climate change and plausible nutrient load changes on biogeochemical cycles in the Baltic Sea. Climate projections for 1961-2099 were combined with four nutrient load scenarios ranging from a pessimistic business-as-usual to a more optimistic case following the Helsinki Commission's (HELCOM) Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP). The model results suggest that in a future climate, water quality, characterized by ecological quality indicators like winter nutrient, summer bottom oxygen, and annual mean phytoplankton concentrations as well as annual mean Secchi depth (water transparency), will be deteriorated compared to present conditions. In case of nutrient load reductions required by the BSAP, water quality is only slightly improved. Based on the analysis of biogeochemical fluxes, we find that in warmer and more anoxic waters, internal feedbacks could be reinforced. Increased phosphorus fluxes out of the sediments, reduced denitrification efficiency and increased nitrogen fixation may partly counteract nutrient load abatement strategies. PMID:22926879

  10. Biogeochemical implications of levee confinement in the lowermost Mississippi River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, J. J.; Bianchi, T. S.; Alison, M. A.; Wysocki, L. A.; Campanella, R.

    With the recent formation of the Center for River-Ocean Studies (CeROS) at Tulane University in Louisiana (see http://www.tulane.edu/~ceros) and the emerging state-federal partnership that is creating river diversions to combat coastal land loss, increased attention is being paid to the lowermost Mississippi River, from Baton Rouge to the Gulf of Mexico, as a critical juncture and storage area for sediment particles and bio-active compounds.CeROS scientists, working with the US. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have undertaken a detailed re-assessment of the channel floor and water column of this region using geophysical and biogeochemical data collection, combined with historical data sets.

  11. Reconstructing disturbances and their biogeochemical consequences over multiple timescales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLauchlan, Kendra K.; Higuera, Philip E.; Gavin, Daniel G.; Perakis, Steven S.; Mack, Michelle C.; Alexander, Heather; Battles, John; Biondi, Franco; Buma, Brian; Colombaroli, Daniele; Enders, Sara K.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Marlon, Jennifer R.; Marshall, John; McGlone, Matt; Morris, Jesse L.; Nave, Lucas E.; Shuman, Bryan; Smithwick, Erica A.H.; Urrego, Dunia H.; Wardle, David A.; Williams, Christopher J.; Williams, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing changes in disturbance regimes are predicted to cause acute changes in ecosystem structure and function in the coming decades, but many aspects of these predictions are uncertain. A key challenge is to improve the predictability of postdisturbance biogeochemical trajectories at the ecosystem level. Ecosystem ecologists and paleoecologists have generated complementary data sets about disturbance (type, severity, frequency) and ecosystem response (net primary productivity, nutrient cycling) spanning decadal to millennial timescales. Here, we take the first steps toward a full integration of these data sets by reviewing how disturbances are reconstructed using dendrochronological and sedimentary archives and by summarizing the conceptual frameworks for carbon, nitrogen, and hydrologic responses to disturbances. Key research priorities include further development of paleoecological techniques that reconstruct both disturbances and terrestrial ecosystem dynamics. In addition, mechanistic detail from disturbance experiments, long-term observations, and chronosequences can help increase the understanding of ecosystem resilience.

  12. Comparative study of infrared techniques for fast biogeochemical sediment analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, A.; RoséN, P.; Kliem, P.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2011-10-01

    Analysis of sediment samples in the visible to mid infrared (IR) region requires small amounts of sample material and enables rapid and cost efficient geochemical analysis of mineral and organic sediment components. Here we use geochemical properties (total organic and inorganic carbon, biogenic silica, total nitrogen) from the ICDP deep drilling project PASADO to compare three different IR spectroscopy techniques: Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform IR Spectrometry (DRIFTS), Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform IR Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIRS) and Visible Near IR Spectroscopy (VNIRS). ATR-FTIRS and VNIRS are more rapid techniques compared to DRIFTS. Results show that calibration models developed using DRIFTS are most robust (correlation coefficient: R = 0.92 for TIC, R = 0.84 for BSi, R = 0.97 for TOC, R = 0.95 for TN). However, good statistical performance was also obtained by using ATR-FTIRS and VNIRS. When time and costs are limiting factors, these tools may be given preference for rapid biogeochemical screening.

  13. Differential leaflet mortality may influence biogeochemical cycling following tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Ferreras, Ulysses

    2014-01-01

    Intensity of tropical cyclones is expected to increase in the coming century, and an improved understanding of their influence on biogeochemical cycles would benefit ecologists and conservationists. We studied the November 2013 Typhoon Haiyan damage to observe that numerous examples of partial leaf necrosis on intact leaves of trees in the Cycadaceae and Arecaceae families resulted, leaving behind a copious amount of arboreal dead leaf material attached to live leaves. The decay process of this form of arboreal litter has not been previously studied. When compared with decay of ground litter or detached litter suspended in the canopy, we predict the decay process of this form of arboreal litter will include increased photooxidation, leaching, and comminution by detritivorous insects and mites; but decreased catabolism of organic molecules by saprophytic organisms. PMID:25083171

  14. Applications of synchrotron techniques in biogeochemical and geomicrobiological research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeth, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Synchrotron methods are useful for examining the chemistry, speciation and distribution of elements such as Fe and Mn within environmental samples. Techniques such as x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) are routinely used at synchrotrons worldwide, by both academic and industrial users. It can be a challenge for potential users to identify where these methods will be useful to them. Here, I will present an overview of techniques available for geomicrobiologists at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). I will provide examples of the use of synchrotron tools in geomicrobiological projects, as well as examples of where CLS scientists have worked with mining companies to use these tools to address challenges in the mining industry. An overview of the CLS Green Mining Program will also be provided; our research group is conducting biogeochemical research that contributes to developing sustainable mining practices.

  15. Deriving forest fire ignition risk with biogeochemical process modelling?

    PubMed Central

    Eastaugh, C.S.; Hasenauer, H.

    2014-01-01

    Climate impacts the growth of trees and also affects disturbance regimes such as wildfire frequency. The European Alps have warmed considerably over the past half-century, but incomplete records make it difficult to definitively link alpine wildfire to climate change. Complicating this is the influence of forest composition and fuel loading on fire ignition risk, which is not considered by purely meteorological risk indices. Biogeochemical forest growth models track several variables that may be used as proxies for fire ignition risk. This study assesses the usefulness of the ecophysiological model BIOME-BGC's ‘soil water’ and ‘labile litter carbon’ variables in predicting fire ignition. A brief application case examines historic fire occurrence trends over pre-defined regions of Austria from 1960 to 2008. Results show that summer fire ignition risk is largely a function of low soil moisture, while winter fire ignitions are linked to the mass of volatile litter and atmospheric dryness. PMID:26109905

  16. Biogeochemical evolution of a landfill leachate plume, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Masoner, Jason R.; Breit, George N.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Tuttle, Michele L.; Jaeschke, Jeanne B.

    2011-01-01

    Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last for decades to centuries. The fate of reactive contaminants in leachate-affected aquifers depends on the sustainability of biogeochemical processes affecting contaminant transport. Temporal variations in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade. The leachate plume contained elevated concentrations of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) (up to 300 mg/L), methane (16 mg/L), ammonium (650 mg/L as N), iron (23 mg/L), chloride (1030 mg/L), and bicarbonate (4270 mg/L). Chemical and isotopic investigations along a 2D plume transect revealed consumption of solid and aqueous electron acceptors in the aquifer, depleting the natural attenuation capacity. Despite the relative recalcitrance of NVDOC to biodegradation, the center of the plume was depleted in sulfate, which reduces the long-term oxidation capacity of the leachate-affected aquifer. Ammonium and methane were attenuated in the aquifer relative to chloride by different processes: ammonium transport was retarded mainly by physical interaction with aquifer solids, whereas the methane plume was truncated largely by oxidation. Studies near plume boundaries revealed temporal variability in constituent concentrations related in part to hydrologic changes at various time scales. The upper boundary of the plume was a particularly active location where redox reactions responded to recharge events and seasonal water-table fluctuations. Accurately describing the biogeochemical processes that affect the transport of contaminants in this landfill-leachate-affected aquifer required understanding the aquifer's geologic and hydrodynamic framework.

  17. Biogeochemical consequences of an oxygenated intrusion into an anoxic fjord

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper is based on the studies of the biogeochemical structure of the water column in the anoxic Fjord Hunnbunn (south-eastern Norway) performed in 2009, 2011 and 2012. This Fjord is an enclosed basin of brackish water separated by a narrow and shallow outlet to the sea with a permanently anoxic layer. We show how an oxygenated intrusion could lead to both positive and negative effects on the ecosystem state in Hunnbunn due to a change in the biogeochemical structure. Results During the stratified periods in 2009 and 2012 the anoxic layer amounted to approximately 10% of the total water volume in the Fjord, while dissolved oxygen (DO) was present in 80-90% of the water. In the autumn of 2011 the water chemistry structure observed in Fjord Hunnbunn was clearly affected by a recent oxygenated intrusion defined by abnormal salinity patterns. This led to a shift of the DO boundary position to shallower depths, resulting in a thicker anoxic layer comprising approximately 40% of the total water volume, with DO present only in approximately 60% of the water. The oxygenated water intrusions led to a twofold decrease of the concentrations of hydrogen sulphide, ammonia, phosphate and silicate in the deep layers with a simultaneous increase of these nutrients and a decrease of the pH level in the surface layers. The concentrations of manganese, iron, and mercury species changed dramatically and in particular revealed a significant supply of iron and methylmercury to the water column. Conclusions Oxic water intrusions into anoxic fjords could lead not only to the flushing of the bottom anoxia, but to a dispersal of sulphidic and low oxygen conditions to the larger bottom area. The elevation of the hydrogen sulphide to the shallower layers (that can be rapidly oxidized) is accompanied by the appearance in the subsurface water of methylmercury, which is easily accumulated by organisms and can be transported to the surrounding waters, affecting the ecosystem over a larger area. PMID:24872727

  18. Skill assessment of a high-resolution global marine biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovato, Tomas; Storto, Andrea; Vichi, Marcello; Masina, Simona; Santoleri, Rosalia; Sathyendranath, Shubha

    2015-04-01

    Here we present the skill assessment of the PELAgic biogeochemistry for Global Ocean Simulations (PELAGOS) model against different observational products, encompassing gridded climatological fields, satellite and in-situ datasets. PELAGOS is a coupling between the NEMO general circulation model and the Biogeochemical Flux Model (BFM). In particular, BFM is based on a biomass continuum description of the marine ecosystem and it solves the fluxes of multi-nutrients among selected biological functional groups representing the major components of the lower trophic levels. We illustrate the model validation for major inorganic nutrients (nitrate, phosphate, silica), oxygen, and chlorophyll utilizing a multi-decade (1980-2013) hindcast experiment realized at 1/4° horizontal resolution in the framework of MyOcean project. Model-data residuals were analysed to asses the reliability of time-mean spatial patterns and seasonal cycles at both global and regional scales and, where in-situ data from sustained observations are available, long-term dynamics were also addressed. Overall performances of the model were satisfactory, especially for inorganic nutrients and oxygen spatial distributions. Although the timing of the phytoplankton dynamics is well reproduced in some oceanic regions, a systematic bias affected the simulated amplitude of chlorophyll in comparison to the ESA-CCI satellite observations.

  19. The biogeochemical role of baleen whales and krill in Southern Ocean nutrient cycling.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Lavenia; Bowie, Andrew R; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M; Nicol, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The availability of micronutrients is a key factor that affects primary productivity in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the Southern Ocean. Nutrient supply is governed by a range of physical, chemical and biological processes, and there are significant feedbacks within the ecosystem. It has been suggested that baleen whales form a crucial part of biogeochemical cycling processes through the consumption of nutrient-rich krill and subsequent defecation, but data on their contribution are scarce. We analysed the concentration of iron, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, phosphorus and carbon in baleen whale faeces and muscle, and krill tissue using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Metal concentrations in krill tissue were between 20 thousand and 4.8 million times higher than typical Southern Ocean HNLC seawater concentrations, while whale faecal matter was between 276 thousand and 10 million times higher. These findings suggest that krill act as a mechanism for concentrating and retaining elements in the surface layer, which are subsequently released back into the ocean, once eaten by whales, through defecation. Trace metal to carbon ratios were also higher in whale faeces compared to whale muscle indicating that whales are concentrating carbon and actively defecating trace elements. Consequently, recovery of the great whales may facilitate the recycling of nutrients via defecation, which may affect productivity in HNLC areas. PMID:25469984

  20. Mechanisms driving estuarine water quality: A 3D biogeochemical model for informed management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild-Allen, Karen; Skerratt, Jenny; Whitehead, Jason; Rizwi, Farhan; Parslow, John

    2013-12-01

    Estuaries are amongst the most productive marine ecosystems of the world but are also some of the most degraded due to coastal urban development. Sparse sampling of complex interactions between estuarine physics, sediment transport, chemistry, and biology limits understanding of the processes controlling estuarine water quality and confounds active management. We use a 3D coupled hydrodynamic, sediment and biogeochemical model to identify the key mechanisms driving fine-scale fluctuations in water quality in a temperate micro-tidal salt wedge estuary [Derwent Estuary, Tasmania]. Model results are dynamically consistent with relatively sparse monitoring data collected over a seasonal cycle and are considered to be a plausible hypothesis of sub-monitoring scale processes occurring in the estuary. The model shows enhanced mixing of nutrients across the pycnocline downstream of the salt wedge front that supports a persistent phytoplankton bloom. The length and flow regime of the estuary results in nutrient recycling and retention in the estuarine circulation driving a decline in bottom water dissolved oxygen in the mid- and upper-reaches. A budget analysis of modelled nitrogen suggests high levels of denitrification are critical to the maintenance of existing water quality. Active estuarine management focused on the improvement of bottom water dissolved oxygen for ecological health reasons must either concurrently reduce anthropogenic nitrogen loads or be sure to maintain high levels of microbial denitrification for net water quality improvement.

  1. Reservoir and contaminated sediments impacts in high-Andean environments: Morphodynamic interactions with biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escauriaza, C. R.; Contreras, M. T.; Müllendorff, D. A.; Pasten, P.; Pizarro, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid changes due to anthropic interventions in high-altitude environments, such as the Altiplano region in South America, require new approaches to understand the connections between physical and biogeochemical processes. Alterations of the water quality linked to the river morphology can affect the ecosystems and human development in the long-term. The future construction of a reservoir in the Lluta river, located in northern Chile, will change the spatial distribution of arsenic-rich sediments, which can have significant effects on the lower parts of the watershed. In this investigation we develop a coupled numerical model to predict and evaluate the interactions between morphodynamic changes in the Lluta reservoir, and conditions that can potentially desorb arsenic from the sediments. Assuming that contaminants are mobilized under anaerobic conditions, we calculate the oxygen concentration within the sediments to study the interactions of the delta progradation with the potential arsenic release. This work provides a framework for future studies aimed to analyze the complex connections between morphodynamics and water quality, when contaminant-rich sediments accumulate in a reservoir. The tool can also help to design effective risk management and remediation strategies in these extreme environments. Research has been supported by Fondecyt grant 1130940 and CONICYT/FONDAP Grant 15110017

  2. Major outputs of the recent multidisciplinary biogeochemical researches undertaken in the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykousis, V.; Chronis, G.; Tselepides, A.; Price, N. B.; Theocharis, A.; Siokou-Frangou, I.; Van Wambeke, F.; Danovaro, R.; Stavrakakis, S.; Duineveld, G.; Georgopoulos, D.; Ignatiades, L.; Souvermezoglou, A.; Voutsinou-Taliadouri, F.

    2002-06-01

    The main outputs of a multidisciplinary and integrated studies are summarised. The results incorporate the latest biogeochemical researches, at basin scale, in the Aegean Sea (including thermohaline circulation studies, SPM dynamics, mass and energy fluxes, acknowledge biochemical processes in the euphotic and the benthic layer and benthic response to downward fluxes). The data were acquired within five (seasonal) research cruises, during 1997-1998. Data analysis and evaluation hence provided important new information on the functional processes of the Aegean ecosystem. In terms of water circulation, no new deep water formation in the Aegean Sea was observed, during 1997-1998, but rather intermediate water, due mainly to the mild winter conditions. All the biochemical parameters of the euphotic zone (nutrients, Particulate Organic Carbon (POC), chlorophyll- a, phytoplankton, primary and bacterial production), although high in the N. Aegean Sea reflect clearly the highly oligotrophic character of the Aegean Sea. In the N. Aegean, microbial food web was the main pathway of carbon, whereas in the S. Aegean, the food web could be classified as multivorous. An important Black Sea Water (BSW) signal was observed in the dissolved phase; this was especially pronounced in the Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC), Mn and to a lesser degree to Cd, Cu and Ni concentrations. The downward material fluxes are higher in the N. Aegean, relative to the S. Aegean. Substantially higher values of near-bottom mass fluxes were measured in the deep basins of the N. Aegean, implying significant deep lateral fluxes of POM. The N. Aegean could be classified as a "continental margin" ecosystem, whilst the S. Aegean is a typical "oceanic margin" environment. There is a close relationship and, consequently, coupling between the near-bottom mass fluxes and the accumulation rates of organic matter (OM), with the near-bottom mineralisation, bioturbation, redox potential, oxygen consumption rates, the sediment microbiological and enzymatic activity and the meio-macro- and mega fauna abundances in the Aegean Sea. The N. Aegean is characterised by higher fluxes of labile POC and higher rates of benthic mineralisation and displays much higher benthic productivity and diversity relatively to the S. Aegean. The deep isolated N. Aegean basins should be regarded as "hot spots" of organic matter accumulation, benthic abundances and diversity. There is a general N-S gradient in the biogeochemical and benthic processes in the Aegean that is especially pronounced during winter-early spring, implied mainly by the of Black Sea Water (BSW) inflow (through the dissolved phase) and the lateral marginal inputs.

  3. Biogeochemical and hydrological controls on fate and distribution of trace metals in oiled Gulf salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevan, J.; Natter, M.; Lee, M.; Keimowitz, A.; Okeke, B.; Savrda, C.; Saunders, J.

    2011-12-01

    On April 20, 2010, the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting in the release of approximately 5 million barrels of crude oil into the environment. Oil and its associated trace metals have been demonstrated to have a detrimental effect on coastal wetland ecosystems. Wetlands are particularly susceptible to oil contamination because they are composed largely of fine-grained sediments, which have a high capacity to adsorb organic matter and metals. The biogeochemical cycling of trace metals can be strongly influenced by microbial activity, specifically those of sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria. Microbial activity may be enhanced by an increase in amounts of organic matter such as oil. This research incorporates an assessment of levels of trace metals and associated biogeochemical changes from ten coastal marshes in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. These sampling sites range in their pollution levels from pristine to highly contaminated. A total digestion analysis of wetland sediments shows higher concentrations of certain trace metals (e.g., Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn, Sr, Co, V, Ba, Hg, As) in heavily-oiled areas compared to less-affected and pristine sites. Due to chemical complexation among organic compounds and metals, crude oils often contain elevated levels (up to hundreds of mg/kg) of trace metals At the heavily-oiled Louisiana sites (e.g., Bay Jimmy, Bayou Dulac, Bay Batiste), elevated levels of metals and total organic carbon have been found in sediments down to depths of 30 cm. Clearly the contamination is not limited to shallow sediments and oil, along with various associated metals, may be invading into deeper (pre-industrial) portions of the marsh sediments. Pore-waters extracted from contaminated sediments are characterized by very high levels of reduced sulfur (up to 80 mg/kg), in contrast to fairly low ferrous iron concentrations (<0.02 mg/kg). The influx of oil into the wetlands might provide the initial substrate and carbon source for stimulating sulfate-reducing bacteria. The high sulfur levels, coupled with the low levels of iron, indicate that iron-reducing bacteria are outcompeted by sulfate reducers in oiled salt marshes. Moreover, pore-water pH values show a general increasing trend (ranging from 6.6 to 8.0) with depth, possibly reflecting the combined effects of bacterial sulfate reduction and saltwater intrusion at depth. Despite high levels of trace metals in bulk sediments, concentrations of trace metals dissolved in pore-waters are generally low. It is very likely that high organic matter content and bacterially-mediated sulfate reduction promote metal retention through the formation of sulfide solids. Framboidal pyrites, as well as other sulfides, have been identified, and are currently undergoing XRD, SEM, and EDAX analyses. Continued research is needed to monitor possible re-mobilization of trace metals in changing redox and biogeochemical conditions.

  4. Understanding Biogeochemical Transformations Of Trace Elements In Multi Metal-Rich Geomaterials Under Stimulated Redox Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural and anthropogenic influences on hydrological conditions can induce periodic or long-term reduced conditions in geologic materials. Such conditions can cause significant impacts on biogeochemical processes of trace elements in subsurface or near surface environments. The...

  5. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Biofuel Crops and Parameterization in the EPIC Biogeochemical Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes year 1 field measurements of N2O fluxes and crop yields which are used to parameterize the EPIC biogeochemical model for the corresponding field site. Initial model simulations are also presented....

  6. CALIBRATION OF SUBSURFACE BATCH AND REACTIVE-TRANSPORT MODELS INVOLVING COMPLEX BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the calibration of subsurface batch and reactive-transport models involving complex biogeochemical processes was systematically evaluated. Two hypothetical nitrate biodegradation scenarios were developed and simulated in numerical experiments to evaluate the perfor...

  7. SEASONAL VARIATION IN THE BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING OF SESTON IN GRAND TRAVERSE BAY, LAKE MICHIGAN. (R825151)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study describes the biogeochemical cycling of seston in Grand Traverse Bay, Lake Michigan. Seston was characterized by carbon and nitrogen elemental and isotopic abundances. Fluorescence, temperature, light transmittance, and concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen we...

  8. Biogeochemical Reaction Kinetics Associated With Uranium Bioremediation at Multiple Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C. I.; Kowalsky, M. B.

    2007-12-01

    Effective bioremediation requires understanding and quantification of biogeochemical reaction kinetics in natural porous media. Although the intrinsic rates of biogeochemical reactions have been measured in well-mixed laboratory systems, extrapolation of those rates to natural porous media remains challenging, partly due to the fact that natural systems are rarely well-mixed. In this work, we examine the reaction kinetics of iron and sulfate reductions involved in a bioremediation field experiment at the Old Rifle UMTRA site in Western Colorado where acetate as an electron donor was injected into the subsurface to reduce mobile U(VI) to relatively immobile U(IV). We examine at multiple spatial scales how the biogeochemical reaction rates are affected by the extent of mixing and how this in turn affects the efficiency of bioremediation and the evolution of physical and chemical properties of bioremediation sites over the long term. The rates of iron and sulfate reduction were examined at the pore scale and the field scale. At the pore scale (tens to thousands of microns), numerical experiments show that transport processes are fast enough to homogenize the concentration and that the intrinsic rate measured under well-mixed conditions can be directly used. However, at the field scale (tens of meters), dispersion/diffusion processes are not fast enough to homogenize the concentration and the local reaction rates depend on local, spatially variable concentrations. As such, the overall reaction rates at the field scale depend largely on the extent of mixing, which is controlled in large part by the physical and chemical heterogeneities present in the subsurface. Focusing on dissimilatory Fe reduction and assuming the same average flow velocity and the same average total solid iron content, we compare three different cases: 1) a homogeneous permeability distribution with a homogeneous Fe distribution; 2) a heterogeneous permeability distribution, determined from the inverse modeling of field-scale tracer breakthrough data, with a homogeneous Fe distribution; and 3) the same heterogeneous permeability distribution as in the second case, but with a heterogeneous Fe distribution based on an assumed negative correlation between permeability and iron content. Reactive transport modeling results were compared to field data to determine the overall volume-averaged reaction rates. The first case represents the largest extent of mixing and therefore leads to the largest overall Fe reduction rates, while the second and third cases, respectively, represent progressively lower extents of mixing and therefore lead to slower reduction rates. Differences in the overall Fe reduction rates result in different amounts and spatial patterns of precipitated secondary minerals. In the homogeneous case, secondary minerals precipitate evenly across the transverse distance, while in the heterogeneous cases, secondary minerals precipitate primarily where the contact between the electron donor acetate and solid iron is greatest. As such, both physical and chemical heterogeneity may dramatically affect reductions in permeability over the long term.

  9. Simulation and assimilation of global ocean pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes using ship observations of surface ocean pCO2 in a simplified biogeochemical offline model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vinu Valsala; Shamil Maksyutov

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT We used an offline tracer transport model, driven by reanalysis ocean currents and coupled to a simple biogeochemical model, to synthesize the surface ocean pCO2 and air-sea CO2 flux of the global ocean from 1996 to 2004, using a variational assimilation method. This oceanic CO2 flux analysis system was developed at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Japan,

  10. Biogeochemical controls on metal behaviour in freshwater environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Lesley A.; Haack, Elizabeth A.

    2001-08-01

    The biogeochemical controls on metal behaviour in aqueous environments involve complex linkages of biological, principally bacterially driven, and geochemical processes, which occur at both microscopic and macroscopic scales. The framework of aqueous surface chemistry and aquatic geochemistry continues to provide the foundations of the emerging paradigm: (1) metal behaviour (e.g., transport, toxicity, bioaccumulation) is governed by solid-solution reactions; (2) pH, ionic strength, redox potential, the types and concentrations of solution elements, and solid surfaces all interact to determine metal behaviour in any given system; (3) metal sorption reactions show both metal ion and solid surface specificity; (4) sorption reactions are dynamic and reversible; and (5) processes are at sufficient pseudo-equilibrium or dynamic steady state that thermodynamics can be applied to describe such reactions. Reactions controlling metal behaviour are increasingly modelled, with some success, using a variety of geochemical modelling approaches all based on this framework. However, not yet considered in the majority of these thermodynamic treatments of metal dynamics is that these reactions are highly influenced by biological factors, which will affect their location, magnitude and rate. The extent of this influence will be largely driven by microbial ecology, and thus, a fundamental identification and mechanistic understanding of how these factors will drive the geochemistry of a particular system is required. The lack of substantive biogeochemical understanding stems from the fact that the field of environmental microbiology, with its crossover to environmental geochemistry, has only recently begun to receive attention. The developing evidence strongly underscores the impact of bacterial reactions for a number of highly relevant processes related to metal dynamics such as solid solution partitioning, mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions, and intense changes in system geochemical conditions. The development of new molecular level microscopic and spectroscopic techniques provides powerful tools to promote an integrated approach to understanding the mechanisms underlying metal dynamics, which encompasses both the geochemical and biological components of this dynamic and complex cycle. Particularly, when used in conjunction with new molecular biological tools, these multiple lines of evidence will provide a mechanistic model of the controls on metal behaviour that will reflect the inherently complex reality of natural systems.

  11. Suspended Particles: Their Role in Estuarine Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A.; Millward, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    Suspended particles are instrumental in controlling the reactivity, transport and biological impacts of substances in aquatic environments, and provide a crucial link for chemical constituents between the water column, bed sediment and food chain. This article reviews the role of suspended particles in the chemical and biological cycling of trace constituents (trace metals, organo-metallic compounds and hydrophobic organic micropollutants; HOMs) in estuaries, with particular emphasis on the effects of and changes to particle reactivity and composition. The partitioning (or distribution coefficient, KD ) and bioavailability of chemical constituents, and assimilation efficiency (AE) of such by bivalve suspension feeders, are identified as key parameters requiring definition for accurate biogeochemical modelling, and the discussion centres around the determination of and controls on these parameters. Particle-water interactions encompass a variety of physical, biological, electrostatic and hydrophobic effects, and are largely dependent on the character and concentration of suspended particles and salinity. The salinity-dependence results from the competing and complexing effects of seawater ions for trace metals, and the compression of water in the presence of dissolved seawater ions and consequent salting out of neutral solute (HOMs, organo-metallic compounds and some trace metal complexes). The extent of biological solubilization of chemical constituents from suspended particles is dependent on the nature of chemical components of the gastro-intestinal environment and their interactions with ingested particles, and the physiological (e.g. gut passage time) and chemical (e.g. redox conditions and pH) constraints imposed on these interactions. Generally, chemicals that associate with fine, organic-rich particles (or, for some HOMs, fine inorganic particles), and desorb at pH 5-6 and/or complex with digestive enzymes or surfactants are most readily solubilized in the gut. The extent of assimilation of solubilized chemical is then determined by its ability to pass the gut lining and partition into cytosolic material. In practice, KD and AE are determined experimentally by means of radiotracers added to contained suspensions or mesocosms, while operational measurement of bioavailability relies on in vitro chemical or biological (enzymatic) extraction of particles. What is lacking, however, and is identified as an ultimate goal of future research, is the ability to predict these parameters from theoretical principles and thermodynamic constants. Since many of the inherent interactions and mechanisms are controlled by particle composition and reactivity, a more immediate objective would be better characterization of the biogeochemical properties of suspended particles themselves. This includes chemical resolution of the bulk organic matter, definition of the abundance and synergistic effects of component sorbent phases, and determination of the effects of particle-seawater ion interactions on the reactivity of the particle surface.

  12. Chironomid larvae stimulate biogeochemical and microbial processes in a riverbed covered with fine sediment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Géraldine Nogaro; Florian Mermillod-Blondin; Bernard Montuelle; Jean-Claude Boisson; Janine Gibert

    2008-01-01

    .  We determined if the influence of chironomid larvae on biogeochemical and microbial processes in fine surface sediments of\\u000a a riverbed depended on the characteristics of the sedimentary habitat. The influence of chironomids was measured on sediment\\u000a reworking, biogeochemical processes and bacterial characteristics in infiltration sediment columns having three different\\u000a surface sediments (with different organic matter characteristics). The results showed that

  13. Tracking evolution of urban biogeochemical cycles: salinization of fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S.; McDowell, W. H.; Wollheim, W. M.; Duan, S.; Gorman, J. K.; Haq, S.; Hohman, S.; Smith, R. M.; Mayer, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The built environment often changes quickly in response to human activities, thus contributing to an evolution of stream chemistry over time. Depending upon development and management strategies, these changes can result in pulses and/or long-term trends. Here, we explore patterns of evolving salinization of fresh water over time, and we evaluate the potential water quality implications of fresh water salinization. We show that there has been global salinization of freshwater across urbanizing landscapes over a century. We also show that human-accelerated weathering in watersheds and river alkalinization can further influence regional rates of salinization (in addition to anthropogenic sources such as road salts, sewage leaks, etc.). Finally, we investigate how salinization of fresh water can impact stream sediment fluxes of carbon, nutrients, and sulfate in watersheds across a land use gradient at the Baltimore Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. The impacts of salinization on mobilization and uptake of carbon, nutrients, and sulfate in streams warrant further consideration in water quality management strategies. Overall, we propose that salinization can be a "universal tracer" of watershed urbanization globally with major regional consequences for drinking water and evolution of biogeochemical cycles in freshwater ecosystems.

  14. Biogeochemical effects of seawater restoration to diked salt marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Portnoy, J.W.; Giblin, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    We conducted greenhouse microcosm experiments to examine the biogeochemical effects of restoring seawater to historically diked Cape Cod salt marshes. Peat cores from both seasonally flooded and drained diked marshes were waterlogged with seawater, and porewater chemistry was subsequently monitored for 21 mo. The addition of seawater to highly organic, seasonally flooded peat caused the death of freshwater wetland plants, 6-8 cm of sediment subsidence, and increased N and P mineralization. Also, sulfides and alkalinity increased 10-fold, suggesting accelerated decomposition by sulfate reduction. Addition of seawater to the low-organic-content acidic peat from the drained marsh increased porewater pH, alkalinity, PO4-P, and Fe(II), which we attribute to the reestablishment of SO4 and Fe(III) mineral reduction. Increased cation exchange contributed to 6-fold increases in dissolved Fe(II) and Al and 60-fold increases in NH4-N within 6 mo of sail-nation. Seawater reintroductions to seasonally flooded diked marshes will cause porewater sulfides to increase, likely reducing the success of revegetation efforts. Sulfide toxicity is of less concern in resalinated drained peats because of the abundance of Fe(II) to precipitate sulfides, and of NH4-N to offset sulfide inhibition of N uptake. Restoration of either seasonally flooded or drained diked marshes could stimulate potentially large nutrient and Fe(II) releases, which could in turn increase primary production and lower oxygen in receiving waters. These findings suggest that tidal restoration be gradual and carefully monitored.

  15. A quantitative model of the biogeochemical transport of iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, H.; Ji, Z.; Weng, J.

    2010-12-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) are among the world’s most prevalent public health problems yet preventable by dietary iodine supplements. To better understand the biogeochemical behavior of iodine and to explore safer and more efficient ways of iodine supplementation as alternatives to iodized salt, we studied the behavior of iodine as it is absorbed, accumulated and released by plants. Using Chinese cabbage as a model system and the 125I tracing technique, we established that plants uptake exogenous iodine from soil, most of which are transported to the stem and leaf tissue. The level of absorption of iodine by plants is dependent on the iodine concentration in soil, as well as the soil types that have different iodine-adsorption capacity. The leaching experiment showed that the remainder soil content of iodine after leaching is determined by the iodine-adsorption ability of the soil and the pH of the leaching solution, but not the volume of leaching solution. Iodine in soil and plants can also be released to the air via vaporization in a concentration-dependent manner. This study provides a scientific basis for developing new methods to prevent IDD through iodized vegetable production.

  16. A coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical model for assessing watershed responses to climate and land use

    EPA Science Inventory

    This seminar for Oregon State University’s Water Resources Graduate Program will describe the use of a spatially-distributed ecohydrological model, VELMA, for quantifying how alternative land use and climate scenarios affect tradeoffs among important ecosystem services. Sp...

  17. COUPLED REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING BASED ON THE NEW BIOGEOCHEMICAL CODE HP1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The migration of many naturally occurring elements and contaminants in the subsurface is affected by a multitude of complex, interactive physical, chemical, mineralogical, geological, and biological processes. Recently, a new comprehensive simulation tool HP1 (HYDRUS1D-PHREEQC) was developed by cou...

  18. Zooplankton population model coupled to a biogeochemical model of the North Western Mediterranean Sea ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Eisenhauer; F. Carlotti; M. Baklouti; F. Diaz

    2009-01-01

    A stage structured population (SSP) model based on Fennel's [Fennel, W., 2001. Modelling copepods with links to circulation models. Journal of Plankton Research, 23, 1217–1232] equations is applied to Centropages typicus (Kröyer), a dominant copepod species of the North Western Mediterranean Sea (NWMS) and a prey of small pelagic fish. The model considers five groups of stages and development rates

  19. Widespread euxinia in the aftermath of the Lomagundi event: insights from a modeling study of ocean biogeochemical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Kazumi; Tajika, Eiichi

    2015-04-01

    The emergence of strongly sulphidic oceanic waters (euxinia) during the Proterozoic may have affected biological turnover, extinction, and evolution, not only because of its toxicity to eukaryotes but also because of its fundamental role on bioessential trace metal availability. From this point of view, the evidence for euxinic environments in the Lomagundi-Jatuli event (LJE) aftermath (~2.08-2.05 billion years ago) in Gabon and Karelia are notable because their low ?98/95Mo values (less than 0.95o and 0.85o respectively) imply widespread euxinia at that time. The Francevillian Group in Gabon represents the oxic-anoxic/euxinic transitional sequence, implying a fluctuation in the atmospheric redox condition from oxic to relatively reducing, possibly due to the oxidation of substantial amount of organic matter deposited during the LJE. The large positive anomaly of sulphur isotopes and a substantial contraction of marine sulphate reservoir size through the latter part of the LJE also imply a fall in surface oxidation state. Variations of the oxygenation state of the Earth's surface would have caused substantial changes in oceanic chemical composition and, in turn, would surely have impacted the biosphere. However, the nature and dynamics of oceanic biogeochemical cycles for this interval are poorly understood. To unravel cause and effect of the variations of oceanic redox state in the Paleoproteorozoic, we improved the CANOPS model (a 1-D advection-diffusion-reaction marine biogeochemical cycle model), in which coupled C-N-O-P-S marine biogeochemical cycles and a series of redox reactions were adequately taken into account. Through systematic sensitivity experiments we show that a substantial drop in atmospheric oxygen level could cause a widespread euxinia for millions of years, which provides a theoretical explanation consistent with the geological records, such as large positive anomaly of ?34S, low ?98/95Mo, and a decrease in SO4 concentration, in the aftermath of the LJE. A mass balance calculation of Mo also demonstrates that the period is marked by an expansion of euxinia to ca. 9-40% of the whole seafloor. Under such conditions Mo levels would decrease to as low as ca. 2.0-6.5 nM where nitrogen fixation by Fe-Mo nitrogenase is very sensitive to Mo concentration. We propose that a pervasive euxinia was established in the wake of the LJE as a direct consequence of a substantial drop in atmospheric oxygen level and that such waxing and waning of the atmospheric oxygenation state in the Paleoproterozoic could have caused biological upheavals through dynamic oceanic euxinia, followed by long-term stability of anoxic/non-sulphidic conditions during the mid-Proterozoic.

  20. Consequences of ecological, evolutionary and biogeochemical uncertainty for coral reef responses to climatic stress.

    PubMed

    Mumby, Peter J; van Woesik, Robert

    2014-05-19

    Coral reefs are highly sensitive to the stress associated with greenhouse gas emissions, in particular ocean warming and acidification. While experiments show negative responses of most reef organisms to ocean warming, some autotrophs benefit from ocean acidification. Yet, we are uncertain of the response of coral reefs as systems. We begin by reviewing sources of uncertainty and complexity including the translation of physiological effects into demographic processes, indirect ecological interactions among species, the ability of coral reefs to modify their own chemistry, adaptation and trans-generational plasticity. We then incorporate these uncertainties into two simple qualitative models of a coral reef system under climate change. Some sources of uncertainty are far more problematic than others. Climate change is predicted to have an unambiguous negative effect on corals that is robust to several sources of uncertainty but sensitive to the degree of biogeochemical coupling between benthos and seawater. Macroalgal, zoanthid, and herbivorous fish populations are generally predicted to increase, but the ambiguity (confidence) of such predictions are sensitive to the source of uncertainty. For example, reversing the effect of climate-related stress on macroalgae from being positive to negative had no influence on system behaviour. By contrast, the system was highly sensitive to a change in the stress upon herbivorous fishes. Minor changes in competitive interactions had profound impacts on system behaviour, implying that the outcomes of mesocosm studies could be highly sensitive to the choice of taxa. We use our analysis to identify new hypotheses and suggest that the effects of climatic stress on coral reefs provide an exceptional opportunity to test emerging theories of ecological inheritance. PMID:24845674

  1. A GEOCLIM simulation of climatic and biogeochemical consequences of Pangea breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnadieu, Y.; GoddéRis, Y.; Pierrehumbert, R.; Dromart, G.; Fluteau, F.; Jacob, R.

    2006-11-01

    Large fluctuations in continental configuration occur throughout the Mesozoic. While it has long been recognized that paleogeography may potentially influence atmospheric CO2 via the continental silicate weathering feedback, no numerical simulations have been done, because of the lack of a spatially resolved climate-carbon model. GEOCLIM, a coupled numerical model of the climate and global biogeochemical cycles, is used to investigate the consequences of the Pangea breakup. The climate module of the GEOCLIM model is the FOAM atmospheric general circulation model, allowing the calculation of the consumption of atmospheric CO2 through continental silicate weathering with a spatial resolution of 7.5°long × 4.5°lat. Seven time slices have been simulated. We show that the breakup of the Pangea supercontinent triggers an increase in continental runoff, resulting in enhanced atmospheric CO2 consumption through silicate weathering. As a result, atmospheric CO2 falls from values above 3000 ppmv during the Triassic down to rather low levels during the Cretaceous (around 400 ppmv), resulting in a decrease in global mean annual continental temperatures from about 20°C to 10°C. Silicate weathering feedback and paleogeography both act to force the Earth system toward a dry and hot world reaching its optimum over the last 260 Myr during the Middle-Late Triassic. In the super continent case, given the persistent aridity, the model generates high CO2 values to produce very warm continental temperatures. Conversely, in the fragmented case, the runoff becomes the most important contributor to the silicate weathering rate, hence producing a CO2 drawdown and a fall in continental temperatures. Finally, another unexpected outcome is the pronounced fluctuation in carbonate accumulation simulated by the model in response to the Pangea breakup. These fluctuations are driven by changes in continental carbonate weathering flux. Accounting for the fluctuations in area available for carbonate platforms, the simulated ratio of carbonate deposition between neritic and deep sea environments is in better agreement with available data.

  2. Biogeochemical controls on hexavalent chromium formation in estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Amar R; Stone, Alan T; Bouwer, Edward J

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the aquatic and human health impacts of chromium (Cr) necessitates one to determine its speciation as either relatively nontoxic Cr(III) or toxic Cr(VI) and elucidate the influence of biogeochemical changes on its behavior and fate. In the Baltimore Harbor, Cr predominantly exists as Cr(III) associated with sediments. While reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is dominant in these anoxic sediments, the potential of Cr(III) oxidation and Cr(VI) reoccurrence during sediment resuspension and oxygenation resulting from dredging, bioturbation, and flood events poses a serious concern. In batch experiments, aqueous Cr(VI) spiked into continuously mixed anoxic suspensions was reduced to product Cr(III) under anaerobic conditions. No Cr(VI) reoccurrence was observed when conditions remained anaerobic. Aeration caused Cr(VI) reoccurrence from the abiotic oxidation of product Cr(III). Rates of aeration-driven Cr(VI) reoccurrence increased with pH, and Cr(VI) reoccurrence positively correlated with dissolved manganese (Mn) decline at pH ? 7. Aeration-driven oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III,IV)(hydr)oxides was the underlying mechanism causing product Cr(III) oxidation. Cr(VI) reoccurrence decreased with sediment loading and negatively correlated with the acid volatile sulfide (AVS) concentration. Although sediment resuspension and oxygenation may create temporary conditions conducive to Cr(VI) formation, long-term Cr(VI) persistence is unlikely in the presence of sediment reductants. While such natural attenuation in reducing environments mitigates the risk associated with Cr toxicity, this risk may still persist in Mn-rich and reductant-deficient environments. PMID:23802856

  3. Expanding the Role of Reactive Transport Modeling in Biogeochemical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Maher, Katherine M.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis

    2014-09-01

    Earth systems are complex due to the intimate coupling of physical, chemical, and biological processes in the subsurface. Field observation and data analysis have provided significant insights into the coupling of these processes. However, mechanistic understanding often requires advanced modeling tools to quantify the role of individual processes while maintaining the process coupling that determines the overall system behavior. As a result, reactive transport modeling (RTM) has been used extensively to interrogate complex subsurface processes relevant to energy and the environment. Existing work has shown the significant research and educational advantages of RTM in elucidating mechanisms, integrating large data sets, testing hypotheses, and guiding the stewardship and management of water and energy resources.

  4. How does global biogeochemical cycle become complicated by terrestrial-aquatic interactions ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tadanobu; Maksyutov, Shamil

    2015-04-01

    Inland water such as river and lake are now known to be important and active components of global carbon cycle though its contribution has remained uncertain due to data scarcity (Battin et al., 2009; Aufdenkampe et al., 2011). The author has developed process-based National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model (Nakayama, 2008a-b, 2010, 2011a-b, 2012a-c, 2013; Nakayama and Fujita, 2010; Nakayama and Hashimoto, 2011; Nakayama and Shankman, 2013a-b; Nakayama and Watanabe, 2004, 2006, 2008a-b; Nakayama et al., 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012), which incorporates surface-groundwater interactions, includes up- and down-scaling processes between local-global scales, and can simulate iteratively nonlinear feedback between hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological processes. In this study, NICE was coupled with various biogeochemical models to incorporate biogeochemical cycle including reaction between inorganic and organic carbons (DOC, POC, DIC, pCO2, etc.) in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems including surface water and groundwater. The coupled model simulated CO2 evasion from inland water in global scale, was relatively in good agreement in that estimated by empirical regression model (Raymond et al., 2013). In particular, the simulated result implied importance of connectivity between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in addition to surface and groundwater, and hillslopes and stream channels, etc. The model further improved the accuracy of CH4 flux in wetland which is sensitive to fluctuations of shallow groundwater because the original NICE incorporates 3-D groundwater sub-model and simulates lateral subsurface flow more reasonably. This simulation system would play important role in integration of greenhouse gas budget of the biosphere, quantification of hot spots in boundless biogeochemical cycle, and bridging gap between top-down and bottom-up approaches (Cole et al., 2007; Frei et al., 2012; Kiel and Cardenas, 2014). References; Aufdenkampe, A.K., et al., Front. Ecol. Environ., doi:10.1890/100014, 2011. Battin, T.J., et al., Nat. Geosci., 2, 598-600, 2009. Cole, J.J. et al., Ecosystems, doi:10.1007/s10021-006-9013-8, 2007. Frei, S., et al., J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2012JG002012, 2012. Kiel, B.A. & Cardenas, M.B., Nat. Geosci., doi:10.1038/ngeo02157, 2014. Nakayama, T., Ecol. Model., doi:10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2008.02.017, 2008a. Nakayama, T. , Forest Ecol. Manag., doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2008.07.017, 2008b. Nakayama, T., River Res. Applic., doi:10.1002/rra.1253, 2010. Nakayama, T., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.8009, 2011a. Nakayama, T., Agr. Forest Meteorol., doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2010.11.006, 2011b. Nakayama, T., Water Sci. Technol., doi:10.2166/wst.2012.205, 2012a. Nakayama, T., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.9347, 2012b. Nakayama, T., Ecohydrol. Hydrobiol., doi:10.1016/j.ecohyd.2013.03.004, 2013. Nakayama, T., Proc. Environ. Sci., doi:10.1016/j.proenv.2012.01.008, 2012c. Nakayama, T. & Fujita, T., Landscape Urban Plan., doi:10.1016/j.landurbplan.2010.02.003, 2010. Nakayama, T. & Hashimoto, S., Environ. Pollut., doi:10.1016/j.envpol.2010.11.016, 2011. Nakayama, T. & Shankman, D., Global Planet. Change, doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2012.10.004, 2013a. Nakayama, T. & Shankman, D., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.9835, 2013b. Nakayama, T. & Watanabe, M., Water Resour. Res., doi:10.1029/2004WR003174, 2004. Nakayama, T. & Watanabe, M., Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 3, 2101-2144, 2006. Nakayama, T. & Watanabe, M., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.6684, 2008a. Nakayama, T. & Watanabe, M., Global Planet. Change, doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2008.04.002, 2008b. Nakayama, T., et al., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.6142, 2006. Nakayama, T., et al., Sci. Total Environ., doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2006.11.033, 2007. Nakayama, T., et al., Global Planet. Change, doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2010.06.001, 2010. Nakayama, T., et al., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.9290, 2012. Raymond, P.A., et al., Nature, doi:10.1038/nature12760, 2013.

  5. Use of the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD) to Simulate Water Quality at Five U.S. Geological Survey Research Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, R. M.; Leavesley, G. H.; Shanley, J. B.; Peters, N. E.; Aulenbach, B. T.; Blum, A. E.; Campbell, D. H.; Clow, D. W.; Mast, M. A.; Stallard, R. F.; Larsen, M. C.; Troester, J. W.; Walker, J. F.; White, A. F.

    2003-12-01

    The Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD) was developed as an aid to compare and contrast basic hydrologic and biogeochemical processes active in the diverse hydroclimatic regions represented by the five U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) sites: Loch Vale, Colorado; Trout Lake, Wisconsin; Sleepers River, Vermont; Panola Mountain, Georgia; and Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. WEBMOD simulates solute concentrations for vegetation canopy, snow pack, impermeable ground, leaf litter, unsaturated and saturated soil zones, riparian zones and streams using selected process modules coupled within the USGS Modular Modeling System (MMS). Source codes for the MMS hydrologic modules include the USGS Precipitation Runoff Modeling System, the National Weather Service Hydro-17 snow model, and TOPMODEL. The hydrologic modules distribute precipitation and temperature to predict evapotranspiration, snow accumulation, snow melt, and streamflow. Streamflow generation mechanisms include infiltration excess, saturated overland flow, preferential lateral flow, and base flow. Input precipitation chemistry, and fluxes and residence times predicted by the hydrologic modules are input into the geochemical module where solute concentrations are computed for a series of discrete well-mixed reservoirs using calls to the geochemical engine PHREEQC. WEBMOD was used to better understand variations in water quality observed at the WEBB sites from October 1991 through September 1997. Initial calibrations were completed by fitting the simulated hydrographs with those measured at the watershed outlets. Model performance was then refined by comparing the predicted export of conservative chemical tracers such as chloride, with those measured at the watershed outlets. The model succeeded in duplicating the temporal variability of net exports of major ions from the watersheds.

  6. The changing role of dust in biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, J. C.; Reynolds, R. L.; Farmer, G. L.; Reheis, M.

    2007-12-01

    Dust emission and deposition have the potential to deplete and enrich ecosystems of mineral resources essential to life. In many parts of the world, and particularly in semi-arid settings, wind erosion of soils and the subsequent long-distance transport and deposition of mineral aerosols play a basic role in soil composition and processes, including the production of essential plant nutrients through weathering. Although the long-term role of dust in the development of soils is reasonably well understood, the effects of recent dust emission and deposition on ecosystems are not. Recent work on ecosystems around the world has highlighted the fundamental importance of contemporary wind erosion and dust deposition in biogeochemical cycling. In the western U.S., studies of Sr and Nd isotopes, elemental concentrations, and magnetic properties elucidate the role of dust in recent soil development and soil loss by wind erosion related to land-use change. In the arid landscapes in and around Canyonlands National Park (Utah), these techniques provide insight into the development of soils in stable settings where human activities have been minimal but the loss of soil in areas affected by grazing and recreational activities. In stable settings of the central Colorado Plateau (Utah), dust deposition is responsible for a large proportion (as much as 20 percent) of surface soil mass and elemental content. In contrast, wind erosion is responsible for large losses of nutrients and surface soil of nearby, closely similar geomorphic settings disturbed by human activity. In the San Juan Mountains (Colorado) downwind of the Colorado Plateau, Nd and Sr isotopes in dust and lake sediments provide evidence for large increases in dust deposition during the 19th and 20th century compared to records from the middle to late Holocene. The recent enhancement in dust deposition is also responsible for increased loading of many elements, including essential nutrients that may influence ecological processes. In settings of continued dust accumulation over the past ca. 150 years, geochemical results point to changes in dust composition, particularly in some trace metals and P. The apparent, human-driven change in the amount and composition of emitted dusts has implications for both our understanding and prediction of mineralization processes across a range of landscapes.

  7. Multifactorial biogeochemical monitoring of linden alley in Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Vadim; Khushvakhtova, Sabsbakhor; Tyutikov, Sergey; Danilova, Valentina; Roca, Núria; Bech, Jaume

    2015-04-01

    The ecological and biogeochemical assessment of the linden alley within the Kosygin Street was conducted by means of an integrated comparative study of soils, their chemical composition and morphological parameters of leaf linden. For this purpose 5 points were tested within the linden alley and 5 other points outside the highway. In soils, water extract of soil, leaf linden the content of Cu, Pb, Mn, Fe, Cd, Zn, As, Ni, Co Mo, Cr and Se were determined by AAS and spectrofluorimetric method [1]. Macrocomponents (Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, sulphates, chlorides), pH and total mineralization of water soil extract were measured by generally accepted methods. Thio-containing compounds in the leaves were determined by HPLC-NAM spectrofluorometry [2]. On level content of trace elements the soils of "contaminated" points different from background more high concentrations of lead, manganese, iron, selenium, strontium and low level of zinc. Leaf of linden from contaminated sites characterized by an increase of lead, copper, iron, zinc, arsenic, chromium, and a sharp decrease in the level of manganese and strontium. Analysis of the aqueous extracts of the soil showed a slight decrease in the pH value in the "control" points and lower content of calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium and total mineralization of the water soil extract. The phytochelatins test in the leaves of linden was weakly effective and the degree of asymmetry of leaf lamina too. The most differences between the variants were marked by the degree of pathology leaves (chlorosis and necrosis) and the content of pigments (chlorophyll and carotene). The data obtained reflect the impact of the application of de-icing salts and automobile emissions. References 1. Ermakov V.V., Danilova V.N., Khyshvakhtova S.D. Application of HPLC-NAM spectrofluorimtry to determination of sulfur-containing compounds in the environmental objects// Science of the biosphere: Innovation. Moscow State University by M.V. Lomonosov, 2014. P. 10-12. 2. Ermakov V.V., Tyutikov S.F., Khushvakhtova S.D., Danilova V.N., Boev V.N., Barabanschikova R.N., Chudinova E.A. Peculiarities of quantitative determination of selenium in biological materials// Bulletin of the Tyumen State University Press, 2010, 3, 206-214. Supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grant number 15-05-00279a

  8. Biogeochemical factors which regulate the formation and fate of sulfide in wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Lyons, W. Berry; Gaudette, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    Coastal wetland areas occupy a small percentage of the terrestrial environment yet are extremely productive regions which support rapid rates of belowground bacterial activity. Wetlands appear to be significant as biogenic sources of gaseous sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen. These gases are important as tracers of man's activities, and they influence atmospheric chemistry. The interactions among wetland biogeochemical processes regulate the anaerobic production of reduced gases and influence the fate of these volatiles. Therefore, spatial and temporal variations in hydrology, salinity, temperature and specification, and growth of vegetation affect the type and magnitude of gas emissions thus hindering predictive estimates of gas flux. Our research is divided into two major components, the first is the biogeochemical characterization of a selected tidal wetland area in terms of factors likely to regulate sulfide flux; the second is a direct measurement of gaseous sulfur flux as related to changes in these biogeochemical conditions. Presently, we are near completion of phase one.

  9. A general paradigm to model reaction-based biogeochemical processes in batch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yilin; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Burgos, William D.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents the development and illustration of a numerical model of reaction-based geochemical and biochemical processes with mixed equilibrium and kinetic reactions. The objective is to provide a general paradigm for modeling reactive chemicals in batch systems, with expectations that it is applicable to reactive chemical transport problems. The unique aspects of the paradigm are to simultaneously (1) facilitate the segregation (isolation) of linearly independent kinetic reactions and thus enable the formulation and parameterization of individual rates one reaction by one reaction when linearly dependent kinetic reactions are absent, (2) enable the inclusion of virtually any type of equilibrium expressions and kinetic rates users want to specify, (3) reduce problem stiffness by eliminating all fast reactions from the set of ordinary differential equations governing the evolution of kinetic variables, (4) perform systematic operations to remove redundant fast reactions and irrelevant kinetic reactions, (5) systematically define chemical components and explicitly enforce mass conservation, (6) accomplish automation in decoupling fast reactions from slow reactions, and (7) increase the robustness of numerical integration of the governing equations with species switching schemes. None of the existing models to our knowledge has included these scopes simultaneously. This model (BIOGEOCHEM) is a general computer code to simulate biogeochemical processes in batch systems from a reaction-based mechanistic standpoint, and is designed to be easily coupled with transport models. To make the model applicable to a wide range of problems, programmed reaction types include aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, ion-exchange, oxidation-reduction, precipitation-dissolution, acid-base reactions, and microbial mediated reactions. In addition, user-specified reaction types can be programmed into the model. Any reaction can be treated as fast/equilibrium or slow/kinetic reaction. An equilibrium reaction is modeled with an infinite rate governed by a mass action equilibrium equation or by a user-specified algebraic equation. Programmed kinetic reaction rates include multiple Monod kinetics, nth order empirical, and elementary formulations. In addition, user-specified rate formulations can be programmed into the model. No existing models to our knowledge offer these simultaneous features. Furthermore, most available reaction-based models assume chemical components a priori so that reactions can be written in basic (canonical) forms and implicitly assume that fast equilibrium reactions occur only for homogeneous reactions. The decoupling of fast reactions from slow reactions lessens the stiffness typical of these systems. The explicit enforcement of mass conservation overcomes the mass conservation error due to numerical integration errors. The removal of redundant fast reactions alleviates the problem of singularity. The exclusion of irrelevant slow reactions eliminates the issue of exporting their problematic rate formulations/parameter estimations to different environment conditions. Taking the advantage of the nonuniqueness of components, a dynamic basis-species switching strategy is employed to make the model numerically robust. Backward basis switching allows components to freely change in the simulation of the chemistry module, while being recovered for transport simulation. Three example problems were selected to demonstrate the versatility and robustness of the model.

  10. An offline unstructured biogeochemical model (UBM) for complex estuarine and coastal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Yun; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2012-05-01

    Due to increased pollutant loads and water use from coastal development and population growth, occurrences of low-dissolved oxygen and "hypoxic zones" have increased. Reports of fish kills and water quality impairment are also becoming more frequent in many coastal waters. Water quality managers and regulatory agencies rely on numerical modeling tools to quantify the relative contributions of anthropogenic and "natural" pollutant loads (nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand) on dissolved oxygen levels and use the results for remedial activities and source control. The ability to conduct seasonlong simulations with sufficient nearshore resolution is therefore a key requirement. Mesh flexibility and the ability to increase site specific resolution without disturbing the larger domain setup and calibration are critical. The objective of this effort was to develop a robust biogeochemical model suitable for simulation of water quality dynamics including dissolved oxygen in complex coastal environments with multiple tidal channels, tidal flats, and density-driven circulation using unstructured-grid formulation. This paper presents an offline unstructured biogeochemical model that uses the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) discretization of the study domain and the corresponding hydrodynamic solution to drive biogeochemical kinetics based on a water quality model CE-QUAL-ICM. In this paper, the linkage between selected hydrodynamic and water quality models is subjected to several scalar transport and biogeochemical module tests (plume transport and dilution, BOD/DO sag, and phytoplankton/nutrients reaction), and results are compared to their analytical solutions as part of model validation. A preliminary application of the biogeochemical model with a year-long simulation of Hood Canal basin in Puget Sound, USA, is presented as an example and a test of the tool in a real estuary setting. The model reproduced the dynamics and seasonal variations in the biogeochemical state variables and was used to test short-term wind-driven dynamics that could influence dissolved oxygen concentrations in Hood Canal.

  11. Correlating phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) in a landfill leachate polluted aquifer with biogeochemical factors by multivariate statistical methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L Ludvigsen; H.-J Albrechtsen; H Holst; T. H Christensen

    1997-01-01

    Different multivariate statistical analyses were applied to phospholipid fatty acids representing the biomass composition and to different biogeochemical parameters measured in 37 samples from a landfill contaminated aquifer at Grindsted Landfill (Denmark). Principal component analysis and correspondence analysis were used to identify groups of samples showing similar patterns with respect to biogeochemical variables and phospholipid fatty acid composition. The principal

  12. Use of the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD) to Simulate Water Quality at Five U.S. Geological Survey Research Watersheds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Webb; G. H. Leavesley; J. B. Shanley; N. E. Peters; B. T. Aulenbach; A. E. Blum; D. H. Campbell; D. W. Clow; M. A. Mast; R. F. Stallard; M. C. Larsen; J. W. Troester; J. F. Walker; A. F. White

    2003-01-01

    The Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD) was developed as an aid to compare and contrast basic hydrologic and biogeochemical processes active in the diverse hydroclimatic regions represented by the five U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) sites: Loch Vale, Colorado; Trout Lake, Wisconsin; Sleepers River, Vermont; Panola Mountain, Georgia; and Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico.

  13. Biogeochemical Redox Processes and their Impact on Contaminant Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    September 7, 2009. Revised manuscript received November 12, 2009. Accepted November 13, 2009. Life) by microorganisms coupled to the reduction of electron acceptors including humic substances, iron-bearing minerals transformationsofnaturalorganicmatter(NOM)andmineral phases, in particular (hydr)oxides of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn), Fe-bearing clay

  14. MULTICOMPONENT BIOGEOCHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELING USING THE HYDRUS COMPUTER SOFTWARE PACKAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminant transport in the subsurface is generally affected by a large number of nonlinear and often interactive physical, chemical and biological processes. Simulating these processes requires a coupled reactive transport code that integrates the physical processes of water flow and advective-dis...

  15. The Neoproterozoic oxygenation event: Environmental perturbations and biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Och, Lawrence M.; Shields-Zhou, Graham A.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen content of the Earth's surface environment is thought to have increased in two broad steps: the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE) around the Archean-Proterozoic boundary and the Neoproterozoic Oxygenation Event (NOE), during which oxygen possibly accumulated to the levels required to support animal life and ventilate the deep oceans. Although the concept of the GOE is widely accepted, the NOE is less well constrained and its timing and extent remain the subjects of debate. We review available evidence for the NOE against the background of major climatic perturbations, tectonic upheaval related to the break-up of the supercontinent Rodinia and reassembly into Gondwana, and, most importantly, major biological innovations exemplified by the Ediacarian Biota and the Cambrian 'Explosion'. Geochemical lines of evidence for the NOE include perturbations to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon. Generally high ? 13C values are possibly indicative of increased organic carbon burial and the release of oxidative power to the Earth's surface environment after c. 800 Ma. A demonstrably global and primary record of extremely negative ? 13C values after about 580 Ma strongly suggests the oxidation of a large dissolved organic carbon pool (DOC), the culmination of which around c. 550 Ma coincided with an abrupt diversification of Ediacaran macrobiota. Increasing 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios toward the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian transition indicates enhanced continental weathering which may have fuelled higher organic production and burial during the later Neoproterozoic. Evidence for enhanced oxidative recycling is given by the increase in sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfide and sulfate, exceeding the range usually attained by sulfate reduction alone, reflecting an increasing importance of the oxidative part in the sulfur cycle. S/C ratios attained a maximum during the Precambrian-Cambrian transition, further indicating higher sulfate concentrations in the ocean and a transition from dominantly pyrite burial to sulfate burial after the Neoproterozoic. Strong evidence for the oxygenation of the deep marine environment has emerged through elemental approaches over the past few years which were able to show significant increases in redox-sensitive trace-metal (notably Mo) enrichment in marine sediments not only during the GOE but even more pronounced during the inferred NOE. In addition to past studies involving Mo enrichment, which has been extended and further substantiated in the current review, we present new compilations of V and U concentrations in black shales throughout Earth history that confirm such a rise and further support the NOE. With regard to ocean ventilation, we also review other sedimentary redox indicators, such as iron speciation, molybdenum isotopes and the more ambiguous REE patterns. Although the timing and extent of the NOE remain the subjects of debate and speculation, we consider the record of redox-sensitive trace-metals and C and S contents in black shales to indicate delayed ocean ventilation later in the Cambrian on a global scale with regard to rising oxygen levels in the atmosphere which likely rose during the Late Neoproterozoic.

  16. Sulfur and Methylmercury in the Florida Everglades - the Biogeochemical Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orem, W. H.; Gilmour, C. C.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Aiken, G.

    2011-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a serious environmental problem in aquatic ecosystems worldwide because of its toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate. The Everglades receives some of the highest levels of atmospheric mercury deposition and has some of the highest levels of MeHg in fish in the USA, posing a threat to pisciverous wildlife and people through fish consumption. USGS studies show that a combination of biogeochemical factors make the Everglades especially susceptible to MeHg production and bioaccumulation: (1) vast wetland area with anoxic soils supporting anaerobic microbial activity, (2) high rates of atmospheric mercury deposition, (3) high levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that complexes and stabilizes mercury in solution for transport to sites of methylation, and (4) high sulfate loading in surface water that drives microbial sulfate reduction and mercury methylation. The high levels of sulfate in the Everglades represent an unnatural condition. Background sulfate levels are estimated to be <1 mg/L, but about 60% of the Everglades has surface water sulfate concentrations exceeding background. Highly sulfate-enriched marshes in the northern Everglades have average sulfate levels of 60 mg/L. Sulfate loading to the Everglades is principally a result of land and water management in south Florida. The highest concentrations of sulfate, averaging 60-70 mg/L, are in canal water in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA). Geochemical data and a preliminary sulfur mass balance for the EAA are consistent with sulfur currently used in agriculture, and sulfur released by oxidation of organic EAA soils (including legacy agricultural applications and natural sulfur) as the primary sources of sulfate enrichment to the canals and ecosystem. Sulfate loading increases microbial sulfate reduction and MeHg production in soils. The relationship between sulfate loading and MeHg production, however, is complex. Sulfate levels up to about 20-30 mg/L increase mercury methylation, but buildup of sulfide from microbial sulfate reduction begins to inhibit mercury methylation above this range. Sulfate from the EAA canals has primarily impacted the northern Everglades nearest the EAA, but recent evidence shows sulfate loading extending about 80 km further south into Everglades National Park. Current restoration plans to restore to deliver more water south to Everglades National Park may increase overall sulfur loads to the southern part of the ecosystem. A comprehensive Everglades restoration strategy should include reduction of sulfur loads as a goal because of the many detrimental impacts of sulfate on the ecosystem. Monitoring data show that the ecosystem response to changes in sulfate levels is rapid, and strategies for reducing sulfate loading may be effective in the near-term. A multifaceted approach employing best management practices for sulfur in agriculture, agricultural practices that minimize soil oxidation, and changes to stormwater treatment areas that increase sulfate retention, could help reduce sulfate loads to the Everglades, with resulting benefits.

  17. Using inherent optical properties to investigate biogeochemical dynamics in a tropical macrotidal coastal system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kadija Oubelkheir; Lesley A. Clementson; Ian T. Webster; Phillip W. Ford; Arnold G. Dekker; Lynda C. Radke; Paul Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The variability in the inherent optical properties along an estuary-coast-ocean continuum in tropical Australia has been studied. The study area, the Fitzroy Estuary and Keppel Bay system, is a shallow coastal environment (depth < 30 m) with highly turbid waters in the estuary and blue oceanic waters in the bay and subject to macrotides. Biogeochemical and inherent optical properties (IOPs)

  18. Investigation of In-situ Biogeochemical Reduction of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater by Reduced Iron Minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogeochemical transformation is a process in which chlorinated solvents are degraded abiotically by reactive minerals formed by, at least in part or indirectly from, anaerobic biological processes. Five mulch biowall and/or vegetable oil-based bioremediation applications for tr...

  19. Biogeochemical research priorities for sustainable biofuel and bioenergy feedstock production in the Americas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid expansion in biomass production for biofuels and bioenergy in the Americas is increasing demands on the ecosystem resources required to sustain soil and site productivity. We review the current state of knowledge and highlight gaps in research on biogeochemical processes and ecosystem sustaina...

  20. Sensitivity analysis of simple global marine biogeochemical models I. Kriest,1

    E-print Network

    Khatiwala, Samar

    Sensitivity analysis of simple global marine biogeochemical models I. Kriest,1 A. Oschlies,1 and S] This study presents results from 46 sensitivity experiments carried out with three structurally simple (2, 3 with respect to observed phosphate and oxygen distributions is found to be particularly sensitive to changes

  1. A new implementation of the Biogeochemical Flux Model in sea ice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Tedesco; M. Vichi

    2009-01-01

    The Biogeochemical Flux Model (BFM) is a direct descendent of the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM) and it has been widely used and validated among the scientific community. The BFM view of the of the marine ecosystem is based upon the recognition that the major ecological functions of producers, decomposers and consumers and their specific trophic interactions can be

  2. NUTRIENT STOICHIOMETRIC RELATIONS AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL NICHE IN COEXISTING PLANT SPECIES: EFFECT OF SIMULATED CLIMATE CHANGE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Josep Peñuelas; Jordi Sardans; Romà Ogaya; Marc Estiarte

    ABSTRACT: Here ,we define ,a “biogeo- chemical niche” characterized by the,species po- sition in the ,multivariate space generated ,by its content not only of macronutrients like N, P or K, but also of micronutrients such as Mo, Mg and Ca, and trace toxic elements such as Pb and As. We then ,hypothesize ,that the flexibility of the species “biogeochemical niche”

  3. Author's personal copy A biogeochemical study of sediments from the eutrophic Lake Lugano

    E-print Network

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Author's personal copy A biogeochemical study of sediments from the eutrophic Lake Lugano) and carbonate from sediment cores from the oligotrophic Lake Brienz and the eutrophic Lake Lugano (both. Eutrophic conditions at Lake Lugano are reflected in elevated total organic carbon (TOC) content

  4. ForPeerReview Biogeochemical reduction processes in a hyper-alkaline

    E-print Network

    Burke, Ian

    ForPeerReview Only Biogeochemical reduction processes in a hyper-alkaline affected leachate soil processes in a hyper-alkaline affected leachate soil profile1 2 Ian T. Burke1* , Robert J.G. Mortimer1 precipitate (tufa) that is17 accumulating where highly alkaline leachate from a lime kiln waste tip

  5. Evidence of Trichodesmium viral lysis and potential significance for biogeochemical cycling in the oligotrophic ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Hewson; Sarah R. Govil; Douglas G. Capone; Edward J. Carpenter; Jed A. Fuhrman

    2004-01-01

    The planktonic cyanobacterium Trichodesmium spp. is a globally important diazotroph, fixing at least 80 Tg N yr -1 in tropical waters. Despite its biogeochemical importance, the mechanisms of Trichodesmium mortality, and the means by which its fixed N enters upper levels of the food web, are poorly understood. Potential virus-like particle (VLP) production by Trichodesmium spp. was observed in both

  6. Potential impacts of emerald ash borer invasion on biogeochemical and water cycling in residential

    E-print Network

    Weiblen, George D

    Potential impacts of emerald ash borer invasion on biogeochemical and water cycling in residential could threaten those services, with unknown environmental consequences. The outbreak of emerald ash borer is an imminent threat to the ash population in North America. In the Minneapolis­Saint Paul

  7. Biogeochemical factors affecting mercury methylation rate in two contaminated floodplain soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Frohne; J. Rinklebe; U. Langer; G. Du Laing; S. Mothes; R. Wennrich

    2011-01-01

    An automated biogeochemical microcosm system allowing controlled variation of redox potential (EH) in soil suspensions was used to assess the effect of various factors on the mobility of mercury (Hg) as well as on the methylation of Hg in two contaminated floodplain soils with different Hg concentrations (approximately 5 mg kg-1 Hg and >30 mg kg-1 Hg). The experiment was

  8. Biogeochemical Controls on Mercury Methylation: A compilation of Data Across Fresh and Saltwater Wetlands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Gilmour; A. Heyes; C. Mitchell; D. Krabbenhoft; W. Orem; G. Aiken; R. Mason

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, we have examined the biogeochemical controls on net methylmercury production across a number of wetland ecosystems, including salt marshes in Chesapeake Bay, the freshwater and estuarine Everglades, and a variety of boreal freshwater wetlands in Ontario. The balance between sulfate and sulfide is key for understanding Hg methylation rates among these ecosystems. Sulfate stimulates Hg-methylating sulfate-

  9. Impacts of Eddies and Mixing on Plankton Community Structure and Biogeochemical Cycling in the Sargasso Sea

    E-print Network

    Buesseler, Ken

    Impacts of Eddies and Mixing on Plankton Community Structure and Biogeochemical Cycling of measurements that will document phyto- plankton physiological response, changes in community structure, export with an undulating towed instrument that includes a Video Plankton Recorder and a Fast Repetition Rate Fluorometer

  10. Modeling the physical and biogeochemical response of a marine shelf system to a tropical cyclone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Condie; M. Herzfeld; N. Margvelashvili; J. R. Andrewartha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the first use of a fully integrated biogeochemical model to explore the response of a marine shelf system to a tropical cyclone. Ocean currents, nutrients, sediments and plankton dynamics were simulated under conditions representative of Tropical Cyclone Bobby, which traversed the Australian North West Shelf in February 1995. Results show strong upwelling of nutrients and a phytoplankton bloom.

  11. Catchment hydro-biogeochemical response to climate change and future land-use

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential interacting effects of climate change and future land-use on hydrological and biogeochemical dynamics rarely have been described at the catchment level and are difficult or impossible to capture through experimentation or observation alone. We apply a new model, Vi...

  12. Surface-subsurface flow linkage in a snowmelt environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In much of the western USA streamflow and water resources are driven by snowmelt. Hydrologic objectives for addressing water issues have generally revolved around predicting the timing and amount of snowmelt input and assessing the impact on streamflow. Groundwater is generally overlooked. We provid...

  13. Hydrologic flowpaths and biogeochemical cycles in the subalpine Como Creek catchment, Colorado Front Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, R. M.; Williams, M. W.; Zeliff, M. M.; Parman, J.

    2011-12-01

    An outstanding question for snowmelt-dominated watersheds of the western US are the responses of biogeochemical processes to two major drivers of environmental change: directional changes in climate and increasing dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deposition in wetfall. In the Colorado Front Range, atmospheric deposition of DIN has increased several-fold in the last 25 years. In response, nitrate concentrations at the alpine Green Lakes 4 (GL4) catchment have increased from 1985 to 2009 by 0.27 ?eq L-1 yr-1. In contrast, we see no directional change in either nitrate concentrations or fluxes in the subalpine Como Creek catchment. We hypothesize that differences in surface/groundwater interactions result in the differing behavior of stream nitrate between the alpine and subalpine catchments that are receiving similar amounts of DIN from atmospheric deposition. For both basins we sampled precipitation, snowpack, snowmelt, surface water, and subsurface waters. All water samples are analyzed for geochemical, nutrient and isotopic (?18O, ?D) composition. Stream chemistry data from the last ten years at Como Creek show increases in nitrate concentration during baseflow conditions and then a sharp decline during snowmelt. In contrast, in the alpine basin there is sharp increase in surface water nitrate during snowmelt. Hydrograph separation at the alpine GL4 using end member mixing analysis (EMMA) shows that stream flow is a mixture of three components, groundwater, talus, and new snowmelt that each contribute to roughly a third of discharge, with talus flow supplying the majority of nitrate. In contrast, and somewhat surprisingly, EMMA shows that for the subalpine Como Creek basin, annual streamflow is a mixture of only two components, groundwater and new snowmelt. During snowmelt the groundwater and snow contributions are nearly equal and subsurface flows dominate the remainder of the year. Newly installed piezometers at Como Creek provide evidence that the basin is largely a losing reach during snowmelt, with water levels in the piezometers increasing 5-7 m. After peak snowmelt however, Como Creek becomes a gaining stream, with piezometer levels dropping. Thus, both EMMA and piezometers show that surface-groundwater interactions are tightly coupled during snowmelt, with snowmelt at Como first replenishing the subsurface water deficit and increasing groundwater levels before contributing to discharge. Thus, in contrast to the alpine GL4 basin, DIN released in snowmelt is assimilated belowground as snowmelt infiltrates the subsurface in the subalpine basin. Interestingly, at the subalpine Como Creek basin, isotopic and geochemical solute concentrations undergo shifts during periods of winter baseflow prior to snowmelt. In winter much of the stream is frozen and we hypothesize that cryo-concentration of solutes and fractionation of isotopes may influence the concentrations of winter stream samples.

  14. A 15-year global biogeochemical reanalysis with ocean colour data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, David; Barciela, Rosa

    2013-04-01

    A continuous global time-series of remotely sensed ocean colour observations is available from 1997 to the present day. However coverage is incomplete, and limited to the sea surface. Models are therefore required to provide full spatial coverage, and to investigate the relationships between physical and biological variables and the carbon cycle. Data assimilation can then be used to constrain models to fit the observations, thereby combining the advantages of both sources of information. As part of the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative (ESA-CCI), we assimilate chlorophyll concentration derived from ocean colour observations into a coupled physical-biogeochemical model. The data assimilation scheme (Hemmings et al., 2008, J. Mar. Res.; Ford et al., 2012, Ocean Sci.) uses the information from the observations to update all biological and carbon cycle state variables within the model. Global daily reanalyses have been produced, with and without assimilation of merged ocean colour data provided by GlobColour, for the period September 1997 to August 2012. The assimilation has been shown to significantly improve the model's representation of chlorophyll concentration, at the surface and at depth. Furthermore, there is evidence of improvement to the representation of pCO2, nutrients and zooplankton concentration compared to in situ observations. We use the results to quantify recent seasonal and inter-annual variability in variables including chlorophyll concentration, air-sea CO2 flux and alkalinity. In particular, we explore the impact of physical drivers such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on the model's representation of chlorophyll and the carbon cycle, and the pros and cons of the model reanalyses compared to observation-based climatologies. Furthermore, we perform a comparison between the GlobColour product and an initial version of a new merged product being developed as part of the ESA-CCI. Equivalent year-long hindcasts are performed with assimilation of each data set, and compared to a control run. Differences in the products are discussed, along with their impact on model accuracy compared to in situ observations, and the representation of the carbon cycle in each hindcast.

  15. Iron: A Biogeochemical Engine That Drives Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus Cycling in Humid Tropical Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, W. L.; Hall, S. J.; Thompson, A.; Yang, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    The abundance of redox active Fe minerals has the potential to alter the storage and loss of C, contribute to gaseous N emissions, and control P retention in upland tropical forest soils. High concentrations of short-range order Fe minerals led to Fe(II) production rates of 26-206 ?g g d-1 under short-term low redox conditions (Chacón et al. 2006, Liptzin and Silver 2009, Dubinsky et al. 2010). Potential C mineralization from Fe(II) reduction was 34-263 g CO2-C m-2 y-1, C losses equivalent to approximately 10-60 % of annual litterfall production in this forest. Decreased acidity during Fe reduction can destabilize soil aggregates and lead to C losses. Iron is rapidly reoxidized during aerobic periods, which can subsequently lead to C stabilization via complexation reactions. Fe oxidation can also stimulate C losses via pH-driven dissolved organic C production and directly via Fenton reactions. In laboratory experiments, rates of CO2 production were strongly linearly correlated with Fe(II) loss under aerobic conditions, increasing by 0.51 ± 0.02 µg CO2-C g soil h-1 respired for each mg of Fe(II) g-1 soil oxidized or sorbed (Hall and Silver 2013). Iron oxidation has also been linked to dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ leading to N retention in ecosystems. Fe(III) reduction coupled with NH4+ oxidation (Feammox) can lead to N losses as dinitrogen gas (N2) or nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Estimates suggest that Feammox resulted in gaseous N losses of 1-4 kg N ha-1 y-1 (Yang et al. 2012), rates equivalent to total denitrification in this forest. Oxidized Fe can strongly bind P decreasing it's availability to plant roots. While this is commonly cited as a potential limitation to net primary production in tropical forests, it also helps to retain P in ecosystems with high rainfall and potential leaching losses. Microbial biomass P availability increased significantly with Fe(II) production, suggesting the P mobilized during Fe(II) reduction was rapidly immobilized into biological pools (Liptzin and Silver 2009). Data suggest that Fe-redox cycling may decrease P limitation to NPP, and help maintain forest nutrient stocks. In summary, our results highlight the biogeochemical significance of Fe cycling in upland soils environments and its important role in the dynamics of humid tropical forests.

  16. A GEOCLIM Simulation Of Climatic And Biogeochemical Consequences Of Pangea Break Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnadieu, Y.; Godderis, Y.; Pierrehumbert, R.; Dromart, G.; Jacob, R.

    2006-12-01

    Large fluctuations in continental configuration occur all along the Mesozoic times. While it has long been recognized that paleogeography may potentially influence atmospheric CO2 via the continental silicate weathering feedback, no numerical simulation have been done given the lack of a spatially resolved climate- carbon model. GEOCLIM, a coupled numerical model of the climate and global biogeochemical cycles, is used to investigate the consequences of the Pangea break up. The climate module of the GEOCLIM model is the FOAM atmospheric general circulation model, allowing the calculation of the consumption of atmospheric CO2 through continental silicate weathering with a spatial resolution of 7.5°long 4.5°lat. Seven time slices have been simulated. We show that the break up of the Pangea supercontinent triggers an increase in continental runoff, resulting in enhanced atmospheric CO2 consumption through silicate weathering. As a result, atmospheric CO2 falls from values above 3000 ppmv during the Triassic, down to rather low levels during the Cretaceous (around 400 ppmv), resulting in a decrease in continental temperatures from about 20°C to 10°C. Silicate weathering feedback and paleogeography both act to force the Earth system toward a dry and hot world reaching its optimum over the last 260 Ma during the Middle-Late Triassic. In the super continent case, given the relative aridity that cannot be climatically overwhelmed, the model generates high CO2 values to produce very warm continental temperatures compensating for the lack of continental humidity. Conversely, in the fragmented case, the runoff becomes the most important contributor to the silicate weathering rate, hence, producing a CO2 drawdown and a fall in continental temperatures. Finally, an other unexpected outcome is the pronounced fluctuations in carbonate accumulation simulated by the model in response to the Pangea break up. These fluctuations are driven by changes in continental carbonate weathering flux. Accounting for the fluctuations in area available for carbonate platforms, the simulated ratio of carbonate deposition between neritic and deep sea environments is in better agreement with available data.

  17. Integrated Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving Arsenic Release from Shallow Sediments to Groundwaters of the Mekong Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Kocar, Benjamin D.; Polizzotto, Matthew L.; Benner, Shawn G.; Ying, Samantha C.; Ung, Mengieng; Ouch, Kagna; Samreth, Sopheap; Suy, Bunseang; Phan, Kongkea; Sampson, Michael; Fendorf, Scott

    2008-11-01

    Arsenic is contaminating the groundwater of Holocene aquifers throughout South and Southeast Asia. To examine the biogeochemical and hydrological processes influencing dissolved concentrations and transport of As within soils/sediments in the Mekong River delta, a ~50 km? field site was established near Phnom Penh, Cambodia, where aqueous As concentrations are dangerously high and where groundwater retrieval for irrigation is minimal. Dissolved As concentrations vary spatially, ranging up to 1300 µg/L in aquifer groundwater and up to 600 µg/L in surficial clay pore water. Groundwaters with high As concentrations are reducing with negligible dissolved O? and high concentrations of Fe(II), NH?? , and dissolved organic C. Within near-surface environments, these conditions are most pronounced in sediments underlying permanent wetlands, often found within oxbow channels near the Mekong River. There, labile C, co-deposited with As-bearing Fe (hydr)oxides under reducing conditions, drives the reductive mobilization (inclusive of Fe and As reduction) of As. Here, conditions are described under which As is mobilized from these sediments, and near-surface As release is linked to aquifer contamination over long time periods (100s to 1000s of years). Site biogeochemistry is coupled with extensive hydrologic measurements, and, accordingly, a comprehensive interpretation of spatial As release and transport within a calibrated hydraulic flow-field is provided of an As-contaminated aquifer that is representative of those found throughout South and Southeast Asia.

  18. Parameterizing soil emission and atmospheric oxidation-reduction in a model of the global biogeochemical cycle of mercury.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Tetsuro; Ikemoto, Hisatoshi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Hasome, Hisashi; Ueda, Hiromasa

    2013-01-01

    Using the GEOS-Chem atmosphere-land-ocean coupled mercury model, we studied the significances of two processes, soil emission and atmospheric oxidation-reduction, in the global biogeochemical cycling of mercury and their parametrization to improve model performance. Implementing an empirical equation for soil emission flux (Esoil) including soil mercury concentration, solar radiation, and surface air temperature as parameters enabled the model to reproduce the observed seasonal variations of Esoil, whereas the default setting, which uses only the former two parameters, failed. The modified setting of Esoil also increased the model-simulated atmospheric concentration in the summertime surface layer of the lower- and midlatitudes and improved the model reproducibility for the observations in Japan and U.S. in the same period. Implementing oxidation of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) by ozone with an updated rate constant, as well as the oxidation by bromine atoms (Br) in the default setting, improved the model reproducibility for the dry deposition fluxes observed in Japan. This setting, however, failed to reproduce the observed seasonal variations of atmospheric concentrations in the Arctic sites due to the imbalance between oxidation and reduction, whereas the model with Br as the sole Hg(0) oxidant in the polar atmosphere could capture the variations. PMID:24053722

  19. Vadose zone attenuation of organic compounds at a crude oil spill site - Interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.; Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Contaminant attenuation processes in the vadose zone of a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN have been simulated with a reactive transport model that includes multicomponent gas transport, solute transport, and the most relevant biogeochemical reactions. Dissolution and volatilization of oil components, their aerobic and anaerobic degradation coupled with sequential electron acceptor consumption, ingress of atmospheric O2, and the release of CH4 and CO2 from the smear zone generated by the floating oil were considered. The focus of the simulations was to assess the dynamics between biodegradation and gas transport processes in the vadose zone, to evaluate the rates and contributions of different electron accepting processes towards vadose zone natural attenuation, and to provide an estimate of the historical mass loss. Concentration distributions of reactive (O2, CH4, and CO2) and non-reactive (Ar and N2) gases served as key constraints for the model calibration. Simulation results confirm that as of 2007, the main degradation pathway can be attributed to methanogenic degradation of organic compounds in the smear zone and the vadose zone resulting in a contaminant plume dominated by high CH4 concentrations. In accordance with field observations, zones of volatilization and CH4 generation are correlated to slightly elevated total gas pressures and low partial pressures of N2 and Ar, while zones of aerobic CH4 oxidation are characterized by slightly reduced gas pressures and elevated concentrations of N2 and Ar. Diffusion is the most significant transport mechanism for gases in the vadose zone; however, the simulations also indicate that, despite very small pressure gradients, advection contributes up to 15% towards the net flux of CH4, and to a more limited extent to O2 ingress. Model calibration strongly suggests that transfer of biogenically generated gases from the smear zone provides a major control on vadose zone gas distributions and vadose zone carbon balance. Overall, the model was successful in capturing the complex interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport processes. However, despite employing a process-based modeling approach, honoring observed parameter ranges, and generally obtaining good agreement between field observations and model simulations, accurate quantification of natural attenuation rates remains difficult. The modeling results are affected by uncertainties regarding gas phase saturations, tortuosities, and the magnitude of CH4 and CO2 flux from the smear zone. These findings highlight the need to better delineate gas fluxes at the model boundaries, which will help constrain contaminant degradation rates, and ultimately source zone longevity. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Vadose zone attenuation of organic compounds at a crude oil spill site - interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport.

    PubMed

    Molins, S; Mayer, K U; Amos, R T; Bekins, B A

    2010-03-01

    Contaminant attenuation processes in the vadose zone of a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN have been simulated with a reactive transport model that includes multicomponent gas transport, solute transport, and the most relevant biogeochemical reactions. Dissolution and volatilization of oil components, their aerobic and anaerobic degradation coupled with sequential electron acceptor consumption, ingress of atmospheric O(2), and the release of CH(4) and CO(2) from the smear zone generated by the floating oil were considered. The focus of the simulations was to assess the dynamics between biodegradation and gas transport processes in the vadose zone, to evaluate the rates and contributions of different electron accepting processes towards vadose zone natural attenuation, and to provide an estimate of the historical mass loss. Concentration distributions of reactive (O(2), CH(4), and CO(2)) and non-reactive (Ar and N(2)) gases served as key constraints for the model calibration. Simulation results confirm that as of 2007, the main degradation pathway can be attributed to methanogenic degradation of organic compounds in the smear zone and the vadose zone resulting in a contaminant plume dominated by high CH(4) concentrations. In accordance with field observations, zones of volatilization and CH(4) generation are correlated to slightly elevated total gas pressures and low partial pressures of N(2) and Ar, while zones of aerobic CH(4) oxidation are characterized by slightly reduced gas pressures and elevated concentrations of N(2) and Ar. Diffusion is the most significant transport mechanism for gases in the vadose zone; however, the simulations also indicate that, despite very small pressure gradients, advection contributes up to 15% towards the net flux of CH(4), and to a more limited extent to O(2) ingress. Model calibration strongly suggests that transfer of biogenically generated gases from the smear zone provides a major control on vadose zone gas distributions and vadose zone carbon balance. Overall, the model was successful in capturing the complex interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport processes. However, despite employing a process-based modeling approach, honoring observed parameter ranges, and generally obtaining good agreement between field observations and model simulations, accurate quantification of natural attenuation rates remains difficult. The modeling results are affected by uncertainties regarding gas phase saturations, tortuosities, and the magnitude of CH(4) and CO(2) flux from the smear zone. These findings highlight the need to better delineate gas fluxes at the model boundaries, which will help constrain contaminant degradation rates, and ultimately source zone longevity. PMID:19853961

  1. Modeling the Biogeochemical Response of a Flood Plain Aquifer Impacted By Seasonal Temperature and Water Table Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Spycher, N.; Molins, S.; Steefel, C. I.

    2014-12-01

    With the overarching goal of understanding the impacts of climate and land use changes on carbon and nutrient cycles, we are developing a reactive transport model that couples hydrologic and biogeochemical processes to microbial functional distributions inferred from site-specific 'omic' data. The objective of the modeling approach is to simulate changes in carbon and nutrient fluxes and aquifer biogeochemistry over longer time periods due to changes in climate and/or land use, while also considering shorter time periods in which water table fluctuations and temperature variations are important. A 2-D reactive transport model has been developed for the unsaturated-saturated zone of the Rifle site, CO, an alluvial aquifer bordering the Colorado River. Modeling efforts focus on the April through September 2013 time frame that corresponds to the spring snow melt event that lead to an approximately 1 meter rise in the water table followed by a gradual lowering over 3 months. Temperature variations of as much as 10ºC are observed at shallow depths (< 1m), while at least some temperature variation (1ºC) occurs as deep as about 7m. A field survey of the microbial populations indicates the presence and activity of chemo(litho)autotrophic bacteria within the saturated zone of the alluvial aquifer. Model simulations are used to quantify the release of carbon dioxide and consumption of oxygen via abiotic pathways and heterotrophic microbial oxidation of reduced species (Fe(II), S(-2)) and minerals (pyrite). Results indicate that the observed oxygen profiles and/or carbon fluxes cannot be matched by considering abiotic reactions alone. The importance of including microbial contributions from chemo(litho)autotrophic processes (e.g., ammonia, sulfur and iron oxidation) is supported by both field observations and model simulations. Important conclusions from the study are to: (1) include microbially-mediated processes and contributions from the unsaturated zone, and (2) account for seasonal temperature changes to accurately represent lateral and vertical delivery of water and nutrients as well as biogeochemical transformations within the Rifle Flood Plain system.

  2. Investigation of CO2 induced biogeochemical reactions and active microorganisms of two German gas fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoth, N.; Kassahun, A.; Seifert, J.; Krüger, M.; Bretschneider, H.; Gniese, C.; Frerichs, J.; Simon, A.; Simon, E.; Muschalle, T.

    2009-04-01

    The BMBF-Geotechnologien project "RECOBIO 2" continues the investigation of the long-term biogeochemical transformation of stored CO2. In addition to the Upper Carboniferous gas reservoir Schneeren (Westphalian C) the almost depleted Altmark gas field (Permian - Upper Rotliegend) is also investigated. Both sandstone reservoirs belong to the North German Basin and are operated by the GDF SUEZ E&P Germany (GDF SUEZ). The reservoirs differ in depth, initial and current fluid pressure as well as reservoir temperature, which is a biogeochemical important parameter. While the uplifted horst structure of Schneeren (approx. depth 2700 m) has a temperature level of 80 - 90 °C, the Altmark gas field (approx. depth 3300 m) shows temperatures around 120 °C. The Altmark site is known to be favourable for underground CO2-storage by enhanced gas recovery (EGR). This EGR process is operated by GDF SUEZ at the small and hydraulic isolated reservoir block "Altensalzwedel". This pilot test is accompanied by the scientific large-scale project CLEAN. In addition the RECOBIO2 project characterises the biogeochemical situation of the both large reservoir blocks of the Altmark gas field - „Salzwedel/ Peckensen" and „Heidberg/ Mellin". The produced formation waters of these reservoir blocks were sampled on different wellheads. The redox potentials are partly very low (Eh up to -300 mV) with slightly acidic pH-values (5,5 to 6). The high saline and (nearly) sulphate free formation waters of Na/Ca-Cl type have very high loads of Zn, Pb, Hg and As. In combination to the analysed DOC levels the talk discusses the importance of metal organic complexes. Also results of fluid geochemical calculations will be presented. Furthermore the diversity of bacteria and archaea of the formation waters as well as the potentials of CH4-, CO2-formation and sulphate reduction will be shown. Therefore the cultivation experiments were carried out with different substrates (H2/CO2, acetate, methanol). It can be summarised, that mainly the differences between wells treated with chemical foams (to enhance the gas lift) and such without this treatment have to take into account. The autoclave experiments for the Schneeren site show the importance of biogeochemical reactions for the long-term pressure behaviour of the storage unit. During autotrophic (CO2 consuming) metabolic activities a CO2 turnover into the liquid and solid phase takes place (DOC increase, carbonate phase formation). Without the knowledge of these biogeochemical induced processes the accompanied decreasing pressure can be interpreted wrongly as a leaky storage unit. That's why a well-founded biogeochemical process understanding is important.

  3. A multi-decadal hindcast of a physical-biogeochemical model and derived oceanographic indices in the Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huret, Martin; Sourisseau, Marc; Petitgas, Pierre; Struski, Caroline; Léger, Fabien; Lazure, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Multiple year oceanographic simulations (hindcast) are identified as a priority oceanography product for fisheries and environment studies since they provide a unique continuous long-term dataset allowing integrated assessment of the ocean state and evolution. We performed a 37 year (1972-2008) hindcast run with a coupled physical-biogeochemical model in the Bay of Biscay. The coupled model and the hindcast configuration are described. A model skill assessment is performed with a large set of in-situ data. Average seasonal currents show major circulation patterns over the shelf. Among tracers, temperature and salinity have the best agreement, ahead of nitrates and silicates, chlorophyll, and finally phosphates and ammonium. For chlorophyll, improved pattern statistics are found when compared to monthly composites of satellite-derived chlorophyll data. From the hindcast, we derived indices related to mesoscale activity (eddies, plumes, fronts, stratification) and production (chlorophyll and primary production). They help characterise the evolution of the environment in a functional way, on both the seasonal and multi-decadal scales. From these indices, first, a multivariate analysis reveals an increasing number of years that deviate from the mean seasonal pattern. Second, we propose interpretations of the simulated increasing trends detected in several of them (temperature, thermocline depth and primary production). We also recommend further developments to confirm these simulated evolutions, from addition of open boundary forcing with a global circulation model, to the improvement of the dynamics of nutrient regeneration and of the seasonal variability of secondary production. As a perspective, we review the different applications made from our hindcast in relation to anchovy life cycle, a species of major interest in the Bay of Biscay.

  4. Beyond The Blueprint: Development Of Genome-Informed Trait-Based Models For Prediction Of Microbial Dynamics And Biogeochemical Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, E.; King, E.; Molins, S.; Karaoz, U.; Johnson, J. N.; Bouskill, N.; Hug, L. A.; Thomas, B. C.; Castelle, C. J.; Beller, H. R.; Banfield, J. F.; Steefel, C. I.

    2014-12-01

    In soils and sediments microorganisms perform essential ecosystem services through their roles in regulating the stability of carbon and the flux of nutrients, and the purification of water. But these are complex systems with the physical, chemical and biological components all intimately connected. Components of this complexity are gradually being uncovered and our understanding of the extent of microbial functional diversity in particular has been enhanced greatly with the development of cultivation independent approaches. However we have not moved far beyond a descriptive and correlative use of this powerful resource. As the ability to reconstruct thousands of genomes from microbial populations using metagenomic techniques gains momentum, the challenge will be to develop an understanding of how these metabolic blueprints serve to influence the fitness of organisms within these complex systems and how populations emerge and impact the physical and chemical properties of their environment. In the presentation we will discuss the development of a trait-based model of microbial activity that simulates coupled guilds of microorganisms that are parameterized including traits extracted from large-scale metagenomic data. Using a reactive transport framework we simulate the thermodynamics of coupled electron donor and acceptor reactions to predict the energy available for respiration, biomass development and exo-enzyme production. Each group within a functional guild is parameterized with a unique combination of traits governing organism fitness under dynamic environmental conditions. This presentation will address our latest developments in the estimation of trait values related to growth rate and the identification and linkage of key fitness traits associated with respiratory and fermentative pathways, macromolecule depolymerization enzymes and nitrogen fixation from metagenomic data. We are testing model sensitivity to initial microbial composition and intra-guild trait variability amongst other parameters and are using this model to explore abiotic controls on community emergence and impact on rates of reactions that contribute to the cycling of carbon across biogeochemical gradients from the soil to the subsurface.

  5. How important are biogeochemical hotspots at aquifer-river interfaces for surface water and groundwater quality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, S.; Blume, T.; Weatherill, J.; Munz, M.; Tecklenburg, C.; Angermann, L.; Cassidy, N. J.

    2012-04-01

    The mixing of groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) can have substantial impact on the transformation of solutes transported between aquifer and river. The assessment of biogeochemical cycling at reactivity hotspots as the aquifer-river interface and its implications for GW and SW quality require detailed understanding of the complex patterns of GW-SW exchange fluxes and residence time distributions in particular under changing climatic and landuse conditions. This study presents combined experimental and model-based investigations of the physical drivers and chemical controls of nutrient transport and transformation at the aquifer-river interfaces of two upland and lowland UK rivers. It combines the application of in-stream geophysical exploration techniques, multi-level mini-piezometer networks, active and passive heat tracing methods (including fibre-optic distributed temperature sensing - FO-DTS) for identifying hyporheic exchange fluxes and residence time distributions with multi-scale approaches of hyporheic pore-water sampling and reactive tracers for analysing the patterns of streambed redox conditions and chemical transformation rates. The analysis of hyporheic pore water from nested multi-level mini piezometers and passive gel probe samplers revealed significant spatial variability in streambed redox conditions and concentration changes of nitrogen species, dissolved oxygen and bio-available organic carbon. Hot spots of increased nitrate attenuation were identified beneath semi-confining peat lenses in the streambed of the investigated lowland river. The intensity of concentration changes underneath the confining peat pockets correlated with the state of anoxia in the pore water as well as the supply of organic carbon and hyporheic residence times. In contrast, at locations where flow inhibiting peat layers were absent or disrupted - fast exchange between aquifer and river caused a break-through of nitrate without significant concentration changes along the hyporheic flow path. Fibre-optic distributed temperature sensor networks and streambed electric resistivity tomography were applied for identifying exchange flow patterns between groundwater and surface water in dependency of streambed structural heterogeneity and for delineating the location and extend of flow inhibiting structures as indicators of streambed reactivity hot spots. Results of these surveys indicate that during summer, patterns of cold spots in the investigated streambed sediments can be attributed to fast groundwater up-welling in sandy and gravely sediments resulting in low hyporheic residence times. Contrasting conditions were found at warmer areas at the streambed surface where groundwater - surface water exchange was inhibited by the existence of peat or clay lenses within the streambed. Model simulations of coupled groundwater and surface water flow indicated that ignoring the increased reactivity in hyporheic streambed hotspots would lead to substantial under- or over-prediction of nitrate fluxes between aquifer and stream with potentially critical implications for river management and restoration. The investigations supported the development of a conceptual model of aquifer-river exchange and hyporheic reactivity in lowland rivers including temperature traceable hyporheic exchange fluxes at multiple scales and highlighted the necessity to adequately reflect hyporheic hotspot reactivity in coupled groundwater-surface water models for adequate water quality predictions.

  6. Hybrid numerical methods for multiscale simulations of subsurface biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Tartakovsky, D. M.; Redden, G. D.; Meakin, P.

    2007-07-01

    Many subsurface flow and transport problems of importance today involve coupled non-linear flow, transport, and reaction in media exhibiting complex heterogeneity. In particular, problems involving biological mediation of reactions fall into this class of problems. Recent experimental research has revealed important details about the physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms involved in these processes at a variety of scales ranging from molecular to laboratory scales. However, it has not been practical or possible to translate detailed knowledge at small scales into reliable predictions of field-scale phenomena important for environmental management applications. A large assortment of numerical simulation tools have been developed, each with its own characteristic scale. Important examples include 1. molecular simulations (e.g., molecular dynamics); 2. simulation of microbial processes at the cell level (e.g., cellular automata or particle individual-based models); 3. pore-scale simulations (e.g., lattice-Boltzmann, pore network models, and discrete particle methods such as smoothed particle hydrodynamics); and 4. macroscopic continuum-scale simulations (e.g., traditional partial differential equations solved by finite difference or finite element methods). While many problems can be effectively addressed by one of these models at a single scale, some problems may require explicit integration of models across multiple scales. We are developing a hybrid multi-scale subsurface reactive transport modeling framework that integrates models with diverse representations of physics, chemistry and biology at different scales (sub-pore, pore and continuum). The modeling framework is being designed to take advantage of advanced computational technologies including parallel code components using the Common Component Architecture, parallel solvers, gridding, data and workflow management, and visualization. This paper describes the specific methods/codes being used at each scale, techniques used to directly and adaptively couple across model scales, and preliminary results of application to a multi-scale model of mineral precipitation at a solute mixing interface.

  7. EFFECT OF NUTRIENT LOADING ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES IN A NEW ENGLAND HIGH SALT MARSH, SPARTINA PATNES, (AITON MUHL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal marshes represent an important transitional zone between uplands and estuaries and can assimilate nutrient inputs from uplands. We examined the effects of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization on biogeochemical and microbial processes during the summer growing sea...

  8. Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan R. Lloyd

    2009-02-03

    The objective of this research program was to take a highly multidisciplinary approach to define the biogeochemical factors that control technetium (Tc) mobility in FRC sediments. The aim was to use batch and column studies to probe the biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC. Background sediment samples from Area 2 (pH 6.5, low nitrate, low {sup 99}Tc) and Area 3 (pH 3.5, high nitrate, relatively high {sup 99}Tc) of the FRC were selected (http://www.esd.ornl.gov/nabirfrc). For the batch experiments, sediments were mixed with simulated groundwater, modeled on chemical constituents of FRC waters and supplemented with {sup 99}Tc(VII), both with and without added electron donor (acetate). The solubility of the Tc was monitored, alongside other biogeochemical markers (nitrate, nitrite, Fe(II), sulfate, acetate, pH, Eh) as the 'microcosms' aged. At key points, the microbial communities were also profiled using both cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques, and results correlated with the geochemical conditions in the sediments. The mineral phases present in the sediments were also characterized, and the solid phase associations of the Tc determined using sequential extraction and synchrotron techniques. In addition to the batch sediment experiments, where discrete microbial communities with the potential to reduce and precipitate {sup 99}Tc will be separated in time, we also developed column experiments where biogeochemical processes were spatially separated. Experiments were conducted both with and without amendments proposed to stimulate radionuclide immobilization (e.g. the addition of acetate as an electron donor for metal reduction), and were also planned with and without competing anions at high concentration (e.g. nitrate, with columns containing Area 3 sediments). When the columns had stabilized, as determined by chemical analysis of the effluents, we used a spike of the short-lived gamma emitter {sup 99m}Tc (50-200 MBq; half life 6 hours) and its mobility was monitored using a {gamma}-camera. Incorporation of low concentrations of the long-lived 99Tc gave a tracer that can be followed by scintillation counting, should the metastable form of the radionuclide decay to below detection limits before the end of the experiment (complete immobilization or loss of the Tc from the column). After the Tc was reduced and immobilized, or passed through the system, the columns were dismantled carefully in an anaerobic cabinet and the pore water geochemistry and mineralogy of the columns profiled. Microbial community analysis was determined, again using molecular and culture-dependent techniques. Experimental results were also modeled using an established coupled speciation and transport code, to develop a predictive tool for the mobility of Tc in FRC sediments. From this multidisciplinary approach, we hoped to obtain detailed information on the microorganisms that control the biogeochemical cycling of key elements at the FRC, and we would also be able to determine the key factors that control the mobility of Tc at environmentally relevant concentrations at this site.

  9. Biogeochemical evolution of sulfide ore mine tailings profiles under semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorover, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mining represents a principal form of earth surface disturbance in the anthropocene. Weathering reactions that ensue following tailings deposition are strongly affected by climatic forcing and tailings composition, and these also affect the weathering-induced transformations of the associated mineral assemblages and metal(loid) contaminants. The presence or absence of plants and associated microbiota can have a profound influence on these weathering trajectories. We employed field, laboratory and modeling approaches to resolve the impact of (bio)geochemical weathering reactions on the transformation of mine tailings parent materials into soil over the time following mining cessation. Using controlled experiments, we have evaluated the impacts of plants and associated rhizosphere microbiota on these reactions, hydrologic fluxes, and the molecular speciation of mining derived contaminants. Plant establishment is shown to alter site ecohydrology and biogeochemical weathering processes leading to distinctly different weathering products and patterns.

  10. Biogeochemical and environmental study of the chromite-rich ultramafic terrain of Malakand area, Pakistan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Q. Kfayatullah; M. Tahir Shah; M. Arfan

    2001-01-01

    The biogeochemical distribution of enzyme-bound metals in the plants and soil of the chromite-rich mineralized area of Malakand Agency and the non-mineralized area of Mardan (N.W.F.P., Pakistan) has been studied in regard to mineral prospecting and environmental pollution. Samples of lower plants accompanied with their associated soil samples were collected and analysed for copper, lead, zinc, nickel, chromium and cobalt.

  11. Environmental biogeochemical behaviors of rare earth elements in soil–plant systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tao Liang; Shen Zhang; Lijun Wang; Hsiang-Te Kung; Yuqi Wang; Aitang Hu; Shiming Ding

    2005-01-01

    With the continual increase in the utilization of rare earth elements (REEs) for industrial and agricultural purposes in China,\\u000a the research into the environmental biogeochemical behavior of REEs has become a pressing issue. The REEs’ content in soil\\u000a and various parts of wheat under different conditions in soil–plant systems were measured by INAA and ICP-MS. The results\\u000a showed four aspects.

  12. Cyclic biogeochemical processes and nitrogen fate beneath a subtropical stormwater infiltration basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P.

    2012-01-01

    A stormwater infiltration basin in north–central Florida, USA, was monitored from 2007 through 2008 to identify subsurface biogeochemical processes, with emphasis on N cycling, under the highly variable hydrologic conditions common in humid, subtropical climates. Cyclic variations in biogeochemical processes generally coincided with wet and dry hydrologic conditions. Oxidizing conditions in the subsurface persisted for about one month or less at the beginning of wet periods with dissolved O2 and NO3- showing similar temporal patterns. Reducing conditions in the subsurface evolved during prolonged flooding of the basin. At about the same time O2 and NO3- reduction concluded, Mn, Fe and SO42- reduction began, with the onset of methanogenesis one month later. Reducing conditions persisted up to six months, continuing into subsequent dry periods until the next major oxidizing infiltration event. Evidence of denitrification in shallow groundwater at the site is supported by median NO3-–N less than 0.016 mg L-1, excess N2 up to 3 mg L-1 progressively enriched in ?15N during prolonged basin flooding, and isotopically heavy ?15N and ?18O of NO3- (up to 25‰ and 15‰, respectively). Isotopic enrichment of newly infiltrated stormwater suggests denitrification was partially completed within two days. Soil and water chemistry data suggest that a biogeochemically active zone exists in the upper 1.4 m of soil, where organic carbon was the likely electron donor supplied by organic matter in soil solids or dissolved in infiltrating stormwater. The cyclic nature of reducing conditions effectively controlled the N cycle, switching N fate beneath the basin from NO3- leaching to reduction in the shallow saturated zone. Results can inform design of functionalized soil amendments that could replace the native soil in a stormwater infiltration basin and mitigate potential NO3- leaching to groundwater by replicating the biogeochemical conditions under the observed basin.

  13. Defining Mediterranean and Black Sea Biogeochemical Subprovinces and Synthetic Ocean Indicators Using Mesoscale Oceanographic Features

    PubMed Central

    Nieblas, Anne-Elise; Drushka, Kyla; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Rossi, Vincent; Demarcq, Hervé; Dubroca, Laurent; Bonhommeau, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean and Black Seas are semi-enclosed basins characterized by high environmental variability and growing anthropogenic pressure. This has led to an increasing need for a bioregionalization of the oceanic environment at local and regional scales that can be used for managerial applications as a geographical reference. We aim to identify biogeochemical subprovinces within this domain, and develop synthetic indices of the key oceanographic dynamics of each subprovince to quantify baselines from which to assess variability and change. To do this, we compile a data set of 101 months (2002–2010) of a variety of both “classical” (i.e., sea surface temperature, surface chlorophyll-a, and bathymetry) and “mesoscale” (i.e., eddy kinetic energy, finite-size Lyapunov exponents, and surface frontal gradients) ocean features that we use to characterize the surface ocean variability. We employ a k-means clustering algorithm to objectively define biogeochemical subprovinces based on classical features, and, for the first time, on mesoscale features, and on a combination of both classical and mesoscale features. Principal components analysis is then performed on the oceanographic variables to define integrative indices to monitor the environmental changes within each resultant subprovince at monthly resolutions. Using both the classical and mesoscale features, we find five biogeochemical subprovinces for the Mediterranean and Black Seas. Interestingly, the use of mesoscale variables contributes highly in the delineation of the open ocean. The first axis of the principal component analysis is explained primarily by classical ocean features and the second axis is explained by mesoscale features. Biogeochemical subprovinces identified by the present study can be useful within the European management framework as an objective geographical framework of the Mediterranean and Black Seas, and the synthetic ocean indicators developed here can be used to monitor variability and long-term change. PMID:25360783

  14. The role of nitrogen fixation in biogeochemical cycling in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Karl; R. Letelier; L. Tupas; J. Dore; J. Christian; D. Hebel

    1997-01-01

    Seven years of time-series observations of biogeochemical processes in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean gyre have revealed dramatic changes in the microbial community structure and in the mechanisms of nutrient cycling in response to large-scale ocean-atmosphere interactions. Several independent lines of evidence show that the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen by cyanobacteria can fuel up to half of the new production.

  15. Climate-quality Ocean Biogeochemical Research Data From Satellite Ocean Color Observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. McClain

    2008-01-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)\\/Aqua missions are providing global climate research-quality time series of several important marine biogeochemical quantities such as chlorophyll-a, net primary production, calcite, and particulate organic carbon. The accuracies of these data sets rely on precise sensor calibrations and estimates of water-leaving radiances. While SeaWiFS and MODIS\\/Aqua have been

  16. Assessment of biogeochemical natural attenuation and treatment of chlorinated solvents, Altus Air Force Base, Altus, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lonnie G. Kennedy; Jess W. Everett; James Gonzales

    2006-01-01

    Biogeochemical reductive dechlorination (BiRD) is a newly recognized method for the remediation or natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents. Chlorinated solvents are rapidly treated by abiotic reaction with reduced mineral iron sulfides. Iron sulfides are formed by naturally occurring sulfate-reducing bacteria when sufficient SO42? and organic carbon are present or supplied to sediments containing mineral iron. An example of site characterization

  17. Assessment of biogeochemical natural attenuation and treatment of chlorinated solvents, Altus Air Force Base, Altus, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lonnie G. Kennedy; Jess W. Everett; James Gonzales

    2006-01-01

    Biogeochemical reductive dechlorination (BiRD) is a newly recognized method for the remediation or natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents. Chlorinated solvents are rapidly treated by abiotic reaction with reduced mineral iron sulfides. Iron sulfides are formed by naturally occurring sulfate-reducing bacteria when sufficient SO42- and organic carbon are present or supplied to sediments containing mineral iron. An example of site characterization

  18. A biogeochemical model for metabolism and nutrient cycling in a Southeastern Piedmont impoundment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoqing Zeng; Todd C. Rasmussen; M. Bruce Beck; Amanda K. Parker; Zhulu Lin

    2006-01-01

    While non-point nutrient loads are important determinants of biological productivity in Southeastern Piedmont impoundments, productivity can be attenuated by concomitant sediment loads that reduce the biological availability of these nutrients. A biogeochemical model is proposed that explicitly accounts for the effects of sediment–nutrient interactions on multiple components of phytoplankton metabolism dynamics, including algal photosynthesis and respiration, pH, carbonate speciation, dissolved

  19. Biogeochemical Characteristics of Lacustrine Sediments Reflecting a Changing Alpine Neotropical Ecosystem during the Pleistocene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Germán Mora; Lisa M. Pratt; Arnoud Boom; Henry Hooghiemstra

    2002-01-01

    Continuous lacustrine deposits of the Funza-II core from the Bogotá basin, Colombia (5°N74°W) record late Pleistocene climatic variations, providing an opportunity to assess the influence of glacial–interglacial climate changes on alpine ecosystems in equatorial South America. Biogeochemical response of this tropical alpine system to climate change was inferred from changes in elemental concentrations and ratios and isotopic signatures in the

  20. Principal Biogeochemical Factors Affecting the Speciation And Transport of Mercury through the terrestrial environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark C. Gabriel; Derek G. Williamson

    2004-01-01

    It is increasingly becoming known that mercury transport and speciation in the terrestrial environment play major roles in methyl-mercury bioaccumulation potential in surface water. This review discusses the principal biogeochemical reactions affecting the transport and speciation of mercury in the terrestrial watershed. The issues presented are mercury-ligand formation, mercury adsorption\\/desorption, and elemental mercury reduction and volatilization. In terrestrial environments, OH–,

  1. Biogeochemical cycling and microbial diversity in the thrombolitic microbialites of Highborne Cay, Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Myshrall, K L; Mobberley, J M; Green, S J; Visscher, P T; Havemann, S A; Reid, R P; Foster, J S

    2010-09-01

    Thrombolites are unlaminated carbonate build-ups that are formed via the metabolic activities of complex microbial mat communities. The thrombolitic mats of Highborne Cay, Bahamas develop in close proximity (1-2 m) to accreting laminated stromatolites, providing an ideal opportunity for biogeochemical and molecular comparisons of these two distinctive microbialite ecosystems. In this study, we provide the first comprehensive characterization of the biogeochemical activities and microbial diversity of the Highborne Cay thrombolitic mats. Morphological and molecular analyses reveal two dominant mat types associated with the thrombolite deposits, both of which are dominated by bacteria from the taxa Cyanobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. Diel cycling of dissolved oxygen (DO) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were measured in all thrombolitic mat types. DO production varied between thrombolitic types and one morphotype, referred to in this study as 'button mats', produced the highest levels among all mat types, including the adjacent stromatolites. Characterization of thrombolite bacterial communities revealed a high bacterial diversity, roughly equivalent to that of the nearby stromatolites, and a low eukaryotic diversity. Extensive phylogenetic overlap between thrombolitic and stromatolitic microbial communities was observed, although thrombolite-specific cyanobacterial populations were detected. In particular, the button mats were dominated by a calcified, filamentous cyanobacterium identified via morphology and 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Dichothrix sp. The distinctive microbial communities and chemical cycling patterns within the thrombolitic mats provide novel insight into the biogeochemical processes related to the lithifying mats in this system, and provide data relevant to understanding microbially induced carbonate biomineralization. PMID:20491947

  2. Biogeochemical factors which regulate the formation and fate of sulfide in wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Lyons, W. Berry; Gaudette, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    Coastal wetland areas occupy a small percentage of the terrestrial environment yet are extremely productive regions which support rapid rates of below ground bacterial activity. Wetlands appear to be significant as biogenic sources of gaseous sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen. These gases are important as tracers of man's activities, and they influence atmospheric chemistry. The interactions among wetland biogeochemical processes regulate the anaerobic production of reduced gases and influence the fate of these volatiles. Therefore, spatial and temporal variations in hydrology, salinity, temperature, and speciation and growth of vegetation affect the type and magnitude of gas emissions thus hindering predictive estimates of gas flux. The research is divided into two major parts, the first is the biogeochemical characterization of a selected tidal wetland area in terms of factors likely to regulate sulfide flux; the second is a direct measurement of gaseous sulfur flux as related to changes in these biogeochemical conditions. Variant factors affecting sulfide flux include the wetlands' tidal range, seasonal salinity, and other hydrological conditions, grass species and plant growth, soil composition, and microbial activity.

  3. Biogeochemical processes on tree islands in the greater everglades: Initiating a new paradigm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetzel, P.R.; Sklar, F.H.; Coronado, C.A.; Troxler, T.G.; Krupa, S.L.; Sullivan, P.L.; Ewe, S.; Price, R.M.; Newman, S.; Orem, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientists' understanding of the role of tree islands in the Everglades has evolved from a plant community of minor biogeochemical importance to a plant community recognized as the driving force for localized phosphorus accumulation within the landscape. Results from this review suggest that tree transpiration, nutrient infiltration from the soil surface, and groundwater flow create a soil zone of confluence where nutrients and salts accumulate under the head of a tree island during dry periods. Results also suggest accumulated salts and nutrients are flushed downstream by regional water flows during wet periods. That trees modulate their environment to create biogeochemical hot spots and strong nutrient gradients is a significant ecological paradigm shift in the understanding of the biogeochemical processes in the Everglades. In terms of island sustainability, this new paradigm suggests the need for distinct dry-wet cycles as well as a hydrologic regime that supports tree survival. Restoration of historic tree islands needs further investigation but the creation of functional tree islands is promising. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  4. Biogeochemical hotspots within forested landscapes: quantifying the functional role of vernal pools in ecosystem processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, K. A.; Rancatti, R.; Calhoun, A.; Hunter, M.

    2013-12-01

    Biogeochemical hotspots are characterized as small areas within a landscape matrix that show comparably high chemical reaction rates relative to surrounding areas. For small, natural features to generate biogeochemical hotspots within a landscape, their contribution to nutrient dynamics must be significant relative to nutrient demand of the surrounding landscape. In northeastern forests in the US, vernal pools are abundant, small features that typically fill in spring with snow melt and precipitation and dry by the end of the summer. Ephemeral flooding alters soil moisture and the depth of the oxic/anoxic boundary in the soil, which may affect leaf-litter decomposition rates and nutrient dynamics including denitrification. Additionally, pool-breeding organisms may influence nutrient dynamics via consumer-driven nutrient remineralization. We studied the effects of vernal pools on rates of leaf-litter decomposition and denitrification in forested habitats in Maine. Our results indicate leaf-litter decomposition and denitrification rates in submerged habitats of vernal pools were greater than in upland forest habitat. Our data also suggest pool-breeding organisms, such as wood frogs, may play an important role in nutrient dynamics within vernal pools. Together, the results suggest vernal pools may function as biogeochemical hotspots within forested landscapes.

  5. Integrating remotely sensed land cover observations and a biogeochemical model for estimating forest ecosystem carbon dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, J.; Liu, S.; Loveland, T.R.; Tieszen, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    Land cover change is one of the key driving forces for ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics. We present an approach for using sequential remotely sensed land cover observations and a biogeochemical model to estimate contemporary and future ecosystem carbon trends. We applied the General Ensemble Biogeochemical Modelling System (GEMS) for the Laurentian Plains and Hills ecoregion in the northeastern United States for the period of 1975-2025. The land cover changes, especially forest stand-replacing events, were detected on 30 randomly located 10-km by 10-km sample blocks, and were assimilated by GEMS for biogeochemical simulations. In GEMS, each unique combination of major controlling variables (including land cover change history) forms a geo-referenced simulation unit. For a forest simulation unit, a Monte Carlo process is used to determine forest type, forest age, forest biomass, and soil C, based on the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data and the U.S. General Soil Map (STATSGO) data. Ensemble simulations are performed for each simulation unit to incorporate input data uncertainty. Results show that on average forests of the Laurentian Plains and Hills ecoregion have been sequestrating 4.2 Tg C (1 teragram = 1012 gram) per year, including 1.9 Tg C removed from the ecosystem as the consequences of land cover change. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Invasive Fishes Generate Biogeochemical Hotspots in a Nutrient-Limited System

    PubMed Central

    Capps, Krista A.; Flecker, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    Fishes can play important functional roles in the nutrient dynamics of freshwater systems. Aggregating fishes have the potential to generate areas of increased biogeochemical activity, or hotspots, in streams and rivers. Many of the studies documenting the functional role of fishes in nutrient dynamics have focused on native fish species; however, introduced fishes may restructure nutrient storage and cycling freshwater systems as they can attain high population densities in novel environments. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a non-native catfish (Loricariidae: Pterygoplichthys) on nitrogen and phosphorus remineralization and estimate whether large aggregations of these fish generate measurable biogeochemical hotspots within nutrient-limited ecosystems. Loricariids formed large aggregations during daylight hours and dispersed throughout the stream during evening hours to graze benthic habitats. Excretion rates of phosphorus were twice as great during nighttime hours when fishes were actively feeding; however, there was no diel pattern in nitrogen excretion rates. Our results indicate that spatially heterogeneous aggregations of loricariids can significantly elevate dissolved nutrient concentrations via excretion relative to ambient nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations during daylight hours, creating biogeochemical hotspots and potentially altering nutrient dynamics in invaded systems. PMID:23342083

  7. Swept under the carpet: the effect of organic matter burial in global biogeochemical ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriest, I.; Oschlies, A.

    2013-07-01

    Although of substantial importance for marine tracer distributions and eventually global carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen fluxes, the interaction between sinking and remineralization of organic matter, benthic fluxes and burial is not always represented consistently in global biogeochemical models. We here aim to investigate the relationships between these processes with a suite of global biogeochemical models, each simulated over millennia, and compared against observed distributions of pelagic tracers and benthic and pelagic fluxes. We concentrate on the representation of sediment-water interactions in common numerical models, and investigate their potential impact on simulated global sediment-water fluxes and nutrient and oxygen distributions. We find that model configurations with benthic burial simulate global oxygen well over a wide range of possible sinking flux parameterizations, making the model more robust with regard to uncertainties about the remineralization length scale. On a global scale, burial mostly affects oxygen in the meso- to bathypelagic zone. While all model types show an almost identical fit to observed pelagic particle flux, and the same sensitivity to particle sinking speed, comparison to observational estimates of benthic fluxes reveals a more complex pattern and may be influenced by the data distribution and methodology. Still, evaluating model results against observed pelagic and benthic fluxes of organic matter can complement model assessments based on more traditional tracers such as nutrients or oxygen. Based on a combined metric of dissolved tracers and biogeochemical fluxes, we here identify two model descriptions of burial as suitable candidates for further experiments and eventual model refinements.

  8. Technical Note: Simple formulations and solutions of the dual-phase diffusive transport for biogeochemical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Riley, W. J.

    2014-07-01

    Representation of gaseous diffusion in variably saturated near-surface soils is becoming more common in land biogeochemical models, yet the formulations and numerical solution algorithms applied vary widely. We present three different but equivalent formulations of the dual-phase (gaseous and aqueous) tracer diffusion transport problem that is relevant to a wide class of volatile tracers in land biogeochemical models. Of these three formulations (i.e., the gas-primary, aqueous-primary, and bulk-tracer-based formulations), we contend that the gas-primary formulation is the most convenient for modeling tracer dynamics in biogeochemical models. We then provide finite volume approximation to the gas-primary equation and evaluate its accuracy against three analytical models: one for steady-state soil CO2 dynamics, one for steady-state soil CH4 dynamics, and one for transient tracer diffusion from a constant point source into two different sequentially aligned medias. All evaluations demonstrated good accuracy of the numerical approximation. We expect our result will standardize an efficient mechanistic numerical method for solving relatively simple, multi-phase, one-dimensional diffusion problems in land models.

  9. Biogeochemical phosphorus mass balance for Lake Baikal, southeastern Siberia, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callender, E.; Granina, L.

    1997-01-01

    Extensive data for Lake Baikal have been synthesized into a geochemical mass balance for phosphorus (P). Some of the P budget and internal cycling terms for Baikal have been compared to similar terms for oligotrophic Lake Superior, mesotrophic Lake Michigan and the Baltic Sea, and the Ocean. Lake Baikal has a large external source of fluvial P compared to the Laurentian upper Great Lakes and the Ocean. The major tributary to Lake Baikal has experienced substantial increases in organic P loading during the past 25 years. This, coupled with potential P inputs from possible phosphorite mining, may threaten Baikal's oligotrophic status in the future. Water-column remineralization of particulate organic P is substantially greater in Lake Baikal than in the Laurentian Great Lakes. This is probably due to the great water depths of Lake Baikal. There is a gradient in P burial efficiency, with very high values (80%) for Lake Baikal and Lake Superior, lower values (50%) for Lake Michigan and the Baltic Sea, and a low value (13%) for the Ocean. The accumulation rate of P in Lake Baikal sediments is somewhat greater than that in the Laurentian upper Great Lakes and the Baltic Sea, and much greater than in the Ocean. Benthic regeneration rates are surprisingly similar for large lacustrine and marine environments and supply less than 10% of the P utilized for primary production in these aquatic environments.

  10. Multi-Ecosystem Assessment of Mercury Bioaccumulation in Fishes: Habitat, Landscape, and Biogeochemical Drivers of Fish Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagles-Smith, C.; Ackerman, J.; Herring, G.; Willacker, J.; Flanagan, C.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a globally distributed contaminant that threatens ecosystem health across aquatic environments. The complexity of the Hg cycle and its primary drivers, coupled with dynamic food web processes that govern biomagnification, result in marked spatial variability in Hg bioaccumulation across aquatic ecosystems. However, it is unclear if patterns of bioaccumulation are consistent in magnitude and direction across ecosystem types. We synthesized data from several studies spanning more than 200 individual sites, comprising four distinct ecosystem classifications (estuaries, sub-alpine lakes, rivers, and managed wetlands). Within each ecosystem, we compared fish Hg concentrations among replicated sub-habitats and also evaluated the influence of land use, landscape composition, and biogeochemical drivers on fish Hg concentrations. We found substantial variability in fish Hg concentrations among adjacent sub-habitats within ecosystems. In estuarine environments, fish Hg concentrations were 7.4x higher in seasonal-saline wetlands than adjacent tidal wetland habitats. In riverine alcoves, preliminary data suggest that fish Hg concentrations were 1.5x higher than in fishes from paired mainstem river habitat. Among managed wetland habitats, fish Hg concentrations in rice fields were 2x higher than those in managed seasonal wetlands that were subjected to identical wetting and drying patterns. Across ecosystems, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in surface waters were consistently correlated with fish Hg concentrations, highlighting its importance in Hg methylation and transport processes. Yet, the strength and direction of the relationships varied among habitat types. For example, fish Hg concentrations were positively correlated with DOC concentrations in riverine environments, whereas we found a negative correlation in alpine lakes. Instead, the most important determinant of fish Hg concentrations in alpine lakes was conifer tree density within a lake's catchment, resulting in a 4x increase in fish Hg concentration in lakes with the lowest to the highest catchment conifer tree density. Together, this integrated ecosystem analysis highlights the importance of understanding small-scale variation in bioaccumulation processes in order to better predict Hg risk.

  11. Nitrous oxide emissions from cropland: a procedure for calibrating the DayCent biogeochemical model using inverse modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rafique, Rashad; Fienen, Michael N.; Parkin, Timothy B.; Anex, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    DayCent is a biogeochemical model of intermediate complexity widely used to simulate greenhouse gases (GHG), soil organic carbon and nutrients in crop, grassland, forest and savannah ecosystems. Although this model has been applied to a wide range of ecosystems, it is still typically parameterized through a traditional “trial and error” approach and has not been calibrated using statistical inverse modelling (i.e. algorithmic parameter estimation). The aim of this study is to establish and demonstrate a procedure for calibration of DayCent to improve estimation of GHG emissions. We coupled DayCent with the parameter estimation (PEST) software for inverse modelling. The PEST software can be used for calibration through regularized inversion as well as model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The DayCent model was analysed and calibrated using N2O flux data collected over 2 years at the Iowa State University Agronomy and Agricultural Engineering Research Farms, Boone, IA. Crop year 2003 data were used for model calibration and 2004 data were used for validation. The optimization of DayCent model parameters using PEST significantly reduced model residuals relative to the default DayCent parameter values. Parameter estimation improved the model performance by reducing the sum of weighted squared residual difference between measured and modelled outputs by up to 67 %. For the calibration period, simulation with the default model parameter values underestimated mean daily N2O flux by 98 %. After parameter estimation, the model underestimated the mean daily fluxes by 35 %. During the validation period, the calibrated model reduced sum of weighted squared residuals by 20 % relative to the default simulation. Sensitivity analysis performed provides important insights into the model structure providing guidance for model improvement.

  12. Evaluation of Boundless Biogeochemical Cycle through Development of Process-Based Eco-Hydrological and Biogeochemical Cycle Model to Incorporate Terrestrial-Aquatic Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, T.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Inland water might act as important transport pathway for continental biogeochemical cycle although its contribution has remained uncertain yet due to a paucity of data (Battin et al. 2009). The author has developed process-based National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model (Nakayama, 2008a-b, 2010, 2011a-b, 2012a-c, 2013; Nakayama and Fujita, 2010; Nakayama and Hashimoto, 2011; Nakayama and Shankman, 2013a-b; Nakayama and Watanabe, 2004, 2006, 2008a-b; Nakayama et al., 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012), which incorporates surface-groundwater interactions, includes up- and down-scaling processes between local-regional-global scales, and can simulate iteratively nonlinear feedback between hydrologic-geomorphic-ecological processes. Because NICE incorporates 3-D groundwater sub-model and expands from previous 1- or 2-D or steady state, the model can simulate the lateral transport pronounced at steeper-slope or riparian/floodplain with surface-groundwater connectivity. River discharge and groundwater level simulated by NICE agreed reasonably with those in previous researches (Niu et al., 2007; Fan et al., 2013) and extended to clarify lateral subsurface also has important role on global hydrologic cycle (Nakayama, 2011b; Nakayama and Shankman, 2013b) though the resolution was coarser. NICE was further developed to incorporate biogeochemical cycle including reaction between inorganic and organic carbons in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The missing role of carbon cycle simulated by NICE, for example, CO2 evasion from inland water (global total flux was estimated as about 1.0 PgC/yr), was relatively in good agreement in that estimated by empirical relation using previous pCO2 data (Aufdenkampe et al., 2011; Laruelle et al., 2013). The model would play important role in identification of greenhouse gas balance of the biosphere and spatio-temporal hot spots, and bridging gap between top-down and bottom-up approaches (Cole et al. 2007; Frei et al. 2012).

  13. Afforestation alters the composition of functional genes in soil and biogeochemical processes in South American grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Berthrong, Sean T [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Pineiro, Gervasio [Duke University; Jackson, Robert B [Duke University

    2009-01-01

    Soil microbes are highly diverse and control most soil biogeochemical reactions. We examined how microbial functional genes and biogeochemical pools responded to the altered chemical inputs accompanying land use change. We examined paired native grasslands and adjacent Eucalyptus plantations (previously grassland) in Uruguay, a region that lacked forests before European settlement. Along with measurements of soil carbon, nitrogen, and bacterial diversity, we analyzed functional genes using the GeoChip 2.0 microarray, which simultaneously quantified several thousand genes involved in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling. Plantations and grassland differed significantly in functional gene profiles, bacterial diversity, and biogeochemical pool sizes. Most grassland profiles were similar, but plantation profiles generally differed from those of grasslands due to differences in functional gene abundance across diverse taxa. Eucalypts decreased ammonification and N fixation functional genes by 11% and 7.9% (P < 0.01), which correlated with decreased microbial biomass N and more NH{sub 4}{sup +} in plantation soils. Chitinase abundance decreased 7.8% in plantations compared to levels in grassland (P = 0.017), and C polymer-degrading genes decreased by 1.5% overall (P < 0.05), which likely contributed to 54% (P < 0.05) more C in undecomposed extractable soil pools and 27% less microbial C (P < 0.01) in plantation soils. In general, afforestation altered the abundance of many microbial functional genes, corresponding with changes in soil biogeochemistry, in part through altered abundance of overall functional gene types rather than simply through changes in specific taxa. Such changes in microbial functional genes correspond with altered C and N storage and have implications for long-term productivity in these soils.

  14. Estimating the Effects of Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreaks on Biophysical and Biogeochemical Variables Using MODIS Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meddens, A. J.; Hicke, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Insects such as mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) are major disturbances in forested ecosystems, affecting forest structure and function. In recent decades, mountain pine beetles have affected large forested areas in the United States and Canada. Insect disturbances impact biophysical variables important for atmosphere/ecosystem exchanges of mass, energy, and momentum as well as biogeochemical processes, notably carbon cycling. Our goal was to estimate the effects of insect disturbance, in particular mountain pine beetle infestations, on carbon cycling in Colorado by using MODIS biophysical and biogeochemical data products in conjunction with fine-resolution aerial imagery that identified the infestation locations. We classified a fine-resolution aerial image, acquired on August 13 2008 in Colorado, into five classes: (1) undisturbed forests, (2) red-attack (when needles are red and still on trees), (3) gray-attack (when trees have lost most of their needles), (4) herbaceous vegetation, and (5) non-vegetation. The classified aerial image was evaluated using field observations, and high accuracies were achieved. The classified aerial image was then aggregated to the MODIS resolution to investigate different levels of insect-caused tree mortality (i.e., the percentage of fine-resolution red-attack and gray-attack pixels in the aggregated pixels). MODIS-derived biophysical and biogeochemical products, including gross and net primary production, leaf area index (LAI), and surface albedo were overlaid on locations with the different levels of outbreak severity. Trajectories of these variables across time were extracted and pre- and post-outbreak values were compared. The outcomes of the effects of MPB on biophysical parameters can be used to increase understanding of impacts of insects to forest functioning and carbon cycling in the western United States.

  15. Can spectroscopic analysis improve our understanding of biogeochemical processes in agricultural streams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieroza, Magdalena; Heathwaite, Ann Louise

    2015-04-01

    In agricultural catchments diffuse fluxes of nutrients, mainly nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from arable land and livestock are responsible for pollution of receiving waters and their eutrophication. Organic matter (OM) can play an important role in mediating a range of biogeochemical processes controlling diffuse pollution in streams and at their interface with surrounding land in the riparian and hyporheic zones. Thus, a holistic and simultaneous monitoring of N, P and OM fractions can help to improve our understanding of biogeochemical functioning of agricultural streams. In this study we build on intensive in situ monitoring of diffuse pollution in a small agricultural groundwater-fed stream in NW England carried out since 2009. The in situ monitoring unit captures high-frequency (15 minutes to hourly) responses of water quality parameters including total phosphorus, total reactive phosphorus and nitrate-nitrogen to changing flow conditions. For two consecutive hydrological years we have carried out additional spectroscopic water analyses to characterise organic matter components and their interactions with nutrient fractions. Automated and grab water samples have been analysed using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorbance and excitation-emission (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, a tryptophan sensor was trialled to capture in situ fluorescence dynamics. Our paper evaluates patterns in nutrient and OM responses to baseflow and storm flow conditions and provides an assessment of storage-related changes of automated samples and temperature and turbidity effects on in situ tryptophan measurements. The paper shows the value of spectroscopic measurements to understand biogeochemical and hydrological nutrient dynamics and quantifies analytical uncertainty associated with both laboratory-based and in situ spectroscopic measurements.

  16. A new implementation of the Biogeochemical Flux Model in sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedesco, L.; Vichi, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Biogeochemical Flux Model (BFM) is a direct descendent of the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM) and it has been widely used and validated among the scientific community. The BFM view of the of the marine ecosystem is based upon the recognition that the major ecological functions of producers, decomposers and consumers and their specific trophic interactions can be expressed in terms of material flows of basic elements. The concentration and characteristics of organic and inorganic compounds are thus seen under a stoichiometrical perspective. This functional approach brings to the definition of Chemical Functional Families (CFF) and Living Functional Groups (LFG). The BFM is thus a set of biogeochemical equations describing the cycling of carbon, the macro-nutrients and oxygen through the lower trophic levels of marine ecosystems. A Sea-Ice system has now been implemented in the BFM and the new BFM-SI consists of three new LFG (sea ice algae, heterotrophic zooplankton, bacterioplankton), one new non-living organic functional group (sea ice DOM and POM) and two new inorganic functional groups: dissolved gases (sea ice CO2 and O2) and four nutrients (sea ice PO4, NH3, NO3 and SiO4). The innovative approach consists in simulating the biogeochemistry of the sea ice Biologically-Active-Layer (BAL), where the majority of the biomass (bottom communities) concentrates. The BFM-SI requires the physical properties of the BAL in order to be able to simulate the physiological and ecological response of the biological community to the physical environment. This is currently done by using an Enhanced 1-D thermo-halodynamic Sea Ice Model (ESIM2), developed to be suitable for biogeochemical studies. Since the biogeochemistry of sea ice is largely unknown, the BFM-SI is a useful tool that allow us to test hypotheses on the functioning of the sea ice ecosystem. By initially setting the sea ice community as having the same characteristics than the pelagic community, it is possible to change many parametrizations of the model, such as the adaptation to the different environmental conditions (light, temperature and salinity) but also nutrient utilization and carbon-chlorophyll ratio. Elected experiments will be shown to elucidate some dynamics of sea ice ecosystems. Once biogeochemical dynamics have been studied in local process studies, it will be possible to apply the new implementation of the model both regionally and globally in order to give a wider picture of the role and importance of the sea ice biogeochemistry in the global carbon cycle, also in view of climate change scenarios.

  17. Biogeochemical study of areas of sulphide mineralisation in eastern Thrace, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kelepertsis, A E; Reeves, R D

    1989-03-01

    The uptake of copper, lead and zinc by plants in several areas of sulphide mineralisation in eastern Thrace, Greece, has been studied. Two indicator plants for sulphide deposits in central Macedonia,Rumex acetosella L. andMinuartia verna (L.) Hiern, have not been found on Thracian soils high in sulphides. However, the widespread speciesHypericum perforatum L. andScleranthus perennis L. are tolerant of the elevated metal levels in these soils. AlthoughH. perforatum is not useful as a biogeochemical indicator, the levels of Cu, Pb and Zn inS. perennis were found to be strongly correlated with the corresponding concentrations in the soil. PMID:24202203

  18. The contribution of plant-soil interactions to biogeochemical cycles in a changing world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pregitzer, K.

    2005-12-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, plants are the transducers that provide the energy for microbial metabolism through root exudation, cell sloughing, and the turnover of leaves and roots. Changes in the Earth's atmosphere such as increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, tropospheric ozone, and the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, will modify plant net primary productivity (NPP) and plant carbon (C) allocation. These changes will, in turn, initiate a series of biochemical alterations in dead leaves and fine roots, responses which move through the soil to structure food webs and control rates of biogeochemical cycling. In our conceptual framework, plant physiology, plant tissue biochemistry, and the production and mortality of plant modules (leaves and roots) are pivotal control points in the soil for the regulation of ecosystem biogeochemistry. In other words, understanding how plant form and function as well as the associated microbial dynamics respond to changes in the Earth's atmosphere is important to understanding the biogeochemical feedbacks which may ultimately constrain long-term ecosystem responses. We will review examples of how changes in the Earth's atmosphere directly modify plant growth and C allocation, which initiates a series of physiological and biochemical changes in live and dead leaves and fine roots. We will then examine how these plant responses structure rhizosphere food webs and control rates of microbial metabolism. Microbial enzyme activity regulates many of the transformation and weathering processes in the soil, thus changes in the microbial community can strongly alter ecosystem biogeochemistry. For example, we will explore how plants and microbes are linked to ecosystem-level feedbacks between soil respiration, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leaching. The basic premise of our conceptual model is that altered atmospheric chemistry directly impacts plant form and function. Theses human-induced changes to the Earth's atmosphere will cascade through plants into the soil, where microbial communities mediate the ecosystem functions that regulate biogeochemical cycles. There are several key research opportunities as we attempt to understand how changes in the Earth's atmosphere cascade through terrestrial ecosystems to alter biogeochemical cycles. For example, far too little attention has been given to how the interactions between changes in atmospheric chemistry (e.g. carbon dioxide and nitrogen, or carbon dioxide and ozone) will impact C transformations in the soil. If we deliberately set out to understand how variable plant and microbial physiology are to interactive changes in atmospheric chemistry, it should be possible to build a deeper understanding of the fundamental processes controlling ecosystem response to global change.

  19. The role of nitrogen fixation in biogeochemical cycling in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, D.; Letelier, R.; Tupas, L.; Dore, J.; Christian, J.; Hebel, D.

    1997-08-01

    Seven years of time-series observations of biogeochemical processes in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean gyre have revealed dramatic changes in the microbial community structure and in the mechanisms of nutrient cycling in response to large-scale ocean-atmosphere interactions. Several independent lines of evidence show that the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen by cyanobacteria can fuel up to half of the new production. These and other observations demand a reassessment of present views of nutrient and carbon cycling in one of the Earth's largest biomes.

  20. Biogeochemical study of termite mounds: a case study from Tummalapalle area of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Arveti, Nagaraju; Reginald, S; Kumar, K Sunil; Harinath, V; Sreedhar, Y

    2012-04-01

    Termite mounds are abundant components of Tummalapalle area of uranium mineralization of Cuddapah District of Andhra Pradesh, India. The systematic research has been carried out on the application of termite mound sampling to mineral exploration in this region. The distribution of chemical elements Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Co, Cr, Li, Rb, Sr, Ba, and U were studied both in termite soils and adjacent surface soils. Uranium accumulations were noticed in seven termite mounds ranging from 10 to 36 ppm. A biogeochemical parameter called "Biological Absorption Coefficient" of the termite mounds indicated the termite affected soils contained huge amounts of chemical elements than the adjacent soils. PMID:21594643

  1. Reconstructing paleo-ocean silicon chemistry and ecology during Last Glacial Maximum, a biogeochemical cycle modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. D.; Lerman, A.; Mackenzie, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    It has been established by a number of investigators that opal content and Si-C isotope studies in the marine sediments reveal information about paleooceanography and the impact on silicic acid utilization by marine autotrophes (diatoms, silicoflagellates) and heterotrophes (radiolarians) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Opal, as an amorphous form of SiO2, formed by marine Si-secreting organisms, has been used as a proxy to indicate chemical ocean evolution, paleoproductivity and temperature variations in the paleoenvironment and regional ocean water biogeochemical studies, both on million- and thousand-year scales. Here, we are using a model of the global silicon biogeochemical cycle to understand and reconstruct evolutionary history of the paleobiogeochemical cycle and paleoenvironment since LGM. The model is process-driven, temperature-driven, and land-ocean-sediment coupled with specific marine Si-secreting organisms that represent different trophic levels and physiological mechanisms. Specifically, Si utilization by marine silicoflagellates and radiolarians are each about 5% of that of ubiquitous marine diatoms. Available marine reactive Si is controlled by variation of diatom bioproduction that represents 5% of the total marine primary productivity (Si/C Redfield ratio in the marine organic matter is ~0.13, which is an order of magnitude higher than ratio in land organic matter). River input of Si is controlled by chemical weathering of silicate rocks and biocyling of land plant phytoliths. Decreasing dissolved and particulate Si input from land and less favorable climatic condition into LGM diminished the primary production of marine diatoms. However, because radiolarians favor deep-water habitat, where a higher level of DSi is found and that is less affected by temperature changes, a peak of relative abundance is usually observed in sedimentary record during LGM. Given that opal formation fractionated seawater ?30Si (1‰) and enriched seawater with heavier 30Si, the sediment isotope records of ?30Si variations have been found to support the suppressed diatom Si biological bump. Since the LGM, the temperature increased about 5°C and contributed to almost 50% of land bio-productivity rise. On the other hand, warming climate and enhanced hydrological cycle drove the chemical weathering of continental silicate rocks and soil phytoliths remineralization that increased riverine input of dissolved Si, that promoted the Si utilization of diatom in the surface waters. We present a history of species-specific Si utilization due to the environmental and hydrological changes on land and in the ocean. We also use and compare available data of opal sedimentation, Si and C isotope records, as well as temperature history to better quantify the biogeochemistry of the Si cycle during LGM and in later time. The results provide insight into paleoproductivity of Si-C cycles in the ocean and assist the Si model in its projections of future environmental changes.

  2. Biogeochemical processes governing exposure and uptake of organic pollutant compounds in aquatic organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Farrington, J W

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge of biogeochemical cycles of pollutant organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems with a focus on coastal ecosystems. There is a bias toward discussing chemical and geochemical aspects of biogeochemical cycles and an emphasis on hydrophobic organic compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated organic compounds used as pesticides. The complexity of mixtures of pollutant organic compounds, their various modes of entering ecosystems, and their physical chemical forms are discussed. Important factors that influence bioavailability and disposition (e.g., organism-water partitioning, uptake via food, food web transfer) are reviewed. These factors include solubilities of chemicals; partitioning of chemicals between solid surfaces, colloids, and soluble phases; variables rates of sorption, desorption; and physiological status of organism. It appears that more emphasis on considering food as a source of uptake and bioaccumulation is important in benthic and epibenthic ecosystems when sediment-associated pollutants are a significant source of input to an aquatic ecosystem. Progress with mathematical models for exposure and uptake of contaminant chemicals is discussed briefly. PMID:1904812

  3. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    SciTech Connect

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

    2010-01-05

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

  4. Environmental and biogeochemical changes following a decade's reclamation in the Dapeng (Tapong) Bay, southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, J.-J.; Huang, W.-C.; Yu, C.-S.

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the environmental and biogeochemical changes in Dapeng (formerly spelled Tapong) Bay, a semi-enclosed coastal lagoon in southwestern Taiwan, after two major reclamation works performed between 1999 and 2010. The lagoon was largely occupied by oyster culture racks and fish farming cages before December, 2002. Substantial external inputs of nutrients and organic carbon and the fairly long water exchange time (?) (10 ± 2 days) caused the lagoon to enter a eutrophic state, particularly at the inner lagoon, which directly received nutrient inputs. However, the entire lagoon showed autotrophic, and the estimated net ecosystem production (NEP) during the first stage was 5.8 mol C m-2 yr-1. After January, 2003, the aquaculture structures were completely removed, and the ? decreased to 6 ± 2 days. The annual mean concentrations of dissolved oxygen increased, and nutrients decreased substantially, likely due to improved water exchange, absence of feeding and increased biological utilization. The NEP increased 37% to 7.7 mol C m-2 yr-1 after structure removal. The second reclamation work beginning from July, 2006, focused on establishing artificial wetlands for wastewater treatment and on dredging bottom sediment. Although the ? did not change significantly (8 ± 3 days), substantial decreases in nutrient concentrations and dissolved organic matter continued. The NEP (14.3 mol C m-2 yr-1) increased 85% compared to that in the second stage. The data suggest that the reclamations substantially improved water quality, carbon and nutrient biogeochemical processes and budgets in this semi-enclosed ecosystem.

  5. Biogeochemical implications of the ubiquitous colonization of marine habitats and redox gradients by Marinobacter species.

    PubMed

    Handley, Kim M; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    The Marinobacter genus comprises widespread marine bacteria, found in localities as diverse as the deep ocean, coastal seawater and sediment, hydrothermal settings, oceanic basalt, sea-ice, sand, solar salterns, and oil fields. Terrestrial sources include saline soil and wine-barrel-decalcification wastewater. The genus was designated in 1992 for the Gram-negative, hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Since then, a further 31 type strains have been designated. Nonetheless, the metabolic range of many Marinobacter species remains largely unexplored. Most species have been classified as aerobic heterotrophs, and assessed for limited anaerobic pathways (fermentation or nitrate reduction), whereas studies of low-temperature hydrothermal sediments, basalt at oceanic spreading centers, and phytoplankton have identified species that possess a respiratory repertoire with significant biogeochemical implications. Notable physiological traits include nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidation, arsenic and fumarate redox cycling, and Mn(II) oxidation. There is also evidence for Fe(III) reduction, and metal(loid) detoxification. Considering the ubiquity and metabolic capabilities of the genus, Marinobacter species may perform an important and underestimated role in the biogeochemical cycling of organics and metals in varied marine habitats, and spanning aerobic-to-anoxic redox gradients. PMID:23734151

  6. Novel Imaging Techniques, Integrated with Mineralogical, Geochemical and Microbiological Characterization to Determine the Biogeochemical Controls....

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2004-06-01

    Aims and objectives Technetium-99 is a priority pollutant at numerous DOE sites, due to a combination of its long half life (2.1 x 105 years), high mobility as Tc(VII) (TcO4-; pertechnetate anion) in oxic waters, and bioavailability as a sulfate analog. Under anaerobic conditions, however, the radionuclide is far less mobile, forming insoluble Tc(IV) precipitates. As anaerobic microorganisms can reduce soluble Tc(VII) to insoluble Tc(IV), microbial metabolism may have the potential to treat sediments and waters contaminated with Tc. In previous studies we have focused on the fundamental mechanisms of Tc(VII) bioreduction and precipitation, and we have identified direct enzymatic (hydrogenase-mediated) mechanisms, and a range of potentially important indirect transformations catalyzed by biogenic Fe(II), U(IV) or sulfide. These baseline studies have generally used pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, in order to develop conceptual models for the biogeochemical cycling of Tc. There is, however, comparatively little known about interactions of metal-reducing bacteria with environmentally relevant trace concentrations of Tc, against a more complex biogeochemical background provided by mixed microbial communities in the subsurface.

  7. Biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity as key drivers of ecosystem services provided by soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Rumpel, C.; Paustian, K.; Kuikman, P. J.; Elliott, J. A.; McDowell, R.; Griffiths, R. I.; Asakawa, S.; Bustamante, M.; House, J. I.; Sobocká, J.; Harper, R.; Pan, G.; West, P. C.; Gerber, J. S.; Clark, J. M.; Adhya, T.; Scholes, R. J.; Scholes, M. C.

    2015-06-01

    Soils play a pivotal role in major global biogeochemical cycles (carbon, nutrient and water), while hosting the largest diversity of organisms on land. Because of this, soils deliver fundamental ecosystem services, and management to change a soil process in support of one ecosystem service can either provide co-benefits to other services or can result in trade-offs. In this critical review, we report the state-of-the-art understanding concerning the biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity in soil, and relate these to the provisioning, regulating, supporting and cultural ecosystem services which they underpin. We then outline key knowledge gaps and research challenges, before providing recommendations for management activities to support the continued delivery of ecosystem services from soils. We conclude that although there are knowledge gaps that require further research, enough is known to start improving soils globally. The main challenge is in finding ways to share knowledge with soil managers and policy-makers, so that best-practice management can be implemented. A key element of this knowledge sharing must be in raising awareness of the multiple ecosystem services underpinned by soils, and the natural capital they provide. The International Year of Soils in 2015 presents the perfect opportunity to begin a step-change in how we harness scientific knowledge to bring about more sustainable use of soils for a secure global society.

  8. Contrasting biogeochemical characteristics of the Oubangui River and tributaries (Congo River basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouillon, Steven; Yambélé, Athanase; Gillikin, David P.; Teodoru, Cristian; Darchambeau, François; Lambert, Thibault; Borges, Alberto V.

    2014-06-01

    The Oubangui is a major tributary of the Congo River. We describe the biogeochemistry of contrasting tributaries within its central catchment, with watershed vegetation ranging from wooded savannahs to humid rainforest. Compared to a 2-year monitoring record on the mainstem Oubangui, these tributaries show a wide range of biogeochemical signatures, from highly diluted blackwaters (low turbidity, pH, conductivity, and total alkalinity) in rainforests to those more typical for savannah systems. Spectral analyses of chromophoric dissolved organic matter showed wide temporal variations in the Oubangui compared to spatio-temporal variations in the tributaries, and confirm that different pools of dissolved organic carbon are mobilized during different hydrological stages. ?13C of dissolved inorganic carbon ranged between -28.1‰ and -5.8‰, and was strongly correlated to both partial pressure of CO2 and to the estimated contribution of carbonate weathering to total alkalinity, suggesting an important control of the weathering regime on CO2 fluxes. All tributaries were oversaturated in dissolved greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O, CO2), with highest levels in rivers draining rainforest. The high diversity observed underscores the importance of sampling that covers the variability in subcatchment characteristics, to improve our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in the Congo Basin.

  9. Characterizing marine particles and their impact on biogeochemical cycles in the GEOTRACES program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert F.; Hayes, Christopher T.

    2015-04-01

    Trace elements and their isotopes (TEIs) are of priority interest in several subdisciplines of oceanography. For example, the vital role of trace element micronutrients in regulating the growth of marine organisms, which, in turn, may influence the structure and composition of marine ecosystems, is now well established (Morel and Price, 2003; Twining and Baines, 2013). Natural distributions of some TEIs have been severely impacted by anthropogenic emissions, leading to substantial perturbations of natural ocean inventories. Pb and Hg, for example, (Lamborg et al., 2002; Schaule and Patterson, 1981), may represent a significant threat to human food supply. Furthermore, much of our knowledge of past variability in the ocean environment, including the ocean's role in climate change, has been developed using TEI proxies archived in marine substrates such as sediments, corals and microfossils. Research in each of these areas relies on a comprehensive knowledge of the distributions of TEIs in the ocean, and on the sensitivity of these distributions to changing environmental conditions. With numerous processes affecting the regional supply and removal of TEIs in the ocean, a comprehensive understanding of the marine biogeochemical cycles of TEIs can be attained only by a global, coordinated, international effort. GEOTRACES, an international program designed to study the marine biogeochemical cycles of trace elements and their isotopes (Anderson et al., 2014; Henderson et al., 2007), aims to achieve these goals.

  10. Biogeochemical processes governing natural pyrite oxidation and release of acid metalliferous drainage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-ting; Li, Jin-tian; Chen, Lin-xing; Hua, Zheng-shuang; Huang, Li-nan; Liu, Jun; Xu, Bi-bo; Liao, Bin; Shu, Wen-sheng

    2014-05-20

    The oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals (principally pyrite) is responsible for the majority of acid metalliferous drainage from mine sites, which represents a significant environmental problem worldwide. Understanding the complex biogeochemical processes governing natural pyrite oxidation is critical not only for solving this problem but also for understanding the industrial bioleaching of sulfide minerals. To this end, we conducted a simulated experiment of natural pyrite oxidative dissolution. Pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial community revealed a distinct succession across three stages. At the early stage, a newly proposed genus, Tumebacillus (which can use sodium thiosulfate and sulfite as the sole electron donors), dominated the microbial community. At the midstage, Alicyclobacillus (the fifth most abundant genus at the early stage) became the most dominant genus, whereas Tumebacillus was still ranked as the second most abundant. At the final stage, the microbial community was dominated by Ferroplasma (the tenth most abundant genus at the early stage). Our geochemical and mineralogical analyses indicated that exchangeable heavy metals increased as the oxidation progressed and that some secondary sulfate minerals (including jarosite and magnesiocopiapite) were formed at the final stage of the oxidation sequence. Additionally, we propose a comprehensive model of biogeochemical processes governing the oxidation of sulfide minerals. PMID:24730689

  11. Ocean biogeochemical fluxes: New production and export of organic matter from the upper ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducklow, Hugh W.

    1995-07-01

    Studies of ocean biogeochemical fluxes have been energized in this decade, by the urgency of our need to understand and predict the effects of continued CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere, by the global perspectives offered by satellite views of ocean color and related physical fields (McClain et al. 1991; Yoder et al. 1992; Mitchell 1994), and by the successful implementation of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS; Bowles and Livingston, 1993). In this review, I focus on oceanic new production, originally defined as the fraction of primary production supported by inputs of `new' nitrogen from outside the euphotic zone. With a growing appreciation of the role of this fundamental biogeochemical flux in the global carbon cycle, it has become more common to refer interchangeably to new production so defined, and to the export of organic matter from the upper ocean (e.g.. Sarmiento and Siegenthaler 1992). New production, the driving process of the ocean carbon cycle, is responsible for maintaining over half the vertical gradient in total inorganic carbon. In this review I refer to nitrate-based new production in the open sea, and not to new production supported by other N compounds as observed in the coastal zone. Eppley (1992) gives a personal view of the modern formulation of the concept of equivalence between new production and upper ocean export. This review is dedicated to the memory of John Martin, a friend, colleague, leader and teacher who contributed mightily to our field.

  12. Biophysical and Biogeochemical Responses to Climate Change Depend on Dispersal and Migration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PAUL A. T. HIGGINS and JOHN HARTE (; )

    2006-05-01

    This peer- reviewed article from BioScience looks at the effects of dispersal and migration on biophysical and biogeochemical responses to climate change. Different species, populations, and individuals disperse and migrate at different rates. The rate of movement that occurs in response to changes in climate, whether fast or slow, will shape the distribution of natural ecosystems in the decades to come. Moreover, land-use patterns associated with urban, suburban, rural, and agricultural development will complicate ecosystem adaptation to climate change by hindering migration. Here we examine how vegetation's capacity to disperse and migrate may affect the biophysical and biogeochemical characteristics of the land surface under anthropogenic climate change. We demonstrate that the effectiveness of plant migration strongly influences carbon storage, evapotranspiration, and the absorption of solar radiation by the land surface. As a result, plant migration affects the magnitude, and in some cases the sign, of feedbacks from the land surface to the climate system. We conclude that future climate projections depend on much better understanding of and accounting for dispersal and migration.

  13. Biogeochemical impacts of wildfires over four millennia in a Rocky Mountain subalpine watershed.

    PubMed

    Dunnette, Paul V; Higuera, Philip E; McLauchlan, Kendra K; Derr, Kelly M; Briles, Christy E; Keefe, Margaret H

    2014-08-01

    Wildfires can significantly alter forest carbon (C) storage and nitrogen (N) availability, but the long-term biogeochemical legacy of wildfires is poorly understood. We obtained a lake-sediment record of fire and biogeochemistry from a subalpine forest in Colorado, USA, to examine the nature, magnitude, and duration of decadal-scale, fire-induced ecosystem change over the past c. 4250 yr. The high-resolution record contained 34 fires, including 13 high-severity events within the watershed. High-severity fires were followed by increased sedimentary N stable isotope ratios (?15N) and bulk density, and decreased C and N concentrations--reflecting forest floor destruction, terrestrial C and N losses, and erosion. Sustained low sediment C : N c. 20-50 yr post-fire indicates reduced terrestrial organic matter subsidies to the lake. Low sedimentary ?15N c. 50-70 yr post-fire, coincident with C and N recovery, suggests diminishing terrestrial N availability during stand development. The magnitude of post-fire changes generally scaled directly with inferred fire severity. Our results support modern studies of forest successional C and N accumulation and indicate pronounced, long-lasting biogeochemical impacts of wildfires in subalpine forests. However, even repeated high-severity fires over millennia probably did not deplete C or N stocks, because centuries between high-severity fires allowed for sufficient biomass recovery. PMID:24803372

  14. The role of the vertical fluxes of particulate organic matter and calcite in the oceanic carbon cycle: Studies using an ocean biogeochemical general circulation model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasuhiro Yamanaka; Eiichi Tajika

    1996-01-01

    Distributions of chemical tracers in the world ocean are well reproduced in an ocean general circulation model which includes biogeochemical processes (biogeochemical general circulation model, B-GCM). The difference in concentration of tracers between the surface and the deep water depends not only on the export production but also on the remineralization depth. Case studies changing the vertical profile of particulate

  15. Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718, Berkeley, CA February 1999 Critical Biogeochemical Parameters Used for In Situ Bioremediation of Solvents in

    E-print Network

    Hazen, Terry

    Critical Biogeochemical Parameters Used for In Situ Bioremediation of Solvents in Fractured Rock Terry C-scale demonstrations of in situ bioremediation via biosparging/bioventing illustrate the critical biogeochemical parameters for in situ bioremediation of solvents in fractured rock. Both sites were in Virginia

  16. The coupling of mercury and organic matter in the biogeochemical cycle — towards a mechanistic model for the boreal forest zone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markus Meili

    1991-01-01

    In boreal forest lakes, high Hg concentrations in fish are common, even in remote areas. In this paper, the effects of atmospheric\\u000a Hg pollution in Sweden are synthesized and related to a concept based on the strong interaction of Hg with biogenic matter\\u000a (Hg\\/B). Based on this concept, a compartment model is developed to predict concentrations, pool sizes, flux rates

  17. Evidence of linked biogeochemical and hydrological processes in homogeneous and layered vadose zone systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. T.; Hansen, D. J.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding chemical fate and transport in the vadose zone is critical to protect groundwater resources and preserve ecosystem health. However, prediction can be challenging due to the dynamic hydrologic and biogeochemical nature of the vadose zone. Additional controls on hydrobiogeochemical processes are added by subsurface structural heterogeneity. This study uses repacked soil column experiments to quantify linkages between microbial activity, geochemical cycling and hydrologic flow. Three “short” laboratory soil columns were constructed to evaluate the effects of soil layering: a homogenized medium-grained sand, homogenized organic-rich loam, and a sand-over-loam layered column. In addition, two “long” columns were constructed using either gamma-irradiated (sterilized) or untreated sediments to evaluate the effects of both soil layers and the presence of microorganisms. The long columns were packed identically; a medium-grained sand matrix with two vertically separated and horizontally offset lenses of organic-rich loam. In all 5 columns, downward and upward infiltration of water was evaluated to simulate rainfall and rising water table events respectively. In-situ colocated probes were used to measure soil water content, matric potential, Eh, major anions, ammonium, Fe2+, and total sulfide. Enhanced biogeochemical cycling was observed in the short layered column versus the short, homogeneous columns, and enumerations of iron and sulfate reducing bacteria were 1-2 orders of magnitude greater. In the long columns, microbial activity caused mineral bands and produced insoluble gases that impeded water flow through the pores of the sediment. Capillary barriers, formed around the lenses due to soil textural differences, retarded water flow rates through the lenses. This allowed reducing conditions to develop, evidenced by the production of Fe2+ and S2-. At the fringes of the lenses, Fe2+ oxidized to form Fe(III)-oxide bands that further retarded water flux. No such mineral bands developed in the sterilized column. As a consequence, water content in the lenses of the sterilized column was half that of the other column and flow rates through the lenses were an order of magnitude lower. This flow impedance limited the interaction and mixing of groundwater with infiltrating vadose zone water and led to the formation of geochemically distinct water masses residing in relatively close proximity to one another. Results provide a specific examples of the direct impact of biogeochemical cycling on water flow in the vadose zone and vice versa. In addition, these demonstrate that the presence of layers in vadose zone environments may be an important control on overall chemical fate and transport in subsurface systems.

  18. Isotopic, geophysical and biogeochemical investigation of submarine groundwater discharge: IAEA-UNESCO intercomparison exercise at Mauritius Island

    E-print Network

    1 Isotopic, geophysical and biogeochemical investigation of submarine groundwater discharge: IAEA ABSTRACT Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into a shallow lagoon on the west coast of Mauritius Island of submarine waters was characterized by significant variability and heavy isotope enrichment and was used

  19. FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters

    E-print Network

    Wilhelm, Steven W.

    , sinks of iron from, and rates of iron recycling within, the surface mixed layer. A pelagic iron budgetFeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters P. W. Boyd,1 C. S. Law,2 D. A. Hutchins,3 E. R. Abraham,2 P. L. Croot,4 M. Ellwood

  20. Variability in biogeochemical fluxes in the oligotrophic central pacific: Results of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Winn; D. Hebel; R. Letelier; D. Bird; D. Karl

    1990-01-01

    The Hawaii Ocean Time-series Program has been conducting a long-term investigation of the oceanic carbon cycle in the oligotrophic North Pacific Ocean. The specific objective of the program is to assess annual and interannual variability in biogeochemical fluxes in the central portion of the world's largest ocean basin. The program has now made measurements at a single location in the

  1. Fine roots are important to biogeochemical cycling in nutrient-limited wetlands that store a substantial amount of

    E-print Network

    -destructive minirhizotron technology in wetlands. · Solutions were developed to deal with unique wetland challenges including minirhizotron installation and anchorage, capture and analysis of images, and upscaling of data for biogeochemical analyses and model parameterization. · Appropriate use of minirhizotron technology in wetlands

  2. in press, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, April 18, 2007 Carbon dioxide and oxygen fluxes in the Southern Ocean

    E-print Network

    Marshall, John

    in press, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, April 18, 2007 Carbon dioxide and oxygen fluxes College, London, UK Abstract. We analyze the variability of air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide and oxygen. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM), known to impact the variability of air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide, is also

  3. Estimating forest carbon fluxes in a disturbed southeastern landscape: Integration of remote sensing, forest inventory, and biogeochemical modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey G. Masek; G. James Collatz

    2006-01-01

    Received 8 June 2005; revised 20 September 2005; accepted 25 October 2005; published 2 February 2006. (1) Quantifying carbon fluxes between the atmosphere and land surface requires detailed knowledge of the disturbance regime as well as the photosynthetic response of vegetation to climate. In this study, we use a combination of satellite remote sensing, forest inventory data, and biogeochemical modeling

  4. BIOGEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON REACTION OF SEDIMENTARY ORGANIC MATTER AND AQUEOUS SULFIDES IN HOLOCENE SEDIMENTS OF MUD LAKE FLORIDA: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    JOURNAL NRMRL-ADA-00133 Filley,T.R., Freeman, K.H., Wilkin*, R.T., and Hatcher, P.G. Biogeochemical Controls on Reaction of Sedimentary Organic Matter and Aqueous Sulfides in Holocene Sediments of Mud Lake Florida. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 66 (6):937-954...

  5. Assessment of fixed nitrogen emission from land cover\\/use using remote sensing imagery and biogeochemical modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nader Adnan Khatib

    2001-01-01

    This thesis is an interdisciplinary study that combines remote sensing imagery, biogeochemical modeling, and ecology to address the contribution of fixed nitrogen to the atmosphere from corn agriculture. Agricultural land covers and associated farming practices provide a pathway for fixed nitrogen to enter the atmosphere where its effects are transported globally. It is estimated that agriculture is the dominant source

  6. Dynamics of biogeochemical properties in temperate coastal areas of freshwater influence: Lessons from the Northern Adriatic Sea (Gulf of Trieste)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossarini, Gianpiero; Solidoro, Cosimo; Fonda Umani, Serena

    2012-12-01

    High spatial and temporal variabilities of biogeochemical properties are prominent features of regions under freshwater influence as a result of multiple factors. Understanding the ecological functioning of these ecosystems, which provide important services for humans, is challenging since it requires adequate observational strategies and efforts. Multi-years (1999-2006) continuous observations in the northernmost part of the Adriatic Sea (Gulf of Trieste) allowed us to compute a climatological description of seasonal dynamics of biogeochemical properties for three relevant sites: a coastal area directly influenced by a river, an off-shore area located in the centre of the Gulf and a coastal area located far from potential source of external nutrients. The analysis of the climatologies provides a quantitative corroboration of the conceptual scheme for biogeochemical and ecological seasonal dynamics of temperate coastal areas under freshwater influence already proposed in literature, highlighting the role of river input, lateral transport, stratification regime and interaction with bottom environment as driving factors. While all areas follow a common pattern of succession of ecological processes, spatial variability accounts for a significant decrease of the absolute trophic state, and for a phase delay in biogeochemical dynamics. Results show that spatial heterogeneity is an inherent structural feature of coastal ecosystems, suggesting that the evaluation of the quality status of coastal ecosystems should be made by using different reference terms for different sub-areas.

  7. Circulation and biogeochemical processes in the East China Sea and the vicinity of Taiwan: an overview and a brief synthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kon-Kee Liu; Tsung-Hung Peng; Ping-Tung Shaw; Fuh-Kwo Shiah

    2003-01-01

    The East China Sea shelf (including the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea) is a very challenging system for hydrodynamic and biogeochemical studies due to its complicated physical and chemical forcing. It receives much attention because of its capacity for absorbing atmospheric CO2 in spite of large riverine fluxes of terrigenous carbon. This volume reports field observations and modeling studies

  8. Modeling of carbon cycling and biogeochemical changes during injection and recovery of reclaimed water at Bolivar, South Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janek Greskowiak; Henning Prommer; Joanne Vanderzalm; Paul Pavelic; Peter Dillon

    2005-01-01

    Managed aquifer recharge is an increasingly popular technique to secure and enhance water supplies. Among a range of recharging techniques, single-well aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is becoming a common option to either augment drinking water supplies or facilitate reuse of reclaimed water. For the present study a conceptual biogeochemical model for reclaimed water ASR was developed and incorporated into

  9. Influence of the human perturbation on carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen biogeochemical cycles in the global coastal ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christophe Rabouille; Fred T. Mackenzie; Leah May Ver

    2001-01-01

    The responses to human perturbations of the biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and oxygen (O) in the global coastal ocean were evaluated using a process-based model. In this model, the global coastal ocean is represented by two distinct zones: the proximal zone which includes large bays, the open water part of estuaries, deltas, inland seas, and salt marshes;

  10. Biogeochemical cycles as integrative and spatial models for the study of environmental pollution (the example of the Sulphur cycle)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Moss

    1976-01-01

    This paper stresses the need for an approach to pollution of the total physical environment. An ecosystematic approach is suggested whereby biogeochemical cycles are identified as models which can integrate all physical environment components and also provide information on the forms of elemental pollution so that, for example, the spatial aspects of the problem can be identified. The sulphur cycle

  11. Biogeochemical Modeling of In Situ U(VI) Reduction and Immobilization with Emulsified Vegetable Oil as the Electron Donor at a Field Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G.; Parker, J.; Wu, W.; Schadt, C. W.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.; Orifrc Team

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive biogeochemical model was developed to quantitatively describe the coupled hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological processes that occurred following injection of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor to immobilize U(VI) at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site (ORIFRC) in Tennessee. The model couples the degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), glycerol, hydrogen and acetate, reduction of nitrate, manganese, ferrous iron, sulfate and uranium, and methanoganesis with growth of multiple microbial groups. The model describes the evolution of geochemistry and microbial populations not only in the aqueous phase as typically observed, but also in the mineral phase and therefore enables us to evaluate the applicability of rates from the literature for field scale assessment, estimate the retention and degradation rates of EVO and LCFA, and assess the influence of the coupled processes on fate and transport of U(VI). Our results suggested that syntrophic bacteria or metal reducers might catalyze LCFA oxidation in the downstream locations when sulfate was consumed, and competition between methanogens and others for electron donors and slow growth of methanogen might contribute to the sustained reducing condition. Among the large amount of hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological parameter values, the initial biomass, and the interactions (e.g., inhibition) of the microbial functional groups, and the rate and extent of Mn and Fe oxide reduction appear as the major sources of uncertainty. Our model provides a platform to conduct numerical experiments to study these interactions, and could be useful for further iterative experimental and modeling investigations into the bioreductive immobiliztion of radionuclide and metal contaminants in the subsurface.

  12. Biogeochemical cycles of Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems: long-term dynamics of the migration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, Alexey; Tsvetnova, Ol'ga; Klyashtorin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Biogeochemical migration is a dominant factor of the radionuclide transport through the biosphere. In the early XX century, V.I. Vernadskii, a Russian scientist known, noted about a special role living things play in transport and accumulation of natural radionuclide in various environments. The role of biogeochemical processes in migration and redistribution of technogenic radionuclides is not less important. In Russia, V. M. Klechkovskii and N.V. Timofeev-Ressovskii showed some important biogeochemical aspects of radionuclide migration by the example of global fallout and Kyshtym accident. Their followers, R.M. Alexakhin, M.A. Naryshkin, N.V. Kulikov, F.A. Tikhomirov, E.B. Tyuryukanova, and others also contributed a lot to biogeochemistry of radionuclides. In the post-Chernobyl period, this area of knowledge received a lot of data that allowed building the radioactive element balance and flux estimation in various biogeochemical cycles [Shcheglov et al., 1999]. Regrettably, many of recent radioecological studies are only focused on specific radionuclide fluxes or pursue some applied tasks, missing the holistic approach. Most of the studies consider biogeochemical fluxes of radioactive isotopes in terms of either dose estimation or radionuclide migration rates in various food chains. However, to get a comprehensive picture and develop a reliable forecast of environmental, ecological, and social consequences of radioactive pollution in a vast contaminated area, it is necessary to investigate all the radionuclide fluxes associated with the biogeochemical cycles in affected ecosystems. We believe such an integrated approach would be useful to study long-term environmental consequences of the Fukushima accident as well. In our long-term research, we tried to characterize the flux dynamics of the Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems and landscapes as a part of the integrated biogeochemical process. Our field studies were started in June of 1986 (less than two months after the accident) and have been continued up to now, focused on the most common forest ecosystems scattered over the contaminated areas of Russian Federation and Ukraine. A comprehensive analysis of the 137Cs and 90Sr biogeochemical fluxes shows that downward radionuclide fluxes (those directed from tree crowns to the soil) dominated over the upward fluxes (from the soil to forest vegetation) in the first years after the accident. Currently, the biological cycle in the contaminated ecosystems is a main factor impeding further vertical migration of long-lived radionuclides from upper soil layers to the ground water. The role of biota as a retardation factor depends on landscape type as well. In accumulative landscapes (with positive material balance), biota plays leading role in radionuclide retardation, while in eluvial landscapes (with the negative balance) soil absorbing complex serves as the dominant barrier for radionuclides leaching down the soil profile. The manifestation of both soil- and biota-driven factors depends on the radionuclide chemical speciation in the initial fallout. The latter factor is most important for 137Cs, yet less manifested for 90Sr. Among the biota components, fungi and forest vegetation are of particular importance for 137Cs and 90Sr accumulation, respectively. In summary, biogeochemical cycles of 137Cs and 90Sr in the investigated forest ecosystems serve as main factors impeding the radionuclide migration from the fallout to ground water. Larger-scale landscape factors determine the radionuclide flux intensity in the biogeochemical cycles and affect the radionuclide spatial variability in the contaminated biota components.

  13. A biogeochemical model for phosphorus and nitrogen cycling in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Part 1. Model development, initialization and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cappellen, P.; Powley, H. R.; Emeis, K.-C.; Krom, M. D.

    2014-11-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS) is the largest marine basin whose annual primary productivity is limited by phosphorus (P) rather than nitrogen (N). The basin is nearly entirely land-locked and receives substantial external nutrient fluxes, comparable for instance to those of the Baltic Sea. The biological productivity of the EMS, however, is among the lowest observed in the oceans. The water column exhibits very low P and N concentrations with N:P ratios in excess of the Redfield value. These unique biogeochemical features are analyzed using a mass balance model of the coupled P and N cycles in the EMS. The present paper describes the conceptual basis, quantitative implementation and sensitivity of the model. The model is initialized for the year 1950, that is, prior to the large increase in anthropogenic nutrient loading experienced by the EMS during the second half of the 20th century. In the companion paper, the model is used to simulate the P and N cycles during the period 1950-2000. The 1950 model set-up and sensitivity analyses support the following conclusions. Inorganic molar N:P ratios in excess of the 16:1 Redfield value observed in the water column reflect higher-than-Redfield N:P ratios of the external inputs, combined with negligible denitrification. Model simulations imply that the denitrification flux would have to increase by at least a factor of 14, relative to the 1950 flux, in order for the inorganic N:P ratio of the deep waters to approach the Redfield value. The higher-than-Redfield N:P ratios of dissolved and particulate organic matter in the EMS further imply the preferential regeneration of P relative to N during organic matter decomposition.

  14. FORWARD AND INVERSE BIO-GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF MICROBIALLY INDUCED PRECIPITATION IN 0.5M COLUMNAR EXPERIMENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkouki, T. H.; Martinez, B.; Mortensen, B.; Dejong, J.; Weathers, T. S.; Spycher, N.; Ginn, T. R.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides threatens water supplies and ecosystem health at sites worldwide. One potential solution is immobilization in calcite where mineral precipitation is induced in situ by microbially-mediated ureolysis. Specifically, immobile aerobic biophases (cells or enzymes) mediate the conversion of urea to ammonium and carbonate, raising pH and promoting calcite precipitation. Divalent species such as strontium (including 90Sr, a common radionuclide contaminant) can co-precipitate, resulting in in situ immobilization. In waters that are saturated with respect to calcite, this represents a long-term sequestration mechanism. Calcite precipitation also enables control of mechanical properties of the medium through the cementation of particles thus increasing the shear strength and stiffness, while decreasing the permeability and compressibility. Challenges in application include design of the injectate aqueous chemistry (e.g., calcium, carbonate, urea, pH buffer, microbial nutrients) and selection of injection rates in order to control the timing and rate of calcite precipitation to generate the desired spatial distribution. Modeling ultimately requires incorporation of comprehensive reaction networks into transport simulators for non-uniform flow. To develop and validate the reaction network for use in both contaminant co-precipitation and subsurface structural modification applications, multicomponent biogeochemical modeling (TOUGHREACT v2) was applied in analyses of laboratory batch and column investigations of microbially-mediated calcite precipitation using Sporosarcina pasteurii. Column experiments included continuous and repeat pulse-flows, with cumulative flux equal in both cases. Aqueous chemistry and calcite distribution were monitored, as well as seismic shear waves that correlate to the stiffness of the column and thus to precipitation extent. TOUGHREACT was coupled with the inversion code UCODE to invert on observed pH and calcite abundance data to determine the effective urease concentrations and calcite precipitation rate (through the reactive calcite surface area). Simulations included both constant and spatially distributed urease concentrations to account for non-uniform distributions of bacteria in the column experiments. For the inversion of the model with constant distribution of urease, regression was initiated at several initial parameter values to test the uniqueness of the solution by searching the error surface for local minima. The calibrated model with distributed urease values shows a good agreement with the experimental calcite precipitation data, and will be used to predict the results of future pilot- and field-scale experiments with push-pull well configurations.

  15. Investigations in the Szczecin Lagoon during the Oder Flood (July August 1997) from a biogeochemical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenske, Christiane; Westphal, Helmut; Bachor, Alexander; Breitenbach, Elke; Meyer, Hinrich; Buchholz, Wladyslaw; Jülich, Wolf-Dieter

    1998-06-01

    Caused by both an exceptional meteorological situation, especially high precipitation, and anthropogenic factors (melioration), the level of the river Oder rose quickly within a few days in July 97. An additional 5 km3 of water were discharged during the flood. This represents about a third of the normal annual Oder discharge of 17 km3. The flow was strongly enhanced by the large difference (approx. 30 cm) between the water levels of the Szczecin Lagoon and the Baltic Sea. However, the Szczecin Lagoon (=Oderhaff) was not as much affected as the upper course of the river. The substances transported, such as nutrients and pollutants, did not cause much harm, due to strong dilution. Hygienic investigations proved the water to have bathing quality during the whole flood. In this paper results of biogeochemical investigations in the period of the Oder flood (July/August 1997) are presented and compared with long-term data.

  16. (Man-made radionuclides as tracers for biogeochemical and limnological processes)

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.

    1987-03-09

    C.R. Olsen attended the 23rd SIL Congress and was asked to chair a session on man-made radionuclides as tracers for biogeochemical and limnological processes at the next Congress in Munich in 1989. The traveler presented his results on the use of radionuclides to quantify contaminant sorption kinetics and water-column removal rates at the IASW Symposium. Numerous discussions with several European scientists provided valuable information concerning the environmental fate of radionuclides released during the recent accident at Chernobyl. The traveler developed contacts with Swedish scientists involved in quantifying the effects of sediment resuspension on nutrient cycles. At the University of Melbourne, scientists have developed a new nuclear technique for reconstructing paleotemperatures and aiding in oil exploration.

  17. Holocene climate dynamics, biogeochemical cycles and ecosystem variability in the eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedl, Gerhard; Adloff, Fanny; Emeis, Kay; Grimm, Rosina; Maier-Reimer, Ernst; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Möbius, Jürgen; Müller-Navarra, Katharina

    2013-04-01

    The past variability of biogeochemical processes and marine ecosystems of the eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS) is documented in the form of organic-rich sapropels that occurred at northern hemisphere insolation maxima. In order to understand the processes leading from deglacial and Holocene climate variability to the formation of sapropel S1 via changed biogeochemical cycling in the EMS, we integrated results from global and regional Earth system model experiments with biogeochemical and micropaleontological proxy records. Our results suggest a high spatiotemporal variability of deep-water oxygenation and biogeochemical processes at the sea floor during the late glacial and early Holocene. Changes in trophic conditions of bathyal ecosystems along ocean margins are closely linked to the hydrology of the EMS borderlands; they reflect orbital and sub-orbital climate variations of the high northern latitudes and the African monsoon system. Local trophic conditions were particularly variable in the northern Aegean Sea as a response to changes in riverine runoff and Black Sea outflow. During the time of S1 deposition, average oxygen levels decreased exponentially with increasing water depth, suggesting a basin-wide shallowing of vertical convection superimposed by local signals. In the northernmost Aegean Sea, deep-water ventilation persisted during the early period of S1 formation, owing to temperature-driven local convection and the absence of low-salinity Black Sea outflow. At the same time, severe temporary dysoxia or even short anoxia occurred in the eastern Levantine basin at water depths as shallow as 900 m. This area was likely influenced by enhanced nutrient input of the Nile river that resulted in high organic matter fluxes and related high oxygen-consumption rates in the water column. In contrast, abyssal ecosystems of the Levantine and Ionian basins lack eutrophication during the early Holocene suggesting that enhanced productivity did not play a crucial role in basin-wide S1 formation. Instead, sapropel formation can be attributed to a long-term persistence of water column stratification. The modeled and observed trends of oxygen consumption rates and deep-water residence times date the initiation of stagnating deep-waters at the start of the deglacial period, thus several millennia prior to S1 deposition. Once oxygen levels fell below a critical threshold, bathyal and abyssal benthic ecosystems collapsed almost synchronously with onset of S1 deposition suggesting a rapid vertical propagation of the oxygen minimum layer. The recovery of bathyal deep-sea benthic ecosystems during the terminal phase of S1 formation is controlled by subsequently deeper convection and re-ventilation over a period of approximately 1500 years; the ultra-oligotrophic abyssal ecosystems reveal a considerably lower recovery potential. After the re-ventilation of the various sub-basins had been completed during the middle and late Holocene, deep-water renewal was more or less similar to recent rates. During that time, deep-sea ecosystem variability was driven by short-term changes in food quantity and quality as well as in seasonality, all of which are linked to millennial-scale changes in riverine runoff and associated nutrient input.

  18. Biogeochemical context impacts seawater pH changes resulting from atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, Mathilde; Hunter, Keith A.; Liss, Peter S.; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2014-02-01

    Seawater acidification can be induced both by absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and by atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen oxides and ammonia. Their relative significance, interplay, and dependency on water column biogeochemistry are not well understood. Using a simple biogeochemical model we show that the initial conditions of coastal systems are not only relevant for CO2-induced acidification but also for additional acidification due to atmospheric acid deposition. Coastal areas undersaturated with respect to CO2 are most vulnerable to CO2-induced acidification but are relatively least affected by additional atmospheric deposition-induced acidification. In contrast, the pH of CO2-supersaturated systems is most sensitive to atmospheric deposition. The projected increment in atmospheric CO2 by 2100 will increase the sensitivity of coastal systems to atmospheric deposition-induced acidification by up to a factor 4, but the additional annual change in proton concentration is at most 28%.

  19. Sleepers River, Vermont: a Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets Program site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, James B.

    2000-01-01

    The Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont was established by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1959 and is now operated jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL), will collaboration from several other Federal Agencies and Universities. The USGS has contributed to the understanding of hydrological processes and added a major biogeochemical cycling research component in the last 10 years of Sleepers River's 40-year history as a field laboratory. The USGS uses hydrologic measurements and chemical and isotopic tracing techniques to determine how water moves from the hillslope to the stream, and what processes cause chemical changes, such as neutralization of acid rain. Research results provide insights on how pollutants move through ecosystems, and how ecosystems may respond to climatic change.

  20. Biogeochemical cycling of selenium in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, T.S.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Subsurface agricultural drainage waters from western San Joaquin Valley, California, were found to contain elevated concentrations of the element selenium in the form of selenate. In 1978, these drainage waters began to replace previous input to Kesterson Reservoir, a pond system within Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge; this substitution was completed by 1982. In the 1983 nesting season, unusual rates of deformity and death in embryos and hatchlings of wild aquatic birds (up to 64% of eared grebe and American coot nests) occurred at the refuge and were attributed to selenium toxicosis. Features necessary for contamination to have taken place included geologic setting, climate, soil type, availability of imported irrigation water, type of irrigation, and the unique chemical properties of selenium. The mechanisms of biogeochemical cycling raise questions about other ecosystems and human exposure.

  1. Sedimentary Biogeochemical Indicators for Assessing the Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Blowout on Coastal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeal, K. S.; Guthrie, C. L.; Mishra, D.

    2013-05-01

    The impact of the Deepwater Horizon blowout on coastal wetlands can be understood through investigating carbon loading and microbial activity in salt marsh sediments. Carbon influx causes porewater sulfide to increase in wetland sediment, making it toxic and inhospitable to marsh vegetation. High sulfide levels due to increased microbial activity can lead to plant browning and mortality. Preliminary analyses at Marsh Point, MS indicated that sulfate reducing bacteria are more active in contaminated grass, producing sulfide concentrations 100x higher than in non-contaminated grass. Sediment electrode profiles, hydrocarbon contamination, and microbial community profiles were measured at three additional locations to capture the spatial sedimentary geochemical processes impacting salt marsh dieback. Findings indicate that response to contamination is variable due to physical and biogeochemical processes specific to each marsh. Temporal evaluation indicates that there is a lag in maximum response to contamination due to seasonal effects on microbial activity.

  2. Sensitivity studies on uranium mobilization using the biogeochemical transport code DRINK

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, T.; Humphreys, P.N.; Trivedi, D.; Hoffmann, A. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Risley (United Kingdom). Environmental Services

    1995-12-31

    The sensitivity of uranium mobilization from LLW to cellulose degradation rates and the solubility of any uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) precipitated, was investigated in a generic study using the biogeochemical transport code DRINK. Three arbitrary degradation rates were employed, corresponding to cellulose half lives of 6.6, 66 and 660 years. At all degradation rates reducing conditions were generated due to microbial consumption of the available oxygen. At the shortest half life oxidizing condition were re-established due to the majority of cellulose being degraded. Under reducing conditions uranium mobilization was controlled by the solubility Of UO{sub 2} precipitate whereas under oxidizing conditions it was strongly K{sub d} dependent.

  3. Interactive effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Zepp, R G; Erickson, D J; Paul, N D; Sulzberger, B

    2007-03-01

    This report assesses research on the interactions of UV radiation (280-400 nm) and global climate change with global biogeochemical cycles at the Earth's surface. The effects of UV-B (280-315 nm), which are dependent on the stratospheric ozone layer, on biogeochemical cycles are often linked to concurrent exposure to UV-A radiation (315-400 nm), which is influenced by global climate change. These interactions involving UV radiation (the combination of UV-B and UV-A) are central to the prediction and evaluation of future Earth environmental conditions. There is increasing evidence that elevated UV-B radiation has significant effects on the terrestrial biosphere with implications for the cycling of carbon, nitrogen and other elements. The cycling of carbon and inorganic nutrients such as nitrogen can be affected by UV-B-mediated changes in communities of soil organisms, probably due to the effects of UV-B radiation on plant root exudation and/or the chemistry of dead plant material falling to the soil. In arid environments direct photodegradation can play a major role in the decay of plant litter, and UV-B radiation is responsible for a significant part of this photodegradation. UV-B radiation strongly influences aquatic carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and metals cycling that affect a wide range of life processes. UV-B radiation changes the biological availability of dissolved organic matter to microorganisms, and accelerates its transformation into dissolved inorganic carbon and nitrogen, including carbon dioxide and ammonium. The coloured part of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) controls the penetration of UV radiation into water bodies, but CDOM is also photodegraded by solar UV radiation. Changes in CDOM influence the penetration of UV radiation into water bodies with major consequences for aquatic biogeochemical processes. Changes in aquatic primary productivity and decomposition due to climate-related changes in circulation and nutrient supply occur concurrently with exposure to increased UV-B radiation, and have synergistic effects on the penetration of light into aquatic ecosystems. Future changes in climate will enhance stratification of lakes and the ocean, which will intensify photodegradation of CDOM by UV radiation. The resultant increase in the transparency of water bodies may increase UV-B effects on aquatic biogeochemistry in the surface layer. Changing solar UV radiation and climate also interact to influence exchanges of trace gases, such as halocarbons (e.g., methyl bromide) which influence ozone depletion, and sulfur gases (e.g., dimethylsulfide) that oxidize to produce sulfate aerosols that cool the marine atmosphere. UV radiation affects the biological availability of iron, copper and other trace metals in aquatic environments thus potentially affecting metal toxicity and the growth of phytoplankton and other microorganisms that are involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling. Future changes in ecosystem distribution due to alterations in the physical and chemical climate interact with ozone-modulated changes in UV-B radiation. These interactions between the effects of climate change and UV-B radiation on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial and aquatic systems may partially offset the beneficial effects of an ozone recovery. PMID:17344963

  4. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Honeyman, Bruce D.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Chin-Chang Hung; Diaz, Angelique; Tinnacher, Ruth; Roberts, Kimberly; Schwehr, Kathy

    2006-04-05

    The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation and immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this work is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  5. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Santschi, Peter H.

    2006-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  6. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2005-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  7. Interactive Effects of Urban Land Use and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouyat, R. V.

    2009-12-01

    Urban land-use change can affect biogeochemical cycles through altered disturbance regimes, landscape management practices (e.g., irrigation and fertilization), built structures, and altered environments (heat island effect, pollution, introduction of non-native species, loss of native species). As a result, the conversion of native to urban ecological systems has been shown to significantly affect carbon, nitrogen, and water cycles at local, regional, and global scales. These changes have created novel habitats and ecosystems, which have no analogue in the history of life. Nonetheless, some of the environmental changes occurring in urban areas are analogous to the changes expected in climate by the end of the century, e.g. atmospheric increase in CO2 and an increase in air temperatures, which can be utilized as a “natural experiment” to investigate global change effects on large scale ecosystem processes. Moreover, as analogues of expected future environments, urban ecological systems may act as reservoirs of plant and animal species for adjoining landscapes that are expected to undergo relatively rapid climate changes in the next 100 years. Urban land-use change by itself may contribute to changes in regional weather patterns and long-term changes in global climate, which will depend on the net effect of converting native systems to urban systems and the comparison of per capita “footprints” between urban, suburban, and rural inhabitants. My objectives are to 1) assess the impact of changes in urban land-use on climate change and in turn how climate change may affect urban biogeochemical cycles and 2) discuss the potential for urban ecosystems to mitigate green house gas emissions.

  8. Modelling the biogeochemical cycle of silicon in soils: Application to a temperate forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, F.; Mayer, K. U.; Hodson, M. J.; Ranger, J.

    2008-02-01

    We investigated the biogeochemical cycling of silicon (Si) in an acidic brown soil covered by a coniferous forest (Douglas fir). Based on published and original data, we constructed a conceptual model and used a modified version of the reactive transport code MIN3P for model testing and quantification purposes. The model was first calibrated and further validated with respect to biomass data and Si-concentrations in capillary solutions, which were collected monthly over several years by means of suction-cup lysimeters placed at different soil depths. Following sensitivity tests, the model was calibrated quite accurately (limited to a 10% concentration error) by the adjustment of kinetic constants, longitudinal dispersion, and apparent activation energy for K-feldspar dissolution. Calibrated parameter values were constrained by ranges reported in the literature, when available. Mass balance calculations indicate that an average of 60% of the biogeochemical cycle of Si was controlled by biological processes (i.e. Si-uptake and dissolution of phytoliths). Sensitivity analyses suggest that no more than 55% of the Si-cycle is controlled by weathering of primary silicates. Such a large contribution of biological turnover to Si-cycling may be explained by the combined effects of a relatively large Si-content in the litter fall (i.e. specifically in the needles) and high biomass productivity of the coniferous species considered. In addition to potential implications for the global Si cycle, this investigation raises several fundamental questions concerning the nature of Si-uptake mechanisms and physiological use of Si by trees in natural systems.

  9. Using large area imaging to integrate biogeochemical data across spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapers, H. M.; Laquerre, A.; Phaneuf, M. W.; Osinski, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Large Area Imaging (LAI) systems such as the Carl Zeiss "Atlas" module allow acquisition of SEM images on the scale of millimeters to centimeters with an image resolution ranging from nanometers to micrometers. This provides researchers with the powerful capability to investigate large areas of up to tens of millimeters in scale and expand anywhere within these areas to see details on the micrometer to nanometer scale while retaining full contextual information regarding the areas under investigation. Biogeochemical processes operate on multiple scales and evidence of these phenomena can be difficult to observe across scales. For example, microbial etching of glass occurs on a nanometer scale as organic acids locally lower pH and destabilize Si-O bonds. However, interpreting a pattern of glass etching as abiotic or biogenic depends on observations at the micrometer to centimeter scale to assess evidence for microbial populations and/or biological behavior, assess fluid flow, changes in elemental composition and mineralogy. LAI is particularly suited to the investigation of multi-scale, interdisciplinary biogeochemical datasets. Using LAI we have generated contiguous image data at resolutions as high as 100 nm (pixel size) for areas approaching 25 cm2, using backscattered and secondary electrons in both traditional high vacuum and variable pressure SEM modes. Image stitching produces seamless mosaics composed of multiple image tiles; mosaic acquisition times can be as little as a few hours of fully automated operation. Using this primary information, additional micrometer-scale data sets such as EDX spectroscopy, millimeter-scale datasets such as transmitted light photomicrographs, and nanometer-scale information such as synchrotron-based spectroscopy, can be registered and fused with the LAI SEM images. LAI and data fusion facilitates critical connections across spatial scales to test hypotheses that cross the threshold of traditional microscopy methods.

  10. Tracing biogeochemical and microbial variability over a complete oil sand mining and recultivation process.

    PubMed

    Noah, Mareike; Lappé, Michael; Schneider, Beate; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilkes, Heinz; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2014-11-15

    Recultivation of disturbed oil sand mining areas is an issue of increasing importance. Nevertheless only little is known about the fate of organic matter, cell abundances and microbial community structures during oil sand processing, tailings management and initial soil development on reclamation sites. Thus the focus of this work is on biogeochemical changes of mined oil sands through the entire process chain until its use as substratum for newly developing soils on reclamation sites. Therefore, oil sand, mature fine tailings (MFTs) from tailings ponds and drying cells and tailings sand covered with peat-mineral mix (PMM) as part of land reclamation were analyzed. The sample set was selected to address the question whether changes in the above-mentioned biogeochemical parameters can be related to oil sand processing or biological processes and how these changes influence microbial activities and soil development. GC-MS analyses of oil-derived biomarkers reveal that these compounds remain unaffected by oil sand processing and biological activity. In contrast, changes in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance and pattern can be observed along the process chain. Especially naphthalenes, phenanthrenes and chrysenes are altered or absent on reclamation sites. Furthermore, root-bearing horizons on reclamation sites exhibit cell abundances at least ten times higher (10(8) to 10(9) cells g(-1)) than in oil sand and MFT samples (10(7) cells g(-1)) and show a higher diversity in their microbial community structure. Nitrate in the pore water and roots derived from the PMM seem to be the most important stimulants for microbial growth. The combined data show that the observed compositional changes are mostly related to biological activity and the addition of exogenous organic components (PMM), whereas oil extraction, tailings dewatering and compaction do not have significant influences on the evaluated compounds. Microbial community composition remains relatively stable through the entire process chain. PMID:25201817

  11. Small pores in soils: Is the physico-chemical environment accurately reflected in biogeochemical models ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias K. D.; Riedel, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Free water is a prerequesite to chemical reactions and biological activity in earth's upper crust essential to life. The void volume between the solid compounds provides space for water, air, and organisms that thrive on the consumption of minerals and organic matter thereby regulating soil carbon turnover. However, not all water in the pore space in soils and sediments is in its liquid state. This is a result of the adhesive forces which reduce the water activity in small pores and charged mineral surfaces. This water has a lower tendency to react chemically in solution as this additional binding energy lowers its activity. In this work, we estimated the amount of soil pore water that is thermodynamically different from a simple aqueous solution. The quantity of soil pore water with properties different to liquid water was found to systematically increase with increasing clay content. The significance of this is that the grain size and surface area apparently affects the thermodynamic state of water. This implies that current methods to determine the amount of water content, traditionally determined from bulk density or gravimetric water content after drying at 105°C overestimates the amount of free water in a soil especially at higher clay content. Our findings have consequences for biogeochemical processes in soils, e.g. nutrients may be contained in water which is not free which could enhance preservation. From water activity measurements on a set of various soils with 0 to 100 wt-% clay, we can show that 5 to 130 mg H2O per g of soil can generally be considered as unsuitable for microbial respiration. These results may therefore provide a unifying explanation for the grain size dependency of organic matter preservation in sedimentary environments and call for a revised view on the biogeochemical environment in soils and sediments. This could allow a different type of process oriented modelling.

  12. Biogeochemical pathways that influence de-watering and consolidation of fluid fine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, T.; Foght, J.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 1 million m3 of fluid fine tailings are produced every day in northern Alberta, Canada from processing of surface-mined oil sands resources. The tailings, comprising an aqueous suspension of fines dominated by clay particles that remain dispersed for decades, are deposited into tailings ponds for containment, de-watering and consolidation. Slow consolidation of clays retained in tailings ponds hinders recovery and re-use of water, retards volume reduction and presents a technical challenge for effective tailings ponds management. Here, we reveal that microorganisms indigenous to oil sands tailings ponds change the surface chemistry of clay particles and accelerate tailings consolidation by two biogeochemical pathways: one pathway shows that microorganisms metabolize organic substrates and produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in oil sands tailings. Dissolution of biogenic CO2 increases bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations in the pore water and reduces pore water pH, which dissolves carbonate minerals and releases cations from tailings minerals. The higher ionic strength of the pore water resulting from increased concentrations of ions shrinks the double diffuse layers of clay particles and hence increases consolidation. In addition, biogenic CH4 ebullition creates transient physical channels for recovery of pore water. The second pathway exerts a more direct microbial effect on consolidation through transformation of iron (Fe) minerals in oil sands tailings. Microbial reduction and dissolution of FeIII minerals forms amorphous FeII minerals that entrap and mask electronegative clay surfaces. These biogeochemical processes provide essential information for construction of geotechnical models to predict settling of clay particles for effective reclamation and management of fluid fine tailings.

  13. Water, energy, and biogeochemical budget research at Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, James B.; Sundquist, E.T.; Kendall, Carol

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has selected the Sleepers River Research Watershed (Sleepers River) near Danville, Vt., as one of five sites for the investigation of Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB). Sleepers River was chosen because it is a well-designed outdoor laboratory with a long history of hydrologic data collection and research, and also because it provides an ideal opportunity for collaboration among the U.S. Geological Survey, other Federal agencies, and universities at the site. The multiple subwatersheds at Sleepers River present a unique opportunity to investigate hydrologic, energy, and biogeochemical processes over a variety of spatial scales. This WEBB study builds on fundamental research on process mechanisms and rates at the plot scale (in this case, a hillslope). Results then are scaled up to interpret the hydrochemical response of first- and higher- order basins. Five research elements make up the Sleepers River WEBB project. Individually, each of the five elements is designed to investigate specific WEBB processes (such as CO2 efflux through a snowpack), address specific WEBB issues (such as scaling and flowpaths), or apply specific WEBB approaches (such as integrated chemical and physical study of a hillslope). The research elements overlap so that many of the processes investigated will be assessed in more than one way, thus allowing independent verification of research results. For example, flowpath information will be derived separately by use of isotopic tracers, conservative chemical solutes, and soil-moisture fluxes. Collectively, the five elements constitute an integrated approach to a comprehensive understanding of WEBB processes needed for the prediction of the effects of global change.

  14. A Linked Physical and Biological Framework to Assess Biogeochemical Dynamics in a Shallow Estuarine Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, C. P.; Wetzel, R. L.; Meyers, M. B.

    1999-12-01

    The littoral zone of Chesapeake Bay contains a mosaic of shallow vegetated and nonvegetated habitats with biotic components that are sensitive to changes in biological and physical driving factors. Static and dynamic modelling frameworks provide an integrative way to study complex hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes in linked estuarine habitats. In this study we describe a spatial simulation model developed and calibrated relative to a specific littoral zone, estuarine ecosystem. The model consisted of four distinct habitats that contained phytoplankton, sediment microalgae, Zostera marina (eelgrass), and Spartina alterniflora. There was tidal exchange of phytoplankton, particulate and dissolved organic carbon and dissolved inorganic nitrogen between the littoral zone ecosystem and the offshore channel. Physical exchange and biogeochemical transformations within the habitats determined water column concentrations in each habitat. Predicted subtidal water column concentrations and Z. marina and S. alterniflora biomass were within the variability of validation data and the predicted annual rates of net primary production were similar to measured rates. Phytoplankton accounted for 17%, sediment microalgae 46%, the Z. marina community 24% and S. alterniflora 13% of the annual littoral zone primary production. The linked habitat model provided insights into producer, habitat and ecosystem carbon and nitrogen properties that might not have been evident with stand-alone models. Although it was an intra-ecosystem sink for particulate carbon, the seagrass habitat was a DOC source and responsible for over 30% of the littoral zone carbon and nitrogen primary production. The model predicted that the Goodwin Islands littoral zone was a sink of channel derived POC, but a source of DOC to the surrounding estuary. The framework created in this study of estuarine ecosystem dynamics is applicable to many different aquatic systems over a range of spatial and temporal scales.

  15. Physical and biogeochemical modulation of ocean acidification in the central North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Dore, John E; Lukas, Roger; Sadler, Daniel W; Church, Matthew J; Karl, David M

    2009-07-28

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is increasing at an accelerating rate, primarily due to fossil fuel combustion and land use change. A substantial fraction of anthropogenic CO(2) emissions is absorbed by the oceans, resulting in a reduction of seawater pH. Continued acidification may over time have profound effects on marine biota and biogeochemical cycles. Although the physical and chemical basis for ocean acidification is well understood, there exist few field data of sufficient duration, resolution, and accuracy to document the acidification rate and to elucidate the factors governing its variability. Here we report the results of nearly 20 years of time-series measurements of seawater pH and associated parameters at Station ALOHA in the central North Pacific Ocean near Hawaii. We document a significant long-term decreasing trend of -0.0019 +/- 0.0002 y(-1) in surface pH, which is indistinguishable from the rate of acidification expected from equilibration with the atmosphere. Superimposed upon this trend is a strong seasonal pH cycle driven by temperature, mixing, and net photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation. We also observe substantial interannual variability in surface pH, influenced by climate-induced fluctuations in upper ocean stability. Below the mixed layer, we find that the change in acidification is enhanced within distinct subsurface strata. These zones are influenced by remote water mass formation and intrusion, biological carbon remineralization, or both. We suggest that physical and biogeochemical processes alter the acidification rate with depth and time and must therefore be given due consideration when designing and interpreting ocean pH monitoring efforts and predictive models. PMID:19666624

  16. Compound-specific isotopic analyses: a novel tool for reconstruction of ancient biogeochemical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Freeman, K. H.; Popp, B. N.; Hoham, C. H.

    1990-01-01

    Patterns of isotopic fractionation in biogeochemical processes are reviewed and it is suggested that isotopic fractionations will be small when substrates are large. If so, isotopic compositions of biomarkers will reflect those of their biosynthetic precursors. This prediction is tested by consideration of results of analyses of geoporphyrins and geolipids from the Greenhorn Formation (Cretaceous, Western Interior Seaway of North America) and the Messel Shale (Eocene, lacustrine, southern Germany). It is shown (i) that isotopic compositions of porphyrins that are related to a common source, but which have been altered structurally, cluster tightly and (ii) that isotopic differences between geolipids and porphyrins related to a common source are equal to those observed in modern biosynthetic products. Both of these observations are consistent with preservation of biologically controlled isotopic compositions during diagenesis. Isotopic compositions of individual compounds can thus be interpreted in terms of biogeochemical processes in ancient depositional environments. In the Cretaceous samples, isotopic compositions of n-alkanes are covariant with those of total organic carbon, while delta values for pristane and phytane are covariant with those of porphyrins. In this unit representing an open marine environment, the preserved acyclic polyisoprenoids apparently derive mainly from primary material, while the extractable, n-alkanes derive mainly from lower levels of the food chain. In the Messel Shale, isotopic compositions of individual biomarkers range from -20.9 to -73.4% vs PDB. Isotopic compositions of specific compounds can be interpreted in terms of origin from methylotrophic, chemautotrophic, and chemolithotrophic microorganisms as well as from primary producers that lived in the water column and sediments of this ancient lake.

  17. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  18. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  19. Extracellular enzyme activity and microbial diversity measured on seafloor exposed basalts from Loihi seamount indicate the importance of basalts to global biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Jacobson Meyers, Myrna E; Sylvan, Jason B; Edwards, Katrina J

    2014-08-01

    Seafloor basalts are widely distributed and host diverse prokaryotic communities, but no data exist concerning the metabolic rates of the resident microbial communities. We present here potential extracellular enzyme activities of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) measured on basalt samples from different locations on Loihi Seamount, HI, coupled with analysis of prokaryotic biomass and pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The community maximum potential enzyme activity (Vmax) of LAP ranged from 0.47 to 0.90 nmol (g rock)(-1) h(-1); the Vmax for AP was 28 to 60 nmol (g rock)(-1) h(-1). The Km of LAP ranged from 26 to 33 ?M, while the Km for AP was 2 to 7 ?M. Bacterial communities on Loihi basalts were comprised primarily of Alpha-, Delta-, andGammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. The putative ability to produce LAP is evenly distributed across the most commonly detected bacterial orders, but the ability to produce AP is likely dominated by bacteria in the orders Xanthomonadales, Flavobacteriales, and Planctomycetales. The enzyme activities on Loihi basalts were compared to those of other marine environments that have been studied and were found to be similar in magnitude to those from continental shelf sediments and orders of magnitude higher than any measured in the water column, demonstrating that the potential for exposed basalts to transform organic matter is substantial. We propose that microbial communities on basaltic rock play a significant, quantifiable role in benthic biogeochemical processes. PMID:24907315

  20. Pore-scale experimental study of multiphase flow relevant to CO2 sequestration and biogeochemical reactive transport relevant to contaminant fate in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Oostrom, M.; Liu, C.

    2012-12-01

    Pore-scale micromodel experiments are being conducted at EMSL PNNL to gain better understanding of i) fundamental interfacial processes that control multiphase flow relevant to CO2 sequestration, and ii) biogeochemical reactive transport that affect the fate of contaminants in the subsurface. During the main drainage process, unstable capillary and viscous fingering mechanisms were observed in a nearly homogeneous micromodel and a dual-permeability micromodel that affect supercritical CO2 (scCO2, 9 MPa, 41 degree C) displacement of water from the pore space. During primary imbibition, water flooding of a micromodel partially saturated with scCO2 resulted in preferential dissolution of scCO2 (i.e., dissolution fingering). Micromodel experiments were also performed to investigate kinetics of reductive dissolution of hematite coating on grain surfaces when coupled with pore diffusion. Results showed hematite reduction rate in micropores where transport is dominated by diffusion is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than macropores where transport is controlled by advection.

  1. Validation of the 3D biogeochemical model MIRO&CO with field nutrient and phytoplankton data and MERIS-derived surface chlorophyll a images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Geneviève; Ruddick, Kevin; Park, Youngje; Gypens, Nathalie; Lancelot, Christiane

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results obtained with MIRO&CO-3D, a biogeochemical model dedicated to the study of eutrophication and applied to the Channel and Southern Bight of the North Sea (48.5°N-52.5°N). The model results from coupling of the COHERENS-3D hydrodynamic model and the biogeochemical model MIRO, which was previously calibrated in a multi-box implementation. MIRO&CO-3D is run to simulate the annual cycle of inorganic and organic carbon and nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus and silica), phytoplankton (diatoms, nanoflagellates and Phaeocystis), bacteria and zooplankton (microzooplankton and copepods) with realistic forcing (meteorological conditions and river loads) for the period 1991-2003. Model validation is first shown by comparing time series of model concentrations of nutrients, chlorophyll a, diatom and Phaeocystis with in situ data from station 330 (51°26.00'N, 2°48.50'E) located in the centre of the Belgian coastal zone. This comparison shows the model's ability to represent the seasonal dynamics of nutrients and phytoplankton in Belgian waters. However the model fails to simulate correctly the dissolved silica cycle, especially during the beginning of spring, due to the late onset (in the model) of the early spring diatom bloom. As a general trend the chlorophyll a spring maximum is underestimated in simulations. A comparison between the seasonal average of surface winter nutrients and spring chlorophyll a concentrations simulated with in situ data for different stations is used to assess the accuracy of the simulated spatial distribution. At a seasonal scale, the spatial distribution of surface winter nutrients is in general well reproduced by the model with nevertheless a small overestimation for a few stations close to the Rhine/Meuse mouth and a tendency to underestimation in the coastal zone from Belgium to France. PO 4 was simulated best; silica was simulated with less success. Spring chlorophyll a concentration is in general underestimated by the model. The accuracy of the simulated phytoplankton spatial distribution is further evaluated by comparing simulated surface chlorophyll a with that derived from the satellite sensor MERIS for the year 2003. Reasonable agreement is found between simulated and satellite-derived regions of high chlorophyll a with nevertheless discrepancies close to the boundaries.

  2. Couples Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen J. Bergman; Janet L. Surrey

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we describe the application of the relational model to couples therapy. The model emphasizes the importance of holding awareness of self, other, and the relationship. The therapist's primary work is to help each member of the couple hold this relational awareness. The discussion of gender differences and the introduction of the language of connection, disconnection, and reconnection

  3. Hawaii and Beyond: Volcanic Islands as Model Systems for Biogeochemical and Human Ecodynamic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Hawaiian Islands provide an excellent natural lab for understanding geochemical and ecosystem processes. The most important features are: a) increasing volcano age with distance from the hotspot, b) asymmetric rainfall distribution imposed by the northeasterly trade winds and orographic processes, creating wet windward and dry leeward landscapes, c) an impoverished vegetation assemblage allowing the same species to grow in strongly varying climate and soil conditions, d) the ability to hold topography relatively constant over long time scales by sampling on volcanic shield remnants that are preserved even on the oldest high island, Kauai, and e) a long-term topographic evolution that carves the gently sloping shield surfaces into steep-sided, amphitheater headed, relatively flat floored valleys. Although deeply incised valleys are well represented in Kauai, the later stages of volcanic island evolution are not well expressed in the exposed Hawaiian Islands. Therefore, I also consider examples from the Society and Gambier Islands in French Polynesia to demonstrate the biogeochemical and human ecodynamic impacts of valley expansion and subsidence leading to drowning of all but the highest elevation interfluves. In Hawaii, I and many colleagues have characterized the details of biogeochemical processes such as: a) variations in oxygen isotopes in soil water and soil minerals, b) changing nutrient sources using Sr, Ca, and Mg isotopes, c) mineral - carbon sorption and its implications for carbon storage in soils and for mineral ripening, and d) the development of leaching and redox driven pedogenic thresholds. Here, I address how these biogeochemical features influence human land-use decisions in prehistoric Hawaii and elsewhere in the Pacific. Polynesian radiation into the eastern Pacific occurred rapidly after 1300 y bp. Although they carried with them a kitchen garden each new island presented a different environmental challenge. They were sensitive to topographic and weathering conditions and adjusted their agricultural efforts accordingly. On young minimally eroded islands they favored dryland agriculture in the uplands - there being nowhere to establish extensive irrigation systems - whereas on older islands they favored irrigated lands in the extensive eroded valleys - the soil nutrient status being too depleted in the uplands. Thus Hawaii has most dryland agriculture and Kauai has most irrigated agriculture. Islands such as Easter Island created a problem because the upland soils were nutrient depleted and there were no valleys. On Moorea, valleys provided substantial areas for irrigation. However much of the uplands had infertile lateritic soils, which in places are covered by landslide deposits that contained very rocky and nutrient-rich soils. Archeological surveys demonstrate that religious and house features were sited on the lateritic soils whereas agriculture was practiced on the landslide deposits. The Gambier Islands are composed of steep highly eroded slopes and small valleys. The valleys were the only place where agriculture could be developed and it is clear that they were the locus of considerable alluvial/colluvial deposition during prehistory and even more so during historic times.

  4. Geochemical variability of soils and biogeochemical variability of plants in the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.L.; Severson, R.C.; Dean, W.E.; Klusman, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Geochemical baselines for native soils and biogeochemical baselines for plants in the Piceance basin provide data that can be used to assess geochemical and biogeochemical effects of oil-shale development, monitor changes in the geochemical and biogeochemical environment during development, and assess the degree of success of rehabilitation of native materials after development. Baseline values for 52 properties in native soils, 15 properties in big sagebrush, and 13 properties in western wheatgrass were established. Our Study revealed statistically significant regional variations of the following properties across the basin: in soil&-aluminum, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, sodium, nickel, phosphorus, lead, scandium, titanium, vanadium, zinc, organic and total carbon, pH, clay, dolomite, sodium feldspar, and DTPA-extractable calcium, cadmium, iron, potassium, manganese, nickel, phosphorus, yttrium, and zinc; in big sagebrush-barium, calcium, copper, magnesium, molybdenum, sodium, strontium, zinc, and ash; and in western wheatgrass-boron, barium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, strontium, zinc, and ash. These variations show up as north-south trends across the basin, or they reflect differences in elevation, hydrology, and soil parent material. Baseline values for properties that do not have statistically significant regional variations can be represented by geometric means and deviations calculated from all values within the basin. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of soil and chemical analyses of western wheatgrass samples from Colorado State University's experimental revegetation plot at Anvil Points provide data useful in assessing potential effects on soil and plant properties when largescale revegetation operations begin. The concentrations of certain properties are related to the presence of topsoil over spent shale in the lysimeters. In soils, calcium, fluorine, lithium, magnesium, sodium, phosphorus, strontium, carbonate and total carbon, and DTPA-extractable boron, copper, iron, magnesium, and nickel have lower concentrations in topsoil than in the spent oil shale; whereas, silicon, titanium, ytterbium, clay, quartz, and DTPA-extractable potassium have greater concentrations in the topsoil than in the spent oil shale. In western wheatgrass, molybdenum has a lower concentration in grasses growing on the topsoil than in grasses on the spent oil shale; whereas, barium, calcium, manganese, strontium, zinc, and ash have greater concentrations in grasses growing on the topsoil than on the spent oil shale. When compared to baseline values, soils in the revegetation plot are significantly higher in concentrations of lead, zinc, organic and total carbon, and DTP A-extractable cadmium, iron, manganese, nickel, phosphorus, and zinc. Whereas, western wheatgrass grown within the revegetation plot has concentrations which fall within the baseline values established in the regional study. The equations used in predicting concentrations of elements in plants from native and altered sites are cumbersome because of the large number of variables required to adequately predict expected concentrations and are of limited use because many explained only a small proportion of the total variation.

  5. Using NMR, SIP, and MS measurements for monitoring subsurface biogeochemical reactions at the Rifle IFRC site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosier, C. L.; Keating, K.; Williams, K. H.; Robbins, M.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Grunewald, E.; Walsh, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site is located on a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado (USA). Although removal of tailings and contaminated surface materials was completed in 1996, residual uranium contamination of groundwater and subsurface sediments remains. Since 2002, research at the site has primarily focused on quantifying uranium mobility associated with stimulated and natural biogeochemical processes. Uranium mobility at the Rifle IFRC site is typically quantified through direct sampling of groundwater; however, direct sampling does not provide information about the solid phase material outside of the borehole and continuous measurements are not always possible due to multiple constraints. Geophysical methods have been suggested as a minimally invasive alternative approach for long term monitoring of biogeochemical reactions associated with uranium remediation. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), spectral induced polarization (SIP), and magnetic susceptibility (MS) are considered as potential geophysical methods for monitoring the biogeochemical reactions occurring at the Rifle IFRC site. Additionally, a pilot field study using an NMR borehole-logging tool was carried out at the Rifle IFRC site. These methods are sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical subsurface properties that occur as a result of bioremediation efforts; specifically, changes in the redox state and chemical form of iron, production of iron sulfide minerals, production of the magnetic mineral magnetite, and associated changes in the pore geometry. Laboratory experiments consisted of monitoring changes in the NMR, SIP and MS response of an acetate-amended columns packed with sediments from the Rifle IFRC site over the course of two months. The MS values remained relatively stable throughout the course of the experiment suggesting negligible production of magnetic phases (e.g. magnetite, pyrrhotite) as a result of enhanced microbial activity. However, both the SIP and NMR measurements were found to change as the experiment progressed. Changes in NMR and SIP values are attributed to the microbially induced formation of iron sulfide minerals and changes in the pore geometry. Continuous borehole NMR data were collected at the Rifle IFRC site using the Javelin NMR logging tool developed by Vista Clara Inc. Data were collected in two wells, one at a site that had previously been treated with an acetate amendment, and the second at a background (e.g. control) site. Results from the control well suggest very limited variation in NMR values. However, in the acetate amended well we observed a significant decrease in the mean of echoes (proportional to T2 and free water content) as the water table fluctuated from spring runoff. This decrease appeared to be more pronounced at longer echo spacing, suggesting changes in NMR values are potentially the result of alteration in hydrological properties resulting from microbial biomass and/or mineral accumulation in the pore space.

  6. Spatial Scaling Patterns of C, N and P Loads in Engineered Watersheds: Hydrologic vs. Biogeochemical Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, N. B.; Rao, P. C.; S, Z.; Ye, S.; Botter, G.; Sivapalan, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-05-01

    Understanding nutrient dynamics in diverse ecosystems is critical in evaluating ecological impacts (e.g., eutrophication; coastal hypoxia) from increased loads of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and carbon (C). The linkage between the hydrologic and the biogeochemical cycles is crucial for predicting nutrient cycling in these ecosystems. Examining the impacts of large-scale human modifications of watersheds (e.g., land-use intensification for food production; hydrologic modification though extensive tile-drainage, etc.) on the hydrologic and biogeochemical responses, and ecological impacts at various scales has been the focus of large-scale monitoring and modeling studies over the past two decades. Non-linear interactions between the climate (rainfall, evapotranspiration) and landscape are modified by the fractal river network to generate emergent scaling patterns of runoff that has been studied in considerable detail. The role of biogeochemistry as an additional non-linear filter that modifies the runoff signature to generate emergent patterns of nutrient loads has received much less attention. While scaling behavior of streamflow has been observed to be a function of the time scales of rainfall and catchment response, scaling patterns of nutrient loads would also be dependent on the time scales of the contaminant input function, and reaction time scales within various components of the system (hillslope, riparian zones, stream network). We examined the hydrologic and water-quality monitoring data available for the Mississippi River Basin, and found consistent linear relationships between area-normalized annual discharge (Q; L3L-2T-1) and area- normalized annual nutrient loads (ML-2T-1) at all spatial scales, ranging from first-order watersheds (~101 to 102 km2) to the entire river basin (~3x106 km2). By comparing the load-discharge data for conservative constituents (e.g., bicarbonate) with that for more-reactive constituents (nitrate, phosphate, pesticides), we estimated the effective attenuation rate constants at each spatial scale. We derived explicit analytical expressions for reproducing the reported scale-dependence of the nutrient attenuation rate constants. Finally, we used a simple hillslope-network model to investigate the spatial scaling patterns of nutrient loads as a function of the transport and reaction time scales. Implications of these results to predicting water quality impacts of land-use and climate change are discussed.

  7. Clio: An Autonomous Vertical Sampling Vehicle for Global Ocean Biogeochemical Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakuba, M.; Gomez-Ibanez, D.; Saito, M. A.; Dick, G.; Breier, J. A., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    We report the preliminary design of a fast vertical profiling autonomous underwater vehicle, called Clio, designed to cost-effectively improve the understanding of marine microorganism ecosystem dynamics on a global scale. The insights into biogeochemical cycles to be gained from illuminating the relationships between ocean life and chemistry have led to establishment of the GEOTRACES program. The nutrient and trace element profiles generated by GEOTRACES will provide insight into what is happening biogeochemically, but not how it is happening, i.e., what biochemical pathways are active? Advances in sequencing technology and in situ preservation have made it possible to study the genomics (DNA), transcriptomics (RNA), proteomics (proteins and enzymes), metabolomics (lipids and other metabolites), and metallomics (metals), associated with marine microorganisms; however, these techniques require sample collection. To this end, Clio will carry two to four SUspended Particle Rosette (SUPR) multi-samplers to depths of 6000 m. Clio is being designed specifically to complement the GEOTRACES program—to operate simultaneously and independently of the wire-based sampling protocols developed for GEOTRACES. At each GEOTRACES ocean transect sampling station, Clio will be deployed from the ship, transit vertically to the seafloor, and then ascend to, and stop at up to 32 sampling depths, where it will filter up to 150 l of seawater per sample. Filtered samples for RNA will be administered a dose of preservative (RNALater) in situ. Clio must efficiently hold station at multiple depths between the surface and 6000 m, but also move rapidly between sampling depths. It must be chemically clean and avoid disturbing the water column while sampling. Clio must be operationally friendly, requiring few personnel to operate, and have minimal impact on shipboard operations. We have selected a positively-buoyant thruster-driven design with a quasi-isopycnal construction. Our simulations indicate the vehicle can complete dives that mirror their GEOTRACES counterparts within the station time alloted. The simulation includes the effects of material/housing compressibility and thermal expansion, and employs a global average T/S profile from the Levitus 1982 climatology.

  8. Dust in the Earth system: the biogeochemical linking of land, air and sea.

    PubMed

    Ridgwell, Andy J

    2002-12-15

    Understanding the response of the Earth's climate system to anthropogenic perturbation has been a pressing priority for society since the late 1980s. However, recent years have seen a major paradigm shift in how such an understanding can be reached. Climate change demands analysis within an integrated 'Earth-system' framework, taken to encompass the suite of interacting physical, chemical, biological and human processes that, in transporting and transforming materials and energy, jointly determine the conditions for life on the whole planet. This is a highly complex system, characterized by multiple nonlinear responses and thresholds, with linkages often between apparently disparate components. The interconnected nature of the Earth system is wonderfully illustrated by the diverse roles played by atmospheric transport of mineral 'dust', particularly in its capacity as a key pathway for the delivery of nutrients essential to plant growth, not only on land, but perhaps more importantly, in the ocean. Dust therefore biogeochemically links land, air and sea. This paper reviews the biogeochemical role of mineral dust in the Earth system and its interaction with climate, and, in particular, the potential importance of both past and possible future changes in aeolian delivery of the micro-nutrient iron to the ocean. For instance, if, in the future, there was to be a widespread stabilization of soils for the purpose of carbon sequestration on land, a reduction in aeolian iron supply to the open ocean would occur. The resultant weakening of the oceanic carbon sink could potentially offset much of the carbon sequestered on land. In contrast, during glacial times, enhanced dust supply to the ocean could have 'fertilized' the biota and driven atmospheric CO(2) lower. Dust might even play an active role in driving climatic change; since changes in dust supply may affect climate, and changes in climate, in turn, influence dust, a 'feedback loop' is formed. Possible feedback mechanisms are identified, recognition of whose operation could be crucial to our understanding of major climatic transitions over the past few million years. PMID:12626273

  9. Biogeochemical and metabolic responses to the flood pulse in a semiarid floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valett, H.M.; Baker, M.A.; Morrice, J.A.; Crawford, C.S.; Molles, M.C., Jr.; Dahm, C. N.; Moyer, D.L.; Thibault, J.R.; Ellis, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    Flood pulse inundation of riparian forests alters rates of nutrient retention and organic matter processing in the aquatic ecosystems formed in the forest interior. Along the Middle Rio Grande (New Mexico, USA), impoundment and levee construction have created riparian forests that differ in their inter-flood intervals (IFIs) because some floodplains are still regularly inundated by the flood pulse (i.e., connected), while other floodplains remain isolated from flooding (i.e., disconnected). This research investigates how ecosystem responses to the flood pulse relate to forest IFI by quantifying nutrient and organic matter dynamics in the Rio Grande floodplain during three years of experimental flooding of the disconnected floodplain and during a single year of natural flooding of the connected floodplain. Surface and subsurface conditions in paired sites (control, flood) established in the two floodplain types were monitored to address metabolic and biogeochemical responses. Compared to dry controls, rates of respiration in the flooded sites increased by up to three orders of magnitude during the flood pulse. In the disconnected forest, month-long experimental floods produced widespread anoxia of four-week duration during each of the three years of flooding. In contrast, water in the connected floodplain remained well oxygenated (3-8 ppm). Material budgets for experimental floods showed the disconnected floodplain to be a sink for inorganic nitrogen and suspended solids, but a potential source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Compared to the main stem of the Rio Grande, flood-water on the connected floodplain contained less nitrate, but comparable concentrations of DOC, phosphate-phosphorus, and ammonium-nitrogen. Results suggest that floodplain IFI drives metabolic and biogeochemical responses during the flood pulse. Impoundment and fragmentation have altered floodplains from a mosaic of patches with variable IFI to a bimodal distribution. Relatively predictable flooding occurs in the connected forest, while inundation of the disconnected forest occurs only as the result of managed application of water. In semiarid floodplains, water is scarce except during the flood pulse. Ecosystem responses to the flood pulse are related to the IFI and other measures of flooding history that help describe spatial variation in ecosystem function.

  10. Anthropogenic and Climate Influences on Biogeochemical Dynamics and Molecular-Level Speciation of Soil Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, D.; Lehmann, J; Kinyangi, J; Pell, A; Theis , J; Riha , S; Ngoze, S; Amelung, W; du Preez, C; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    The soil environment is a primary component of the global biogeochemical sulfur (S) cycle, acting as a source and sink of various S species and mediating oxidation state changes. However, ecological significance of the various S forms and the impacts of human intervention and climate on the amount and structural composition of these compounds are still poorly understood. We investigated the long-term influences of anthropogenically mediated transitions from natural to managed ecosystems on molecular-level speciation, biogeochemical dynamics, and the apparent temperature sensitivity of S moieties in temperate, subtropical, and tropical environments with mean annual temperature (MAT) ranging from 5C to 21C, using elemental analysis and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Land-use and land-cover changes led to the depletion of total soil S in all three ecoregions over a period of up to 103 years. The largest decline occurred from tropical forest agroecosystems (67% Kakamega and 76% Nandi, Kenya), compared to losses from temperate (36% at Lethbridge, Canada, and 40% at Pendleton, USA) and subtropical (48% at South Africa) grassland agroecosystems. The total S losses correlated significantly with MAT. Anthropogenic interventions profoundly altered the molecular-level composition and resulted in an apparent shift in oxidation states of organic S from native ecosystems composed primarily of S moieties in intermediate and highly reduced oxidation states toward managed agroecosystems dominated by organic S rich in strongly oxidized functionalities. The most prominent change occurred in thiols and sulfides, the proportion of which decreased by 46% (Lethbridge) and 57% (Pendleton) in temperate agroecosystems, by 46% in subtropical agroecosystems, and by 79% (Nandi) and 81% (Kakamega) in tropical agroecosystems. The proportion of organic S directly linked to O increased by 81%, 168%, 40%, 92%, and 85%, respectively. Among the various organic S functionalities, thiols and sulfides seem to have higher apparent temperature sensitivity, and thus these organic S moieties may become prone to losses due to land-use changes, even from the cooler regions of the world if MAT of these regions rise in the future.

  11. Late Pleistocene biogenic sedimentation in the Gulf of Alaska: A biogeochemical perspective from IODP Expedition 341

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, C. M.; Addison, J. A.; Finney, B.; Bahlburg, H.; Childress, L. B.; Cowan, E. A.; Forwick, M.; Ribeiro, F.; Ridgway, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Reconstructing the timing and nature of past changes in aquatic productivity in the Gulf of Alaska (GoA) can shed light on the primary processes driving biogeochemical cycling over geologic timescales. Here, we present sedimentologic, physical property, stable isotope, and biogenic opal concentration data from IODP Expedition 341 Sites U1417 and U1419 and identify intervals where diatom ooze lithofacies and geochemical evidence for increased algal productivity are prevalent during the Pleistocene. Sites U1417 and U1419 are located in the center and the margin of the Fe-limited GoA, respectively, and they offer the potential to characterize past changes in biogeochemical cycling during different Pleistocene time intervals. Site U1419 cores were collected from a small slope basin at the edge of the continental shelf. Sediment cores reveal two prominent ~6-m-thick intervals of diatomaceous ooze. Between these intervals are numerous 20-cm-thick sections of biogenic-rich sediment, interbedded with gray mud that commonly contains lonestones. Based on preliminary age models, the two diatom ooze intervals likely correspond to the Holocene and MIS 3, while the intervening interbedded glacigenic and biogenic sediment can broadly be ascribed to MIS 2. Diatomaceous ooze and diatom-rich sediments are generally characterized by lower magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma ray, bulk density, and higher b* color reflectance. Initial C & N concentration and stable isotopic data show elevated concentrations and more positive stable isotope values during the Holocene and MIS 3, which approximate the isotopic signature of modern phytoplankton measured in the GoA. Within the glacial period, the biogenic-rich intervals are also characterized by more positive C and N isotopic values. When combined with the shipboard physical property data, the stable isotopic results are indicative of millennial-scale variations in productivity and/or changes in glacial ice extent in the GoA during the last glacial period. We will discuss these results in the context of an improved isotope stratigraphy and ongoing work examining multiple interglacial productivity variations at Site U1417.

  12. Study of Impact of Groundwater Cascading on Bio-Geochemical Parameters of Lake Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Y. A.; Stumpf, A.

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater Cascading (GC) is a specific type of thermohaline circulation, in which dense water formed over the continental shelf descends down the continental slope to a greater depth. This process is a major component of ventilation of intermediate and abyssal waters, hence affecting thermohaline circulation and global climate. The resulting flows produce an irreversible exchange of oceanic and shelf waters and takes an important role in bio-geochemical cycles by removal of phytoplankton, carbon and chlorophyll from productive areas. Because it can take decades or more for the subducted water to re-surface, water cascades contribute to long term climatic variability. It is common to consider formation of dense water by cooling, evaporation or freezing in the surface layer. GC can provide an alternative mechanism of dense water formation on the shelf. We are working on the estimation of the impact of GC on the bio-geochemical parameters of Lake Michigan. GC and groundwater discharge (GD) through permeable sediments is an important pathway for fluid, solute, and energy transport including freshwater, nutrients, trace metals, bacteria, and other land based pollutants. Given the vast population, agriculture, and industry surrounding Lake Michigan including Chicago area, there is high potential that the groundwater exchange in this environment can significantly contribute dissolved nutrients, heavy metal contaminants and organic pollutants to the lake. These pollutants are likely to impact both water quality and ecosystem health and must be considered by area managers and ecosystem modelers in order to fully understand the water, nutrient, and metal budgets of the lake under influence of climate change. It is important to obtain reliable quantitative estimates of both in coming and outgoing fluxes of fresh cold waters. In situation that incoming groundwater is cold enough to occupy the lower part of the lake water column, transport processes in the bottom boundary layer dominate the removal of discharged water from the coastal zone. Physical mechanisms of such removal seem to be similar to the mechanisms of dense water cascades off the continental shelf over the shelf break. We investigate the physical mechanisms of the removal of groundwater from the coastal zone of Lake Michigan to try to get a quantification of off-shore fluxes and transport pathways for GD/GC and chemical species from the shelf through numerical modeling of the processes in the bottom boundary layer. We are using numerical modeling of the GD fluxes and transport pathways of dense water flow in the bottom boundary layer of Lake Michigan using a set of process oriented numerical models of GC. Some results of this study will be presented during the session.

  13. Physical and biogeochemical correlates of spatio-temporal variation in the ?13C of marine macroalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Andrew P.; Hyndes, Glenn A.; Carvalho, Matheus C.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon isotope ratios (13C/12C) can be used to trace sources of production supporting food chains, as ?13C undergoes relatively small and predictable increases (?0.5‰) through each trophic level. However, for this technique to be precise, variation in ?13C signatures of different sources of production (baseline sources) must be clearly defined and distinct from each other. Despite this, ?13C in the primary producers of marine systems are highly variable over space and time, due to the complexity of physical and biogeochemical processes that drive ?13C variation at the base of these foodwebs. We measured spatial and temporal variation in the ?13C of two species of macroalgae that are important dietary components of grazers over temperate reefs: the small kelp Ecklonia radiata, and the red alga Plocamium preissianum, and related any variation to a suite of physical and biogeochemical variables. Patterns in ?13C variation, over different spatial (10 s m to 100 km) and temporal scales (weeks to seasons), differed greatly between taxa, but these were partly explained by the ?13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and light. However, while the ?13C in E. radiata was not related to water temperature, a highly significant proportion of the spatio-temporal variation in ?13C of P. preissianum was explained by temperature alone. Accordingly, we applied this relationship to project (across temperate Australasia) and forecast (in time, south-western Australia) patterns in P. preissianum ?13C. The mean projected ?13C for P. preissianum in the study region varied by only ?1‰ over a 12-month period, compared to ?3‰ over 2000 km. This illustrates the potential scale in the shift of ?13C in baseline food sources over broad scales, and its implications to food web studies. While we show that those relationships differ across taxonomic groups, we recommend developing models to explain variability in ?13C of other baseline sources to facilitate the interpretation of variation in ?13C of consumers in food webs, particularly where data for baselines are absent over broad scales.

  14. Biogeochemical Impact of Long-Range Transported Dust over Northern South China Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Wang, S. H.; Hsu, N. C.

    2011-01-01

    Transpacific transport and impact of Asian dust aerosols have been well documented (e.g., results from ACE-Asia and regional follow-on campaigns), but little is known about dust invasion to the South China Sea (SCS). On 19-21 March 2010, a fierce Asian dust storm affected large areas from the Gobi deserts to the West Pacific, including Taiwan and Hong Kong. As a pilot study of the 7-SEAS (Seven South East Asian Studies) in the northern SCS, detailed characteristics of long-range transported dust aerosols were first observed by a comprehensive set of ground-based instruments deployed at the Dongsha islands (20deg42'52" N, 116deg43'51" E). Aerosol measurements such as particle mass concentrations, size distribution, optical properties, hygroscopicity, and vertical profiles help illustrate the evolution of this dust outbreak. Our results indicate that these dust particles were mixed with anthropogenic and marine aerosols, and transported near the surface. Satellite assessment of biogeochemical impact of dust deposition into open oceans is hindered by our current inability in retrieving areal dust properties and ocean colors over an extensive period of time, particularly under the influence of cloudy conditions. In this paper, we analyze the changes of retrieved Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration over the northern SCS, considered as oligotophic waters in the spring, from long-term SeaWiFS measurements since 1997. Over the past decade, six long-range transported dust events are identified based on spatiotemporal evolutions of PM10 measurements from regional monitoring stations, with the aid of trajectory analysis. Multi-year composites of Chl-a imagery for dust event and non-dust background during March-April are applied to overcome insufficient retrievals of Chl-a due to cloudy environment. Due to anthropogenic modification within a shallow boundary layer off the densely populated and industrial southeast coast of China, the iron ion activation of deliquescent dust particles enhances the efficiency of fertilization for biological productivity. Compared to the West Pacific, the marine ecosystem in the northern SCS is much more susceptible to the biogeochemical impact of long-range transported Asian dust.

  15. Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Connections between Uplands and Streams in Contrasting Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, J. B.; Webb, R. M.; Hjerdt, K. N.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Peters, N. E.; Burns, D. A.; Aulenbach, B. T.; Campbell, D. H.; Clow, D. W.; Mast, M. A.; Walker, J. F.; Hunt, R. J.; Troester, J. W.; Larsen, M. C.

    2004-12-01

    We used combinations of hydrometric, chemical, and isotopic evidence to evaluate linkages between upland and riparian zones at the 5 small watersheds of the U.S. Geological Survey Water Energy and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) program. These sites span a broad range of climate and topography. At Sleepers River, Vermont, snowmelt induced the water table on hillslopes to rise into the highly transmissive upper soil. The close timing of the groundwater and stream hydrographs suggests a large contribution of hillslope water to the stream. However, the chemistry of these upland groundwaters indicates that only limited areas of convergent groundwater flow directly contribute to streamflow. At Panola Mountain, Georgia, a thin saturated zone develops on the hillslope during large rainstorms. This hillslope groundwater is chemically distinct from riparian groundwater, and transits the riparian zone near land surface with little mixing. Based on chemical mixing analysis, the hillslope contributes up to 30% of the streamwater during moderate to large-sized rainstorms. The Trout Lake site in Wisconsin is a low-lying landscape in highly conductive sandy glacial outwash.Hillslope water chemistry is considerably more dilute (i.e. less evolved) than the regional groundwater that supplies baseflow. The lack of chemical response in streamwater during storms suggests that hillslope water makes a minimal contribution relative to regional groundwater flow. In the alpine/subalpine watershed of Loch Vale, Colorado, much of the subsurface flow occurs on steep slopes of talus. Water in the talus flow has a wide range of residence times. The talus deposits are biogeochemically active and play an important role in maintaining summer baseflow, regulating seasonal changes in streamwater chemistry, and exporting nitrogen from atmospheric deposition. The tropical Icacos watershed in the Luquillo mountains of Puerto Rico receives 4 meters of rainfall annually and has high physical and chemical weathering rates. Streamwater chemistry during baseflow is strongly controlled by groundwater interaction with weathered bedrock. Most hillslope runoff occurs through near-surface macropores with limited soil interaction. This source dominates during storms resulting in stream chemistry that resembles that of the extremely dilute precipitation.We will compare these field observations at each site with the aid of TOPMODEL-based simulation of residence times and observed water quality on the hillslope and riparian saturated zones.

  16. Abiotic and biogeochemical signals derived from the seasonal cycles of tropospheric nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, C. D.; Dlugokencky, E.; Dutton, G.; Elkins, J. W.; Fraser, P.; Hall, B.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Prinn, R. G.; Steele, L. P.; Weiss, R. F.

    2010-11-01

    Seasonal cycles in the mixing ratios of tropospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) are derived by detrending long-term measurements made at sites across four global surface monitoring networks. These cycles are examined for physical and biogeochemical signals. The detrended monthly data display large interannual variability, which at some sites challenges the concept of a "mean" seasonal cycle. The interannual variability in the seasonal cycle is not always correlated among networks that share common sites. In the Northern Hemisphere, correlations between detrended N2O seasonal minima and polar winter lower stratospheric temperature provide compelling evidence for a stratospheric influence, which varies in strength from year to year and can explain much of the interannual variability in the surface seasonal cycle. Even at sites where a strong, competing, regional N2O source exists, such as from coastal upwelling at Trinidad Head, California, the stratospheric influence must be understood in order to interpret the biogeochemical signal in monthly mean data. In the Southern Hemisphere, detrended surface N2O monthly means are correlated with polar lower stratospheric temperature in months preceding the N2O minimum, suggesting a coherent stratospheric influence in that hemisphere as well. A decomposition of the N2O seasonal cycle in the extratropical Southern Hemisphere suggests that ventilation of deep ocean water (microbially enriched in N2O) and the stratospheric influx make similar contributions in phasing, and may be difficult to disentangle. In addition, there is a thermal signal in N2O due to seasonal ingassing and outgassing of cooling and warming surface waters that is out of phase and thus competes with the stratospheric and ventilation signals. All the seasonal signals discussed above are subtle and are generally better quantified in high-frequency in situ data than in data from weekly flask samples, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. The importance of abiotic influences (thermal, stratospheric influx, and tropospheric transport) on N2O seasonal cycles suggests that, at many sites, surface N2O mixing ratio data by themselves are unlikely to provide information about seasonality in surface sources (e.g., for atmospheric inversions), but may be more powerful if combined with complementary data such as CFC-12 mixing ratios or N2O isotopes.

  17. Environmental biogeochemical characteristics of rare earth elements in soil and soil-grown plants of the Hetai goldfield, Guangdong Province, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Miao; Yueliang Ma; Ruisong Xu; Wen Yan

    2011-01-01

    Very few studies deal with the biogeochemical behaviors of rare earth elements (REEs) in goldfields. This paper presents the\\u000a geochemical and biogeochemical characteristics of REEs within the soil–plant system in the Hetai goldfield, Guangdong, China.\\u000a The samples from the goldfield region show anomalies in distribution patterns and behavioral characteristics of REES as compared\\u000a with those from the background areas. The

  18. Biogeochemical characteristics of Kuan-Tzu-Ling, Chung-Lun and Bao-Lai hot springs in southern Taiwan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jyoti Prakash Maity; Chia-Chuan Liu; Bibhash Nath; Jochen Bundschuh; Sandeep Kar; Jiin-Shuh Jean; Prosun Bhattacharya; Jiann-Hong Liu; Shashi B. Atla; Chien-Yen Chen

    2011-01-01

    Hot springs are the important natural sources of geothermally heated groundwater from the Earth's crust. Kuan-Tzu-Ling (KTL), Chung-Lun (CL) and Bao-Lai (BL) are well-known hot springs in southern Taiwan. Fluid and mud (sediments) samples were collected from the eruption points of three hot springs for detailed biogeochemical characterization. The fluid sample displays relatively high concentrations of Na and Cl compared

  19. Biogeochemical modeling at mass extinction boundaries: Atmospheric carbon dioxide and ocean alkalinity at the K\\/T boundary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken Caldeira; Michael Rampino; Tyler Volk; James Zachos

    The causes of mass extinctions and the importance of major bio-events in the history of life are subjects of considerable scientific interest. A large amount of geological, geochemical, and paleontological information now exists for the Cretaceous\\/Tertiary (K\\/T) boundary (66 Myr BP). These data are used here to constrain a newly developed time-dependent biogeochemical cycle model that is designed to study

  20. Fifty-year biogeochemical effects of green ash, white pine, and Norway spruce in a replicated experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan Binkley; David Valentine

    1991-01-01

    Binkley, D. and Valentine, D., 1991. Fifty-year biogeochemical effects of green ash, white pine, and Norway spruce in a replicated experiment. For. Ecol. Manage., 40:13-25. Few long-term, replicated experiments are available to provide information on the effects of tree species on soil chemistry and ecosystem biogeochemistry. We examined replicated, 50-year-old plots of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh), white pine (Pinus

  1. Biogeochemical cycling of carbon, water, energy, trace gases, and aerosols in Amazonia: The LBA-EUSTACH experiments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. O. Andreae; P. Artaxo; C. Brandão; F. E. Carswell; P. Ciccioli; A. L. da Costa; A. D. Culf; J. L. Esteves; J. H. C. Gash; J. Grace; P. Kabat; J. Lelieveld; Y. Malhi; A. O. Manzi; F. X. Meixner; A. D. Nobre; C. A. Nobre; M. d. L. P. Ruivo; M. A. F. da Silva-Dias; P. Stefani; R. Valentini; J. von Jouanne; M. J. Waterloo

    2002-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of carbon, water, energy, aerosols, and trace gases in the Amazon Basin was investigated in the project European Studies on Trace Gases and Atmospheric Chemistry as a Contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA-EUSTACH). We present an overview of the design of the project, the measurement sites and methods, and the meteorological conditions during the

  2. Comparison of alternative spatial resolutions in the application of a spatially distributed biogeochemical model over complex terrain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David P. Turner; Rusty Dodson; Danny Marks

    1996-01-01

    Spatially distributed biogeochemical models may be applied over grids at a range of spatial resolutions, however, evaluation of potential errors and loss of information at relatively coarse resolutions is rare. In this study, a georeferenced database at the 1-km spatial resolution was developed to initialize and drive a process-based model (Forest-BGC) of water and carbon balance over a gridded 54976

  3. Biogeochemical Reactions and Mineralogical Characteristics in an Iron Reactive Barrier at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Gu; D. Watson; D. Phillips

    2001-01-01

    A permeable iron reactive barrier was installed in late November, 1997 at the U.S. Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The biogeochemical reactions and mineralogical and hydrological characteristics in the barrier were investigated over an extended field operation ( ~3 years). Results indicated that zero-valent iron (Fe0) reacts with a number of groundwater constituents such

  4. Assessment of the GHG reduction potential from energy crops using a combined LCA and biogeochemical process models: a review.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dong; Hao, Mengmeng; Fu, Jingying; Wang, Qiao; Huang, Yaohuan; Fu, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose for developing biofuel is to reduce GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions, but the comprehensive environmental impact of such fuels is not clear. Life cycle analysis (LCA), as a complete comprehensive analysis method, has been widely used in bioenergy assessment studies. Great efforts have been directed toward establishing an efficient method for comprehensively estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction potential from the large-scale cultivation of energy plants by combining LCA with ecosystem/biogeochemical process models. LCA presents a general framework for evaluating the energy consumption and GHG emission from energy crop planting, yield acquisition, production, product use, and postprocessing. Meanwhile, ecosystem/biogeochemical process models are adopted to simulate the fluxes and storage of energy, water, carbon, and nitrogen in the soil-plant (energy crops) soil continuum. Although clear progress has been made in recent years, some problems still exist in current studies and should be addressed. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art method for estimating GHG emission reduction through developing energy crops and introduces in detail a new approach for assessing GHG emission reduction by combining LCA with biogeochemical process models. The main achievements of this study along with the problems in current studies are described and discussed. PMID:25045736

  5. Evidence of Microbial Regulation of Biogeochemical Cycles from a Study on Methane Flux and Land Use Change

    PubMed Central

    Nazaries, Loïc; Pan, Yao; Bodrossy, Levente; Baggs, Elizabeth M.; Millard, Peter; Murrell, J. Colin

    2013-01-01

    Microbes play an essential role in ecosystem functions, including carrying out biogeochemical cycles, but are currently considered a black box in predictive models and all global biodiversity debates. This is due to (i) perceived temporal and spatial variations in microbial communities and (ii) lack of ecological theory explaining how microbes regulate ecosystem functions. Providing evidence of the microbial regulation of biogeochemical cycles is key for predicting ecosystem functions, including greenhouse gas fluxes, under current and future climate scenarios. Using functional measures, stable-isotope probing, and molecular methods, we show that microbial (community diversity and function) response to land use change is stable over time. We investigated the change in net methane flux and associated microbial communities due to afforestation of bog, grassland, and moorland. Afforestation resulted in the stable and consistent enhancement in sink of atmospheric methane at all sites. This change in function was linked to a niche-specific separation of microbial communities (methanotrophs). The results suggest that ecological theories developed for macroecology may explain the microbial regulation of the methane cycle. Our findings provide support for the explicit consideration of microbial data in ecosystem/climate models to improve predictions of biogeochemical cycles. PMID:23624469

  6. Assessment of the GHG Reduction Potential from Energy Crops Using a Combined LCA and Biogeochemical Process Models: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dong; Hao, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiao; Huang, Yaohuan; Fu, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose for developing biofuel is to reduce GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions, but the comprehensive environmental impact of such fuels is not clear. Life cycle analysis (LCA), as a complete comprehensive analysis method, has been widely used in bioenergy assessment studies. Great efforts have been directed toward establishing an efficient method for comprehensively estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction potential from the large-scale cultivation of energy plants by combining LCA with ecosystem/biogeochemical process models. LCA presents a general framework for evaluating the energy consumption and GHG emission from energy crop planting, yield acquisition, production, product use, and postprocessing. Meanwhile, ecosystem/biogeochemical process models are adopted to simulate the fluxes and storage of energy, water, carbon, and nitrogen in the soil-plant (energy crops) soil continuum. Although clear progress has been made in recent years, some problems still exist in current studies and should be addressed. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art method for estimating GHG emission reduction through developing energy crops and introduces in detail a new approach for assessing GHG emission reduction by combining LCA with biogeochemical process models. The main achievements of this study along with the problems in current studies are described and discussed. PMID:25045736

  7. Swept under the carpet: organic matter burial decreases global ocean biogeochemical model sensitivity to remineralization length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriest, I.; Oschlies, A.

    2013-12-01

    Although of substantial importance for marine tracer distributions and eventually global carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen fluxes, the interaction between sinking and remineralization of organic matter, benthic fluxes and burial is not always represented consistently in global biogeochemical models. We here aim to investigate the relationships between these processes with a suite of global biogeochemical models, each simulated over millennia, and compared against observed distributions of pelagic tracers and benthic and pelagic fluxes. We concentrate on the representation of sediment-water interactions in common numerical models, and investigate their potential impact on simulated global sediment-water fluxes and nutrient and oxygen distributions. We find that model configurations with benthic burial simulate global oxygen well over a wide range of possible sinking flux parameterizations, making the model more robust with regard to uncertainties about the remineralization length scale. On a global scale, burial mostly affects oxygen in the meso- to bathypelagic zone. While all model types show an almost identical fit to observed pelagic particle flux, and the same sensitivity to particle sinking speed, comparison to observational estimates of benthic fluxes reveals a more complex pattern, but definite interpretation is not straightforward because of heterogeneous data distribution and methodology. Still, evaluating model results against observed pelagic and benthic fluxes of organic matter can complement model assessments based on more traditional tracers such as nutrients or oxygen. Based on a combined metric of dissolved tracers and biogeochemical fluxes, we here identify two model descriptions of burial as suitable candidates for further experiments and eventual model refinements.

  8. From rainfall to spring discharge: Coupling conduit flow, subsurface matrix flow and surface flow in karst systems using a discrete-continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rooij, Rob; Perrochet, Pierre; Graham, Wendy

    2013-11-01

    Physics-based distributed models for simulating flow in karst systems are generally based on the discrete-continuum approach in which the flow in the three-dimensional fractured limestone matrix continuum is coupled with the flow in discrete one-dimensional conduits. In this study we present a newly designed discrete-continuum model for simulating flow in karst systems. We use a flexible spatial discretization such that complicated conduit networks can be incorporated. Turbulent conduit flow and turbulent surface flow are described by the diffusion wave equation whereas laminar variably saturated flow in the matrix is described by the Richards equation. Transients between free-surface and pressurized conduit flow are handled by changing the capacity term of the conduit flow equation. This new approach has the advantage that the transients in mixed conduit flow regimes can be handled without the Preissmann slot approach. Conduit-matrix coupling is based on the Peaceman's well-index such that simulated exchange fluxes across the conduit-matrix interface are less sensitive to the spatial discretization. Coupling with the surface flow domain is based on numerical techniques commonly used in surface-subsurface models and storm water drainage models. Robust algorithms are used to simulate the non-linear flow processes in a coupled fashion. The model is verified and illustrated with simulation examples.

  9. Biogeochemical plant-soil microbe feedback in response to climate warming in peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragazza, Luca; Parisod, Julien; Buttler, Alexandre; Bardgett, Richard D.

    2013-03-01

    Peatlands act as global sinks of atmospheric carbon (C) through the accumulation of organic matter, primarily made up of decay-resistant litter of peat mosses. However, climate warming has been shown to promote vascular plant growth in peatlands, especially ericaceous shrubs. A change in vegetation cover is in turn expected to modify above-ground/below-ground interactions, but the biogeochemical mechanisms involved remain unknown. Here, by selecting peatlands at different altitudes to simulate a natural gradient of soil temperature, we show that the expansion of ericaceous shrubs with warming is associated with an increase of polyphenol content in both plant litter and pore water. In turn, this retards the release of nitrogen (N) from decomposing litter, increases the amount of dissolved organic N and reduces N immobilization by soil microbes. A decrease of soil water content with increasing temperature promotes the growth of fungi, which feeds back positively on ericaceous shrubs by facilitating the symbiotic acquisition of dissolved organic N. We also observed a higher release of labile C from vascular plant roots at higher soil temperatures, which promotes the microbial investment in C-degrading enzymes. Our data suggest that climate-induced changes in plant cover can reduce the productivity of peat mosses and potentially prime the decomposition of organic matter by affecting the stoichiometry of soil enzymatic activity.

  10. A continuous time random walk approach to model biogeochemical processes in rivers and hyporheic water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Drummond, J. D.; Packman, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    Exchange of solutes and particles between river channels and the subsurface is critical for biogeochemical processes in rivers. Subsurface water moves slowly, delaying downstream transport and providing ample time for reactions to proceed. We present a stochastic modeling framework for the transport of reactive solutes in rivers based on continuous time random walk theory. This model includes solute transport, storage, and reactions in both the channel and the bed. Hyporheic residence times can take any distribution. The model produces realistic breakthrough curves for conservative and reactive solutes. Reactive solutes breakthrough curves exhibit characteristic late time truncation. We have also extended the model for river networks and use it to assess how the interaction of exchange rates, residence time distributions and reaction rates affect export at the watershed scale. We show that extended travel times reduce total export, but in proportions that vary with reaction kinetics relative to transport rates. When reactions are fast relative to transport rates, exchange between the surface and subsurface tend to control removal whereas for slow reactions, residence time distributions become more important.

  11. Exploring a microbial ecosystem approach to modeling deep ocean biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakem, E.; Follows, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Though microbial respiration of organic matter in the deep ocean governs ocean and atmosphere biogeochemistry, it is not represented mechanistically in current global biogeochemical models. We seek approaches that are feasible for a global resolution, yet still reflect the enormous biodiversity of the deep microbial community and its associated metabolic pathways. We present a modeling framework grounded in thermodynamics and redox reaction stoichiometry that represents diverse microbial metabolisms explicitly. We describe a bacterial/archaeal functional type with two parameters: a growth efficiency representing the chemistry underlying a bacterial metabolism, and a rate limitation given by the rate of uptake of each of the necessary substrates for that metabolism. We then apply this approach to answer questions about microbial ecology. As a start, we resolve two dominant heterotrophic respiratory pathways- reduction of oxygen and nitrate- and associated microbial functional types. We combine these into an ecological model and a two-dimensional ocean circulation model to explore the organization, biogeochemistry, and ecology of oxygen minimum zones. Intensified upwelling and lateral transport conspire to produce an oxygen minimum at mid-depth, populated by anaerobic denitrifiers. This modeling approach should ultimately allow for the emergence of bacterial biogeography from competition of metabolisms and for the incorporation of microbial feedbacks to the climate system.

  12. Inferring Properties of Ancient Cyanobacteria from Biogeochemical Activity and Genomes of Siderophilic Cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Brown, I. I.; Tringe, S. G.; Thomas-Keprta, K. E.; Bryant, D. A.; Sarkisova, S. S.; Malley, K.; Sosa, O.; Klatt, C. G.; McKay, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    Interrelationships between life and the planetary system could have simultaneously left landmarks in genomes of microbes and physicochemical signatures in the lithosphere. Verifying the links between genomic features in living organisms and the mineralized signatures generated by these organisms will help to reveal traces of life on Earth and beyond. Among contemporary environments, iron-depositing hot springs (IDHS) may represent one of the most appropriate natural models [1] for insights into ancient life since organisms may have originated on Earth and probably Mars in association with hydrothermal activity [2,3]. IDHS also seem to be appropriate models for studying certain biogeochemical processes that could have taken place in the late Archean and,-or early Paleoproterozoic eras [4, 5]. It has been suggested that inorganic polyphosphate (PPi), in chains of tens to hundreds of phosphate residues linked by high-energy bonds, is environmentally ubiquitous and abundant [6]. Cyanobacteria (CB) react to increased heavy metal concentrations and UV by enhanced generation of PPi bodies (PPB) [7], which are believed to be signatures of life [8]. However, the role of PPi in oxygenic prokaryotes for the suppression of oxidative stress induced by high Fe is poorly studied. Here we present preliminary results of a new mechanism of Fe mineralization in oxygenic prokaryotes, the effect of Fe on the generation of PPi bodies in CB, as well as preliminary analysis of the diversity and phylogeny of proteins involved in the prevention of oxidative stress in phototrophs inhabiting IDHS.

  13. Evaluating the ocean biogeochemical components of earth system models using atmospheric potential oxygen (APO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, Cynthia; Manizza, Manfredi; Keeling, Ralph; Kahru, Mati; Bopp, Laurent; Dunne, John; Tjiputra, Jerry; Ilyina, Tatiana; Mitchell, Greg

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric potential oxygen (APO ~ O2/N2 + 1.1 CO2) is an atmospheric tracer that varies seasonally mainly due to air-sea exchanges of oxygen. The observed seasonal cycles in APO provide a new benchmark for ocean biogeochemistry models. They offer evaluation metrics complementary to more traditional ocean color products by providing information on deep ventilation processes unavailable from satellite data alone. Further, many ocean biogeochemical changes expected in the future, such as responses to warming and stratification, are also highly relevant on seasonal time scales. Thus, challenging models against known seasonal variations in APO can aid in the development of credible predictions of future change. Here, the observed seasonal cycles in APO at a range of mid to high latitude surface monitoring sites will be compared to those inferred from atmospheric transport model simulations forced by the air-sea O2 fluxes from a range of CMIP5 models. Results from both historical and future RCP8.5 scenarios will be presented and the relevance of the APO metric to carbon cycle processes such as net oceanic CO2 uptake will be discussed.

  14. Diversity and biogeochemical structuring of bacterial communities across the Porangahau ridge accretionary prism, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Leila J; Gillevet, Patrick M; Pohlman, John W; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Greinert, Jens; Coffin, Richard B

    2011-09-01

    Sediments from the Porangahau ridge, located off the northeastern coast of New Zealand, were studied to describe bacterial community structure in conjunction with differing biogeochemical regimes across the ridge. Low diversity was observed in sediments from an eroded basin seaward of the ridge and the community was dominated by uncultured members of the Burkholderiales. Chloroflexi/GNS and Deltaproteobacteria were abundant in sediments from a methane seep located landward of the ridge. Gas-charged and organic-rich sediments further landward had the highest overall diversity. Surface sediments, with the exception of those from the basin, were dominated by Rhodobacterales sequences associated with organic matter deposition. Taxa related to the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus and the JS1 candidates were highly abundant at the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) at three sites. To determine how community structure was influenced by terrestrial, pelagic and in situ substrates, sequence data were statistically analyzed against geochemical data (e.g. sulfate, chloride, nitrogen, phosphorous, methane, bulk inorganic and organic carbon pools) using the Biota-Environmental matching procedure. Landward of the ridge, sulfate was among the most significant structuring factors. Seaward of the ridge, silica and ammonium were important structuring factors. Regardless of the transect location, methane was the principal structuring factor on SMTZ communities. PMID:21595727

  15. Carbon (1s) NEXAFS Spectroscopy of Biogeochemically Relevant Reference Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, D.; Lehmann, J; Kinyangi, J; Liang, B; Heymann, K; Dathe, L; Hanley, K; Wirick, S; Jacobsen, C

    2009-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is a highly active component of soils and sediments, and plays an important role in global C cycling. However, NOM has defied molecular-level structural characterization, owing to variations along the decomposition continuum and its existence as highly functionalized polyelectrolytes. We conducted a comprehensive systematic overview of spectral signatures and peak positions of major organic molecules that occur as part of NOM using near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This investigation provides a more comprehensive NEXAFS spectral library of biogeochemically relevant organic C compounds. The spectra of these reference organic compounds reveal distinct spectral features and peak positions at the C K-edge that are characteristic of the molecular orbitals bonding C atoms. Detailed structural information can be derived from these distinctive spectral features that could be used to build robust peak assignment criteria to exploit the chemical sensitivity of NEXAFS spectroscopy for in situ molecular-level spatial investigation and fingerprinting of complex organic C compounds in environmental samples.

  16. The role of industrial nitrogen in the global nitrogen biogeochemical cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Baojing; Chang, Jie; Min, Yong; Ge, Ying; Zhu, Qiuan; Galloway, James N.; Peng, Changhui

    2013-01-01

    Haber-Bosch nitrogen (N) has been increasingly used in industrial products, e.g., nylon, besides fertilizer. Massive numbers of species of industrial reactive N (Nr) have emerged and produced definite consequences but receive little notice. Based on a comprehensive inventory, we show that (1) the industrial N flux has increased globally from 2.5 to 25.4?Tg N yr?1 from 1960 through 2008, comparable to the NOx emissions from fossil fuel combustion; (2) more than 25% of industrial products (primarily structural forms, e.g., nylon) tend to accumulate in human settlements due to their long service lives; (3) emerging Nr species define new N-assimilation and decomposition pathways and change the way that Nr is released to the environment; and (4) the loss of these Nr species to the environment has significant negative human and ecosystem impacts. Incorporating industrial Nr into urban environmental and biogeochemical models could help to advance urban ecology and environmental sciences. PMID:23999540

  17. Deep Carbon Cycling in the Deep Hydrosphere: Abiotic Organic Synthesis and Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood Lollar, B.; Sutcliffe, C. N.; Ballentine, C. J.; Warr, O.; Li, L.; Ono, S.; Wang, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Research into the deep carbon cycle has expanded our understanding of the depth and extent of abiotic organic synthesis in the deep Earth beyond the hydrothermal vents of the deep ocean floor, and of the role of reduced gases in supporting deep subsurface microbial communities. Most recently, this research has expanded our understanding not only of the deep biosphere but the deep hydrosphere - identifying for the first time the extreme antiquity (millions to billions of years residence time) of deep saline fracture waters in the world's oldest rocks. Energy-rich saline fracture waters in the Precambrian crust that makes up more than 70% of the Earth's continental lithosphereprovide important constraints on our understanding of the extent of the crust that is habitable, on the time scales of hydrogeologic isolation (and conversely mixing) of fluids relevant to the deep carbon cycle, and on the geochemistry of substrates that sustain both abiotic organic synthesis and biogeochemical cycles driven by microbial communities. Ultimately the chemistry and hydrogeology of the deep hydrosphere will help define the limits for life in the subsurface and the boundary between the biotic-abiotic fringe. Using a variety of novel techniques including noble gas analysis, clumped isotopologues of methane, and compound specific isotope analysis of CHNOS, this research is addressing questions about the distribution of deep saline fluids in Precambrian rocks worldwide, the degree of interconnectedness of these potential biomes, the habitability of these fluids, and the biogeographic diversity of this new realm of the deep hydrosphere.

  18. Estimation of biogeochemical rates from concentration profiles: A novel inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettmann, Karsten Alexander; Riedinger, Natascha; Ramlau, Ronny; Knab, Nina; Böttcher, Michael Ernst; Khalili, Arzhang; Wolff, Jörg-Olaf; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2012-03-01

    A numerical procedure is proposed to estimate net microbiological and chemical consumption and production rates from measured solute profiles in limnic and marine sediments, as well as pelagic aquatic systems. The estimation process builds on the one-dimensional steady state diagenetic transport-reaction equation for dissolved compounds (e.g. electron acceptors, nutrients, or metabolic products). This equation is inverted by a technique called Tikhonov regularization which is a common and robust technique for solving ill-conditioned inverse problems. The new procedure (REC model, Rate Estimation from Concentrations) is tested with both some artificial test cases and real measurements of sulfate and methane profiles in marine sediments. Furthermore, the technique is compared with results obtained from the models of Berg et al. (1998) and Wang et al. (2008). The REC model results demonstrate that the proposed numerical procedure is well suited to estimate robust and reasonable rate profiles for relative concentration measurement uncertainties not larger than ±5%. At larger uncertainties, the model provides an estimation of a nearly constant mean rate profile. Our new approach has a similar performance as the PROFILE model of Berg et al. (1998) and the model of Wang et al. (2008). However, the REC model has the advantage of providing smooth rate profiles and estimation of the position of discrete zones of enhanced biogeochemical activities, more accurately.

  19. Bio-mineralization and potential biogeochemical processes in bauxite deposits: genetic and ore quality significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskou, Magdalini; Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria

    2013-08-01

    The Parnassos-Ghiona bauxite deposit in Greece of karst type is the 11th largest bauxite producer in the world. The mineralogical, major and trace-element contents and ?18O, ?12C, ?34S isotopic compositions of bauxite ores from this deposit and associated limestone provide valuable evidence for their origin and biogeochemical processes resulting in the beneficiation of low grade bauxite ores. The organic matter as thin coal layers, overlying the bauxite deposits, within limestone itself (negative ?12C isotopic values) and the negative ?34S values in sulfides within bauxite ores point to the existence of the appropriate circumstances for Fe bio-leaching and bio-mineralization. Furthermore, a consortium of microorganisms of varying morphological forms (filament-like and spherical to lenticular at an average size of 2 ?m), either as fossils or presently living and producing enzymes, is a powerful factor to catalyze the redox reactions, expedite the rates of metal extraction and provide alternative pathways for metal leaching processes resulting in the beneficiation of bauxite ore.

  20. Dust deposition to the East China Sea and its biogeochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Liu, Shaw Chen; Arimoto, Richard; Liu, Tsun-Hsien; Huang, Yi-Tang; Tsai, Fujung; Lin, Fei-Jan; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2009-08-01

    Atmospheric Al concentrations published by Hsu et al. (2008) are used together with new information on mass particle-size distributions (MSDs) to calculate dust deposition to northern Taiwan and to evaluate the significance of the process for the East China Sea (ECS). Seasonal variations in aerosol Al in northern Taiwan show maxima in spring and winter and minima in summer and fall. The MSD of Al and Fe is monomodal, with a mean mass median diameter of 3.6 ± 1.2 ?m, and the dry deposition velocity integrated over the entire MSD is 2.0 ± 1.5 cm s-1. The estimated dust deposition to the ECS is ˜20 g m-2 a-1, with wet deposition accounting for three fourths of the total. The quantity of dust deposited decreases exponentially with distance from the source regions. The annual dust input to the entire ECS is estimated to be ˜17 Mt, and when compared with riverine discharge, dust deposition appears to be a significant source of sediments and dissolved Fe. The large quantities of dust deposited also could have significant implications for the biogeochemical cycling of Fe (and Al), including effects on phytoplankton populations.

  1. Biogeochemical and ecological impacts of livestock grazing in semi-arid southeastern Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, D.P.; Neff, J.C.; Reynolds, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Relatively few studies have examined the ecological and biogeochemical effects of livestock grazing in southeastern Utah. In this study, we evaluated how grazing has affected soil organic carbon and nitrogen to a depth of 50 cm in grasslands located in relict and actively-grazed sites in the Canyonlands physiographic section of the Colorado Plateau. We also evaluated differences in plant ground cover and the spatial distribution of soil resources. Results show that areas used by domestic livestock have 20% less plant cover and 100% less soil organic carbon and nitrogen compared to relict sites browsed by native ungulates. In actively grazed sites, domestic livestock grazing also appears to lead to clustered, rather than random, spatial distribution of soil resources. Magnetic susceptibility, a proxy for soil stability in this region, suggests that grazing increases soil erosion leading to an increase in the area of nutrient-depleted bare ground. Overall, these results, combined with previous studies in the region, suggest that livestock grazing affects both plant cover and soil fertility with potential long-term implications for the sustainability of grazing operations in this semi-arid landscape. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diversity and biogeochemical structuring of bacterial communities across the Porangahau ridge accretionary prism, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamdan, L.J.; Gillevet, P.M.; Pohlman, J.W.; Sikaroodi, M.; Greinert, J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Sediments from the Porangahau ridge, located off the northeastern coast of New Zealand, were studied to describe bacterial community structure in conjunction with differing biogeochemical regimes across the ridge. Low diversity was observed in sediments from an eroded basin seaward of the ridge and the community was dominated by uncultured members of the Burkholderiales. Chloroflexi/GNS and Deltaproteobacteria were abundant in sediments from a methane seep located landward of the ridge. Gas-charged and organic-rich sediments further landward had the highest overall diversity. Surface sediments, with the exception of those from the basin, were dominated by Rhodobacterales sequences associated with organic matter deposition. Taxa related to the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus and the JS1 candidates were highly abundant at the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) at three sites. To determine how community structure was influenced by terrestrial, pelagic and in situ substrates, sequence data were statistically analyzed against geochemical data (e.g. sulfate, chloride, nitrogen, phosphorous, methane, bulk inorganic and organic carbon pools) using the Biota-Environmental matching procedure. Landward of the ridge, sulfate was among the most significant structuring factors. Seaward of the ridge, silica and ammonium were important structuring factors. Regardless of the transect location, methane was the principal structuring factor on SMTZ communities. FEMS Microbiology Ecology ?? 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  3. Microbial community composition and in silico predicted metabolic potential reflect biogeochemical gradients between distinct peatland types.

    PubMed

    Urbanová, Zuzana; Bárta, Ji?í

    2014-12-01

    It is not well understood how the ecological status and microbial community composition of spruce swamp forests (SSF) relate to those found in bogs and fens. To clarify this, we investigated biogeochemical parameters and microbial community composition in a bog, a fen and two SSF using high throughput barcoded sequencing of the small ribosomal subunit (SSU) variable region V4. The results demonstrated that the microbial community of SSF is positioned between those of bogs and fens, and this was confirmed by in silico predicted metabolic potentials. This corresponds well with the position of SSF on the trophic gradient and reflects distinct responses of microbial communities to environmental variables. Species richness and microbial diversity increased significantly from bog to fen, with SSF in between, reflecting the variation in pH, nutrient availability and peat decomposability. The archaeal community, dominated by hydrogenotrophic methanogens, was more similar in SSF and the bog compared with the fen. The composition of the bacterial community of SSF was intermediate between those of bog and fen. However, the production of CO2 (an indicator of peat decomposability) did not differ between SSF and bog, suggesting the limiting effect of low pH and poor litter quality on the functioning of the bacterial community in SSF. These results help to clarify the transitional position of SSF between bogs and fens and showed the strong effect of environmental conditions on microbial community composition and functioning. PMID:25195805

  4. Biogeochemical Functioning of The Seine River and Its Sensitivity To Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducharne, A.; Billen, G.; Garnier, J.; Brunstein, D.

    A model was developed to study the influence of climate on riverine hydrology and ecology, which both control nutrient load and water quality. It includes a biogeochem- ical model, describing the transformations and fluxes of C, N, P and Si between the main microbiological populations, the water column and the sediment. Recognizing the continuity of the river system, it uses for these processes the same kinetics along the entire river continuum (with parameters set from direct experimentation). Only the constraints on these processes, related to nutrient inputs and hydrology, vary along the river network. In particular, runoff is calculated by a physically-based land surface model, as a function of vegetation, soil type, topography and meteorological condi- tions. It is then routed in the drainage network to simulate discharge, depth and flow velocity, which control the residence time, sedimentation and dilution of nutrients. This integrated model was forced in the Seine river basin (75 000 km2) with observa- tional meteorological data and nutrient inputs, characterized from land-use and/or in situ measurements using a GIS. After validation against discharge and concentrations of nutrients, O2 and chlorophyll, we started to explore the sensitivity of the river func- tioning to variations of the climate forcing. We will detail the influence of arbitrary changes in precipitation and air temperature on eutrophication and oxygen depletion, then illustrate the impact of the climate change simulated by a general circulation model under a doubling of CO2.

  5. Community structure and biogeochemical impacts of microbial life on floating pumice.

    PubMed

    Elser, J J; Bastidas Navarro, M; Corman, J R; Emick, H; Kellom, M; Laspoumaderes, C; Lee, Z M; Poret-Peterson, A T; Balseiro, E; Modenutti, B

    2015-03-01

    Volcanic eruptions are a widespread force of geological and ecological disturbance and present recurrent opportunities for the study of biological responses to novel habitat formation. However, scientific study of such events is difficult given their short duration and often distant location. Here we report results from opportunistic sampling of unique volcano-generated habitats formed during the 2011 explosive eruption in the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle complex (Chile), when massive amounts of pumice were ejected, creating novel floating substrata that have never before been characterized from a microbiological perspective. DNA sequencing revealed a dynamic community of microbes that came to inhabit the pumice, with a unique composition distinct from that of the lakes' surface waters and with suggestions of ecological convergence across lakes and sampling times. Furthermore, biogeochemical studies of net nutrient fluxes showed that, while the fresh pumice arriving to the lakes was an initial source of phosphorus (P), colonized pumice had high rates of nitrogen (N) and P uptake and was sufficiently abundant to represent a significant lake-wide nutrient sink. These findings highlight the remarkable versatility of microbes in exploiting novel environments and are consistent with a recent proposal of floating pumice as a favorable environment for the initial origins of life on early Earth. PMID:25527547

  6. Influence of a stormwater sediment deposit on microbial and biogeochemical processes in infiltration porous media.

    PubMed

    Nogaro, Géraldine; Mermillod-Blondin, Florian; Montuelle, Bernard; Boisson, Jean-Claude; Bedell, Jean-Philippe; Ohannessian, Aurélie; Volat, Bernadette; Gibert, Janine

    2007-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to test the relative influence of organic matter quantity and quality and the pollutant content of a stormwater sediment deposit on mineralization processes, microbial characteristics, and the release of solutes in infiltration sediment systems. In microcosm experiments, two other natural sediment deposits (one low and one rich particulate organic matter deposits) were studied to compare their effects with those of the stormwater deposit. The results showed that the biogeochemical processes (aerobic respiration, denitrification, fermentative processes), the microbial metabolism (enzymatic activities), and the releases of several solutes (NH(4)(+) and DOC) were stimulated in presence of the stormwater deposit and the natural particulate organic matter (POM)-rich deposit because of the quantity of the POM in these deposits. In the stormwater deposit, the high availability of the POM (indicated by its low C/N ratio and its high P content) produced a higher stimulation of the microbial metabolism than in presence of the POM-rich deposit (with a high C/N ratio). Pollutant (hydrocarbon and heavy metal) contents of the stormwater deposit did not have a significant effect on microbial processes. Thus, main effects of the stormwater sedimentary deposit on infiltration system were due to its organic matter characteristics (quantity and quality). Such organic matter characteristics need to be considered in future studies to determine the contamination potential of stormwater management practices. PMID:17368513

  7. Biogeochemical processes controlling density stratification in an iron-meromictic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixdorf, E.; Boehrer, B.

    2015-06-01

    Biogeochemical processes and mixing regime of a lake can control each other mutually. The prominent case of iron meromixis is investigated in Waldsee near Doebern, a small lake that originated from surface mining of lignite. From a four years data set of monthly measured electrical conductivity profiles, we calculated summed conductivity as a quantitative variable reflecting the amount of electro-active substances in the entire lake. Seasonal variations followed changing chemocline height. Coinciding changes of electrical conductivities in the monimolimnion indicated that a considerable share of substances, precipitated by the advancing oxygenated epilimnion, re-dissolved in the remaining anoxic deep waters and contributed considerably to the density stratification. In addition, we constructed a lab experiment, in which aeration of monimolimnetic waters removed iron compounds and organic material. Precipitates could be identified by visual inspection. Introduced air bubbles ascended through the water column and formed a water mass similar to the mixolimnetic Waldsee water. The remaining less dense water remained floating on the nearly unchanged monimolimnetic water. In conclusion, iron meromixis as seen in Waldsee did not require two different sources of incoming waters, but the inflow of iron rich deep groundwater and the aeration through the lake surface were fully sufficient.

  8. The production of phytolith-occluded carbon in China's forests: implications to biogeochemical carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhaoliang; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Beilei; Yang, Xiaomin

    2013-09-01

    The persistent terrestrial carbon sink regulates long-term climate change, but its size, location, and mechanisms remain uncertain. One of the most promising terrestrial biogeochemical carbon sequestration mechanisms is the occlusion of carbon within phytoliths, the silicified features that deposit within plant tissues. Using phytolith content-biogenic silica content transfer function obtained from our investigation, in combination with published silica content and aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) data of leaf litter and herb layer in China's forests, we estimated the production of phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) in China's forests. The present annual phytolith carbon sink in China's forests is 1.7 ± 0.4 Tg CO2  yr(-1) , 30% of which is contributed by bamboo because the production flux of PhytOC through tree leaf litter for bamboo is 3-80 times higher than that of other forest types. As a result of national and international bamboo afforestation and reforestation, the potential of phytolith carbon sink for China's forests and world's bamboo can reach 6.8 ± 1.5 and 27.0 ± 6.1 Tg CO2  yr(-1) , respectively. Forest management practices such as bamboo afforestation and reforestation may significantly enhance the long-term terrestrial carbon sink and contribute to mitigation of global climate warming. PMID:23729188

  9. Using the Deepwater Horizon Disaster to Investigate Natural Biogeochemical Cycling Associated with Rapid Methane Emissions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, J. D.; Valentine, D. L.; Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Heintz, M. B.; Hu, L.; Garcia Tigreros, F.; Du, M.; Chan, E. W.

    2010-12-01

    On April 20, a violent methane discharge severed the Deepwater Horizon rig from its well and oil and gas began spilling into the deep Gulf of Mexico at depths of ca. 1.5 km simulating a natural, rapid, and short-term methane release in deepwater. Given the estimated rates of emission of total material as well as the fraction methane by weight, one can estimate that a total of 0.1 to 0.3 Tg (10^12 g) of methane were emitted from a localized area in only 83 days. Measurements of methane oxidation and sea-air methane flux were measured in June indicating that at that time, oxidation rates were slow and sea-air fluxes were relatively insignificant. A deepwater methane plume was identified and in June 2010, the depth of the methane plume was on average from 950 - 1150 m with the maximum methane concentration measured being 183 ?M. Analyses of diffusion, advective mixing, and methane oxidation were used to estimate that this plume has a lifetime of years to decades with the main controlling factor being the rate of methane oxidation. The persistent nature of this deepwater methane plume allows it to be used as a natural laboratory to investigate key hypotheses concerning the biogeochemical cycling of methane and oxygen associated with rapid, short-term methane discharges.

  10. Physical and biogeochemical controls on light attenuation in a eutrophic, back-barrier estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganju, N. K.; Miselis, J. L.; Aretxabaleta, A. L.

    2014-08-01

    Light attenuation is a critical parameter governing the ecological function of shallow estuaries. In these systems primary production is often dominated by benthic macroalgae and seagrass; thus light penetration to the bed is of primary importance. We quantified light attenuation in three seagrass meadows in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey, a shallow eutrophic back-barrier estuary; two of the sites were located within designated Ecologically Sensitive Areas (ESAs). We sequentially deployed instrumentation measuring photosynthetically active radiation, chlorophyll a (chl a) fluorescence, dissolved organic matter fluorescence (fDOM; a proxy for colored DOM absorbance), turbidity, pressure, and water velocity at 10 min intervals over three week periods at each site. At the southernmost site, where sediment availability was highest, light attenuation was highest and dominated by turbidity and to a lesser extent chl a and CDOM. At the central site, chl a dominated followed by turbidity and CDOM, and at the northernmost site turbidity and CDOM contributed equally to light attenuation. At a given site, the temporal variability of light attenuation exceeded the difference in median light attenuation at the three sites, indicating the need for continuous high-temporal resolution measurements. Vessel wakes, anecdotally implicated in increasing sediment resuspension, did not contribute to local resuspension within the seagrass beds, though frequent vessel wakes were observed in the channels. With regards to light attenuation and water clarity, physical and biogeochemical variables appear to outweigh any regulation of boat traffic within the ESAs.

  11. Physical and biogeochemical controls on light attenuation in a eutrophic, back-barrier estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganju, N. K.; Miselis, J. L.; Aretxabaleta, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Light attenuation is a critical parameter governing the ecological function of shallow estuaries. In these systems primary production is often dominated by benthic macroalgae and seagrass; thus light penetration to the bed is of primary importance. We quantified light attenuation in three seagrass meadows in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey, a shallow eutrophic back-barrier estuary; two of the sites were located within designated Ecologically Sensitive Areas (ESAs). We sequentially deployed instrumentation measuring photosynthetically active radiation, chlorophyll a (chl a) fluorescence, dissolved organic matter fluorescence (fDOM; a proxy for colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorbance), turbidity, pressure, and water velocity at 10 min intervals over 3-week periods at each site. At the southernmost site, where sediment availability was highest, light attenuation was highest and dominated by turbidity and to a lesser extent chl a and CDOM. At the central site, chl a dominated followed by turbidity and CDOM, and at the northernmost site turbidity and CDOM contributed equally to light attenuation. At a given site, the temporal variability of light attenuation exceeded the difference in median light attenuation between the three sites. Vessel wakes, anecdotally implicated in increasing sediment resuspension, did not contribute to local resuspension within the seagrass beds, though frequent vessel wakes were observed in the channels. With regards to light attenuation and water clarity, physical and biogeochemical variables appear to outweigh any regulation of boat traffic within the ESAs.

  12. Perirheic mixing and biogeochemical processing in flow-through and backwater floodplain wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. Nathan; Scott, Durelle T.; Edwards, Brandon L.; Keim, Richard F.

    2014-09-01

    Inundation hydrology and associated processes control biogeochemical processing in floodplains. To better understand how hydrologic connectivity, residence time, and intrafloodplain mixing vary in floodplain wetlands, we examined how water quality of two contrasting areas in the floodplain of the Atchafalaya River—a flow-through and a backwater wetland—responded to an annual flood pulse. Large, synoptic sampling campaigns occurred in both wetlands during the rising limb, peak, and falling limb of the hydrograph. Using a combination of conservative and reactive tracers, we inferred three dominant processes that occurred over the course of the flood pulse: flushing (rising limb), advective transport (peak), and organic matter accumulation (falling limb). Biogeochemistry of the two wetlands was similar during the peak while the river overflowed into both. However, during the rising and falling limbs, flow in the backwater wetland experienced much greater residence time. This led to the accumulation of dissolved organic matter and dissolved phosphorus. There were also elevated ratios of dissolved organic carbon to nitrate in the backwater wetland, suggesting nitrogen removal was limited by nitrate transported into the floodplain there. Collectively, our results suggest inclusion of a temporal component into the perirheic concept more fully describes inundation hydrology and biogeochemistry in large river floodplain. This article was corrected on 6 OCT 2014. See the end of the full text for details

  13. Development of a coupled framework for simulating interactive effects of soil thermal and hydrological dynamics in landscapes underlain by permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, N.; Downer, C. W.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Marchenko, S. S.; Douglas, T. A.; Wahl, M.

    2012-12-01

    Climate warming is expected to degrade permafrost in many areas of Alaska which will dramatically affect surface hydrological, soil and vegetation regimes. Projections of long-term effects of climate warming on high latitude ecosystems require a representation of soil thermal state and hydrological dynamics. We developed a coupled framework to explicitly model the soil moisture effects of soil thermal conductivity and heat capacity and its effects on hydrological dynamics. Our model is the result of coupling the Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) model with the Geophysical Institute Permafrost Laboratory (GIPL) model. The model platform can account for the effect of frozen ground on hydrology by infiltration, lateral flows and storage capacity. The GIPL model simulates soil temperature dynamics and the depth of seasonal freezing and thawing by numerically solving a 1-D nonlinear heat equation with phase change. The GSSHA model is a spatially explicit hydrological model that simulates 2-D overland flow, 2-D groundwater flow, and 1-D flow in stream networks. We combined these two models into one framework and tested it using data from Caribou Poker Creek Research Watershed in Interior Alaska. Simulation results reproduce the typical characteristics observed in the watersheds underlain by permafrost, where the reduced storage capacity produces higher peak and lower base flow.

  14. Minerals vs. Microbes: Biogeochemical Controls on Carbon Storage in Humid Tropical Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    Humid tropical forest soils contain a substantial portion (~500 Pg) of the terrestrial carbon (C) pool, yet their response to climate change remains unclear due to mechanistic uncertainty in the biogeochemical controls on soil C storage in these ecosystems. Poorly-crystalline minerals have long been known to stabilize soil C, but few studies have explored their relative importance in comparison with other likely controls such as rhizosphere processes, oxygen deficiency (anaerobiosis), and C quality. We examined relationships among soil C and a suite of biogeochemical variables measured in 162 samples from surface soils (ultisols and oxisols) collected over scales of landforms to landscapes (m - km) in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. We measured iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), and manganese (Mn) oxides in 0.5M hydrochloric acid (HCl), sodium citrate/ascorbic acid (CA), and citrate/dithionite (CD) extractions, along with clay content, root biomass, C quality (C/N ratios), and anaerobiosis using HCl-extractable reduced iron (Fe(II)) concentrations as a proxy. We used mixed-effects models to compare the relative importance of the above variables (normalized by mean and standard deviation) as predictors of soil C, with random effects to account for spatial structure. Poorly-crystalline Al oxide concentrations (CA extraction), soil C/N ratio, and Fe(II) concentrations each had highly significant (p < 0.0001) positive relationships with soil C concentrations that conveyed equivalent explanatory power, assessed by comparing standardized regression coefficients. The optimal mixed model explained 82 % of the variation of the residual sum of squares of soil C concentrations, which varied between 2 - 20 % C among samples. Fine root biomass had a weak but significantly positive association with soil C concentrations (p < 0.05), while crystalline Fe oxide concentrations (CD extraction) displayed a negative correlation (p < 0.01), and clay contents had no significant relationship. The latter results are surprising given the documented role of Fe oxides and clay minerals in C stabilization, yet may indicate the importance of C supply via roots in controlling C concentrations in humid tropical ecosystems. Samples associated with high concentrations of crystalline Fe and high clay contents may represent soils from deeper in the soil profile exposed by landslides, characterized by poorly-developed aggregate structure and fewer C inputs since disturbance. Our optimal mixed model suggested an equivalent importance of soil mineralogy, anaerobiosis, and C quality as correlates of soil C concentrations across tropical forest ecosystems varying in temperature, precipitation, and community composition. Whereas soil mineralogy may be relatively static over timescales of years to decades, O2 availability and the chemical composition of soil C inputs and can potentially vary more rapidly. Our model suggests that changes in temperature and precipitation regimes that alter O2 availability and/or increase the lability of C inputs may lead to decreased soil C storage in humid tropical forest soils.

  15. Parallel geochemical and metagenomic datasets reveal biogeochemical cycling in a hot spring ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Swingley, W.; Raymond, J.; Shock, E.

    2012-12-01

    Environmental sequence data (2,321 16S rRNA clones and 470 megabases of "metagenome" sequence) were produced from biofilms at five sites in the outflow of "Bison Pool" (BP), an alkaline hot spring in the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park. The outflow of BP is characterized by decreasing temperature, increasing pH, increasing dissolved oxygen, decreasing total sulfide, and changing availability of biological nutrients. Microbial life along a 22 m gradient at BP transitions from a 92°C chemotrophic streamer biofilm community in the source pool to a 56°C phototrophic mat community. Coordinated analysis of the BP Environmental Genome and a complementary contextual geochemical dataset of ~75 parameters has revealed biogeochemical cycling and metabolic and microbial community shifts within a hot spring ecosystem (1). In the BP outflow, genes diagnostic for sulfide oxidation, attributed to Aquificales in the chemosynthetic zone and Deinococcus-Thermus at the photosynthetic fringe, decrease in total number downstream. Geochemical data indicate that biological sulfide oxidation, an energy-yielding process in BP, occurs over this same range. While the genetic capacity for sulfate reduction in Thermoproteales at high temperature was found, inorganic sulfate reduction is only minimally energy-yielding at BP suggesting limited activity of these genes. Presence of apr, sat, and dsr genes in the photosynthetic mats may indicate sulfate reduction in micro-niches at depth within the biofilms, perhaps in response to increased availability of organic solutes. Carbon fixation tactics shift downstream in BP as well, as evidenced by the presence of genes associated with specific pathways and carbon isotope ratios. Capacity for the rTCA cycle, attributed to Aquificales and Thermoproteales, and the acetyl co-A pathway are found throughout BP, but are most prevalent in highest temperature sites. At lower temperature sites, fewer total carbon fixation genes were observed, perhaps indicating an increase in heterotrophic metabolism. Finally, no evidence for nitrogen fixation was found in the chemosynthetic zone at BP, corresponding to geochemical and isotopic data (3). While the capacity for partial denitrification/N-recycling was found, evidence for nitrification in the outflow is lacking. Together these datasets have allowed informed reconstruction of biogeochemical cycling and microbial community shifts in BP, and along with other recent work broaden our view of carbon fixation and nitrogen cycling in hot spring environments (2-6). 1 Swingley, W.D. et al., PLoS ONE, 7(6): e38108. 2 Hamilton, T.L., et al., 2011. EM, 13: 2204-2215. 3 Loiacono, S.T. et al., 2012. EM, 14(5): 1272-1283. 4 Steunou, A.-S. et al., 2006. PNAS, 103: 2398-2403. 5 Dodsworth, J.A. et al., 2011. EM, 13: 2371-2386. 6 Zhang, C.L. et al., 2008. AEM, 74: 6417-6426.

  16. Apotropaic Practices and the Undead: A Biogeochemical Assessment of Deviant Burials in Post-Medieval Poland

    PubMed Central

    Gregoricka, Lesley A.; Betsinger, Tracy K.; Scott, Amy B.; Polcyn, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Apotropaic observances-traditional practices intended to prevent evil-were not uncommon in post-medieval Poland, and included specific treatment of the dead for those considered at risk for becoming vampires. Excavations at the Drawsko 1 cemetery (17th–18th c. AD) have revealed multiple examples (n?=?6) of such deviant burials amidst hundreds of normative interments. While historic records describe the many potential reasons why some were more susceptible to vampirism than others, no study has attempted to discern differences in social identity between individuals within standard and deviant burials using biogeochemical analyses of human skeletal remains. The hypothesis that the individuals selected for apotropaic burial rites were non-local immigrants whose geographic origins differed from the local community was tested using radiogenic strontium isotope ratios from archaeological dental enamel. 87Sr/86Sr ratios (?=?0.7112±0.0006, 1?) from the permanent molars of 60 individuals reflect a predominantly local population, with all individuals interred as potential vampires exhibiting local strontium isotope ratios. These data indicate that those targeted for apotropaic practices were not migrants to the region, but instead, represented local individuals whose social identity or manner of death marked them with suspicion in some other way. Cholera epidemics that swept across much of Eastern Europe during the 17th century may provide one alternate explanation as to the reason behind these apotropaic mortuary customs, as the first person to die from an infectious disease outbreak was presumed more likely to return from the dead as a vampire. PMID:25427197

  17. Low Nitrogen Fertilization Adapts Rice Root Microbiome to Low Nutrient Environment by Changing Biogeochemical Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Seishi; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Okubo, Takashi; Yamashita, Akifumu; Terasawa, Kimihiro; Bao, Zhihua; Liu, Dongyan; Watanabe, Takeshi; Murase, Jun; Asakawa, Susumu; Eda, Shima; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Sato, Tadashi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-01-01

    Reduced fertilizer usage is one of the objectives of field management in the pursuit of sustainable agriculture. Here, we report on shifts of bacterial communities in paddy rice ecosystems with low (LN), standard (SN), and high (HN) levels of N fertilizer application (0, 30, and 300 kg N ha?1, respectively). The LN field had received no N fertilizer for 5 years prior to the experiment. The LN and HN plants showed a 50% decrease and a 60% increase in biomass compared with the SN plant biomass, respectively. Analyses of 16S rRNA genes suggested shifts of bacterial communities between the LN and SN root microbiomes, which were statistically confirmed by metagenome analyses. The relative abundances of Burkholderia, Bradyrhizobium and Methylosinus were significantly increased in root microbiome of the LN field relative to the SN field. Conversely, the abundance of methanogenic archaea was reduced in the LN field relative to the SN field. The functional genes for methane oxidation (pmo and mmo) and plant association (acdS and iaaMH) were significantly abundant in the LN root microbiome. Quantitative PCR of pmoA/mcrA genes and a 13C methane experiment provided evidence of more active methane oxidation in the rice roots of the LN field. In addition, functional genes for the metabolism of N, S, Fe, and aromatic compounds were more abundant in the LN root microbiome. These results suggest that low-N-fertilizer management is an important factor in shaping the microbial community structure containing key microbes for plant associations and biogeochemical processes in paddy rice ecosystems. PMID:24463575

  18. Impact of sulfate pollution on anaerobic biogeochemical cycles in a wetland sediment.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Darren S; Mitchell, Alison

    2012-03-15

    The impact of sulfate pollution is increasingly being seen as an issue in the management of inland aquatic ecosystems. In this study we use sediment slurry experiments to explore the addition of sulfate, with or without added carbon, on the anaerobic biogeochemical cycles in a wetland sediment that previously had not been exposed to high levels of sulfate. Specifically we looked at the cycling of S (sulfate, dissolved and particulate sulfide--the latter measured as acid volatile sulfide; AVS), C (carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, methane and the short chain volatile fatty acids formate, acetate, butyrate and propionate), N (dinitrogen, ammonium, nitrate and nitrite) and redox active metals (Fe(II) and Mn(II)). Sulfate had the largest effects on the cycling of S and C. All the added S at lower loadings were converted to AVS over the course of the experiment (30 days). At the highest loading (8 mmol) less than 50% of consumed S was converted to AVS, however this is believed to be a kinetic effect. Although sulfate reduction was occurring in sediments with added sulfate, dissolved sulfide concentrations remained low throughout the study. Sulfate addition affected methanogenesis. In the absence of added carbon, addition of sulfate, even at a loading of 1 mmol, resulted in a halving of methane formation. The initial rate of formation of methane was not affected by sulfate if additional carbon was added to the sediment. However, there was evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation in those sediments with added sulfate and carbon, but not in those sediments treated only with carbon. Surprisingly, sulfate addition had little apparent impact on N dynamics; previous studies have shown that sulfide can inhibit denitrification and stimulate dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. We propose that because most of the reduced sulfur was in particulate form, levels of dissolved sulfide were too low to interfere with the N cycle. PMID:22204939

  19. Biogeochemical patchiness, geomorphic feedbacks, and flow connectivity in river-floodplain corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, L.; Harvey, J. W.; Maglio, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ecogeomorphology is the understanding of the signature of life on landforms. The field has advanced primarily on the basis of studies of physical-biological feedbacks between vegetation, flow, and sediment transport. However, biogeochemistry also has the potential to exert strong feedback on life and landforms. This potential is particularly high in tropical and subtropical regions, where vegetation is often phosphorus (P)-limited. Aquatic landscapes are essentially closed systems for P—in contrast to nitrogen—and the transport of P primarily in particulate form can establish a tight feedback between biogeochemical and geomorphic processes in these regions. Here we examine mechanisms that can contribute to spatial patterning, or patchiness, in nutrient distributions and vegetated landforms. We evaluated hypotheses for evapotranspiration focusing, differential hydrologic exchange, and particulate nutrient redistribution mechanisms to explain spatial patterns of P retention and function of the Everglades. Based on field measurements in sloughs and on slightly higher and more densely vegetated ridges and field-grounded mechanistic models, we quantified P fluxes attributable to the three mechanisms. Findings suggest that evapotranspiration focusing is not a driver of Everglades nutrient retention nor of ridge and slough patterning. Instead, differential hydrologic exchange, driven by different periods of groundwater-surface water connectivity across topographic elements, is the primary cause of elevated P concentrations on ridges and can completely explain interpatch differences in long-term P accumulation rates. With historical flow velocities, which were an order of magnitude higher than at present, particulate P redistribution would have further increased the interpatch difference in long-term P retention rates nearly twofold, with potential consequences for landscape pattern development. In conclusion, differential hydrologic exchange and particulate nutrient redistribution are the dominant drivers of nutrient patchiness in the Everglades and are hypothesized to be important in P-limited river and floodplain corridors globally.

  20. Soil engineering in vivo: harnessing natural biogeochemical systems for sustainable, multi-functional engineering solutions

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, Jason T.; Soga, Kenichi; Banwart, Steven A.; Whalley, W. Richard; Ginn, Timothy R.; Nelson, Douglas C.; Mortensen, Brina M.; Martinez, Brian C.; Barkouki, Tammer

    2011-01-01

    Carbon sequestration, infrastructure rehabilitation, brownfields clean-up, hazardous waste disposal, water resources protection and global warming—these twenty-first century challenges can neither be solved by the high-energy consumptive practices that hallmark industry today, nor by minor tweaking or optimization of these processes. A more radical, holistic approach is required to develop the sustainable solutions society needs. Most of the above challenges occur within, are supported on, are enabled by or grown from soil. Soil, contrary to conventional civil engineering thought, is a living system host to multiple simultaneous processes. It is proposed herein that ‘soil engineering in vivo’, wherein the natural capacity of soil as a living ecosystem is used to provide multiple solutions simultaneously, may provide new, innovative, sustainable solutions to some of these great challenges of the twenty-first century. This requires a multi-disciplinary perspective that embraces the science of biology, chemistry and physics and applies this knowledge to provide multi-functional civil and environmental engineering designs for the soil environment. For example, can native soil bacterial species moderate the carbonate cycle in soils to simultaneously solidify liquefiable soil, immobilize reactive heavy metals and sequester carbon—effectively providing civil engineering functionality while clarifying the ground water and removing carbon from the atmosphere? Exploration of these ideas has begun in earnest in recent years. This paper explores the potential, challenges and opportunities of this new field, and highlights one biogeochemical function of soil that has shown promise and is developing rapidly as a new technology. The example is used to propose a generalized approach in which the potential of this new field can be fully realized. PMID:20829246

  1. Possible energetic linkage between primary production and deep-sea benthic archaea: insight from biogeochemical lipidomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2013-04-01

    Marine archaea have been recognized as a cosmopolitan player for global carbon and nitrogen cycles in the water column and sub-seafloor environments. Recent molecular evidence based on lipids and DNA suggests that uncultured benthic archaea dominate biomass in marine sediment, implying past primary production is a crucial factor for their presently ongoing heterotrophy (e.g., 1-4). Focusing on benthic archaeal heterotrophic processes in deep-sea sediment, we preliminarily traced 13C-signature in archaeal lipids to determine de novo and salvage pathway by in situ 13C-experiment. On the basis of the differential 13C-uptake, we suggest that benthic archaea recycles sedimentary relic membrane lipids to minimize the energy expenditure during 405 days (5). The 16S rRNA and quantitative PCR analysis indicated a community shift in the composition of the benthic archaeal community (e.g., Marine Group I, Marine Benthic Group, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group). In bacteria and eukarya, it is commonly recognized that free fatty acids are incorporated into cells and converted to acyl-CoA, which are eventually incorporated into membrane lipids as a salvage pathway (cf. 6). Considering the suggestion of salvage pathway in archaeal membrane synthesis (7,8), we discuss archaeal heterotrophic processes in terms of possible biogeochemical lipidomics. Reference [1] Biddle et al., (2006) PNAS, 103, 3846-3851. [2] Lipp et al., (2008) Nature, 454, 991-994. [3] Kallmeyer et al., (2012) PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1203849109 [4] Hinrichs and Inagaki, (2012) Science, 338, 204-205. [5] Takano et al., (2010) Nature Geosci., 3, 858-861. [6] Silbert et al., (1968) J Bacteriol., 95, 1658-1665. [7] Poulter et al., (1988) JACS, 110, 2620-2624. [8] Ohnuma et al., (1996) J Biochem., 119, 541-547.

  2. Top-down constraints on atmospheric mercury emissions and implications for global biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.; Selin, N. E.; Soerensen, A. L.; Angot, H.; Artz, R.; Brooks, S.; Brunke, E.-G.; Conley, G.; Dommergue, A.; Ebinghaus, R.; Holsen, T. M.; Jaffe, D. A.; Kang, S.; Kelley, P.; Luke, W. T.; Magand, O.; Marumoto, K.; Pfaffhuber, K. A.; Ren, X.; Sheu, G.-R.; Slemr, F.; Warneke, T.; Weigelt, A.; Weiss-Penzias, P.; Wip, D. C.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-02-01

    We perform global-scale inverse modeling to constrain present-day atmospheric mercury emissions and relevant physio-chemical parameters in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. We use Bayesian inversion methods combining simulations with GEOS-Chem and ground-based Hg0 observations from regional monitoring networks and individual sites in recent years. Using optimized emissions/parameters, GEOS-Chem better reproduces these ground-based observations, and also matches regional over-water Hg0 and wet deposition measurements. The optimized global mercury emission to the atmosphere is ~5.8 Gg yr-1. The ocean accounts for 3.2 Gg yr-1 (55% of the total), and the terrestrial ecosystem is neither a net source nor a net sink of Hg0. The optimized Asian anthropogenic emission of Hg0 (gas elemental mercury) is 650-1770 Mg yr-1, higher than its bottom-up estimates (550-800 Mg yr-1). The ocean parameter inversions suggest that dark oxidation of aqueous elemental mercury is faster, and less mercury is removed from the mixed layer through particle sinking, when compared with current simulations. Parameter changes affect the simulated global ocean mercury budget, particularly mass exchange between the mixed layer and subsurface waters. Based on our inversion results, we re-evaluate the long-term global biogeochemical cycle of mercury, and show that legacy mercury becomes more likely to reside in the terrestrial ecosystem than in the ocean. We estimate that primary anthropogenic mercury contributes up to 23% of present-day atmospheric deposition.

  3. Timing of the Departure of Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles from the Preindustrial State

    PubMed Central

    Christian, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in ocean chemistry and climate induced by anthropogenic CO2 affect a broad range of ocean biological and biogeochemical processes; these changes are already well underway. Direct effects of CO2 (e.g. on pH) are prominent among these, but climate model simulations with historical greenhouse gas forcing suggest that physical and biological processes only indirectly forced by CO2 (via the effect of atmospheric CO2 on climate) begin to show anthropogenically-induced trends as early as the 1920s. Dates of emergence of a number of representative ocean fields from the envelope of natural variability are calculated for global means and for spatial ‘fingerprints’ over a number of geographic regions. Emergence dates are consistent among these methods and insensitive to the exact choice of regions, but are generally earlier with more spatial information included. Emergence dates calculated for individual sampling stations are more variable and generally later, but means across stations are generally consistent with global emergence dates. The last sign reversal of linear trends calculated for periods of 20 or 30 years also functions as a diagnostic of emergence, and is generally consistent with other measures. The last sign reversal among 20 year trends is found to be a conservative measure (biased towards later emergence), while for 30 year trends it is found to have an early emergence bias, relative to emergence dates calculated by departure from the preindustrial mean. These results are largely independent of emission scenario, but the latest-emerging fields show a response to mitigation. A significant anthropogenic component of ocean variability has been present throughout the modern era of ocean observation. PMID:25386910

  4. Environmental biogeochemical behaviors of rare earth elements in soil-plant systems.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tao; Zhang, Shen; Wang, Lijun; Kung, Hsiang-Te; Wang, Yuqi; Hu, Aitang; Ding, Shiming

    2005-12-01

    With the continual increase in the utilization of rare earth elements (REEs) for industrial and agricultural purposes in China, the research into the environmental biogeochemical behavior of REEs has become a pressing issue. The REEs' content in soil and various parts of wheat under different conditions in soil-plant systems were measured by INAA and ICP-MS. The results showed four aspects. (1) The mean value of total REEs in soil of China was 176.8 mg kg(-1). The mean ratio of SigmaLREE/SigmaHREE in soils was 8.0 and cerium accounts for 42% of the total REEs. The content of REEs in wheat seed ranged between 10(-11) and 10(-8) g g(-1), 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than that in soil. (2) The REEs contents in ryegrass, especially in roots, were significantly related to that of soil. The bioavailability of REEs in soil mainly depended on the exchangeable fraction of REEs, which was strongly affected by the physico-chemical properties of the soil. (3) Long-term foliage-dressing with Changle microfertilizer of REEs did not affect the contents and distribution patterns of REEs in soil. At the maturing stage of spring wheat, the REEs content was in the order of root > leaf >stem and crust. Compared with the control, foliage-dressing has a higher accumulation of REEs in root and leaf. However, no significant difference was found in stem and crust between the two treatments. (4) There was no significant accumulation with the soil-dressing method. When comparing controls in both foliage- and soil-dressing methods, no distinct residue of REEs in grains was found. PMID:16027965

  5. Effects of Past Climate Changes on Ecosystem Biogeochemical Cycles in Rocky Mountain Forests and Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, B.; Mechenich, M. F.; Stefanova, I.; Henderson, A.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Ongoing climate trends will likely alter how forest ecosystems produce important goods and services, in part, by changing ecosystem responses to disturbances, such as fires and land-use. Disturbances induce forest succession and thus dramatically change the flow of water and nutrients through a given ecosystem. However, long-term ecosystem responses to disturbance, especially regarding nutrient pools and cycling rates, are poorly documented, and less is known about the effects of century-scale climate trends on these responses especially with respect to moisture. Here, we show biogeochemical responses to repeated (>20) episodes of disturbance and succession in a single ecosystem under a range of climatic conditions over 2000 years. Our lake sediment record shows regular fluctuations in the flux of base cations and other macronutrients from lodgepole pine ( Pinus contorta) forests in northern Colorado following catastrophic stand-replacing fires. Post-fire elemental fluctuations are consistent with ecosystem theory regarding the re-equilibration of biomass and nutrient pools during succession, but show systematic variation that has been previously undocumented. The time span of post-fire re-equilibration correlates positively with measures of fire severity, which is consistent with hypotheses that seed dispersal and soil recovery likely slow re-growth after large or severe fires. Likewise, dry conditions during the Medieval Climatic Anomaly (MCA, 1200-500 yrs BP) altered elemental fluctuations and, thus, generated post-fire pulses of lake eutrophication that were not evident during other periods. The interaction of climate and disturbance, therefore, has important consequences for ecosystem function and services, including the quality of aquatic environments.

  6. Top-down constraints on atmospheric mercury emissions and implications for global biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.; Selin, N. E.; Soerensen, A. L.; Angot, H.; Artz, R.; Brooks, S.; Brunke, E.-G.; Conley, G.; Dommergue, A.; Ebinghaus, R.; Holsen, T. M.; Jaffe, D. A.; Kang, S.; Kelley, P.; Luke, W. T.; Magand, O.; Marumoto, K.; Pfaffhuber, K. A.; Ren, X.; Sheu, G.-R.; Slemr, F.; Warneke, T.; Weigelt, A.; Weiss-Penzias, P.; Wip, D. C.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-06-01

    We perform global-scale inverse modeling to constrain present-day atmospheric mercury emissions and relevant physiochemical parameters in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. We use Bayesian inversion methods combining simulations with GEOS-Chem and ground-based Hg0 observations from regional monitoring networks and individual sites in recent years. Using optimized emissions/parameters, GEOS-Chem better reproduces these ground-based observations and also matches regional over-water Hg0 and wet deposition measurements. The optimized global mercury emission to the atmosphere is ~ 5.8 Gg yr-1. The ocean accounts for 3.2 Gg yr-1 (55 % of the total), and the terrestrial ecosystem is neither a net source nor a net sink of Hg0. The optimized Asian anthropogenic emission of Hg0 (gas elemental mercury) is 650-1770 Mg yr-1, higher than its bottom-up estimates (550-800 Mg yr-1). The ocean parameter inversions suggest that dark oxidation of aqueous elemental mercury is faster, and less mercury is removed from the mixed layer through particle sinking, when compared with current simulations. Parameter changes affect the simulated global ocean mercury budget, particularly mass exchange between the mixed layer and subsurface waters. Based on our inversion results, we re-evaluate the long-term global biogeochemical cycle of mercury, and show that legacy mercury becomes more likely to reside in the terrestrial ecosystem than in the ocean. We estimate that primary anthropogenic mercury contributes up to 23 % of present-day atmospheric deposition.

  7. Soil biogeochemical characteristics influenced by alum application in a municipal wastewater treatment wetland.

    PubMed

    Malecki-Brown, Lynette M; White, John R; Reddy, K R

    2007-01-01

    Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low-cost alternative used for tertiary treatment of wastewater. Phosphorus (P) removal capacity of these wetlands may decline, however, as P is released from the accrued organic soils. Little research has been done on methods to restore the treatment capacity of aging constructed wetlands. One possibility is the seasonal addition of alum during periods of low productivity and nutrient removal. Our 3-mo mesocosm study investigated the effectiveness of alum in immobilizing P during periods of reduced treatment efficiency, as well as the effects on soil biogeochemistry. Eighteen mesocosms were established, triplicate experimental and control units for Typha sp., Schoenoplectus californicus, and submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) (Najas guadalupensis dominated). Alum was slowly dripped to the water column of the experimental units at a rate of 0.91 g Al m(-2) d(-1) and water quality parameters were monitored. Soil cores were collected at experiment initiation and completion and sectioned into 0- to 5- and 5- to 10-cm intervals for characterization. The alum floc remained in the 0- to 5-cm surface soil, however, soil pH and microbial parameters were impacted throughout the upper 10 cm with the lowest pH found in the Typha treatment. Plant type did not impact most biogeochemical parameters; however, data were more variable in the SAV mesocosms. Amorphous Al was greater in the surface soil of alum-treated mesocosms, inversely correlated with soil pH and microbial biomass P in both soil layers. Microbial activity was also suppressed in the surface soil of alum-treated mesocosms. This research suggests alum may significantly affect the biogeochemistry of treatment wetlands and needs further investigation. PMID:17965393

  8. Biogeochemical transfer and dynamics of iodine in a soil-plant system.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huan-Xin; Yan, Ai-Lan; Hong, Chun-Lai; Qin, Ya-Chao; Pan, Lehua; Xie, Ling-Li

    2009-06-01

    Radioactive iodide (125I) is used as a tracer to investigate the fate and transport of iodine in soil under various leaching conditions as well as the dynamic transfer in a soil-plant (Chinese cabbage) system. Results show that both soils (the paddy soil and the sandy soil) exhibit strong retention capability, with the paddy soil being slightly stronger. Most iodine is retained by soils, especially in the top 10 cm, and the highest concentration occurs at the top most section of the soil columns. Leaching with 1-2 pore volume water does not change this pattern of vertical distributions. Early breakthrough and long tailing are two features observed in the leaching experiments. Because of the relatively low peak concentration, the early breakthrough is really not an environmental concern of contamination to groundwater. The long tailing implies that the retained iodine is undergoing slow but steady release and the soils can provide a low but stable level of mobile iodine after a short period. The enrichment factors of 125I in different plant tissues are ranked as: root > stem > petiole > leaf, and the 125I distribution in the young leaves is obviously higher than that in the old ones. The concentrations of 125I in soil and Chinese cabbage can be simulated with a dual-chamber model very well. The biogeochemical behaviors of iodine in the soil-cabbage system show that cultivating iodized cabbage is an environmentally friendly and effective technique to eliminate iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). Planting vegetables such as cabbage on the 129I-contaminated soil could be a good remediation technique worthy of consideration. PMID:18563587

  9. Effects of Short Term Bioturbation by Common Voles on Biogeochemical Soil Variables

    PubMed Central

    Wilske, Burkhard; Eccard, Jana A.; Zistl-Schlingmann, Marcus; Hohmann, Maximilian; Methler, Annabel; Herde, Antje; Liesenjohann, Thilo; Dannenmann, Michael; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Bioturbation contributes to soil formation and ecosystem functioning. With respect to the active transport of matter by voles, bioturbation may be considered as a very dynamic process among those shaping soil formation and biogeochemistry. The present study aimed at characterizing and quantifying the effects of bioturbation by voles on soil water relations and carbon and nitrogen stocks. Bioturbation effects were examined based on a field set up in a luvic arenosol comprising of eight 50 × 50 m enclosures with greatly different numbers of common vole (Microtus arvalis L., ca. 35–150 individuals ha–1 mth–1). Eleven key soil variables were analyzed: bulk density, infiltration rate, saturated hydraulic conductivity, water holding capacity, contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (N), CO2 emission potential, C/N ratio, the stable isotopic signatures of 13C and 15N, and pH. The highest vole densities were hypothesized to cause significant changes in some variables within 21 months. Results showed that land history had still a major influence, as eight key variables displayed an additional or sole influence of topography. However, the ?15N at depths of 10–20 and 20–30 cm decreased and increased with increasing vole numbers, respectively. Also the CO2 emission potential from soil collected at a depth of 15–30 cm decreased and the C/N ratio at 5–10 cm depth narrowed with increasing vole numbers. These variables indicated the first influence of voles on the respective mineralization processes in some soil layers. Tendencies of vole activity homogenizing SOC and N contents across layers were not significant. The results of the other seven key variables did not confirm significant effects of voles. Thus overall, we found mainly a first response of variables that are indicative for changes in biogeochemical dynamics but not yet of those representing changes in pools. PMID:25954967

  10. Nutrient Legacies and Time Lags: Understanding Catchment Biogeochemical Responses in Anthropogenic Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meter, K. J.; Basu, N. B.

    2014-12-01

    Human modification of the nitrogen (N) cycle has resulted in increased flows of reactive N, with some suggesting that planetary boundaries for maintaining human and ecosystem health have been exceeded. Persistence of large hypoxic zones in inland and coastal waters created by elevated concentrations of nitrate is one of the most significant impacts of such increased flows. While the need to manage these flows is recognized, best management practices to reduce stream N concentrations have had only limited success. Some have attributed this lack of success to accumulation of legacy N stores from decades of fertilizer application. Here we introduce an unprecedented analysis of long-term soil data from the Mississippi River Basin (MRB) revealing significant increases in total N (TN) content. We show that TN accumulation for the MRB accounts for 43% of net anthropogenic N inputs, complementing previous work indicating an approximately 25% loss of net inputs as riverine output. These findings significantly reduce uncertainty associated with basin-level N retention and demonstrate the presence of N accumulation in the deeper subsurface of agricultural soils. The presence of such legacy N stores is utilized in the development of a conceptual framework for quantifying catchment-scale time lags based on both soil nutrient accumulations (biogeochemical legacy) and groundwater travel time distributions (hydrologic legacy). Time scales of change for stream nutrient concentrations are explored as a function of both natural and anthropogenic controls, from topography to spatial patterns of land-use change, and an optimization approach has been developed to determine maximum possible concentration reduction benefits within time frames of interest.

  11. Biogeochemical processes and buffering capacity concurrently affect acidification in a seasonally hypoxic coastal marine basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, M.; Slomp, C. P.; Meysman, F. J. R.; Seitaj, D.; Harlay, J.; Borges, A. V.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2014-11-01

    Coastal areas are impacted by multiple natural and anthropogenic processes and experience stronger pH fluctuations than the open ocean. These variations can weaken or intensify the ocean acidification signal induced by increasing atmospheric pCO2. The development of eutrophication-induced hypoxia intensifies coastal acidification, since the CO2 produced during respiration decreases the buffering capacity of the hypoxic bottom water. To assess the combined ecosystem impacts of acidification and hypoxia, we quantified the seasonal variation in pH and oxygen dynamics in the water column of a seasonally stratified coastal basin (Lake Grevelingen, the Netherlands). Monthly water column chemistry measurements were complemented with estimates of primary production and respiration using O2 light-dark incubations, in addition to sediment-water fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). The resulting dataset was used to set up a proton budget on a seasonal scale. Temperature-induced seasonal stratification combined with a high community respiration was responsible for the depletion of oxygen in the bottom water in summer. The surface water showed strong seasonal variation in process rates (primary production, CO2 air-sea exchange), but relatively small seasonal pH fluctuations (0.46 units on the total hydrogen ion scale). In contrast, the bottom water showed less seasonality in biogeochemical rates (respiration, sediment-water exchange), but stronger pH fluctuations (0.60 units). This marked difference in pH dynamics could be attributed to a substantial reduction in the acid-base buffering capacity of the hypoxic bottom water in the summer period. Our results highlight the importance of acid-base buffering in the pH dynamics of coastal systems and illustrate the increasing vulnerability of hypoxic, CO2-rich waters to any acidifying process.

  12. Archaea in metazoan diets: implications for food webs and biogeochemical cycling

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Andrew R; Levin, Lisa A; Orphan, Victoria J; Marlow, Jeffrey J

    2012-01-01

    Although the importance of trophic linkages, including ‘top-down forcing', on energy flow and ecosystem productivity is recognized, the influence of metazoan grazing on Archaea and the biogeochemical processes that they mediate is unknown. Here, we test if: (1) Archaea provide a food source sufficient to allow metazoan fauna to complete their life cycle; (2) neutral lipid biomarkers (including crocetane) can be used to identify Archaea consumers; and (3) archaeal aggregates are a dietary source for methane seep metazoans. In the laboratory, we demonstrated that a dorvilleid polychaete, Ophryotrocha labronica, can complete its life cycle on two strains of Euryarchaeota with the same growth rate as when fed bacterial and eukaryotic food. Archaea were therefore confirmed as a digestible and nutritious food source sufficient to sustain metazoan populations. Both strains of Euryarchaeota used as food sources had unique lipids that were not incorporated into O. labronica tissues. At methane seeps, sulfate-reducing bacteria that form aggregations and live syntrophically with anaerobic-methane oxidizing Archaea contain isotopically and structurally unique fatty acids (FAs). These biomarkers were incorporated into tissues of an endolithofaunal dorvilleid polychaete species from Costa Rica (mean bulk ?13C=?92±4‰ polar lipids ?116‰) documenting consumption of archaeal-bacterial aggregates. FA composition of additional soft-sediment methane seep species from Oregon and California provided evidence that consumption of archaeal-bacterial aggregates is widespread at methane seeps. This work is the first to show that Archaea are consumed by heterotrophic metazoans, a trophic process we coin as ‘archivory'. PMID:22402398

  13. Potential impacts of climate change on biogeochemical functioning of Cerrado ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, M M C; Nardoto, G B; Pinto, A S; Resende, J C F; Takahashi, F S C; Vieira, L C G

    2012-08-01

    The Cerrado Domain comprises one of the most diverse savannas in the world and is undergoing a rapid loss of habitats due to changes in fire regimes and intense conversion of native areas to agriculture. We reviewed data on the biogeochemical functioning of Cerrado ecosystems and evaluated the potential impacts of regional climate changes. Variation in temperature extremes and in total amount of rainfall and altitude throughout the Cerrado determines marked differences in the composition of species. Cerrado ecosystems are controlled by interactions between water and nutrient availability. In general, nutrient cycles (N, P and base cations) are very conservative, while litter, microbial and plant biomass are important stocks. In terms of C cycling, root systems and especially the soil organic matter are the most important stocks. Typical cerrado ecosystems function as C sinks on an annual basis, although they work as source of C to the atmosphere close to the end of the dry season. Fire is an important factor altering stocks and fluxes of C and nutrients. Predicted changes in temperature, amount and distribution of precipitation vary according to Cerrado sub-regions with more marked changes in the northeastern part of the domain. Higher temperatures, decreases in rainfall with increase in length of the dry season could shift net ecosystem exchanges from C sink to source of C and might intensify burning, reducing nutrient stocks. Interactions between the heterogeneity in the composition and abundance of biological communities throughout the Cerrado Domain and current and future changes in land use make it difficult to project the impacts of future climate scenarios at different temporal and spatial scales and new modeling approaches are needed. PMID:23011296

  14. A Comprehensive Plan for the Long-Term Calibration and Validation of Oceanic Biogeochemical Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B.; McClain, Charles R.; Mannino, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this planning document is to establish a long-term capability and validating oceanic biogeochemical satellite data. It is a pragmatic solution to a practical problem based primarily o the lessons learned from prior satellite missions. All of the plan's elements are seen to be interdependent, so a horizontal organizational scheme is anticipated wherein the overall leadership comes from the NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry (OBB) Program Manager and the entire enterprise is split into two components of equal sature: calibration and validation plus satellite data processing. The detailed elements of the activity are based on the basic tasks of the two main components plus the current objectives of the Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems Roadmap. The former is distinguished by an internal core set of responsibilities and the latter is facilitated through an external connecting-core ring of competed or contracted activities. The core elements for the calibration and validation component include a) publish protocols and performance metrics; b) verify uncertainty budgets; c) manage the development and evaluation of instrumentation; and d) coordinate international partnerships. The core elements for the satellite data processing component are e) process and reprocess multisensor data; f) acquire, distribute, and archive data products; and g) implement new data products. Both components have shared responsibilities for initializing and temporally monitoring satellite calibration. Connecting-core elements include (but are not restricted to) atmospheric correction and characterization, standards and traceability, instrument and analysis round robins, field campaigns and vicarious calibration sites, in situ database, bio-optical algorithm (and product) validation, satellite characterization and vicarious calibration, and image processing software. The plan also includes an accountability process, creating a Calibration and Validation Team (to help manage the activity), and a discussion of issues associated with the plan's scientific focus.

  15. Effects of short term bioturbation by common voles on biogeochemical soil variables.

    PubMed

    Wilske, Burkhard; Eccard, Jana A; Zistl-Schlingmann, Marcus; Hohmann, Maximilian; Methler, Annabel; Herde, Antje; Liesenjohann, Thilo; Dannenmann, Michael; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Bioturbation contributes to soil formation and ecosystem functioning. With respect to the active transport of matter by voles, bioturbation may be considered as a very dynamic process among those shaping soil formation and biogeochemistry. The present study aimed at characterizing and quantifying the effects of bioturbation by voles on soil water relations and carbon and nitrogen stocks. Bioturbation effects were examined based on a field set up in a luvic arenosol comprising of eight 50 × 50 m enclosures with greatly different numbers of common vole (Microtus arvalis L., ca. 35-150 individuals ha-1 mth-1). Eleven key soil variables were analyzed: bulk density, infiltration rate, saturated hydraulic conductivity, water holding capacity, contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (N), CO2 emission potential, C/N ratio, the stable isotopic signatures of 13C and 15N, and pH. The highest vole densities were hypothesized to cause significant changes in some variables within 21 months. Results showed that land history had still a major influence, as eight key variables displayed an additional or sole influence of topography. However, the ?15N at depths of 10-20 and 20-30 cm decreased and increased with increasing vole numbers, respectively. Also the CO2 emission potential from soil collected at a depth of 15-30 cm decreased and the C/N ratio at 5-10 cm depth narrowed with increasing vole numbers. These variables indicated the first influence of voles on the respective mineralization processes in some soil layers. Tendencies of vole activity homogenizing SOC and N contents across layers were not significant. The results of the other seven key variables did not confirm significant effects of voles. Thus overall, we found mainly a first response of variables that are indicative for changes in biogeochemical dynamics but not yet of those representing changes in pools. PMID:25954967

  16. Determination of dominant biogeochemical processes in a contaminated aquifer-wetland system using multivariate statistical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baez-Cazull, S. E.; McGuire, J.T.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Voytek, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Determining the processes governing aqueous biogeochemistry in a wetland hydrologically linked to an underlying contaminated aquifer is challenging due to the complex exchange between the systems and their distinct responses to changes in precipitation, recharge, and biological activities. To evaluate temporal and spatial processes in the wetland-aquifer system, water samples were collected using cm-scale multichambered passive diffusion samplers (peepers) to span the wetland-aquifer interface over a period of 3 yr. Samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, methane, and a suite of organic acids resulting in a large dataset of over 8000 points, which was evaluated using multivariate statistics. Principal component analysis (PCA) was chosen with the purpose of exploring the sources of variation in the dataset to expose related variables and provide insight into the biogeochemical processes that control the water chemistry of the system. Factor scores computed from PCA were mapped by date and depth. Patterns observed suggest that (i) fermentation is the process controlling the greatest variability in the dataset and it peaks in May; (ii) iron and sulfate reduction were the dominant terminal electron-accepting processes in the system and were associated with fermentation but had more complex seasonal variability than fermentation; (iii) methanogenesis was also important and associated with bacterial utilization of minerals as a source of electron acceptors (e.g., barite BaSO4); and (iv) seasonal hydrological patterns (wet and dry periods) control the availability of electron acceptors through the reoxidation of reduced iron-sulfur species enhancing iron and sulfate reduction. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  17. Field experiment and Modeling full coupling hydrologic model with mircotopography in typical watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Long; Zhu, Yongshu; Xu, Ruchao; Yu, Zhongbo; Chen, Li

    2015-04-01

    With high human activties and landscape remodeling, the various landuse and micropography are newly added in scienctific sight. In order to quanify the solpo effect in high resolution sub-grid system, three-dimensional Richards' equations and the two-dimensional diffusion wave equations are chosen to solve the output difference between hydro-flows, The difficulty of quantitating surface water and groundwater interaction and parameterizing the microtopography with the help of multi-scale observation experiments. For three-dimensional coupling mechanism in surface-subsurface system, we design real-time observations on water flow at Hydrologic Response Units (HRU) located on various landuse and outlet in Meilin experimental watershed. The continuously observed data disclose the principle of runoff yield spatially and temporally, and show the surface runoff redistribution, unsaturated soil water dynamics, shallow groundwater response to typical rainfall-runoff events on complex microtopographic slope. A surface storage function with elevation various is embeded into diffuse wave equations to describe microtopographic effect. we improve for paramterizing microtopography in subelements and evaluate the strength of microtopography and couple length at soil-water interface impacting the hydrologic modeling. Based on observed conclusions, a full physical based distributed model system is established at Meilin watershed to quantify the hydrodynamic processes of overland flow, soil water saturation, and groundwater level and analyze dynamic exchanges among them in simulation. The relationships between the various saturation area (VSA) and runoff yield and flow confluence in each typical event are quantified statistically. With the field work and simulations, we demostrated the approach to describe complex hydrologic processes in human-interrupted watershed. Keywords: micropography, coupling mechanism, various saturation area, surface storage

  18. Dark coupling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. Gavela; D. Hernandez; L. Lopez Honorez; O. Mena; S. Rigolin

    2009-01-01

    The two dark sectors of the universe - dark matter and dark energy - may\\u000ainteract with each other. Background and linear density perturbation evolution\\u000aequations are developed for a generic coupling. We then establish the general\\u000aconditions necessary to obtain models free from early time non-adiabatic\\u000ainstabilities. As an application, we consider a viable universe in which the\\u000ainteraction

  19. Modeling the long-term and transient evolution of biogeochemical and isotopic signatures in coal tar-contaminated aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Affonseca, Fernando Mazo; Prommer, Henning; Finkel, Michael; Blum, Philipp; Grathwohl, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Reactive transport modeling is a critical element in assessing the potential of natural attenuation of groundwater pollutants. In the present study, we developed a comprehensive quantitative model that incorporates the key processes affecting the long-term fate of complex organic compound mixtures released from coal tar-type dense nonaqueous phase liquid sources. The model framework addresses the simulation of the long-term dynamics of source zone depletion, the fate of the released compounds during reactive transport in the groundwater, the evolution of the aquifer's biogeochemical response, in particular its redox conditions, and the redox-dependent carbon isotope fractionation of selected organic compounds. The modeling framework was applied for the interpretation of observed biogeochemical and isotopic data from a well-characterized coal tar-contaminated site in northern Germany. The simulations highlight the diversity of fates of the individual compounds, which result from their widely varying physicochemical characteristics, and also how complex interactions develop over the lifetime of the contamination. The highly transient release of contaminants from the coal tar as pool and as heterogeneously distributed blobs in the source zone triggers continuously changing biogeochemical conditions and isotope signatures. The modeling results illustrate how difficult and uncertain the assessment of contaminant fate can be if the collected data cover only a small time window relative to the transport time scale. This emphasizes the need for a holistic understanding of the governing processes that control the effectiveness of monitored natural attenuation before it is implemented as a passive remediation strategy at nonaqueous phase liquid-contaminated sites.

  20. Spatial patterns in soil biogeochemical process rates along a Louisiana wetland salinity gradient in the Barataria Bay estuarine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. J.; Rich, M. W.; Sullivan, H. L.; Bledsoe, R.; Dawson, M.; Donnelly, B.; Marton, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Louisiana has the highest rates of coastal wetland loss in the United States. In addition to being lost, Louisiana wetlands experience numerous other environmental stressors including changes in salinity regime (both increases from salt water intrusion and decreases from the creation of river diversions) and climate change induced changes in vegetation (e.g. the northward expansion of Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) into salt marshes). In this study, we examined how these changes might influence biogeochemical process rates important in regulating carbon balance and the cycling, retention, and removal of nutrients in Louisiana wetlands. Specifically, we measured net soil greenhouse gas fluxes and collected cores for the determination of rates of greenhouse gas production, denitrification potential, nitrification potential, iron reduction, and phosphorus sorption from surface (0-5cm) and subsurface (10-15cm) depths for three plots in each of 4 sites along the salinity gradient: a freshwater marsh site, a brackish (7 ppt) marsh site, a salt marsh (17 ppt), and a Avicennia germinans stand (17 ppt; adjacent to salt marsh site) in the Barataria Bay estuarine system. Most biogeochemical processes displayed similar spatial patterns with salt marsh rates being lower than rates in freshwater and/or brackish marsh sites and not having significantly different rates than in Avicennia germinans stands. Rates in surface soils were generally higher than in subsurface soils. These patterns were generally consistent with spatial patterns in soil properties with soil water content, organic matter quantity and quality, and extractable nutrients generally being higher in freshwater and brackish marsh sites than salt marsh and Avicennia germinans sites, especially in surface soils. These spatial patterns suggest that the ability of coastal wetlands to retain and remove nutrients might change significantly in response to future climate changes in the region and that these alterations to biogeochemical cycling capacity need to be considering when designing and managing future restoration projects especially those involving river diversions.

  1. Catchment low pass filter characteristics, legacy contamination and their link to variability in biogeochemical 1/f? scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, Markus; Fovet, Ophelie; Ruiz, Laurent; Savenije, Hubert

    2015-04-01

    In spite of recent progress, hydrological processes underlying observed water quality response patterns, such as the emergence of near-chemostatic conditions and fractal 1/f? scaling of stream chemistry, are not completely understood. Analysing hydrological and Cl- tracer data for two intensely managed, hydrologically contrasting yet biogeochemically similar catchments we tested (1) if a model can simultaneously reproduce the hydrological and biogeochemical responses, (2) if legacy stores, allowing for long-term storage of nutrient inputs can be identified and (3) if a model can reproduce 1/f? scaling. Further we analysed (4) the transit (TTD) and residence time distributions (RTD) and the associated response dynamics of legacy stores, and (5) what controls fluctuations in the scaling exponent ?, establishing a process based link between 1/f? scaling, legacy stores, and age distributions. We found that the model could reproduce the variable hydrological and the stable Cl- responses. This was possible through Cl- accumulation in hydrologically passive legacy stores (e.g. groundwater), where Cl- age is well above 2000 days, one magnitude above the Cl- age in other components, such as the root zone (200d). The results indicate that legacy stores can cause stable nutrient concentrations in streams for several decades after the end of nutrient input. It was further found that the model could reproduce fractal scaling of stream Cl- in both catchments, with higher values of ? for the catchment with the smaller legacy store and faster response (?=-0.88 vs. -1.29). Further analysing the spectral properties of model components, it was found that the parts of the system with less storage are characterized by higher values of ?. This suggests a plausible processes-based link between the fluctuations of ?, legacy stores and RTDs: the smaller the legacy store and the higher the flow contribution from faster responding system components, the higher ?, suggesting that fractal scaling may potentially not be a universally emerging property of the biogeochemical response in streams.

  2. Bayesian calibration of mechanistic aquatic biogeochemical models and benefits for environmental management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhonditsis, George B.; Papantou, Dimitra; Zhang, Weitao; Perhar, Gurbir; Massos, Evangelia; Shi, Molu

    2008-09-01

    Aquatic biogeochemical models have been an indispensable tool for addressing pressing environmental issues, e.g., understanding oceanic response to climate change, elucidation of the interplay between plankton dynamics and atmospheric CO 2 levels, and examination of alternative management schemes for eutrophication control. Their ability to form the scientific basis for environmental management decisions can be undermined by the underlying structural and parametric uncertainty. In this study, we outline how we can attain realistic predictive links between management actions and ecosystem response through a probabilistic framework that accommodates rigorous uncertainty analysis of a variety of error sources, i.e., measurement error, parameter uncertainty, discrepancy between model and natural system. Because model uncertainty analysis essentially aims to quantify the joint probability distribution of model parameters and to make inference about this distribution, we believe that the iterative nature of Bayes' Theorem is a logical means to incorporate existing knowledge and update the joint distribution as new information becomes available. The statistical methodology begins with the characterization of parameter uncertainty in the form of probability distributions, then water quality data are used to update the distributions, and yield posterior parameter estimates along with predictive uncertainty bounds. Our illustration is based on a six state variable (nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic nitrogen, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and bacteria) ecological model developed for gaining insight into the mechanisms that drive plankton dynamics in a coastal embayment; the Gulf of Gera, Island of Lesvos, Greece. The lack of analytical expressions for the posterior parameter distributions was overcome using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations; a convenient way to obtain representative samples of parameter values. The Bayesian calibration resulted in realistic reproduction of the key temporal patterns of the system, offered insights into the degree of information the data contain about model inputs, and also allowed the quantification of the dependence structure among the parameter estimates. Finally, our study uses two synthetic datasets to examine the ability of the updated model to provide estimates of predictive uncertainty for water quality variables of environmental management interest.

  3. Biogeochemical indicators of peatland degradation - a case study of a temperate bog in northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, J. P.; Leifeld, J.; Glatzel, S.; Szidat, S.; Alewell, C.

    2014-12-01

    Peatlands store a great proportion of the global soil carbon pool and can loose carbon via the atmosphere due to degradation. In Germany, most of the greenhouse gas emissions from organic soils are attributed to sites managed as grassland. Here we investigated a land-use gradient from near-natural wetland (NW) to an extensively managed (GE) to an intensively managed grassland site (GI), all formed in the same bog complex in northern Germany. Vertical depth profiles of ?13C, ?15N, ash content, C/N ratio, bulk density, as well as radiocarbon ages were studied to identify peat degradation and to calculate carbon loss. At all sites, including the near-natural site, ?13C depth profiles indicate aerobic decomposition in the upper horizons. Depth profiles of ?15Ndiffered significantly between sites with increasing ?15N values in the top layers with increasing intensity of use, indicating that the peat is more decomposed. At both grassland sites, the ash content peaked within the first centimeter. In the near-natural site, ash contents were highest in 10-60 cm depth. This indicates that not only the managed grasslands, but also the near-natural site, is influenced by anthropogenic activities, most likely due to the drainage of the surrounding area. However, we found very young peat material in the first centimeter of the NW, indicating recent peat growth. The NW site accumulates carbon today even though it is and probably was influenced by anthropogenic activities in the past indicated by ?13C and ash content depth profiles. Based on the enrichment of ash content and changes in bulk density, we calculated carbon loss from these sites in retrograde. As expected land use intensification leads to a higher carbon loss which is supported by the higher peat ages at the intensive managed grassland site. All investigated biogeochemical parameters together indicate degradation of peat due to (i) conversion to grassland, (ii) historical drainage as well as recent development and (iii) land use intensification.

  4. The Importance of Kinetics and Redox in the Biogeochemical Cycling of Iron in the Surface Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Croot, Peter L.; Heller, Maija I.

    2012-01-01

    It is now well established that Iron (Fe) is a limiting element in many regions of the open ocean. Our current understanding of the key processes which control iron distribution in the open ocean have been largely based on thermodynamic measurements performed under the assumption of equilibrium conditions. Using this equilibrium approach, researchers have been able to detect and quantify organic complexing ligands in seawater and examine their role in increasing the overall solubility of iron. Our current knowledge about iron bioavailability to phytoplankton and bacteria is also based heavily on carefully controlled laboratory studies where it is assumed the chemical species are in equilibrium in line with the free ion association model and/or its successor the biotic ligand model. Similarly most field work on iron biogeochemistry generally consists of a single profile which is in essence a “snap-shot” in time of the system under investigation. However it is well known that the surface ocean is an extremely dynamic environment and it is unlikely if thermodynamic equilibrium between all the iron species present is ever truly achieved. In sunlit waters this is mostly due to the daily passage of the sun across the sky leading to photoredox processes which alter Fe speciation by cycling between redox states and between inorganic and organic species. Episodic deposition events, dry and wet, are also important perturbations to iron cycling as they bring in new iron to the system and alter the equilibrium between iron species and phases. Here we utilize new field data collected in the open ocean on the complexation kinetics of iron in the surface ocean to identify the important role of weak iron binding ligands (i.e., those that cannot maintain iron in solution indefinitely at seawater pH: ?FeL?biogeochemical cycling of iron in the ocean. PMID:22723797

  5. Biogeochemical characteristics of dissolved and particulate organic matter in Russian rivers entering the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobbes, Jörg M.; Fitznar, Hans Peter; Kattner, Gerhard

    2000-09-01

    The biogeochemical signature of riverine matter in the Russian Arctic was investigated to establish a background for tracing terrestrial organic material in the Arctic Ocean. Elemental and lignin compositions of particulate and dissolved organic matter (POM, DOM), stable carbon isotope ratios of POM and nutrient concentrations are reported for 12 Russian rivers along 4000 km of coastline. The 12 rivers account for about 43% of the freshwater supply to the Arctic Ocean. Nine rivers drain both tundra and taiga areas and three rivers only tundra. Concentrations of nitrogenous nutrients and phosphate were low, whereas silicate values were generally high with only few exceptions. The concentrations of particulate organic carbon (POC) varied between 25.5 and 291 ?mol/L C, contributing 0.4-2.1% to the total suspended sediment (TSS). Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) ranging from 230 to 1006 ?mol/L C was on average eight times higher than POC. The concentrations of particulate and dissolved organic nitrogen were similar (ca. 11 ?mol/L N) resulting in four times higher C/N ratios in the dissolved fraction (48) compared to the particulate fraction (11). The ? 13C ratios were uniform (-25.6 to -27.4‰) and similar in taiga and tundra draining rivers. The exclusively terrestrial component lignin, determined as lignin phenols after cupric oxide oxidation, ranged from 5.6 to 37.6 nmol/L in the particulate fraction and from 34 to 319 nmol/L in the dissolved fraction. The syringyl/vanillyl (S/V) and cinnamyl/vanillyl (C/V) ratios of the particulate and dissolved lignin phenols were significantly correlated with the proportion of tundra and taiga in the drainage areas. This is true despite different formation processes and diagenetic degree of POM and DOM, as evident from acid/aldehyde ratios of vanillyl phenols [(Ad/Al)v]. Export rates were calculated from the carbon and lignin data. The 12 rivers studied transport about 10 × 10 12 g of total organic carbon per year into the Arctic Ocean. The largest proportion is discharged by the Yenisey River with about 5 × 10 12 g/yr. Total lignin discharge was about 42 × 10 9 g/yr. The contribution of lignin to the overall carbon flux (0.26% of carbon export) was almost negligible, which does not limit its quality as a quantitative tracer for organic matter fluxes from tundra and taiga regions.

  6. The importance of kinetics and redox in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in the surface ocean.

    PubMed

    Croot, Peter L; Heller, Maija I

    2012-01-01

    It is now well established that Iron (Fe) is a limiting element in many regions of the open ocean. Our current understanding of the key processes which control iron distribution in the open ocean have been largely based on thermodynamic measurements performed under the assumption of equilibrium conditions. Using this equilibrium approach, researchers have been able to detect and quantify organic complexing ligands in seawater and examine their role in increasing the overall solubility of iron. Our current knowledge about iron bioavailability to phytoplankton and bacteria is also based heavily on carefully controlled laboratory studies where it is assumed the chemical species are in equilibrium in line with the free ion association model and/or its successor the biotic ligand model. Similarly most field work on iron biogeochemistry generally consists of a single profile which is in essence a "snap-shot" in time of the system under investigation. However it is well known that the surface ocean is an extremely dynamic environment and it is unlikely if thermodynamic equilibrium between all the iron species present is ever truly achieved. In sunlit waters this is mostly due to the daily passage of the sun across the sky leading to photoredox processes which alter Fe speciation by cycling between redox states and between inorganic and organic species. Episodic deposition events, dry and wet, are also important perturbations to iron cycling as they bring in new iron to the system and alter the equilibrium between iron species and phases. Here we utilize new field data collected in the open ocean on the complexation kinetics of iron in the surface ocean to identify the important role of weak iron binding ligands (i.e., those that cannot maintain iron in solution indefinitely at seawater pH: ?(FeL)?biogeochemical cycling of iron in the ocean. PMID:22723797

  7. Benthic biogeochemical cycling of mercury in two contaminated northern Adriatic coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covelli, Stefano; Emili, Andrea; Acquavita, Alessandro; Koron, Neža; Faganeli, Jadran

    2011-10-01

    Previous research recognized most of the Northern Adriatic coastal lagoon environments as contaminated by mercury (Hg) from multiple anthropogenic sources. Among them, the Pialassa Baiona (P.B.) Lagoon, located near the city of Ravenna (Italy), received between 100 and 200 tons of Hg, generated by an acetaldehyde factory in the period 1957-1977. Further east, the Grado Lagoon has been mainly affected by a long-term Hg input from the Idrija mine (western Slovenia) through the Isonzo River since the 16th century. Hg cycling at the sediment-water interface (SWI) of the two lagoons was investigated and compared by means of an in situ benthic chamber, estimating diffusive Hg and Methyl-Hg fluxes in the summer season. Major chemical features in porewaters (Fe, Mn, H 2S, dissolved inorganic (DIC) and organic carbon (DOC), nutrients) and in the solid phase (C org, N and S) were also explored to understand the general biogeochemical conditions of the system in response to benthic respiration. The daily integrated flux for the methylated Hg form was extremely low in P.B. Lagoon, accounting for only 7% of the corresponding flux calculated for the Grado Lagoon. Despite a higher sedimentary Hg content in the P.B. Lagoon (14.4-79.0 ?g g -1) compared to the Grado Lagoon (10.7-12.5 ?g g -1), the in situ fluxes of Hg in the two experimental sites appeared similar. A selective sequential extraction procedure was applied to the solid phase, showing that the stable crystalline mineral phase cinnabar (HgS) is the predominant Hg fraction (about 50%) in the Grado Lagoon surface sediments. Conversely, Hg mobilization and sequestration in the P.B. Lagoon is related to the extremely anoxic redox conditions of the system where the intense sulfate reduction, by the release of sulfur and the formation of sulfides, limits the metal recycling at the SWI and its availability for methylation processes. Thus, the environmental conditions at the SWI in the P.B. Lagoon seem to represent a natural "barrier" for the potential risk of Hg transfer to the aquatic trophic chain.

  8. Geochemical cycling of mercury in a deep, confined aquifer: Insights from biogeochemical reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, Karen H.; Neumann, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    Total dissolved mercury concentrations (HgT) were measured in groundwaters collected along a flow path within a deep, confined aquifer (i.e., the Carrizo Sand) in southeastern Texas, USA, along with major solutes, pH, and redox sensitive parameters that include dissolved iron species [Fe(II), Fe(III)] and sulfide [S(-II)] concentrations. Mercury concentrations range from below detection (<0.43 pmol kg-1) to close to 8 pmol kg-1, and increase 6-fold along the first 13 km of the flow path, coincident with the region of the aquifer where dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction buffers the redox conditions. With groundwater flow beyond the Fe(III) reducing zone and into the region of the aquifer dominated by sulfate reduction, the dissolved HgT concentrations decrease by close to a factor of 3. Dissolved HgT is positively correlated with dissolved Fe(II) concentrations (r = 0.61), and to a lesser extent with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (r = 0.54), and inversely related to both pH (r = -0.56) and dissolved S(-II) concentrations (r = -0.41), although this latter relationship is not statistically significant. Solution complexation modeling indicates that Hg is chiefly complexed with dissolved sulfide and that organic complexes with Hg are generally negligible. Biogeochemical reactive transport modeling demonstrates that the distinct zones of high Fe(II) followed by high S(-II) groundwaters observed along the flow path are consistent with microbially mediated Fe(III) reduction followed by SO42- reduction that occurs sequentially along the flow path. Furthermore, the modeling suggests that Hg is released to Carrizo Sand aquifer groundwaters by dissimilatory reduction of the Fe(III) oxides/oxyhydroxides (goethite and hematite), which are common in the aquifer, occurring as coatings on sand grains (chiefly quartz). Subsequently, the model suggests that Hg is removed from Carrizo Sand groundwater further down gradient along the flow path by adsorption onto goethite and hematite. Adsorption onto, or co-precipitation with, Fe-sulfide minerals like mackinawite, sorption onto sedimentary organic matter, and/or precipitation of HgS(s) may also play important roles in Hg removal from Carrizo Sand groundwaters.

  9. Hydrological and Biogeochemical Controls on Seasonal and Spatial Differences in Food Webs in the Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, C.; Wankel, S. D.; Bemis, B. E.; Rawlik, P. S.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Lange, T.

    2002-05-01

    Stable isotopes can be used to determine the relative trophic positions of biota within a food web, and to improve our understanding of the biomagnification of contaminants. Plants at the base of the food web uptake dissolved organic carbon (DIC) and nitrogen (DIN) for growth, and their tissue reflects the isotopic composition of these sources. Animals then mirror the isotopic composition of the primary producers, as modified by consumer-diet fractionations at successive trophic steps. During 1995-99, we collected algae, macrophyte, invertebrate, and fish samples from 15 USGS sites in the Everglades and analyzed them for d13C and d15N with the goal of characterizing seasonal and spatial differences in food web relations. Carbon isotopes effectively distinguish between two main types of food webs: ones where algae is the dominant base of the food web, which are characteristic of relatively pristine marsh sites with long hydroperiods, and ones where macrophyte debris appears to be a significant source of nutrients, which are apparently characteristic of shorter hydroperiod sites, and nutrient-impacted marshes and canals. There usually is an inverse relation between d13C and d15N of organisms over time, especially in more pristine environments, reflecting seasonal changes in the d13C of DIC and the d15N of DIN. The d13C and d15N of algae also show strong positive correlations with seasonal changes in water levels. This variability is substantially damped up the food chain, probably because of the longer integration times of animals vs. plants. We speculate that these seasonal shifts in water level result in changes in biogeochemical reactions and nutrient levels, with corresponding variations in the d15N and d13C of biota. For example, small changes in water level may change the balance of photosynthesis, bacterial respiration, and atmospheric exchange reactions that control the d13C of DIC. Such changes will probably also affect the d15N of dissolved inorganic N (DIN) because of corresponding changes in N uptake and redox conditions. During the dry season, the marshes probably become more anoxic because of shallower water levels, less photosynthesis, and increased quantities of decaying vegetation. During this season, macrophyte debris appears to be a significant source of nutrients to local food webs. Our isotope data are consistent with seasonal differences in food webs, related to seasonal differences in water levels. Hence, biota isotopes provide a powerful tool for monitoring how future ecosystem changes, in particular changes in hydroperiod, will affect food webs across the Everglades.

  10. Regional scale hydrological and biogeochemical processes controlling high biodiversity of a groundwater fed alkaline fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zee, Sjoerd E. A. T. M.; (D. G.) Cirkel, Gijsbert; (J. P. M) witte, Flip

    2014-05-01

    The high floral biodiversity of groundwater fed fens and mesotrophic grasslands depends on the different chemical signatures of the shallow rainwater fed topsoil water and the slightly deeper geochemically affected groundwater. The relatively abrupt gradients between these two layers of groundwater enable the close proximity of plants that require quite different site factors and have different rooting depths. However, sulphur inflow into such botanically interesting areas is generally perceived as a major threat to biodiversity. Although in Europe atmospheric deposition of sulphur has decreased considerably over the last decades, groundwater pollution by sulphate may still continue due to pyrite oxidation in soil as a result of excessive fertilisation. Inflowing groundwater rich in sulphate can change biogeochemical cycling in nutrient-poor wetland ecosystems because of 'so called' internal eutrophication as well as the accumulation of dissolved sulphide, which is phytotoxic. Complementary to conventions, we propose that upwelling sulphate rich groundwater may, in fact, promote the conservation of rare and threatened alkaline fens: excessive fertilisation and pyrite oxidation also produces acidity, which invokes calcite dissolution, and increased alkalinity and hardness of the inflowing groundwater. For a very species-rich wetland nature reserve, we show that sulphate is reduced and effectively precipitated as iron sulphides, when this calcareous and sulphate rich groundwater flows upward through the organic soil of the investigated nature reserve. Also, we show that sulphate reduction occurs simultaneously with an increase in alkalinity production, which in our case results in active calcite precipitation in the soil. In spite of the occurring sulphate reduction, we found no evidence for internal eutrophication. Extremely low phosphorous concentration in the pore water could be attributed to a high C:P ratio of soil organic matter and co-precipitation with calcite. Our study shows that seepage dependent alkaline fen ecosystems can be remarkably resilient to fertilisation and pyrite oxidation induced groundwater quality changes. The profound impact, of factors that were ignored in the literature, reveals that reducing environmental complexity may significantly constrain the value of predictions.

  11. High-order schemes for 2D unsteady biogeochemical ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckermann, Mattheus P.; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate numerical modeling of biogeochemical ocean dynamics is essential for numerous applications, including coastal ecosystem science, environmental management and energy, and climate dynamics. Evaluating computational requirements for such often highly nonlinear and multiscale dynamics is critical. To do so, we complete comprehensive numerical analyses, comparing low- to high-order discretization schemes, both in time and space, employing standard and hybrid discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods, on both straight and new curved elements. Our analyses and syntheses focus on nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton dynamics under advection and diffusion within an ocean strait or sill, in an idealized 2D geometry. For the dynamics, we investigate three biological regimes, one with single stable points at all depths and two with stable limit cycles. We also examine interactions that are dominated by the biology, by the advection, or that are balanced. For these regimes and interactions, we study the sensitivity to multiple numerical parameters including quadrature-free and quadrature-based discretizations of the source terms, order of the spatial discretizations of advection and diffusion operators, order of the temporal discretization in explicit schemes, and resolution of the spatial mesh, with and without curved elements. A first finding is that both quadrature-based and quadrature-free discretizations give accurate results in well-resolved regions, but the quadrature-based scheme has smaller errors in under-resolved regions. We show that low-order temporal discretizations allow rapidly growing numerical errors in biological fields. We find that if a spatial discretization (mesh resolution and polynomial degree) does not resolve the solution, oscillations due to discontinuities in tracer fields can be locally significant for both low- and high-order discretizations. When the solution is sufficiently resolved, higher-order schemes on coarser grids perform better (higher accuracy, less dissipative) for the same cost than lower-order scheme on finer grids. This result applies to both passive and reactive tracers and is confirmed by quantitative analyses of truncation errors and smoothness of solution fields. To reduce oscillations in un-resolved regions, we develop a numerical filter that is active only when and where the solution is not smooth locally. Finally, we consider idealized simulations of biological patchiness. Results reveal that higher-order numerical schemes can maintain patches for long-term integrations while lower-order schemes are much too dissipative and cannot, even at very high resolutions. Implications for the use of simulations to better understand biological blooms, patchiness, and other nonlinear reactive dynamics in coastal regions with complex bathymetric features are considerable.

  12. Exploring the potential of hyper-spectral imaging for the biogeochemical analysis of varved lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, Christoph; Grosjean, Martin; Enters, Dirk; Tylmann, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    Varved lake sediments have successfully been used to make inferences about past environmental and climate conditions from annual to multi-millennial scales. Among other proxies, concentrations of sedimentary photopigments have been used for temperature reconstructions. However, obtaining well calibrated annually resolved records from sediments still remains challenging. Most laboratory methods used to analyse lake sediments require physical subsampling and are destructive in the process. Hence, temporal resolution and number of data are limited by the amount of material available in the core. Furthermore, for very low sediment accumulation rates annual subsampling is often very difficult or even impossible. To address these problems we explore hyper-spectral imaging as a new method to analyse lake sediments based on their reflectance spectra in the visible and near infrared spectrum. In contrast to other fast and non-destructive methods like X-ray fluorescence, VIS/NIR reflectance spectrometry distinguishes between biogeochemical substances rather than single elements. Rein (2003) has shown that VIS-RS can be used to detect relative concentrations of sedimentary photopigments (e.g. chlorins, carotenoids) and clay minerals. This study presents an advanced approach using a hyper-spectral camera and remote sensing techniques to infer climate proxy data from reflectance spectra of varved lake sediments. Hyper-spectral imaging allows analysing an entire sediment core in a single measurement, producing a spectral dataset with very high spatial (30x30µm/pixel) and spectral resolutions (~1nm) and a higher spectral range (400-1000nm) compared to previously used spectrophotometers. This allows the analysis of data time series at sub-varve scales or spatial mapping of sedimentary substances (e.g. chlorophyll-a and diagenetic products) at very high resolution. The method is demonstrated on varved lake sediments from northern Poland showing the change of the relative concentrations of chlorin pigments within individual varve years. In a next step absolute concentrations of chlorins derived from HPLC measurements have been calibrated to the spectral data using a linear regression model. This results in a very high-resolution dataset of absolute sedimentary pigment concentrations. In a second example µXRF measurements are used to validate a spectral index for clay mineral detection.

  13. Improvement of wine terroir management according to biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najat, Nassr; Aude, Langenfeld; Mohammed, Benbrahim; Lionel, Ley; Laurent, Deliere; Jean-Pascal, Goutouly; David, Lafond; Marie, Thiollet-Scholtus

    2015-04-01

    Good wine terroir production implies a well-balanced Biogeochemical Cycle of Nitrogen (BCN) at field level i.e. in soil and in plant. Nitrogen is very important for grape quality and soil sustainability. The mineralization of organic nitrogen is the main source of mineral nitrogen for the vine. This mineralization depends mainly on the soil microbial activity. This study is focused on the functional microbial populations implicated in the BCN, in particular nitrifying bacteria. An experimental network with 6 vine sites located in Atlantic coast (Loire valley and Bordeaux) and in North-East (Alsace) of France has been set up since 2012. These vine sites represent a diversity of environmental factors (i.e. soil and climate). The adopted approach is based on the measure of several indicators to assess nitrogen dynamic in soil, i.e. nitrogen mineralization, regarding microbial biomass and activity. Statistical analyses are performed to determine the relationship between biological indicator and nitrogen mineralisation regarding farmer's practices. The variability of the BCN indicators seems to be correlated to the physical and chemical parameters in the soil of the field. For all the sites, the bacterial biomass is correlated to the rate and kinetic of nitrogen in soil, however this bioindicator depend also on others parameters. Moreover, the functional bacterial diversity depends on the soil organic matter content. Differences in the bacterial biomass and kinetic of nitrogen mineralization are observed between the sites with clayey (Loire valley site) and sandy soils (Bordeaux site). In some tested vine systems, effects on bacterial activity and nitrogen dynamic are also observed depending on the farmer's practices: soil tillage, reduction of inputs, i.e. pesticides and fertilizers, and soil cover management between rows. The BCN indicators seem to be strong to assess the dynamics of the nitrogen in various sites underline the functional diversity of the soils. These BCN indicators could help to manage the dynamics of the nitrogen and the nitrogenous nutrition of the vine in innovative sites/systems with various farmer's practices.

  14. Biogeochemical and Isotopic Records of Holocene Climate Change in the Gulf of Alaska, Northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, J. A.; Finney, B. P.; Coon, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    The rapidly accumulating sediment in the Gulf of Alaska (GoA) presents a unique opportunity to study the effects of climate change on marine production over decadal to millennial timescales during the Late Quaternary. Because several parameters that influence marine production are directly related to climate, it is possible to quantify the effects of both short-term regime shifts in the Aleutian Low/Pacific (inter)Decadal Oscillation and long-term Milankovitch orbital forcing using techniques that measure marine paleoproduction. This study describes fluctuations in the accumulation of biogenic and terrestrial sedimentary components using sediment cores recovered from the Gulf of Alaska during the R/V Maurice Ewing EW0408 cruise in the summer of 2004. This set of cores provides an opportunity for the first systematic assessment of marine paleoproductivity for this sector of the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Bulk sediment samples from a subset of these cores along the southern margin of the Gulf of Alaska were analyzed for biogeochemical concentrations and isotopic ratios. We analyzed a suite of proxies to assess paleoproductivity, including opal, Corg, CaCO3, ?13C, ?15N, and C/N ratios. A suite of major, minor, and trace elements were also measured using X-ray fluorometry to assess fluxes of lithogenic, biogenic, and redox sensitive components. Preliminary results indicate that opal and Corg concentrations are more than two times higher in fjords than in adjacent shelf environments. A strong correlation between opal and Corg records for the GoA shelf suggests a diatom-dominated ecosystem throughout the Holocene. This observation is supported by ?13C measurements that indicate carbon contributions dominantly from phytoplankton with minor terrestrial C3 plant input. ?15N data are relatively constant over the Holocene suggesting either persistent advection of upwelled Alaska Gyre nutrients towards the GoA margin, or constant rates of denitrification since the onset of modern oceanographic conditions. Spectral analysis of the paleoproductivity time series reveal cyclic fluctuations in fjord environments that correspond with sub-millenial periods similar to those thought to represent solar forcing. Similar frequencies are also observed in transition metal concentrations along the adjacent GoA shelf, suggesting variable redox conditions in sediment diagenesis may also be linked to changes in organic carbon fluxes driven by paleoproductivity variability.

  15. Some aspects of ecophysiological and biogeochemical responses of tropical forests to atmospheric change.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Jeffrey Q; Silver, Whendee L

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric changes that may affect physiological and biogeochemical processes in old-growth tropical forests include: (i) rising atmospheric CO2 concentration; (ii) an increase in land surface temperature; (iii) changes in precipitation and ecosystem moisture status; and (iv) altered disturbance regimes. Elevated CO2 is likely to directly influence numerous leaf-level physiological processes, but whether these changes are ultimately reflected in altered ecosystem carbon storage is unclear. The net primary productivity (NPP) response of old-growth tropical forests to elevated CO2 is unknown, but unlikely to exceed the maximum experimentally measured 25% increase in NPP with a doubling of atmospheric CO2 from pre-industrial levels. In addition, evolutionary constraints exhibited by tropical plants adapted to low CO2 levels during most of the Late Pleistocene, may result in little response to increased carbon availability. To set a maximum potential response for a Central Amazon forest, using an individual-tree-based carbon cycling model, a modelling experiment was performed constituting a 25% increase in tree growth rate, linked to the known and expected increase in atmospheric CO2. Results demonstrated a maximum carbon sequestration rate of ca. 0.2 Mg C per hectare per year (ha(-1) yr(-1), where 1 ha = 10(4) m2), and a sequestration rate of only 0.05 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) for an interval centred on calendar years 1980-2020. This low rate results from slow growing trees and the long residence time of carbon in woody tissues. By contrast, changes in disturbance frequency, precipitation patterns and other environmental factors can cause marked and relatively rapid shifts in ecosystem carbon storage. It is our view that observed changes in tropical forest inventory plots over the past few decades is more probably being driven by changes in disturbance or other environmental factors, than by a response to elevated CO2. Whether these observed changes in tropical forests are the beginning of long-term permanent shifts or a transient response is uncertain and remains an important research priority. PMID:15212096

  16. Biogeochemical study on mud-volcano sediments from the Kumano forearc basin, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijiri, A.; Toki, T.; Yamaguchi, Y. T.; Kawagucci, S.; Hattori, S.; Morono, Y.; Lever, M. A.; Yoshida, N.; Tsunogai, U.; Nakamura, K.; Takai, K.; Ashi, J.; Inagaki, F.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated microbial communities and biogeochemical processes in mud-volcano subsurface sediments down to 20 meters from the summit, obtained from the Kumano forearc basin in the Nankai Trough during the CK09-01 D/V Chikyu training cruise in 2009. The cored sediments contained several methane hydrates. Chemical characteristics of pore fluid indicated that the fluid in the mud volcano was supplied from the accretionary prism beneath the forearc sediments probably through faults. The cored sediments contained relatively low population of microbial cells (<104 cells/cm3). The ?13C value of dissolved inorganic carbon (?13CDIC) increased with the coring depth, reaching +40% at 3 meters below the seafloor (mbsf). The highly 13C-enriched values are possibly due to strong microbial reduction of DIC to 12C-enriched products. The hydrogen isotopic composition of methane (-181±2%) and magnitude of the carbon isotopic fractionation between DIC and methane (75.6±2.8%) bellow 3 mbsf suggest the significant contribution of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis as the source of methane. The ?13C value of acetate was appeared to increase with the sediment depth (from -41 to -22%), synchronous to the increase of ?13CDIC. The significant isotopic fractionation between DIC and acetate (54.0±6.9%) indicates that the principal process producing acetate is homo-acetogenesis via the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Radioactive tracer experiments exhibited relatively high activities of homo-acetogenesis (14-34,900 pmol/cm3/day) compared to that of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (0.6-128 pmol/cm3/day). In ordinary marine sediments, homo-acetogenesis from H2 and CO2 is thermodynamically inhibited because H2 concentrations are maintained at low levels less than several nM. However, the homo-acetogenesis was thermodynamically favorable in the cored sediments because of the high concentration of H2 (>560nM). These results showed that homo-acetogenesis is dominant in the sediments around the summit of the mud volcano, while active hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis has been occurred in a deeper depth, and most portion of methane formed methane hydrates was supplied from the deep active methanogenic zone.

  17. Belowground Carbon Allocation to Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Links Biogeochemical Cycles of Boron and Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, R. W.; Högberg, P.; Ingri, J. N.

    2011-12-01

    Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient to most trees and represents an important limiting resource in some regions, deficient trees experiencing the loss of apical dominance, altered stem growth, and even tree death in extreme cases. Similar to the acquisition of most soil nutrients, B is likely supplied to host trees by mycorrhizal symbionts in exchange for recently fixed carbohydrates. In this way, belowground allocation of photosynthate, which drives the majority of biological processes belowground, links the biogeochemical cycles of B and nitrogen (N). Using a long-term N addition experiment in a Pinus sylvestris forest that has been ongoing for 41 years, we examined how the availability of inorganic N mediates the response of B isotopes in the tree needles, organic soil, and fungal pools in a boreal forest in northern Sweden. Using archived needle samples collected annually from the current year's needle crop, we observed ?11B to increase from 30.8 (0.5 se) to 41.8 (0.7 se)% in N fertilized plots from 1970 to 1979, a period of increasing B deficiency stress induced by N fertilization; the concentration of B in tree needles during 1979 dropping as low as 3.0 ?g g-2. During the same period, B concentrations in tree needles from control plots remained relatively unchanged and ?11B remained at a steady state value of 34.1 (1.0 se)%. Following a distinct, large-scale, pulse labeling event in 1980 in which 2.5 kg ha-1 of isotopically distinct B was applied to all treatment and control plots to alleviate the N-induced B deficiency, concentrations of B in current needles increased immediately in all treatments, the magnitude of the response being dependent upon the N treatment. But unlike other pool dilution studies, ?11B of current tree needles did not return to pre-addition, steady-state levels. Instead, ?11B continued to decrease over time in both N addition and control treatments. This unexpected pattern has not been previously described but can be explained by the preferential translocation of 10B to their host trees by ectomycorrhizal fungi, while the fungal partner retains the heavier 11B. Repeated fractionation over time leads to progressively larger differences in ?11B in both current tree needles and also fungal tissue, analogous to the repeated fractionation of N isotopes by ectomycorrhizal fungi.

  18. Biogeochemical implications of comparative growth rates of Emiliania huxleyi and Coccolithus species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, C. J.; Sheward, R. M.; Poulton, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Coccolithophores, a diverse group of phytoplankton, make important contributions to pelagic calcite production and export, yet the comparative biogeochemical role of species other than the ubiquitous Emiliania huxleyi is poorly understood. The contribution of different coccolithophore species to total calcite production is controlled by inter-species differences in cellular calcite, growth rate and relative abundance within a mixed community. In this study we examined the relative importance of E. huxleyi and two Coccolithus species in terms of daily calcite production. Culture experiments compared growth rates and cellular calcite content of E. huxleyi (Arctic and temperate strains), Coccolithus pelagicus (novel Arctic strain) and Coccolithus braarudii (temperate strain). Despite assumptions that E. huxleyi is a fast-growing species, growth rates between the three species were broadly comparable (0.16-0.85 d-1) under identical temperature and light conditions. Emiliania huxleyi grew only 12% faster on average than C. pelagicus, and 28% faster than C. braarudii. As the cellular calcite content of C. pelagicus and C. braarudii is typically 30-80 times greater than E. huxleyi, comparable growth rates suggest that Coccolithus species have the potential to be major calcite producers in mixed populations. To further explore these results we devised a simplistic model comparing daily calcite production from Coccolithus and E. huxleyi across a realistic range of relative abundances and a wide range of relative growth rates. Using the relative differences in growth rates from our culture studies, we found that C. pelagicus would be a larger source of calcite if abundances of E. huxleyi to C. pelagicus were below 34:1. Relative abundance data collected from North Atlantic field samples (spring and summer 2010) suggest that, with a relative growth rate of 88%, C. pelagicus dominated calcite production at 69% of the sites sampled. With a more extreme difference in growth rates, where C. pelagicus grows at 1/10th of the rate of E. huxleyi, C. pelagicus still dominated calcite production in 14% of the field. These results demonstrate the necessity of considering interactions between inter-species differences in growth rates, cellular calcite and relative abundances when evaluating the contribution of different coccolithophores to pelagic calcite production. In the case of C. pelagicus, we find that there is strong potential for this species to make major contributions to calcite production in the North Atlantic, although estimates of relative growth rates from the field are needed to confirm our conclusions.

  19. The "Point Zero": Monitoring of biogeochemical patterns and processes in an initial ecosystem (Lusatia, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veste, M.; Biemelt, D.; Fischer, A.; Gerwin, W.; Schaaf, W.

    2009-04-01

    Ecosystems are highly complex systems composed of many different abiotic and biotic compartments that are closely linked by interacting processes and co-develop over long-term periods. Most integrating studies have been carried out in 'climax' ecosystems and only limited knowledge exists about the initial phase of ecosystem development although it is hypothesized that the conditions at ´point zeró and the processes of the initial phase determine and control further development. ‘Point zero' of the ecosystem development was analysed at e.g. volcanic regions of Hawaii, Mount St. Helens and Iceland and also in glacier retreat areas in the Arctic, Antarctic and the Alps. The attempt to study patterns and processes of initial ecosystem development at an artificial catchment is a novel approach to disentangle the complex interactions and feedback mechanisms typically found in mature ecosystems and to understand the relevance and importance of initial conditions on further development and future state of an ecosystem. The watershed approach allows to integrate the relevant processes with related pattern and structure development over temporal and spatial scales and to derive thresholds and stages in state and functioning at the catchment level. To allow the clear definition of as homogeneous as possible starting conditions at ´point zeró and to be able to integrate spatially distributed processes and patterns to larger units, an artificial catchment was constructed in the mining area of Lusatia, Germany. This artificial catchment ´Hühnerwasse? with an area of about 6 ha was constructed as a 2-4 m layer of post-glacial sandy to loamy sediments overlying a 1-2 m layer of Tertiary clay that forms a shallow pan and seals the whole catchment at the base. A comprehensive monitoring program is carried out in the catchment including: meteorology, atmospheric bulk deposition, dust deposition, grid soil sampling, soil solution chemistry (ions, DOC, TOC, grain size, etc.), soil water (TDR, tensiometers), hydrology (stream flow, groundwater, water quality, etc.), erosion, and limnology (water quality). Furthermore, the establishment of higher vegetation (species, pattern) and soil fauna (species, abundance) are investigated and will be related to the physical-chemical soil development. The gathered data are the basis for the calculation of water and element fluxes in the ecosystem and their interactions with the formation of observed structures. A special focus will be on the interactions of the biogeochemical processes on different scales. First results will be presented and discussed.

  20. Assessment of diel chemical and isotopic techniques to investigate biogeochemical cycles in the upper Klamath River, Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulson, S.R.; Sullivan, A.B.

    2009-01-01

    The upper Klamath River experiences a cyanobacterial algal bloom and poor water quality during the summer. Diel chemical and isotopic techniques have been employed in order to investigate the rates of biogeochemical processes. Four diel measurements of field parameters (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentrations, and alkalinity) and stable isotope compositions (dissolved oxygen-??18O and dissolved inorganic carbon-??13C) have been performed between June 2007 and August 2008. Significant diel variations of pH, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, and DO-??18O were observed, due to varying rates of primary productivity vs. respiration vs. gas exchange with air. Diel cycles are generally similar to those previously observed in river systems, although there are also differences compared to previous studies. In large part, these different diel signatures are the result of the low turbulence of the upper Klamath River. Observed changes in the diel signatures vs. sampling date reflect the evolution of the status of the algal bloom over the course of the summer. Results indicate the potential utility of applying diel chemical and stable isotope techniques to investigate the rates of biogeochemical cycles in slow-moving rivers, lakes, and reservoirs, but also illustrate the increased complexity of stable isotope dynamics in these low-turbulence systems compared to well-mixed aquatic systems. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. Part 1: Introduction to the effects of upwelling along the west coast of North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1986-01-01

    Coastal upwelling is examined as it relates to the cycling of chemical species in coastal waters along the west coast of North America. The temporal and spatial features of upwelling phenomena in the Eastern boundary regions of the North Pacific Ocean are presented and discussed in terms of upwelling episodes. Climate conditions affecting upwelling include: thermal effects, wind-induced shear stress which moves surface laye