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Sample records for surface-subsurface biogeochemical coupling

  1. Quantifying the surface subsurface biogeochemical coupling during the VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Gall, Mark P.; Silver, Mary W.; Coale, Susan L.; Bidigare, Robert R.; Bishop, James L. K. B.

    2008-07-01

    A central question addressed by the VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) study was 'What controls the efficiency of particle export between the surface and subsurface ocean'? Here, we present data from sites at ALOHA (N Central Pacific Gyre) and K2 (NW subarctic Pacific) on phytoplankton processes, and relate them via a simple planktonic foodweb model, to subsurface particle export (150-500 m). Three key factors enable quantification of the surface-subsurface coupling: a sampling design to overcome the temporal lag and spatial displacement between surface and subsurface processes; data on the size partitioning of net primary production (NPP) and subsequent transformations prior to export; estimates of the ratio of algal- to faecal-mediated vertical export flux. At ALOHA, phytoplankton were characterized by low stocks, NPP, Fv/ Fm (N-limited), and were dominated by picoplankton. The HNLC waters at K2 were characterized by both two-fold changes in NPP and floristic shifts (high to low proportion of diatoms) between deployment 1 and 2. Prediction of export exiting the euphotic zone was based on size partitioning of NPP, a copepod-dominated foodweb and a ratio of 0.2 (ALOHA) and 0.1 (K2) for algal:faecal particle flux. Predicted export was 20-22 mg POC m -2 d -1 at ALOHA (i.e. 10-11% NPP (0-125 m); 1.1-1.2×export flux at 150 m ( E150). At K2, export was 111 mg C m -2 d -1 (21% NPP (0-50 m); 1.8× E150) and 33 mg POC m -2 d -1 (11% NPP, 0-55 m); 1.4× E150) for deployments 1 and 2, respectively. This decrease in predicted export at K2 matches the observed trend for E150. Also, the low attenuation of export flux from 60 to 150 m is consistent with that between 150 and 500 m. This strong surface-subsurface coupling suggests that phytoplankton productivity and floristics play a key role at K2 in setting export flux, and moreover that pelagic particle transformations by grazers strongly influence to what extent sinking particles are further broken down in the underlying waters of the Twilight Zone.

  2. Quantifying the surface-subsurface biogeochemical coupling during the VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, P.W.; Gall, M.P.; Silver, M.W.; Bishop, J.K.B.; Coale, Susan L.; Bidigare, Robert R.

    2008-02-25

    A central question addressed by the VERTIGO (VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean) study was 'What controls the efficiency of particle export between the surface and subsurface ocean'? Here, we present data from sites at ALOHA (N Central Pacific Gyre) and K2 (NW subarctic Pacific) on phytoplankton processes, and relate them via a simple planktonic foodweb model, to subsurface particle export (150-500 m). Three key factors enable quantification of the surface-subsurface coupling: a sampling design to overcome the temporal lag and spatial displacement between surface and subsurface processes; data on the size-partitioning of Net Primary Production (NPP) and subsequent transformations prior to export; estimates of the ratio of algal- to faecal-mediated vertical export flux. At ALOHA, phytoplankton were characterized by low stocks, NPP, F{sub v}/F{sub m} (N-limited), and were dominated by picoplankton. The HNLC waters at K2 were characterized by both two-fold changes in NPP and floristic shifts (high to low proportion of diatoms) between deployment 1 and 2. Prediction of export exiting the euphotic zone was based on size-partitioning of NPP, a copepod-dominated foodweb and a ratio of 0.2 (ALOHA) and 0.1 (K2) for algal:faecal particle flux. Predicted export was 20-22 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at ALOHA (i.e. 10-11% NPP (0-125 m); 1.1-1.2 x export flux at 150 m (E{sub 150}). At K2, export was 111 mg C m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (21% NPP (0-50 m); 1.8 x E{sub 150}) and 33 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (11% NPP, 0-55 m); 1.4 x E{sub 150}) for deployments 1 and 2, respectively. This decrease in predicted export at K2 matches the observed trend for E{sub 150}. Also, the low attenuation of export flux from 60 to 150 m is consistent with that between 150 to 500 m. This strong surface-subsurface coupling suggests that phytoplankton productivity and floristics play a key role at K2 in setting export flux, and moreover that pelagic particle transformations by grazers strongly influence to what extent sinking particles are further broken down in the underlying waters of the Twilight Zone.

  3. An exploration of coupled surface-subsurface solute transport in a fully integrated catchment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggett, Jessica E.; Partington, Daniel; Frei, Sven; Werner, Adrian D.; Simmons, Craig T.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-10-01

    Coupling surface and subsurface water flow in fully integrated hydrological codes is becoming common in hydrological research; however, the coupling of surface-subsurface solute transport has received much less attention. Previous studies on fully integrated solute transport focus on small scales, simple geometric domains, and have not utilised many different field data sources. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the inclusion of both flow and solute transport in a 3D, fully integrated catchment model, utilising high resolution observations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export from a wetland complex during a rainfall event. A sensitivity analysis is performed to span a range of transport conditions for the surface-subsurface boundary (e.g. advective exchange only, advection plus diffusion, advection plus full mechanical dispersion) and subsurface dispersivities. The catchment model captures some aspects of observed catchment behaviour (e.g. solute discharge at the catchment outlet, increasing discharge from wetlands with increased stream discharge, and counter-clockwise concentration-discharge relationships), although other known behaviours are not well represented in the model (e.g. slope of concentration-discharge plots). Including surface-subsurface solute transport aids in evaluating internal model processes, however there are challenges related to the influence of dispersion across the surface-subsurface interface, and non-uniqueness of the solute transport solution. This highlights that obtaining solute field data is especially important for constraining integrated models of solute transport.

  4. Control of coupling mass balance error in a process-based numerical model of surface-subsurface flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentini, Marcello; Orlandini, Stefano; Paniconi, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    A process-based numerical model of integrated surface-subsurface flow is analyzed in order to identify, track, and reduce the mass balance errors affiliated with the model's coupling scheme. The sources of coupling error include a surface-subsurface grid interface that requires node-to-cell and cell-to-node interpolation of exchange fluxes and ponding heads, and a sequential iterative time matching procedure that includes a time lag in these same exchange terms. Based on numerical experiments carried out for two synthetic test cases and for a complex drainage basin in northern Italy, it is shown that the coupling mass balance error increases during the flood recession limb when the rate of change in the fluxes exchanged between the surface and subsurface is highest. A dimensionless index that quantifies the degree of coupling and a saturated area index are introduced to monitor the sensitivity of the model to coupling error. Error reduction is achieved through improvements to the heuristic procedure used to control and adapt the time step interval and to the interpolation algorithm used to pass exchange variables from nodes to cells. The analysis presented illustrates the trade-offs between a flexible description of surface and subsurface flow processes and the numerical errors inherent in sequential iterative coupling with staggered nodal points at the land surface interface, and it reveals mitigation strategies that are applicable to all integrated models sharing this coupling and discretization approach.

  5. Progress Towards Coupled Simulation of Surface/Subsurface Hydrologic Processes and Terrestrial Ecosystem Dynamics Using the Community Models PFLOTRAN and CLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. T.; Bisht, G.; Karra, S.; Hoffman, F. M.; Hammond, G. E.; Kumar, J.; Painter, S.; Thornton, P. E.; Lichtner, P. C.

    2012-12-01

    Accurately simulating regional water cycle dynamics is challenging because of strong soil moisture-rainfall feedbacks and large uncertainties associated with vegetation and energy interactions. Earth system models of today cannot accurately capture such interactions, because current-generation land surface models (LSMs) 1) do not explicitly represent the fine-scale spatial variability of topography, soils, and vegetation that play a significant role in determining the response of hydrologic states (soil moisture) and fluxes (interception, infiltration, runoff, evapotranspiration) and 2) over-simplify or completely omit some key physical processes, such as lateral flow of water and heat, surface-subsurface interactions, realistic groundwater-vadose zone interactions, and freeze-thaw dynamics. Capturing such processes is critically important for predicting regional precipitation, vegetation productivity, and the disposition of carbon stored in potentially vulnerable permafrost under scenarios of climate change. Towards this end, we have added coupled surface water-groundwater interactions to the the open-source, massively parallel flow and reactive transport model PFLOTRAN, and have been developing a framework for coupling PFLOTRAN with the Community Land Model (CLM). PFLOTRAN is an open-source (LGPL-licensed) code -- with a growing community of users -- developed for simulation of multiscale, multiphase, multicomponent subsurface flow and reactive transport problems on machines ranging from laptops to leadership-class supercomputers. It has been applied in studies of contaminant fate and transport, geologic CO2 sequestration, and geothermal energy production, among others, and has been run using up to 262,144 processor cores on Jaguar, the Cray XK6 supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We have recently added a surface flow component in PFLOTRAN that is integrated with the subsurface. The underlying solver framework employed allows significant flexibility in how the governing equations are solved, and we will compare different surface flow formulations as well as coupling strategies between the surface and subsurface domains. Additionally, for studies of hydrology in Arctic regions, we have added a three-phase ice model. We will present some demonstrations of this capability and discuss solver strategies for handling the strong nonlinearities that arise. To provide a unified treatment of the unsaturated and saturated zones and to enable lateral redistribution of soil moisture (and eventually surface water, heat, and nutrients) in regional climate models, we have developed an approach for coupling PFLOTRAN with CLM. CLM is the global land model component used within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) to simulate an extensive set of biogeophysical and biogeochemical processes occurring at or near the terrestrial surface. We will describe our approach for replacing the existing CLM hydrology using PFLOTRAN and present some preliminary simulations undertaken with the CLM-PFLOTRAN coupled model.

  6. Revisiting "nutrient trapping" in global coupled biogeochemical ocean circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, H.; Loeptien, U.

    2013-04-01

    We analyze an extensive set of global coupled biogeochemical ocean circulation models. The focus is on the equatorial Pacific. In all simulations, which are consistent with observed standing stocks of relevant biogeochemical species at the surface, we find spuriously enhanced (reduced) macronutrient (oxygen) concentrations in the deep eastern equatorial Pacific. This modeling problem, apparently endemic to global coupled biogeochemical ocean circulation models, was coined "nutrient trapping" by Najjar et al. (1992). In contrast to Aumont et al. (1999), we argue that "nutrient trapping" is still a persistent problem, even in eddy-permitting models and, further, that the scale of the problem retards model projections of nitrogen cycling. In line with previous work, our results indicate that a deficient circulation is at the core of the problem rather than an admittedly poor quantitative understanding of biogeochemical cycles. More specifically, we present indications that "nutrient trapping" in models is a result of a spuriously damped Equatorial Intermediate (zonal) Current System and Equatorial Deep Jets—phenomenon which await a comprehensive understanding and have, to date, not been successfully simulated.

  7. Characterization of Coupled Hydrologic-Biogeochemical Processes Using Geophysical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan

    2005-06-01

    Biogeochemical and hydrological processes are naturally coupled and variable over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Many remediation approaches also induce dynamic transformations in natural systems, such as the generation of gases, precipitates and biofilms. These dynamic transformations are often coupled and can reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic materials, making it difficult to introduce amendments or to perform targeted remediation. Because it is difficult to predict these transformations, our ability to develop effective and sustainable remediation conditions at contaminated sites is often limited. Further complicating the problem is the inability to collect the necessary measurements at a high enough spatial resolution yet over a large enough volume for understanding field-scale transformations.

  8. Coupling a terrestrial biogeochemical model to the common land model

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Wang, Yingping; Dai, Yongjiu; Tang, Xuli

    2011-01-01

    A terrestrial biogeochemical model (CASACNP) was coupled to a land surface model (the Common Land Model, CoLM) to simulate the dynamics of carbon substrate in soil and its limitation on soil respiration. The combined model, CoLM-CASACNP, was able to predict long-term carbon sources and sinks that CoLM alone could not. The coupled model was tested using measurements of belowground respiration and surface fluxes from two forest ecosystems. The combined model simulated reasonably well the diurnal and seasonal variations of net ecosystem carbon exchange, as well as seasonal variation in the soil respiration rate of both the forest sites chosen for this study. However, the agreement between model simulations and actual measurements was poorer under dry conditions. The model should be tested against more measurements before being applied globally to investigate the feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate change.

  9. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Frederick; Radtke, Corey; Newby, Deborah; Delwiche, Mark; Crawf, Ronald L.; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Strap, Janice; Conrad, Mark; Brodic, Eoin; Starr, Robert; Lee, Hope

    2006-04-05

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires 'lines of evidence' indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. Our research will study the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism in contaminated aquifers first at the Idaho National Laboratory and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site, where natural attenuation of TCE is occurring. We will use flow-through in situ reactors to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. We will use new approaches (e.g., stable isotope probing, enzyme activity probes, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, proteomics) to assay the TCE co-metabolic rates, and interpret these rates in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different methane concentrations and groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites that are contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  10. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Colwell; Corey Radtke; Mark Delwiche; Deborah Newby; Lynn Petzke; Mark Conrad; Eoin Brodie; Hope Lee; Bob Starr; Dana Dettmers; Ron Crawford; Andrzej Paszczynski; Nick Bernardini; Ravi Paidisetti; Tonia Green

    2006-06-01

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires different ?lines of evidence? indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. We are studying the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism first in the medial zone (TCE concentration: 1,000 to 20,000 ?g/L) of a plume at the Idaho National Laboratory?s Test Area North (TAN) site and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site. We will use flow-through in situ reactors (FTISR) to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. TCE co-metabolic rates at TAN are being assessed and interpreted in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial co-metabolism relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  11. A 3-D variational assimilation scheme in coupled transport-biogeochemical models: Forecast of Mediterranean biogeochemical properties

    PubMed Central

    Teruzzi, Anna; Dobricic, Srdjan; Solidoro, Cosimo; Cossarini, Gianpiero

    2014-01-01

    [1] Increasing attention is dedicated to the implementation of suitable marine forecast systems for the estimate of the state of the ocean. Within the framework of the European MyOcean infrastructure, the pre-existing short-term Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry operational forecast system has been upgraded by assimilating remotely sensed ocean color data in the coupled transport-biogeochemical model OPATM-BFM using a 3-D variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) procedure. In the present work, the 3D-VAR scheme is used to correct the four phytoplankton functional groups included in the OPATM-BFM in the period July 2007 to September 2008. The 3D-VAR scheme decomposes the error covariance matrix using a sequence of different operators that account separately for vertical covariance, horizontal covariance, and covariance among biogeochemical variables. The assimilation solution is found in a reduced dimensional space, and the innovation for the biogeochemical variables is obtained by the sequential application of the covariance operators. Results show a general improvement in the forecast skill, providing a correction of the basin-scale bias of surface chlorophyll concentration and of the local-scale spatial and temporal dynamics of typical bloom events. Further, analysis of the assimilation skill provides insights into the functioning of the model. The computational costs of the assimilation scheme adopted are low compared to other assimilation techniques, and its modular structure facilitates further developments. The 3D-VAR scheme results especially suitable for implementation within a biogeochemistry operational forecast system. PMID:26213670

  12. Exploring the Influence of Topography on Belowground C Processes Using a Coupled Hydrologic-Biogeochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Davis, K. J.; Eissenstat, D. M.; Kaye, J. P.; Duffy, C.; Yu, X.; He, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Belowground carbon processes are affected by soil moisture and soil temperature, but current biogeochemical models are 1-D and cannot resolve topographically driven hill-slope soil moisture patterns, and cannot simulate the nonlinear effects of soil moisture on carbon processes. Coupling spatially-distributed physically-based hydrologic models with biogeochemical models may yield significant improvements in the representation of topographic influence on belowground C processes. We will couple the Flux-PIHM model to the Biome-BGC (BBGC) model. Flux-PIHM is a coupled physically-based land surface hydrologic model, which incorporates a land-surface scheme into the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM). The land surface scheme is adapted from the Noah land surface model. Because PIHM is capable of simulating lateral water flow and deep groundwater, Flux-PIHM is able to represent the link between groundwater and the surface energy balance, as well as the land surface heterogeneities caused by topography. The coupled Flux-PIHM-BBGC model will be tested at the Susquehanna/Shale Hills critical zone observatory (SSHCZO). The abundant observations, including eddy covariance fluxes, soil moisture, groundwater level, sap flux, stream discharge, litterfall, leaf area index, above ground carbon stock, and soil carbon efflux, make SSHCZO an ideal test bed for the coupled model. In the coupled model, each Flux-PIHM model grid will couple a BBGC cell. Flux-PIHM will provide BBGC with soil moisture and soil temperature information, while BBGC provides Flux-PIHM with leaf area index. Preliminary results show that when Biome- BGC is driven by PIHM simulated soil moisture pattern, the simulated soil carbon is clearly impacted by topography.

  13. Effects of Coupled Biogeochemical and Transport Processes on Soil Aggregate-Scale Selenium Speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallud, C. E.; Kausch, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes controlling elemental cycling in soil are heterogeneously distributed due to its complex physical structure. The aggregate scale (mm-cm) is of particular interest due to the sharp transition in pore size between the aggregates themselves and the macropores surrounding them, which can lead to mass-transfer limitations and to chemical gradients over short distances. The objective of this study is to investigate how the coupled transport and biogeochemical processes that occur at the soil-aggregate scale affect selenium speciation and immobilization within soils. We present a combined experimental and modelling study on artificial soil aggregates using a complex, but controlled, setting representative of natural systems. Circumventing byproduct accumulation and substrate exhaustion common in batchs and avoiding the poor physical analogy to soils of homogenously packed columns, our experiments mimic soils using constructed cm-scale aggregates in flow-through reactors, which results in diffusively and advectively controlled regions. A reactive transport model is used to delineate transport regimes, identify reaction zones, and estimate kinetic parameters and reaction rates at the aggregate scale. Model simulations showed extensive intra-aggregate, mm-scale radial variations in selenium distribution, reproducing the trends observed experimentally. Anoxic microzones developed over time within soil aggregates, both under oxic and anoxic conditions. We showed that those chemical gradients are mainly controlled by the coupling and respective importance of transport and microbial selenium reduction. Furthermore, we found that solid-phase concentrations of reduced selenium increased from the advection boundary (macropore) toward the aggregate cores, which would imply that more selenium can be sequestered in soils with larger aggregates. Simulations predict that selenium retention is positively correlated with aggregate size. Overall, this work highlights the importance of the spatial connection between reaction and transport fronts. It points out to the importance of obtaining information on transport-limited, intra-aggregate biogeochemical dynamics to better understand reactive transport of redox-sensitive species in structured soils.

  14. Study of the plankton ecosystem variability using a coupled hydrodynamics biogeochemical modelling in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessouri, Fayçal; Ulses, Caroline; Estournel, Claude; Marsaleix, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean Sea presents a wide variety of trophic regimes since the large and intense spring bloom of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea (NWMS) that follows winter convection to the extreme oligotrophic regions of the South-eastern basin. The Mediterranean Sea displays a strong time variability revealing its high sensitivity to climate and anthropic pressures. In this context, it is crucial to develop tools allowing to understand the evolution of the Mediterranean hydrology and marine ecosystem as a response to external forcing. Numerical coupled hydrodynamic and biogeochemical modelling carefully calibrated in the different regions of the basin is the only tool that can answer this question. However, this important step of calibration is particularly difficult because of the lack of coherent sets of data describing the seasonal evolution of the main parameters characterizing the physical and biogeochemical environment in the different sub-basins. The chlorophyll satellite data from 4km MODIS products, a multiple in situ data from MerMEX MOOSE and DEWEX cruises and Bio-Argo floats from NAOS project are believed to be an opportunity to strongly improve the realism of ecosystem models. The model is a 3D coupled simulation using NemoMed12 for hydrodynamics and ECO 3MS for biogeochemistry and covers the whole Mediterranean Sea and runs at 1/12°. The relevant variables mentioned are phytoplankton, organic and inorganic matters faced to water masses dynamics, over ten years since summer 2003. After a short validation, we will expose two topics: First, through this coupling we quantify the nutrients fluxes across the Mediterranean straits over the years. For example, we found an annual net average around 150 Giga moles NO3 per year at Gibraltar, where we expect low annual fluctuations. In contrast, the Strait of Sicily shows greater annual variability going from 70 to 92 Giga moles NO3 per year. All the fluxes are resumed in a detailed diagram of the transport for organic matters and the nutrients. Second, we described for each basin the particularities with evoking the main dynamics and biogeochemical aspects affecting primary production and export of particulate carbon outside the photic zone.

  15. Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Gruber, Nicolas; Jin, Xin; Armstrong, Robert

    2007-06-21

    This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled “Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.” A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1; and, December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled “Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.” This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in the following Section II on “Large scale fertilization,” has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on “patch fertilization” discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on “model development” summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

  16. Net greenhouse gas balance in response to nitrogen enrichment: perspectives from a coupled biogeochemical model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chaoqun; Tian, Hanqin

    2013-02-01

    Increasing reactive nitrogen (N) input has been recognized as one of the important factors influencing climate system through affecting the uptake and emission of greenhouse gases (GHG). However, the magnitude and spatiotemporal variations of N-induced GHG fluxes at regional and global scales remain far from certain. Here we selected China as an example, and used a coupled biogeochemical model in conjunction with spatially explicit data sets (including climate, atmospheric CO2 , O3 , N deposition, land use, and land cover changes, and N fertilizer application) to simulate the concurrent impacts of increasing atmospheric and fertilized N inputs on balance of three major GHGs (CO2 , CH4 , and N2 O). Our simulations showed that these two N enrichment sources in China decreased global warming potential (GWP) through stimulating CO2 sink and suppressing CH4 emission. However, direct N2 O emission was estimated to offset 39% of N-induced carbon (C) benefit, with a net GWP of three GHGs averaging -376.3 ± 146.4 Tg CO2  eq yr(-1) (the standard deviation is interannual variability of GWP) during 2000-2008. The chemical N fertilizer uses were estimated to increase GWP by 45.6 ± 34.3 Tg CO2  eq yr(-1) in the same period, and C sink was offset by 136%. The largest C sink offset ratio due to increasing N input was found in Southeast and Central mainland of China, where rapid industrial development and intensively managed crop system are located. Although exposed to the rapidly increasing N deposition, most of the natural vegetation covers were still showing decreasing GWP. However, due to extensive overuse of N fertilizer, China's cropland was found to show the least negative GWP, or even positive GWP in recent decade. From both scientific and policy perspectives, it is essential to incorporate multiple GHGs into a coupled biogeochemical framework for fully assessing N impacts on climate changes. PMID:23504794

  17. Evaluation of an operational ocean configuration at 1/12° on the Indonesian seas: Physical/Biogeochemical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, Elodie; Reffray, Guillaume; Gehlen, Marion

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the INDESO (Infrastructure Development of Space Oceanography) project, an operational ocean forecasting center has been developed to monitor the state of the Indonesian seas in terms of circulation, biogeochemistry and fisheries. The forecasting system combines a suite of numerical models connecting physical and biogeochemical parameters to population dynamics of large marine predators. Developed by Mercator Ocean and CLS, the physical/biogeochemical coupled component (INDO12BIO configuration) covers a large region extending from the western Pacific Ocean to the Eastern Indian Ocean at 1/12° resolution. The OPA/NEMO physical ocean model and the PISCES biogeochemical model are coupled in mode "on-line" without degradation in space and time. The operational global ocean forecasting system (1/4°) operated by Mercator Ocean provides the physical forcing while climatological open boundary conditions are prescribed for the biogeochemistry. This poster describes the performances of the INDO12BIO configuration. They are assessed by the evaluation of a reference hindcast simulation covering the last 8 years (2007-2014). Confrontations to satellite, in-situ and climatological observations are commented. Diagnostics are performed on chlorophyll-a, primary production, nutrients and oxygen. The model catches the main characteristics of the biogeochemical tracers in space and time. The seasonal cycle of chlorophyll-a and primary production is in phase with satellite-based products. The northern and southern parts of the archipelago present a distinct seasonal cycle, with higher chlorophyll biomass and production rates in the southern (northern) part during SE (NW) monsoon. Nutrient and oxygen concentrations are correctly reproduced in terms of horizontal and vertical distributions. The biogeochemical content of water masses entering in the archipelago as well as the water mass transformation across the archipelago conserves realistic vertical distribution in Banda sea and at the exit of the archipelago.

  18. Controllability of mixing errors in a coupled physical biogeochemical model of the North Atlantic: a nonlinear study using anamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béal, D.; Brasseur, P.; Brankart, J.-M.; Ourmières, Y.; Verron, J.

    2009-06-01

    In biogeochemical models coupled to ocean circulation models, vertical mixing is an important physical process which governs the nutrient supply and the plankton residence in the euphotic layer. However, mixing is often poorly represented in numerical simulations because of approximate parameterizations of sub-grid scale turbulence, wind forcing errors and other mis-represented processes such as restratification by mesoscale eddies. Getting a sufficient knowledge of the nature and structure of these error sources is necessary to implement appropriate data assimilation methods and to evaluate their controllability by a given observation system. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to study mixing errors induced by approximate wind forcings in a three-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model of the North Atlantic with a 1/4° horizontal resolution. An ensemble forecast involving 200 members is performed during the 1998 spring bloom, by prescribing realistic wind perturbations to generate mixing errors. It is shown that the biogeochemical response can be rather complex because of nonlinearities and threshold effects in the coupled model. In particular, the response of the surface phytoplankton depends on the region of interest and is particularly sensitive to the local stratification. We examine the robustness of the statistical relationships computed between the various physical and biogeochemical variables, and we show that significant information on the ecosystem can be obtained from observations of chlorophyll concentration or sea surface temperature. In order to improve the analysis step of sequential assimilation schemes, we propose to perform a simple nonlinear change of variables that operates separately on each state variable, by mapping their ensemble percentiles on the Gaussian percentiles. It is shown that this method is able to substantially reduce the estimation error with respect to the linear estimates computed by the Kalman filter.

  19. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M.; Gwo, J.P.; Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E.

    1998-07-01

    The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

  20. Towards coupled physical-biogeochemical models of the ocean carbon cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the critical gaps in our knowledge of ocean dynamics and biogeochemical cycles. It is assumed that the ultimate goal is the design of a model of the earth system that can predict the response to changes in the external forces driving climate.

  1. Prospecting for natural attenuation: Coupled geophysical-biogeochemical studies at DOE's Rifle IFRC site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Long, P. E.; Flores Orozco, A.; Kemna, A.

    2011-12-01

    Research activities at the Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, Colorado (USA) are designed to integrate geochemical, biological, and hydrological studies to enhance our understanding of subsurface uranium mobility. While much of the research activities at the site have focused on stimulating subsurface microbial activity through acetate amendment, there is growing interest in the role that natural biogeochemical processes play in constraining uranium mobility in the aquifer. Such processes constitute a form of natural uranium attenuation in the subsurface and are inferred to result from elevated concentrations of natural organic matter associated with alluvial sediments. Referred to as naturally reduced zones (NRZ's), they are characterized by the presence of reduced and/or magnetic mineral phases (e.g. FeS, FeS2, and Fe3O4), elevated Fe(II), and refractory organic carbon compounds (e.g. roots, twigs, and cones). Elevated rates of microbial activity associated with NRZ's and their mineralogical makeup act to sequester uranium from groundwater at levels higher that background alluvium. Their unique composition within a matrix of relatively oxidized, low-bioactivity sediments constitutes a potential target for a variety of exploration geophysical techniques, such as induced polarization and magnetic susceptibility. Both methods have been successfully applied at the Rifle IFRC site to delineate the ubiquity and extent of NRZ's across the floodplain. Sediments recovered from drilling targets identified through the use of exploration geophysical techniques have identified elevated uranium concentrations associated with both magnetite and framboid pyrite; however, the extent to which such minerals are the direct product of in situ microbial activity remains unknown. While diverse, the microbial community composition of NRZ's suggest dominance by fermentative organisms capable of degrading lignitic carbon to low molecular weight organic compounds and molecular hydrogen, the oxidation of which may be coupled to the reductive immobilization of aqueous uranium by a variety of indigenous microorganism (e.g. Geobacter sp.). The ability to utilize geophysical techniques to assess a site's prospects for natural attenuation thus constitutes an exciting new development in the emerging field of biogeophysics.

  2. Three-dimensional approach using two coupled models for description of hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesca, Ina; Kraft, Philipp; Haas, Edwin; Klatt, Steffen; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Frede, Hans-Georg; Breuer, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological and biogeochemical transport through changing landscapes has been well described during the past years in literature. However, the uncertainties of combined water quality and water quantity models are still challenging, both due to a lack in process understanding as well to spatiotemporal heterogeneity of environmental conditions driving the processes. In order to reduce the uncertainty in water quality and runoff predictions at the catchment scale, a variety of different model approaches from empirical-conceptual to fully physical and process based models have been developed. In this study we present a new modelling approach for the investigation of hydrological processes and nutrient cycles, with a focus on nitrogen in a small catchment from Hessen, Germany. A hydrological model based on the model toolbox Catchment Modelling Framework (CMF) has been coupled with the process based biogeochemical model LandscapeDNDC. States, fluxes and parameters are exchanged between the models at high temporal and spatial resolution using the Python scripting language in order to obtain a 3-dimensional model application. The transport of water and nutrients through the catchment is modelled using a 3D Richards/Darcy approach for subsurface fluxes, a kinematic wave approach for surface runoff and a Penman-Monteith based calculation of evapotranspiration. Biogeochemical processes are modelled by Landscape-DNDC, including plant growth and biomass allocation, organic matter mineralisation, nitrification, denitrification and associated nitrous oxide emissions. The interactions and module connectivity between the two coupled models, as well as the model application on a 3.7 km² catchment with the runoff results and nitrogen quantification will be presented in this study.

  3. Study of the Tagus estuarine plume using coupled hydro and biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Nuno; Leitão, Paulo C.; Juliano, Manuela; Mateus, Marcos; Dias, João. Miguel; Neves, Ramiro

    2010-05-01

    Plumes of buoyant water produced by inflow from rivers and estuaries are common on the continental shelf. Buoyancy associated with estuarine waters is a key mediating factor in the transport and transformation of dissolved and particulate materials in coastal margins. The offshore displacement of the plume is influenced greatly by the local alongshore wind, which will tend to advect the plume either offshore or onshore, consistently with the Ekman transport. Other factor affecting the propagation of an estuarine plume is the freshwater inflow on the landward boundary. In this paper, a coupled three-dimensional ocean circulation and biogeochemical model with realistic high and low frequency forcing is used to get insight on how the Tagus River plume responds to wind and freshwater discharge during winter and spring. A nesting approach based on the MOHID numerical system was implemented for the Tagus estuary near shelf. Realistic hindcast simulations were performed, covering a period from January to June 2007. Model results were evaluated using in-situ and satellite imagery data. The numerical model was implemented using a three level nesting model. The model domain includes the whole Portuguese coast, the Tagus estuary near shelf and the Tagus River estuary, using a realistic coastline and bottom topography. River discharge and wind forcing are considered as landward and surface boundary conditions, respectively. Initial ocean stratification is from the MERCATOR solution. Ambient shelf conditions include tidal motion. As a prior validation, models outputs of salinity and water temperature were compared to available data (January 30th and May 30th, 2007) and were found minor differences between model outputs and data. On January 30th, outside the estuary, the model results reveal a stratified water column, presenting salinity stratification of the order of 3-4. The model also reproduces the hydrography for the May 30th observations. In May, near the Tagus mouth, measurements show low salinity stratification (when compared to the January observations). During this month, stratification is mainly due to water temperature. In general, the correlation between water temperature from the model and satellite data, reveals values higher than 0.5 (significant values) for the whole simulation period, presenting high correlations (about 0.8) in January and February, when the plume propagation is mainly controlled by the estuarine discharge. The correlation between the model results of suspended sediments and the satellite data (suspended matter) presents significant values (higher than 0.5) for almost the whole simulation period. On the shelf, near the Tagus mouth, the export of estuarine waters forms a plume which is highly influenced by the geography of the coastline, inducing a plume trajectory very close to shore. Northern winds events cause a displacement of the coastally trapped plume, driving a new offshore plume. The relaxation of the northern wind regime pushes back the coastal jet toward the coast, propagating estuarine water to the north along the coastline. The model was also able to reproduce the effect of the estuary plume over the coastal surface chlorophyll patterns observed remotely and the in situ chlorophyll and nutrient profiles, especially in the periods of low wind intensity. In periods of persistent Northerly winds the effect of the Sintra Mountains Ridge over the wind field tend to be underestimated. This leads to a southerly transport by the model slightly more intense than the one observed remotely.

  4. Hierarchical framework for coupling a biogeochemical trace gas model to a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.; Foster, I.T.

    1994-04-01

    A scheme is described for the computation of terrestrial biogeochemical trace gas fluxes in the context of a general circulation model. This hierarchical system flux scheme (HSFS) incorporates five major components: (1) a general circulation model (GCM), which provides a medium-resolution (i.e., 1{degrees} by 1{degrees}) simulation of the atmospheric circulation; (2) a procedure for identifying regions of defined homogeneity of surface type within GCM grid cells; (3) a set of surface process models, to be run within each homogeneous region, which include a biophysical model, the Biosphere Atmospheric Transfer Scheme (BATS), and a biogeochemical model (BGCM); (4) an interpolation/integration system that transfers information between the GCM and surface process models with finer resolution; and (5) an interactive data array based on a geographic information system (GIS), which provides land characteristic information via the interpolator. The goals of this detailed investigation are to compute the local and global sensitivities of trace gas fluxes to GCM and BATS variables, the effects of trace gas fluxes on global climate, and the effects of global climate on specific biomes.

  5. A Coupled Ocean General Circulation, Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model of the Global Oceans: Seasonal Distributions of Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Busalacchi, Antonio (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ocean general circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. Biogeochemical processes in the model are determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability. and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms. chlorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Basin scale (greater than 1000 km) model chlorophyll results are in overall agreement with CZCS pigments in many global regions. Seasonal variability observed in the CZCS is also represented in the model. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of imagery are generally in conformance although occasional departures are apparent. Model nitrate distributions agree with in situ data, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The overall agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicates that the model dynamics offer a reasonably realistic simulation of phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on synoptic scales. This is especially true given that initial conditions are homogenous chlorophyll fields. The success of the model in producing a reasonable representation of chlorophyll and nutrient distributions and seasonal variability in the global oceans is attributed to the application of a generalized, processes-driven approach as opposed to regional parameterization and the existence of multiple phytoplankton groups with different physiological and physical properties. These factors enable the model to simultaneously represent many aspects of the great diversity of physical, biological, chemical, and radiative environments encountered in the global oceans.

  6. On the implementation of the surface conductance approach using a block-centred surface-subsurface hydrology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggett, Jessica E.; Knowling, Matthew J.; Werner, Adrian D.; Simmons, Craig T.

    2013-07-01

    In physically based catchment hydrology models, dynamic surface-subsurface interactions are often represented using the surface conductance (SC) coupling approach. Guidance on SC parameterisation within block-centred codes is limited, and common practice is to express the SC coefficient as the quotient of the vertical saturated hydraulic conductivity and the half-cell thickness of the uppermost layer. This study evaluates the implementation of the SC approach utilising a popular block-centred, surface-subsurface hydrology model (MODHMS) to simulate one-dimensional infiltration experiments under Hortonian conditions. Results show that defining the SC coefficient based on a half-cell thickness of the uppermost subsurface cell inhibits accurate prediction of infiltration rates (qe) and the time to initiate surface runoff (tro) for the adopted rainfall-runoff scenario. Increasing the SC coefficient independently of the grid allows for accurate simulation of qe, but not tro. The addition of a thin layer at the surface is shown to improve model accuracy substantially, such that qe and tro approach those obtained using an equivalent mesh-centred model (i.e. where the surface and upper subsurface nodes are coincident). Whilst the addition of a single thin layer in block-centred codes allows improved prediction of surface-subsurface interaction, it does not provide a surrogate for fine discretisation throughout the subsurface that is necessary for accurate simulation of unsaturated zone flow. This study offers guidance on the implementation of the SC approach in a block-centred code and demonstrates the importance of systematic testing of parameters (that are otherwise calibrated) in physically based surface-subsurface hydrology models.

  7. Seasonal Distributions of Global Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients: Analysis with a Coupled Ocean General Circulation Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.

    1999-01-01

    A coupled general ocean circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. The model is driven by climatological meteorological conditions, cloud cover, and sea surface temperature. Biogeochemical processes in the model are determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability, and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms, chorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrient groups (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Phytoplankton groups are initialized as homogeneous fields horizontally and vertically, and allowed to distribute themselves according to the prevailing conditions. Basin-scale model chlorophyll results are in very good agreement with CZCS pigments in virtually every global region. Seasonal variability observed in the CZCS is also well represented in the model. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of imagery are also in good conformance, although occasional departures are apparent. Agreement of nitrate distributions with in situ data is even better, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The good agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicates that the model dynamics realistically simulate phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on synoptic scales. This is especially true given that initial conditions are homogenous chlorophyll fields. The success of the model in producing a reasonable representation of chlorophyll and nutrient distributions and seasonal variability in the global oceans is attributed to the application of a generalized, processes-driven approach as opposed to regional parameterization, and the existence of multiple phytoplankton groups with different physiological and physical properties. These factors enable the model to simultaneously represent the great diversity of physical, biological, chemical, and radiative environments encountered in the global oceans.

  8. Nutrient limitation and physiology mediate the fine-scale (de)coupling of biogeochemical cycles.

    PubMed

    Appling, Alison P; Heffernan, James B

    2014-09-01

    Nutrients in the environment are coupled over broad timescales (days to seasons) when organisms add or withdraw multiple nutrients simultaneously and in ratios that are roughly constant. But at finer timescales (seconds to days), nutrients become decoupled if physiological traits such as nutrient storage limits, circadian rhythms, or enzyme kinetics cause one nutrient to be processed faster than another. To explore the interactions among these coupling and decoupling mechanisms, we introduce a model in which organisms process resources via uptake, excretion, growth, respiration, and mortality according to adjustable trait parameters. The model predicts that uptake can couple the input of one nutrient to the export of another in a ratio reflecting biological demand stoichiometry, but coupling occurs only when the input nutrient is limiting. Temporal nutrient coupling may, therefore, be a useful indicator of ecosystem limitation status. Fine-scale patterns of nutrient coupling are further modulated by, and potentially diagnostic of, physiological traits governing growth, uptake, and internal nutrient storage. Together, limitation status and physiological traits create a complex and informative relationship between nutrient inputs and exports. Understanding the mechanisms behind that relationship could enrich interpretations of fine-scale time-series data such as those now emerging from in situ solute sensors. PMID:25141147

  9. Coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes controlling variability of nitrogen species in streamflow during autumn in an upland forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Shanley, James B.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Kendall, Carol; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-02-01

    Autumn is a season of dynamic change in forest streams of the northeastern United States due to effects of leaf fall on both hydrology and biogeochemistry. Few studies have explored how interactions of biogeochemical transformations, various nitrogen sources, and catchment flow paths affect stream nitrogen variation during autumn. To provide more information on this critical period, we studied (1) the timing, duration, and magnitude of changes to stream nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and ammonium concentrations; (2) changes in nitrate sources and cycling; and (3) source areas of the landscape that most influence stream nitrogen. We collected samples at higher temporal resolution for a longer duration than typical studies of stream nitrogen during autumn. This sampling scheme encompassed the patterns and extremes that occurred during base flow and stormflow events of autumn. Base flow nitrate concentrations decreased by an order of magnitude from 5.4 to 0.7 µmol L-1 during the week when most leaves fell from deciduous trees. Changes to rates of biogeochemical transformations during autumn base flow explained the low nitrate concentrations; in-stream transformations retained up to 72% of the nitrate that entered a stream reach. A decrease of in-stream nitrification coupled with heterotrophic nitrate cycling were primary factors in the seasonal nitrate decline. The period of low nitrate concentrations ended with a storm event in which stream nitrate concentrations increased by 25-fold. In the ensuing weeks, peak stormflow nitrate concentrations progressively decreased over closely spaced, yet similarly sized events. Most stormflow nitrate originated from nitrification in near-stream areas with occasional, large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate, which has rarely been reported for nonsnowmelt events. A maximum input of 33% unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to the stream occurred during one event. Large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate show direct and rapid effects on forest streams that may be widespread, although undocumented, throughout nitrogen-polluted temperate forests. In contrast to a week-long nitrate decline during peak autumn litterfall, base flow DON concentrations increased after leaf fall and remained high for 2 months. Dissolved organic nitrogen was hydrologically flushed to the stream from riparian soils during stormflow. In contrast to distinct seasonal changes in base flow nitrate and DON concentrations, ammonium concentrations were typically at or below the detection limit, similar to the rest of the year. Our findings reveal couplings among catchment flow paths, nutrient sources, and transformations that control seasonal extremes of stream nitrogen in forested landscapes.

  10. Coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes controlling variability of nitrogen species in streamflow during autumn in an upland forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Shanley, James B.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Kendall, Carol; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Autumn is a season of dynamic change in forest streams of the northeastern United States due to effects of leaf fall on both hydrology and biogeochemistry. Few studies have explored how interactions of biogeochemical transformations, various nitrogen sources, and catchment flow paths affect stream nitrogen variation during autumn. To provide more information on this critical period, we studied (1) the timing, duration, and magnitude of changes to stream nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and ammonium concentrations; (2) changes in nitrate sources and cycling; and (3) source areas of the landscape that most influence stream nitrogen. We collected samples at higher temporal resolution for a longer duration than typical studies of stream nitrogen during autumn. This sampling scheme encompassed the patterns and extremes that occurred during base flow and stormflow events of autumn. Base flow nitrate concentrations decreased by an order of magnitude from 5.4 to 0.7 µmol L?1 during the week when most leaves fell from deciduous trees. Changes to rates of biogeochemical transformations during autumn base flow explained the low nitrate concentrations; in-stream transformations retained up to 72% of the nitrate that entered a stream reach. A decrease of in-stream nitrification coupled with heterotrophic nitrate cycling were primary factors in the seasonal nitrate decline. The period of low nitrate concentrations ended with a storm event in which stream nitrate concentrations increased by 25-fold. In the ensuing weeks, peak stormflow nitrate concentrations progressively decreased over closely spaced, yet similarly sized events. Most stormflow nitrate originated from nitrification in near-stream areas with occasional, large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate, which has rarely been reported for nonsnowmelt events. A maximum input of 33% unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to the stream occurred during one event. Large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate show direct and rapid effects on forest streams that may be widespread, although undocumented, throughout nitrogen-polluted temperate forests. In contrast to a week-long nitrate decline during peak autumn litterfall, base flow DON concentrations increased after leaf fall and remained high for 2 months. Dissolved organic nitrogen was hydrologically flushed to the stream from riparian soils during stormflow. In contrast to distinct seasonal changes in base flow nitrate and DON concentrations, ammonium concentrations were typically at or below the detection limit, similar to the rest of the year. Our findings reveal couplings among catchment flow paths, nutrient sources, and transformations that control seasonal extremes of stream nitrogen in forested landscapes.

  11. Emergent biological patterns and surface-subsurface interactions at landscape scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pringle, C.M.; Triska, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    In this chapter, we focus on emergent biological patterns in riverine ecosystems at landscape scales resulting from surface-subsurface water interaction. Our objectives are to examine (1) how the balance of physical and chemical factors on the "natural" geologic template affects biological patterns, (2) how natural hydrothermal systems can be used as a model for understanding surface-subsurface interactions and biological patterns in streams, and (3) how anthropogenic influences decouple the stream from the landscape by altering the nature of surface-subsurface water interactions and affecting biological patterns. We conclude with a synthesis and recommendations for further studies.

  12. Aggregate-scale spatial heterogeneity in reductive transformation of ferrihydrite resulting from coupled biogeochemical and physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallud, C.; Masue-Slowey, Y.; Fendorf, S.

    2010-05-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and play a dominant role in the geochemistry of surface and subsurface environments. Their fate depends on local environmental conditions, which in structured soils may vary significantly over short distances due to mass-transfer limitations on solute delivery and metabolite removal. In the present study, artificial soil aggregates were used to investigate the coupling of physical and biogeochemical processes affecting the spatial distribution of iron (Fe) phases resulting from reductive transformation of ferrihydrite. Spherical aggregates made of ferrihydrite-coated sand were inoculated with the dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN-32, and placed into a flow reactor, the reaction cell simulates a diffusion-dominated soil aggregate surrounded by an advective flow domain. The spatial and temporal evolution of secondary mineralization products resulting from dissimilatory Fe reduction of ferrihydrite were followed within the aggregates in response to a range of flow rates and lactate concentrations. Strong radial variations in the distribution of secondary phases were observed owing to diffusively controlled delivery of lactate and efflux of Fe(II) and bicarbonate. In the aggregate cortex, only limited formation of secondary Fe phases were observed over 30 d of reaction, despite high rates of ferrihydrite reduction. Under all flow conditions tested, ferrihydrite transformation was limited in the cortex (70-85 mol.% Fe remained as ferrihydrite) because metabolites such as Fe(II) and bicarbonate were efficiently removed in outflow solutes. In contrast, within the inner fractions of the aggregate, limited mass-transfer results in metabolite (Fe(II) and bicarbonate) build-up and the consummate transformation of ferrihydrite - only 15-40 mol.% Fe remained as ferrihydrite after 30 d of reaction. Goethite/lepidocrocite, and minor amounts of magnetite, formed in the aggregate mid-section and interior at low lactate concentration (0.3 mM) after 30 d of reaction. Under high lactate (3 mM) concentration, magnetite was observed only as a transitory phase, and rather goethite/lepidocrocite and siderite were the dominant secondary mineralization products. Our results illustrate the importance of slow diffusive transport of both electron donor and metabolites concentrations and concomitant biogeochemical reactions within soils and sediments, giving rise to heterogeneous products over small spatial (?m) scale.

  13. Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This lecture will introduce the concept of biogeochemical cycling. The roles of microbes in the cycling of nutrients, production and consumption of trace gases, and mineralization will be briefly introduced.

  14. Spatial and temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes in the Fraser River, Canada : a coupled organic-inorganic perspective

    E-print Network

    Voss, Britta Marie

    2014-01-01

    The great geologic and climatic diversity of the Fraser River basin in southwestern Canada render it an excellent location for understanding biogeochemical cycling of sediments and terrigenous organic carbon in a relatively ...

  15. Global Biogeochemical Cycle of Si: Its Coupling to the Perturbed C-N-P cycles in Industrial Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerman, A.; Li, D. D.; MacKenzie, F. T.

    2010-12-01

    The importance of silicon (Si) in global biogeochemical cycles is demonstrated by its abundance in the land and aquatic biomass, where Si/C is 0.02 in land plants and 0.15 in marine organisms. Estimates show that Si-bioproduction accounts for ~1.5% of terrestrial primary production, and ~4.5% in the coastal ocean. Human land-use activities have substantially changed regional patterns of vegetation distribution, soil conditions, and nutrient fluxes via runoff to the coastal ocean. Anthropogenic chemical fertilization of the land has caused a significant increase in fluvial nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) transport, whereas land-use and vegetation mass changes have caused variations in the riverine Si input, all eventually affecting the cycling of nutrients in the marine environment. We developed a global biogeochemical model of the Si cycle as coupled to the global C-N-P cycle model, TOTEM II (Terrestrial-Ocean-aTmosphere-Ecosystem-Model). In the model analysis from year 1700, taken as the start of the Anthropocene, to 2050, the bioproduction of Si on land and in the ocean is coupled to the bioproduction of C, perturbed by the atmospheric CO2 rise, land-use changes, and chemical fertilization. Also, temperature rise affects the Si cycling on land through bioproduction rates, terrestrial organic matter remineralization, and weathering, thereby affecting its delivery to the coastal zone. The results show that biouptake and subsequent release of Si on land strongly affect the Si river flux to the coastal ocean. During the 350-year period, Si river discharge has increased by ~10% until ~1940, decreasing since then to below its 1700 value and continuing to drop, under the current IPCC IS92 projections of CO2, temperature and other forcings. From 1700 to ~1950, land-use changes, associated with slash and burn of large areas of high-productivity land, caused a decrease of global land vegetation. Dissolution of Si in soil humus and weathering of silicate minerals are the main dissolved Si sources for rivers and groundwater. The decrease in Si uptake by land biomass made more Si available for river discharge, causing an increase in the Si river input until an increase in the land primary production reversed the process. Around 1950, the use of fertilizer on land, especially N and P, increased, driving the growth of coastal marine primary producers, including such Si organisms as diatoms, silicoflagellates, and sponge spicules, and thus causing a decrease of dissolved Si in the surface ocean. The percent decrease of coastal dissolved Si due to increased primary production is greater than that of surface open ocean due to the shorter residence time of Si in coastal water (~2.7 years) compared to that of surface open ocean (~10 years. The combination of the relatively small size and location of the coastal ocean at the junction of the land, atmosphere, and open ocean make it important to changes in water chemistry, in situ biological production, and sedimentary storage. Its buffer effect and fast response to perturbations are also shown in the results of this coupling study of the C-N-P-Si cycles.

  16. Kinetic Modeling of Biogeochemical Processes in Subsurface Environments: Coupling Transport, Microbial Metabolism and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Microbial reactions play an important role in regulating pore water chemistry (e.g., pH and Eh) as well as secondary mineral distribution in many subsurface systems and therefore directly control trace metal migration and recycling in those systems. In this paper, we present a multicomponent kinetic model that explicitly accounts for the coupling of microbial metabolism, microbial population dynamics, advective/dispersive transport of chemical species, aqueous speciation, and mineral precipitation/dissolution in porous geologic media. A modification to the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation is proposed, to account for the likely achievement of quasi-steady state biomass accumulations in natural environments. A scale dependence of microbial reaction rates is derived based on both field observations and the scaling analysis of reactive transport equations. As an example, we use the model to simulate a subsurface contaminant migration scenario, in which a water flow containing both uranium and a complexing organic ligand is recharged into an oxic carbonate aquifer. The model simulation shows that Mn and Fe oxyhydroxides may vary significantly along a flow path. The simulation also shows that uranium (VI) can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Characterization of mixing errors in a coupled physical biogeochemical model of the North Atlantic: implications for nonlinear estimation using Gaussian anamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béal, D.; Brasseur, P.; Brankart, J.-M.; Ourmières, Y.; Verron, J.

    2010-02-01

    In biogeochemical models coupled to ocean circulation models, vertical mixing is an important physical process which governs the nutrient supply and the plankton residence in the euphotic layer. However, vertical mixing is often poorly represented in numerical simulations because of approximate parameterizations of sub-grid scale turbulence, wind forcing errors and other mis-represented processes such as restratification by mesoscale eddies. Getting a sufficient knowledge of the nature and structure of these errors is necessary to implement appropriate data assimilation methods and to evaluate if they can be controlled by a given observation system. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to study mixing errors induced by approximate wind forcings in a three-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model of the North Atlantic with a 1/4° horizontal resolution. An ensemble forecast involving 200 members is performed during the 1998 spring bloom, by prescribing perturbations of the wind forcing to generate mixing errors. The biogeochemical response is shown to be rather complex because of nonlinearities and threshold effects in the coupled model. The response of the surface phytoplankton depends on the region of interest and is particularly sensitive to the local stratification. In addition, the statistical relationships computed between the various physical and biogeochemical variables reflect the signature of the non-Gaussian behaviour of the system. It is shown that significant information on the ecosystem can be retrieved from observations of chlorophyll concentration or sea surface temperature if a simple nonlinear change of variables (anamorphosis) is performed by mapping separately and locally the ensemble percentiles of the distributions of each state variable on the Gaussian percentiles. The results of idealized observational updates (performed with perfect observations and neglecting horizontal correlations) indicate that the implementation of this anamorphosis method into sequential assimilation schemes can substantially improve the accuracy of the estimation with respect to classical computations based on the Gaussian assumption.

  18. Control of mass balance error in a detailed model of surface-subsurface flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentini, Marcello; Orlandini, Stefano; Paniconi, Claudio; Putti, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Several process-based catchment-scale hydrologic models have been developed in recent years to describe the interactions and feedbacks between different components of the water cycle, but few studies have considered the sources of coupling error in these models. In this work we analyze the sequential iterative coupling scheme of the distributed model CATHY (CATchment HYdrology) in order to identify the different sources of mass balance error and to examine how these are influenced by topography, hydraulic properties, and atmospheric forcing. A pair of adimensional indices that quantify the degree of coupling and of flux partitioning is presented. Our analysis shows that mass balance errors increase during the flood recession limb because of the exchange of information between surface and subsurface water flow. Surface water propagation is cell centered, while the subsurface flow equation is solved on the vertices of surface cells. Evaluation of surface pressure heads and exchange fluxes is critical on this staggered surface-subsurface mesh, especially during transitions from unsaturated to saturated conditions and vice versa. A modified version of the flux exchange algorithm is introduced that considers the effective availability of water on surface cells. The performance of the model is also improved by introducing a heuristic procedure to control and adapt the time step interval. Starting from numerical stability and convergence constraints, this procedure varies the computational interval as a function of the rate of change of surface saturation via the coupling degree index. A final improvement made to the sequential coupling scheme in CATHY is to solve the surface routing equation after rather than before the subsurface module. We find that the modified version improves the water balance by more than 50% in most of the tests considered for a simple v-shaped catchment. The results so far obtained for the synthetic v-catchment indicate the need for a more comprehensive analysis including real catchments.

  19. Numerical modeling of coupled fluid flow and thermal and reactive biogeochemical transport in porous and fractured media

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Fang, Yilin; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Jiangtao; Li, Yuan; Li, Ming-Hsu; Siegel, Malcolm D

    2009-01-01

    Subsurface contamination problems of metals and radionuclides are ubiquitous. Metals and radionuclides may exist in the solute phase or may be bound to soil particles and interstitial portions of the geologic matrix. Accurate tools to reliably predict the migration and transformation of these metals and radionuclides in the subsurface environment enhance the ability of environmental scientists, engineers, and decision makers to analyze their impact and to evaluate the efficacy of alternative remediation techniques prior to incurring expense in the field. A mechanistic-based numerical model could provide such a tool. This paper communicates the development and verification of a mechanistically coupled fluid-flow thermal-reactive biogeochemical-transport model where both fast and slow reactions occur in porous and fractured media. Theoretical bases, numerical implementations, and numerical experiments using the model are described. A definition of the rates of fast/equilibrium reactions is presented to come up with a consistent set of governing equations. Two example problems are presented. The first one is a reactive transport problem which elucidates the non-isothermal effects on heterogeneous reactions. It also demonstrates that the rates of fast/equilibrium reactions are not necessarily greater than that of slow/kinetic reactions in the context of reactive transport. The second example focuses on a complicated but realistic advective dispersive reactive transport problem. This example exemplifies the need for innovative numerical algorithms to solve problems involving stiff geochemical reactions. It also demonstrates that rates of all fast/equilibrium reactions are finite and definite. Furthermore, it is noted that a species-versus-time curve cannot be used to characterize the rate of homogeneous fast/equilibrium reaction in a reactive transport system even if one and only one such reaction is responsible for the production of this species.

  20. New Insights from Electrochemical Noise: A Coupled Biogeochemical and Electrochemical Investigation of an Anoxic Groundwater Seep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, A. M.; Ferris, F. G.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the electrochemical properties of microbial processes is a significant step towards developing physical and chemical signatures of biotic activity and the impact of microbes within Earth systems. Electrochemical noise techniques, borrowed from corrosion science, hold promise as a method of discerning contributions from chemical reactions occurring in a natural system. These techniques rely exclusively on measurements of fluctuation in potential or current to assess different chemical contributors. To this end, a coupled electrochemical and geochemical study of flocculent ocherous mats of bacteriogenic iron oxides in an anoxic, neutral pH groundwater seep near Deep River, Ontario, Canada, was undertaken. Hydrogeochemical properties, including redox potential, dissolved oxygen, and dissolved ferrous and total iron concentrations were measured in a series of three microcosms. (A), a chemical control of 0.22 ?m filtered groundwater; (B) an abiotic control with 50 mL of autoclaved biogenic iron oxides (BIOS), and (C), a live microcosm with 50 mL of BIOS. All BIOS and groundwater samples were collected at a distance of 200 cm from the spring source using sterile syringes, and measurements were recorded every 30 minutes over a period of two hours from initial collection. Redox potential was measured using a Pt/Ag/Ag-Cl electrode and a National Instruments data-acquisition device (DAQ) at a frequency of 200 Hz for 60 seconds at 30 minute intervals, for the purpose of electrochemical noise analysis. After 120 minutes, for microcosm (A), 75% of the initial total dissolved iron remained in solution, as well as 32% of the initial dissolved ferrous iron. The pseudo-first order rate constant for Fe2+ oxidation was 0.007 min-1. Dissolved oxygen increased from 1.40 mg/L to 2.74 mg/L, and redox potential remained relatively constant at approximately 248 mV, relative to the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), over this time interval. In microcosm (B), 16% of the total dissolved iron remained in after 120 minutes, and 16% of the initial dissolved ferrous iron with an Fe2+ oxidation rate constant of 0.021 min-1. Dissolved oxygen increased from 0.38 mg/L to 0.88 mg/L, while redox potential increased from 254.2 mV to 282.9 mV relative to SHE. In microcosm (C), 18% of the initial dissolved total iron remained in solution, and 17% of the initial dissolved ferrous iron with an Fe2+ oxidation rate constant of 0.036 min-1. Dissolved oxygen decreased from 0.31 mg/L to 0.5 mg/L, and redox potential increased from 301.9 mV to 328.8 mV. A slight (approximately 5.87-6.31) increase in pH was observed in all three microcosms. Preliminary analysis of electrochemical noise data indicates that each microcosm can be differentiated on this basis in the frequency domain; but relationships between rates of chemical reactions, such as iron oxidation, precipitation of iron from solution, and oxygen dissolution, are still being elucidated. This technique shows promise in providing evidence that the contributions to overall redox condition from various redox-active chemical species will be distinguished in the frequency domain.

  1. Final Progress Report: Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Cometabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2010-02-19

    Our goal within the overall project is to demonstrate the presence and abundance of methane monooxygenases (MMOs) enzymes and their genes within the microbial community of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Area North (TAN) site. MMOs are thought to be the primary catalysts of natural attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in contaminated groundwater at this location. The actual presence of the proteins making up MMO complexes would provide direct evidence for its participation in TCE degradation. The quantitative estimation of MMO genes and their translation products (sMMO and pMMO proteins) and the knowledge about kinetics and substrate specificity of MMOs will be used to develop mathematical models of the natural attenuation process in the TAN aquifer. The model will be particularly useful in prediction of TCE degradation rate in TAN and possibly in the other DOE sites. Bacteria known as methanotrophs produce a set of proteins that assemble to form methane monooxygenase complexes (MMOs), enzymes that oxidize methane as their natural substrate, thereby providing a carbon and energy source for the organisms. MMOs are also capable of co-metabolically transforming chlorinated solvents like TCE into nontoxic end products such as carbon dioxide and chloride. There are two known forms of methane monooxygenase, a membrane-bound particulate form (pMMO) and a cytoplasmic soluble form (sMMO). pMMO consists of two components, pMMOH (a hydroxylase comprised of 47-, 27-, and 24-kDa subunits) and pMMOR (a reductase comprised of 63 and 8-kDa subunits). sMMO consists of three components: a hydroxylase (protein A-250 kDa), a dimer of three subunits (?2?2?2), a regulatory protein (protein B-15.8 kDa), and a reductase (protein C-38.6 kDa). All methanotrophs will produce a methanol dehydrogenase to channel the product of methane oxidation (methanol) into the central metabolite formaldehyde. University of Idaho (UI) efforts focused on proteomic analyses using mass spectrometry and genomic analyses using RT-PCR to characterize these enzyme systems. UI’s specific objectives were to develop the proteomics and genomic tools to assess the presence of the methane monooxygenase (MMO) proteins in the aquifers under study and relate this to the enumeration of methanotrophic microorganisms. We targeted the identification of both sMMO and pMMO. We believe that the copper level in the TAN aquifer is most likely suppressing the expression of sMMO and mediates the higher levels of pMMO expression. Hence our investigations included the identification of both forms of MMOs, and we expected a higher concentration of pMMO proteins in TAN samples. The amounts of these proteins present were correlated with numbers of methanotrophs determined by us and other members of the research team using PCR-based methods. In summary, to accomplish our objectives we applied environmental proteomics techniques to monitor proteins that are involved in the co-metabolic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater of the INL TAN site on Department of Energy ands of near Idaho Falls, ID USA. To acquire peptides sequences information we used an ultra performance chromatography (UPLC) system coupled with QToF Premiere nano-electrospray tandem quadropole-time of flight mass spectrometer. Our goal was to identify signature peptides of methane monooxygenases (MMOs) within methanotrophic bacteria that are active in cometabolic degradation of TCE. We developed a new method for extracting total proteins from environmental planktonic and/or biofilm samples that involve a new time course cell lysis and protein extraction method in combination with chromatographic separation of peptide and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing. The techniques resulted in successful extraction and identification of MMO-based peptides from both pure cultures and TAN site samples. The work confirmed the importance of mathonotrophs in the co-metabolic removal of TCE from the TAN site aquifer.

  2. Modeling greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient transport in managed arable soils with a fully coupled hydrology-biogeochemical modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Edwin; Klatt, Steffen; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kraft, Philipp; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    The use of mineral nitrogen fertilizer sustains the global food production and therefore the livelihood of human kind. The rise in world population will put pressure on the global agricultural system to increase its productivity leading most likely to an intensification of mineral nitrogen fertilizer use. The fate of excess nitrogen and its distribution within landscapes is manifold. Process knowledge on the site scale has rapidly grown in recent years and models have been developed to simulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in managed ecosystems on the site scale. Despite first regional studies, the carbon and nitrogen cycling on the landscape or catchment scale is not fully understood. In this study we present a newly developed modelling approach by coupling the fully distributed hydrology model CMF (catchment modelling framework) to the process based regional ecosystem model LandscapeDNDC for the investigation of hydrological processes and carbon and nitrogen transport and cycling, with a focus on nutrient displacement and resulting greenhouse gas emissions in various virtual landscapes / catchment to demonstrate the capabilities of the modelling system. The modelling system was applied to simulate water and nutrient transport at the at the Yanting Agro-ecological Experimental Station of Purple Soil, Sichuan province, China. The catchment hosts cypress forests on the outer regions, arable fields on the sloping croplands cultivated with wheat-maize rotations and paddy rice fields in the lowland. The catchment consists of 300 polygons vertically stratified into 10 soil layers. Ecosystem states (soil water content and nutrients) and fluxes (evapotranspiration) are exchanged between the models at high temporal scales (hourly to daily) forming a 3-dimensional model application. The water flux and nutrients transport in the soil is modelled using a 3D Richards/Darcy approach for subsurface fluxes with a kinematic wave approach for surface water runoff and the evapotranspiration is based on Penman-Monteith. Biogeochemical processes are modelled by LandscapeDNDC, including soil microclimate, plant growth and biomass allocation, organic matter mineralisation, nitrification, denitrification, chemodenitrification and methanogenesis producing and consuming soil based greenhouse gases. The model application will present first results of the coupled model to simulate soil based greenhouse gas emissions as well as nitrate discharge from the Yanting catchment. The model application will also present the effects of different management practices (fertilization rates and timings, tilling, residues management) on the redistribution of N surplus within the catchment causing biomass productivity gradients and different levels of indirect N2O emissions along topographical gradients.

  3. Gaining a Better Understanding of Surface-Subsurface Reactive Transport using a High-Order Advection Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisman, J. J., III; Maxwell, R. M.; Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Steefel, C. I.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the interactions between physical, geochemical, and biological processes in the shallow subsurface is prerequisite to the development of effective contamination remediation techniques, or the accurate quantification of nutrient fluxes and biogeochemical cycling. Here we present recent developments to the massively parallel reactive transport code ParCrunchFlow. This model, previously applicable only to steady-state, saturated subsurface flows, has been extended to transient, surface-subsurface systems. Proof-of-concept simulations detailing reactive transport processes in hillslope and floodplain settings will be presented. In order to reduce the numerical dispersion inherent in grid based advection schemes, which can lead to an over prediction of reaction rates, a weighted, essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) advection scheme has been implemented, providing formal fifth-order spatial and third-order temporal accuracy. We use a mass-conservative, positivity-preserving flux limiter while advecting solute concentrations to prevent non-physical solutions. The effects of advection schemes and their associated numerical dispersion on reaction rates are evaluated by comparing our scheme to a monotonic lower order scheme in a transverse mixing scenario. The work presented here allows a better understanding of nutrient cycling dynamics in watershed systems.

  4. Development of a 3D Coupled Physical-Biogeochemical Model for the Marseille Coastal Area (NW Mediterranean Sea): What Complexity Is Required in the Coastal Zone?

    PubMed Central

    Fraysse, Marion; Pinazo, Christel; Faure, Vincent Martin; Fuchs, Rosalie; Lazzari, Paolo; Raimbault, Patrick; Pairaud, Ivane

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial inputs (natural and anthropogenic) from rivers, the atmosphere and physical processes strongly impact the functioning of coastal pelagic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to develop a tool for the examination of these impacts on the Marseille coastal area, which experiences inputs from the Rhone River and high rates of atmospheric deposition. Therefore, a new 3D coupled physical/biogeochemical model was developed. Two versions of the biogeochemical model were tested, one model considering only the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles and a second model that also considers the phosphorus (P) cycle. Realistic simulations were performed for a period of 5 years (2007–2011). The model accuracy assessment showed that both versions of the model were able of capturing the seasonal changes and spatial characteristics of the ecosystem. The model also reproduced upwelling events and the intrusion of Rhone River water into the Bay of Marseille well. Those processes appeared to greatly impact this coastal oligotrophic area because they induced strong increases in chlorophyll-a concentrations in the surface layer. The model with the C, N and P cycles better reproduced the chlorophyll-a concentrations at the surface than did the model without the P cycle, especially for the Rhone River water. Nevertheless, the chlorophyll-a concentrations at depth were better represented by the model without the P cycle. Therefore, the complexity of the biogeochemical model introduced errors into the model results, but it also improved model results during specific events. Finally, this study suggested that in coastal oligotrophic areas, improvements in the description and quantification of the hydrodynamics and the terrestrial inputs should be preferred over increasing the complexity of the biogeochemical model. PMID:24324589

  5. In situ response of bay productivity to nutrient loading from a small tributary: The Delaware Bay-Murderkill Estuary tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voynova, Yoana G.; Lebaron, Karine C.; Barnes, Rebecca T.; Ullman, William J.

    2015-07-01

    A small, turbid and nutrient-rich tributary, the Murderkill Estuary, and a large estuarine ecosystem, the Delaware Bay, are tightly linked and form an efficient, tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor during the summer. Nitrate loading from the Murderkill Estuary generates an instantaneous increase in biological oxygen production in the adjacent Delaware Bay. We are able to capture this primary production response with continuous hourly measurements of dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and nitrate. The nitrate influxes from the Murderkill support primary production rates in the Delaware Bay margins that are twice as high as the average production rates measured in the central Bay regions. This elevates chlorophyll in the Bay margins in the summer and fuels metabolism. Tidal transport of the newly produced autochthonous chlorophyll particles from the Bay into the Estuary could also provide a source of labile material to the marshes surrounding the Murderkill, thus perhaps fueling marsh respiration. As a consequence of the tidal coupling between Delaware Bay and the Murderkill Estuary, ecosystem productivity and metabolism in the Bay and Estuary are linked, generating an ecosystem feedback mechanism. Storms modulate this tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor, by generating significant nitrate and salinity changes. Depending on their magnitude and duration, storms induce large phytoplankton blooms in the Delaware Bay. Such large phytoplankton blooms may occur more often with climate change, since century-long discharge records document an increase in storm frequency.

  6. A Coupled Hydrological and Biogeochemical Process Model for Fate and Transport of Nitrate in Agricultural Areas of Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Sanchez, I.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2010-12-01

    In agricultural areas the use of fertilizers to maintain high crop productivity contributes to high concentrations of nitrate in groundwater. The objective of the study is to accurately estimate historical and future nitrate concentration in domestic wells in agricultural areas in Texas. To date most transport models have focused on groundwater processes, neglecting critical biogeochemical processes that occur as contaminated water percolates through the soil profile. Transport, transformation, and distribution of nitrogen from the point of application through the soil profile to groundwater depend upon complex physical, biological, and chemical processes. We developed a mathematical model that accounts for key biogeochemical processes that occur as contaminated water is transported from the land surface to the groundwater. Key features of the model include: root growth, root uptake of nutrients, mineral precipitation-dissolution and biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, iron and sulfur (C-N-Fe-S). The model also includes biological mediated secondary reactions. Depending on aquifer soils, crop type, irrigation technology and climate characteristics, secondary denitrification by ferrous iron may play an important role by inducing nitrate reduction at the interface between nitrate-rich percolating waters and highly-reduced waters. The improved model can be applied for: 1) estimate contaminant levels in a hindcast mode for conducting epidemiologic studies 2) evaluate physical, chemical or biological transformation rates of different contaminants for conducting mitigation studies; and 3) evaluate the effect of land-use change on contaminant concentrations in soil and groundwater aquifers for developing remediation strategies.

  7. Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the coupled effects of hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Boyer, E.W.; David, M.B.; Harvey, J.W.; Mulholland, P.J.; Seitzinger, S.P.; Tobias, C.R.; Tonitto, C.; Wollheim, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of lotic systems as sinks for nitrogen inputs is well recognized. A fraction of nitrogen in streamflow is removed to the atmosphere via denitrification with the remainder exported in streamflow as nitrogen loads. At the watershed scale, there is a keen interest in understanding the factors that control the fate of nitrogen throughout the stream channel network, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We use a dynamic stream transport model to assess biogeochemical (nitrate loadings, concentration, temperature) and hydrological (discharge, depth, velocity) effects on reach-scale denitrification and nitrate removal in the river networks of two watersheds having widely differing levels of nitrate enrichment but nearly identical discharges. Stream denitrification is estimated by regression as a nonlinear function of nitrate concentration, streamflow, and temperature, using more than 300 published measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model to characterize nitrate dynamics related to denitrification at a monthly time scale in the stream reaches of the two watersheds. Results indicate that the nitrate removal efficiency of streams, as measured by the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed via denitrification per unit length of channel, is appreciably reduced during months with high discharge and nitrate flux and increases during months of low-discharge and flux. Biogeochemical factors, including land use, nitrate inputs, and stream concentrations, are a major control on reach-scale denitrification, evidenced by the disproportionately lower nitrate removal efficiency in streams of the highly nitrate-enriched watershed as compared with that in similarly sized streams in the less nitrate-enriched watershed. Sensitivity analyses reveal that these important biogeochemical factors and physical hydrological factors contribute nearly equally to seasonal and stream-size related variations in the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed in each watershed. ?? 2008 The Author(s).

  8. Integrated Modeling Analysis on Surface-Subsurface Water Interaction and Impact on Riparian Vegetation under Climate Change Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, M. P.; Acharya, K.; Chen, L.

    2010-12-01

    Primary objective of this study is to investigate the impact of climate change on riparian vegetation especially Tamarisk, an invasive riparian species widely spread along the lower Virgin River corridor. The lower Virgin River basin is located in Nevada, Utah and Arizona and the study area is approximately 4,500 sq. km. Our prevailing hypothesis is that the climate change will likely alter evapotranspiration (ET) and recharge/discharge pattern of surface-subsurface flow system creating a new moisture distribution profile in unsaturated zone and potentially altering existing ecosystem structure. The Hydrogeosphere, a fully integrated surface and subsurface flow model developed by Groundwater Simulations Group, University of Waterloo is used for the study. The model is able to perform fully coupled simulation of surface-subsurface flow with 2D representation of surface regime and 3D for unsaturated/saturated subsurface flow. The study area has 8 stratigraphic layers, which are further divided into 21 layers. The model is calibrated to produce steady state hydraulic head based on long term precipitation, ET and stream hydrograph. The steady-state result is then used as initial condition to run transient simulation for the year 2008 and 2009. Bias corrected and downscaled WCRP CMIP3 climate projections data for three scenarios will be used to predict the soil moisture distribution within unsaturated zone. Results of present and future climate conditions will be analyzed to investigate if the local hydrology favors Tamarisk in a long run or provides favorable conditions for native species such as Cottonwood and Willows.

  9. Significant Findings: Seasonal Distributions of Global Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients With a Coupled Ocean General Circulation, Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model. 2; Comparisons With Satellite and In Situ Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Busalacchi, Antonio (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ocean general circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. Biogeochemical processes in the model were determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability, and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms, chlorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Basin scale (>1000 km) model chlorophyll seasonal distributions were statistically positively correlated with CZCS chlorophyll in 10 of 12 major oceanographic regions, and with SeaWiFS in all 12. Notable disparities in magnitudes occurred, however, in the tropical Pacific, the spring/summer bloom in the Antarctic, autumn in the northern high latitudes, and during the southwest monsoon in the North Indian Ocean. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of satellite and in situ data exhibited broad agreement, although occasional departures were apparent. Model nitrate distributions agreed with in situ data, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The overall agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicated that the model dynamics offer a reasonably realistic simulation of phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on basin and synoptic scales.

  10. Potential for real-time understanding of coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in stream ecosystems: Future integration of telemetered data with process models for glacial meltwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, Diane M.; Cozzetto, Karen; Cullis, James D. S.; Gooseff, Michael N.; Jaros, Christopher; Koch, Joshua C.; Lyons, W. Berry; Neupauer, Roseanna; Wlostowski, Adam

    2015-08-01

    While continuous monitoring of streamflow and temperature has been common for some time, there is great potential to expand continuous monitoring to include water quality parameters such as nutrients, turbidity, oxygen, and dissolved organic material. In many systems, distinguishing between watershed and stream ecosystem controls can be challenging. The usefulness of such monitoring can be enhanced by the application of quantitative models to interpret observed patterns in real time. Examples are discussed primarily from the glacial meltwater streams of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Although the Dry Valley landscape is barren of plants, many streams harbor thriving cyanobacterial mats. Whereas a daily cycle of streamflow is controlled by the surface energy balance on the glaciers and the temporal pattern of solar exposure, the daily signal for biogeochemical processes controlling water quality is generated along the stream. These features result in an excellent outdoor laboratory for investigating fundamental ecosystem process and the development and validation of process-based models. As part of the McMurdo Dry Valleys Long-Term Ecological Research project, we have conducted field experiments and developed coupled biogeochemical transport models for the role of hyporheic exchange in controlling weathering reactions, microbial nitrogen cycling, and stream temperature regulation. We have adapted modeling approaches from sediment transport to understand mobilization of stream biomass with increasing flows. These models help to elucidate the role of in-stream processes in systems where watershed processes also contribute to observed patterns, and may serve as a test case for applying real-time stream ecosystem models.

  11. Significant Findings: Tracking the SeaWiFS Record with a Coupled Physical/Biogeochemical/Radiative Model of the Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Gregg W.

    2000-01-01

    The Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) has observed 2.5 years of routine global chlorophyll observations from space. The mission was launched into a record El Nino event, which eventually gave way to one of the most intensive and longest-lasting La Nina events ever recorded. The SeaWiFS chlorophyll record captured the response of ocean phytoplankton to these significant events in the tropical Indo-Pacific basins, but also indicated significant interannual variability unrelated to the El Nino/La Nina events. This included large variability in the North Atlantic and Pacific basins, in the North Central and equatorial Atlantic, and milder patterns in the North Central Pacific. This SeaWiFS record was tracked with a coupled physical/biogeochemical/radiative model of the global oceans using near-real-time forcing data such as wind stresses, sea surface temperatures, and sea ice. This provided an opportunity to offer physically and biogeochemically meaningful explanations of the variability observed in the SeaWiFS data set, since the causal mechanisms and interrelationships of the model are completely understood. The coupled model was able to represent the seasonal distributions of chlorophyll during the SeaWiFS era, and was capable of differentiating among the widely different processes and dynamics occurring in the global oceans. The model was also reasonably successful in representing the interannual signal, especially when it was large, such as, the El Nino and La Nina events in the tropical Pacific and Indian Oceans. The model provided different phytoplankton group responses for the different events in these regions: diatoms were predominant in the tropical Pacific during the La Nina but other groups were predominant during El Nino. The opposite condition occurred in the tropical Indian Ocean. Both situations were due to the different responses of the basins to El Nino. The interannual variability in the North Atlantic, which was exhibited in SeaWiFS data as a decline in the spring/summer bloom in 1999 relative to 1998, resulted in the model from a more slowly shoaling mixed layer, allowing herbivore populations to keep pace with increasing phytoplankton populations. However, several aspects of the interannual cycle were not well-represented by the model. Explanations ranged from inherent model deficiencies, to monthly averaging of forcing fields, to biases in SeaWiFS atmospheric correction procedures.

  12. Simulation of radar echoes from Mars' surface/subsurface and inversion of surface media parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuan; Ye, Hongxia; Jin, Ya-Qiu

    2014-07-01

    A two-layer model of Mars' regolith/bedrock media with a cratered rough surface/subsurface is presented for radar echo simulation of planetary exploration research. The numerical approach of geometric ray tracing for the scattering of rough surfaces, which is digitized by the triangulated network, is applied to the calculation of the scattering and imaging simulation of radar range echoes. Numerical simulations of a cratered rough surface generated by the Monte Carlo method are used to analyze the functional dependence of radar range echoes at 1-50 MHz center frequencies upon the surface/subsurface feature and the parameters of the layering media, that is, layer depth and dielectric properties. The radar range echoes from two areas of the real Mars surface, which is described by digital elevation model data with a resolution of 1 m × 1 m and a vertical error of less than 1 m, are also simulated and analyzed. Based on these simulations, this study presents a numerical imaging test of radar sounder at center frequencies 1-50 MHz for exploration of different dielectric regolith and bedrock media. The channel 50 MHz with high resolution might be an optimal frequency. Finally, inversion of the dielectric constants of the two-layer media and the regolith layer thickness are developed.

  13. One-Dimensional Coupled Ecosystem-Carbon Flux Model for the Simulation of Biogeochemical Parameters at Ocean Weather Station P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorini, S.; McClain, C.; Christian, J.; Wong, C. S.

    2000-01-01

    In this Technical Publication, we describe the model functionality and analyze its application to the seasonal and interannual variations of phytoplankton, nutrients, pCO2 and CO2 concentrations in the eastern subarctic Pacific at Ocean Weather Station P (OWSP, 50 deg. N 145 deg. W). We use a verified one-dimensional ecosystem model, coupled with newly incorporated carbon flux and carbon chemistry components, to simulate 22 years (1958-1980) of pCO2 and CO2 variability at Ocean Weather Station P (OWS P). This relatively long period of simulation verifies and extends the findings of previous studies using an explicit approach for the biological component and realistic coupling with the carbon flux dynamics. The slow currents and the horizontally homogeneous ocean in the subarctic Pacific make OWS P one of the best available candidates for modeling the chemistry of the upper ocean in one dimension. The chlorophyll and ocean currents composite for 1998 illustrates this premise. The chlorophyll concentration map was derived from SeaWiFS data and the currents are from an OGCM simulation (from R. Murtugudde).

  14. A coupled hydrological-biogeochemical model to simulate DOC dynamics in a sub-arctic headwater catchment underlain by permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessels, J. S.; Tetzlaff, D.; Carey, S. K.; Soulsby, C.

    2014-12-01

    Sub-arctic regions are currently undergoing climate induced changes, with projections of widespread degradation or loss of permafrost in these regions. While many studies have focussed on the controls of DOC exports in sub-arctic systems and many large scale models were applied, very few studies have investigated these processes in sub-arctic alpine, headwater catchments. With increasing air-temperatures it is predicted that the permafrost will be reduced and the depth of the thawing active layer may increase. The effect of these changes on the quantity and timing of DOC exports under these changes is still unclear. Therefore, it is important to understand the controls of DOC in these systems. These regions are characterised with high DOC concentrations during early spring melt when the thaw depth is shallow and the highly labile organic layer is the dominant flow pathway. As the season progresses and the active layer deepens, maximum soil water storage increases and DOC comes into contact with and is sorbed by less permeable mineral soils. Using a parsimonious coupled conceptual model to simulate stream discharge and DOC production and export for a small (c.a. 8 km2) sub-arctic alpine headwater catchment, this study aims to improve the understanding of stream discharge and DOC dynamics and the main underlying processes of DOC exports. Using a coupled process-based model to simulate DOC production and hydrological processes allows to integrate additional information gained concerning the controls of these processes. Model complexity is balanced with the complexity of the system to allow for the identification of the main controlling processes of DOC exports. Based on the HBV model, the model includes additional components to reflect the effect of slope aspect and the permafrost active layer dynamics and the production and loss of DOC. The results of the model provide valuable information on the dominant controlling processes of DOC in the catchment.

  15. Topographic controls on scaling of hydrologic and thermal processes in polygonal ground features of an Arctic ecosystem: A case study using idealized non-isothermal surface-subsurface simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.; Collier, N.; Kumar, J.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic and sub-Arctic soils currently contain approximately 1700 billion metric tones of frozen organic carbon, approximately 200 times current annual anthropogenic emissions. This carbon is vulnerable to release to the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4 as high-latitude temperatures warm. Microtopographic features, such as polygonal ground, are characteristic sources of landscape heterogeneity in the Alaskan Arctic coastal plain. In a future warmer climate, the spatial distribution of soil moisture and active layer depth are expected to be key factors controlling the fate of thawed permafrost carbon. Polygonal ground structures, with high or low centers, dominate the local hydrologic environment, thereby impacting the energy balance, biogeochemical dynamics, vegetation communities, and carbon releases from the subsurface. In spite of their importance to local hydrologic and thermal processes, the impact of these microtopographic features at larger spatial scales is not well understood. Our previous work from isothermal surface-subsurface simulations has indicated that statistical moments of soil moisture follow a non-linear scaling relationship. In this study, we perform surface-subsurface non-isothermal flow simulations using PFLOTRAN for four study sites located near Barrow, AK. Simulations are performed on domains at multiple horizontal resolutions for several years. We describe the statistical moments of simulated soil moisture and soil temperature fields across spatial resolutions.

  16. The application of a coupled hydrological and biogeochemical model (CHANGE) for modeling of energy, water, and CO2 exchanges over a larch forest in eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hotaek; Iijima, Yoshihiro; Yabuki, Hironori; Ohta, Takeshi; Walsh, John; Kodama, Yuji; Ohata, Tetsuo

    2011-08-01

    A coupled hydrological and biogeochemical model (CHANGE) that evaluates heat, water, and CO2 exchange between the biosphere and atmosphere across a spectrum of various time and space scales is described in this paper. The CHANGE model, which merges important components and functions in Arctic terrestrial ecosystems, is a process model with a self-constrained nature that is based on a complex and nonlinear interplay among hydrological, physiological, biochemical, ecological, and edaphic factors and meteorological conditions. This model was applied to a larch forest in eastern Siberia for the period of 1998-2006. A key objective was to assess the seasonal and interannual variability of the surface water, energy, and carbon fluxes over the larch forest in order to understand the responses of this ecosystem to climate change and to provide their controlling factors. Two types of simulations were performed with half-hourly and daily forcing data, and temporal correlation and other statistical measures supported the agreement between the simulations and observations. The simulated annual evapotranspiration (ET) ranged from 125 to 196 mm with a mean of 164 mm, 67% of which was contributed by transpiration. The simulated annual mean net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was -138.6 g C m-2 y-1 with a range of -79 to -195 g C m-2 y-1. The NEE variation was closely correlated with the net primary production (NPP). The simulation showed 23-43% interannual variability in heterotrophic respiration (Rh) for a mean of 273.1 g C m-2 y-1. Soil water was found to be a determinant that influences ET and CO2 fluxes in the larch forest. NEE was largely correlated to precipitation (PG). Thicker snow depth in the previous winter season contributed to higher NEE. The contribution of snow depth to NEE was significant in the dry years. The combination of summer PG and snow water resulted in higher NEE, which was found since 2004. In dry years, the access of roots to soil-thawed water alleviated soil water deficit and contributed to ecosystem net C uptake. The model sensitivity addressed the potential importance of the dynamic soil organic carbon on soil temperature.

  17. Colloid Transport and Surface-Subsurface Exchange in an Acid Mine Drainage-Impacted Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvell, A. S.; Ryan, J. N.; Ren, J.; McKnight, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Colloidal particles may provide an important control on the mobility of contaminants of concern; e.g., metals introduced into a stream from an acid mine drainage. In order to examine colloidal transport and surface-subsurface exchange, we injected synthesized ferrihydrite colloids along with a conservative tracer, bromide, into Lefthand Creek, a stream contaminated by acid mine drainage in northwestern Boulder County, Colorado. The ferrihydrite colloids were co-precipitated with yttrium to form yttrium-labelled colloids so that we could differentiate them from environmental colloids. Yttrium was measured in samples collected from the surface water and the hyporheic zone. The hyporheic zone samples were collected from a series of mini-piezometers embedded up to 1 m in depth and over a 61 m reach of the stream. A one-dimensional transient storage model (OTIS-P) was used to quantify parameters describing the transport of the conservative tracer and the colloids. Approximately 20% of the colloidal mass was lost over the 61 m reach. The loss of colloids is attributed to deposition in the shallow hyporheic zone. Laboratory column experiments demonstrated that the stream bed sediments effectively remove colloids from suspension at the pH, ionic strength, and dissolved organic matter concentration conditions occurring in Lefthand Creek.

  18. Coupling early-diagenesis and pelagic biogeochemical models for estimating the seasonal variability of N and P fluxes at the sediment-water interface: Application to the northwestern Adriatic coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigolin, Daniele; Lovato, Tomas; Rubino, Angelo; Pastres, Roberto

    2011-09-01

    An integrated numerical model for the simulation of both pelagic and benthic biogeochemical processes was obtained by fully coupling a transient early diagenesis model with a reaction-transport pelagic biogeochemical model. The integrated model was applied to a shallow coastal area of the Northern Adriatic Sea, approximately 1400 km 2 wide, with the aim of investigating: 1) the seasonal dynamics of the fluxes of macronutrients, namely N and P, at the sediment-water interface; 2) the spatial variability in both sediment concentration profiles and benthic-pelagic fluxes of NH 4+, NO 3-, DIP and O 2. Model results concerning the pelagic state variables compare well with field data. The outputs of the benthic biogeochemical sub-model were found to be consistent with a set of literature data on sediment biogeochemistry collected within the model domain. Even though these comparisons should not be regarded as a formal validation, they provide evidence that the model correctly simulates the main patterns of both primary production and organic matter mineralisation. Model results indicate a strong coupling between benthic and pelagic systems, since the oxygen penetration depth is small (2-4 mm) and the sediment oxygen demand, up to 20 mmol m - 2 day - 1 , is high. This is also confirmed by the importance of fluxes of macronutrients from sediments, 17.5 10 6 kg N year - 1 and 1.7 10 6 kg P year - 1 on the whole model domain, which accounted for approximately 14% and 50% of the total N and P reaching the water column on a yearly basis. Fluxes of dissolved inorganic compounds at the SWI are higher in the proximity of the coastline, where the sedimentation rate of organic matter is also more elevated. The integrated model could be further applied for research investigations and management purposes. To this regard, its use for the assessment of aquaculture impacts on sediment geochemistry and nutrient recycling looks appropriate.

  19. Coupled in situ Ammonium and Nitrate analyses of a tidally dominated estuary: New developments from the Elkhorn Slough Land/Ocean Biogeochemical Observatory network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, P. J.; Plant, J.; Johnson, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    For nearly nine years the Elkhorn Slough Land/Ocean Biogeochemical Observatory (LOBO) network of moorings has been delivering freely available hourly data to the web in near real time. Each mooring hosts a suite of instruments including an ISUS nitrate sensor. In addition to providing valuable information on ecosystem scale processes, the moorings serve as ideal test platforms for novel in situ chemical sensors & analyzers developed by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. The recent addition of a newly developed in situ NH4+ analyzer, the DigiScan-II, has provided additional insights into N cycling mechanisms within the slough. The analysis method estimates NH4+ concentration via base conversion to NH3 gas and diffusion across a membrane into an acid carrier stream with subsequent conductivity detection. Although this new NH4+ analyzer is reagent based, it was developed to be relatively cheap, robust, and configurable for a range of deployment options and requires minimal, infrequent maintenance that is ultimately governed by battery life. The fundamental DigiScan-II platform can also be used for other analyses of interest, such as PO4 or CT (total inorganic carbon), by swapping the necessary reagents and components and by making minor code modifications. For deployment in Elkhorn Slough, the NH4+ DigiScan-II was configured for mid-scale concentration detection with a linear calibration range of <0.2 to >30.0 ?M NH4+. The flux of different forms of bioavailable DIN through the system is driven by runoff inputs, tidal exchange, and biological processing. Large inputs of NO3- are sourced from the agriculturally influenced Old Salinas River (OSR), which enters the Slough near the estuary mouth and confluence with Monterey Bay. Rising ocean tides force this eutrophied water mass up into the slough where it is accessed by various biological communities during the course of the tidal period. Mass balance estimates suggest there is an imbalance between the amount of NO3- received by the slough and the amount that is released, with a net NO3- influx to the ecosystem. However, the slough ecosystem releases more NH4+ than it receives, resulting in a net efflux of NH4+ due to remineralization of organic matter (and potentially DNRA) in the slough. Although there is high variability among day to day flux estimates, the sign of the net flux term for NO3- and NH4+ are constant on a monthly scale and seasonal trends in flux magnitude are apparent. Excess N inputs to the slough ecosystem calculated from the LOBO data can serve to estimate productivity when coupled with published estimates of sediment N flux. Published rates of denitrification in the system are few but generally very low. Using the LOBO nitrogen mass balance calculations and Redfield stoichiometry, we estimate that the nitrogen inputs from OSR and Monterey Bay support a net production of roughly 220 g C m-2 yr-1 in Elkhorn Slough, assuming no N is lost to denitrification. This estimate will be revised with detailed hydrological dynamics and available O2 data to provide more accurate estimates of net ecosystem metabolism and the relative influence of allochthonous inputs on ecosystem productivity.

  20. Improving surface-subsurface water budgeting using high resolution satellite imagery applied on a brownfield.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, J; Batelaan, O; Canters, F; Boel, S; Anibas, C; Bronders, J

    2011-01-15

    The estimation of surface-subsurface water interactions is complex and highly variable in space and time. It is even more complex when it has to be estimated in urban areas, because of the complex patterns of the land-cover in these areas. In this research a modeling approach with integrated remote sensing analysis has been developed for estimating water fluxes in urban environments. The methodology was developed with the aim to simulate fluxes of contaminants from polluted sites. Groundwater pollution in urban environments is linked to patterns of land use and hence it is essential to characterize the land cover in a detail. An object-oriented classification approach applied on high-resolution satellite data has been adopted. To assign the image objects to one of the land-cover classes a multiple layer perceptron approach was adopted (Kappa of 0.86). Groundwater recharge has been simulated using the spatially distributed WetSpass model and the subsurface water flow using MODFLOW in order to identify and budget water fluxes. The developed methodology is applied to a brownfield case site in Vilvoorde, Brussels (Belgium). The obtained land use map has a strong impact on the groundwater recharge, resulting in a high spatial variability. Simulated groundwater fluxes from brownfield to the receiving River Zenne were independently verified by measurements and simulation of groundwater-surface water interaction based on thermal gradients in the river bed. It is concluded that in order to better quantify total fluxes of contaminants from brownfields in the groundwater, remote sensing imagery can be operationally integrated in a modeling procedure. PMID:21112074

  1. Simulating temporal variations of nitrogen losses in river networks with a dynamic transport model unravels the coupled effects of hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Alexander, Richard; Bohlke, John; Boyer, Elizabeth; Harvey, Judson; Seitzinger, Sybil; Tobias, Craig; Tonitto, Christina; Wollheim, Wilfred

    2009-01-01

    The importance of lotic systems as sinks for nitrogen inputs is well recognized. A fraction of nitrogen in streamflow is removed to the atmosphere via denitrification with the remainder exported in streamflow as nitrogen loads. At the watershed scale, there is a keen interest in understanding the factors that control the fate of nitrogen throughout the stream channel network, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We use a dynamic stream transport model to assess biogeochemical (nitrate loadings, concentration, temperature) and hydrological (discharge, depth, velocity) effects on reach-scale denitrification and nitrate removal in the river networks of two watersheds having widely differing levels of nitrate enrichment but nearly identical discharges. Stream denitrification is estimated by regression as a nonlinear function of nitrate concentration, streamflow, and temperature, using more than 300 published measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model to characterize nitrate dynamics related to denitrification at a monthly time scale in the stream reaches of the two watersheds. Results indicate that the nitrate removal efficiency of streams, as measured by the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed via denitrification per unit length of channel, is appreciably reduced during months with high discharge and nitrate flux and increases during months of low-discharge and flux. Biogeochemical factors, including land use, nitrate inputs, and stream concentrations, are a major control on reach-scale denitrification, evidenced by the disproportionately lower nitrate removal efficiency in streams of the highly nitrate-enriched watershed as compared with that in similarly sized streams in the less nitrate-enriched watershed. Sensitivity analyses reveal that these important biogeochemical factors and physical hydrological factors contribute nearly equally to seasonal and stream-size related variations in the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed in each watershed.

  2. A dynamic marine iron cycle module coupled to the University of Victoria Earth System Model: the Kiel Marine Biogeochemical Model 2 (KMBM2) for UVic 2.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickelsen, L.; Keller, D. P.; Oschlies, A.

    2014-12-01

    Marine biological production and the associated biotic uptake of carbon in many ocean regions depend on the availability of nutrients in the euphotic zone. While large areas are limited by nitrogen and/or phosphorus, the micronutrient iron is considered the main limiting nutrient in the North Pacific, equatorial Pacific and Southern Ocean. Changes in iron availability via changes in atmospheric dust input are discussed to play an important role in glacial/interglacial cycles via climate feedbacks caused by changes in biological ocean carbon sequestration. Although many aspects of the iron cycle remain unknown, its incorporation into marine biogeochemical models is needed to test our current understanding and better constrain its role in the Earth system. In the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic) iron limitation in the ocean was, until now, simulated pragmatically with an iron concentration masking scheme that did not allow a consistent interactive response to perturbations of ocean biogeochemistry or iron cycling sensitivity studies. Here, we replace the iron masking scheme with a dynamic iron cycle and compare the results to available observations and the previous marine biogeochemical model. Sensitivity studies are also conducted with the new model to test the importance of considering the variable solubility of iron in dust deposition, the importance of considering high resolution bathymetry for the sediment release of iron, the effect of scaling the sedimentary iron release with temperature and the sensitivity of the iron cycle to a climate change scenario.

  3. TerrSysMP-PDAF (version 1.0): a modular high-performance data assimilation framework for an integrated land surface-subsurface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, W.; He, G.; Kollet, S.; Maxwell, R.; Vereecken, H.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.

    2015-11-01

    Modelling of terrestrial systems is continuously moving towards more integrated modelling approaches where different terrestrial compartment models are combined in order to realise a more sophisticated physical description of water, energy and carbon fluxes across compartment boundaries and to provide a more integrated view on terrestrial processes. While such models can effectively reduce certain parameterization errors of single compartment models, model predictions are still prone to uncertainties regarding model input variables. The resulting uncertainties of model predictions can be effectively tackled by data assimilation techniques which allow to correct model predictions with observations taking into account both the model and measurement uncertainties. The steadily increasing availability of computational resources makes it now increasingly possible to perform data assimilation also for computationally highly demanding integrated terrestrial system models. However, as the computational burden for integrated models as well as data assimilation techniques is quite large, there is an increasing need to provide computationally efficient data assimilation frameworks for integrated models that allow to run on and to make efficient use of massively parallel computational resources. In this paper we present a data assimilation framework for the land surface-subsurface part of the Terrestrial System Modelling Platform TerrSysMP. TerrSysMP is connected via a memory based coupling approach with the pre-existing parallel data assimilation library PDAF (Parallel Data Assimilation Framework). This framework provides a fully parallel modular environment for performing data assimilation for the land surface and the subsurface compartment. A simple synthetic case study for a land surface-subsurface system (0.8 Mio. unknowns) is used to demonstrate the effects of data assimilation in the integrated model TerrSysMP and to access the scaling behaviour of the data assimilation system. Results show that data assimilation effectively corrects model states and parameters of the integrated model towards the reference values. Scaling tests provide evidence that the data assimilation system for TerrSysMP can make efficient use of parallel computational resources for > 30 k processors. Simulations with a large problem size (20 Mio. unknows) for the forward model were also efficiently handled by the data assimilation system. The proposed data assimilation framework is useful in simulating and estimating uncertainties in predicted states and fluxes of the terrestrial system over large spatial scales at high resolution utilizing integrated models.

  4. Biogeochemical Processes in Microbial Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines process rates that shape Earth's environment, create the biomarker sedimentary and atmospheric signatures of life and define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred. In order to understand how microorganisms have shaped the global environment of Earth and potentially, other worlds, we must develop an experimental paradigm that links biogeochemical processes with ever-changing temporal and spatial distributions of microbial population, and their metabolic properties. Photosynthetic microbial mats offer an opportunity to define holistic functionality at the millimeter scale. At the same time, their Biogeochemistry contributes to environmental processes on a planetary scale. These mats are possibly direct descendents of the most ancient biological communities; communities in which oxygenic photosynthesis might have been invented. Mats provide one of the best natural systems to study how microbial populations associate to control dynamic biogeochemical gradients. These are self-sustaining, complete ecosystems in which light energy absorbed over a diel (24 hour) cycle drives the synthesis of spatially-organized, diverse biomass. Tightly-coupled microorganisms in the mat have specialized metabolisms that catalyze transformations of carbon, nitrogen. sulfur, and a host of other elements.

  5. Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models: FINAL REPORT of grant Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63726

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Gruber, Nicolas

    2007-06-21

    This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecologicalbiogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: • September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled “Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.” A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. • December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled “Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.” This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in 2 the following Section II on “Large scale fertilization,” has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on “patch fertilization” discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on “model development” summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

  6. Application of a fully-integrated surface-subsurface flow model at the watershed-scale: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. P.; Sudicky, E. A.; McLaren, R. G.

    2008-03-01

    Results are presented in which a physically-based, three-dimensional model that fully integrates surface and variably-saturated subsurface flow processes is applied to the 75 km2 Laurel Creek Watershed within the Grand River basin in Southern Ontario, Canada. The primary objective of this study is to gauge the model's ability to reproduce surface and subsurface hydrodynamic processes at the watershed scale. Our objective was first accomplished by calibrating the steady-state subsurface portion of the system to 50 observation wells where hydraulic head data were available, while simultaneously matching the stream baseflow discharge. The level of agreement between the observed and computed subsurface hydraulic head values, baseflow discharge and the spatial pattern of the surface drainage network indicates that the model captures the essence of the surface-subsurface hydraulic characteristics of the watershed. The calibrated model is then subjected to two time series of input rainfall data and the calculated discharge hydrographs are compared to the observed rainfall-runoff responses. The calculated and observed rainfall-runoff responses were shown to agree moderately well for both rainfall data series that were utilized. Additionally, the spatial and temporal responses of the watershed with respect to the overland flow areas contributing to streamflow and the surface-subsurface exchange fluxes across the land surface during rainfall inundation and subsequent drainage phases demonstrate the dynamic nature of the interaction occurring between the surface and subsurface hydrologic regimes. Overall, it is concluded that it is feasible to apply a fully-integrated, surface/variably-saturated subsurface flow model at the watershed scale and possibly larger scales.

  7. Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, Brent M.; Timothy, Ginn R.; Sani, Rajesh K.

    2013-08-14

    Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 µM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 ?M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5?M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS– by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS– preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ –1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

  8. About the importance of small scale spatial variability in coupled surface-subsurface simulations and how it can be characterized.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks Franssen, H.; Kurtz, W.; Brunner, P.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Small scale spatial variability of soil and aquifer hydraulic properties exerts an important influence on flow and transport processes. Connected structures as present in fluvial aquifers, or macropores in soil, provide preferential flow paths for water and contaminants. Their characterization is therefore also important for management purposes. The importance of small scale spatial variability of riverbed hydraulic properties for exchange fluxes of water and solutes between a stream and the underlying subsurface is not so well studied. A few studies were dedicated to this topic and found that riverbed hydraulic properties might vary over many orders of magnitude and that most of the exchange fluxes might be centered at only a few spots. Next question is whether this spatial variability can be represented well with effective, uniform properties. In earlier work we found that effective, uniform parameters result in a biased estimation of stream-aquifer exchange fluxes, especially if the flow regime is very different from the flow regime in the calibration period. Given these results, the role of small-scale variability of riverbed hydraulic conductivity (K) (and its parameterization in a model) was investigated further by studying a 6km river section in the city of Zurich (Switzerland) in a transient finite elements model for variably saturated flow. It was also assessed whether the small-scale spatial variability can be characterized with stochastic realizations in combination with parameter estimation. Although the simulation example mimics the real-world case (Zurich) as much as possible and uses transient model forcings obtained from real data, synthetic experiments were conducted in order to verify the procedure in detail. Parameter estimation was done with help of the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), on the basis of an augmented state vector approach for estimating the unknown parameters. We used three different setups to generate synthetic realities, and for each setup 10 different synthetic realities were generated. For each synthetic reality 100 different stochastic realizations were generated and updated with EnKF. The set-ups had a moderately heterogeneous K of the riverbed, a strongly heterogeneous riverbed K with strong K contrasts between five different river sections, and a strongly heterogeneous riverbed K without a clear zonation. In all cases, EnKF was used to assimilate either zero (open loop), 10 or 100 time series of hydraulic head data to update either the riverbed K of all nodes (stochastic field approach) or only effective riverbed K for five, three or two zones. The results showed that the stochastic field approach outperforms the approaches where only a limited number of effective parameters is updated. This is especially the case for strongly heterogeneous realities and many measurement data. A zonation approach systematically underestimates net stream-aquifer exchange fluxes, but in case the position of the zones is well-known, also the zonation approach gives good results.

  9. Determination of the effect of ammonia on clathrate hydrates at Titan' surface-subsurface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Iglesias, V.; Vu, T. H.; Smythe, W.; Sotin, C.; Choukroun, M.

    2015-10-01

    The development and combination of two facilities, a cryogenic calorimeter and a cryostage coupled with a Raman spectrometer, allows for detailed studies of the chemical reactions/phase transformations that may take place in the upper layer of Titan's crust and the subsequent exchange processes with the atmosphere due to phase transitions related to the composition in icy materials and the thermal state of the upper few km.

  10. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boano, Fulvio; Harvey, Judson W.; Marion, Andrea; Packman, Aaron I.; Revelli, Roberto; Ridolfi, Luca; Anders, Wörman

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed."

  11. Arctic Ocean shelf biogeochemical cycling under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellerby, Richard; Silyakova, Anna; Slagstad, Dag

    2014-05-01

    Changes to Arctic Ocean biogeochemistry will result from a complex array of climate and chemical perturbations over the next decades. Changes to freshwater and nutrient supply through ice melt and continental runoff; warming of the ocean and an increasing ocean acidification through partial equilibrium with a rising anthropogenic CO2 load will change the nature of Arctic Ocean ecological and biogeochemical coupling. This is no more apparent on the shelf regions where there is strong influence from land sources of freshwater and total alkalinity. This presentation will document our combined approach of studying Arctic biogeochemical change through coupled observational, experimental and modelling campaigns. We have identified large changes in recent anthropogenic carbon transport to the Arctic and have characterised the associated regional and water mass ocean acidification. We have determined, through targeted Arctic pelagic ecosystem perturbations experiments, changes to ecosystem structure, succession and biogeochemical cycling under high CO2. Observations have been incorporated into regional, coupled physical-ecosystem-carbon biogeochemical models (informed at the boundaries by downscaled global earth system models) to develop scenarios of change in biogeochemical pathways. We have identified large regional variability in ocean acidification that is shown to impact on shelf biogeochemistry, ecosystems and climate feedbacks in the Arctic Ocean.

  12. Vegetation Influence on Regional Climate Change: A 3D Integrated Atmospheric-Surface-Subsurface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, J. H.; Hwang, H.; Sudicky, E. A.; Lin, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Human induced land-use change has been shown to be one of the major contributing factors to anthropogenic regional climate change. The transition from densely vegetated forests with deep root zones to shallow rooted agricultural ecosystems drastically limits the natural buffering capacity of deep groundwater during severe drought conditions. In order to quantify the magnitude of climate change from altered ecosystems, we employed the 3D model HydroGeoSphere, an integrated variably-saturated subsurface/surface flow and heat transport model, coupled with a simplified zero-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer model to simulate an extended seasonal drought period. It is found that during drought conditions, trees with deep root zones are capable of maintaining higher evapotranspiration rates, higher latent heat fluxes, and a damped atmospheric temperature response. In contrast, grasses with shallow root zones have minimal evapotranspiration rates, lower latent heat fluxes, and a rapid and sharp atmospheric temperature response. On the whole, converting a naturally wooded ecosystem to a farmland or pasture effectively decreases the available water in the subsurface for transpiration subsequently amplifying the atmospheric response to severe weather.

  13. A Reactive Transport Simulator for Biogeochemical Processes in Subsurface System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-04-01

    BIOGEOCHEM is a Fortran code that mumerically simulates the coupled processes of solute transport, microbial population dynamics, microbial metabolism, and geochemical reactions. The potential applications of the code include, but not limited to, (a) sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for assessing the impact of microbial activity on subsurface geochemical systems; (b) extraction of biogeochemical parameter values from field observations or laboratory measurements, (c) helping to design and optimize laboratory biogeochemical experiments, and (d) data integration. Methodmore »of Solution: A finite difference method and a Newton-Raphson technique are used to solve a set of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations and algebraic equations. Practical Application: Environmental analysis, bioremediation performance assessments of radioactive or non-radioactive wase disposal, and academic research.« less

  14. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Hao; Hamilton, Mark F.; Bhalla, Rajan; Brown, Walter E.; Hay, Todd A.; Whitelonis, Nicholas J.; Yang, Shang-Te; Naqvi, Aale R.

    2013-09-30

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  15. Biogeochemical Cycles in Degraded Lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Vieira, Ima Celia G.; ReisdeCarvalho, Claudio Jose; DeaneDeAbreuSa, Tatiana; deSpozaMoutinho, Paulo R.; Figueiredo, Ricardo O.; Stone, Thomas A.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to define and describe the types of landscapes that fall under the broad category of "degraded lands" and to study biogeochemical cycles across this range of degradation found in secondary forests. We define degraded land as that which has lost part of its capacity of renovation of a productive ecosystem, either in the context of agroecosystems or as native communities of vegetation. This definition of degradation permits evaluation of biogeochemical constraints to future land uses.

  16. Biogeochemical Cycles in Degraded Lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Vieira, Ima Celia G.; ReisdeCarvalho, Claudio Jose; DeanedeAbreuSa, Tatiana; deSouzaMoutinho, Paulo R.; Figueiredo, Ricardo O.; Stone, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to define and describe the types of landscapes that fall under the broad category of "degraded lands" and to study biogeochemical cycles across this range of degradation found in secondary forests. We define degraded land as that which has lost part of its capacity of renovation of a productive ecosystem, either in the context of agroecosystems or as native communities of vegetation. This definition of degradation permits evaluation of biogeochemical constraints to future land uses.

  17. A hierarchical framework for coupling surface fluxes to atompsheric general circulation models: The homogeneity test

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.

    1993-12-31

    The atmosphere and the biosphere are inherently coupled to one another. Atmospheric surface state variables such as temperature, winds, water vapor, precipitation, and radiation control biophysical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes at the surface and subsurface. At the same time, surface fluxes of momentum, moisture, heat, and trace gases act as time-dependent boundary conditions providing feedback on atmospheric processes. To understand such phenomena, a coupled set of interactive models is required. Costs are still prohibitive for computing surface/subsurface fluxes directly for medium-resolution atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs), but a technique has been developed for testing large-scale homogeneity and accessing surface parameterizations and models to reduce this computational cost and maintain accuracy. This modeling system potentially bridges the observed spatial and temporal ranges yet allows the incorporation of necessary details about individual ecological community types or biomes and simulates the net momentum, heat, moisture, and trace gas fluxes. This suite of coupled models is defined here as the hierarchical systems flux scheme (HSFS).

  18. A hierarchical framework for coupling surface fluxes to atompsheric general circulation models: The homogeneity test

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.

    1993-01-01

    The atmosphere and the biosphere are inherently coupled to one another. Atmospheric surface state variables such as temperature, winds, water vapor, precipitation, and radiation control biophysical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes at the surface and subsurface. At the same time, surface fluxes of momentum, moisture, heat, and trace gases act as time-dependent boundary conditions providing feedback on atmospheric processes. To understand such phenomena, a coupled set of interactive models is required. Costs are still prohibitive for computing surface/subsurface fluxes directly for medium-resolution atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs), but a technique has been developed for testing large-scale homogeneity and accessing surface parameterizations and models to reduce this computational cost and maintain accuracy. This modeling system potentially bridges the observed spatial and temporal ranges yet allows the incorporation of necessary details about individual ecological community types or biomes and simulates the net momentum, heat, moisture, and trace gas fluxes. This suite of coupled models is defined here as the hierarchical systems flux scheme (HSFS).

  19. Modeling greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, N2O, CH4) from managed arable soils with a fully coupled hydrology-biogeochemical modeling system simulating water and nutrient transport and associated carbon and nitrogen cycling at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klatt, Steffen; Haas, Edwin; Kraus, David; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kraft, Philipp; Plesca, Ina; Breuer, Lutz; Zhu, Bo; Zhou, Minghua; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Xunhua; Wlotzka, Martin; Heuveline, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    The use of mineral nitrogen fertilizer sustains the global food production and therefore the livelihood of human kind. The rise in world population will put pressure on the global agricultural system to increase its productivity leading most likely to an intensification of mineral nitrogen fertilizer use. The fate of excess nitrogen and its distribution within landscapes is manifold. Process knowledge on the site scale has rapidly grown in recent years and models have been developed to simulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in managed ecosystems on the site scale. Despite first regional studies, the carbon and nitrogen cycling on the landscape or catchment scale is not fully understood. In this study we present a newly developed modelling approach by coupling the fully distributed hydrology model CMF (catchment modelling framework) to the process based regional ecosystem model LandscapeDNDC for the investigation of hydrological processes and carbon and nitrogen transport and cycling, with a focus on nutrient displacement and resulting greenhouse gas emissions in a small catchment at the Yanting Agro-ecological Experimental Station of Purple Soil, Sichuan province, China. The catchment hosts cypress forests on the outer regions, arable fields on the sloping croplands cultivated with wheat-maize rotations and paddy rice fields in the lowland. The catchment consists of 300 polygons vertically stratified into 10 soil layers. Ecosystem states (soil water content and nutrients) and fluxes (evapotranspiration) are exchanged between the models at high temporal scales (hourly to daily) forming a 3-dimensional model application. The water flux and nutrients transport in the soil is modelled using a 3D Richards/Darcy approach for subsurface fluxes with a kinematic wave approach for surface water runoff and the evapotranspiration is based on Penman-Monteith. Biogeochemical processes are modelled by LandscapeDNDC, including soil microclimate, plant growth and biomass allocation, organic matter mineralisation, nitrification, denitrification, chemodenitrification and methanogenesis producing and consuming soil based greenhouse gases. The model application will present first validation results of the coupled model to simulate soil based greenhouse gas emissions as well as nitrate discharge from the Yanting catchment. The model application will also present the effects of different management practices (fertilization rates and timings, tilling, residues management) on the redistribution of N surplus within the catchment causing biomass productivity gradients and different levels of indirect N2O emissions along topographical gradients.

  20. Biogeochemical Redox Processes and their Impact on Contaminant Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    reactions via the oxidation of labile organic carbon or inorganic compounds (electron donors), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), and uranium (U). The chemical speciation, bioavailability, toxicity, the biogeochemical behavior of other not redox-active elements and compounds may be indirectly coupled to redox

  1. Topographic controls on soil moisture scaling properties in polygonal ground using idealized high-resolution surface-subsurface simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.

    2014-11-01

    Microtopographic features, such as polygonal ground, are characteristic sources of landscape heterogeneity in the Alaskan Arctic coastal plain. Here, we analyze the hypothesis that microtopography is a dominant controller of soil moisture in polygonal landscapes. We perform multi-year surface-subsurface isothermal flow simulations using the PFLOTRAN model for summer months at six spatial resolutions (0.25-8 m, in increments of a factor of 2). Simulations are performed for four study sites near Barrow, Alaska that are part of the NGEE-Arctic project. Results indicate a non-linear scaling relationship for statistical moments of soil moisture. Mean soil moisture for all study sites is accurately captured in coarser resolution simulations, but soil moisture variance is significantly under-estimated in coarser resolution simulations. The decrease in soil moisture variance in coarser resolution simulations is greater than the decrease in soil moisture variance obtained by coarsening out the fine resolution simulations. We also develop relationships to estimate the fine-resolution soil moisture probability distribution function (PDF) using coarse resolution simulations and topography. Although the estimated soil moisture PDF is underestimated during very wet conditions, the moments computed from the inferred soil moisture PDF had good agreement with the full model solutions (bias < ± 4 % and correlation > 0.99) for all four sites. Lastly, we develop two spatially-explicit methods to downscale coarse-resolution simulations of soil moisture. The first downscaling method requires simulation of soil moisture at fine and coarse resolution, while the second downscaling approach uses only topographical information at the two resolutions. Both downscaling approaches are able to accurately estimate fine-resolution soil moisture spatial patterns when compared to fine-resolution simulations (mean error for all study sites are < ± 1 %), but the first downscaling method more accurately estimates soil moisture variance.

  2. Capturing optically important constituents and properties in a marine biogeochemical and ecosystem model

    E-print Network

    Hickman, A. E.

    We present a numerical model of the ocean that couples a three-stream radiative transfer component with a marine biogeochemical–ecosystem component in a dynamic three-dimensional physical framework. The radiative transfer ...

  3. Biogeochemical modeling at mass extinction boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, M. R.; Caldeira, K. G.

    1991-01-01

    The causes of major mass extinctions is a subject of considerable interest to those concerned with the history and evolution of life on earth. The primary objectives of the proposed plan of research are: (1) to develop quantitative time-dependent biogeochemical cycle models, coupled with an ocean atmosphere in order to improve the understanding of global scale physical, chemical, and biological processes that control the distribution of elements important for life at times of mass extinctions; and (2) to develop a comprehensive data base of the best available geochemical, isotopic, and other relevant geologic data from sections across mass extinction boundaries. These data will be used to constrain and test the biogeochemical model. These modeling experiments should prove useful in: (1) determining the possible cause(s) of the environmental changes seen at bio-event boundaries; (2) identifying and quantifying little-known feedbacks among the oceans, atmosphere, and biosphere; and (3) providing additional insights into the possible responses of the earth system to perturbations of various timescales. One of the best known mass extinction events marks the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary (66 Myr ago). Data from the K/T boundary are used here to constrain a newly developed time-dependent biogeochemical cycle model that is designed to study transient behavior of the earth system. Model results predict significant fluctuations in ocean alkalinity, atmospheric CO2, and global temperatures caused by extinction of calcareous plankton and reduction in the sedimentation rates of pelagic carbonates and organic carbon. Oxygen-isotome and other paleoclimatic data from K/T time provide some evidence that such climatic fluctuations may have occurred, but stabilizing feedbacks may have acted to reduce the ocean alkalinity and carbon dioxide fluctuations.

  4. Effects of Privately Owned Land Management Practices on Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getson, J. M.; Hutyra, L.; Short, A. G.; Templer, P. H.; Kittredge, D.

    2014-12-01

    An increasing fraction of the global population lives in urban settings. Understanding how the human-natural system couple and decouple biogeochemical cycles across urbanization gradients is crucial for human health and environmental sustainability. Natural processes of nutrient deposition, export, uptake, and internal cycling can be disrupted by human activities. Residential landscape management (e.g. composting, leaf litter collection, fertilizer application) interrupts these natural biogeochemical cycles; therefore, it is key to characterize these practices and their impacts. This study looks at private land management practices along a rural to urban gradient in Boston, Massachusetts. We used a mail survey instrument coupled with biogeochemical measurements and remote sensing derived estimates of aboveground biomass to estimate biogeochemical modifications associated with residential landscape management practices. We find parcel size influences management behavior, management practices differ for leaf litter and lawn clippings, and fertilizer application is unrelated to parcel size or degree of urban-ness. These management practices result in nutrient redistribution that differs with residential characteristics.

  5. Ocean fronts drive marine fishery production and biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Woodson, C Brock; Litvin, Steven Y

    2015-02-10

    Long-term changes in nutrient supply and primary production reportedly foreshadow substantial declines in global marine fishery production. These declines combined with current overfishing, habitat degradation, and pollution paint a grim picture for the future of marine fisheries and ecosystems. However, current models forecasting such declines do not account for the effects of ocean fronts as biogeochemical hotspots. Here we apply a fundamental technique from fluid dynamics to an ecosystem model to show how fronts increase total ecosystem biomass, explain fishery production, cause regime shifts, and contribute significantly to global biogeochemical budgets by channeling nutrients through alternate trophic pathways. We then illustrate how ocean fronts affect fishery abundance and yield, using long-term records of anchovy-sardine regimes and salmon abundances in the California Current. These results elucidate the fundamental importance of biophysical coupling as a driver of bottom-up vs. top-down regulation and high productivity in marine ecosystems. PMID:25624488

  6. Ocean fronts drive marine fishery production and biogeochemical cycling

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, C. Brock; Litvin, Steven Y.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term changes in nutrient supply and primary production reportedly foreshadow substantial declines in global marine fishery production. These declines combined with current overfishing, habitat degradation, and pollution paint a grim picture for the future of marine fisheries and ecosystems. However, current models forecasting such declines do not account for the effects of ocean fronts as biogeochemical hotspots. Here we apply a fundamental technique from fluid dynamics to an ecosystem model to show how fronts increase total ecosystem biomass, explain fishery production, cause regime shifts, and contribute significantly to global biogeochemical budgets by channeling nutrients through alternate trophic pathways. We then illustrate how ocean fronts affect fishery abundance and yield, using long-term records of anchovy–sardine regimes and salmon abundances in the California Current. These results elucidate the fundamental importance of biophysical coupling as a driver of bottom–up vs. top–down regulation and high productivity in marine ecosystems. PMID:25624488

  7. Scaling Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Processes in a Large River Floodplain and Alluvial Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helton, A. M.; Poole, G. C.; Payn, R. A.; Izurieta, C.; Wright, M.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Stanford, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Current methods for characterizing the influence of geomorphic structure on river processes are not well suited for study of large rivers with extensive hydrologic exchanges between the channel, floodplain surface, and alluvial aquifer. We applied a spatially explicit, three-dimensional model to simulate surface and subsurface flow and exchange, temperature, and dissolved oxygen within the 15 sq km Nyack Floodplain of the Middle Fork Flathead River, Montana, USA. We ran the model for four years and simulated nine conservative particle releases across a range of river discharges. Our model results include simulations that: 1) describe the rapid hydrologic response of the alluvial aquifer to flood events, 2) quantify a substantial effect of surface-subsurface water exchange on the hydrologic residence time of the floodplain, and 3) explain >75% of variance in aquifer temperature and >65% of variance in dissolved oxygen concentrations across space and through time (laterally, vertically, and during seasonal discharge variation). We also explore the relationship between simulated residence time and the spatial distribution of electron donors (dissolved organic carbon concentration and quality) and acceptors (nitrate, iron, sulfate) throughout the aquifer. Our results underscore the importance of geomorphic, hydrologic, and temperature dynamics in driving river ecosystem processes, and they demonstrate how a sufficient representation of the physical template of a river ecosystem can be used to explain complex spatiotemporal patterns of biogeochemical dynamics.

  8. The global troposphere - Biogeochemical cycles, chemistry, and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Allario, F.

    1982-01-01

    The chemical composition of the troposphere is controlled by various biogeochemical cycles that couple the atmosphere with the oceans, the solid earth and the biosphere, and by atmospheric photochemical/chemical reactions. These cycles and reactions are discussed and a number of key questions concerning tropospheric composition and chemistry for the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur species are identified. Next, various remote sensing techniques and instruments capable of measuring and monitoring tropospheric species from the ground, aircraft and space to address some of these key questions are reviewed. Future thrusts in remote sensing of the troposphere are also considered.

  9. Simulating non-point source pollution with an integrated surface-subsurface hydrologic approach in an agricultural watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, L.; Chen, L.; Yu, Z.

    2009-12-01

    The non-point source pollution is a major threat for water security in agricultural watersheds. A physically-based integrated hydrological model system is implemented in Meilin watershed, a small agricultural watershed in the southwest part of Tai Lake drainage system, China to study surface and subsurface hydrologic processes and to evaluate the solute (N, P) transport along various pathways at a watershed scale. Based on past and ongoing field studies, the watershed is reasonably well characterized and has been monitored on a regular base. Field observed data were used to assess the overland flow and infiltration processes and evaluate how different factors (i.e., soil texture, land use-land cover, and micro-topography) would affect these hydrologic processes. The model is driven by the observed precipitation to simulate surface water, soil moisture, groundwater and solute transport. The model calibration was conducted by using a multi-objective approach and the objectives include streamflow, soil moisture, groundwater level, solute concentration, etc. Numerical experiments were designed to elucidate the dynamics of watershed hydrologic processes as well as the interactive relationship on variables in land surface, unsaturated zone, and groundwater. The results illustrate how soil texture, land use-land cover, and topography would affect different hydrologic processes and their inter-relationship. The work will help better understand physically-coupled flow and solute transport in the watershed and enhance the quality of watershed flow and solute simulation.

  10. Ecological and Biogeochemical Interactions Constrain Planktonic

    E-print Network

    Pace, Michael L.

    Ecological and Biogeochemical Interactions Constrain Planktonic Nitrogen Fixation in Estuaries nitrogen (N) is strongly limiting to primary production. Estuaries generally fit this pat- tern-limited estuaries. Heterocystic cyanobacteria capable of N2 fixation are seldom observed in estuaries where

  11. Modeling the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen and phosphorus in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea: 1950-2000

    E-print Network

    Einat, Aharonov

    Modeling the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen and phosphorus in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea and remains ultra-oligotrophic. A mass balance model of the coupled N & P cycles synthesizing our conceptual in the model confirms that nitrogen fixation plays a minor role, in agreement with field measurements

  12. Can biogeochemical fluxes be recovered from nitrate and chlorophyll data? A case study assimilating data

    E-print Network

    Faugeras, Blaise

    Can biogeochemical fluxes be recovered from nitrate and chlorophyll data? A case study assimilating station (NW Mediterranean Sea), near-monthly nitrate and chlorophyll profiles and daily surface chlorophyll concentrations are assimilated in a coupled dynamical­biological model using the tangent linear

  13. Global Biogeochemical Cycles Global biogeochemical cycles can be defined as any of the natural circulation pathways

    E-print Network

    Winguth, Arne

    overall positive feedback processes due to global warming, but many of these processes are quantitativelyGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles Global biogeochemical cycles can be defined as any of the natural loops. Human activities, such as deforestation and fossil fuel burning, have directly or indirectly

  14. Linkages beyond boundaries between surface/subsurface and land /ocean for better management of groundwater under the changing climate and society in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Makoto

    2010-05-01

    Change in reliable water resources between groundwater and surface water occurred in many Asian cities depending on the development stage of urbanization and climate change. Although the subsurface water is connected with surface water in hydrological cycle, both waters were treated separately. Intensive field observations and data collections had been made in the basins including Tokyo, Osaka, Bangkok, Jakarta, Manila, Seoul, and Taipei, to evaluate the relationship between development stage of the city and various subsurface environments in Asia beyond the boundary between surface and subsurface environment under the condition of climate change. As a factor of separating water, energy and material at the earth surface into above and below the surface, land use/cover changes at three ages (1940's, 1970's and 2000's) in Asian 7 cities have been analyzed based on GIS with 0.5 km grid at seven targeted cities. Urbanization causes the decease in groundwater recharge rate and increase thermal energy transport into the subsurface. Global warming and heat island effects are also evaluated with in the cities and compared. Another boundary for water and material transports exists between land and ocean. Regarding material (contaminant) transports to the coast, direct groundwater discharge is recently recognized as a significant water and material pathway from land to ocean. Many Asian major cities are located in the coastal zone so material and contaminant transports by groundwater is a key to understanding the coastal water pollution and the effects on associated ecosystems. The exchanges of sea water and fresh water between the boundary were analyzed during the last 100 years in Asian coasts. In this paper, the importance of integrated treatments between surface/subsurface and land/ocean will be shown for better understanding and management of subsurface environment including groundwater under the condition of climate variation.

  15. Stepwise sensitivity analysis from qualitative to quantitative: Application to the terrestrial hydrological modeling of a Conjunctive Surface-Subsurface Process (CSSP) land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yanjun; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Duan, Qingyun; Choi, Hyun Il; Dai, Yongjiu; Wu, Huan

    2015-06-01

    An uncertainty quantification framework was employed to examine the sensitivities of 24 model parameters from a newly developed Conjunctive Surface-Subsurface Process (CSSP) land surface model (LSM). The sensitivity analysis (SA) was performed over 18 representative watersheds in the contiguous United States to examine the influence of model parameters in the simulation of terrestrial hydrological processes. Two normalized metrics, relative bias (RB) and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), were adopted to assess the fit between simulated and observed streamflow discharge (SD) and evapotranspiration (ET) for a 14 year period. SA was conducted using a multiobjective two-stage approach, in which the first stage was a qualitative SA using the Latin Hypercube-based One-At-a-Time (LH-OAT) screening, and the second stage was a quantitative SA using the Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS)-based Sobol' sensitivity indices. This approach combines the merits of qualitative and quantitative global SA methods, and is effective and efficient for understanding and simplifying large, complex system models. Ten of the 24 parameters were identified as important across different watersheds. The contribution of each parameter to the total response variance was then quantified by Sobol' sensitivity indices. Generally, parameter interactions contribute the most to the response variance of the CSSP, and only 5 out of 24 parameters dominate model behavior. Four photosynthetic and respiratory parameters are shown to be influential to ET, whereas reference depth for saturated hydraulic conductivity is the most influential parameter for SD in most watersheds. Parameter sensitivity patterns mainly depend on hydroclimatic regime, as well as vegetation type and soil texture. This article was corrected on 26 JUN 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  16. Archaea in Biogeochemical Pierre Offre, Anja Spang, and Christa Schleper

    E-print Network

    Saleska, Scott

    Archaea in Biogeochemical Cycles Pierre Offre, Anja Spang, and Christa Schleper Department Keywords archaea, biogeochemical cycles, metabolism, carbon, nitrogen, sulfur Abstract Archaea constitute carbon from inorganic sources. Archaea thus play crucial roles in the Earth's global geochemical cycles

  17. Global Change: A Biogeochemical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, M.

    1983-01-01

    A research program that is designed to enhance our understanding of the Earth as the support system for life is described. The program change, both natural and anthropogenic, that might affect the habitability of the planet on a time scale roughly equal to that of a human life is studied. On this time scale the atmosphere, biosphere, and upper ocean are treated as a single coupled system. The need for understanding the processes affecting the distribution of essential nutrients--carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, sulfur, and water--within this coupled system is examined. The importance of subtle interactions among chemical, biological, and physical effects is emphasized. The specific objectives are to define the present state of the planetary life-support system; to ellucidate the underlying physical, chemical, and biological controls; and to provide the body of knowledge required to assess changes that might impact the future habitability of the Earth.

  18. Soil property control of biogeochemical processes beneath two subtropical stormwater infiltration basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Wanielista, Martin P.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Harris, Willie G.; Xuan, Zhemin

    2012-01-01

    Substantially different biogeochemical processes affecting nitrogen fate and transport were observed beneath two stormwater infiltration basins in north-central Florida. Differences are related to soil textural properties that deeply link hydroclimatic conditions with soil moisture variations in a humid, subtropical climate. During 2008, shallow groundwater beneath the basin with predominantly clayey soils (median, 41% silt+clay) exhibited decreases in dissolved oxygen from 3.8 to 0.1 mg L-1 and decreases in nitrate nitrogen (NO3-–N) from 2.7 mg L-1 to -1, followed by manganese and iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. In contrast, beneath the basin with predominantly sandy soils (median, 2% silt+clay), aerobic conditions persisted from 2007 through 2009 (dissolved oxygen, 5.0–7.8 mg L-1), resulting in NO3-–N of 1.3 to 3.3 mg L-1 in shallow groundwater. Enrichment of d15N and d18O of NO3- combined with water chemistry data indicates denitrification beneath the clayey basin and relatively conservative NO3- transport beneath the sandy basin. Soil-extractable NO3-–N was significantly lower and the copper-containing nitrite reductase gene density was significantly higher beneath the clayey basin. Differences in moisture retention capacity between fine- and coarse-textured soils resulted in median volumetric gas-phase contents of 0.04 beneath the clayey basin and 0.19 beneath the sandy basin, inhibiting surface/subsurface oxygen exchange beneath the clayey basin. Results can inform development of soil amendments to maintain elevated moisture content in shallow soils of stormwater infiltration basins, which can be incorporated in improved best management practices to mitigate NO3- impacts.

  19. Temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes at the Norman Landfill site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2013-10-01

    The temporal variability observed in redox sensitive species in groundwater can be attributed to coupled hydrological, geochemical, and microbial processes. These controlling processes are typically nonstationary, and distributed across various time scales. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate biogeochemical data sets from a municipal landfill site to identify the dominant modes of variation and determine the physical controls that become significant at different time scales. Data on hydraulic head, specific conductance, ?2H, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon were collected between 1998 and 2000 at three wells at the Norman Landfill site in Norman, OK. Wavelet analysis on this geochemical data set indicates that variations in concentrations of reactive and conservative solutes are strongly coupled to hydrologic variability (water table elevation and precipitation) at 8 month scales, and to individual eco-hydrogeologic framework (such as seasonality of vegetation, surface-groundwater dynamics) at 16 month scales. Apart from hydrologic variations, temporal variability in sulfate concentrations can be associated with different sources (FeS cycling, recharge events) and sinks (uptake by vegetation) depending on the well location and proximity to the leachate plume. Results suggest that nitrate concentrations show multiscale behavior across temporal scales for different well locations, and dominant variability in dissolved organic carbon for a closed municipal landfill can be larger than 2 years due to its decomposition and changing content. A conceptual framework that explains the variability in chemical concentrations at different time scales as a function of hydrologic processes, site-specific interactions, and/or coupled biogeochemical effects is also presented.

  20. Temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes at the Norman Landfill site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2013-01-01

    The temporal variability observed in redox sensitive species in groundwater can be attributed to coupled hydrological, geochemical, and microbial processes. These controlling processes are typically nonstationary, and distributed across various time scales. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate biogeochemical data sets from a municipal landfill site to identify the dominant modes of variation and determine the physical controls that become significant at different time scales. Data on hydraulic head, specific conductance, ?2H, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon were collected between 1998 and 2000 at three wells at the Norman Landfill site in Norman, OK. Wavelet analysis on this geochemical data set indicates that variations in concentrations of reactive and conservative solutes are strongly coupled to hydrologic variability (water table elevation and precipitation) at 8 month scales, and to individual eco-hydrogeologic framework (such as seasonality of vegetation, surface-groundwater dynamics) at 16 month scales. Apart from hydrologic variations, temporal variability in sulfate concentrations can be associated with different sources (FeS cycling, recharge events) and sinks (uptake by vegetation) depending on the well location and proximity to the leachate plume. Results suggest that nitrate concentrations show multiscale behavior across temporal scales for different well locations, and dominant variability in dissolved organic carbon for a closed municipal landfill can be larger than 2 years due to its decomposition and changing content. A conceptual framework that explains the variability in chemical concentrations at different time scales as a function of hydrologic processes, site-specific interactions, and/or coupled biogeochemical effects is also presented.

  1. The Eastern Mediterranean Sea biogeochemical dynamics in the 1990s: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattia, Gelsomina; Zavatarelli, Marco; Vichi, Marcello; Oddo, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    The coupled physical-biogeochemical dynamics of the Mediterranean Sea have been hindcasted for the decade 1990-2000 with the Nucleus for European Modeling of the Ocean-Biogeochemical Flux Model coupled modeling system. This work describes and discusses the simulated changes in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea physical and biogeochemical dynamics occurring in the 1990s, contemporary to the establishment of the Eastern Mediterranean Transient. The physical component of the modeling system reproduces several changes in the Eastern Mediterranean physical dynamics and thermohaline structure that are consistent with observations pertinent to the transient period. The simulated change in the atmospheric forcing during the early 1990s is considered sufficient to develop upwelling favorable conditions that determine an overall upward displacement of the simulated deep Eastern Mediterranean nutrient pool. Model results indicate that in the post transient period, the displaced nutrients were advected westward along with the reestablishment of the Levantine Intermediate Water pathway, and together with the occurrence of strong winter mixing events in the Ionian Sea, they determined an increase of the primary production processes in the euphotic layer along the eastern coast of Ionian Sea and northern Levantine basin. The biogeochemical model suggests that such an increase in productivity apparently impacted mostly the microbial branch of the marine trophic web.

  2. Comparative Biogeochemical Cycles of Bioenergy Crops Reveal

    E-print Network

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Comparative Biogeochemical Cycles of Bioenergy Crops Reveal Nitrogen-Fixation and Low Greenhouse, miscanthus would result in the greatest GHG reduction. Key words: biofuel; bioenergy; carbon seques- tration crops is expanding because of the increasing disparity between fuel demand and supply (U.S.DOE 2006; EIA

  3. GlobalBiogeochemicalCycles RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-print Network

    Martin, Randall

    (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) have central roles in biogeochemical cycles. Nitrogen oxides (NOx. Zhang (2014), Global dry deposition of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide inferred from space Accepted article online 3 SEP 2014 Global dry deposition of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide inferred

  4. Long-term Simulations of Pluto's Atmosphere and Surface as a Coupled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalucha, Angela M.

    2015-11-01

    Previous work has modeled either Pluto's atmosphere or surface/subsurface as separate entities. In reality, these two regions should be coupled energetically and physically because of the accumulation, sublimation, and transport of volatiles (here, N2). Simulation results over multi-Pluto years are presented from a general circulation model that has both detailed atmospheric and surface/subsurface modules. As the initial model conditions that will ultimately reproduce the observed surface pressures from New Horizons, stellar occultation data, and spectroscopic observations are not known, by trial and error the model is initialized with different surface pressures and amounts of surface ice (collectively known as the volatile inventory). This “brute force” method is now a viable strategy given the ongoing development of the Pluto general circulation model (based on the MIT general circulation model dynamical core; Zalucha & Michaels 2013) and modern supercomputing power. The coupled atmosphere and surface/subsurface model is run until a yearly repeatable frost cycle occurs (if at all). Surface coverage of volatiles and surface pressure will be presented from the various scenarios. Ancillary variables such temperature (of both the atmosphere and surface/subsurface) and wind direction and magnitude will also be shown for cases of particular interest.

  5. BIOGEOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC MICROBIAL MATS AND THEIR BIOTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David; Discipulo, M.; Turk, K.; Londry, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats offer an opportunity to define holistic functionality at the millimeter scale. At the same time. their biogeochemistry contributes to environmental processes on a planetary scale. These mats are possibly direct descendents of the most ancient biological communities; communities in which oxygenic photosynthesis might have been invented. Mats provide one of the best natural systems to study how microbial populations associate to control dynamic biogeochemical gradients. These are self- sustaining, complete ecosystems in which light energy absorbed over a dial (24 hour) cycle drives the synthesis of spatially-organized, diverse biomass. Tightly-coupled microorganisms in the mat have specialized metabolisms that catalyze transformations of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and a host of other elements.

  6. Catchment Legacies and Trajectories: Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, N. B.; Loukinova, N. V.

    2012-04-01

    Increased nutrient loads delivered from watersheds due to agricultural intensification, industrialization, and urbanization have contributed to the persistence of large hypoxic zones in inland and coastal waters at a global scale. Watershed management practices to target these non-point source pollutants have reportedly resulted in little or no improvement in water quality, even after extensive implementation of conservation measures or Best Management Practices (BMPs). The lag time between implementation of a conservation measure and resultant water quality benefits has recently been recognized as an important factor in the "apparent" failure of these BMPs. Conservation measures are often implemented without explicit consideration of the lag time and with the expectation that they will lead to immediate benefits; the resulting failure to meet such expectations then discourages vital restoration efforts. In order to address this problem, it is important to quantify the lag times associated with watershed management efforts a priori and to implement restoration strategies that are targeted specifically at minimizing lag times as well as maximizing restoration benefits. The focus of this research is to develop an analytical framework for understanding the time lags between land use changes and stream water quality benefits. Watershed lag times are a function of coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical factors that modify pollutant loads as these pollutants are transported through the landscape. Hydrologic factors include the pathways of delivery of the solute to streams (e.g., overland flow, tile flow, or groundwater pathways), and the distribution of travel times along the pathways. Biogeochemical factors include the reactivity of the pollutant, and whether there are internal sources of the pollutant within the landscape. Results of a data synthesis effort of the MARB and the Baltic Basin indicate that landscapes having been subject to fertilizer application for decades have accumulated legacy nutrient stores that will sustain stream nitrate concentrations decades after the cessation of fertilizer application. Here, we have used a travel time-based approach to evaluate the hydrologic legacy and a stochastic carbon nitrogen cycling model to evaluate the biogeochemical legacy. Preliminary results indicate a strong dependence of the spatial allocation of the management practice on the benefits realized, both in terms of reductions in concentrations as well as lag times. A random correlation between implementation of management practices and watershed travel times has been found to result in an interesting linear relationship between the concentration reduction and the percent watershed undergoing land use changes, while power function relationships have emerged for cases of positive and negative correlations.

  7. Coastal-zone biogeochemical dynamics under global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, F.T.; Ver, L.M.; Lerman, A.

    2000-03-01

    The coastal zone, consisting of the continental shelves to a depth of 200 meters, including bays, lagoons, estuaries, and near-shore banks, is an environment that is strongly affected by its biogeochemical and physical interactions with reservoirs in the adjacent domains of land, atmosphere, open ocean, and marine sediments. Because the coastal zone is smaller in volume and area coverage relative to the open ocean, it traditionally has been studied as an integral part of the global oceans. In this paper, the authors show by numerical modeling that it is important to consider the coastal zone as an entity separate from the open ocean in any assessment of future Earth-system response under human perturbation. Model analyses for the early part of the 21st century suggest that the coastal zone plays a significant modifying role in the biogeochemical dynamics of the carbon cycle and the nutrient cycles coupled to it. This role is manifested in changes in primary production, storage, and/or export of organic matter, its remineralization, and calcium carbonate precipitation--all of which determine the state of the coastal zone with respect to exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Under a scenario of future reduced or complete cessation of the thermohaline circulation (THC) of the global oceans, coastal waters become an important sink for atmospheric CO{sub 2}, as opposed to the conditions in the past and present, when coastal waters are believed to be a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Profound changes in coastal-zone primary productivity underscore the important role of phosphorus as a limiting nutrient. In addition, calculations indicate that the saturation state of coastal waters with respect to carbonate minerals will decline by {approximately}15% by the year 2030. Any future slowdown in the THC of the oceans will increase slightly the rate of decline in saturation state.

  8. Apparatus for Cold, Pressurized Biogeochemical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pappalardo, Robert T.; Connon, Stephanie A.; Gleeson, Damhnait F.

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory apparatus has been devised as a means of studying plausible biogeochemical reactions under high-pressure, low-temperature aqueous, anaerobic conditions like those conjectured to prevail in a liquid water ocean on Europa (the fourth largest moon of the planet Jupiter). The experiments to be performed by use of this apparatus are intended to enhance understanding of how life (if any) could originate and evolve in the Europa ocean environment. Inasmuch as terrestrial barophilic, psychrophilic organisms that thrive under anaerobic conditions are used in the experiments, the experiments may also contribute to terrestrial biogeochemistry. The apparatus (see figure) includes a bolt-closure reaction vessel secured inside a refrigerator that maintains a temperature of 4 C. Pressurized water is supplied to the interior of the vessel by a hydrostatic pump, which is attached to the vessel via high-pressure fittings. The terrestrial organisms used in the experiments thus far have been several facultative barophilic, psychrophilic stains of Shewanella bacteria. In the experiments, these organisms have been tested for reduction of ferric ion by growing them in the presence of a ferric food source under optimized terrestrial conditions. The short-term goal of these experiments has been to select Shewanella strains that exhibit iron-reduction capability and test their ability to facilitate biogeochemical reduction of iron under temperature and pressure conditions imitating those in Europa s ocean. It is anticipated, that, once growth under Europa-like conditions has been achieved, the selected Shewanella strains will be used to facilitate biogeochemical reactions of sulfate and carbonate with hydrogen gas. Any disequilibrium of the products with the environment would be interpreted as signifying biogenic activity and the possibility of life in Europa s ocean.

  9. Impacts of mesoscale eddies in the South China Sea on biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mingxian; Chai, Fei; Xiu, Peng; Li, Shiyu; Rao, Shivanesh

    2015-09-01

    Biogeochemical cycles associated with mesoscale eddies in the South China Sea (SCS) were investigated. The study was based on a coupled physical-biogeochemical Pacific Ocean model (Regional Ocean Model System-Carbon, Silicate, and Nitrogen Ecosystem, ROMS-CoSiNE) simulation for the period from 1991 to 2008. A total of 568 mesoscale eddies with lifetime longer than 30 days were used in the analysis. Composite analysis revealed that the cyclonic eddies were associated with abundance of nutrients, phytoplankton, and zooplankton while the anticyclonic eddies depressed biogeochemical cycles, which are generally controlled by the eddy pumping mechanism. In addition, diatoms were dominant in phytoplankton species due to the abundance of silicate. Dipole structures of vertical fluxes with net upward motion in cyclonic eddies and net downward motion in anticyclonic eddies were revealed. During the lifetime of an eddy, the evolutions of physical, biological, and chemical structures were not linearly coupled at the eddy core where plankton grew, and composition of the community depended not only on the physical and chemical processes but also on the adjustments by the predator-prey relationship.

  10. Modelling physical and biogeochemical state of the Mediterranean Sea under contemporary and future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solidoro, Cosimo; Lazzari, Paolo; Cossarini, Gianpiero; Melaku Canu, Donata; Lovato, Tomas; Vichi, Marcello

    2014-05-01

    A validated 3D coupled transport-biogeochemical model is used to assess the impact of future climatic and management scenarios on biogeochemical and ecological properties of the Mediterranean Sea. Results are discussed in term of temporal and spatial distribution of parameters and indicators related to the carbonate system and the cycles of carbon and inorganic nutrients through dissolved and particulate phases, as simulated by a multi nutrient multi plankton numerical model under current and future conditions. Simulations span the period 2000-2040 and are performed by forcing a three-dimensional off-line coupled eco-hydrodynamical model (BFM and OPA-tracer model, http://bfm-community.eu/) with marine circulation fields produced by ad hoc implementation of the NEMO modelling system and with river input of nutrient and freshwater computed in recent European fp7 projects. The model properly describes available experimental information on contemporary seasonal dynamic and spatial distribution at the basin and sub-basin scale of major biogeochemical parameters, as well as primary production and carbon fluxes at the air-ocean interface. Model projections suggest that future Mediterranean sea will be globally warmer, more productive, and more acidic, but with significant space variability. The relative importance of different biotic and abiotic parameters in defining such a change is explored through several numerical experiments. Potential implications in terms of ecological and higher trophic level organisms dynamics are explored as well, by integrating niche properties of selected organisms and suggestions provided by food web models.

  11. The NEON Aquatic Network: Expanding the Availability of Biogeochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Bohall, C.; Fitzgerald, M.; Utz, R.; Parker, S. M.; Roehm, C. L.; Goodman, K. J.; McLaughlin, B.

    2013-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are facing unprecedented pressure from climate change and land-use practices. Invasive species, whether plant, animal, insect or microbe present additional threat to aquatic ecosystem services. There are significant scientific challenges to understanding how these forces will interact to affect aquatic ecosystems, as the flow of energy and materials in the environment is driven by multivariate and non-linear biogeochemical cycles. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect and provide observational data across multiple scales. Sites were selected to maximize representation of major North American ecosystems using a multivariate geographic clustering method that partitioned the continental US, AK, HI, and Puerto Rico into 20 eco-climatic domains. The NEON data collection systems and methods are designed to yield standardized, near real-time data subjected to rigorous quality controls prior to public dissemination through an online data portal. NEON will collect data for 30 years to facilitate spatial-temporal analysis of environmental responses and drivers of ecosystem change, ranging from local through continental scales. Here we present the NEON Aquatic Network, a multi-parameter network consisting of a combination of in situ sensor and observational data. This network will provide data to examine biogeochemical, biological, hydrologic and geomorphic metrics at 36 sites, which are a combination of small 1st/2nd order wadeable streams, large rivers and lakes. A typical NEON Aquatic site will host up to two in-stream sensor sets designed to collect near-continuous water quality data (e.g. pH/ORP, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, CDOM) along with up to 8 shallow groundwater monitoring wells (level, temp., cond.), and a local meteorological station (e.g. 2D wind speed, PAR, barometric pressure, temperature, net radiation). These coupled sensor suites will be complemented by observational data (e.g. water/sediment chemistry, aquatic organisms, geomorphology). The aquatic network will produce ~212 low-level data products for each site. NEON will produce several higher level data products such as measurements of whole-stream metabolism, gross primary productivity, ecosystem respiration, and fluxes of nitrogen, phosphorous and carbon that will enable users to analyze processes on a gross scale. These data may be integrated with NEON's terrestrial and airborne networks to bridge the gap between aquatic and terrestrial biogeochemical research. The NEON Aquatic Network is poised to greatly expand our ability to create more robust biogeochemical models. For example, hydrologic and stable isotope data will allow investigation of terrestrial-aquatic carbon flux. Constraints provided by NEON's terrestrial and atmospheric data concurrent with remotely sensed data will facilitate the scaling to regional and continental scales, potentially leading to greater accuracy in the global carbon budget. The NEON Aquatic Network represents a powerful tool that will give the scientific community access to standardized data over spatiotemporal scales that are needed to answer fundamental questions about natural ecological variability and responses to changes in the environment.

  12. Reanalysis of biogeochemical properties in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossarini, Gianpiero; Teruzzi, Anna; Salon, Stefano; Solidoro, Cosimo

    2014-05-01

    In the 3D variational (3DVAR) assimilation approach the error covariance matrix can be decomposed in a series of operators. The decomposition makes the 3DVAR particularly suitable for marine biogeochemistry data assimilation, because of the reduced computational costs of the method and its modularity, which allows to define the covariance among the biogeochemical variables in a specific operator. In the present work, the results of 3DVAR assimilation of surface chlorophyll concentration in a multi-annual simulation of the Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry are presented. The assimilated chlorophyll concentrations are obtained from satellite observations (Volpe et al. 2012). The multi-annual simulation is carried out using the OPATM-BFM model (Lazzari et al. 2012), which describes the low trophic web dynamics and is offline coupled with the MFS physical model (Oddo et al. 2009). In the OPATM-BFM four types of phytoplankton are simulated in terms of their content in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, silicon and chlorophyll. In the 3DVAR the error covariance matrix has been decomposed in three different operators, which account for the vertical, the horizontal and the biogeochemical covariance (Teruzzi et al. 2014). The biogeochemical operator propagates the result of the assimilation to the OPATM-BFM variables, providing innovation for the components of the four phytoplankton types. The biogeochemical covariance has been designed supposing that the assimilation preserves the physiological status and the relative abundances of phytoplankton types. Practically, the assimilation preserves the internal quotas of the components for each phytoplankton as long as the optimal growth rate condition are maintained. The quotas preservation is not applied when the phytoplankton is in severe declining growth phase, and the correction provided by the assimilation is set equal to zero. Moreover, the relative abundances among the phytoplankton functional types are preserved. The 3DVAR has been applied to the Mediterranean Sea for the period 1999-2010 with weekly assimilation. The results of the multi-annual run show that the assimilation improves the model skill in terms of a better representation of the mean chlorophyll concentrations over the Mediterranean Sea sub-regions and also in terms of spatial and temporal definition of local bloom events. Furthermore, the comparison with nutrients climatology based on in situ measurements show that the non assimilated variables are consistent with observations. The application of the 3DVAR revealed that in specific cases the correction introduced by the assimilation is not maintained by the model dynamics. In these cases, the satellite observations are characterized by local patchy bloom events, which are not well captured by the model. It has been observed that, since the bloom events are strongly affected by the vertical mixing dynamics, which support nutrients to the surface layer, a possible source of error are the mixing conditions provided by the physical model. Oddo et al. 2009. Ocean Science, 5(4), 461-473, doi:10.5194/os-5-461-2009. Lazzari et al. 2012. Biogeosciences, 9(1), 217-233, doi:10.5194/bg-9-217-2012. Teruzzi et al. 2014. Journal of Geophysical Research, 119, 1-18, doi:10.1002/2013JC009277. Volpe et al. 2012. Ocean Science Discussions, 9(2), 1349-1385, doi:10.5194/osd-9-1349-2012.

  13. Biogeochemical Cycles of Carbon and Sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The elements carbon (C) and sulfur (S) interact with each other across a network of elemental reservoirs that are interconnected by an array of physical, chemical and biological processes. These networks are termed the biogeochemical C and S cycles. The compounds of C are highly important, not only as organic matter, but also as atmospheric greenhouse gases, pH buffers in seawater, oxidation-reduction buffers virtually everywhere, and key magmatic constituents affecting plutonism and volcanism. The element S assumes important roles as an oxidation-reduction partner with C and Fe in biological systems, as a key constituent in magmas and volcanic gases, and as a major influence upon pH in certain environments. This presentation describes the modern biogeochemical C and S cycles. Measurements are described whereby stable isotopes can help to infer the nature and quantitative significance of biological and geological processes involved in the C and S cycles. This lecture also summarizes the geological and climatologic aspects of the ancient C and S cycles, as well as the planetary and extraterrestrial processes that influenced their evolution over millions to billions of years.

  14. Introduction to: ``Ecological and biogeochemical interactions in the dark ocean''

    E-print Network

    Hansell, Dennis

    '' The deep sea, a vast, dark realm featuring distinctive organ- isms and serving as a massive reservoirEditorial Introduction to: ``Ecological and biogeochemical interactions in the dark ocean that considerably less is known about ecological and biogeochemical processes in the dark ocean (the dim mesopelagic

  15. Global Biology Research Program: Biogeochemical Processes in Wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. S. (editor)

    1984-01-01

    The results of a workshop examining potential NASA contributions to research on wetland processes as they relate to global biogeochemical cycles are summarized. A wetlands data base utilizing remotely sensed inventories, studies of wetland/atmosphere exchange processes, and the extrapolation of local measurements to global biogeochemical cycling processes were identified as possible areas for NASA support.

  16. Nutrient removal using biosorption activated media: preliminary biogeochemical assessment of an innovative stormwater infiltration basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Wanielista, Martin P.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin; Harris, Willie G.

    2012-01-01

    Soil beneath a stormwater infiltration basin receiving runoff from a 22.7 ha predominantly residential watershed in central Florida, USA, was amended using biosorption activated media (BAM) to study the effectiveness of this technology in reducing inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus to groundwater. The functionalized soil amendment BAM consists of a 1.0:1.9:4.1 mixture (by volume) of tire crumb (to increase sorption capacity), silt and clay (to increase soil moisture retention), and sand (to promote sufficient infiltration), which was applied to develop a prototype stormwater infiltration basin utilizing nutrient reduction and flood control sub-basins. Comparison of nitrate/chloride (NO3-/Cl-) ratios for the shallow groundwater indicate that prior to using BAM, NO3- concentrations were substantially influenced by nitrification or variations in NO3- input. In contrast, for the prototype basin utilizing BAM, NO3-/Cl- ratios indicate minor nitrification and NO3- losses with the exception of one summer sample that indicated a 45% loss. Biogeochemical indicators (denitrifier activity derived from real-time polymerase chain reaction and variations in major ions, nutrients, dissolved and soil gases, and stable isotopes) suggest NO3- losses are primarily attributable to denitrification, whereas dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium is a minor process. Denitrification was likely occurring intermittently in anoxic microsites in the unsaturated zone, which was enhanced by increased soil moisture within the BAM layer and resultant reductions in surface/subsurface oxygen exchange that produced conditions conducive to increased denitrifier activity. Concentrations of total dissolved phosphorus and orthophosphate (PO43-) were reduced by more than 70% in unsaturated zone soil water, with the largest decreases in the BAM layer where sorption was the most likely mechanism for removal. Post-BAM PO43-/Cl- ratios for shallow groundwater indicate predominantly minor increases and decreases in PO43- with the exception of one summer sample that indicated a 50% loss. Differences in nutrient variations between the unsaturated zone and shallow groundwater may be the result of the intensity and duration of nutrient removal processes and mixing ratios with water that had not undergone significant chemical changes. Observed nitrogen and phosphorus losses demonstrate the potential, as well as future research needs to improve performance, of the prototype stormwater infiltration basin using BAM for providing passive, economical, stormwater nutrient-treatment technology to support green infrastructure.

  17. The biogeochemical footprint of agricultural soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, Gerard; Van Oost, Kristof; Wang, Zhengang

    2015-04-01

    Global biogeochemical cycles are a key component of the functioning of the Earth System: these cycles are all, to a varying extent, disturbed by human activities which not only has dramatic consequences for the global climate but also for the acidity of the world's oceans. It is only relatively recently that the role of lateral fluxes related to surface water movement and soil erosion and deposition (and the way those fluxes are modified by human action) is explicitly considered by the scientific community. In this paper we present an overview of our present-day understanding of the role of agricultural soil erosion in the global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous and silica. We discuss the major processes through which erosion affects these global cycles and pay particular attention to the knowledge gaps that prevent us from accurately assessing the impact of soil erosion on global biogeochemical cycling at different temporal scales. Furthering our understanding (and better constraining our estimates) will require progress both in terms of model development and process understanding. Research needs can be most clearly identified with respect to soil organic carbon: (i) at present, large-scale soil erosion (and deposition) models are poorly constrained so that the amount of carbon mobilised by erosion (and its fate) cannot be accurately estimated and (ii) the fate of soil organic carbon buried by deposition or delivered to river network is poorly understood. Uncertainties for N, P and Si are larger than those for C as we have less information on the amount of these elements stored in agricultural soils and/or do not fully understand how these elements cycle through the soil/plant system. Agricultural soil erosion does not affect soil functioning through its effect on biogeochemical cycling. Erosion directly affects soil hydrological functioning and is likely to affect weathering processes and soil production. Addressing all these issues requires the combination of a wide range of approaches, allowing not only to assess current processes, but also their cumulative effects over long time spans.

  18. Biogeochemical Reactions Under Simulated Europa Ocean Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amashukeli, X.; Connon, S. A.; Gleeson, D. F.; Kowalczyk, R. S.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2007-12-01

    Galileo data have demonstrated the probable presence of a liquid water ocean on Europa, and existence of salts and carbon dioxide in the satellite's surface ice (e.g., Carr et al., 1998; McCord et al., 1999, Pappalardo et al., 1999; Kivelson et al., 2000). Subsequently, the discovery of chemical signatures of extinct or extant life in Europa's ocean and on its surface became a distinct possibility. Moreover, understanding of Europa's potential habitability is now one of the major goals of the Europa Orbiter Flagship mission. It is likely, that in the early stages of Europa's ocean formation, moderately alkaline oceanic sulfate-carbonate species and a magnetite-silicate mantel could have participated in low-temperature biogeochemical sulfur, iron and carbon cycles facilitated by primitive organisms (Zolotov and Shock, 2004). If periodic supplies of fresh rock and sulfate-carbonate ions are available in Europa's ocean, then an exciting prospect exists that life may be present in Europa's ocean today. In our laboratory, we began the study of the plausible biogeochemical reactions under conditions appropriate to Europa's ocean using barophilic psychrophilic organisms that thrive under anaerobic conditions. In the near absence of abiotic synthetic pathways due to low Europa's temperatures, the biotic synthesis may present a viable opportunity for the formation of the organic and inorganic compounds under these extreme conditions. This work is independent of assumptions regarding hydrothermal vents at Europa's ocean floor or surface-derived oxidant sources. For our studies, we have fabricated a high-pressure (5,000 psi) reaction vessel that simulates aqueous conditions on Europa. We were also successful at reviving barophilic psychrophilic strains of Shewanella bacterium, which serve as test organisms in this investigation. Currently, facultative barophilic psychrophilic stains of Shewanella are grown in the presence of ferric food source; the strains exhibiting iron reduction capability will be later selected and used to facilitate biogeochemical reduction of iron under simulated temperature and pressure of Europa's ocean. The results of this work will enable us to ascertain whether Europa's cold, high-pressure ocean is capable of supporting life. In addition, the data from this study will help in generating a list of organic and inorganic target molecules for future remote sensing and in situ exploration missions.

  19. Biogeochemical cycling in the Strait of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, S C; Macdonald, R W; Burd, B; van Roodselaar, A

    2008-12-01

    The papers in this special issue present the results of a five-year project to study sedimentary biogeochemical processes in the Strait of Georgia, with special emphasis on the near-field of a large municipal outfall. Included in this special issue are overviews of the sedimentology, benthic biology, status of siliceous sponge reefs and distribution of organic carbon in the water column. Other papers address the cycling of contaminants (PCBs, PBDEs) and redox metals in the sediment, a method to map the extent of the influence of municipal effluent from staining on benthic bivalves, and the relationships among geochemical conditions and benthic abundance and diversity. The latter set of papers addresses the role of municipal effluent as a pathway of organic carbon and other contaminants into the Strait of Georgia and the effect of the effluent on benthic geochemistry and biology. PMID:19022498

  20. Microbes in subglacial environments: Significant biogeochemical agents?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanoil, B.; Gaidos, E.; Anderson, S.

    2003-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of abundant microbes in several subglacial environments, including alpine and polar glaciers and the giant Antarctic subglacial lake, Lake Vostok. Some indirect isotopic and geochemical evidence indicate that microbial communities may be active in these cold, dark, extreme environments. We have been using molecular biology, microbiology, and geochemistry tools to correlate the identity of microbes in subglacial systems with important geochemical parameters. Our studies have focused on several sites, including a subglacial volcanic caldera lake in Iceland (Grímsvötn; GI), a temperate alpine valley glacier in Alaska (Bench Glacier; BG), and a polythermal Arctic valley glacier in Nunavut, Canada (John Evans Glacier; JEG). Our preliminary data indicate the presence of some similar microbial groups in BG and JEG, perhaps reflecting a selection for organisms which are capable of growth under extreme physical conditions. However, there is also a large fraction of the communities which differ between the Alaskan and Canadian sites. The predicted physiologies of the variable community components appear to correlate well with the geochemistry of the BG and JEG. We have also detected C-fixation and heterotrophic activities at near in situ conditions in intact samples and/or in bacteria isolated from all three sites. Furthermore, subglacial pelagic and sediment-attached microbial communities at GI are significantly different than snow or ice communities, indicating that the subglacial community may be endemic to the caldera lake. Based on these data, we predict that microbes play important roles in chemical weathering processes, organic carbon turnover, and other (bio)geochemical processes in subglacial environments. Our results may have important implications for biogeochemical cycles, especially during periods in earth history when there was significant ice cover, e.g. the Quaternary and Neoproterozoic “Snowball Earth” events and may provide insights into habitats on other planets.

  1. River restoration: morphological, hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological changes and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Luster, J.; Linde, N.; Perona, P.; Mitchell, E. A. D.; Barry, D. A.; Cirpka, O. A.; Schneider, P.; Vogt, T.; Durisch-Kaiser, E.

    2013-08-01

    River restoration is essential as a means to enhance river dynamics, environmental heterogeneity and biodiversity. The underlying processes governing the dynamic changes need to be understood thoroughly to ensure that restoration projects meet their goals. In particular, we need to understand quantitatively how hydromorphological variability relates to ecosystem functioning and services, biodiversity and (ground)water quality in restored river corridors. Here, we provide a short overview on the literature and present a study of a restored river corridor in Switzerland combining physical, chemical, and biological observations with modeling. The results show complex spatial patterns of bank infiltration, habitat-type, biotic communities and biogeochemical processes. In particular, we found an increase in taxonomic and functional diversity for earthworms, testate amoebae and bacteria in the restored part of the river. This complexity is driven by river hydrology and morphodynamics, which are in turn actively coupled to riparian vegetation processes. Given this complexity and the multiple constraints on the uses and management of floodplains, a multi-disciplinary approach is needed to monitor the success of restoration measures and to make recommendations for future restoration projects.

  2. Biogeochemical Heterogeneity in Mars Analog Soils from the Atacama Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claire, M.; Shirey, B.; Brown, M.; Anderson, D.; Van Mourik, M.

    2014-12-01

    Water is ubiquitous on Earth and plays a fundamental role in all aspects of biogeochemical cycling. Our existence on an aqua planet hampers our ability to interpret a planet like Mars where it may not have rained for a billion years. Soils from the hyperarid core of Chile's Atacama Desert may represent the closest geochemical analog to Martian soils, as this region has the lowest precipitation on Earth. The extreme lack of rainfall (a few mm per decade) limits both weathering and biological activity to the point where soils are effectively sterile. Oxidized end products of atmospheric chemistry such as nitrate and perchlorate build up to values approaching those measured on Mars by NASA's Phoenix Lander. In June 2012, we collected soil samples from 8 locations along an aridity gradient from the hyperarid core of the Atacama (rainfall < 1 mm/yr) towards the arid (5-100 mm/yr) surrounding areas where microbial community activity is sufficient to support the hardiest of desert plant species. Field observations indicate that microbial activity and geochemical heterogeneity are anti-correlated. We will present our quantitative results coupling geochemical heterogeneity (salt concentrations, org C/N, trace metals) and microbial community activity (TRFLP, nitrogen cycling) along this transect, and argue that geochemical heterogeneity (which could be measured by a rover or lander on Mars) may be a proxy for lifeless soils.

  3. An Integrated Biogeochemical and Biophysical Analysis of Bioenergy Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Song, Y.; Barman, R.; Jain, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    Bioenergy crops are becoming increasingly important with growing concerns about the energy demand and climate change and the need to replace fossil fuels with carbon-neutral renewable sources of energy. The transition to a biofuel-based energy supply raises many questions such as: how and where to grow energy crops, what will be the impacts of growing large scale biofuel crops on climate system, the hydrological cycle and soil biogeochemistry. We are developing and applying an integrated system modeling framework to investigate the biophysical, physiological, and biogeochemical systems governing important processes that regulate crop growth such as water, energy and nutrient cycles. The framework has a two-big-leaf canopy scheme for photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, leaf temperature and energy fluxes. The soil/snow hydrology consists of 10 layers for soil and up to 5 layers for snow. The biogeochemistry component explicitly accounts for coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics. The feedstocks currently considered include corn stover, Miscanthus and switchgrass. The parameters used for simulation of each crop have been calibrated using field experimental data from the US. The use of this modeling capability will be demonstrated through its applications to study the environmental effects (through changes in albedo and evapotranspiration) of biofuel production as well as the effective management practice in the United States.

  4. Centimeter-scale characterization of biogeochemical gradients at a wetland-aquifer interface using capillary electrophoresis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baez-Cazull, S.; McGuire, J.T.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Raymond, A.; Welsh, L.

    2007-01-01

    Steep biogeochemical gradients were measured at mixing interfaces in a wetland-aquifer system impacted by landfill leachate in Norman, Oklahoma. The system lies within a reworked alluvial plain and is characterized by layered low hydraulic conductivity wetland sediments interbedded with sandy aquifer material. Using cm-scale passive diffusion samplers, "peepers", water samples were collected in a depth profile to span interfaces between surface water and a sequence of deeper sedimentary layers. Geochemical indicators including electron acceptors, low-molecular-weight organic acids, base cations, and NH4+ were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and field techniques to maximize the small sample volumes available from the centimeter-scale peepers. Steep concentration gradients of biogeochemical indicators were observed at various interfaces including those created at sedimentary boundaries and boundaries created by heterogeneities in organic C and available electron acceptors. At the sediment-water interface, chemical profiles with depth suggest that SO42 - and Fe reduction dominate driven by inputs of organic C from the wetland and availability of electron acceptors. Deeper in the sediments (not associated with a lithologic boundary), a steep gradient of organic acids (acetate maximum 8.8 mM) and NH4+ (maximum 36 mM) is observed due to a localized source of organic matter coupled with the lack of electron acceptor inputs. These findings highlight the importance of quantifying the redox reactions occurring in small interface zones and assessing their role on biogeochemical cycling at the system scale. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inconsistent strategies to spin up models in CMIP5: implications for ocean biogeochemical model performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Séférian, R.; Gehlen, M.; Bopp, L.; Resplandy, L.; Orr, J. C.; Marti, O.; Dunne, J. P.; Christian, J. R.; Doney, S. C.; Ilyina, T.; Lindsay, K.; Halloran, P.; Heinze, C.; Segschneider, J.; Tjiputra, J.

    2015-10-01

    During the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) substantial efforts were carried out on the systematic assessment of the skill of Earth system models. One goal was to check how realistically representative marine biogeochemical tracer distributions could be reproduced by models. Mean-state assessments routinely compared model hindcasts to available modern biogeochemical observations. However, these assessments considered neither the extent of equilibrium in modeled biogeochemical reservoirs nor the sensitivity of model performance to initial conditions or to the spin-up protocols. Here, we explore how the large diversity in spin-up protocols used for marine biogeochemistry in CMIP5 Earth system models (ESM) contribute to model-to-model differences in the simulated fields. We take advantage of a 500 year spin-up simulation of IPSL-CM5A-LR to quantify the influence of the spin-up protocol on model ability to reproduce relevant data fields. Amplification of biases in selected biogeochemical fields (O2, NO3, Alk-DIC) is assessed as a function of spin-up duration. We demonstrate that a relationship between spin-up duration and assessment metrics emerges from our model results and is consistent when confronted against a larger ensemble of CMIP5 models. This shows that drift has implications on their performance assessment in addition to possibly aliasing estimates of climate change impact. Our study suggests that differences in spin-up protocols could explain a substantial part of model disparities, constituting a source of model-to-model uncertainty. This requires more attention in future model intercomparison exercices in order to provide realistic ESM results on marine biogeochemistry and carbon cycle feedbacks.

  6. Searching for Biogeochemical Cycles on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The search for life on Mars clearly benefits from a rigorous, yet broad, definition of life that compels us to consider all possible lines of evidence for a martian biosphere. Recent studies in microbial ecology illustrate that the classic definition of life should be expanded beyond the traditional definition of a living cell. The traditional defining characteristics of life are threefold. First, life is capable of metabolism, that is, it performs chemical reactions that utilize energy and also synthesize its cellular constituents. Second, life is capable of self-replication. Third, life can evolve in order to adapt to environmental changes. An expanded, ecological definition of life also recognizes that life is a community of organisms that must interact with their nonliving environment through processes called biogeochemical cycles. This regenerative processing maintains, in an aqueous conditions, a dependable supply of nutrients and energy for growth. In turn, life can significantly affect those processes that control the exchange of materials between the atmosphere, ocean, and upper crust. Because metabolic processes interact directly with the environment, they can alter their surroundings and thus leave behind evidence of life. For example, organic matter is produced from single-carbon-atom precursors for the biosynthesis of cellular constituents. This leads to a reservoir of reduced carbon in sediments that, in turn, can affect the oxidation state of the atmosphere. The harvesting of chemical energy for metabolism often employs oxidation-reduction reactions that can alter the chemistry and oxidation state of the redox-sensitive elements carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, iron, and manganese. Have there ever been biogeochemical cycles on Mars? Certain key planetary processes can offer clues. Active volcanism provides reduced chemical species that biota can use for organic synthesis. Volcanic carbon dioxide and methane can serve as greenhouse gases. Thus the persistence of volcanism on Mars may well have influenced the persistence of a martian biosphere. The geologic processing of the crust can affect the availability of nutrients and also control the deposition of minerals that could have served as a medium for the preservation of fossil information. Finally, the activity of liquid water is crucial to life. Was there ever an Earth-like hydrologic cycle with rainfall? Has aqueous activity instead been restricted principally to hydrothermal activity below the surface? To what extent did the inorganic chemistry driven by sunlight and hydrothermal activity influence organic chemistry (prebiotic chemical evolution)? This paper addresses these and other key questions.

  7. Doctoral Defense "Biogeochemical evaluation of disposal options for arsenic-

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Biogeochemical evaluation of disposal options for arsenic- bearing wastes Lutgarde Raskin Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering Arsenic contamination of drinking water of arsenic removal technologies requires disposal options for produced wastes that limit the release

  8. Organic geochemistry and stable isotope constraints on Precambrian biogeochemical processes

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Katherine S., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Details of the biogeochemical cycles and the dominant mechanisms present in Precambrian remain heavily debated topics. The events of the Late Proterozoic onset to glaciations and what types of early life existed in the ...

  9. Climate change effects on watershed hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Projected changes in climate are widely expected to alter watershed processes. However, the extent of these changes is difficult to predict because complex interactions among affected hydrological and biogeochemical processes will likely play out over many decades and spatial sc...

  10. Possible biogeochemical consequences of ocean fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrman, J.A. ); Capone, D.G. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors consider biogeochemical secondary effects that could arise from an increase in ocean productivity, such as may occur via fertilization with Fe. These processes and feedback loops are infrequently discussed in this context, yet are likely to be highly relevant to the understanding of global change in general. In particular, the authors suggest that increased productivity may increase the production and efflux of greenhouse gases, such as nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and methane (CH{sub 4}) and that shifts in phytoplankton species and productivity may cause changes in another climate-related gas, dimethylsulfide (DMS). N{sub 2}O is also implicated in the destruction of stratospheric ozone. Factors contributing to amplified release include both increased nutrient cycling in general and possible development of low oxygen conditions from fertilization. It is also remotely possible that reduced oxygen from an initial fertilization could mobilize existing Fe pools, inducing uncontrolled self-fertilization. Although lack of relevant physiological and ecological data makes it difficult to provide quantitative limits on the extent of the undesired effects, rough calculations suggest that the enhanced release of N{sub 2}O alone could totally negate any potential benefit from fertilization and likely worsen global warming and ozone depletion.

  11. Redox chemistry in the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle

    PubMed Central

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Sampson, Jacqueline M.; Atlas, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    The element phosphorus (P) controls growth in many ecosystems as the limiting nutrient, where it is broadly considered to reside as pentavalent P in phosphate minerals and organic esters. Exceptions to pentavalent P include phosphine—PH3—a trace atmospheric gas, and phosphite and hypophosphite, P anions that have been detected recently in lightning strikes, eutrophic lakes, geothermal springs, and termite hindguts. Reduced oxidation state P compounds include the phosphonates, characterized by C?P bonds, which bear up to 25% of total organic dissolved phosphorus. Reduced P compounds have been considered to be rare; however, the microbial ability to use reduced P compounds as sole P sources is ubiquitous. Here we show that between 10% and 20% of dissolved P bears a redox state of less than +5 in water samples from central Florida, on average, with some samples bearing almost as much reduced P as phosphate. If the quantity of reduced P observed in the water samples from Florida studied here is broadly characteristic of similar environments on the global scale, it accounts well for the concentration of atmospheric phosphine and provides a rationale for the ubiquity of phosphite utilization genes in nature. Phosphine is generated at a quantity consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium established by the disproportionation reaction of reduced P species. Comprising 10–20% of the total dissolved P inventory in Florida environments, reduced P compounds could hence be a critical part of the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle, and in turn may impact global carbon cycling and methanogenesis. PMID:25313061

  12. Redox chemistry in the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Matthew A; Sampson, Jacqueline M; Atlas, Zachary

    2014-10-28

    The element phosphorus (P) controls growth in many ecosystems as the limiting nutrient, where it is broadly considered to reside as pentavalent P in phosphate minerals and organic esters. Exceptions to pentavalent P include phosphine--PH3--a trace atmospheric gas, and phosphite and hypophosphite, P anions that have been detected recently in lightning strikes, eutrophic lakes, geothermal springs, and termite hindguts. Reduced oxidation state P compounds include the phosphonates, characterized by C-P bonds, which bear up to 25% of total organic dissolved phosphorus. Reduced P compounds have been considered to be rare; however, the microbial ability to use reduced P compounds as sole P sources is ubiquitous. Here we show that between 10% and 20% of dissolved P bears a redox state of less than +5 in water samples from central Florida, on average, with some samples bearing almost as much reduced P as phosphate. If the quantity of reduced P observed in the water samples from Florida studied here is broadly characteristic of similar environments on the global scale, it accounts well for the concentration of atmospheric phosphine and provides a rationale for the ubiquity of phosphite utilization genes in nature. Phosphine is generated at a quantity consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium established by the disproportionation reaction of reduced P species. Comprising 10-20% of the total dissolved P inventory in Florida environments, reduced P compounds could hence be a critical part of the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle, and in turn may impact global carbon cycling and methanogenesis. PMID:25313061

  13. Redox regime shifts in microbially mediated biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, T.; Butler, I. B.; Free, A.; Allen, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how the Earth's biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change is a prerequisite for the prediction and mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic perturbations. Microbial populations mediate key steps in these cycles, yet they are often crudely represented in biogeochemical models. Here, we show that microbial population dynamics can qualitatively affect the response of biogeochemical cycles to environmental change. Using simple and generic mathematical models, we find that nutrient limitations on microbial population growth can lead to regime shifts, in which the redox state of a biogeochemical cycle changes dramatically as the availability of a redox-controlling species, such as oxygen or acetate, crosses a threshold (a "tipping point"). These redox regime shifts occur in parameter ranges that are relevant to the present-day sulfur cycle in the natural environment and the present-day nitrogen cycle in eutrophic terrestrial environments. These shifts may also have relevance to iron cycling in the iron-containing Proterozoic and Archean oceans. We show that redox regime shifts also occur in models with physically realistic modifications, such as additional terms, chemical states, or microbial populations. Our work reveals a possible new mechanism by which regime shifts can occur in nutrient-cycling ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, and highlights the importance of considering microbial population dynamics in models of biogeochemical cycles.

  14. Redox regime shifts in microbially-mediated biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, T.; Butler, I. B.; Free, A.; Allen, R. J.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding how the Earth's biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change is a prerequisite for the prediction and mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic perturbations. Microbial populations mediate key steps in these cycles, yet are often crudely represented in biogeochemical models. Here, we show that microbial population dynamics can qualitatively affect the response of biogeochemical cycles to environmental change. Using simple and generic mathematical models, we find that nutrient limitations on microbial population growth can lead to regime shifts, in which the redox state of a biogeochemical cycle changes dramatically as the availability of a redox-controlling species, such as oxygen or acetate, crosses a threshold (a "tipping point"). These redox regime shifts occur in parameter ranges that are relevant to the sulfur and nitrogen cycles in the present-day natural environment, and may also have relevance to iron cycling in the iron-containing Proterozoic and Archean oceans. We show that redox regime shifts also occur in models with physically realistic modifications, such as additional terms, chemical states, or microbial populations. Our work reveals a possible new mechanism by which regime shifts can occur in nutrient-cycling ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, and highlights the importance of considering microbial population dynamics in models of biogeochemical cycles.

  15. The impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huai; Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui; Wu, Ning; Wang, Yanfen; Fang, Xiuqing; Gao, Yongheng; Zhu, Dan; Yang, Gang; Tian, Jianqing; Kang, Xiaoming; Piao, Shilong; Ouyang, Hua; Xiang, Wenhua; Luo, Zhibin; Jiang, Hong; Song, Xingzhang; Zhang, Yao; Yu, Guirui; Zhao, Xinquan; Gong, Peng; Yao, Tandong; Wu, Jianghua

    2013-10-01

    With a pace of about twice the observed rate of global warming, the temperature on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (Earth's 'third pole') has increased by 0.2 °C per decade over the past 50 years, which results in significant permafrost thawing and glacier retreat. Our review suggested that warming enhanced net primary production and soil respiration, decreased methane (CH(4)) emissions from wetlands and increased CH(4) consumption of meadows, but might increase CH(4) emissions from lakes. Warming-induced permafrost thawing and glaciers melting would also result in substantial emission of old carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and CH(4). Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emission was not stimulated by warming itself, but might be slightly enhanced by wetting. However, there are many uncertainties in such biogeochemical cycles under climate change. Human activities (e.g. grazing, land cover changes) further modified the biogeochemical cycles and amplified such uncertainties on the plateau. If the projected warming and wetting continues, the future biogeochemical cycles will be more complicated. So facing research in this field is an ongoing challenge of integrating field observations with process-based ecosystem models to predict the impacts of future climate change and human activities at various temporal and spatial scales. To reduce the uncertainties and to improve the precision of the predictions of the impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles, efforts should focus on conducting more field observation studies, integrating data within improved models, and developing new knowledge about coupling among carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus biogeochemical cycles as well as about the role of microbes in these cycles. PMID:23744573

  16. A GIS-based Framework for Examining the Effects of Water-Driven Erosion on Soil Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abban, B. K.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wacha, K.; Wilson, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Soil erosion has long been identified as one of the key mechanisms affecting biogeochemical processes in the soil, through the transport and delivery of carbon and nutrients adsorbed to soil particles in the soil active layer. However, most biogeochemical models treat soil erosion contributions simplistically and lack the capacity to accurately account for the mechanisms that control soil erosion and deposition on the landscape. This stems from the fact that the majority of the biogeochemical models have traditionally been employed on landscapes where lateral and downslope fluxes due to soil erosion have been less significant compared to other vertical fluxes and processes occurring at a fixed location on the landscape. In intensely managed landscapes, however, this may not be the case since land management practices such as tillage and exposed land cover can lead to copious amounts of erosion on the landscape. Therefore, to better understand the role of soil erosion on soil biogeochemical cycling in IMLs, we present a framework for simulating the spatiotemporal effects of soil erosion and deposition on soil biogeochemical cycling. We focus specifically on tillage- and runoff-induced erosion since these are prevalent in IMLs. The framework employs a geospatial approach that loosely couples a GIS-based upland water erosion model, GeoWEPP, with a soil biogeochemistry model, Century, to predict downslope and lateral fluxes of soil erosion and the resultant impacts on soil biogeochemical cycling. The use of a geospatial approach allows us to better capture the effects of topography, soil type, land use/land cover, and climate on soil erosion fluxes as well as soil biogeochemical cycling. The spatiotemporal resolution of the framework makes it particularly beneficial for identifying hotspots in fields and hot moments at scales ranging from daily to annual time scales. We employ the framework to study the monthly redistribution of soil organic carbon over the course of a year in the South Amana Sub-Watershed, located in the headwaters of Clear Creek, Iowa, USA. Preliminary results indicate that the framework is able to capture observed erosional and depositional patterns in the watershed and can provide insight into soil carbon redistribution and sequestration.

  17. A Generic Biogeochemical Module for Earth System Models: Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module (NGBGC), Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yilin; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-13

    Physical and biogeochemical processes regulate soil carbon dynamics and CO2 flux to and from atmosphere, influencing global climate changes. Integration of these processes into earth system models (e.g., community land models (CLM)), however, currently faces three major challenges: 1) extensive efforts are required to modify modeling structures and to rewrite computer programs to incorporate new or updated processes as new knowledge is being generated, 2) computational cost is prohibitively expensive to simulate biogeochemical processes in land models due to large variations in the rates of biogeochemical processes, and 3) various mathematical representations of biogeochemical processes exist to incorporate different aspects of fundamental mechanisms, but systematic evaluation of the different mathematical representations is difficult, if not possible. To address these challenges, we propose a new computational framework to easily incorporate physical and biogeochemical processes into land models. The new framework consists of a new biogeochemical module with a generic algorithm and reaction database so that new and updated processes can be incorporated into land models without the need to manually set up the ordinary differential equations to be solved numerically. The reaction database consists of processes of nutrient flow through the terrestrial ecosystems in plants, litter and soil. This framework facilitates effective comparison studies of biogeochemical cycles in an ecosystem using different conceptual models under the same land modeling framework. The approach was first implemented in CLM and benchmarked against simulations from the original CLM-CN code. A case study was then provided to demonstrate the advantages of using the new approach to incorporate a phosphorus cycle into the CLM model. To our knowledge, the phosphorus-incorporated CLM is a new model that can be used to simulate phosphorus limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  18. Ecosystem biogeochemical function and services in an urbanizing desert region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, N. B.; Cook, E. M.; Earl, S.; Hale, R. L.; Hall, S. J.; Hartnett, H. E.; Iwaniec, D.; Larson, E. K.; McHale, M.; Sponseller, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystem services derive from underlying ecosystem processes but are distinguished by their benefits to society. Among ecosystem services, those associated with biogeochemical cycling and regulation of water, air, and soil quality are relatively unrecognized by the public, although concentrations of some materials are regulated by local, state and national laws. The disconnection between their importance and the degree to which these services are acknowledged means that biogeochemical ecosystem services have seldom been considered in urban planning and design. Drawing from research at multiple scales in the central Arizona region that includes over twenty cities and towns comprising metropolitan Phoenix, we illustrate the relationships between ecosystem functions and services in three areas. First, at household to whole-city scales, we show that the overriding influence of water and material inputs mediated by humans is changing biogeochemical patterns in soil and vegetation. Second, we show how human modification of aquatic ecosystems for water delivery, stormwater management, and wastewater removal give rise to important trade-offs among these services. And finally, we illustrate the limited capacity of surrounding unproductive desert ecosystems to assimilate the air pollutants generated by this region of >4 million inhabitants. We argue that urban planning and design that take into account the ecosystem functions underlying biogeochemical ecosystem services will be most effective in management of potential pollution problems associated with all of these cases. This paper thus highlights biogeochemical research conducted at the central Arizona-Phoenix LTER within a framework of ecosystem services.

  19. Community plans for future of ocean biogeochemical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, James W.; Paffenhofer, Gustav-Adolf

    Members of the biogeochemical research community are taking steps to keep their work thriving in the next millennium. Since 1984, major questions in ocean biogeochemical research have been studied in a concerted manner in the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) program. This effort as well as the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) and Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics program (GOED) is part of the U.S. Global Change Research Plan (USGCRP). The JGOFS Science Plan established two goals: to determine and understand on a global scale the processes controlling the time-varying fluxes of carbon and associated biogenic elements in the ocean, and to develop the capability to predict on a global scale the response of oceanic biogeochemical processes to anthropogenic perturbations, particularly those related to climate change.

  20. Coupled assimilation for an intermediated coupled ENSO prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fei; Zhu, Jiang

    2010-10-01

    The value of coupled assimilation is discussed using an intermediate coupled model in which the wind stress is the only atmospheric state which is slavery to model sea surface temperature (SST). In the coupled assimilation analysis, based on the coupled wind-ocean state covariance calculated from the coupled state ensemble, the ocean state is adjusted by assimilating wind data using the ensemble Kalman filter. As revealed by a series of assimilation experiments using simulated observations, the coupled assimilation of wind observations yields better results than the assimilation of SST observations. Specifically, the coupled assimilation of wind observations can help to improve the accuracy of the surface and subsurface currents because the correlation between the wind and ocean currents is stronger than that between SST and ocean currents in the equatorial Pacific. Thus, the coupled assimilation of wind data can decrease the initial condition errors in the surface/subsurface currents that can significantly contribute to SST forecast errors. The value of the coupled assimilation of wind observations is further demonstrated by comparing the prediction skills of three 12-year (1997-2008) hindcast experiments initialized by the ocean-only assimilation scheme that assimilates SST observations, the coupled assimilation scheme that assimilates wind observations, and a nudging scheme that nudges the observed wind stress data, respectively. The prediction skills of two assimilation schemes are significantly better than those of the nudging scheme. The prediction skills of assimilating wind observations are better than assimilating SST observations. Assimilating wind observations for the 2007/2008 La Niña event triggers better predictions, while assimilating SST observations fails to provide an early warning for that event.

  1. Scaling of Contaminant Loads in Fractal River Networks: Hydrologic, Geomorphic and Biogeochemical Controls (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Zanardo, S.; Basu, N. B.; Sivapalan, M.; Rao, P. C.

    2009-12-01

    Nutrient loads delivered from the hillslopes to the river network during runoff events are moderated by biogeochemical transformations within the sediment, thus mitigating the likely impacts on downstream ecosystems. Modeling of the attenuation and aggregation of nutrient loads requires dynamic coupling of hydrology and biogeochemistry at the reach scale and propagation of reach-scale attenuation along the network. Most network models of nutrient transport use nonlinear empirical regression functions between removal rate constant and stream stage to simulate nutrient retention at daily or monthly time scales. In contrast, stream tracer experiments at the reach scale are usually analyzed in a more mechanistic way, using the 1-D transport model OTIS-P, based on the two-compartment, transient-storage model (TSM; Bencala et al. 1983). We integrated the reach-scale TSM for biogeochemistry with a dynamic network hydrologic model (THREW) for hydrology to explore spatio-temporal scaling in nutrient dynamics as a function of climate, biogeochemical and geomorphic controls in the system. Two representative watersheds (~ 500 km2), one in an arid and another in a humid environment, were selected for the analysis. The effect of climate was explored by varying the frequency and mean depth of the rainfall forcing function. Geomorphic effects were explored by varying channel dimensions and sinuosity, while chemical transformation rate constants were modified to investigate biogeochemical controls. The effect of network structure (e.g., Horton ratios) was evaluated by comparing responses from the two watersheds. Initial results indicate that climatic controls have a weaker effect on the nutrient removal effectiveness than geomorphologic characteristics, especially in the wet climate. The predictability of the scaling responses as a function of the different controls was explored using simple analytical approaches.

  2. Modeling carbon cycle responses to tree mortality: linking microbial and biogeochemical changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. J.; Trahan, N. A.; Dynes, E. L.; Zobitz, J. M.; Gallery, R.

    2013-12-01

    Amid a worldwide increase in tree mortality, mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) have killed billions of trees from Mexico to Alaska in the last 13 years. This mortality is predicted to influence important carbon, water and energy balance feedbacks on the Earth system. We studied changes in soil biogeochemical cycling and microbial community structure after tree mortality. We show, using a decade long chronosequence, that tree mortality causes no increase in total respiration from local to watershed scales, with corresponding changes in biogeochemical pools of nitrogen and phosphorus. We also found comparable declines in both gross primary productivity and respiration suggesting little change in net flux. We tested the mechanisms controlling these patterns using an ecosystem model; contrasting a simplified microbial subroutine with a 'dead soil' model. We coupled our modeling work with direct measurements of microbial biomass, enzyme kinetics and community structure. The transitory recovery of respiration 6-7 years after mortality was associated with increased microbial biomass, increased incorporation of leaf litter carbon into soil organic matter, and was followed by a secondary decline in respiration during years 8-10. Our findings are consistent with the mechanism of reduced input of new carbon causing a decline in microbial biomass rather than an increased output of older carbon.

  3. Biogeochemical Process Comparison of the Five USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, J. B.; Peters, N. E.; Aulenbach, B. T.; Blum, A. E.; Campbell, D. H.; Clow, D. W.; Larsen, M. C.; Mast, M. A.; Stallard, R. F.; Troester, J. W.; Walker, J. F.; Webb, R. M.; White, A. F.

    2001-12-01

    Input - output budgets (in wet deposition and streamwater) have been constructed for water and major solutes at the five USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) sites for the period 1992-97 (Peters et al., 2000). In this poster we interpret the net chemical fluxes to identify the controlling biogeochemical processes, as influenced by the strong physical and biological contrasts (climate, geology, physiography, and vegetation types) in the five diverse environments. The five sites are: Allequash Creek, Wisconsin (low-relief humid continental forest); Andrews Creek, Colorado (cold alpine, taiga/tundra, and subalpine boreal forest); Icacos River, Puerto Rico (lower montane, wet tropical forest); Panola Mountain, Georgia (humid subtropical piedmont forest); and Sleepers River, Vermont (humid northern hardwood forest). Base cations and Si produced by chemical weathering displayed a net export at each site. The magnitude and stoichiometry of export reflects mineralogy, climate (temperature and rainfall), and water residence time in the subsurface. The lowest and highest mass export generally was for Andrews Creek and Icacos River, respectively, consistent with their extreme mean annual temperatures (0/degC in Colorado to 21/degC in Puerto Rico) and the limited residence time of meltwater at Andrews Creek. Calcite in bedrock at the three coldest watersheds caused somewhat higher relative export of Ca, especially at Sleepers River where calcite weathering is a dominant control on stream chemistry. In contrast, the high Mg content of the volcaniclastic rocks at Icacos River and glacial deposits at Allequash Creek caused disproportionately high Mg export relative to the other sites. Relatively high Na export at Panola Mountain and K export at Sleepers River are probably caused by plagioclase and biotite weathering, respectively. SO4 is retained at the two warmest sites, Panola Mountain and Icacos River. SO4 adsorption is known to limit SO4- export in highly weathered subtropical and tropical soils. At Sleepers River, net SO4 export occurs as a result of weathering of sulfide minerals in the bedrock, and correspondingly limited soil SO4 adsorption capacity. A small net export of SO4 occurs at Allequash Creek and Andrews Creek, but the SO4 may be in balance if dry deposition were added to the inputs. All sites except Icacos River retain NO3. At Andrews Creek and Sleepers River, net export of NO3 occurs during the peak snowmelt months, as soils are flushed during a time of low biological uptake. Additional analysis will be performed to evaluate the relative importance of temperature (affecting weathering rates and biological uptake) and water yield (i.e., the amount of water flushing through a catchment) in controlling solute fluxes.

  4. PHOTOREACTIONS IN SURFACE WATERS AND THEIR ROLE IN BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade significant interest has developed in the influence of photochemical reactions on biogeochemical cycles in surface waters of lakes and the sea. A major portion of recent research on these photoreactions has focused on the colored component of dissolved org...

  5. Editorial: Organic wastes in soils: Biogeochemical and Environmental Aspects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue of Soil Biology and Biochemistry presents papers from the Second General Annual Conference of European Geosciences Union, Session SSS12 Recycling of Organic Wastes in Soils: Biogeochemical and Environmental Issues, held at the Austria Center Vienna, 24-29 April 2005. Session SSS12...

  6. The identification and biogeochemical interpretation of fossil magnetotactic bacteria

    E-print Network

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    The identification and biogeochemical interpretation of fossil magnetotactic bacteria Robert E. Available online 14 August 2007. Abstract Magnetotactic bacteria, which most commonly live within the oxic, specifically magnetite or greigite. The crystals cause the bacteria to orient themselves passively with respect

  7. Evaluating oxygen and oxygen minimum zones in global biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oschlies, Andreas; Kriest, Iris; Koeve, Wolfgang; Duteil, Olaf; Schartau, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Global biogeochemical ocean models are used to predict the future evolution of so-called oxygen minimum zones (OMZ), and the associated environmental and possible socio-economic impacts. Different models give different results and vary largely in their biogeochemical, physical and numerical setup. In order to assess the ability of the models to describe the present state as a necessary condition for skillful predictions into the future, they are usually compared against observed distributions of oxygen and other variables, such as thickness of oxygen minimum zones, nutrients, tracers for circulation and/or water mass age. We here examine different metrics for skill evaluation particularly of model representations of oxygen (and OMZs), for a wide range of global biogeochemical models. Among the metrics considered are Taylor plots, volume distributions of oxygen, volume of OMZ, preformed oxygen, and metrics that combine various diagnostic biogeochemical tracers. We finally investigate the impact these metrics may have for the ``choice'' of any best model, and discuss their applicability for different research or societal questions.

  8. Probing the Biogeochemical Behavior of Technetium Using a

    E-print Network

    Burke, Ian

    Probing the Biogeochemical Behavior of Technetium Using a Novel Nuclear Imaging Approach G A V I N 13, 2009. Accepted April 1, 2009. Dynamic -camera imaging of radiotracer technetium (99m Tc) wasusedtoassesstheimpactofbiostimulationofmetal-reducing bacteria on technetium mobility at 10-12 mol L-1 concentrations in sediments. Addition

  9. Incorporating nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria in the global biogeochemical model HAMOCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Hanna; Ilyina, Tatiana; Six, Katharina

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen fixation by marine diazotrophs plays a fundamental role in the oceanic nitrogen and carbon cycle as it provides a major source of 'new' nitrogen to the euphotic zone that supports biological carbon export and sequestration. Since most global biogeochemical models include nitrogen fixation only diagnostically, they are not able to capture its spatial pattern sufficiently. Here we present the incorporation of an explicit, dynamic representation of diazotrophic cyanobacteria and the corresponding nitrogen fixation in the global ocean biogeochemical model HAMOCC (Hamburg Ocean Carbon Cycle model), which is part of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth system model (MPI-ESM). The parameterization of the diazotrophic growth is thereby based on available knowledge about the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium spp., which is considered as the most significant pelagic nitrogen fixer. Evaluation against observations shows that the model successfully reproduces the main spatial distribution of cyanobacteria and nitrogen fixation, covering large parts of the tropical and subtropical oceans. Besides the role of cyanobacteria in marine biogeochemical cycles, their capacity to form extensive surface blooms induces a number of bio-physical feedback mechanisms in the Earth system. The processes driving these interactions, which are related to the alteration of heat absorption, surface albedo and momentum input by wind, are incorporated in the biogeochemical and physical model of the MPI-ESM in order to investigate their impacts on a global scale. First preliminary results will be shown.

  10. EFFECTS OF INCREASED SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increases in solar UV radiation could affect terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical cycles thus altering both sources and sinks of greenhouse and chemically important trace gases (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), carbonyl sulfide (COS)). n terrestrial ecosystems,...

  11. BIO-OPTICAL PROFILING FLOATS AS NEW OBSERVATIONAL TOOLS FOR BIOGEOCHEMICAL AND ECOSYSTEM STUDIES: POTENTIAL SYNERGIES

    E-print Network

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    BIO-OPTICAL PROFILING FLOATS AS NEW OBSERVATIONAL TOOLS FOR BIOGEOCHEMICAL AND ECOSYSTEM STUDIES. In parallel with their emergence, the field of miniature, low power bio-optical and biogeochemical sensors is rapidly evolving. Over recent years, the bio-geochemical and bio-optical community has begun to benefit

  12. Earth's Early Biosphere and the Biogeochemical Carbon Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David

    2004-01-01

    Our biosphere has altered the global environment principally by influencing the chemistry of those elements most important for life, e g., C, N, S, O, P and transition metals (e.g., Fe and Mn). The coupling of oxygenic photosynthesis with the burial in sediments of photosynthetic organic matter, and with the escape of H2 to space, has increased the state of oxidation of the Oceans and atmosphere. It has also created highly reduced conditions within sedimentary rocks that have also extensively affected the geochemistry of several elements. The decline of volcanism during Earth's history reduced the flow of reduced chemical species that reacted with photosynthetically produced O2. The long-term net accumulation of photosynthetic O2 via biogeochemical processes has profoundly influenced our atmosphere and biosphere, as evidenced by the O2 levels required for algae, multicellular life and certain modem aerobic bacteria to exist. When our biosphere developed photosynthesis, it tapped into an energy resource that was much larger than the energy available from oxidation-reduction reactions associated with weathering and hydrothermal activity. Today, hydrothermal sources deliver globally (0.13-1.1)x10(exp l2) mol yr(sup -1) of reduced S, Fe(2+), Mn(2+), H2 and CH4; this is estimated to sustain at most about (0.2-2)xl0(exp 12)mol C yr(sup -1) of organic carbon production by chemautotrophic microorganisms. In contrast, global photosynthetic productivity is estimated to be 9000x10(exp 12) mol C yr(sup -1). Thus, even though global thermal fluxes were greater in the distant geologic past than today, the onset of oxygenic photosynthesis probably increased global organic productivity by some two or more orders of magnitude. This enormous productivity materialized principally because oxygenic photosynthesizers unleashed a virtually unlimited supply of reduced H that forever freed life from its sole dependence upon abiotic sources of reducing power such as hydrothermal emanations and weathering. Communities sustained by oxygenic photosynthesis apparently thrived wherever supplies of sunlight, moisture and nutrients were sufficient. Prior to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis, the net global effect of the ancient global biosphere was to facilitate chemical equilibrium between reduced species from thermal activity and weathering and more oxidized constituents in the surface environment. But even this ancient biosphere might have been globally pervasive. The global geothermal heat flow was substantially higher during Earth's first billion years, and thus reduced chemical species might have persisted in sunlit aquatic environments. Perhaps the substantial decline in thermal activity between 4000 and 3000 Ma created a driver for oxygenic photosynthesis to develop.

  13. The value of automated high-frequency nutrient monitoring in inference of biogeochemical processes, temporal variability and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieroza, Magdalena; Heathwaite, Louise

    2013-04-01

    Stream water quality signals integrate catchment-scale processes responsible for delivery and biogeochemical transformation of the key biotic macronutrients (N, C, P). This spatial and temporal integration is particularly pronounced in the groundwater-dominated streams, as in-stream nutrient dynamics are mediated by the processes occurring within riparian and hyporheic ecotones. In this paper we show long-term high-frequency in-stream macronutrient dynamics from a small agricultural catchment located in the North West England. Hourly in-situ measurements of total and reactive phosphorus (Systea, IT), nitrate (Hach Lange, DE) and physical water quality parameters (turbidity, specific conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH; WaterWatch, UK) were carried out on the lowland, gaining reach of the River Leith. High-frequency data show complex non-linear nutrient concentration-discharge relationships. The dominance of hysteresis effects suggests the presence of a temporally varying apportionment of allochthonous and autochthonous nutrient sources. Varying direction, magnitude and dynamics of the hysteretic responses between storm events is driven by the variation in the contributing source areas and shows the importance of the coupling of catchment-scale, in-stream, riparian and hyporheic biogeochemical cycles. The synergistic effect of physical (temperature-driven, the hyporheic exchange controlled by diffusion) and biogeochemical drivers (stream and hyporheic metabolism) on in-stream nutrient concentrations manifests itself in observed diurnal patterns. As inferred from the high-frequency nutrient monitoring, the diurnal dynamics are of the greatest importance under baseflow conditions. Understanding the role and relative importance of these processes can be difficult due to spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the key mechanisms involved. This study shows the importance of in-situ, fine temporal resolution, automated monitoring approaches in providing evidence and understanding reach-scale in-stream biogeochemical processes. In this paper we discuss the advantages and limitations of the in-situ high-frequency nutrient monitoring, the challenges related to data analysis and process inference and the integration of the short-term biogeochemical behaviour with the long-term trends. Finally the potential for integration of the long-term high-temporal resolution datasets with the predictions of reach- and catchment-scale biogeochemical models and observations from coarse-sampling monitoring strategies has been discussed.

  14. SHIMMER (1.0): a novel mathematical model for microbial and biogeochemical dynamics in glacier forefield ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. A.; Anesio, A. M.; Singarayer, J. S.; Heath, M. R.; Arndt, S.

    2015-08-01

    SHIMMER (Soil biogeocHemIcal Model for Microbial Ecosystem Response) is a new numerical modelling framework which is developed as part of an interdisciplinary, iterative, model-data based approach fully integrating fieldwork and laboratory experiments with model development, testing, and application. SHIMMER is designed to simulate the establishment of microbial biomass and associated biogeochemical cycling during the initial stages of ecosystem development in glacier forefield soils. However, it is also transferable to other extreme ecosystem types (such as desert soils or the surface of glaciers). The model mechanistically describes and predicts transformations in carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus through aggregated components of the microbial community as a set of coupled ordinary differential equations. The rationale for development of the model arises from decades of empirical observation on the initial stages of soil development in glacier forefields. SHIMMER enables a quantitative and process focussed approach to synthesising the existing empirical data and advancing understanding of microbial and biogeochemical dynamics. Here, we provide a detailed description of SHIMMER. The performance of SHIMMER is then tested in two case studies using published data from the Damma Glacier forefield in Switzerland and the Athabasca Glacier in Canada. In addition, a sensitivity analysis helps identify the most sensitive and unconstrained model parameters. Results show that the accumulation of microbial biomass is highly dependent on variation in microbial growth and death rate constants, Q10 values, the active fraction of microbial biomass, and the reactivity of organic matter. The model correctly predicts the rapid accumulation of microbial biomass observed during the initial stages of succession in the forefields of both the case study systems. Simulation results indicate that primary production is responsible for the initial build-up of substrate that subsequently supports heterotrophic growth. However, allochthonous contributions of organic matter are identified as important in sustaining this productivity. Microbial production in young soils is supported by labile organic matter, whereas carbon stocks in older soils are more refractory. Nitrogen fixing bacteria are responsible for the initial accumulation of available nitrates in the soil. Biogeochemical rates are highly seasonal, as observed in experimental data. The development and application of SHIMMER not only provides important new insights into forefield dynamics, but also highlights aspects of these systems that require further field and laboratory research. The most pressing advances need to come in quantifying nutrient budgets and biogeochemical rates, in exploring seasonality, the fate of allochthonous deposition in relation to autochthonous production, and empirical studies of microbial growth and cell death, to increase understanding of how glacier forefield development contributes to the global biogeochemical cycling and climate in the future.

  15. Estimating biogeochemical fluxes across sagebrush-steppe landscapes with Thematic Mapper imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiners, W. A.; Strong, L. L.; Matson, P. A.; Burke, I. C.; Ojima, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite data were coupled to an ecosystem simulation model to simulate variation in nitrogen mineralization over time and space in a sagebrush steppe. This system of data inputs and calculations provides estimates of ecosystem properties including rates of biogeochemical processes over extensive and complex landscapes, and under changing management and climatic conditions. The landscape surface was divided into three sagebrush ecosystem types plus one other class consisting of nonsagebrush vegetation. This classification presented a complex mosaic of ecosystem types that shifted markedly in composition from one end of the 933-sq km study area to the other. Annual N-mineralization rates ranged from 5 to 25 kg N/ha among the three sagebrush types. The most active type comprised 42 percent of the entire area but contributed 60 percent to the nitrogen mineralization throughout the landscape.

  16. Novel Imaging Techniques, Integrated with Mineralogical, Geochemical and Microbiological Characterization to Determine the Biogeochemical Controls....

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2005-06-01

    Tc(VII) will be reduced and precipitated in FRC sediments under anaerobic conditions in batch experiments (progressive microcosms). The complementary microcosm experiments using low pH/nigh nitrate sediments from 3 (near FW 009) are imminent, with the sediment cores already shipped to Manchester. HYPOTHESIS 2. Tc(VII) reduction and precipitation can be visualized in discrete biogeochemical zones in sediment columns using 99mTc and a gamma-camera. Preliminary experiments testing the use of 99mTc as a radiotracer to address hypotheses 2 and 3 have suggested that the 99mTc associates with Fe(II)-bearing sediments in microcosms and stratified columns containing FRC sediments. Initial proof of concept microcosms containing Fe(II)-bearing, microbially-reduced FRC sediments were spiked with 99mTc and imaged using a gamma-camera. In comparison with oxic controls, 99mTc was significantly partitioned in the solid phase in Fe(III)-reducing sediments in batch experiments. Column experiments using FRC background area soil with stratified biogeochemical zones after stimulation of anaerobic processes through nutrient supplementation, suggested that 99mTc transport was retarded through areas of Fe(III) reduction. HYPOTHESIS 3. Sediment-bound reduced 99mTc can be solubilized by perturbations including oxidation coupled to biological nitrate reduction, and mobilization visualized in real-time using a gamma-camera. Significant progress has been made focusing on the impact of nitrate on the biogeochemical behavior of technetium. Additions of 100 mM nitrate to FRC sediment microcosms, which could potentially compete for electrons during metal reduction, inhibited the reduction of both Fe(III) and Tc(VII) completely. Experiments have also addressed the impact of high nitrate concentrations on Fe(II) and Tc(IV) in pre-reduced sediments, showing no significant resolubilization of Tc with the addition of 25 mM nitrate. A parallel set of experiments addressing the impact of aerobic conditions on the stability/solubility of Fe(II) and Tc(IV), found 80 % resolubilization of the Tc. Column experiments exploring this behavior are being planned. HYPOTHESIS 4 The mobility of 99mTc in the sediment columns can be modeled using a coupled speciation and transport code. Microbiological and geochemical characterization of the column experiments is ongoing and transport and geochemical modeling experiments are being planned.

  17. Aquifer/aquitard interfaces: Mixing zones that enhance biogeochemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.

    2001-01-01

    Several important biogeochemical reactions are known to occur near the interface between aquifer and aquitard sediments. These reactions include O2 reduction; denitrification; and Fe3+, SO42-, and CO2 (methanogenesis) reduction. In some settings, these reactions occur on the aquitard side of the interface as electron acceptors move from the aquifer into the electron-donor-enriched aquitard. In other settings, these reactions occur on the aquifer side of the interface as electron donors move from the aquitard into the electron-acceptor-enriched, or microorganism-enriched, aquifer. Thus, the aquifer/aquitard interface represents a mixing zone capable of supporting greater microbial activity than either hydrogeologic unit alone. The extent to which biogeochemical reactions proceed in the mixing zone and the width of the mixing zone depend on several factors, including the abundance and solubility of electron acceptors and donors on either side of the interface and the rate at which electron acceptors and donors react and move across the interface. Biogeochemical reactions near the aquifer/aquitard interface can have a substantial influence on the chemistry of water in aquifers and on the chemistry of sediments near the interface.

  18. Estimating impacts of lichens and bryophytes on global biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porada, Philipp; Weber, Bettina; Elbert, Wolfgang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kleidon, Axel

    2014-02-01

    Lichens and bryophytes may significantly affect global biogeochemical cycles by fixation of nitrogen and biotic enhancement of surface weathering rates. Most of the studies suggesting these effects, however, are either conceptual or rely on upscaling of regional estimates to obtain global numbers. Here we use a different method, based on estimates of net carbon uptake, to quantify the impacts of lichens and bryophytes on biogeochemical cycles at the global scale. We focus on three processes, namely, nitrogen fixation, phosphorus uptake, and chemical weathering. Our estimates have the form of potential rates, which means that we quantify the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus needed by the organisms to build up biomass, also accounting for resorption and leaching of nutrients. Subsequently, we use potential phosphorus uptake on bare ground to estimate chemical weathering by the organisms, assuming that they release weathering agents to obtain phosphorus. The predicted requirement for nitrogen ranges from 3.5 to 34 Tgyr-1 and for phosphorus it ranges from 0.46 to 4.6 Tgyr-1. Estimates of chemical weathering are between 0.058 and 1.1 km3 yr-1 of rock. These values seem to have a realistic order of magnitude, and they support the notion that lichens and bryophytes have the potential to play an important role for biogeochemical cycles.

  19. SYM01or -Arsenic in Soil and Groundwater Environment:Biogeochemical Interactions Proc. 7th Intern. Conf. on the Biogeochem. of Trace Elements; Uppsala '03

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    #12;SYM01or - Arsenic in Soil and Groundwater Environment:Biogeochemical Interactions Proc. 7th dimensional µ-SXRF maps were collected from soils and 30 µm polished thin sections to locate As hotspots #12;SYM01or - Arsenic in Soil and Groundwater Environment:Biogeochemical Interactions Proc. 7th Intern

  20. A Unified Multi-scale Model for Cross-Scale Evaluation and Integration of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Yang, X.; Bailey, V. L.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Hinkle, C.

    2013-12-01

    Mathematical representations of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in soil, plant, aquatic, and atmospheric systems vary with scale. Process-rich models are typically used to describe hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the pore and small scales, while empirical, correlation approaches are often used at the watershed and regional scales. A major challenge for multi-scale modeling is that water flow, biogeochemical processes, and reactive transport are described using different physical laws and/or expressions at the different scales. For example, the flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations at the pore-scale in soils, by the Darcy law in soil columns and aquifer, and by the Navier-Stokes equations again in open water bodies (ponds, lake, river) and atmosphere surface layer. This research explores whether the physical laws at the different scales and in different physical domains can be unified to form a unified multi-scale model (UMSM) to systematically investigate the cross-scale, cross-domain behavior of fundamental processes at different scales. This presentation will discuss our research on the concept, mathematical equations, and numerical execution of the UMSM. Three-dimensional, multi-scale hydrological processes at the Disney Wilderness Preservation (DWP) site, Florida will be used as an example for demonstrating the application of the UMSM. In this research, the UMSM was used to simulate hydrological processes in rooting zones at the pore and small scales including water migration in soils under saturated and unsaturated conditions, root-induced hydrological redistribution, and role of rooting zone biogeochemical properties (e.g., root exudates and microbial mucilage) on water storage and wetting/draining. The small scale simulation results were used to estimate effective water retention properties in soil columns that were superimposed on the bulk soil water retention properties at the DWP site. The UMSM parameterized from smaller scale simulations were then used to simulate coupled flow and moisture migration in soils in saturated and unsaturated zones, surface and groundwater exchange, and surface water flow in streams and lakes at the DWP site under dynamic precipitation conditions. Laboratory measurements of soil hydrological and biogeochemical properties are used to parameterize the UMSM at the small scales, and field measurements are used to evaluate the UMSM.

  1. Effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling: Interactions and feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson III, David J

    2011-01-01

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions of these effects with climate change, including feedbacks on climate. Such interactions occur in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While there is significant uncertainty in the quantification of these effects, they could accelerate the rate of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increase and subsequent climate change beyond current predictions. The effects of predicted changes in climate and solar UV radiation on carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are expected to vary significantly between regions. The balance of positive and negative effects on terrestrial carbon cycling remains uncertain, but the interactions between UV radiation and climate change are likely to contribute to decreasing sink strength in many oceanic regions. Interactions between climate and solar UV radiation will affect cycling of elements other than carbon, and so will influence the concentration of greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases. For example, increases in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean caused by climate change are projected to enhance the emissions of nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gas. Future changes in UV-induced transformations of aquatic and terrestrial contaminants could have both beneficial and adverse effects. Taken in total, it is clear that the future changes in UV radiation coupled with human-caused global change will have large impacts on biogeochemical cycles at local, regional and global scales.

  2. PISCES-v2: an ocean biogeochemical model for carbon and ecosystem studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, O.; Ethé, C.; Tagliabue, A.; Bopp, L.; Gehlen, M.

    2015-08-01

    PISCES-v2 (Pelagic Interactions Scheme for Carbon and Ecosystem Studies volume 2) is a biogeochemical model which simulates the lower trophic levels of marine ecosystems (phytoplankton, microzooplankton and mesozooplankton) and the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and of the main nutrients (P, N, Fe, and Si). The model is intended to be used for both regional and global configurations at high or low spatial resolutions as well as for short-term (seasonal, interannual) and long-term (climate change, paleoceanography) analyses. There are 24 prognostic variables (tracers) including two phytoplankton compartments (diatoms and nanophytoplankton), two zooplankton size classes (microzooplankton and mesozooplankton) and a description of the carbonate chemistry. Formulations in PISCES-v2 are based on a mixed Monod-quota formalism. On the one hand, stoichiometry of C / N / P is fixed and growth rate of phytoplankton is limited by the external availability in N, P and Si. On the other hand, the iron and silicon quotas are variable and the growth rate of phytoplankton is limited by the internal availability in Fe. Various parameterizations can be activated in PISCES-v2, setting, for instance, the complexity of iron chemistry or the description of particulate organic materials. So far, PISCES-v2 has been coupled to the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) and Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) systems. A full description of PISCES-v2 and of its optional functionalities is provided here. The results of a quasi-steady-state simulation are presented and evaluated against diverse observational and satellite-derived data. Finally, some of the new functionalities of PISCES-v2 are tested in a series of sensitivity experiments.

  3. PISCES-v2: an ocean biogeochemical model for carbon and ecosystem studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, O.; Ethé, C.; Tagliabue, A.; Bopp, L.; Gehlen, M.

    2015-02-01

    PISCES-v2 is a biogeochemical model which simulates the lower trophic levels of marine ecosystem (phytoplankton, microzooplankton and mesozooplankton) and the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and of the main nutrients (P, N, Fe, and Si). The model is intended to be used for both regional and global configurations at high or low spatial resolutions as well as for short-term (seasonal, interannual) and long-term (climate change, paleoceanography) analyses. There are twenty-four prognostic variables (tracers) including two phytoplankton compartments (diatoms and nanophytoplankton), two zooplankton size-classes (microzooplankton and mesozooplankton) and a description of the carbonate chemistry. Formulations in PISCES-v2 are based on a mixed Monod-Quota formalism: on one hand, stoichiometry of C/N/P is fixed and growth rate of phytoplankton is limited by the external availability in N, P and Si. On the other hand, the iron and silicium quotas are variable and growth rate of phytoplankton is limited by the internal availability in Fe. Various parameterizations can be activated in PISCES-v2, setting for instance the complexity of iron chemistry or the description of particulate organic materials. So far, PISCES-v2 has been coupled to the NEMO and ROMS systems. A full description of PISCES-v2 and of its optional functionalities is provided here. The results of a quasi-steady state simulation are presented and evaluated against diverse observational and satellite-derived data. Finally, some of the new functionalities of PISCES-v2 are tested in a series of sensitivity experiments.

  4. Biogeochemical control of marine productivity in the Mediterranean Sea during the last 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Diego; Garcia-Gorriz, Elisa; Piroddi, Chiara; Stips, Adolf

    2014-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of biogeochemical variables derived from a coupled 3-D model of the Mediterranean Sea are evaluated for the last 50 years (1960–2010) against independent data on fisheries catch per unit effort (CPUE) for the same time period. Concordant patterns are found in the time series of all of the biological variables (from the model and from fisheries statistics), with low values at the beginning of the series, a later increase, with maximum levels reached at the end of the 1990s, and a posterior stabilization. Spectral analysis of the annual biological time series reveals coincident low-frequency signals in all of them. The first, more energetic signal peaks around the year 2000, while the second, less energetic signal peaks near 1982. Almost identical low-frequency signals are found in the nutrient loads of the rivers and in the integrated nutrient levels in the surface marine ecosystem. Nitrate concentration shows a maximum level in 1998, with a later stabilization to present-day values, coincident with the first low-frequency signal found in the biological series. Phosphate shows maximum concentrations around 1982 and a posterior sharp decline, in concordance with the second low-frequency signal observed in the biological series. That result seems to indicate that the control of marine productivity (plankton to fish) in the Mediterranean is principally mediated through bottom-up processes that could be traced back to the characteristics of riverine discharges. The high sensitivity of CPUE time series to environmental conditions might be another indicator of the overexploitation of this marine ecosystem. Key Points Biogeochemical evolution of the Mediterranean over the past 50 years River nutrient loads drive primary and secondary productions Strong link between low trophic levels and fisheries PMID:26180286

  5. Pre-treatments, characteristics, and biogeochemical dynamics of dissolved organic matter in sediments: A review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meilian; Hur, Jin

    2015-08-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in sediments, termed here sediment DOM, plays a variety of important roles in global biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients as well as in the fate and transport of xenobiotics. Here we reviewed sediment DOM, including pore waters and water extractable organic matter from inland and coastal sediments, based on recent literature (from 1996 to 2014). Sampling, pre-treatment, and characterization methods for sediment DOM were summarized. The characteristics of sediment DOM have been compared along an inland to coastal ecosystems gradient and also with the overlying DOM in water column to distinguish the unique nature of it. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from inland sediment DOM was generally higher than coastal areas, while no notable differences were found for their aromaticity and apparent molecular weight. Fluorescence index (FI) revealed that mixed sources are dominant for inland sediment DOM, but marine end-member prevails for coastal sediment DOM. Many reports showed that sediments operate as a net source of DOC and chromophoric DOM (CDOM) to the water column. Sediment DOM has shown more enrichment of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds in the elemental signature than the overlying DOM. Fluorescent fingerprint investigated by excitation-emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) further demonstrated the characteristics of sediment DOM lacking in the photo-oxidized and the intermediate components, which are typically present in the overlying surface water. In addition, the biogeochemical changes in sediment DOM and the subsequent environmental implications were discussed with the focus on the binding and the complexation properties with pollutants. PMID:25965884

  6. Hyporheic transport and biogeochemical reactions in pool-riffle systems under varying ambient groundwater flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Vieweg, Michael; Maier, Uli; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    At the interface between stream water, groundwater, and the hyporheic zone (HZ), important biogeochemical processes that play a crucial role in fluvial ecology occur. Solutes that infiltrate into the HZ can react with each other and possibly also with upwelling solutes from the groundwater. In this study, we systematically evaluate how variations of gaining and losing conditions, stream discharge, and pool-riffle morphology affect aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. For this purpose, a computational fluid dynamics model of stream water flow is coupled to a reactive transport model. Scenarios of variations of the solute concentration in the upwelling groundwater were conducted. Our results show that solute influx, residence time, and the size of reactive zones strongly depend on presence, magnitude, and direction of ambient groundwater flow. High magnitudes of ambient groundwater flow lower AR efficiency by up to 4 times and DN by up to 3 orders of magnitude, compared to neutral conditions. The influence of stream discharge and morphology on the efficiency of AR and DN are minor, in comparison to that of ambient groundwater flow. Different scenarios of O2 and NO3 concentrations in the upwelling groundwater reveal that DN efficiency of the HZ is highest under low upwelling magnitudes accompanied with low concentrations of O2 and NO3. Our results demonstrate how ambient groundwater flow influences solute transport, AR, and DN in the HZ. Neglecting groundwater flow in stream-groundwater interactions would lead to a significant overestimation of the efficiency of biogeochemical reactions in fluvial systems.

  7. Operator-splitting errors in coupled reactive transport codes for flow and transport under atmospheric boundary conditions or layered soil profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One possible way of integrating subsurface flow and transport processes with (bio)geochemical reactions is to couple by means of an operator-splitting approach two completely separate codes, one for variably-saturated flow and solute transport and one for equilibrium and kinetic biogeochemical react...

  8. Mangrove forests: a potent nexus of coastal biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, J. G.; Fuentes, J. D.; Shoemaker, B.; O'Halloran, T. L.; Lin, G., Sr.; Engel, V. C.

    2014-12-01

    Mangrove forests cover just 0.1% of the Earth's terrestrial surface, yet they provide a disproportionate source (~10 % globally) of terrestrially derived, refractory dissolved organic carbon to the oceans. Mangrove forests are biogeochemical reactors that convert biomass into dissolved organic and inorganic carbon at unusually high rates, and many studies recognize the value of mangrove ecosystems for the substantial amounts of soil carbon storage they produce. However, questions remain as to how mangrove forest ecosystem services should be valuated and quantified. Therefore, this study addresses several objectives. First, we demonstrate that seasonal and annual net ecosystem carbon exchange in three selected mangrove forests, derived from long-term eddy covariance measurements, represent key quantities in defining the magnitude of biogeochemical cycling and together with other information on carbon cycle parameters serves as a proxy to estimate ecosystem services. Second, we model ecosystem productivity across the mangrove forests of Everglades National Park and southern China by relating net ecosystem exchange values to remote sensing data. Finally, we develop a carbon budget for the mangrove forests in the Everglades National Park for the purposes of demonstrating that these forests and adjacent estuaries are sites of intense biogeochemical cycling. One conclusion from this study is that much of the carbon entering from the atmosphere as net ecosystem exchange (~1000 g C m-2 yr-1) is not retained in the net ecosystem carbon balance. Instead, a substantial fraction of the carbon entering the system as net ecosystem exchange is ultimately exported to the oceans or outgassed as reaction products within the adjacent estuary.

  9. Biogeochemical cycling of Si in a California rice cropping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfferth, A.; Kocar, B. D.; Lee, J.; Fendorf, S.

    2012-12-01

    Silicon is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust, but the number of studies on the biogeochemical cycling of Si does not reflect its environmental ubiquity. While not an "essential" plant nutrient, Si is important for many plants, particularly monocots, for structural integrity and protection against disease and environmental stress. For rice, Si fertilization with N and P increases yield significantly more than N and P alone. While total Si in soil is high, much of this Si is tied up in the crystal lattice of primary and secondary minerals and is only slowly released through chemical weathering. Thus, plant-available Si may be limited particularly in highly weathered soils in humid environments where long-term chemical weathering has lead to desilicification of the soils (e.g., in Southeast Asia where most rice is grown). In such Si-depleted environments, the biocycling of Si through decaying plant litter (i.e., phytoliths) and subsequent plant uptake has proven an important component of the terrestrial biogeochemical cycling of Si. Here, we investigate the dynamics of Si cycling over a two-year period in a rice paddy in Northern California where soil incorporation of harvested rice straw has impacted the terrestrial biogeochemical cycling of Si. We use Ge/Si ratios in pore-waters to infer the contribution of chemical weathering vs. dissolution of plant phytoliths on the plant-available Si pool. We found that the Ge/Si ratios change over the growing and fallow seasons reflecting different rates of Si release through phytolith dissolution and plant uptake.

  10. Biogeochemical classification of South Florida's estuarine and coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Briceño, Henry O; Boyer, Joseph N; Castro, Joffre; Harlem, Peter

    2013-10-15

    South Florida's watersheds have endured a century of urban and agricultural development and disruption of their hydrology. Spatial characterization of South Florida's estuarine and coastal waters is important to Everglades' restoration programs. We applied Factor Analysis and Hierarchical Clustering of water quality data in tandem to characterize and spatially subdivide South Florida's coastal and estuarine waters. Segmentation rendered forty-four biogeochemically distinct water bodies whose spatial distribution is closely linked to geomorphology, circulation, benthic community pattern, and to water management. This segmentation has been adopted with minor changes by federal and state environmental agencies to derive numeric nutrient criteria. PMID:23968989

  11. Rivers and Stable Isotopes as Indicators of Biogeochemical Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Consideration of processes on very small (microbe) to large (catchment) scales become increasingly important in biogeochemical gradient work. In this context, rivers are ideal indicators of biogeochemical gradients for large continental scales when geochemical- and discharge data are combined for flux evaluations. If these are further combined with isotope measurements, sources and turnover of water and dissolved constituents can be quantified. An example study is the combination of GIS-, discharge- and water stable isotope data on the in Clyde River basin in Scotland. Here we determined transpiration with an annual average of 0.489 km3 a-1. When combining this rate with the water use efficiency, the CO2 uptake of the entire basin yielded an annual net primary production (NPP) of 185.2 g C m-2. Compared to other temperate areas this is about half the NPP than expected, which is most likely caused by the predominant cover of grasslands. Therefore, agricultural and forest vegetation schemes could influence continental water balances on time scales of years to decades. In another study on the Lagan River in N. Ireland, stable isotope methods were applied to evaluate the role of carbonate versus silicate dissolution. Of these two types of weathering only silicate dissolution withdraws atmospheric CO2 to be stored in the continental crust over long time periods. A downstream evolution with increasing pH- and ?13CDIC values revealed carbonate dissolution despite their minor abundance in the catchment of less than 5 %. This dominant carbonate signal on the riverine carbon cycle outlines the capacity of buffering anthropogenic influences and CO2 turnover. It should be even more pronounced in other rivers where carbonates usually occupy a larger proportion of the basin geology. Future biogeochemical gradient work on rivers should apply particulate and dissolved organic constituent fluxes. This includes more refined compound specific isotope work on selected pollutants such as TCE, PAH, PCB as well as riverine microbiological considerations. Such expansions meet the challenge of measuring much smaller concentrations compared to groundwater contaminant plumes. Further combinations of stable N, H, O, and S isotope systems would also help to resolve overlapping trends when only carbon isotopes are measured. Apart from combining traditional light stable isotope systems, addition of newly accessible isotope groups by multicollector ICP-MS (i.e. Fe, Cr, Zn) and radioisotope techniques can provide innovative tools for resolving gradients and their biogeochemical cycling within rivers.

  12. Global changes in biogeochemical cycles in response to human activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III; Melillo, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of our research was to characterize biogeochemical cycles at continental and global scales in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This characterization applied to both natural ecosystems and those disturbed by human activity. The primary elements of interest were carbon and nitrogen and the analysis sought to quantify standing stocks and dynamic cycling processes. The translocation of major nutrients from the terrestrial landscape to the atmosphere (via trace gases) and to fluvial systems (via leaching, erosional losses, and point source pollution) were of particular importance to this study. Our aim was to develop the first generation of Earth System Models. Our research was organized around the construction and testing of component biogeochemical models which treated terrestrial ecosystem processes, aquatic nutrient transport through drainage basins, and trace gas exchanges at the continental and global scale. A suite of three complementary models were defined within this construct. The models were organized to operate at a 1/2 degree latitude by longitude level of spatial resolution and to execute at a monthly time step. This discretization afforded us the opportunity to understand the dynamics of the biosphere down to subregional scales, while simultaneously placing these dynamics into a global context.

  13. Salt Marsh Sediment Biogeochemical Response to the BP Blowout.

    PubMed

    Mills, Calista G; McNeal, Karen S

    2014-09-01

    The impact of the blowout on salt marshes was investigated by observing the biogeochemistry in salt marsh sediments along the Gulf Coast. High sulfide levels due to hydrocarbon loading, increased microbial activity, and microbial community shifts can lead to plant browning and mortality. Sediment biogeochemical processes that degrade enriched carbon pools through sulfate reduction are primarily responsible for the biodegradation of spilled hydrocarbons. An assessment of the impact of contamination on salt marshes at Skiff Island, LA, and Cat Island, Marsh Point, and Saltpan Island, MS, was achieved through sediment electrode profiling, microbial community profiling, and quantification of hydrocarbon contamination, which captured the spatial sedimentary biogeochemical response that affects salt marsh productivity. At western locations (Skiff and Cat Islands), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) ranged from 2183 to 2996 mg kg, which was more than double the TPH concentration observed at eastern locales. At eastern study locations (e.g., Marsh Point), sedimentary pore-water HS concentrations were higher (maximum value = 231 mg L) and detected further up in the sediment column than at western locales (e.g., Skiff Island). Similarly, anaerobic and aerobic microbial activity, as measured by C substrate utilization profiles and well-color development, was as high or higher at eastern locations as compared with western locations. These results indicate that other factors besides location or degree of contamination, perhaps sedimentary dynamics and physical processes specific to each marsh, should be considered when determining salt marsh response to hydrocarbon contamination. PMID:25603266

  14. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research FY11 Second Quarter Performance Measure

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-03-31

    The Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Long Term Measure for 2011 under the Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) measure is to "Refine subsurface transport models by developing computational methods to link important processes impacting contaminant transport at smaller scales to the field scale." The second quarter performance measure is to "Provide a report on computational methods linking genome-enabled understanding of microbial metabolism with reactive transport models to describe processes impacting contaminant transport in the subsurface." Microorganisms such as bacteria are by definition small (typically on the order of a micron in size), and their behavior is controlled by their local biogeochemical environment (typically within a single pore or a biofilm on a grain surface, on the order of tens of microns in size). However, their metabolic activity exerts strong influence on the transport and fate of groundwater contaminants of significant concern at DOE sites, in contaminant plumes with spatial extents of meters to kilometers. This report describes progress and key findings from research aimed at integrating models of microbial metabolism based on genomic information (small scale) with models of contaminant fate and transport in aquifers (field scale).

  15. The Impacts of Climate-Induced Drought on Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems and, in particular, forests exert strong controls on the global biogeochemical cycles and influence regional hydrology and climatology directly through water and surface energy budgets. Recent studies indicated that forest mortality caused by rising temperature and drought from around the world have unexpectedly increased in the past decade and they collectively illustrate the vulnerability of many forested ecosystems to rapid increases in tree mortality due to warmer temperatures and more severe drought. Persistent changes in tree mortality rates can alter forest structure, composition, and ecosystem services (such as albedo and carbon sequestration). Quantifying potential impacts of tree mortality on ecosystem processes requires research into mortality effects on carbon, energy, and water budgets at both site and regional levels. Despite recent progress, the uncertainty around mortality responses still limits our ability to predict the likelihood and anticipate the impacts of tree die-off. Studies are needed that explore tree death physiology for a wide variety of functional types, connect patterns of mortality with climate events, and quantify the impacts on carbon, energy, and water flux. In this presentation, I will highlight recent research progress, and identify key research needs and future challenges to predict the consequence and impacts of drought-induced large-scale forest mortality on biogeochemical cycles. I will focus on three main forest ecosystems (tropic rainforest in Amazon, temperate forest in Western USA, and boreal forest in Canada) as detailed case studies.

  16. Isotopes and Isoscapes: Tools for Testing Hydrological and Biogeochemical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, C.

    2014-12-01

    In the 21st century, the importance of high quality water resources cannot be overstated. New approaches are needed to pinpoint sources and ages of multiple contaminants, and to better understand critical hydrologic systems. Stable isotopic compositions of materials often show strong spatial and temporal distributions related to combinations of sources and processes. Isoscapes (spatial and/or temporal maps) of riverine and atmospheric data are increasingly being found to be effective means for assessing the effects of different land uses and biogeochemical processes on water resources. Hence, isotopes and isoscapes are a potentially powerful component of monitoring and assessment programs that are aimed at quantifying and mitigating alterations to environments from human activities (anthropogenic disturbances). Locations exhibiting unusually high rates of biogeochemical cycling or elevated pollution levels usually have distinctive isotopic compositions that are suggestive or diagnostic of specific reactions and pollution sources. Isotopes can be more effective at identifying hot spots and hot moments than concentrations alone because isotopic ratios may change even when concentrations do not. Hence, isotopes provide valuable additions to standard chemical and hydrological mass balance methods. This presentation will examine how the field of isotope hydrology has evolved over my 40+ year career as an isotope geochemist, highlight several exciting recent research thrusts, and share some thoughts on future research directions.

  17. BIOGEOCHEMICAL GRADIENTS AS A FRAMEWORK FOR UNDERSTANDING WASTE SITE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, M; Karen Vangelas, K

    2008-10-17

    The migration of biogeochemical gradients is a useful framework for understanding the evolution of biogeochemical conditions in groundwater at waste sites contaminated with metals and radionuclides. This understanding is critical to selecting sustainable remedies and evaluating sites for monitored natural attenuation, because most attenuation mechanisms are sensitive to geochemical conditions such as pH and redox potential. Knowledge of how gradients in these parameters evolve provides insights into the behavior of contaminants with time and guides characterization, remedy selection, and monitoring efforts. An example is a seepage basin site at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina where low-level acidic waste has seeped into groundwater. The remediation of this site relies, in part, on restoring the natural pH of the aquifer by injecting alkaline solutions. The remediation will continue until the pH up-flow of the treatment zone increases to an acceptable value. The time required to achieve this objective depends on the time it takes the trailing pH gradient, the gradient separating the plume from influxing natural groundwater, to reach the treatment zone. Predictions of this length of time will strongly influence long-term remedial decisions.

  18. Enhanced biogeochemical cycling and subsequent reduction of hydraulic conductivity associated with soil-layer interfaces in the vadose zone

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, David J.; McGuire, Jennifer T.; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2013-01-01

    Biogeochemical dynamics in the vadose zone are poorly understood due to the transient nature of chemical and hydrologic conditions, but are nonetheless critical to understanding chemical fate and transport. This study explored the effects of a soil layer on linked geochemical, hydrological, and microbiological processes. Three laboratory soil columns were constructed: a homogenized medium-grained sand, a homogenized organic-rich loam, and a sand-over-loam layered column. Upward and downward infiltration of water was evaluated during experiments to simulate rising water table and rainfall events respectively. In-situ collocated probes measured soil water content, matric potential, and Eh while water samples collected from the same locations were analyzed for Br?, Cl?, NO3?, SO42?, NH4+, Fe2+, and total sulfide. Compared to homogenous columns, the presence of a soil layer altered the biogeochemistry and water flow of the system considerably. Enhanced biogeochemical cycling was observed in the layered column over the texturally homogeneous soil columns. Enumerations of iron and sulfate reducing bacteria showed 1-2 orders of magnitude greater community numbers in the layered column. Mineral and soil aggregate composites were most abundant near the soil-layer interface; the presence of which, likely contributed to an observed order-of-magnitude decrease in hydraulic conductivity. These findings show that quantifying coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes occurring at small-scale soil interfaces is critical to accurately describing and predicting chemical changes at the larger system scale. Findings also provide justification for considering soil layering in contaminant fate and transport models because of its potential to increase biodegradation and/or slow the rate of transport of contaminants. PMID:22031578

  19. A light-driven, one-dimensional dimethylsulfide biogeochemical cycling model for the Sargasso Sea

    E-print Network

    Siegel, David A.

    A light-driven, one-dimensional dimethylsulfide biogeochemical cycling model for the Sargasso Sea cycle. Using the Dacey et al. (1998) 1992­1994 Sargasso Sea DMS data set, in conjunction with an offline-dimensional dimethylsulfide biogeochemical cycling model for the Sargasso Sea, J. Geophys. Res., 113, G02009, doi:10

  20. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF SOLAR UV RADIATION AND CLIMATE CHANGE ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper assesses research on the interactions of UV radiation (280-400 nm) and global climate change with global biogeochemical cycles at the Earth's surface. The effects of UV-B (280-315 nm), which are dependent on the stratospheric ozone layer, on biogeochemical cycles are o...

  1. Aqueous complexation reactions governing the rate and extent of biogeochemical U(VI) reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kemner, K.M.; Kelly, S.D.; Brooks, Scott C.; Dong, Wenming; Carroll, Sue; Fredrickson, James K.

    2006-06-01

    The proposed research will elucidate the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentration, chemical speciation, and reactivity of the redox-sensitive contaminant uranium. The results will provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the biogeochemical reduction of uranium in subsurface environments.

  2. Spatial dynamics of biogeochemical processes in the St. Louis River freshwater estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Great Lakes, river-lake transition zones within freshwater estuaries are hydrologically and biogeochemically dynamic areas that regulate nutrient and energy fluxes between rivers and Great Lakes. The goal of our study was to characterize the biogeochemical properties of th...

  3. Biogeochemical responses of the carbon cycle to natural and human perturbations: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Ver, L.M.B.; Mackenzie, F.T.; Lerman, A.

    1999-07-01

    In the past three centuries, human perturbations of the environment have affected the biogeochemical behavior of the global carbon cycle and that of the other three nutrient elements closely coupled to carbon: nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur. The partitioning of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} among its various sinks in the past, for the present, and for projections into the near future is controlled by the interactions of these four elemental cycles within the major environmental domains of the land, atmosphere, coastal oceanic zone, and open ocean. The authors analyze the past, present, and future behavior of the global carbon cycle using the Terrestrial-Ocean-aTmosphere Ecosystem Model (TOTEM), a unique process-based model of the four global coupled biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur. They find that during the past 300 yrs, anthropogenic CO{sub 2} was mainly stored in the atmosphere and in the open ocean. Human activities on land caused an enhanced loss of mass from the terrestrial organic matter reservoirs (phytomass and humus) mainly through deforestation and consequently increased humus remineralization, erosion, and transport to the coastal margins by rivers and runoff. Photosynthetic uptake by the terrestrial phytomass was enhanced owing to fertilization by increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations and supported by nutrients remineralized from organic matter. TOTEM results indicate that through most of the past 300 yrs, the loss of C from deforestation and other land-use activities was greater than the gain from the enhanced photosynthetic uptake. Since pre-industrial time (since 1700), the net flux of CO{sub 2} from the coastal waters has decreased by 40%, from 0.20 Gt C/yr to 0.12 Gt C/yr. TOTEM analyses of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations for the 21st century were based on the fossil-fuel emission projections of IPCC (business as usual scenario) and of the more restrictive UN 1997 Kyoto Protocol. By the mid-21st century, the projected atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations range from about 550 ppmv (TOTEM, based on IPCC projected emissions) to 510 ppmv (IPCC projection) and to 460 ppmv (TOTEM, based on the Kyoto Protocol reduced emissions).

  4. Biogeochemical Modeling of the Second Rise of Atmospheric Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Catling, D. C.; Claire, M.

    2014-12-01

    The second rise of atmospheric oxygen (~600 Ma) marked an increase of atmospheric pO2 from a poorly constrained value of 0.1% < pO2 < 10% of present atmospheric level (PAL) in the early and mid Proterozoic to >10%PAL1. The event is important because it ushered in the modern era of animal life. To understand the evolution of Earth's habitability, it is therefore key to understand the cause of this 2nd rise. Here, we quantitatively examine possible causes for the 2nd rise of oxygen. We use a biogeochemical box model2 originally developed to calculate the oxygen evolution before and after the 1st rise of oxygen (~2.4 Ga). The Claire et al. (2006) model calculates the evolution of atmospheric oxygen and methane given production and loss fluxes associated with the oxygen, carbon, and iron cycles. Because the model was unable to drive pO2 to end-Proterozoic levels, the authors suggested that another buffer, such as sulfur, is needed to explain the 2nd rise of oxygen. The sulfur and oxygen cycles are tied through various biogeochemical interactions; therefore, once sulfur (as sulfate) began to accumulate in Proterozoic oceans, it likely began to heavily influence the oxygen cycle. We have added a sulfur biogeochemical cycle to this model, enabling exploration of mechanisms that buffer pO2 at intermediate levels in the Proterozoic and fail to do so in the Phanerozoic. Preliminary results show evolution of oxygen and methane that are consistent with geologic proxies. However, the model-generated 2nd rise of oxygen is dependent upon sulfur fluxes that have uncertain magnitudes, so we will present the sensitivity of our results to model assumptions while constraining scenarios for the 2nd rise of atmospheric O2. In the future, we will also integrate isotopic fractionation effects, which will allow comparison with isotopic data from sedimentary sulfides, carbonates, and organic carbon. 1Canfield, C., 2014, Treatise on Geochemistry, 197 2Claire, M.W., et al., 2006, Geobiology, 4, 239

  5. Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namocatcat, J. A.; Fang, J.; Barcelona, M. J.; Quibuyen, A. T. O.; Abrajano, T. A.

    2003-12-01

    Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and 2,3,5-trimethylbenzoic acids temporally and between multilevel wells reflect processes indicative of an actively evolving contaminant plume. The concentration levels of trimethylbenzoic acids were 3-10 orders higher than their tetramethylbenzene precursors, a condition attributed to slow metabolite turnover under sulfidogenic conditions. The observed degradation of tetramethylbenzenes into trimethylbenzoic acids obviates the use of these alkylbenzenes as non-labile tracers for other degradable aromatic hydrocarbons, but provides rare field evidence on the range of high molecular weight alkylbenzenes and isomeric assemblages amenable to anaerobic degradation in situ. The coupling of actual tetramethylbenzene loss with trimethylbenzoic acid production and the general decline in the concentrations of these compounds demonstrate the role of microbially mediated processes in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons and may be a key indicator in the overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation and the biogeochemical evolution of the KC-135 aquifer.

  6. Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Namocatcat, J A; Fang, J; Barcelona, M J; Quibuyen, A T O; Abrajano, T A

    2003-12-01

    Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and 2,3,5-trimethylbenzoic acids temporally and between multilevel wells reflect processes indicative of an actively evolving contaminant plume. The concentration levels of trimethylbenzoic acids were 3-10 orders higher than their tetramethylbenzene precursors, a condition attributed to slow metabolite turnover under sulfidogenic conditions. The observed degradation of tetramethylbenzenes into trimethylbenzoic acids obviates the use of these alkylbenzenes as non-labile tracers for other degradable aromatic hydrocarbons, but provides rare field evidence on the range of high molecular weight alkylbenzenes and isomeric assemblages amenable to anaerobic degradation in situ. The coupling of actual tetramethylbenzene loss with trimethylbenzoic acid production and the general decline in the concentrations of these compounds demonstrate the role of microbially mediated processes in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons and may be a key indicator in the overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation and the biogeochemical evolution of the KC-135 aquifer. PMID:14607476

  7. Variably Saturated Flow and Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling of a Uranium Bioremediation Field Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Dayvault, Richard; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

    2011-11-01

    Field experiments at a former uranium mill tailings site have identified the potential for stimulating indigenous bacteria to catalyze the conversion of aqueous uranium in the +6 oxidation state to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. This effectively removes uranium from solution resulting in groundwater concentrations below actionable standards. Three-dimensional, coupled variably-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport rates and biogeochemical reaction rates that determine the location and magnitude of key reaction products. A comprehensive reaction network, developed largely through previous 1-D modeling studies, was used to simulate the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. A principal challenge is the mechanistic representation of biologically-mediated terminal electron acceptor process (TEAP) reactions whose products significantly alter geochemical controls on uranium mobility through increases in pH, alkalinity, exchangeable cations, and highly reactive reduction products. In general, these simulations of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado confirmed previously identified behaviors including (1) initial dominance by iron reducing bacteria that concomitantly reduce aqueous U(VI), (2) sulfate reducing bacteria that become dominant after {approx}30 days and outcompete iron reducers for the acetate electron donor, (3) continuing iron-reducer activity and U(VI) bioreduction during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions, and (4) lower apparent U(VI) removal from groundwater during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions. New knowledge on simultaneously active metal and sulfate reducers has been incorporated into the modeling. In this case, an initially small population of slow growing sulfate reducers is active from the initiation of biostimulation. Three-dimensional, variably saturated flow modeling was used to address impacts of a falling water table during acetate injection. These impacts included a significant reduction in aquifer saturated thickness and isolation of residual reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted in higher concentrations of TEAP products when terminal electron donors and acceptors were not limiting. Finally, facies-based porosity and reactive surface area variations were shown to affect aqueous uranium concentration distributions; however, the ranges were sufficiently small to preserve general trends. Large computer memory and high computational performance were required to simulate the detailed coupled process models for multiple biogeochemical components in highly resolved heterogeneous materials for the 110-day field experiment and 50 days of post-biostimulation behavior. In this case, a highly-scalable subsurface simulator operating on 128 processor cores for 12 hours was used to simulate each realization. An equivalent simulation without parallel processing would have taken 60 days, assuming sufficient memory was available.

  8. The general ensemble biogeochemical modeling system (GEMS) and its applications to agriculture systems in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The General Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS) was developed for a proper integration of well-established ecosystem biogeochemical models with various spatial databases to simulate biogeochemical cycles over large areas. Major driving variables include land cover and land use, climate, s...

  9. Comparative study of infrared techniques for fast biogeochemical sediment analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, A.; RoséN, P.; Kliem, P.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2011-10-01

    Analysis of sediment samples in the visible to mid infrared (IR) region requires small amounts of sample material and enables rapid and cost efficient geochemical analysis of mineral and organic sediment components. Here we use geochemical properties (total organic and inorganic carbon, biogenic silica, total nitrogen) from the ICDP deep drilling project PASADO to compare three different IR spectroscopy techniques: Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform IR Spectrometry (DRIFTS), Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform IR Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIRS) and Visible Near IR Spectroscopy (VNIRS). ATR-FTIRS and VNIRS are more rapid techniques compared to DRIFTS. Results show that calibration models developed using DRIFTS are most robust (correlation coefficient: R = 0.92 for TIC, R = 0.84 for BSi, R = 0.97 for TOC, R = 0.95 for TN). However, good statistical performance was also obtained by using ATR-FTIRS and VNIRS. When time and costs are limiting factors, these tools may be given preference for rapid biogeochemical screening.

  10. Differential leaflet mortality may influence biogeochemical cycling following tropical cyclones

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E; Ferreras, Ulysses

    2014-01-01

    Intensity of tropical cyclones is expected to increase in the coming century, and an improved understanding of their influence on biogeochemical cycles would benefit ecologists and conservationists. We studied the November 2013 Typhoon Haiyan damage to observe that numerous examples of partial leaf necrosis on intact leaves of trees in the Cycadaceae and Arecaceae families resulted, leaving behind a copious amount of arboreal dead leaf material attached to live leaves. The decay process of this form of arboreal litter has not been previously studied. When compared with decay of ground litter or detached litter suspended in the canopy, we predict the decay process of this form of arboreal litter will include increased photooxidation, leaching, and comminution by detritivorous insects and mites; but decreased catabolism of organic molecules by saprophytic organisms. PMID:25083171

  11. A GIS approach to conducting biogeochemical research in wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brannon, David P.; Irish, Gary J.

    1985-01-01

    A project was initiated to develop an environmental data base to address spatial aspects of both biogeochemical cycling and resource management in wetlands. Specific goals are to make regional methane flux estimates and site specific water level predictions based on man controlled water releases within a wetland study area. The project will contribute to the understanding of the Earth's biosphere through its examination of the spatial variability of methane emissions. Although wetlands are thought to be one of the primary sources for release of methane to the atmosphere, little is known about the spatial variability of methane flux. Only through a spatial analysis of methane flux rates and the environmental factors which influence such rates can reliable regional and global methane emissions be calculated. Data will be correlated and studied from Landsat 4 instruments, from a ground survey of water level recorders, precipitation recorders, evaporation pans, and supplemental gauges, and from flood gate water release; and regional methane flux estimates will be made.

  12. Research highlights: elucidation of biogeochemical factors influencing methylmercury production.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Paul R; Lin, Vivian S

    2015-10-01

    Coal combustion and other human activities release inorganic mercury into the atmosphere at levels far greater than emissions from natural sources, significantly perturbing the global mercury cycle. Subsequent biogeochemical transformation of inorganic mercury to highly toxic methylmercury allows this heavy metal pollutant to enter the food web, where it bioaccumulates and can have severe impacts on animal and human populations. This Highlight features recent articles that examine in detail the effects of nutrient availability on the methylation-demethylation activity of microorganisms living in sediment with mercury contamination. By investigating differences in levels of sulfate, iron, organic matter, and other environmental factors, this research provides insight into the conditions that may favor methylmercury formation and thereby better inform remediation efforts in the future. PMID:26376357

  13. Biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems - Modeling, measurement, and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Matson, P. A.; Lawless, J. G.; Aber, J. D.; Vitousek, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of modeling, remote sensing, and measurements to characterize the pathways and to measure the rate of biogeochemical cycling in forest ecosystems is described. The application of the process-level model to predict processes in intact forests and ecosystems response to disturbance is examined. The selection of research areas from contrasting climate regimes and sites having a fertility gradient in that regime is discussed, and the sites studied are listed. The use of remote sensing in determining leaf area index and canopy biochemistry is analyzed. Nitrous oxide emission is investigated by using a gas measurement instrument. Future research projects, which include studying the influence of changes on nutrient cycling in ecosystems and the effect of pollutants on the ecosystems, are discussed.

  14. Deriving forest fire ignition risk with biogeochemical process modelling?

    PubMed Central

    Eastaugh, C.S.; Hasenauer, H.

    2014-01-01

    Climate impacts the growth of trees and also affects disturbance regimes such as wildfire frequency. The European Alps have warmed considerably over the past half-century, but incomplete records make it difficult to definitively link alpine wildfire to climate change. Complicating this is the influence of forest composition and fuel loading on fire ignition risk, which is not considered by purely meteorological risk indices. Biogeochemical forest growth models track several variables that may be used as proxies for fire ignition risk. This study assesses the usefulness of the ecophysiological model BIOME-BGC's ‘soil water’ and ‘labile litter carbon’ variables in predicting fire ignition. A brief application case examines historic fire occurrence trends over pre-defined regions of Austria from 1960 to 2008. Results show that summer fire ignition risk is largely a function of low soil moisture, while winter fire ignitions are linked to the mass of volatile litter and atmospheric dryness. PMID:26109905

  15. Reconstructing disturbances and their biogeochemical consequences over multiple timescales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLauchlan, Kendra K.; Higuera, Philip E.; Gavin, Daniel G.; Perakis, Steven S.; Mack, Michelle C.; Alexander, Heather; Battles, John; Biondi, Franco; Buma, Brian; Colombaroli, Daniele; Enders, Sara K.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Marlon, Jennifer R.; Marshall, John; McGlone, Matt; Morris, Jesse L.; Nave, Lucas E.; Shuman, Bryan; Smithwick, Erica A.H.; Urrego, Dunia H.; Wardle, David A.; Williams, Christopher J.; Williams, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing changes in disturbance regimes are predicted to cause acute changes in ecosystem structure and function in the coming decades, but many aspects of these predictions are uncertain. A key challenge is to improve the predictability of postdisturbance biogeochemical trajectories at the ecosystem level. Ecosystem ecologists and paleoecologists have generated complementary data sets about disturbance (type, severity, frequency) and ecosystem response (net primary productivity, nutrient cycling) spanning decadal to millennial timescales. Here, we take the first steps toward a full integration of these data sets by reviewing how disturbances are reconstructed using dendrochronological and sedimentary archives and by summarizing the conceptual frameworks for carbon, nitrogen, and hydrologic responses to disturbances. Key research priorities include further development of paleoecological techniques that reconstruct both disturbances and terrestrial ecosystem dynamics. In addition, mechanistic detail from disturbance experiments, long-term observations, and chronosequences can help increase the understanding of ecosystem resilience.

  16. Biogeochemical evolution of a landfill leachate plume, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Masoner, Jason R.; Breit, George N.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Jaeschke, Jeanne B.

    2011-01-01

    Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last for decades to centuries. The fate of reactive contaminants in leachate-affected aquifers depends on the sustainability of biogeochemical processes affecting contaminant transport. Temporal variations in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade. The leachate plume contained elevated concentrations of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) (up to 300 mg/L), methane (16 mg/L), ammonium (650 mg/L as N), iron (23 mg/L), chloride (1030 mg/L), and bicarbonate (4270 mg/L). Chemical and isotopic investigations along a 2D plume transect revealed consumption of solid and aqueous electron acceptors in the aquifer, depleting the natural attenuation capacity. Despite the relative recalcitrance of NVDOC to biodegradation, the center of the plume was depleted in sulfate, which reduces the long-term oxidation capacity of the leachate-affected aquifer. Ammonium and methane were attenuated in the aquifer relative to chloride by different processes: ammonium transport was retarded mainly by physical interaction with aquifer solids, whereas the methane plume was truncated largely by oxidation. Studies near plume boundaries revealed temporal variability in constituent concentrations related in part to hydrologic changes at various time scales. The upper boundary of the plume was a particularly active location where redox reactions responded to recharge events and seasonal water-table fluctuations. Accurately describing the biogeochemical processes that affect the transport of contaminants in this landfill-leachate-affected aquifer required understanding the aquifer's geologic and hydrodynamic framework.

  17. Reservoir and contaminated sediments impacts in high-Andean environments: Morphodynamic interactions with biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escauriaza, C. R.; Contreras, M. T.; Müllendorff, D. A.; Pasten, P.; Pizarro, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid changes due to anthropic interventions in high-altitude environments, such as the Altiplano region in South America, require new approaches to understand the connections between physical and biogeochemical processes. Alterations of the water quality linked to the river morphology can affect the ecosystems and human development in the long-term. The future construction of a reservoir in the Lluta river, located in northern Chile, will change the spatial distribution of arsenic-rich sediments, which can have significant effects on the lower parts of the watershed. In this investigation we develop a coupled numerical model to predict and evaluate the interactions between morphodynamic changes in the Lluta reservoir, and conditions that can potentially desorb arsenic from the sediments. Assuming that contaminants are mobilized under anaerobic conditions, we calculate the oxygen concentration within the sediments to study the interactions of the delta progradation with the potential arsenic release. This work provides a framework for future studies aimed to analyze the complex connections between morphodynamics and water quality, when contaminant-rich sediments accumulate in a reservoir. The tool can also help to design effective risk management and remediation strategies in these extreme environments. Research has been supported by Fondecyt grant 1130940 and CONICYT/FONDAP Grant 15110017

  18. Biogeochemical implications of comparative growth rates of Emiliania huxleyi and Coccolithus species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, C. J.; Sheward, R. M.; Poulton, A. J.

    2014-07-01

    Coccolithophores are a diverse and biogeochemically important group of phytoplankton in terms of the production and export of calcite, yet the comparative physiology and ecology of species other than the ubiquitous Emiliania huxleyi is poorly understood. Despite assumptions that Emiliania huxleyi is a fast growing species, we found it had comparable growth rates (0.16-0.85 d-1) with strains of Coccolithus pelagicus and Coccolithus braarudii when grown under identical temperature and light conditions. A recently isolated Arctic strain of C. pelagicus (RCC4092) exhibited only a 12% slower growth rate, on average, than a recently isolated Arctic strain of E. huxleyi (RCC3533), over a temperature range of 6-12 °C. Established temperate strains of E. huxleyi and C. braarudii (RCC1228 and RCC1198) exhibited a slightly larger difference in growth rates, with E. huxleyi growing 28% faster on average than C. braarudii over a temperature range of 12-19 °C. Coupled with the 30-80 times higher cellular calcite content of C. pelagicus and C. braarudii compared to E. huxleyi, this suggests that Coccolithus species could be major calcite producers in mixed populations. The relative abundance of coccolithophore species is key for determining which species will dominate calcite production in mixed communities growing at similar rates. Field samples from the North Atlantic show that C. pelagicus is in a high enough relative abundance in 69% of samples collected in the spring and summer of 2010 to be a larger source of calcite production than E. huxleyi.

  19. The Biogeochemical Role of Baleen Whales and Krill in Southern Ocean Nutrient Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Ratnarajah, Lavenia; Bowie, Andrew R.; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M.; Nicol, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The availability of micronutrients is a key factor that affects primary productivity in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the Southern Ocean. Nutrient supply is governed by a range of physical, chemical and biological processes, and there are significant feedbacks within the ecosystem. It has been suggested that baleen whales form a crucial part of biogeochemical cycling processes through the consumption of nutrient-rich krill and subsequent defecation, but data on their contribution are scarce. We analysed the concentration of iron, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, phosphorus and carbon in baleen whale faeces and muscle, and krill tissue using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Metal concentrations in krill tissue were between 20 thousand and 4.8 million times higher than typical Southern Ocean HNLC seawater concentrations, while whale faecal matter was between 276 thousand and 10 million times higher. These findings suggest that krill act as a mechanism for concentrating and retaining elements in the surface layer, which are subsequently released back into the ocean, once eaten by whales, through defecation. Trace metal to carbon ratios were also higher in whale faeces compared to whale muscle indicating that whales are concentrating carbon and actively defecating trace elements. Consequently, recovery of the great whales may facilitate the recycling of nutrients via defecation, which may affect productivity in HNLC areas. PMID:25469984

  20. Winners and losers: Ecological and biogeochemical changes in a warming ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Scott, J. R.; Follows, M. J.

    2013-04-01

    We employ a marine ecosystem model, with diverse and flexible phytoplankton communities, coupled to an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to explore mechanisms that will alter the biogeography and productivity of phytoplankton populations in a warming world. Simple theoretical frameworks and sensitivity experiments reveal that ecological and biogeochemical changes are driven by a balance between two impacts of a warming climate: higher metabolic rates (the "direct" effect), and changes in the supply of limiting nutrients and altered light environments (the "indirect" effect). On globally integrated productivity, the two effects compensate to a large degree. Regionally, the competition between effects is more complicated; patterns of productivity changes are different between high and low latitudes and are also regulated by how the supply of the limiting nutrient changes. These complex regional patterns are also found in the changes to broad phytoplankton functional groups. On the finer ecological scale of diversity within functional groups, we find that ranges of some phytoplankton types are reduced, while those of others (potentially minor players in the present ocean) expand. Combined change in areal extent of range and in regionally available nutrients leads to global "winners and losers." The model suggests that the strongest and most robust signal of the warming ocean is likely to be the large turnover in local phytoplankton community composition.

  1. Rn as a geochemical tool for estimating residence times in the hyporheic zone and its application to biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfedder, Benjamin; Dörner, Sebastian; Ebertshäuser, Marlene Esther; Glaser, Barbara; Klug, Maria; Pittroff, Marco; Pieruschka, Ines; Waldemer, Carolin

    2014-05-01

    The hyporheic zone is at the interface between groundwater and surface water systems. It is also often a geochemical and redox boundary between typically reduced groundwater and oxic surface water. It experiences dynamic physical and chemical conditions as both groundwater fluxes and surface water levels vary in time and space. This can be particularly important for processes such as biogeochemical processing of nutrients and carbon. There has recently been an increasing focus on coupling residence times of surface water in the hyporheic zone with biogeochemical reactions. While geochemical profiles can be readily measured using established geochemical sampling techniques (e.g. peepers), quantifying surface water residence times and flow paths within the hyporheic zone is more elusive. The nobel gas radon offers a method for quantification of surface water residence times in the hyporheic zone. Radon activities are typically low in surface waters due to degassing to the atmosphere and decay. However once the surface water flows into the hyporheic zone radon accumulates along the flow path due to emanation from the sediments. Using simple analytical equations the water residence time can be calculated based on the difference between measured 222Rn activities and 222Rn activities at secular equilibrium, with a maximum limit of about 20 days (depending on measurement precision). Rn is particularly suited to residence time measurements in the hyporheic zone since it does not require addition of tracers to the stream nor does it require complex simulations and assumptions (such as 1D vertical flow) as for temperature measurements. As part of the biogeochemistry course at the University of Bayreuth, we have investigated the coupling of redox processes and water residence times in the hyporheic zone using 222Rn as a tracer for residence time. Of particular interest were nitrate and sulfate reduction and methane and CO2 production. Measurements were made in a sandy section of the Mistelbach, a second order stream running through agricultural land near the city of Bayreuth. Radon was measured at 1-3 locations on two occasions and at 5 different depths (-5 to-25 cm). Geochemical parameters NO3-, NO2-, SO4-, Fe2+, CO2 and CH4 was measured in peepers with a vertical resolution of 1-2 cm to a depth of 50 cm as well as in the same samples as the Rn. Groundwater activities were measured in incubation experiments and by the deepest sampling point in the hyporheic zone. The results showed that there was a clear dependence of biogeochemical processes on the residence time. Nitrate was reduced within 2 days, while sulfate reduction began after 5 days while Fe2+ was produced after 10 days. CH4 production occurred at >20 days, which is above the upper limit of residence time detection using Rn. Obviously, biogeochemical processes are controlled by the balance between reaction rates and advection rates in the hyporheic zone, and that the ratio of these rates (i.e. the Damköhler number) will control the efficiency of material processing. The uncertainty in the method increases towards longer residence times, as secular equilibrium activities and measured activities converge. It is also influenced by the heterogeneity of emanation in the sediments. However, research within the hyporheic zone is usually focused on residence times shorter than two weeks, and emanation can be quantified in the laboratory. Thus Rn appears well suited to the study of time scales over which biogeochemical processes occur in the hyporheic zone.

  2. Capturing optically important constituents and properties in a marine biogeochemical and ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Hickman, A. E.; Jahn, O.; Gregg, W. W.; Mouw, C. B.; Follows, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    We present a numerical model of the ocean that couples a three-stream radiative transfer component with a marine biogeochemical-ecosystem component in a dynamic three-dimensional physical framework. The radiative transfer component resolves the penetration of spectral irradiance as it is absorbed and scattered within the water column. We explicitly include the effect of several optically important water constituents (different phytoplankton functional types; detrital particles; and coloured dissolved organic matter, CDOM). The model is evaluated against in situ-observed and satellite-derived products. In particular we compare to concurrently measured biogeochemical, ecosystem, and optical data along a meridional transect of the Atlantic Ocean. The simulation captures the patterns and magnitudes of these data, and estimates surface upwelling irradiance analogous to that observed by ocean colour satellite instruments. We find that incorporating the different optically important constituents explicitly and including spectral irradiance was crucial to capture the variability in the depth of the subsurface chlorophyll a (Chl a) maximum. We conduct a series of sensitivity experiments to demonstrate, globally, the relative importance of each of the water constituents, as well as the crucial feedbacks between the light field, the relative fitness of phytoplankton types, and the biogeochemistry of the ocean. CDOM has proportionally more importance at attenuating light at short wavelengths and in more productive waters, phytoplankton absorption is relatively more important at the subsurface Chl a maximum, and water molecules have the greatest contribution when concentrations of other constituents are low, such as in the oligotrophic gyres. Scattering had less effect on attenuation, but since it is important for the amount and type of upwelling irradiance, it is crucial for setting sea surface reflectance. Strikingly, sensitivity experiments in which absorption by any of the optical constituents was increased led to a decrease in the size of the oligotrophic regions of the subtropical gyres: lateral nutrient supplies were enhanced as a result of decreasing high-latitude productivity. This new model that captures bio-optical feedbacks will be important for improving our understanding of the role of light and optical constituents on ocean biogeochemistry, especially in a changing environment. Further, resolving surface upwelling irradiance will make it easier to connect to satellite-derived products in the future.

  3. Biogeochemical Signatures of Contaminant Transport at the Watershed Scale: Spectral and Wavelet Analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, K.; Harman, C. J.; Basu, N. B.; Rao, S. S.; Sivapalan, M.; Kalita, P. K.; Packman, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    Agricultural watersheds are intensely managed systems, and consist of a large number of dynamic components that interact non-linearly to create emergent patterns in space and time. These systems can be conceptualized as input signals (“drivers”) that cascade through a hierarchy of non-linear “filters” to create the modulated spatial and temporal responses (“signatures”). The coupling between flow and transport (“hydrologic filter”) and transformations (“biogeochemical filter”) control the cascading processes from precipitation through stream flow, and finally to chemical concentrations and loads, at various nested spatial and temporal scales. To detect important “signatures”, we applied spectral analysis and wavelet coherence to the 10-year dataset (at daily resolution) collected from Little Vermillion River watershed (Illinois, USA), an agricultural watershed (~400 km2), drained by an extensive network of subsurface tiles, surface ditches, and streams. Watershed monitoring data includes hydrologic measurements (flow and stage), and concentrations of chemical constituents (nitrate, phosphate, and pesticides) across different spatial scales, from tile-flow stations (drainage area ~ 0.05 km2) to river stations (drainage area ~400 km2). We find that a power-law scaling behavior exists in all the smoothed power spectra for precipitation, stream flow, nitrate concentration and load. The slopes of power spectra increase from precipitation to stream flow to nitrate concentration, demonstrating the cascading effect of the filters. The spectral analysis further shows that the filters retain the major characteristics of long-term response (annual and sub-annual cycle), but smooth (or filter) the short-term responses. Steeper slopes are observed at larger spatial scales, indicating a stronger filtering effect due to greater averaging (buffering) with increasing residence time. Further data analysis using wavelet coherence suggests that at small spatial scales, stream flow is tightly coupled with nitrate concentration for both short and long temporal scales; while at larger spatial scales, only long-term coupling is observed. The decreased coupling with increasing spatial and temporal scale is attributed to the averaging of heterogeneities from different local tiles and ditches to the large-scale stream network outlets. It is hypothesized that this averaging and decoupling leads to the “apparent chemostatic” response that is observed at larger spatial scales, despite strong coupling and non-chemostatic behavior at smaller spatial scales.

  4. Aqueous Complexation Reactions Governing the Rate and Extent of Biogeochemical U(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Scott C. Brooks; Wenming Dong; Sue Carroll; Jim Fredrickson; Ken Kemner; Shelly Kelly

    2006-06-01

    The proposed research will elucidate the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentration, chemical speciation, and reactivity of the redox-sensitive contaminant uranium. The results will provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the biogeochemical reduction of uranium in subsurface environments. In addition, the work plan is designed to: (1) Generate fundamental scientific understanding on the relationship between U(VI) chemical speciation and its susceptibility to biogeochemical reduction reactions. ? Elucidate the controls on the rate and extent of contaminant reactivity. (2) Provide new insights into the aqueous and solid speciation of U(VI)/U(IV) under representative groundwater conditions.

  5. Aqueous Complexation Reactions Governing the Rate and Extent of Biogeochemical U(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Scott C. Brooks; Wenming Dong; Sue Carroll; James K. Fredrickson; Kenneth M. Kemner; Shelly D. Kelly

    2006-06-01

    The proposed research will elucidate the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentration, chemical speciation, and reactivity of the redox-sensitive contaminant uranium. The results will provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the biogeochemical reduction of uranium in subsurface environments. In addition, the work plan is designed to: (1) Generate fundamental scientific understanding on the relationship between U(VI) chemical speciation and its susceptibility to biogeochemical reduction reactions. (2) Elucidate the controls on the rate and extent of contaminant reactivity. (3) Provide new insights into the aqueous and solid speciation of U(VI)/U(IV) under representative groundwater conditions.

  6. Biogeochemical and hydrological controls on fate and distribution of trace metals in oiled Gulf salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevan, J.; Natter, M.; Lee, M.; Keimowitz, A.; Okeke, B.; Savrda, C.; Saunders, J.

    2011-12-01

    On April 20, 2010, the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting in the release of approximately 5 million barrels of crude oil into the environment. Oil and its associated trace metals have been demonstrated to have a detrimental effect on coastal wetland ecosystems. Wetlands are particularly susceptible to oil contamination because they are composed largely of fine-grained sediments, which have a high capacity to adsorb organic matter and metals. The biogeochemical cycling of trace metals can be strongly influenced by microbial activity, specifically those of sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria. Microbial activity may be enhanced by an increase in amounts of organic matter such as oil. This research incorporates an assessment of levels of trace metals and associated biogeochemical changes from ten coastal marshes in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. These sampling sites range in their pollution levels from pristine to highly contaminated. A total digestion analysis of wetland sediments shows higher concentrations of certain trace metals (e.g., Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn, Sr, Co, V, Ba, Hg, As) in heavily-oiled areas compared to less-affected and pristine sites. Due to chemical complexation among organic compounds and metals, crude oils often contain elevated levels (up to hundreds of mg/kg) of trace metals At the heavily-oiled Louisiana sites (e.g., Bay Jimmy, Bayou Dulac, Bay Batiste), elevated levels of metals and total organic carbon have been found in sediments down to depths of 30 cm. Clearly the contamination is not limited to shallow sediments and oil, along with various associated metals, may be invading into deeper (pre-industrial) portions of the marsh sediments. Pore-waters extracted from contaminated sediments are characterized by very high levels of reduced sulfur (up to 80 mg/kg), in contrast to fairly low ferrous iron concentrations (<0.02 mg/kg). The influx of oil into the wetlands might provide the initial substrate and carbon source for stimulating sulfate-reducing bacteria. The high sulfur levels, coupled with the low levels of iron, indicate that iron-reducing bacteria are outcompeted by sulfate reducers in oiled salt marshes. Moreover, pore-water pH values show a general increasing trend (ranging from 6.6 to 8.0) with depth, possibly reflecting the combined effects of bacterial sulfate reduction and saltwater intrusion at depth. Despite high levels of trace metals in bulk sediments, concentrations of trace metals dissolved in pore-waters are generally low. It is very likely that high organic matter content and bacterially-mediated sulfate reduction promote metal retention through the formation of sulfide solids. Framboidal pyrites, as well as other sulfides, have been identified, and are currently undergoing XRD, SEM, and EDAX analyses. Continued research is needed to monitor possible re-mobilization of trace metals in changing redox and biogeochemical conditions.

  7. Mesoscale Variations of Biogeochemical Properties in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGillicuddy Dennis J., Jr.; Johnson, R.; Siegel, D. A.; Michaels, A. F.; Bates, N. R.; Knap, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    A mesoscale resolution biogeochemical survey was carried out in the vicinity of the US Joint Global Ocean Flux Study Bermuda Atlantic Time-Series Study (BATS) site during the summer of 1996. Real-time nowcasting and forecasting of the flow field facilitated adaptive sampling of several eddy features in the area. Variations in upper ocean nutrient and pigment distributions were largely controlled by vertical isopycnal displacements associated with the mesoscale field. Shoaling density surfaces tended to introduce cold, nutrient-rich water into the euphotic zone, while deepening isopycnals displaced nutrient-depleted water downward. Chlorophyll concentration was generally enhanced in the former case and reduced in the latter. Eddy-induced upwelling at the base of the euphotic zone was affected by features of two different types captured in this survey: (1) a typical mid-ocean cyclone in which doming of the main thermocline raised the near-surface stratification upward; and (2) a mode water eddy composed of a thick lens of 18 C water, which pushed up the seasonal thermocline and depressed the main thermocline. Model hindcasts using all available data provide a four-dimensional context in which to interpret temporal trends at the BATS site and two other locations during the two weeks subsequent to the survey. Observed changes in near-surface structure at the BATS site included shoaling iscpycnals, increased nutrient availability at the base of the euphotic zone, and enhanced chlorophyll concentration within the euphotic zone. These trends are explicable in terms of a newly formed cyclone that impinged upon the site during this time period. These observations reveal that eddy upwelling has a demonstrable impact on the way in which the nitrate-density relationship changes with depth from the aphotic zone into the euphotic zone. A similar transition is present in the BATS record, suggesting that eddy-driven upwelling events are present in the time series of upper ocean biogeochemical properties. The variability in main thermocline temperature and nitrate in this synoptic spatial survey spans the range observed in these quantities in the 10-year time series available at BATS to date (1988-1998).

  8. Mesoscale Variations of Biogeochemical Properties in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGillicuddy, D. J.; Johnson, R.; Siegel, D. A.; Michaels, A. F.; Bates, N. R.; Knap, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    A mesoscale resolution biogeochemical survey was carried out in the vicinity of the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site during the summer of 1996. Real-time nowcasting and forecasting of the flow field facilitated adaptive sampling of several eddy features in the area. Variations in upper ocean nutrient and pigment distributions were largely controlled by vertical isopycnal displacements associated with the mesoscale field. Shoaling density surfaces tended to introduce cold, nutrient-rich water into the euphotic zone, while deepening isopycnals displaced nutrient-depleted water downward. Chlorophyll concentration was generally enhanced in the former case and reduced in the latter. Eddy-induced upwelling at the base of the euphotic zone was affected by features of two different types captured in this survey-, (1) a typical mid-ocean cyclone in which doming of the main thermocline raised the near-surface stratification upward and (2) a mode water eddy composed of a thick lens of 18C water, which pushed up the seasonal thermocline and depressed the main thermocline. Model hindcasts using all available data provide a four-dimensional context in which to interpret temporal trends at the BATS site and two other locations during the 2 weeks subsequent to the survey. Observed changes in near-surface structure at the BATS site included shoaling isopycnals, increased nutrient availability at the base of the euphotic zone, and enhanced chlorophyll concentration within the cuphotic zone. These trends are explicable in terms of a newly formed cyclone that impinged upon the site during this time period. These observations reveal that eddy upwelling has a demonstrable impact on the way in which the nitrate-density relationship changes with depth from the aphotic zone into the euphotic zone. A similar transition is present in the BATS record, suggesting that eddy-driven upwelling events are present in the time series of upper ocean biogeochemical properties. The variability in main thermocline temperature and nitrate in this synoptic spatial survey spans the range observed in these quantities in the 10-year time series available at BATS to date (1988-1998).

  9. Complexity, accuracy and practical applicability of different biogeochemical model versions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, F. J.; Blaas, M.

    2010-04-01

    The construction of validated biogeochemical model applications as prognostic tools for the marine environment involves a large number of choices particularly with respect to the level of details of the .physical, chemical and biological aspects. Generally speaking, enhanced complexity might enhance veracity, accuracy and credibility. However, very complex models are not necessarily effective or efficient forecast tools. In this paper, models of varying degrees of complexity are evaluated with respect to their forecast skills. In total 11 biogeochemical model variants have been considered based on four different horizontal grids. The applications vary in spatial resolution, in vertical resolution (2DH versus 3D), in nature of transport, in turbidity and in the number of phytoplankton species. Included models range from 15 year old applications with relatively simple physics up to present state of the art 3D models. With all applications the same year, 2003, has been simulated. During the model intercomparison it has been noticed that the 'OSPAR' Goodness of Fit cost function (Villars and de Vries, 1998) leads to insufficient discrimination of different models. This results in models obtaining similar scores although closer inspection of the results reveals large differences. In this paper therefore, we have adopted the target diagram by Jolliff et al. (2008) which provides a concise and more contrasting picture of model skill on the entire model domain and for the entire period of the simulations. Correctness in prediction of the mean and the variability are separated and thus enhance insight in model functioning. Using the target diagrams it is demonstrated that recent models are more consistent and have smaller biases. Graphical inspection of time series confirms this, as the level of variability appears more realistic, also given the multi-annual background statistics of the observations. Nevertheless, whether the improvements are all genuine for the particular year cannot be judged due to the low sampling frequency of the traditional monitoring data at hand. Specifically, the overall results for chlorophyll- a are rather consistent throughout all models, but regionally recent models are better; resolution is crucial for the accuracy of transport and more important than the nature of the forcing of the transport; SPM strongly affects the biomass simulation and species composition, but even the most recent SPM results do not yet obtain a good overall score; coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) should be included in the calculation of the light regime; more complexity in the phytoplankton model improves the chlorophyll- a simulation, but the simulated species composition needs further improvement for some of the functional groups.

  10. COUPLED REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING BASED ON THE NEW BIOGEOCHEMICAL CODE HP1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The migration of many naturally occurring elements and contaminants in the subsurface is affected by a multitude of complex, interactive physical, chemical, mineralogical, geological, and biological processes. Recently, a new comprehensive simulation tool HP1 (HYDRUS1D-PHREEQC) was developed by cou...

  11. A coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical model for assessing watershed responses to climate and land use

    EPA Science Inventory

    This seminar for Oregon State University’s Water Resources Graduate Program will describe the use of a spatially-distributed ecohydrological model, VELMA, for quantifying how alternative land use and climate scenarios affect tradeoffs among important ecosystem services. Sp...

  12. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Biofuel Crops and Parameterization in the EPIC Biogeochemical Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes year 1 field measurements of N2O fluxes and crop yields which are used to parameterize the EPIC biogeochemical model for the corresponding field site. Initial model simulations are also presented.

  13. CALIBRATION OF SUBSURFACE BATCH AND REACTIVE-TRANSPORT MODELS INVOLVING COMPLEX BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the calibration of subsurface batch and reactive-transport models involving complex biogeochemical processes was systematically evaluated. Two hypothetical nitrate biodegradation scenarios were developed and simulated in numerical experiments to evaluate the perfor...

  14. BENTIDC-BIOGEOCHEMICAL RESPONSES TO PARTICLE FLUX: THE MINERALS AND MICROBIOTA OF CROSS SEAMOUNT

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    BENTIDC-BIOGEOCHEMICAL RESPONSES TO PARTICLE FLUX: THE MINERALS AND MICROBIOTA OF CROSS SEAMOUNT waterdepths on Cross Seamount (180 40'N, 1580 17IW). Scanning electron microscopy, interfaced to ananalytical

  15. Understanding Biogeochemical Transformations Of Trace Elements In Multi Metal-Rich Geomaterials Under Stimulated Redox Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural and anthropogenic influences on hydrological conditions can induce periodic or long-term reduced conditions in geologic materials. Such conditions can cause significant impacts on biogeochemical processes of trace elements in subsurface or near surface environments. The...

  16. SEASONAL VARIATION IN THE BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING OF SESTON IN GRAND TRAVERSE BAY, LAKE MICHIGAN. (R825151)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study describes the biogeochemical cycling of seston in Grand Traverse Bay, Lake Michigan. Seston was characterized by carbon and nitrogen elemental and isotopic abundances. Fluorescence, temperature, light transmittance, and concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen we...

  17. Search for morphological and biogeochemical vestiges of fossil life in extraterrestrial settings: utility of terrestrial evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schidlowski, Manfred

    An overview is presented of the principal morphological and biogeochemical evidence indicating the presence of life on a planetary surface. The discourse both summarizes, and elaborates on, previous more exhaustive presentations of the subject by the author (1992, 1993, 1998).

  18. A quantitative model of the biogeochemical transport of iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, H.; Ji, Z.; Weng, J.

    2010-12-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) are among the world’s most prevalent public health problems yet preventable by dietary iodine supplements. To better understand the biogeochemical behavior of iodine and to explore safer and more efficient ways of iodine supplementation as alternatives to iodized salt, we studied the behavior of iodine as it is absorbed, accumulated and released by plants. Using Chinese cabbage as a model system and the 125I tracing technique, we established that plants uptake exogenous iodine from soil, most of which are transported to the stem and leaf tissue. The level of absorption of iodine by plants is dependent on the iodine concentration in soil, as well as the soil types that have different iodine-adsorption capacity. The leaching experiment showed that the remainder soil content of iodine after leaching is determined by the iodine-adsorption ability of the soil and the pH of the leaching solution, but not the volume of leaching solution. Iodine in soil and plants can also be released to the air via vaporization in a concentration-dependent manner. This study provides a scientific basis for developing new methods to prevent IDD through iodized vegetable production.

  19. Tracking evolution of urban biogeochemical cycles: salinization of fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S.; McDowell, W. H.; Wollheim, W. M.; Duan, S.; Gorman, J. K.; Haq, S.; Hohman, S.; Smith, R. M.; Mayer, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The built environment often changes quickly in response to human activities, thus contributing to an evolution of stream chemistry over time. Depending upon development and management strategies, these changes can result in pulses and/or long-term trends. Here, we explore patterns of evolving salinization of fresh water over time, and we evaluate the potential water quality implications of fresh water salinization. We show that there has been global salinization of freshwater across urbanizing landscapes over a century. We also show that human-accelerated weathering in watersheds and river alkalinization can further influence regional rates of salinization (in addition to anthropogenic sources such as road salts, sewage leaks, etc.). Finally, we investigate how salinization of fresh water can impact stream sediment fluxes of carbon, nutrients, and sulfate in watersheds across a land use gradient at the Baltimore Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. The impacts of salinization on mobilization and uptake of carbon, nutrients, and sulfate in streams warrant further consideration in water quality management strategies. Overall, we propose that salinization can be a "universal tracer" of watershed urbanization globally with major regional consequences for drinking water and evolution of biogeochemical cycles in freshwater ecosystems.

  20. Biogeochemical effects of seawater restoration to diked salt marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Portnoy, J.W.; Giblin, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    We conducted greenhouse microcosm experiments to examine the biogeochemical effects of restoring seawater to historically diked Cape Cod salt marshes. Peat cores from both seasonally flooded and drained diked marshes were waterlogged with seawater, and porewater chemistry was subsequently monitored for 21 mo. The addition of seawater to highly organic, seasonally flooded peat caused the death of freshwater wetland plants, 6-8 cm of sediment subsidence, and increased N and P mineralization. Also, sulfides and alkalinity increased 10-fold, suggesting accelerated decomposition by sulfate reduction. Addition of seawater to the low-organic-content acidic peat from the drained marsh increased porewater pH, alkalinity, PO4-P, and Fe(II), which we attribute to the reestablishment of SO4 and Fe(III) mineral reduction. Increased cation exchange contributed to 6-fold increases in dissolved Fe(II) and Al and 60-fold increases in NH4-N within 6 mo of sail-nation. Seawater reintroductions to seasonally flooded diked marshes will cause porewater sulfides to increase, likely reducing the success of revegetation efforts. Sulfide toxicity is of less concern in resalinated drained peats because of the abundance of Fe(II) to precipitate sulfides, and of NH4-N to offset sulfide inhibition of N uptake. Restoration of either seasonally flooded or drained diked marshes could stimulate potentially large nutrient and Fe(II) releases, which could in turn increase primary production and lower oxygen in receiving waters. These findings suggest that tidal restoration be gradual and carefully monitored.

  1. Biogeochemical Approaches to Assess PAH Pollution in an Urban Waterway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xianhao; Forsythe, Jennifer; Peterkin, Earl

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical approaches were applied to enhance the study on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollution in an urban waterway. Chemical characterizations of PAHs in the studied area were identified, geochemical factors were revealed, and related mechanisms were discussed. It was found that, during summer, an early diagenetic process in the sediment could play a major role for the existence of high PAH concentrations, especially high molecular weight PAHs (?4 rings), in the water column and sediment porewater. This effect could vary with tidal cycling, and higher PAH concentration in the water column would be expected during low tide. Other potential pollution sources were also evaluated in the studied creek. Results showed that pyrogenic sources dominated in the creek, generally. Nevertheless, petroleum products from a metal recycling plant could be an important point source to the waterway during wet weather. Comparing with previous studies in other waterways of the same watershed and published literature suggested that the limited toxicity to the ecosystem was only detected in sediments. More information needs to be collected during low tide for a more objective evaluation of PAH toxicity in the creek. PMID:26579786

  2. Genomic Potential of Marinobacter aquaeolei, a Biogeochemical “Opportunitroph”?†

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Esther; Webb, Eric A.; Nelson, William C.; Heidelberg, John F.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2011-01-01

    The genus of Marinobacter is one of the most ubiquitous in the global oceans and assumed to significantly impact various biogeochemical cycles. The genome structure and content of Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 was analyzed and compared with those from other organisms with diverse adaptive strategies. Here, we report the many “opportunitrophic” genetic characteristics and strategies that M. aquaeolei has adopted to promote survival under various environmental conditions. Genome analysis revealed its metabolic potential to utilize oxygen and nitrate as terminal electron acceptors, iron as an electron donor, and urea, phosphonate, and various hydrocarbons as alternative N, P, and C sources, respectively. Miscellaneous sensory and defense mechanisms, apparently acquired via horizontal gene transfer, are involved in the perception of environmental fluctuations and antibiotic, phage, toxin, and heavy metal resistance, enabling survival under adverse conditions, such as oil-polluted water. Multiple putative integrases, transposases, and plasmids appear to have introduced additional metabolic potential, such as phosphonate degradation. The genomic potential of M. aquaeolei and its similarity to other opportunitrophs are consistent with its cosmopolitan occurrence in diverse environments and highly variable lifestyles. PMID:21335390

  3. Catchment Legacies and Trajectories: Understanding Time Lags in Catchment Response as a Function of Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, N. B.; Van Meter, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    Increased nutrient loads delivered from watersheds due to agricultural intensification, industrialization, and urbanization have contributed globally to the persistence of large hypoxic zones in inland and coastal waters. Watershed management practices targeting these non-point source pollutants often lead to little or no improvement in water quality, even after extensive implementation of conservation measures or Best Management Practices (BMPs). The lag time between implementation of a conservation measure and resultant water quality benefits has recently been recognized as an important factor in the "apparent" failure of these BMPs. When conservation measures are implemented without explicit consideration of the lag time and with expectations that they will lead to immediate benefits, the resulting failure to meet such expectations can discourage vital restoration efforts. It is therefore important to quantify the lag times associated with watershed management efforts a priori and to implement restoration strategies targeted specifically at minimizing lag times and maximizing restoration benefits. The focus of this research is to develop a framework for understanding the time lags between land-use changes and stream water quality benefits. We hypothesize that such time lags arise from nutrient legacies building over decades of fertilizer application. For nitrogen (N), one can conceptualize this as either hydrologic legacy, in the form of dissolved nitrate that is delayed due to slow groundwater transport, or as biogeochemical legacy, in the form of organic N, possibly in dissolved or readily mineralizable forms. Indeed, mass-balance studies across the Mississippi and Thames river basins indicate the possibility of missing N mass in these landscapes, with inputs being consistently greater than the outputs even when accounting for all possible pathways of nitrogen transformation. Historical soil data within the upper Mississippi River Basin (MRB) indicate that agriculture depletes organic N in surface soil, but leads to N accumulations deeper in the profile. Nitrogen accumulation estimates (approximately 2 million Mt/yr) based on the historical data are startlingly close to the deficit suggested by mass-balance studies of the MRB (3 million Mt/yr). Understanding the lag times associated with such biogeochemical legacies requires quantification of this accumulation as a function of landscape attributes, climate, and management controls, as well as the rate of mineralization of accumulated N after implementation of management practices. Understanding hydrologic legacy requires a partitioning of flow along various pathways (e.g., overland flow, tile flow, or groundwater pathways), and the distribution of travel times along the pathways. Based on this framework, we developed a coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical model to quantify these legacies and predict landscape recovery times as a function of natural and anthropogenic controls.

  4. Assessing Feedbacks between Remediation-Induced Biogeochemical Transformations and Flow Characteristics using Multi-Scale Geophysical Approaches (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, S. S.; Wu, Y.; Chen, J.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Li, L.; Tuglus, C.; Williams, K. H.

    2009-12-01

    Although in situ strategies are frequently considered for environmental remediation, the impact of feedbacks between induced biogeochemical transformations and hydrological characteristics on remediation efficacy is not well understood. In situ remediation approaches that strongly perturb subsurface systems (such as chemical oxidation, pH manipulation, redox manipulation or biostimulation) typically lead to biogeochemical end-products, which form at grain-fluid boundaries, within pore spaces, and across pore throats. Our recent research has suggested that the evolution of these remediation-induced microscale end-products is significant enough to impact flow characteristics at the field scale. This feedback between biogeochemical transformations and flow characteristics may render it challenging to introduce additional amendments into the subsurface or may alter the hydrobiogeochemical conditions favorable for sustained treatment. Our research focuses on exploring how geophysical signatures change as a function of remediation-induced biotic and abiotic transformations, including the evolution of electrically conductive (e.g., FeS) and non-conductive (e.g., calcite) precipitates, gases, biofilms, TDS, and electroactive ions. Using numerical, theoretical, and experimental approaches, our nested investigations span from several microns to the field scale. Our research is aligned with biostimulation experiments that are ongoing at the Uranium-contaminated Rifle, Colorado DOE Site, where stimulation of iron- and sulfate-reducing microorganisms accompanying acetate injection has been shown to promote uranium removal, presumably as insoluble mineral precipitates. To explore these transformations and their impact on flow characteristics, we are performing research along five different fronts: 1) dynamic synchrotron tomography studies to explore the evolution in pore geometry and precipitate morphology due to remediation treatments; (2) laboratory column experiments to develop an understanding about geophysical (complex resistivity, seismic, and radar) attributes to remediation-induced end-products and to develop petrophysical relationships; (3) stochastic approaches that permit integration of the disparate geophysical, geochemical, and petrophysical datasets to quantify end-product attributes (i.e., volume fraction, mean radius, and distribution of evolved precipitates) as well as their impact on permeability; (4) Coupled imaging/inversion studies to explore the ability and resolution of geophysical methods for quantifying remediation-induced transformations at the field scale; and (5) iteration with reactive transport modeling to improve understanding of geophysical signatures as well as field-scale phenomena. This presentation will review advances in all of these research fronts and will discuss existing challenges for exploring complex system feedbacks using geophysical methods.

  5. Widespread euxinia in the aftermath of the Lomagundi event: insights from a modeling study of ocean biogeochemical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Kazumi; Tajika, Eiichi

    2015-04-01

    The emergence of strongly sulphidic oceanic waters (euxinia) during the Proterozoic may have affected biological turnover, extinction, and evolution, not only because of its toxicity to eukaryotes but also because of its fundamental role on bioessential trace metal availability. From this point of view, the evidence for euxinic environments in the Lomagundi-Jatuli event (LJE) aftermath (~2.08-2.05 billion years ago) in Gabon and Karelia are notable because their low ?98/95Mo values (less than 0.95o and 0.85o respectively) imply widespread euxinia at that time. The Francevillian Group in Gabon represents the oxic-anoxic/euxinic transitional sequence, implying a fluctuation in the atmospheric redox condition from oxic to relatively reducing, possibly due to the oxidation of substantial amount of organic matter deposited during the LJE. The large positive anomaly of sulphur isotopes and a substantial contraction of marine sulphate reservoir size through the latter part of the LJE also imply a fall in surface oxidation state. Variations of the oxygenation state of the Earth's surface would have caused substantial changes in oceanic chemical composition and, in turn, would surely have impacted the biosphere. However, the nature and dynamics of oceanic biogeochemical cycles for this interval are poorly understood. To unravel cause and effect of the variations of oceanic redox state in the Paleoproteorozoic, we improved the CANOPS model (a 1-D advection-diffusion-reaction marine biogeochemical cycle model), in which coupled C-N-O-P-S marine biogeochemical cycles and a series of redox reactions were adequately taken into account. Through systematic sensitivity experiments we show that a substantial drop in atmospheric oxygen level could cause a widespread euxinia for millions of years, which provides a theoretical explanation consistent with the geological records, such as large positive anomaly of ?34S, low ?98/95Mo, and a decrease in SO4 concentration, in the aftermath of the LJE. A mass balance calculation of Mo also demonstrates that the period is marked by an expansion of euxinia to ca. 9-40% of the whole seafloor. Under such conditions Mo levels would decrease to as low as ca. 2.0-6.5 nM where nitrogen fixation by Fe-Mo nitrogenase is very sensitive to Mo concentration. We propose that a pervasive euxinia was established in the wake of the LJE as a direct consequence of a substantial drop in atmospheric oxygen level and that such waxing and waning of the atmospheric oxygenation state in the Paleoproterozoic could have caused biological upheavals through dynamic oceanic euxinia, followed by long-term stability of anoxic/non-sulphidic conditions during the mid-Proterozoic.

  6. First-order exchange coefficient coupling for simulating surface water-groundwater interactions: Parameter sensitivity and consistency with a physics-based approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebel, B.A.; Mirus, B.B.; Heppner, C.S.; VanderKwaak, J.E.; Loague, K.

    2009-01-01

    Distributed hydrologic models capable of simulating fully-coupled surface water and groundwater flow are increasingly used to examine problems in the hydrologic sciences. Several techniques are currently available to couple the surface and subsurface; the two most frequently employed approaches are first-order exchange coefficients (a.k.a., the surface conductance method) and enforced continuity of pressure and flux at the surface-subsurface boundary condition. The effort reported here examines the parameter sensitivity of simulated hydrologic response for the first-order exchange coefficients at a well-characterized field site using the fully coupled Integrated Hydrology Model (InHM). This investigation demonstrates that the first-order exchange coefficients can be selected such that the simulated hydrologic response is insensitive to the parameter choice, while simulation time is considerably reduced. Alternatively, the ability to choose a first-order exchange coefficient that intentionally decouples the surface and subsurface facilitates concept-development simulations to examine real-world situations where the surface-subsurface exchange is impaired. While the parameters comprising the first-order exchange coefficient cannot be directly estimated or measured, the insensitivity of the simulated flow system to these parameters (when chosen appropriately) combined with the ability to mimic actual physical processes suggests that the first-order exchange coefficient approach can be consistent with a physics-based framework. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. South Florida wetlands ecosystem; biogeochemical processes in peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, William; U.S. Geological Survey

    1996-01-01

    The South Florida wetlands ecosystem is an environment of great size and ecological diversity (figs. 1 and 2). The landscape diversity and subtropical setting of this ecosystem provide a habitat for an abundance of plants and wildlife, some of which are unique to South Florida. South Florida wetlands are currently in crisis, however, due to the combined effects of agriculture, urbanization, and nearly 100 years of water management. Serious problems facing this ecosystem include (1) phosphorus contamination producing nutrient enrichment, which is causing changes in the native vegetation, (2) methylmercury contamination of fish and other wildlife, which poses a potential threat to human health, (3) changes in the natural flow of water in the region, resulting in more frequent drying of wetlands, loss of organic soils, and a reduction in freshwater flow to Florida Bay, (4) hypersalinity, massive algal blooms, and seagrass loss in parts of Florida Bay, and (5) a decrease in wildlife populations, especially those of wading birds. This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project focuses on the role of organic-rich sediments (peat) of South Florida wetlands in regulating the concentrations and impact of important chemical species in the environment. The cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in peat is an important factor in the regulation of water quality in the South Florida wetlands ecosystem. These elements are central to many of the contamination issues facing South Florida wetlands, such as nutrient enrichment, mercury toxicity, and loss of peat. Many important chemical and biological reactions occur in peat and control the fate of chemical species in wetlands. Wetland scientists often refer to these reactions as biogeochemical processes, because they are chemical reactions usually mediated by microorganisms in a geological environment. An understanding of the biogeochemical processes in peat of South Florida wetlands will provide a basis for evaluating the effects on water quality of (1) constructing buffer wetlands to alleviate nutrient contamination and (2) replumbing the ecosystem to restore natural water flow. The results may also suggest new approaches for solving problems of contamination and water quality in these wetlands. A second focus of this project will be on the geochemical history of the South Florida ecosystem. Peat is a repository of the history of past environmental conditions in the wetland. Before effective action can be taken to correct many of the problems facing these wetlands, we must first study the biogeochemistry of the peat at depth in order to understand whether current problems are the result of recent human activity or are part of a long-term natural cycle. Coordination with other (USGS) projects for South Florida is ongoing. These projects are studying the biological history of the ecosystem by using pollen and shells buried in the peat, together with procedures for dating the peat at various depths, to develop an overall ecosystem history model, with emphasis on the last 100 years.

  8. Climate and Land Use Change Impacts on Terrestrial-Ocean Fluxes of Carbon and Nutrients and Associated Biogeochemical Cycling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohrenz, S. E.; Cai, W.; Tian, H.; He, R.; Liu, M.; Hopkinson, C.

    2011-12-01

    Changing climate and land use practices have the potential to dramatically alter coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes and associated movement of water, carbon and nutrients through various terrestrial reservoirs into rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters. Consequences of climate- and land use-related changes will be particularly evident in large river basins and their associated coastal outflow regions. The large spatial extent of such systems necessitates a combination of satellite observations and model-based approaches coupled with targeted ground-based site studies to adequately characterize relationships among climate forcing (e.g., wind, precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, humidity, extreme weather), land use practice/land cover change, and transport of materials through watersheds and, ultimately, to coastal regions. Here, we describe a NASA Interdisciplinary Science program that will employ an integrated suite of models in conjunction with remotely sensed as well as targeted in situ observations with the objectives of describing processes controlling fluxes on land, their coupling to riverine systems, and the delivery of materials to estuaries and the coastal ocean. Our approach involves the coupling of terrestrial hydrological-ecosystem models with hydrological-biogeochemical models of coastal and estuarine systems used in conjunction with satellite and in situ observations to examine water quality, transport, and ecosystem function resulting from climate and land use change. Output from the Dynamic Land-Ecosystem Model is compared to observed time-series of data to allow for an examination of various climate and land use/land cover change scenarios on the delivery of materials from the watershed to the coastal margin. A three dimensional coupled physical-biological model is then used to examine ecosystem responses to terrestrial inputs. This research will provide information that will be integral to determining an overall carbon balance in North America. In addition, an expected outcome of this project will be a state-of-the-science coupled land-ocean, physical-biogeochemical prediction tool to assess land ecological processes and the coastal ocean responses in the face of climate change. Such information is needed to better understand linkages between land use changes and subsequent coastal processes including water quality and hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  9. Biogeochemical indicators of elevated nitrogen deposition in semiarid Mediterranean ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Hueso, Raúl; Arróniz-Crespo, María; Bowker, Mathew A.; Maestre, Fernando T.; Pérez-Corona, M. Esther; Theobald, Mark R.; Vivanco, Marta G.; Manrique, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition has doubled the natural N inputs received by ecosystems through biological N-fixation and is currently a global problem that is affecting the Mediterranean regions. We evaluated the existing relationships between increased atmospheric N deposition and biogeochemical indicators related to soil chemical factors and cryptogam species across semiarid central, southern and eastern Spain. The cryptogam species studied were the biocrust-forming Pleurochaete squarrosa (moss) and Cladonia foliacea (lichen). Sampling sites were chosen in Quercus coccifera (kermes oak) shrublands and Pinus halepensis (Aleppo pine) forests to cover a range of inorganic N deposition representative of the levels found in the Iberian Peninsula (between 4.4 and 8.1 kg N ha?1 yr?1). We extended the ambient N deposition gradient by including experimental plots to which N had been added for three years at rates of 10, 20 and 50 kg N ha?1 yr?1. Overall, N deposition (extant plus simulated) increased soil inorganic N availability and caused soil acidification. Nitrogen deposition increased phosphomonoesterase (PME) enzyme activity and PME:nitrate reductase (NR) ratio in both species, whereas the NR activity was reduced only in the moss. Responses of PME and NR activities were attributed to an induced N to phosphorus imbalance and to N saturation, respectively. When only considering the ambient N deposition, soil organic C and N contents were positively related to N deposition, a response driven by pine forests. The PME:NR ratios of the moss were better predictors of N deposition rates than PME or NR activities alone in shrublands, whereas no correlation between N deposition and the lichen physiology was observed. We conclude that integrative physiological measurements, such as PME:NR ratios, measured on sensitive species such as P. squarrosa, can provide useful data for national-scale biomonitoring programs, whereas soil acidification and soil C and N storage could be useful as additional corroborating ecosystem indicators of chronic N pollution. PMID:24894911

  10. Biogeochemical characterisation of a coal tar distillate plume.

    PubMed

    Williams, G M; Pickup, R W; Thornton, S F; Lerner, D N; Mallinson, H E; Moore, Y; White, C

    2001-12-15

    The distillation of acidified coal tars for up to 50 years has given rise to a phenol plume approximately 500 m long, 50 m deep and containing up to 15 g l(-1) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the Triassic Sandstones aquifer. A conceptual biogeochemical model based on chemical and microbiological analysis of groundwater samples has been developed as a preliminary to more detailed studies of the controls on natural attenuation. While the development of redox zones and the production of methane and carbon dioxide provide evidence of natural attenuation, it appears that degradation is slow. The existence of sulphate in the plume indicates that this electron acceptor has not been depleted and that consequently methanogenesis is probably limited. Based on a simple estimate of sulphate input concentration, a half-life of about 15 years has been estimated for sulphate reduction. Geochemical modelling predicts that increased alkalinity within the plume has not led to carbonate precipitation, and thus within the limits of accuracy of the measurement, alkalinity may reflect the degree of biodegradation. This implies a loss of around 18% of the DOC over a 30-year period. Despite limited degradation, microbial studies show that there are diverse microbial communities in the aquifer with the potential for both anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation. Microbial activity was found to be greatest at the leading edge of the plume where DOC concentrations are 60 mg l(-1) or less, but activity could still be observed in more contaminated samples even though cells could not be cultured. The study suggests that degradation may be limited by the high phenol concentrations within the core of the plume, but that once diluted by dispersion, natural attenuation may proceed. More detailed studies to confirm these initial findings are identified and form the basis of associated papers. PMID:11820470

  11. Aquifer/aquitard interfaces: mixing zones that enhance biogeochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    Several important biogeochemical reactions are known to occur near the interface between aquifer and aquitard sediments. These reactions include O2 reduction; denitrification; and Fe3+, SO42-, and CO2 (methanogenesis) reduction. In some settings, these reactions occur on the aquitard side of the interface as electron acceptors move from the aquifer into the electron-donor-enriched aquitard. In other settings, these reactions occur on the aquifer side of the interface as electron donors move from the aquitard into the electron-acceptor-enriched, or microorganism-enriched, aquifer. Thus, the aquifer/aquitard interface represents a mixing zone capable of supporting greater microbial activity than either hydrogeologic unit alone. The extent to which biogeochemical reactions proceed in the mixing zone and the width of the mixing zone depend on several factors, including the abundance and solubility of electron acceptors and donors on either side of the interface and the rate at which electron acceptors and donors react and move across the interface. Biogeochemical reactions near the aquifer/aquitard interface can have a substantial influence on the chemistry of water in aquifers and on the chemistry of sediments near the interface. Résumé. Il se produit au voisinage de l'interface entre les aquifères et les imperméables plusieurs réactions biogéochimiques importantes. Il s'agit des réactions de réduction de l'oxygène, de la dénitrification et de la réduction de Fe3+, SO42- et CO2 (méthanogenèse). Dans certaines situations, ces réactions se produisent du côté imperméable de l'interface, avec des accepteurs d'électrons qui vont de l'aquifère vers l'imperméable riche en donneurs d'électrons. Dans d'autres situations, ces réactions se produisent du côté aquifère de l'interface, avec des donneurs d'électrons qui se déplacent de l'imperméable vers l'aquifère riche en accepteurs d'électrons ou en microorganismes. Ainsi, l'interface aquifère/imperméable constitue une zone de mélange capable de supporter une plus grande activité microbienne que chacune des deux unités hydrogéologiques seules. L'extension des réactions biogéochimiques dans la zone de mélange et la largeur de cette zone dépendent de plusieurs facteurs, dont l'abondance et la solubilité des accepteurs et des donneurs d'électrons de chaque côté de l'interface, et le taux de réaction et de déplacement des accepteurs et des donneurs d'électrons au travers de cette interface. Les réactions biogéochimiques au voisinage de l'interface aquifère/imperméable peuvent avoir une influence appréciable sur le chimisme de l'eau des aquifères et sur celui des sédiments au niveau de l'interface. Resúmen. Es conocido que varias reacciones biogeoquímicas de importancia pueden tener lugar cerca de la interfaz entre los sedimentos de un acuífero y de un acuitardo. Entre ellas, destaca la reducción del O2, la denitrificación, y la reducción del Fe+3, SO4-2 y CO2 (metanogénesis). En algunos casos, estas reacciones se producen en la región cercana al acuitardo, ya que los dadores de electrones se mueven desde éste hacia el acuífero, el cual está enriquecido en aceptores de electrones o en microorganismos. Así, la interfaz acuífero/acuitardo constituye una zona de mezcla que es capaz de sustentar una actividad microbiana mayor que cualquier unidad hidrogeológica por sí misma. El alcance de las reacciones biogeoquímicas en la zona de mezcla y el ancho de esta zona de mezcla depende de varios factores, como la abundancia y la solubilidad de los aceptores y dadores de electrones en ambas caras de la interfaz y la velocidad a la que los aceptores y dadores de electrones reaccionan y se mueven a través de la interfaz. Las reacciones biogeoquímicas cerca de la interfaz acuífero/acuitardo pueden tener una influencia substancial en la hidroquímica de los acuíferos y en la química de los sedimentos cerca de la superficie.

  12. Carbon Cycle Model Linkage Project (CCMLP): Evaluating Biogeochemical Process Models with Atmospheric Measurements and Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, M.; Prentice, I. C.; Foley, J.; Hickler, T.; Kicklighter, D. W.; McGuire, A. D.; Melillo, J. M.; Ramankutty, N.; Sitch, S.

    2001-12-01

    Models of biophysical and biogeochemical proceses are being used -either offline or in coupled climate-carbon cycle (C4) models-to assess climate- and CO2-induced feedbacks on atmospheric CO2. Observations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, and supplementary tracers including O2 concentrations and isotopes, offer unique opportunities to evaluate the large-scale behaviour of models. Global patterns, temporal trends, and interannual variability of the atmospheric CO2 concentration and its seasonal cycle provide crucial benchmarks for simulations of regionally-integrated net ecosystem exchange; flux measurements by eddy correlation allow a far more demanding model test at the ecosystem scale than conventional indicators, such as measurements of annual net primary production; and large-scale manipulations, such as the Duke Forest Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) experiment, give a standard to evaluate modelled phenomena such as ecosystem-level CO2 fertilization. Model runs including historical changes of CO2, climate and land use allow comparison with regional-scale monthly CO2 balances as inferred from atmospheric measurements. Such comparisons are providing grounds for some confidence in current models, while pointing to processes that may still be inadequately treated. Current plans focus on (1) continued benchmarking of land process models against flux measurements across ecosystems and experimental findings on the ecosystem-level effects of enhanced CO2, reactive N inputs and temperature; (2) improved representation of land use, forest management and crop metabolism in models; and (3) a strategy for the evaluation of C4 models in a historical observational context.

  13. Biogeochemical changes in the eastern Mediterranean Sea during the early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Rosina; Maier-Reimer, Ernst

    2010-05-01

    During the early Holocene, a series of changes in the conditions of the Mediterranean hydrography, and corresponding its biogeochemistry, occurred. This led to the formation of sapropels, which are the result of an increased accumulation of organic matter that has been attributed to a better preservation of organic carbon due to oxygen depletion and/or to higher biological production that enhances the carbon flux to the seafloor. This study aims to identify plausible scenarios leading to sapropel formation. For this purpose, we set up a regional version of the general ocean circulation model MPI-OM for the Mediterranean (26 km horizontal resolution, 29 levels) coupled to the biogeochemical model HAMOCC. The model is forced with atmospheric data derived from equilibrium time slice simulations for pre-industrial conditions and 9000 B.P with the atmosphere-ocean-dynamical vegetation model ECHAM5/MPI-OM/LPJ. For the identification of scenarios leading to sapropel formation, we simulated a 9 kyr B.P. baseline simulation and two sensitivity experiments, one with enhanced riverine nutrient input and one with stagnating deep water circulation. Results show that a 3x increase in riverine nutrient input leads to an enhanced particulate organic carbon export production. The corresponding increased oxygen utilization, however, is not sufficient to induce an anoxic state. In the stagnating deep water circulation perturbation experiment there is no further ventilation of the deep water, while the continuous utilization of oxygen through organic matter reminearlization stays unvaried. When extrapolating the oxygen utilization rate, it would take millennia to reach an anoxic state, which suggests that the onset of the stagnating deep water circulation was during the period of deglaciation. In the future experiments we will test both a combination of the stagnating deep water with enhanced riverine nutrient input, as well as the initialization with glacial conditions.

  14. Asynchrony Controls on Biogeochemical Fluxes in a Mediterranean Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, T.; Fenn, M.; Allen, E.; Wood, Y.; Sirulnik, A.; Michalski, G.; Wohlgemuth, P.; Riggan, P.

    2005-05-01

    Southern California has some of the highest rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition recorded in the world. These high rates of atmospheric deposition have resulted in elevated levels of dissolved nitrogen in some streams in southern California and may have contributed to landscape level changes in vegetative communities. The levels of nitrogen (overwhelmingly as nitrate) in streams correlate with atmospheric deposition in the region but there is also considerable spatial and temporal variability. The variability in space and time appears to be due to differences in hydrologic flowpath and biogeochemical cycling and how they affect the fate, storage and transport of nitrogen in the environment of the dominant semi-arid Mediterranean ecosystems of southern California. Catchment scale research in southern California has shown several causes for the spatial and temporal differences in nitrogen in theses ecosystems. First, interannual variability appears to be due to some level of nitrate storage within these catchments since wet years following dry years have elevated nitrate concentrations with the reverse also being true. Second, isotopic results recently published indicate that 10% of the nitrate observed at baseflow is direct throughput of atmospherically derived nitrate and during storm events nearly 40% of exported nitrate is throughput of atmospheric nitrate. These high fractions during storm events are likely due in part to direct throughfall into streams. Third, nitrate is well correlated with discharge in any stream in southern California with a significant groundwater flow component, which indicates groundwater storage of nitrate. Fourth, since the water in storm event flows bears a groundwater signature the nitrate observed in stormflows must have undergone some level of storage within the catchments vadose zone/groundwater system. Taken together the interannual variability, correlation with discharge, isotopic data and mixture modeling results indicate that the common temporal disconnect (asynchrony) between when and where nitrogen is physically available and when and where biological processes demand this nitrogen play a leading control in the export and processing of nitrogen in seasonally dry ecosystems. Additionally the increased fertility offered by the within landscape storage of nitrogen appears to contribute to a positive feedback encouraging the extirpation of coastal sage scrub and their replacement with exotic annual grasslands.

  15. Multifactorial biogeochemical monitoring of linden alley in Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Vadim; Khushvakhtova, Sabsbakhor; Tyutikov, Sergey; Danilova, Valentina; Roca, Núria; Bech, Jaume

    2015-04-01

    The ecological and biogeochemical assessment of the linden alley within the Kosygin Street was conducted by means of an integrated comparative study of soils, their chemical composition and morphological parameters of leaf linden. For this purpose 5 points were tested within the linden alley and 5 other points outside the highway. In soils, water extract of soil, leaf linden the content of Cu, Pb, Mn, Fe, Cd, Zn, As, Ni, Co Mo, Cr and Se were determined by AAS and spectrofluorimetric method [1]. Macrocomponents (Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, sulphates, chlorides), pH and total mineralization of water soil extract were measured by generally accepted methods. Thio-containing compounds in the leaves were determined by HPLC-NAM spectrofluorometry [2]. On level content of trace elements the soils of "contaminated" points different from background more high concentrations of lead, manganese, iron, selenium, strontium and low level of zinc. Leaf of linden from contaminated sites characterized by an increase of lead, copper, iron, zinc, arsenic, chromium, and a sharp decrease in the level of manganese and strontium. Analysis of the aqueous extracts of the soil showed a slight decrease in the pH value in the "control" points and lower content of calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium and total mineralization of the water soil extract. The phytochelatins test in the leaves of linden was weakly effective and the degree of asymmetry of leaf lamina too. The most differences between the variants were marked by the degree of pathology leaves (chlorosis and necrosis) and the content of pigments (chlorophyll and carotene). The data obtained reflect the impact of the application of de-icing salts and automobile emissions. References 1. Ermakov V.V., Danilova V.N., Khyshvakhtova S.D. Application of HPLC-NAM spectrofluorimtry to determination of sulfur-containing compounds in the environmental objects// Science of the biosphere: Innovation. Moscow State University by M.V. Lomonosov, 2014. P. 10-12. 2. Ermakov V.V., Tyutikov S.F., Khushvakhtova S.D., Danilova V.N., Boev V.N., Barabanschikova R.N., Chudinova E.A. Peculiarities of quantitative determination of selenium in biological materials// Bulletin of the Tyumen State University Press, 2010, 3, 206-214. Supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grant number 15-05-00279a

  16. Biogeochemical features of aquatic plants in the Selenga River delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkareva, Galina; Lychagin, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    The Selenga River system provides more than a half of the Lake Baikal total inflow. The river collects a significant amount of pollutants (e.g. heavy metals) from the whole basin. These substances are partially deposited within the Selenga delta, and partially are transported further to the lake. A generous amount of aquatic plants grow in the delta area according to its favorable conditions. This vegetation works as a specific biofilter. It accumulates suspended particles and sorbs some heavy metals from the water. The study aimed to reveal the species of macrophytes which could be mostly important for biomonitoring according to their chemical composition. The field campaign took place in the Selenga River delta in July-August of 2011 (high water period) and in June of 2012 (low water period). 14 species of aquatic plants were collected: water starwort Callitriche hermaphroditica, small yellow pond lily Nuphar pumila, pondweeds Potamogeton crispus, P. pectinatus, P. friesii, broadleaf cattail Typha latifolia, hornwort or coontail Ceratophyllum demersum, arrowhead Sagittaria natans, flowering rush (or grass rush) Butomus umbellatus, reed Phragmites australis, parrot's feather Myriophyllum spicatum, the common mare's tail Hippuris vulgaris, Batrachium trichophyllum, canadian waterweed Elodea canadensis. The samples were dried, grinded up and digested in a mixture of HNO3 and H2O2. The chemical composition of the plant material was defined using ICP-MS and ICP-AES methods. Concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni, Cu, B, Zn, V, Co, As, Mo, Pb, and U were considered. The study revealed that Potamogeton pectinatus and Myriophyllum spicatum concentrate elements during both high and low water periods. Conversely the Butomus umbellatus and Phragmites australis contain small amount of heavy metals. The reed as true grasses usually accumulates fewer amounts of elements than other macrophytes. To compare biogeochemical specialization of different species we suggest to use concentration ratio relatively Phragmites australis as a background content. This factor showed that Nuphar pumila and Ceratophyllum demersum are acting like concentrators in comparison with the reed. According to this ratio, the mostly accumulated elements in aquatic plants in 2011 were V, Co, As, U, and in 2012 - Cu, As, Bi. Differences in chemical composition are due to different water periods. During the high water period in 2011 a large amount of soil particles after the heavy rains were taken into the flow from the river banks and then deposited within the delta. The transportation of suspended particles during the low water period of 2012 was significantly less.

  17. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, O.; Ricart, A. M.; Lavery, P. S.; Mateo, M. A.; Arias-Ortiz, A.; Masque, P.; Steven, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3 to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3 to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stores were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). Also, sediment accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr-1 and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr-1 and 5 %, respectively). The Corg stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg Corg m-2 and 1.2 g Corg m-2 yr-1) were 3 to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8 and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypotheses that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g. meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g. recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g. hydrodynamic energy and sediment accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  18. Biogeochemical consequences of vertical and lateral transport of particulate organic matter in the southern North Sea: A multiproxy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guitton, M.; Soetaert, K.; Damsté, J. S. Sinninghe; Middelburg, J. J.

    2015-11-01

    Vertical and lateral transports are of importance in continental shelf systems such as the North Sea and play a major role in the processing of organic matter. We investigated the biogeochemical consequences of these transports on particulate organic matter at the molecular level in the southern North Sea. We analysed suspended particulate matter and surface sediments for organic carbon, pigments and phospholipid derived fatty acids at 10 stations sampled in September 2011 along the particle transport route. The particulate organic matter in both suspended particulate matter and surface sediment was mainly from marine phytoplankton origin but of fresher quality in the water column. Particulate organic matter quality did not change from south to north in the suspended particulate matter, whereas it clearly decreased towards the north in the surface sediments, reflecting a decreased intensity of benthic-pelagic coupling. However, we also observed strong deposition of fresh organic matter in the northern station denoting that occasionally, intense benthic-pelagic coupling can occur. Finally, our study highlights the necessity to use a multiproxy approach covering multiple characteristic time scales, when investigating both suspended particulate matter and surface sediments.

  19. Significant differences in biogeochemical processes between a glaciated and a permafrost dominated catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindshaw, Ruth; Heaton, Tim; Boyd, Eric; Lang, Susan; Tipper, Ed

    2014-05-01

    It is increasingly recognised that microbially mediated processes have a significant impact on chemical fluxes from glaciated catchments. One important reaction is the oxidation of pyrite since the production of sulphuric acid facilitates the dissolution of minerals without the need for acidity generated by dissolved atmospheric CO2. Thus weathering processes can still continue even when isolated from the atmosphere, as is thought to occur under large ice masses. However, as a glacier melts, it is expected that the microbial community will change with knock-on effects on the stream water chemistry. Understanding the difference in solute generation processes between glaciated and un-glaciated terrain is key to understanding how glacial-interglacial cycles affect atmospheric CO2 consumption by chemical weathering. In order to investigate whether biogeochemical processes differ between glaciated and un-glaciated terrain we collected stream water samples from two small catchments (each approximately 3 km2) in Svalbard. One catchment is glaciated and the other catchment is un-glaciated but is affected by permafrost and a seasonal snow-pack. The two catchments are situated next to each other with identical bedrock (shale with minor siltstone and sandstone). The proximity of the catchments to each other ensures that meteorological variables such as temperature and precipitation are very similar. Sampling was conducted early in the melt-season when there was still significant snow-cover and in mid-summer when most of the seasonal snow-pack had melted. The water samples were analysed for ?34S-SO4, ?18O-SO4, ?18O-H2O, ?13C-DIC and ?13C-DOC, together with major anions and cations. Despite the nominally identical lithology, there were significant differences in the stream water chemistry between the two catchments. For example, sulphate was the dominant anion in the un-glaciated catchment whereas bicarbonate was the dominant anion in the glaciated catchment. Pyrite oxidation under anoxic conditions and microbially mediated sulphate reduction occur in both catchments. However, in the glaciated catchment pyrite oxidation is mainly coupled to carbonate dissolution and in the un-glaciated catchment it is mainly coupled to silicate dissolution. These significant differences in weathering processes will be discussed with reference to the microbial communities found in the two catchments.

  20. How does global biogeochemical cycle become complicated by terrestrial-aquatic interactions ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tadanobu; Maksyutov, Shamil

    2015-04-01

    Inland water such as river and lake are now known to be important and active components of global carbon cycle though its contribution has remained uncertain due to data scarcity (Battin et al., 2009; Aufdenkampe et al., 2011). The author has developed process-based National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model (Nakayama, 2008a-b, 2010, 2011a-b, 2012a-c, 2013; Nakayama and Fujita, 2010; Nakayama and Hashimoto, 2011; Nakayama and Shankman, 2013a-b; Nakayama and Watanabe, 2004, 2006, 2008a-b; Nakayama et al., 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012), which incorporates surface-groundwater interactions, includes up- and down-scaling processes between local-global scales, and can simulate iteratively nonlinear feedback between hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological processes. In this study, NICE was coupled with various biogeochemical models to incorporate biogeochemical cycle including reaction between inorganic and organic carbons (DOC, POC, DIC, pCO2, etc.) in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems including surface water and groundwater. The coupled model simulated CO2 evasion from inland water in global scale, was relatively in good agreement in that estimated by empirical regression model (Raymond et al., 2013). In particular, the simulated result implied importance of connectivity between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in addition to surface and groundwater, and hillslopes and stream channels, etc. The model further improved the accuracy of CH4 flux in wetland which is sensitive to fluctuations of shallow groundwater because the original NICE incorporates 3-D groundwater sub-model and simulates lateral subsurface flow more reasonably. This simulation system would play important role in integration of greenhouse gas budget of the biosphere, quantification of hot spots in boundless biogeochemical cycle, and bridging gap between top-down and bottom-up approaches (Cole et al., 2007; Frei et al., 2012; Kiel and Cardenas, 2014). References; Aufdenkampe, A.K., et al., Front. Ecol. Environ., doi:10.1890/100014, 2011. Battin, T.J., et al., Nat. Geosci., 2, 598-600, 2009. Cole, J.J. et al., Ecosystems, doi:10.1007/s10021-006-9013-8, 2007. Frei, S., et al., J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2012JG002012, 2012. Kiel, B.A. & Cardenas, M.B., Nat. Geosci., doi:10.1038/ngeo02157, 2014. Nakayama, T., Ecol. Model., doi:10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2008.02.017, 2008a. Nakayama, T. , Forest Ecol. Manag., doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2008.07.017, 2008b. Nakayama, T., River Res. Applic., doi:10.1002/rra.1253, 2010. Nakayama, T., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.8009, 2011a. Nakayama, T., Agr. Forest Meteorol., doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2010.11.006, 2011b. Nakayama, T., Water Sci. Technol., doi:10.2166/wst.2012.205, 2012a. Nakayama, T., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.9347, 2012b. Nakayama, T., Ecohydrol. Hydrobiol., doi:10.1016/j.ecohyd.2013.03.004, 2013. Nakayama, T., Proc. Environ. Sci., doi:10.1016/j.proenv.2012.01.008, 2012c. Nakayama, T. & Fujita, T., Landscape Urban Plan., doi:10.1016/j.landurbplan.2010.02.003, 2010. Nakayama, T. & Hashimoto, S., Environ. Pollut., doi:10.1016/j.envpol.2010.11.016, 2011. Nakayama, T. & Shankman, D., Global Planet. Change, doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2012.10.004, 2013a. Nakayama, T. & Shankman, D., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.9835, 2013b. Nakayama, T. & Watanabe, M., Water Resour. Res., doi:10.1029/2004WR003174, 2004. Nakayama, T. & Watanabe, M., Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 3, 2101-2144, 2006. Nakayama, T. & Watanabe, M., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.6684, 2008a. Nakayama, T. & Watanabe, M., Global Planet. Change, doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2008.04.002, 2008b. Nakayama, T., et al., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.6142, 2006. Nakayama, T., et al., Sci. Total Environ., doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2006.11.033, 2007. Nakayama, T., et al., Global Planet. Change, doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2010.06.001, 2010. Nakayama, T., et al., Hydrol. Process., doi:10.1002/hyp.9290, 2012. Raymond, P.A., et al., Nature, doi:10.1038/nature12760, 2013.

  1. Decadal variability in biogeochemical models: Comparison with a 50-year ocean colour dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, Stephanie A.; Raitsos, Dionysios; Dunne, John P.; McQuatters-Gollop, Abigail

    2009-11-01

    Assessing the skill of biogeochemical models to hindcast past variability is challenging, yet vital in order to assess their ability to predict biogeochemical change. However, the validation of decadal variability is limited by the sparsity of consistent, long-term biological datasets. The Phytoplankton Colour Index (PCI) product from the Continuous Plankton Recorder survey, which has been sampling the North Atlantic since 1948, is an example of such a dataset. Converting the PCI to chlorophyll values using SeaWiFS data allows a direct comparison with model output. Here we validate decadal variability in chlorophyll from the GFDL TOPAZ model. The model demonstrates skill at reproducing interannual variability, but cannot simulate the regime shifts evident in the PCI data. Comparison of the model output, data and climate indices highlights under-represented processes that it may be necessary to include in future biogeochemical models in order to accurately simulate decadal variability in ocean ecosystems.

  2. Biogeochemical factors which regulate the formation and fate of sulfide in wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Lyons, W. Berry; Gaudette, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    Coastal wetland areas occupy a small percentage of the terrestrial environment yet are extremely productive regions which support rapid rates of belowground bacterial activity. Wetlands appear to be significant as biogenic sources of gaseous sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen. These gases are important as tracers of man's activities, and they influence atmospheric chemistry. The interactions among wetland biogeochemical processes regulate the anaerobic production of reduced gases and influence the fate of these volatiles. Therefore, spatial and temporal variations in hydrology, salinity, temperature and specification, and growth of vegetation affect the type and magnitude of gas emissions thus hindering predictive estimates of gas flux. Our research is divided into two major components, the first is the biogeochemical characterization of a selected tidal wetland area in terms of factors likely to regulate sulfide flux; the second is a direct measurement of gaseous sulfur flux as related to changes in these biogeochemical conditions. Presently, we are near completion of phase one.

  3. Biogeochemical Cycles: A Computer-Interactive Study of Earth System Science and Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, Fred T.

    Global biogeochemistry is the discipline that links various aspects of biology, geology, and chemistry to investigate the surface environment of the Earth. The global biogeochemical cycles of the elements lie at the very core of the subject and involve a myriad of processes that transform and transport various substances throughout the Earth's ecosphere, which consists of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, shallow crust (soils, sediments, and crustal rocks), biosphere, and cryosphere. As the authors of Biogeochemical Cycles: A Computer-Interactive Study of Earth System Science and Global Change say, “anyone interested in understanding the causes of global environmental change and its implications for life would be well-advised to begin with an investigation of global biogeochemistry.” This small but illuminating book is an attempt to provide a reasonably integrated and comprehensive text dealing with the study of the life-essential global biogeochemical cycles of carbon, phosphorus, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen.

  4. Use of the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD) to Simulate Water Quality at Five U.S. Geological Survey Research Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, R. M.; Leavesley, G. H.; Shanley, J. B.; Peters, N. E.; Aulenbach, B. T.; Blum, A. E.; Campbell, D. H.; Clow, D. W.; Mast, M. A.; Stallard, R. F.; Larsen, M. C.; Troester, J. W.; Walker, J. F.; White, A. F.

    2003-12-01

    The Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD) was developed as an aid to compare and contrast basic hydrologic and biogeochemical processes active in the diverse hydroclimatic regions represented by the five U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) sites: Loch Vale, Colorado; Trout Lake, Wisconsin; Sleepers River, Vermont; Panola Mountain, Georgia; and Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. WEBMOD simulates solute concentrations for vegetation canopy, snow pack, impermeable ground, leaf litter, unsaturated and saturated soil zones, riparian zones and streams using selected process modules coupled within the USGS Modular Modeling System (MMS). Source codes for the MMS hydrologic modules include the USGS Precipitation Runoff Modeling System, the National Weather Service Hydro-17 snow model, and TOPMODEL. The hydrologic modules distribute precipitation and temperature to predict evapotranspiration, snow accumulation, snow melt, and streamflow. Streamflow generation mechanisms include infiltration excess, saturated overland flow, preferential lateral flow, and base flow. Input precipitation chemistry, and fluxes and residence times predicted by the hydrologic modules are input into the geochemical module where solute concentrations are computed for a series of discrete well-mixed reservoirs using calls to the geochemical engine PHREEQC. WEBMOD was used to better understand variations in water quality observed at the WEBB sites from October 1991 through September 1997. Initial calibrations were completed by fitting the simulated hydrographs with those measured at the watershed outlets. Model performance was then refined by comparing the predicted export of conservative chemical tracers such as chloride, with those measured at the watershed outlets. The model succeeded in duplicating the temporal variability of net exports of major ions from the watersheds.

  5. High-resolution physical and biogeochemical variability from a shallow back reef on Ofu, American Samoa: an end-member perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koweek, David A.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Mucciarone, David A.; Woodson, C. Brock; Samuel, Lianna

    2015-09-01

    Shallow back reefs commonly experience greater thermal and biogeochemical variability owing to a combination of coral community metabolism, environmental forcing, flow regime, and water depth. We present results from a high-resolution (sub-hourly to sub-daily) hydrodynamic and biogeochemical study, along with a coupled long-term (several months) hydrodynamic study, conducted on the back reefs of Ofu, American Samoa. During the high-resolution study, mean temperature was 29.0 °C with maximum temperatures near 32 °C. Dissolved oxygen concentrations spanned 32-178 % saturation, and pHT spanned the range from 7.80 to 8.39 with diel ranges reaching 0.58 units. Empirical cumulative distribution functions reveal that pHT was between 8.0 and 8.2 during only 30 % of the observational period, with approximately even distribution of the remaining 70 % of the time between pHT values less than 8.0 and greater than 8.2. Thermal and biogeochemical variability in the back reefs is partially controlled by tidal modulation of wave-driven flow, which isolates the back reefs at low tide and brings offshore water into the back reefs at high tide. The ratio of net community calcification to net community production was 0.15 ± 0.01, indicating that metabolism on the back reef was dominated by primary production and respiration. Similar to other back reef systems, the back reefs of Ofu are carbon sinks during the daytime. Shallow back reefs like those in Ofu may provide insights for how coral communities respond to extreme temperatures and acidification and are deserving of continued attention.

  6. Radionuclide release from simulated waste material after biogeochemical leaching of uraniferous mineral samples.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Aimee Lynn; Caron, François; Spiers, Graeme

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical mineral dissolution is a promising method for the released of metals in low-grade host mineralization that contain sulphidic minerals. The application of biogeochemical mineral dissolution to engineered leach heap piles in the Elliot Lake region may be considered as a promising passive technology for the economic recovery of low grade Uranium-bearing ores. In the current investigation, the decrease of radiological activity of uraniferous mineral material after biogeochemical mineral dissolution is quantified by gamma spectroscopy and compared to the results from digestion/ICP-MS analysis of the ore materials to determine if gamma spectroscopy is a simple, viable alternative quantification method for heavy nuclides. The potential release of Uranium (U) and Radium-226 ((226)Ra) to the aqueous environment from samples that have been treated to represent various stages of leaching and passive closure processes are assessed. Dissolution of U from the solid phase has occurred during biogeochemical mineral dissolution in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, with gamma spectroscopy indicating an 84% decrease in Uranium-235 ((235)U) content, a value in accordance with the data obtained by dissolution chemistry. Gamma spectroscopy data indicate that only 30% of the (226)Ra was removed during the biogeochemical mineral dissolution. Chemical inhibition and passivation treatments of waste materials following the biogeochemical mineral dissolution offer greater protection against residual U and (226)Ra leaching. Pacified samples resist the release of (226)Ra contained in the mineral phase and may offer more protection to the aqueous environment for the long term, compared to untreated or inhibited residues, and should be taken into account for future decommissioning. PMID:24726552

  7. An offline unstructured biogeochemical model (UBM) for complex estuarine and coastal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Yun; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2012-05-01

    Due to increased pollutant loads and water use from coastal development and population growth, occurrences of low-dissolved oxygen and "hypoxic zones" have increased. Reports of fish kills and water quality impairment are also becoming more frequent in many coastal waters. Water quality managers and regulatory agencies rely on numerical modeling tools to quantify the relative contributions of anthropogenic and "natural" pollutant loads (nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand) on dissolved oxygen levels and use the results for remedial activities and source control. The ability to conduct seasonlong simulations with sufficient nearshore resolution is therefore a key requirement. Mesh flexibility and the ability to increase site specific resolution without disturbing the larger domain setup and calibration are critical. The objective of this effort was to develop a robust biogeochemical model suitable for simulation of water quality dynamics including dissolved oxygen in complex coastal environments with multiple tidal channels, tidal flats, and density-driven circulation using unstructured-grid formulation. This paper presents an offline unstructured biogeochemical model that uses the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) discretization of the study domain and the corresponding hydrodynamic solution to drive biogeochemical kinetics based on a water quality model CE-QUAL-ICM. In this paper, the linkage between selected hydrodynamic and water quality models is subjected to several scalar transport and biogeochemical module tests (plume transport and dilution, BOD/DO sag, and phytoplankton/nutrients reaction), and results are compared to their analytical solutions as part of model validation. A preliminary application of the biogeochemical model with a year-long simulation of Hood Canal basin in Puget Sound, USA, is presented as an example and a test of the tool in a real estuary setting. The model reproduced the dynamics and seasonal variations in the biogeochemical state variables and was used to test short-term wind-driven dynamics that could influence dissolved oxygen concentrations in Hood Canal.

  8. MULTICOMPONENT BIOGEOCHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELING USING THE HYDRUS COMPUTER SOFTWARE PACKAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminant transport in the subsurface is generally affected by a large number of nonlinear and often interactive physical, chemical and biological processes. Simulating these processes requires a coupled reactive transport code that integrates the physical processes of water flow and advective-dis...

  9. Biogeochemical dynamics of pollutants in Insitu groundwater remediation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.; Millot, R.; Rose, J.; Négrel, P.; Battaglia-Brunnet, F.; Diels, L.

    2010-12-01

    Insitu (bio) remediation of groundwater contaminants has been area of potential research interest in last few decades as the nature of contaminant encountered has also changed drastically. This gives tough challenge to researchers in finding a common solution for all contaminants together in one plume. Redox processes play significant role in pollutant dynamics and mobility in such systems. Arsenic particularly in reduced environments can get transformed into its reduced form (As3+), which is apparently more mobile and highly toxic. Also parallel sulfate reduction can lead to sulfide production and formation of thioarsenic species. On the other hand heavy metals (Zn, Fe, and Cd) in similar conditions will favour more stable metal sulfide precipitation. In the present work, we tested Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) in handling such issues and found promising results. Although it has been well known for contaminants like arsenic and chlorinated compounds but not much explored for heavy metals. Its high available surface area supports precipitation and co -precipitation of contaminants and its highly oxidizing nature and water born hydrogen production helps in stimulation of microbial activities in sediment and groundwater. These sulfate and Iron reducing bacteria can further fix heavy metals as stable metal sulfides by using hydrogen as potential electron donor. In the present study flow through columns (biotic and control) were set up in laboratory to understand the behaviour of contaminants in subsurface environments, also the impact of microbiology on performance of ZVI was studied. These glass columns (30 x 4cm) with intermediate sampling points were monitored over constant temperature (20°C) and continuous groundwater (up)flow at ~1ml/hr throughout the experiment. Simulated groundwater was prepared in laboratory containing sulfate, metals (Zn,Cd) and arsenic (AsV). While chemical and microbial parameters were followed regularly over time, solid phase has been characterized at the end of experiment using synchrotron and other microscopic techniques (SEM, µXRF). Stable isotope signatures have been proved as a critical tool in understanding the redox and microbial processes. We monitored ?34S, ?66Zn and ?56Fe isotope evolution with time to understand the relationship between biogeochemical process and isotope fractionation. We observed ?34S biotic - abiotic ~6‰ and ?56Fe variation up to 1.5‰ in our study. ZVI was very efficient in metal removal and also in enhancing sulfate reduction in column sediment. Arsenic reduction and thiarsenic species were also detected in biotic columns showing a positive correlation with sulfide production and Fe speciation. Latest results will be presented with integration of different processes. This multidisciplinary approach will help in deep understanding of contaminants behaviour and also to constrain the efficiency and longitivity of treatment system for different contaminants. “This is contribution of the AquaTrain MRTN (Contract No. MRTN-CT-2006-035420) funded under the European Commission sixth framework programme (2002-2006) Marie Curie Actions, Human Resources & Mobility Activity Area- Research Training Networks”

  10. The Neoproterozoic oxygenation event: Environmental perturbations and biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Och, Lawrence M.; Shields-Zhou, Graham A.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen content of the Earth's surface environment is thought to have increased in two broad steps: the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE) around the Archean-Proterozoic boundary and the Neoproterozoic Oxygenation Event (NOE), during which oxygen possibly accumulated to the levels required to support animal life and ventilate the deep oceans. Although the concept of the GOE is widely accepted, the NOE is less well constrained and its timing and extent remain the subjects of debate. We review available evidence for the NOE against the background of major climatic perturbations, tectonic upheaval related to the break-up of the supercontinent Rodinia and reassembly into Gondwana, and, most importantly, major biological innovations exemplified by the Ediacarian Biota and the Cambrian 'Explosion'. Geochemical lines of evidence for the NOE include perturbations to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon. Generally high ? 13C values are possibly indicative of increased organic carbon burial and the release of oxidative power to the Earth's surface environment after c. 800 Ma. A demonstrably global and primary record of extremely negative ? 13C values after about 580 Ma strongly suggests the oxidation of a large dissolved organic carbon pool (DOC), the culmination of which around c. 550 Ma coincided with an abrupt diversification of Ediacaran macrobiota. Increasing 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios toward the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian transition indicates enhanced continental weathering which may have fuelled higher organic production and burial during the later Neoproterozoic. Evidence for enhanced oxidative recycling is given by the increase in sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfide and sulfate, exceeding the range usually attained by sulfate reduction alone, reflecting an increasing importance of the oxidative part in the sulfur cycle. S/C ratios attained a maximum during the Precambrian-Cambrian transition, further indicating higher sulfate concentrations in the ocean and a transition from dominantly pyrite burial to sulfate burial after the Neoproterozoic. Strong evidence for the oxygenation of the deep marine environment has emerged through elemental approaches over the past few years which were able to show significant increases in redox-sensitive trace-metal (notably Mo) enrichment in marine sediments not only during the GOE but even more pronounced during the inferred NOE. In addition to past studies involving Mo enrichment, which has been extended and further substantiated in the current review, we present new compilations of V and U concentrations in black shales throughout Earth history that confirm such a rise and further support the NOE. With regard to ocean ventilation, we also review other sedimentary redox indicators, such as iron speciation, molybdenum isotopes and the more ambiguous REE patterns. Although the timing and extent of the NOE remain the subjects of debate and speculation, we consider the record of redox-sensitive trace-metals and C and S contents in black shales to indicate delayed ocean ventilation later in the Cambrian on a global scale with regard to rising oxygen levels in the atmosphere which likely rose during the Late Neoproterozoic.

  11. An integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United States

    E-print Network

    Jain, Atul K.

    An integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United-specific economic analysis of breakeven prices of bioenergy crop production to assess the biophysical and economic potential of biofuel production in the Midwestern United States. The bioenergy crops considered

  12. Real-Time Characterization of Biogeochemical Reduction of Cr(VI) on Basalt Surfaces

    E-print Network

    on surfaces of geologic materials. Time-resolved SR-FTIR spectra indicate that, in the presence of endolithsReal-Time Characterization of Biogeochemical Reduction of Cr(VI) on Basalt Surfaces by SR the time- and space-resolvedSR-FTIR spectra show that in the absence of endoliths, Cr(VI) reduction

  13. Biogeochemical research priorities for sustainable biofuel and bioenergy feedstock production in the Americas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid expansion in biomass production for biofuels and bioenergy in the Americas is increasing demands on the ecosystem resources required to sustain soil and site productivity. We review the current state of knowledge and highlight gaps in research on biogeochemical processes and ecosystem sustaina...

  14. A tubular-coring device for use in biogeochemical sampling of succulent and pulpy plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    A hand-operated, tubular-coring device developed for use in biogeochemical sampling of succulent and pulpy plants is described. The sampler weighs about 500 g (1.1 lb); and if 25 ?? 175 mm (1 ?? 7 in) screw-top test tubes are used as sample containers, the complete sampling equipment kit is easily portable, having both moderate bulk and weight. ?? 1986.

  15. A Virtual Soil System to Study Macroscopic Manifestation of Pore-Scale Biogeochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fang, Y.; Shang, J.; Bailey, V. L.

    2012-12-01

    Mechanistic soil biogeochemical processes occur at the pore-scale that fundamentally control the moisture and CO2 fluxes at the soil and atmosphere interface. This presentation will present an on-going research to investigate pore-scale moisture migration and biogeochemical processes of organic carbon degradation, and their macroscopic manifestation in soils. Soil cores collected from Rattlesnake Mountain in southeastern Washington, USA, where a field experiment was conducted to investigate dynamic response of soil biogeochemistry to changing climate conditions, were used as an example for this study. The cores were examined using computerized x-ray tomography (XCT) to determine soil pore structures. The XCT imaging, together with various measurements of soil properties such as porosity, moisture content, organic carbon, biochemistry, etc are used to establish a virtual soil core with a high spatial resolution (~20um). The virtual soil system is then used to simulate soil moisture migration and organic carbon degradation, to identify important physical and biogeochemical factors controlling macroscopic moisture and CO2 fluxes in response to changing climate conditions, and to develop and evaluate pragmatic biogeochemical process models for larger scale applications. Core-scale measurements of CO2 flux and moisture change are used for development and validation of the process models.

  16. Evaluation of the Current State of Mechanistic Aquatic Biogeochemical Modeling: Citation Analysis and Future

    E-print Network

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    was that the performance of existing mechanistic aquatic biogeochemical models declines as we move from physical-chemical Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M1C 1A4, and thus address questions regarding the pace and impacts of climate change (5, 6). Their role as a key

  17. A dynamic organic soil biogeochemical model for simulating the effects of wildfire on soil environmental

    E-print Network

    Turetsky, Merritt

    A dynamic organic soil biogeochemical model for simulating the effects of wildfire on soil the effects of wildfire on soil environmental conditions and carbon dynamics of black spruce forests, J. Geophys. Res., 115, G04015, doi:10.1029/2010JG001302. 1. Introduction [2] Wildfire is an important

  18. Impacts of Eddies and Mixing on Plankton Community Structure and Biogeochemical Cycling in the Sargasso Sea

    E-print Network

    Buesseler, Ken

    in the Sargasso Sea The currents, fronts and eddies that comprise the oceanic mesoscale, sometimes referred and the biogeochemical ramifications of eddy induced upwelling and mixing in the Sargasso Sea. Target features to as the "internal weather of the sea," are highly energetic and ubiquitous features of ocean circulation. Dynamical

  19. Simulated biogeochemical responses to iron enrichments in three high nutrient, low chlorophyll (HNLC) regions

    E-print Network

    Xiu, Peng

    Simulated biogeochemical responses to iron enrichments in three high nutrient, low chlorophyll 236-0001, Japan Available online 7 April 2005 Abstract To fill temporal gaps in iron-enrichment experimental data and gain further understanding of marine ecosystem responses to iron enrichments, we apply

  20. ForPeerReview Biogeochemical reduction processes in a hyper-alkaline

    E-print Network

    Burke, Ian

    profile Journal: Geomicrobiology Journal Manuscript ID: UGMB-2011-0080.R1 Manuscript Type: Original Article Date Submitted by the Author: n/a Complete List of Authors: Burke, Ian; University of Leeds://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ugmb Email: pll2@cornell.edu Geomicrobiology Journal #12;ForPeerReview Only 1 Biogeochemical reduction

  1. INTERACTIONS OF CHANGING CLIMATE AND ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION IN AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade interest has developed in the interactive effects of climate change and UV radiation on aquatic and terrestrial biogeochemical cycles. This talk used selected case studies to illustrate approaches that are being used to investigate these intriguing processe...

  2. Potential impacts of emerald ash borer invasion on biogeochemical and water cycling in residential

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Potential impacts of emerald ash borer invasion on biogeochemical and water cycling in residential . Agrilus planipennis . Evapotranspiration . Water flux Introduction Trees modify the cycling of carbon (C, nitrogen, and phosphorus storage in ash trees, the cycling of these elements, and the total

  3. Catchment hydro-biogeochemical response to climate change and future land-use

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential interacting effects of climate change and future land-use on hydrological and biogeochemical dynamics rarely have been described at the catchment level and are difficult or impossible to capture through experimentation or observation alone. We apply a new model, Vi...

  4. Biogeochemical impact of a model western iron source in the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent

    E-print Network

    Murray, James W.

    Biogeochemical impact of a model western iron source in the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent Lia 2009 Available online 19 August 2009 Keywords: Iron Ecosystem model Bioavailability Equatorial Pacific Limitation High-nitrate low-chlorophyll Transport Export Biological pump a b s t r a c t Trace element

  5. Modeling physical and biogeochemical controls over carbon accumulation in a boreal forest soil

    E-print Network

    Neff, Jason

    the physical and chemical properties of soils and the biophysical regu- lation of decomposition. Within borealModeling physical and biogeochemical controls over carbon accumulation in a boreal forest soil with dynamic soil layers that develop through time as soil organic matter burns and reaccumulates. We

  6. Deepened snow increases late thaw biogeochemical pulses in mesic low arctic tundra

    E-print Network

    Grogan, Paul

    Deepened snow increases late thaw biogeochemical pulses in mesic low arctic tundra Kate M­spring transition in arctic tundra. Our aims were to quantify the magnitude of these potential nutrient pulses variability in winter snow depth. Keywords Nitrogen Á Phosphorus Á Carbon Á Low arctic birch hummock tundra Á

  7. Afforestation Alters the Composition of Functional Genes in Soil and Biogeochemical Processes

    E-print Network

    Post, Wilfred M.

    , however their belowground carbon cycle changes have not been fully investigated. · Functional genes with changes in soil biogeochemistry, in part through altered abundance of overall functional gene types ratherAfforestation Alters the Composition of Functional Genes in Soil and Biogeochemical Processes

  8. Investigation of In-situ Biogeochemical Reduction of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater by Reduced Iron Minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogeochemical transformation is a process in which chlorinated solvents are degraded abiotically by reactive minerals formed by, at least in part or indirectly from, anaerobic biological processes. Five mulch biowall and/or vegetable oil-based bioremediation applications for tr...

  9. Effects of Solar UV Radiation and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions...

  10. Gene-centric approach to integrating environmental genomics and biogeochemical models.

    PubMed

    Reed, Daniel C; Algar, Christopher K; Huber, Julie A; Dick, Gregory J

    2014-02-01

    Rapid advances in molecular microbial ecology have yielded an unprecedented amount of data about the evolutionary relationships and functional traits of microbial communities that regulate global geochemical cycles. Biogeochemical models, however, are trailing in the wake of the environmental genomics revolution, and such models rarely incorporate explicit representations of bacteria and archaea, nor are they compatible with nucleic acid or protein sequence data. Here, we present a functional gene-based framework for describing microbial communities in biogeochemical models by incorporating genomics data to provide predictions that are readily testable. To demonstrate the approach in practice, nitrogen cycling in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) was modeled to examine key questions about cryptic sulfur cycling and dinitrogen production pathways in OMZs. Simulations support previous assertions that denitrification dominates over anammox in the central Arabian Sea, which has important implications for the loss of fixed nitrogen from the oceans. Furthermore, cryptic sulfur cycling was shown to attenuate the secondary nitrite maximum often observed in OMZs owing to changes in the composition of the chemolithoautotrophic community and dominant metabolic pathways. Results underscore the need to explicitly integrate microbes into biogeochemical models rather than just the metabolisms they mediate. By directly linking geochemical dynamics to the genetic composition of microbial communities, the method provides a framework for achieving mechanistic insights into patterns and biogeochemical consequences of marine microbes. Such an approach is critical for informing our understanding of the key role microbes play in modulating Earth's biogeochemistry. PMID:24449851

  11. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF OZONE DEPLETION AND CLIMATE CHANGE ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of ozone depletion on global biogeochemical cycles, via increased UV-B radiation at the Earth's surface, have continued to be documented over the past 4 years. In this report we also document various effects of UV-B that interact with global climate change because the...

  12. Community Structure and Biogeochemical Impacts of Microbial Life on Floating Pumice

    E-print Network

    Elser, Jim

    Community Structure and Biogeochemical Impacts of Microbial Life on Floating Pumice J. J. Elser,a M (Chile), when massive amounts of pumice were ejected, creating novel floating substrata that have never of microbes that came to inhabit the pumice, with a unique composition dis- tinct from that of the lakes

  13. Catchment hydro-biogeochemical response to forest harvest intensity and spatial pattern

    EPA Science Inventory

    We apply a new model, Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Assessment (VELMA), to Watershed 10 (WS10) in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest to simulate the effects of harvest intensity and spatial pattern on catchment hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Specificall...

  14. Iron: A Biogeochemical Engine That Drives Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus Cycling in Humid Tropical Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, W. L.; Hall, S. J.; Thompson, A.; Yang, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    The abundance of redox active Fe minerals has the potential to alter the storage and loss of C, contribute to gaseous N emissions, and control P retention in upland tropical forest soils. High concentrations of short-range order Fe minerals led to Fe(II) production rates of 26-206 ?g g d-1 under short-term low redox conditions (Chacón et al. 2006, Liptzin and Silver 2009, Dubinsky et al. 2010). Potential C mineralization from Fe(II) reduction was 34-263 g CO2-C m-2 y-1, C losses equivalent to approximately 10-60 % of annual litterfall production in this forest. Decreased acidity during Fe reduction can destabilize soil aggregates and lead to C losses. Iron is rapidly reoxidized during aerobic periods, which can subsequently lead to C stabilization via complexation reactions. Fe oxidation can also stimulate C losses via pH-driven dissolved organic C production and directly via Fenton reactions. In laboratory experiments, rates of CO2 production were strongly linearly correlated with Fe(II) loss under aerobic conditions, increasing by 0.51 ± 0.02 µg CO2-C g soil h-1 respired for each mg of Fe(II) g-1 soil oxidized or sorbed (Hall and Silver 2013). Iron oxidation has also been linked to dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ leading to N retention in ecosystems. Fe(III) reduction coupled with NH4+ oxidation (Feammox) can lead to N losses as dinitrogen gas (N2) or nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Estimates suggest that Feammox resulted in gaseous N losses of 1-4 kg N ha-1 y-1 (Yang et al. 2012), rates equivalent to total denitrification in this forest. Oxidized Fe can strongly bind P decreasing it's availability to plant roots. While this is commonly cited as a potential limitation to net primary production in tropical forests, it also helps to retain P in ecosystems with high rainfall and potential leaching losses. Microbial biomass P availability increased significantly with Fe(II) production, suggesting the P mobilized during Fe(II) reduction was rapidly immobilized into biological pools (Liptzin and Silver 2009). Data suggest that Fe-redox cycling may decrease P limitation to NPP, and help maintain forest nutrient stocks. In summary, our results highlight the biogeochemical significance of Fe cycling in upland soils environments and its important role in the dynamics of humid tropical forests.

  15. MODELING COUPLED HYDROLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES: LONG-TERM URANIUM TRANSPORT FOLLOWING PHOSPHOROUS-FERTILIZATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminants in the vadose zone are affected by the physical processes of water flow, heat movement and multicomponent transport, as well as generally by a range of interacting biogeochemical processes. Coupling these various processes within one integrated numerical simulator provides a process-ba...

  16. Modeling the Natural Biogeochemical Cycle of Mercury in the Global Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Jaegle, L.; Thompson, L.; Emerson, S. R.; Deutsch, C. A.; Trossman, D. S.; Shao, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ocean plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of mercury (Hg) because of its large reservoir mass and re-emission flux via evasion. The currently available Hg models, including 2D slab, 1D column and 0D box model cannot fully resolve the marine Hg cycle because of the lack of the proper spatial resolution. In this work, we have implemented Hg biogeochemistry in a state-of-the-art 3D offline ocean tracer model (OFFTRAC). OFFTRAC simulates the evolution of three Hg species (Hg0aq, HgIIaq and HgPaq), which are diffused and advected in the ocean. Hg0aq and HgII aq are interconverted in the surface ocean via parameterized photochemical and biological redox processes. The partitioning between HgIIaq and HgPaq depends on the local levels of particulate organic carbon (POC). The sinking of HgPaq is parameterized by coupling with the nutrient phosphorous cycle simulated in OFFTRAC. The reduction of HgIIaq to Hg0aq in the anaerobic subsurface water is proportional to the remineralizaiton of POC. OFFTRAC is coupled to a global simulation of the natural atmospheric Hg cycle in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. The GEOS-Chem simulation includes a geogenic source and provides the atmospheric deposition flux of HgII to the ocean and atmospheric Hg0 concentrations. The riverine input of Hg is calculated based on the climatological monthly mean fresh water discharge from continental to ocean and the average soil concentrations near the river mouth. The results show that the riverine input enhances Hg concentrations at surface by a factor of 2-3 near large river mouths and nearby coastal regions. The riverine input approximately doubles surface Hg concentration over the Arctic because of the small basin volume. In the deep ocean, which is not influenced by anthropogenic emissions, the model results (1.1±0.3 pM) generally agree with the observed present-day total Hg concentration profiles (1.4±0.9 pM). In the surface ocean, observations show average total Hg concentrations of 1.0±0.6 pM, while our natural ocean model shows an average concentration of 0.17±0.1 pM, indicating enrichment between present-day and natural condition by a factor of 5-6. The results show that Hg accumulates in the tropical ocean basins at depth due to the stronger particle sinking flux. Higher levels of surface concentration are also modeled in the upwelling regions in the subarctic North Pacific, subpolar North Atlantic and in the Southern Ocean. The modeled HgIIaq concentration in the deep North Pacific is approximately twice of that of the deep North Atlantic because of the accumulated source from particles removing Hg from the surface waters. The Hg0aq concentrations are highest in the Pacific equatorial intermediate ocean (1000 - 2000 m), where the remineralization rate is largest and oxygen concentrations are low. We will present preliminary results from a 560 year (1450 - 2008) coupled atmosphere-ocean Hg simulation with increasing anthropogenic input.

  17. Integrated Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving Arsenic Release from Shallow Sediments to Groundwaters of the Mekong Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Kocar, Benjamin D.; Polizzotto, Matthew L.; Benner, Shawn G.; Ying, Samantha C.; Ung, Mengieng; Ouch, Kagna; Samreth, Sopheap; Suy, Bunseang; Phan, Kongkea; Sampson, Michael; Fendorf, Scott

    2008-11-01

    Arsenic is contaminating the groundwater of Holocene aquifers throughout South and Southeast Asia. To examine the biogeochemical and hydrological processes influencing dissolved concentrations and transport of As within soils/sediments in the Mekong River delta, a ~50 km? field site was established near Phnom Penh, Cambodia, where aqueous As concentrations are dangerously high and where groundwater retrieval for irrigation is minimal. Dissolved As concentrations vary spatially, ranging up to 1300 µg/L in aquifer groundwater and up to 600 µg/L in surficial clay pore water. Groundwaters with high As concentrations are reducing with negligible dissolved O? and high concentrations of Fe(II), NH?? , and dissolved organic C. Within near-surface environments, these conditions are most pronounced in sediments underlying permanent wetlands, often found within oxbow channels near the Mekong River. There, labile C, co-deposited with As-bearing Fe (hydr)oxides under reducing conditions, drives the reductive mobilization (inclusive of Fe and As reduction) of As. Here, conditions are described under which As is mobilized from these sediments, and near-surface As release is linked to aquifer contamination over long time periods (100s to 1000s of years). Site biogeochemistry is coupled with extensive hydrologic measurements, and, accordingly, a comprehensive interpretation of spatial As release and transport within a calibrated hydraulic flow-field is provided of an As-contaminated aquifer that is representative of those found throughout South and Southeast Asia.

  18. Coupling TOUGH2 with CLM3: Developing a Coupled Land Surface andSubsurface Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur

    2006-05-19

    An understanding of the hydrologic interactions among atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface is one of the keys to understanding the water cycling system that supports life on earth. The inherent coupled processes and complex feedback structures among subsystems make such interactions difficult to simulate. In this paper, we present a model that simulates the land surface and subsurface hydrologic response to meteorological forcing. This model combines a state-of-the-art land-surface model, the NCAR Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), with a variably saturated groundwater model, TOUGH2, through an internal interface that includes flux and state variables shared by the two submodels. Specifically, TOUGH2 uses infiltration, evaporation, and root-uptake rates, calculated by CLM3, as source/sink terms in its simulation; CLM3 uses saturation and capillary pressure profiles, calculated by TOUGH2, as state variables in its simulation. This new model, CLMT2, preserves the best aspects of both submodels: the state-of-the-art modeling capability of surface energy and hydrologic processes (including snow, runoff, freezing/melting, evapotranspiration, radiation, and biophysiological processes) from CLM3 and the more realistic physical-process-based modeling capability of subsurface hydrologic processes (including heterogeneity, three-dimensional flow, seamless combining of unsaturated and saturated zone, and water table) from TOUGH2. The preliminary simulation results show that the coupled model greatly improved the predictions of the groundwater table, evapotranspiration, and surface temperature at a real watershed, as evaluated using 18 years of observed data. The new model is also ready to be coupled with an atmospheric simulation model, to form one of the first top of the atmosphere to deep groundwater atmosphere-land-surface-subsurface models.

  19. Vadose zone attenuation of organic compounds at a crude oil spill site - Interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.; Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Contaminant attenuation processes in the vadose zone of a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN have been simulated with a reactive transport model that includes multicomponent gas transport, solute transport, and the most relevant biogeochemical reactions. Dissolution and volatilization of oil components, their aerobic and anaerobic degradation coupled with sequential electron acceptor consumption, ingress of atmospheric O2, and the release of CH4 and CO2 from the smear zone generated by the floating oil were considered. The focus of the simulations was to assess the dynamics between biodegradation and gas transport processes in the vadose zone, to evaluate the rates and contributions of different electron accepting processes towards vadose zone natural attenuation, and to provide an estimate of the historical mass loss. Concentration distributions of reactive (O2, CH4, and CO2) and non-reactive (Ar and N2) gases served as key constraints for the model calibration. Simulation results confirm that as of 2007, the main degradation pathway can be attributed to methanogenic degradation of organic compounds in the smear zone and the vadose zone resulting in a contaminant plume dominated by high CH4 concentrations. In accordance with field observations, zones of volatilization and CH4 generation are correlated to slightly elevated total gas pressures and low partial pressures of N2 and Ar, while zones of aerobic CH4 oxidation are characterized by slightly reduced gas pressures and elevated concentrations of N2 and Ar. Diffusion is the most significant transport mechanism for gases in the vadose zone; however, the simulations also indicate that, despite very small pressure gradients, advection contributes up to 15% towards the net flux of CH4, and to a more limited extent to O2 ingress. Model calibration strongly suggests that transfer of biogenically generated gases from the smear zone provides a major control on vadose zone gas distributions and vadose zone carbon balance. Overall, the model was successful in capturing the complex interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport processes. However, despite employing a process-based modeling approach, honoring observed parameter ranges, and generally obtaining good agreement between field observations and model simulations, accurate quantification of natural attenuation rates remains difficult. The modeling results are affected by uncertainties regarding gas phase saturations, tortuosities, and the magnitude of CH4 and CO2 flux from the smear zone. These findings highlight the need to better delineate gas fluxes at the model boundaries, which will help constrain contaminant degradation rates, and ultimately source zone longevity. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Vadose zone attenuation of organic compounds at a crude oil spill site - interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport.

    PubMed

    Molins, S; Mayer, K U; Amos, R T; Bekins, B A

    2010-03-01

    Contaminant attenuation processes in the vadose zone of a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN have been simulated with a reactive transport model that includes multicomponent gas transport, solute transport, and the most relevant biogeochemical reactions. Dissolution and volatilization of oil components, their aerobic and anaerobic degradation coupled with sequential electron acceptor consumption, ingress of atmospheric O(2), and the release of CH(4) and CO(2) from the smear zone generated by the floating oil were considered. The focus of the simulations was to assess the dynamics between biodegradation and gas transport processes in the vadose zone, to evaluate the rates and contributions of different electron accepting processes towards vadose zone natural attenuation, and to provide an estimate of the historical mass loss. Concentration distributions of reactive (O(2), CH(4), and CO(2)) and non-reactive (Ar and N(2)) gases served as key constraints for the model calibration. Simulation results confirm that as of 2007, the main degradation pathway can be attributed to methanogenic degradation of organic compounds in the smear zone and the vadose zone resulting in a contaminant plume dominated by high CH(4) concentrations. In accordance with field observations, zones of volatilization and CH(4) generation are correlated to slightly elevated total gas pressures and low partial pressures of N(2) and Ar, while zones of aerobic CH(4) oxidation are characterized by slightly reduced gas pressures and elevated concentrations of N(2) and Ar. Diffusion is the most significant transport mechanism for gases in the vadose zone; however, the simulations also indicate that, despite very small pressure gradients, advection contributes up to 15% towards the net flux of CH(4), and to a more limited extent to O(2) ingress. Model calibration strongly suggests that transfer of biogenically generated gases from the smear zone provides a major control on vadose zone gas distributions and vadose zone carbon balance. Overall, the model was successful in capturing the complex interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport processes. However, despite employing a process-based modeling approach, honoring observed parameter ranges, and generally obtaining good agreement between field observations and model simulations, accurate quantification of natural attenuation rates remains difficult. The modeling results are affected by uncertainties regarding gas phase saturations, tortuosities, and the magnitude of CH(4) and CO(2) flux from the smear zone. These findings highlight the need to better delineate gas fluxes at the model boundaries, which will help constrain contaminant degradation rates, and ultimately source zone longevity. PMID:19853961

  1. Modeling the Biogeochemical Response of a Flood Plain Aquifer Impacted By Seasonal Temperature and Water Table Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Spycher, N.; Molins, S.; Steefel, C. I.

    2014-12-01

    With the overarching goal of understanding the impacts of climate and land use changes on carbon and nutrient cycles, we are developing a reactive transport model that couples hydrologic and biogeochemical processes to microbial functional distributions inferred from site-specific 'omic' data. The objective of the modeling approach is to simulate changes in carbon and nutrient fluxes and aquifer biogeochemistry over longer time periods due to changes in climate and/or land use, while also considering shorter time periods in which water table fluctuations and temperature variations are important. A 2-D reactive transport model has been developed for the unsaturated-saturated zone of the Rifle site, CO, an alluvial aquifer bordering the Colorado River. Modeling efforts focus on the April through September 2013 time frame that corresponds to the spring snow melt event that lead to an approximately 1 meter rise in the water table followed by a gradual lowering over 3 months. Temperature variations of as much as 10ºC are observed at shallow depths (< 1m), while at least some temperature variation (1ºC) occurs as deep as about 7m. A field survey of the microbial populations indicates the presence and activity of chemo(litho)autotrophic bacteria within the saturated zone of the alluvial aquifer. Model simulations are used to quantify the release of carbon dioxide and consumption of oxygen via abiotic pathways and heterotrophic microbial oxidation of reduced species (Fe(II), S(-2)) and minerals (pyrite). Results indicate that the observed oxygen profiles and/or carbon fluxes cannot be matched by considering abiotic reactions alone. The importance of including microbial contributions from chemo(litho)autotrophic processes (e.g., ammonia, sulfur and iron oxidation) is supported by both field observations and model simulations. Important conclusions from the study are to: (1) include microbially-mediated processes and contributions from the unsaturated zone, and (2) account for seasonal temperature changes to accurately represent lateral and vertical delivery of water and nutrients as well as biogeochemical transformations within the Rifle Flood Plain system.

  2. Hybrid Numerical Methods for Multiscale Simulations of Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Redden, George D.; Meakin, Paul

    2007-08-01

    Many subsurface flow and transport problems of importance today involve coupled non-linear flow, transport, and reaction in media exhibiting complex heterogeneity. In particular, problems involving biological mediation of reactions fall into this class of problems. Recent experimental research has revealed important details about the physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms involved in these processes at a variety of scales ranging from molecular to laboratory scales. However, it has not been practical or possible to translate detailed knowledge at small scales into reliable predictions of field-scale phenomena important for environmental management applications. A large assortment of numerical simulation tools have been developed, each with its own characteristic scale including molecular (e.g., molecular dynamics), microbial (e.g., cellular automata or particle individual-based models), pore (e.g., lattice-Boltzmann, pore network models, and discrete particle methods such as smoothed particle hydrodynamics) and continuum scales (e.g., traditional partial differential equations solved by finite difference or finite element methods). While many problems can be effectively addressed by one of these models at a single scale, some problems may require explicit integration of models across multiple scales. We are developing a hybrid multi-scale subsurface reactive transport modeling framework that integrates models with diverse representations of physics, chemistry and biology at different scales (sub-pore, pore and continuum). The modeling framework is being designed to take advantage of advanced computational technologies including parallel code components using the Common Component Architecture, parallel solvers, gridding, data and workflow management, and visualization. This paper describes the specific methods/codes being used at each scale, techniques used to directly and adaptively couple across model scales, and preliminary results of application to a multi-scale model of mineral precipitation at a solute mixing interface.

  3. A multi-decadal hindcast of a physical-biogeochemical model and derived oceanographic indices in the Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huret, Martin; Sourisseau, Marc; Petitgas, Pierre; Struski, Caroline; Léger, Fabien; Lazure, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Multiple year oceanographic simulations (hindcast) are identified as a priority oceanography product for fisheries and environment studies since they provide a unique continuous long-term dataset allowing integrated assessment of the ocean state and evolution. We performed a 37 year (1972-2008) hindcast run with a coupled physical-biogeochemical model in the Bay of Biscay. The coupled model and the hindcast configuration are described. A model skill assessment is performed with a large set of in-situ data. Average seasonal currents show major circulation patterns over the shelf. Among tracers, temperature and salinity have the best agreement, ahead of nitrates and silicates, chlorophyll, and finally phosphates and ammonium. For chlorophyll, improved pattern statistics are found when compared to monthly composites of satellite-derived chlorophyll data. From the hindcast, we derived indices related to mesoscale activity (eddies, plumes, fronts, stratification) and production (chlorophyll and primary production). They help characterise the evolution of the environment in a functional way, on both the seasonal and multi-decadal scales. From these indices, first, a multivariate analysis reveals an increasing number of years that deviate from the mean seasonal pattern. Second, we propose interpretations of the simulated increasing trends detected in several of them (temperature, thermocline depth and primary production). We also recommend further developments to confirm these simulated evolutions, from addition of open boundary forcing with a global circulation model, to the improvement of the dynamics of nutrient regeneration and of the seasonal variability of secondary production. As a perspective, we review the different applications made from our hindcast in relation to anchovy life cycle, a species of major interest in the Bay of Biscay.

  4. Beyond The Blueprint: Development Of Genome-Informed Trait-Based Models For Prediction Of Microbial Dynamics And Biogeochemical Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, E.; King, E.; Molins, S.; Karaoz, U.; Johnson, J. N.; Bouskill, N.; Hug, L. A.; Thomas, B. C.; Castelle, C. J.; Beller, H. R.; Banfield, J. F.; Steefel, C. I.

    2014-12-01

    In soils and sediments microorganisms perform essential ecosystem services through their roles in regulating the stability of carbon and the flux of nutrients, and the purification of water. But these are complex systems with the physical, chemical and biological components all intimately connected. Components of this complexity are gradually being uncovered and our understanding of the extent of microbial functional diversity in particular has been enhanced greatly with the development of cultivation independent approaches. However we have not moved far beyond a descriptive and correlative use of this powerful resource. As the ability to reconstruct thousands of genomes from microbial populations using metagenomic techniques gains momentum, the challenge will be to develop an understanding of how these metabolic blueprints serve to influence the fitness of organisms within these complex systems and how populations emerge and impact the physical and chemical properties of their environment. In the presentation we will discuss the development of a trait-based model of microbial activity that simulates coupled guilds of microorganisms that are parameterized including traits extracted from large-scale metagenomic data. Using a reactive transport framework we simulate the thermodynamics of coupled electron donor and acceptor reactions to predict the energy available for respiration, biomass development and exo-enzyme production. Each group within a functional guild is parameterized with a unique combination of traits governing organism fitness under dynamic environmental conditions. This presentation will address our latest developments in the estimation of trait values related to growth rate and the identification and linkage of key fitness traits associated with respiratory and fermentative pathways, macromolecule depolymerization enzymes and nitrogen fixation from metagenomic data. We are testing model sensitivity to initial microbial composition and intra-guild trait variability amongst other parameters and are using this model to explore abiotic controls on community emergence and impact on rates of reactions that contribute to the cycling of carbon across biogeochemical gradients from the soil to the subsurface.

  5. Novel tracer method to measure isotopic labeled gas-phase nitrous acid (HO15NO) in biogeochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianming; Kampf, Christopher J; Pöschl, Ulrich; Oswald, Robert; Cui, Junfang; Ermel, Michael; Hu, Chunsheng; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2014-07-15

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO), the protonated form of nitrite, contributes up to ?60% to the primary formation of hydroxyl radical (OH), which is a key oxidant in the degradation of most air pollutants. Field measurements and modeling studies indicate a large unknown source of HONO during daytime. Here, we developed a new tracer method based on gas-phase stripping-derivatization coupled to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to measure the 15N relative exceedance, ?(15N), of HONO in the gas-phase. Gaseous HONO is quantitatively collected and transferred to an azo dye, purified by solid phase extraction (SPE), and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). In the optimal working range of ?(15N)=0.2-0.5, the relative standard deviation of ?(15N) is <4%. The optimum pH and solvents for extraction by SPE and potential interferences are discussed. The method was applied to measure HO15NO emissions from soil in a dynamic chamber with and without spiking 15) labeled urea. The identification of HO15NO from soil with 15N urea addition confirmed biogenic emissions of HONO from soil. The method enables a new approach of studying the formation pathways of HONO and its role for atmospheric chemistry (e.g., ozone formation) and environmental tracer studies on the formation and conversion of gaseous HONO or aqueous NO2- as part of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, e.g., in the investigation of fertilization effects on soil HONO emissions and microbiological conversion of NO2- in the hydrosphere. PMID:24954648

  6. How important are biogeochemical hotspots at aquifer-river interfaces for surface water and groundwater quality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, S.; Blume, T.; Weatherill, J.; Munz, M.; Tecklenburg, C.; Angermann, L.; Cassidy, N. J.

    2012-04-01

    The mixing of groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) can have substantial impact on the transformation of solutes transported between aquifer and river. The assessment of biogeochemical cycling at reactivity hotspots as the aquifer-river interface and its implications for GW and SW quality require detailed understanding of the complex patterns of GW-SW exchange fluxes and residence time distributions in particular under changing climatic and landuse conditions. This study presents combined experimental and model-based investigations of the physical drivers and chemical controls of nutrient transport and transformation at the aquifer-river interfaces of two upland and lowland UK rivers. It combines the application of in-stream geophysical exploration techniques, multi-level mini-piezometer networks, active and passive heat tracing methods (including fibre-optic distributed temperature sensing - FO-DTS) for identifying hyporheic exchange fluxes and residence time distributions with multi-scale approaches of hyporheic pore-water sampling and reactive tracers for analysing the patterns of streambed redox conditions and chemical transformation rates. The analysis of hyporheic pore water from nested multi-level mini piezometers and passive gel probe samplers revealed significant spatial variability in streambed redox conditions and concentration changes of nitrogen species, dissolved oxygen and bio-available organic carbon. Hot spots of increased nitrate attenuation were identified beneath semi-confining peat lenses in the streambed of the investigated lowland river. The intensity of concentration changes underneath the confining peat pockets correlated with the state of anoxia in the pore water as well as the supply of organic carbon and hyporheic residence times. In contrast, at locations where flow inhibiting peat layers were absent or disrupted - fast exchange between aquifer and river caused a break-through of nitrate without significant concentration changes along the hyporheic flow path. Fibre-optic distributed temperature sensor networks and streambed electric resistivity tomography were applied for identifying exchange flow patterns between groundwater and surface water in dependency of streambed structural heterogeneity and for delineating the location and extend of flow inhibiting structures as indicators of streambed reactivity hot spots. Results of these surveys indicate that during summer, patterns of cold spots in the investigated streambed sediments can be attributed to fast groundwater up-welling in sandy and gravely sediments resulting in low hyporheic residence times. Contrasting conditions were found at warmer areas at the streambed surface where groundwater - surface water exchange was inhibited by the existence of peat or clay lenses within the streambed. Model simulations of coupled groundwater and surface water flow indicated that ignoring the increased reactivity in hyporheic streambed hotspots would lead to substantial under- or over-prediction of nitrate fluxes between aquifer and stream with potentially critical implications for river management and restoration. The investigations supported the development of a conceptual model of aquifer-river exchange and hyporheic reactivity in lowland rivers including temperature traceable hyporheic exchange fluxes at multiple scales and highlighted the necessity to adequately reflect hyporheic hotspot reactivity in coupled groundwater-surface water models for adequate water quality predictions.

  7. Biogeochemical phosphorus mass balance for Lake Baikal, southeastern Siberia, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callender, E.; Granina, L.

    1997-01-01

    Extensive data for Lake Baikal have been synthesized into a geochemical mass balance for phosphorus (P). Some of the P budget and internal cycling terms for Baikal have been compared to similar terms for oligotrophic Lake Superior, mesotrophic Lake Michigan and the Baltic Sea, and the Ocean. Lake Baikal has a large external source of fluvial P compared to the Laurentian upper Great Lakes and the Ocean. The major tributary to Lake Baikal has experienced substantial increases in organic P loading during the past 25 years. This, coupled with potential P inputs from possible phosphorite mining, may threaten Baikal's oligotrophic status in the future. Water-column remineralization of particulate organic P is substantially greater in Lake Baikal than in the Laurentian Great Lakes. This is probably due to the great water depths of Lake Baikal. There is a gradient in P burial efficiency, with very high values (80%) for Lake Baikal and Lake Superior, lower values (50%) for Lake Michigan and the Baltic Sea, and a low value (13%) for the Ocean. The accumulation rate of P in Lake Baikal sediments is somewhat greater than that in the Laurentian upper Great Lakes and the Baltic Sea, and much greater than in the Ocean. Benthic regeneration rates are surprisingly similar for large lacustrine and marine environments and supply less than 10% of the P utilized for primary production in these aquatic environments.

  8. Dynamic Landscape Connectivity, Threshold Behavior, and Scaling Frameworks for Hydrologic and Bio-geochemical Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula, E.; Zanardo, S.; Danesh-Yazdi, M.; Zaliapin, I.; Power, M.; Dietrich, W.

    2012-12-01

    The hydrologic connectivity of landscapes (the surface fluvial and non-fluvial flowpaths and the flowpaths in the sub-surface) is temporally and spatially changing as dictated by landscape features and precipitation. Developing simple conceptual frameworks for quantifying the response of a basin (hydrologic, sedimentologic, and bio-geochemical) based on theories of network dynamics is still an open problem with slow progress. In this talk two issues will be addressed: (1) scaling of peak flows in response to space-time variable rainfall of duration smaller than the time of concentration of the basin, and (2) predictive modeling and scaling of bio-geochemical fluxes using a spatially explicit model of light and nutrient availability, streamflow, and temperature on the connected network. Data from the Walnut Gulch watershed and the Eel river at Angelo Coast Range Reserve are used for model development and testing.

  9. Biogeochemical evolution of sulfide ore mine tailings profiles under semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorover, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mining represents a principal form of earth surface disturbance in the anthropocene. Weathering reactions that ensue following tailings deposition are strongly affected by climatic forcing and tailings composition, and these also affect the weathering-induced transformations of the associated mineral assemblages and metal(loid) contaminants. The presence or absence of plants and associated microbiota can have a profound influence on these weathering trajectories. We employed field, laboratory and modeling approaches to resolve the impact of (bio)geochemical weathering reactions on the transformation of mine tailings parent materials into soil over the time following mining cessation. Using controlled experiments, we have evaluated the impacts of plants and associated rhizosphere microbiota on these reactions, hydrologic fluxes, and the molecular speciation of mining derived contaminants. Plant establishment is shown to alter site ecohydrology and biogeochemical weathering processes leading to distinctly different weathering products and patterns.

  10. EFFECT OF NUTRIENT LOADING ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES IN A NEW ENGLAND HIGH SALT MARSH, SPARTINA PATNES, (AITON MUHL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal marshes represent an important transitional zone between uplands and estuaries and can assimilate nutrient inputs from uplands. We examined the effects of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization on biogeochemical and microbial processes during the summer growing sea...

  11. Effects of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion, Solar UV Radiation, and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change modulates the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, particularly for carbon cycling, resulting in UV-mediated positive or negative feedbacks on climate. Possible positive feedbacks discussed in this assessment...

  12. Toward a dynamic biogeochemical division of the Mediterranean Sea in a context of global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reygondeau, Gabriel; Olivier Irisson, Jean; Guieu, Cecile; Gasparini, Stephane; Ayata, Sakina; Koubbi, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    In recent decades, it has been found useful to ecoregionalise the pelagic environment assuming that within each partition environmental conditions are distinguishable and unique. Indeed, each partition of the ocean that is proposed aimed to delineate the main oceanographical and ecological patterns to provide a geographical framework of marine ecosystems for ecological studies and management purposes. The aim of the present work is to integrate and process existing data on the pelagic environment of the Mediterranean Sea in order to define biogeochemical regions. Open access databases including remote sensing observations, oceanographic campaign data and physical modeling simulations are used. These various dataset allow the multidisciplinary view required to understand the interactions between climate and Mediterranean marine ecosystems. The first step of our study has consisted in a statistical selection of a set of crucial environmental factors to propose the most parsimonious biogeographical approach that allows detecting the main oceanographic structure of the Mediterranean Sea. Second, based on the identified set of environmental parameters, both non-hierarchical and hierarchical clustering algorithms have been tested. Outputs from each methodology are then inter-compared to propose a robust map of the biotopes (unique range of environmental parameters) of the area. Each biotope was then modeled using a non parametric environmental niche method to infer a dynamic biogeochemical partition. Last, the seasonal, inter annual and long term spatial changes of each biogeochemical regions were investigated. The future of this work will be to perform a second partition to subdivide the biogeochemical regions according to biotic features of the Mediterranean Sea (ecoregions). This second level of division will thus be used as a geographical framework to identify ecosystems that have been altered by human activities (i.e. pollution, fishery, invasive species) for the European project PERSEUS (Protecting EuRopean Seas and borders through the intelligence US of surveillance) and the French program MERMEX (Marine Ecosystems Response in the Mediterranean Experiment).

  13. Cyclic biogeochemical processes and nitrogen fate beneath a subtropical stormwater infiltration basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P.

    2012-01-01

    A stormwater infiltration basin in north–central Florida, USA, was monitored from 2007 through 2008 to identify subsurface biogeochemical processes, with emphasis on N cycling, under the highly variable hydrologic conditions common in humid, subtropical climates. Cyclic variations in biogeochemical processes generally coincided with wet and dry hydrologic conditions. Oxidizing conditions in the subsurface persisted for about one month or less at the beginning of wet periods with dissolved O2 and NO3- showing similar temporal patterns. Reducing conditions in the subsurface evolved during prolonged flooding of the basin. At about the same time O2 and NO3- reduction concluded, Mn, Fe and SO42- reduction began, with the onset of methanogenesis one month later. Reducing conditions persisted up to six months, continuing into subsequent dry periods until the next major oxidizing infiltration event. Evidence of denitrification in shallow groundwater at the site is supported by median NO3-–N less than 0.016 mg L-1, excess N2 up to 3 mg L-1 progressively enriched in ?15N during prolonged basin flooding, and isotopically heavy ?15N and ?18O of NO3- (up to 25‰ and 15‰, respectively). Isotopic enrichment of newly infiltrated stormwater suggests denitrification was partially completed within two days. Soil and water chemistry data suggest that a biogeochemically active zone exists in the upper 1.4 m of soil, where organic carbon was the likely electron donor supplied by organic matter in soil solids or dissolved in infiltrating stormwater. The cyclic nature of reducing conditions effectively controlled the N cycle, switching N fate beneath the basin from NO3- leaching to reduction in the shallow saturated zone. Results can inform design of functionalized soil amendments that could replace the native soil in a stormwater infiltration basin and mitigate potential NO3- leaching to groundwater by replicating the biogeochemical conditions under the observed basin.

  14. A state-space Bayesian framework for estimating biogeochemical transformations using time-lapse geophysical data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Pride, S.; Li, L.; Steefel, C.; Slater, L.

    2009-04-15

    We develop a state-space Bayesian framework to combine time-lapse geophysical data with other types of information for quantitative estimation of biogeochemical parameters during bioremediation. We consider characteristics of end-products of biogeochemical transformations as state vectors, which evolve under constraints of local environments through evolution equations, and consider time-lapse geophysical data as available observations, which could be linked to the state vectors through petrophysical models. We estimate the state vectors and their associated unknown parameters over time using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling methods. To demonstrate the use of the state-space approach, we apply it to complex resistivity data collected during laboratory column biostimulation experiments that were poised to precipitate iron and zinc sulfides during sulfate reduction. We develop a petrophysical model based on sphere-shaped cells to link the sulfide precipitate properties to the time-lapse geophysical attributes and estimate volume fraction of the sulfide precipitates, fraction of the dispersed, sulfide-encrusted cells, mean radius of the aggregated clusters, and permeability over the course of the experiments. Results of the case study suggest that the developed state-space approach permits the use of geophysical datasets for providing quantitative estimates of end-product characteristics and hydrological feedbacks associated with biogeochemical transformations. Although tested here on laboratory column experiment datasets, the developed framework provides the foundation needed for quantitative field-scale estimation of biogeochemical parameters over space and time using direct, but often sparse wellbore data with indirect, but more spatially extensive geophysical datasets.

  15. Cyclic biogeochemical processes and nitrogen fate beneath a subtropical stormwater infiltration basin.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Andrew M; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P

    2012-05-15

    A stormwater infiltration basin in north-central Florida, USA, was monitored from 2007 through 2008 to identify subsurface biogeochemical processes, with emphasis on N cycling, under the highly variable hydrologic conditions common in humid, subtropical climates. Cyclic variations in biogeochemical processes generally coincided with wet and dry hydrologic conditions. Oxidizing conditions in the subsurface persisted for about one month or less at the beginning of wet periods with dissolved O(2) and NO(3)(-) showing similar temporal patterns. Reducing conditions in the subsurface evolved during prolonged flooding of the basin. At about the same time O(2) and NO(3)(-) reduction concluded, Mn, Fe and SO(4)(2-) reduction began, with the onset of methanogenesis one month later. Reducing conditions persisted up to six months, continuing into subsequent dry periods until the next major oxidizing infiltration event. Evidence of denitrification in shallow groundwater at the site is supported by median NO(3)(-)-N less than 0.016 mg L(-1), excess N(2) up to 3 mg L(-1) progressively enriched in ?(15)N during prolonged basin flooding, and isotopically heavy ?(15)N and ?(18)O of NO(3)(-) (up to 25‰ and 15‰, respectively). Isotopic enrichment of newly infiltrated stormwater suggests denitrification was partially completed within two days. Soil and water chemistry data suggest that a biogeochemically active zone exists in the upper 1.4m of soil, where organic carbon was the likely electron donor supplied by organic matter in soil solids or dissolved in infiltrating stormwater. The cyclic nature of reducing conditions effectively controlled the N cycle, switching N fate beneath the basin from NO(3)(-) leaching to reduction in the shallow saturated zone. Results can inform design of functionalized soil amendments that could replace the native soil in a stormwater infiltration basin and mitigate potential NO(3)(-) leaching to groundwater by replicating the biogeochemical conditions under the observed basin. PMID:22504424

  16. Defining Mediterranean and Black Sea Biogeochemical Subprovinces and Synthetic Ocean Indicators Using Mesoscale Oceanographic Features

    PubMed Central

    Nieblas, Anne-Elise; Drushka, Kyla; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Rossi, Vincent; Demarcq, Hervé; Dubroca, Laurent; Bonhommeau, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean and Black Seas are semi-enclosed basins characterized by high environmental variability and growing anthropogenic pressure. This has led to an increasing need for a bioregionalization of the oceanic environment at local and regional scales that can be used for managerial applications as a geographical reference. We aim to identify biogeochemical subprovinces within this domain, and develop synthetic indices of the key oceanographic dynamics of each subprovince to quantify baselines from which to assess variability and change. To do this, we compile a data set of 101 months (2002–2010) of a variety of both “classical” (i.e., sea surface temperature, surface chlorophyll-a, and bathymetry) and “mesoscale” (i.e., eddy kinetic energy, finite-size Lyapunov exponents, and surface frontal gradients) ocean features that we use to characterize the surface ocean variability. We employ a k-means clustering algorithm to objectively define biogeochemical subprovinces based on classical features, and, for the first time, on mesoscale features, and on a combination of both classical and mesoscale features. Principal components analysis is then performed on the oceanographic variables to define integrative indices to monitor the environmental changes within each resultant subprovince at monthly resolutions. Using both the classical and mesoscale features, we find five biogeochemical subprovinces for the Mediterranean and Black Seas. Interestingly, the use of mesoscale variables contributes highly in the delineation of the open ocean. The first axis of the principal component analysis is explained primarily by classical ocean features and the second axis is explained by mesoscale features. Biogeochemical subprovinces identified by the present study can be useful within the European management framework as an objective geographical framework of the Mediterranean and Black Seas, and the synthetic ocean indicators developed here can be used to monitor variability and long-term change. PMID:25360783

  17. Investigation of Biogeochemical Functional Proxies in Headwater Streams Across a Range of Channel and Catchment Alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Jacob F.; Summers, Elizabeth A.; Noble, Chris V.; White, John R.; DeLaune, Ronald D.

    2014-03-01

    Historically, headwater streams received limited protection and were subjected to extensive alteration from logging, farming, mining, and development activities. Despite these alterations, headwater streams provide essential ecological functions. This study examines proxy measures of biogeochemical function across a range of catchment alterations by tracking nutrient cycling (i.e., inputs, processing, and stream loading) with leaf litter fall, leaf litter decomposition, and water quality parameters. Nutrient input and processing remained highest in second growth forests (the least altered areas within the region), while recently altered locations transported higher loads of nutrients, sediments, and conductivity. Biogeochemical functional proxies of C and N input and processing significantly, positively correlated with rapid assessment results (Pearson coefficient = 0.67-0.81; P = 0.002-0.016). Additionally, stream loading equations demonstrate that N and P transport, sediment, and specific conductivity negatively correlated with rapid assessment scores (Pearson coefficient = 0.56-0.81; P = 0.002-0.048). The observed increase in stream loading with lower rapid assessment scores indicates that catchment alterations impact stream chemistry and that rapid assessments provide useful proxy measures of function in headwater ecosystems. Significant differences in nutrient processing, stream loading, water quality, and rapid assessment results were also observed between recently altered (e.g., mined) headwater streams and older forested catchments (Mann-Whitney U = 24; P = 0.01-0.024). Findings demonstrate that biogeochemical function is reduced in altered catchments, and rapid assessment scores respond to a combination of alteration type and recovery time. An analysis examining time and economic requirements of proxy measurements highlights the benefits of rapid assessment methods in evaluating biogeochemical functions.

  18. Investigation of biogeochemical functional proxies in headwater streams across a range of channel and catchment alterations.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Jacob F; Summers, Elizabeth A; Noble, Chris V; White, John R; DeLaune, Ronald D

    2014-03-01

    Historically, headwater streams received limited protection and were subjected to extensive alteration from logging, farming, mining, and development activities. Despite these alterations, headwater streams provide essential ecological functions. This study examines proxy measures of biogeochemical function across a range of catchment alterations by tracking nutrient cycling (i.e., inputs, processing, and stream loading) with leaf litter fall, leaf litter decomposition, and water quality parameters. Nutrient input and processing remained highest in second growth forests (the least altered areas within the region), while recently altered locations transported higher loads of nutrients, sediments, and conductivity. Biogeochemical functional proxies of C and N input and processing significantly, positively correlated with rapid assessment results (Pearson coefficient = 0.67-0.81; P = 0.002-0.016). Additionally, stream loading equations demonstrate that N and P transport, sediment, and specific conductivity negatively correlated with rapid assessment scores (Pearson coefficient = 0.56-0.81; P = 0.002-0.048). The observed increase in stream loading with lower rapid assessment scores indicates that catchment alterations impact stream chemistry and that rapid assessments provide useful proxy measures of function in headwater ecosystems. Significant differences in nutrient processing, stream loading, water quality, and rapid assessment results were also observed between recently altered (e.g., mined) headwater streams and older forested catchments (Mann-Whitney U = 24; P = 0.01-0.024). Findings demonstrate that biogeochemical function is reduced in altered catchments, and rapid assessment scores respond to a combination of alteration type and recovery time. An analysis examining time and economic requirements of proxy measurements highlights the benefits of rapid assessment methods in evaluating biogeochemical functions. PMID:24310643

  19. Cyclic biogeochemical processes and nitrogen fate beneath a subtropical stormwater infiltration basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P.

    2012-05-01

    A stormwater infiltration basin in north-central Florida, USA, was monitored from 2007 through 2008 to identify subsurface biogeochemical processes, with emphasis on N cycling, under the highly variable hydrologic conditions common in humid, subtropical climates. Cyclic variations in biogeochemical processes generally coincided with wet and dry hydrologic conditions. Oxidizing conditions in the subsurface persisted for about one month or less at the beginning of wet periods with dissolved O2 and NO3- showing similar temporal patterns. Reducing conditions in the subsurface evolved during prolonged flooding of the basin. At about the same time O2 and NO3- reduction concluded, Mn, Fe and SO42 - reduction began, with the onset of methanogenesis one month later. Reducing conditions persisted up to six months, continuing into subsequent dry periods until the next major oxidizing infiltration event. Evidence of denitrification in shallow groundwater at the site is supported by median NO3--N less than 0.016 mg L- 1, excess N2 up to 3 mg L- 1 progressively enriched in ?15N during prolonged basin flooding, and isotopically heavy ?15N and ?18O of NO3- (up to 25‰ and 15‰, respectively). Isotopic enrichment of newly infiltrated stormwater suggests denitrification was partially completed within two days. Soil and water chemistry data suggest that a biogeochemically active zone exists in the upper 1.4 m of soil, where organic carbon was the likely electron donor supplied by organic matter in soil solids or dissolved in infiltrating stormwater. The cyclic nature of reducing conditions effectively controlled the N cycle, switching N fate beneath the basin from NO3- leaching to reduction in the shallow saturated zone. Results can inform design of functionalized soil amendments that could replace the native soil in a stormwater infiltration basin and mitigate potential NO3- leaching to groundwater by replicating the biogeochemical conditions under the observed basin.

  20. Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan R. Lloyd

    2009-02-03

    The objective of this research program was to take a highly multidisciplinary approach to define the biogeochemical factors that control technetium (Tc) mobility in FRC sediments. The aim was to use batch and column studies to probe the biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC. Background sediment samples from Area 2 (pH 6.5, low nitrate, low {sup 99}Tc) and Area 3 (pH 3.5, high nitrate, relatively high {sup 99}Tc) of the FRC were selected (http://www.esd.ornl.gov/nabirfrc). For the batch experiments, sediments were mixed with simulated groundwater, modeled on chemical constituents of FRC waters and supplemented with {sup 99}Tc(VII), both with and without added electron donor (acetate). The solubility of the Tc was monitored, alongside other biogeochemical markers (nitrate, nitrite, Fe(II), sulfate, acetate, pH, Eh) as the 'microcosms' aged. At key points, the microbial communities were also profiled using both cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques, and results correlated with the geochemical conditions in the sediments. The mineral phases present in the sediments were also characterized, and the solid phase associations of the Tc determined using sequential extraction and synchrotron techniques. In addition to the batch sediment experiments, where discrete microbial communities with the potential to reduce and precipitate {sup 99}Tc will be separated in time, we also developed column experiments where biogeochemical processes were spatially separated. Experiments were conducted both with and without amendments proposed to stimulate radionuclide immobilization (e.g. the addition of acetate as an electron donor for metal reduction), and were also planned with and without competing anions at high concentration (e.g. nitrate, with columns containing Area 3 sediments). When the columns had stabilized, as determined by chemical analysis of the effluents, we used a spike of the short-lived gamma emitter {sup 99m}Tc (50-200 MBq; half life 6 hours) and its mobility was monitored using a {gamma}-camera. Incorporation of low concentrations of the long-lived 99Tc gave a tracer that can be followed by scintillation counting, should the metastable form of the radionuclide decay to below detection limits before the end of the experiment (complete immobilization or loss of the Tc from the column). After the Tc was reduced and immobilized, or passed through the system, the columns were dismantled carefully in an anaerobic cabinet and the pore water geochemistry and mineralogy of the columns profiled. Microbial community analysis was determined, again using molecular and culture-dependent techniques. Experimental results were also modeled using an established coupled speciation and transport code, to develop a predictive tool for the mobility of Tc in FRC sediments. From this multidisciplinary approach, we hoped to obtain detailed information on the microorganisms that control the biogeochemical cycling of key elements at the FRC, and we would also be able to determine the key factors that control the mobility of Tc at environmentally relevant concentrations at this site.

  1. Tracer-based assessment of the origin and biogeochemical transformation of a cyclonic eddy in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian P.; Hansell, Dennis A.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Bates, Nicholas R.; Johnson, Rodney J.

    2008-10-01

    Mechanisms of nutrient supply in oligotrophic ocean systems remain inadequately understood and quantified. In the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, for example, the observed rates of new production are apparently not balanced by nutrient supply via vertical mixing. Mesoscale eddies have been hypothesized as a mechanism for vertical nutrient pumping into the euphotic zone, but the full range and magnitude of biogeochemical impacts by eddies remain uncertain. We evaluated a cyclonic eddy located near Bermuda for its effect on water column biogeochemistry. In the density range ?? 26.1 to 26.7, an eddy core with anomalous salinity, temperature, and biogeochemical properties was observed, suggesting that the eddy was not formed with local water (i.e., not formed of the waters surrounding the eddy at the time of observations), hence complicating efforts to quantify biogeochemical processes in the eddy. We combined conservative hydrographic tracers (density versus potential temperature and salinity) and quasi-conservative biogeochemical tracers (density versus NO, PO, and total organic carbon) to propose the origin of the eddy core water to have been several hundred kilometers to the southeast of the eddy location at sampling. By comparing the observed eddy core's biogeochemical properties with those near the proposed origin, we estimate the net changes in biogeochemical properties that occurred. A conservative estimate of export was 0.5 ± 0.34 mol N m-2 via sinking particles, with export occurring prior to our period of direct observation. Our results suggest that biogeochemical signals induced by mesoscale eddies could survive to be transported over long distances, thus providing a mechanism for lateral fluxes of nutrients and AOU (apparent oxygen utilization). Given that the proposed source area of this eddy is relatively broad, and the eddy-mixing history before our sampling is unknown, uncertainty remains in our assessment of the true biogeochemical impact of mesoscale eddies in the gyre.

  2. A framework to assess biogeochemical response to ecosystem disturbance using nutrient partitioning ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kranabetter, J. Marty; McLauchlan, Kendra K.; Enders, Sara K.; Fraterrigo, Jennifer M.; Higuera, Philip E.; Morris, Jesse L.; Rastetter, Edward B.; Barnes, Rebecca; Buma, Brian; Gavin, Daniel G.; Gerhart, Laci M.; Gillson, Lindsey; Hietz, Peter; Mack, Michelle C.; McNeil, Brenden; Perakis, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Disturbances affect almost all terrestrial ecosystems, but it has been difficult to identify general principles regarding these influences. To improve our understanding of the long-term consequences of disturbance on terrestrial ecosystems, we present a conceptual framework that analyzes disturbances by their biogeochemical impacts. We posit that the ratio of soil and plant nutrient stocks in mature ecosystems represents a characteristic site property. Focusing on nitrogen (N), we hypothesize that this partitioning ratio (soil N: plant N) will undergo a predictable trajectory after disturbance. We investigate the nature of this partitioning ratio with three approaches: (1) nutrient stock data from forested ecosystems in North America, (2) a process-based ecosystem model, and (3) conceptual shifts in site nutrient availability with altered disturbance frequency. Partitioning ratios could be applied to a variety of ecosystems and successional states, allowing for improved temporal scaling of disturbance events. The generally short-term empirical evidence for recovery trajectories of nutrient stocks and partitioning ratios suggests two areas for future research. First, we need to recognize and quantify how disturbance effects can be accreting or depleting, depending on whether their net effect is to increase or decrease ecosystem nutrient stocks. Second, we need to test how altered disturbance frequencies from the present state may be constructive or destructive in their effects on biogeochemical cycling and nutrient availability. Long-term studies, with repeated sampling of soils and vegetation, will be essential in further developing this framework of biogeochemical response to disturbance.

  3. Biogeochemical processes on tree islands in the greater everglades: Initiating a new paradigm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetzel, P.R.; Sklar, F.H.; Coronado, C.A.; Troxler, T.G.; Krupa, S.L.; Sullivan, P.L.; Ewe, S.; Price, R.M.; Newman, S.; Orem, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientists' understanding of the role of tree islands in the Everglades has evolved from a plant community of minor biogeochemical importance to a plant community recognized as the driving force for localized phosphorus accumulation within the landscape. Results from this review suggest that tree transpiration, nutrient infiltration from the soil surface, and groundwater flow create a soil zone of confluence where nutrients and salts accumulate under the head of a tree island during dry periods. Results also suggest accumulated salts and nutrients are flushed downstream by regional water flows during wet periods. That trees modulate their environment to create biogeochemical hot spots and strong nutrient gradients is a significant ecological paradigm shift in the understanding of the biogeochemical processes in the Everglades. In terms of island sustainability, this new paradigm suggests the need for distinct dry-wet cycles as well as a hydrologic regime that supports tree survival. Restoration of historic tree islands needs further investigation but the creation of functional tree islands is promising. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  4. The Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD): A TOPMODEL application developed within the Modular Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, R. M.; Wolock, D. M.; Linard, J. I.; Wieczorek, M. E.

    2004-12-01

    Process-based flow and transport simulation models can help increase understanding of how hydrologic flow paths affect biogeochemical mixing and reactions in watersheds. This presentation describes the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD), a new model designed to simulate water and chemical transport in both pristine and agricultural watersheds. WEBMOD simulates streamflow using TOPMODEL algorithms and also simulates irrigation, canopy interception, snowpack, and tile-drain flow; these are important processes for successful multi-year simulations of agricultural watersheds. In addition, the hydrologic components of the model are linked to the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) geochemical model PHREEQC such that solute chemistry for the hillslopes and streams also are computed. Model development, execution, and calibration take place within the USGS Modular Modeling System. WEBMOD is being validated at ten research watersheds. Five of these watersheds are nearly pristine and comprise the USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) Program field sites: Loch Vale, Colorado; Trout Lake, Wisconsin; Sleepers River, Vermont; Panola Mountain, Georgia; and the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. The remaining five watersheds contain intensely cultivated fields being studied by USGS National Water Quality Assessment Program: Merced River, California; Granger Drain, Washington; Maple Creek, Nebraska; Sugar Creek, Indiana; and Morgan Creek, Delaware. Model calibration improved understanding of observed variations in soil moisture, solute concentrations, and stream discharge at the five WEBB watersheds and is now being set up to simulate the processes at the five agricultural watersheds that are now ending their first year of data collection.

  5. Global biogeochemical changes at both ends of the proterozoic: insights from phosphorites.

    PubMed

    Papineau, Dominic

    2010-03-01

    The distribution of major phosphate deposits in the Precambrian sedimentary rock record is restricted to periods that witnessed global biogeochemical changes, but the cause of this distribution is unclear. The oldest known phosphogenic event occurred around 2.0 Ga and was followed, after more than 1.3 billion years, by an even larger phosphogenic event in the Neoproterozoic. Phosphorites (phosphate-rich sedimentary rocks that contain more than 15% P(2)O(5)) preserve a unique record of seawater chemistry, biological activity, and oceanographic changes. In an attempt to emphasize the potentially crucial significance of phosphorites in the evolution of Proterozoic biogeochemical cycles, this contribution provides a review of some important Paleoproterozoic phosphate deposits and of models proposed for their origin. A new model is then presented for the spatial and temporal modes of occurrence of phosphorites along with possible connections to global changes at both ends of the Proterozoic. Central to the new model is that periods of atmospheric oxygenation may have been caused by globally elevated rates of primary productivity stimulated by high fluxes of phosphorus delivery to seawater as a result of increased chemical weathering of continental crust over geological timescales. The striking similarities in biogeochemical evolution between the Paleo- and Neoproterozoic are discussed in light of the two oldest major phosphogenic events and their possible relation to the stepwise rise of atmospheric oxygen that ultimately resulted in significant leaps in biological evolution. PMID:20105035

  6. Biogeochemical hotspots within forested landscapes: quantifying the functional role of vernal pools in ecosystem processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, K. A.; Rancatti, R.; Calhoun, A.; Hunter, M.

    2013-12-01

    Biogeochemical hotspots are characterized as small areas within a landscape matrix that show comparably high chemical reaction rates relative to surrounding areas. For small, natural features to generate biogeochemical hotspots within a landscape, their contribution to nutrient dynamics must be significant relative to nutrient demand of the surrounding landscape. In northeastern forests in the US, vernal pools are abundant, small features that typically fill in spring with snow melt and precipitation and dry by the end of the summer. Ephemeral flooding alters soil moisture and the depth of the oxic/anoxic boundary in the soil, which may affect leaf-litter decomposition rates and nutrient dynamics including denitrification. Additionally, pool-breeding organisms may influence nutrient dynamics via consumer-driven nutrient remineralization. We studied the effects of vernal pools on rates of leaf-litter decomposition and denitrification in forested habitats in Maine. Our results indicate leaf-litter decomposition and denitrification rates in submerged habitats of vernal pools were greater than in upland forest habitat. Our data also suggest pool-breeding organisms, such as wood frogs, may play an important role in nutrient dynamics within vernal pools. Together, the results suggest vernal pools may function as biogeochemical hotspots within forested landscapes.

  7. Characterization of eco-hydraulic habitats for examining biogeochemical processes in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhillips, L. E.; O'Connor, B. L.; Harvey, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    Spatial variability in biogeochemical reaction rates in streams is often attributed to sediment characteristics such as particle size, organic material content, and biota attached to or embedded within the sediments. Also important in controlling biogeochemical reaction rates are hydraulic conditions, which influence mass transfer of reactants from the stream to the bed, as well as hyporheic exchange within near-surface sediments. This combination of physical and ecological variables has the potential to create habitats that are unique not only in sediment texture but also in their biogeochemical processes and metabolism rates. In this study, we examine the two-dimensional (2D) variability of these habitats in an agricultural river in central Iowa. The streambed substratum was assessed using a grid-based survey identifying dominant particle size classes, as well as aerial coverage of green algae, benthic organic material, and coarse woody debris. Hydraulic conditions were quantified using a calibrated 2D model, and hyporheic exchange was assessed using a scaling relationship based on sediment and hydraulic characteristics. Point-metabolism rates were inferred from measured sediment dissolved oxygen profiles using an effective diffusion model and compared to traditional whole-stream measurements of metabolism. The 185 m study reach had contrasting geomorphologic and hydraulic characteristics in the upstream and downstream portions of an otherwise relatively straight run of a meandering river. The upstream portion contained a large central gravel bar (50 m in length) flanked by riffle-run segments and the downstream portion contained a deeper, fairly uniform channel cross-section. While relatively high flow velocities and gravel sediments were characteristic of the study river, the upstream island bar separated channels that differed with sandy gravels on one side and cobbley gravels on the other. Additionally, green algae was almost exclusively found in riffle portions of the cobbley gravel channel sediments while fine benthic organic material was concentrated at channel margins, regardless of the underlying sediments. A high degree of spatial variability in hyporheic exchange potential was the result of the complex 2D nature of topography and hydraulics. However, sediment texture classifications did a reasonable job in characterizing variability in hyporheic exchange potential because sediment texture mapping incorporates qualitative aspects of bed shear stress and hydraulic conductivity that control hyporheic exchange. Together these variables greatly influenced point-metabolism measurements in different sediment texture habitats separated by only 1 to 2 m. Results from this study suggest that spatial variability and complex interactions between geomorphology, hydraulics, and biological communities generate eco-hydraulic habitats that control variability in biogeochemical processes. The processes controlling variability are highly two-dimensional in nature and are not often accounted for in traditional one-dimensional analysis approaches of biogeochemical processes.

  8. Intra- versus inter-site macroscale variation in biogeochemical properties along a paddy soil chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Niggemann, C.; Bannert, A.; Schloter, M.; Lehndorff, E.; Schwark, L.

    2012-03-01

    In order to assess the intrinsic heterogeneity of paddy soils, a set of biogeochemical soil parameters was investigated in five field replicates of seven paddy fields (50, 100, 300, 500, 700, 1000, and 2000 yr of wetland rice cultivation), one flooded paddy nursery, one tidal wetland (TW), and one freshwater site (FW) from a coastal area at Hangzhou Bay, Zhejiang Province, China. All soils evolved from a marine tidal flat substrate due to land reclamation. The biogeochemical parameters based on their properties were differentiated into (i) a group behaving conservatively (TC, TOC, TN, TS, magnetic susceptibility, soil lightness and colour parameters, ?13C, ?15N, lipids and n-alkanes) and (ii) one encompassing more labile properties or fast cycling components (Nmic, Cmic, nitrate, ammonium, DON and DOC). The macroscale heterogeneity in paddy soils was assessed by evaluating intra- versus inter-site spatial variability of biogeochemical properties using statistical data analysis (descriptive, explorative and non-parametric). Results show that the intrinsic heterogeneity of paddy soil organic and minerogenic components per field is smaller than between study sites. The coefficient of variation (CV) values of conservative parameters varied in a low range (10% to 20%), decreasing from younger towards older paddy soils. This indicates a declining variability of soil biogeochemical properties in longer used cropping sites according to progress in soil evolution. A generally higher variation of CV values (>20-40%) observed for labile parameters implies a need for substantially higher sampling frequency when investigating these as compared to more conservative parameters. Since the representativeness of the sampling strategy could be sufficiently demonstrated, an investigation of long-term carbon accumulation/sequestration trends in topsoils of the 2000 yr paddy chronosequence under wetland rice cultivation restricted was conducted. Observations cannot be extrapolated to global scale but with coastal paddy fields developed on marine tidal flat substrates after land reclamation in the Zhejiang Province represent a small fraction (<1%) of the total rice cropping area. The evolutionary trend showed that the biogeochemical signatures characteristic for paddy soils were fully developed in less than 300 yr since onset of wetland rice cultivation. A six-fold increase of topsoil TOC suggests a substantial gain in CO2 sequestration potential when marine tidal wetland substrate developed to 2000 yr old paddy soil.

  9. Intra-versus inter-site macroscale variation in biogeochemical properties along a paddy soil chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Niggemann, C.; Bannert, A.; Schloter, M.; Lehndorff, E.; Schwark, L.

    2011-10-01

    In order to assess the intrinsic heterogeneity of paddy soils, a set of biogeochemical soil parameters was investigated in five field replicates of seven paddy fields (50, 100, 300, 500, 700, 1000, and 2000 yr of wetland rice cultivation), one flooded paddy nursery, one tidal wetland (TW), and one freshwater site (FW) from a coastal area at Hangzhou Bay, Zhejiang Province, China. All soils evolved from a marine tidal flat substrate due to land reclamation. The biogeochemical parameters based on their properties were differentiated into (i) a group behaving conservatively (TC, TOC, TN, TS, magnetic susceptibility, soil lightness and colour parameters, ?13C, ?15N, lipids and n-alkanes) and (ii) one encompassing more labile properties or fast cycling components (Nmic, Cmic, nitrate, ammonium, DON and DOC). The macroscale heterogeneity in paddy soils was assessed by evaluating intra- versus inter-site spatial variability of biogeochemical properties using statistical data analysis (descriptive, explorative and non-parametric). Results show that the intrinsic heterogeneity of paddy soil organic and minerogenic components per field is smaller than between study sites. The coefficient of variation (CV) values of conservative parameters varied in a low range (10 % to 20 %), decreasing from younger towards older paddy soils. This indicates a declining variability of soil biogeochemical properties in longer used cropping sites according to progress in soil evolution. A generally higher variation of CV values (>20-40 %) observed for labile parameters implies a need for substantially higher sampling frequency when investigating these as compared to more conservative parameters. Since the representativeness of the sampling strategy could be sufficiently demonstrated, an investigation of long-term carbon accumulation/sequestration trends in topsoils of the 2000 year paddy chronosequence under wetland rice cultivation was conducted. The evolutionary trend showed that the biogeochemical signatures characteristic for paddy soils were fully developed in less than 300 yr since onset of wetland rice cultivation. A six-fold increase of topsoil TOC suggests a substantial gain in CO2 sequestration potential when marine tidal wetland substrate developed to 2000 year old paddy soil.

  10. Projecting the long-term biogeochemical impacts of a diverse agroforestry system in the Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolz, K. J.; DeLucia, E. H.; Paul, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    Annual, monoculture cropping systems have become the standard agricultural model in the Midwestern US. Unintended consequences of these systems include surface and groundwater pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, loss of biodiversity, and soil erosion. Diverse agroforestry (DA) systems dominated by fruit and nut trees/shrubs have been proposed as an agricultural model for the Midwestern US that can restore ecosystem services while simultaneously providing economically viable and industrially relevant staple food crops. A DA system including six species of fruit and nut crops was established on long-time conventional agricultural land at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2012, with the conventional corn-soybean rotation (CSR) as a control. Initial field measurements of the nitrogen and water cycles during the first two years of transition have indicated a significant decrease in N losses and modification of the seasonal evapotranspiration (ET) pattern. While these early results suggest that the land use transition from CSR to DA can have positive biogeochemical consequences, models must be utilized to make long-term biogeochemical projections in agroforestry systems. Initial field measurements of plant phenology, net N2O flux, nitrate leaching, soil respiration, and soil moisture were used to parameterize the DA system within the DayCENT biogeochemical model as the "savanna" ecosystem type. The model was validated with an independent subset of field measurements and then run to project biogeochemical cycling in the DA system for 25 years past establishment. Model results show that N losses via N2O emission or nitrate leaching reach a minimum within the first 5 years and then maintain this tight cycle into the future. While early ET field measurements revealed similar magnitudes between the DA and CSR systems, modeled ET continued to increase for the DA system throughout the projected time since the trees would continue to grow larger. These modeling results illustrate the potential long-term biogeochemical impacts that can be generated by a land-use transition to a diverse agroforestry system in the Midwest.

  11. Global response of the terrestrial biosphere to CO2 and climate change using a coupled climate-carbon cycle model

    E-print Network

    Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    feedback in the climate-carbon cycle system. INDEX TERMS: 0315 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Impact phenomena; KEYWORDS: climate change impact, terrestrial carbon cycle Citation: Berthelot, M., P of the terrestrial biosphere to CO2 and climate change using a coupled climate-carbon cycle model, Global Biogeochem

  12. Modeling the coupling of ocean ecology and biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Follows, M. J.; Bragg, J. G.

    2009-04-01

    We examine the interplay between ecology and biogeochemical cycles in the context of a global three-dimensional ocean model where self-assembling phytoplankton communities emerge from a wide set of potentially viable cell types. The simulations have clear and plausible organization of the emergent community structure by the physical regime: Strongly seasonal, high nutrient regimes are dominated by fast-growing bloom specialists, while stable, low-seasonality regimes are dominated by organisms that can grow at low nutrient concentrations, and are suited to oligotrophic conditions. In the latter regions, resource competition theory is capable of predicting not only the competitive outcome amongst organisms, but also the ecosystems control on the ambient nutrients. Sensitivity experiments clearly indicate the strong coupling of ecology and biogeochemical cycles: Changes to the phytoplankton physiology had a predictable effect on nutrient concentrations. We investigate how inter-annual variability and potential future changes to the ocean impact the biogeographical organization in our model.

  13. Multi-Ecosystem Assessment of Mercury Bioaccumulation in Fishes: Habitat, Landscape, and Biogeochemical Drivers of Fish Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagles-Smith, C.; Ackerman, J.; Herring, G.; Willacker, J.; Flanagan, C.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a globally distributed contaminant that threatens ecosystem health across aquatic environments. The complexity of the Hg cycle and its primary drivers, coupled with dynamic food web processes that govern biomagnification, result in marked spatial variability in Hg bioaccumulation across aquatic ecosystems. However, it is unclear if patterns of bioaccumulation are consistent in magnitude and direction across ecosystem types. We synthesized data from several studies spanning more than 200 individual sites, comprising four distinct ecosystem classifications (estuaries, sub-alpine lakes, rivers, and managed wetlands). Within each ecosystem, we compared fish Hg concentrations among replicated sub-habitats and also evaluated the influence of land use, landscape composition, and biogeochemical drivers on fish Hg concentrations. We found substantial variability in fish Hg concentrations among adjacent sub-habitats within ecosystems. In estuarine environments, fish Hg concentrations were 7.4x higher in seasonal-saline wetlands than adjacent tidal wetland habitats. In riverine alcoves, preliminary data suggest that fish Hg concentrations were 1.5x higher than in fishes from paired mainstem river habitat. Among managed wetland habitats, fish Hg concentrations in rice fields were 2x higher than those in managed seasonal wetlands that were subjected to identical wetting and drying patterns. Across ecosystems, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in surface waters were consistently correlated with fish Hg concentrations, highlighting its importance in Hg methylation and transport processes. Yet, the strength and direction of the relationships varied among habitat types. For example, fish Hg concentrations were positively correlated with DOC concentrations in riverine environments, whereas we found a negative correlation in alpine lakes. Instead, the most important determinant of fish Hg concentrations in alpine lakes was conifer tree density within a lake's catchment, resulting in a 4x increase in fish Hg concentration in lakes with the lowest to the highest catchment conifer tree density. Together, this integrated ecosystem analysis highlights the importance of understanding small-scale variation in bioaccumulation processes in order to better predict Hg risk.

  14. Nitrous oxide emissions from cropland: a procedure for calibrating the DayCent biogeochemical model using inverse modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rafique, Rashad; Fienen, Michael N.; Parkin, Timothy B.; Anex, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    DayCent is a biogeochemical model of intermediate complexity widely used to simulate greenhouse gases (GHG), soil organic carbon and nutrients in crop, grassland, forest and savannah ecosystems. Although this model has been applied to a wide range of ecosystems, it is still typically parameterized through a traditional “trial and error” approach and has not been calibrated using statistical inverse modelling (i.e. algorithmic parameter estimation). The aim of this study is to establish and demonstrate a procedure for calibration of DayCent to improve estimation of GHG emissions. We coupled DayCent with the parameter estimation (PEST) software for inverse modelling. The PEST software can be used for calibration through regularized inversion as well as model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The DayCent model was analysed and calibrated using N2O flux data collected over 2 years at the Iowa State University Agronomy and Agricultural Engineering Research Farms, Boone, IA. Crop year 2003 data were used for model calibration and 2004 data were used for validation. The optimization of DayCent model parameters using PEST significantly reduced model residuals relative to the default DayCent parameter values. Parameter estimation improved the model performance by reducing the sum of weighted squared residual difference between measured and modelled outputs by up to 67 %. For the calibration period, simulation with the default model parameter values underestimated mean daily N2O flux by 98 %. After parameter estimation, the model underestimated the mean daily fluxes by 35 %. During the validation period, the calibrated model reduced sum of weighted squared residuals by 20 % relative to the default simulation. Sensitivity analysis performed provides important insights into the model structure providing guidance for model improvement.

  15. Evaluation of Boundless Biogeochemical Cycle through Development of Process-Based Eco-Hydrological and Biogeochemical Cycle Model to Incorporate Terrestrial-Aquatic Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, T.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Inland water might act as important transport pathway for continental biogeochemical cycle although its contribution has remained uncertain yet due to a paucity of data (Battin et al. 2009). The author has developed process-based National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model (Nakayama, 2008a-b, 2010, 2011a-b, 2012a-c, 2013; Nakayama and Fujita, 2010; Nakayama and Hashimoto, 2011; Nakayama and Shankman, 2013a-b; Nakayama and Watanabe, 2004, 2006, 2008a-b; Nakayama et al., 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012), which incorporates surface-groundwater interactions, includes up- and down-scaling processes between local-regional-global scales, and can simulate iteratively nonlinear feedback between hydrologic-geomorphic-ecological processes. Because NICE incorporates 3-D groundwater sub-model and expands from previous 1- or 2-D or steady state, the model can simulate the lateral transport pronounced at steeper-slope or riparian/floodplain with surface-groundwater connectivity. River discharge and groundwater level simulated by NICE agreed reasonably with those in previous researches (Niu et al., 2007; Fan et al., 2013) and extended to clarify lateral subsurface also has important role on global hydrologic cycle (Nakayama, 2011b; Nakayama and Shankman, 2013b) though the resolution was coarser. NICE was further developed to incorporate biogeochemical cycle including reaction between inorganic and organic carbons in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The missing role of carbon cycle simulated by NICE, for example, CO2 evasion from inland water (global total flux was estimated as about 1.0 PgC/yr), was relatively in good agreement in that estimated by empirical relation using previous pCO2 data (Aufdenkampe et al., 2011; Laruelle et al., 2013). The model would play important role in identification of greenhouse gas balance of the biosphere and spatio-temporal hot spots, and bridging gap between top-down and bottom-up approaches (Cole et al. 2007; Frei et al. 2012).

  16. MEDUSA-2.0: an intermediate complexity biogeochemical model of the marine carbon cycle for climate change and ocean acidification studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yool, A.; Popova, E. E.; Anderson, T. R.

    2013-10-01

    MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification) was developed as an "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model to study the biogeochemical response, and especially that of the so-called "biological pump", to anthropogenically driven change in the World Ocean (Yool et al., 2011). The base currency in this model was nitrogen from which fluxes of organic carbon, including export to the deep ocean, were calculated by invoking fixed C:N ratios in phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. However, due to anthropogenic activity, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) has significantly increased above its natural, inter-glacial background. As such, simulating and predicting the carbon cycle in the ocean in its entirety, including ventilation of CO2 with the atmosphere and the resulting impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, requires that both organic and inorganic carbon be afforded a more complete representation in the model specification. Here, we introduce MEDUSA-2.0, an expanded successor model which includes additional state variables for dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen and detritus carbon (permitting variable C:N in exported organic matter), as well as a simple benthic formulation and extended parameterizations of phytoplankton growth, calcification and detritus remineralisation. A full description of MEDUSA-2.0, including its additional functionality, is provided and a multi-decadal spin-up simulation (1860-2005) is performed. The biogeochemical performance of the model is evaluated using a diverse range of observational data, and MEDUSA-2.0 is assessed relative to comparable models using output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5).

  17. Modeling Active Layer and Permafrost Dynamics of Ice Wedge Polygon Dominated Arctic Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, J.; Bisht, G.; Liljedahl, A.; Mills, R. T.; Karra, S.; Painter, S. L.; Thornton, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost soils contains vast stock of frozen organic carbon. As warming climate accelerates the thaw of the permafrost, increasing amount of organic matter is exposed to respiration leading to release of carbon to the atmosphere in the form of CO2 and CH4 . Permafrost thermal dynamics play a key role influencing hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in these ecosystems. Large areas of Arctic landscape are covered by the patterned ground features created by repeated freezing and thawing of soil underlain by aerially continuous permafrost. These microtopographic features in the landscape controls the local surface-subsurface hydrology and thermal regimes through differential transport of heat and water. Study of these interacting thermal-hydrologic-biogeochemical in permafrost soils are further complicated by the complex topography and heterogeneity of subsurface. We have developed and applied a coupled multiscale-multiphase-multicomponent surface-subsurface flow and reactive transport model PFLOTRAN for modeling of thermal-hydrologic-biogeochemical processes in permafrost soils. We study the permafrost thermal dynamics, role of microtopography in local scale hydrology at the Department of Energy's Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE) - Arctic field sites near Barrow, Alaska. High resolution LiDAR data is used to represent the microtopography at sub-meter resolution in PFLOTRAN. Long term simulations have been conducted at the field sites informed by the observations from field and laboratory campaigns to study and understand the hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in these Arctic ecosystems.

  18. Seasonal ITCZ migration dynamically controls the location of the (sub)tropical Atlantic biogeochemical divide

    PubMed Central

    Schlosser, Christian; Klar, Jessica K.; Wake, Bronwyn D.; Snow, Joseph T.; Honey, David J.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Achterberg, Eric P.; Moore, C. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic nitrogen depletion restricts productivity in much of the low-latitude oceans, generating a selective advantage for diazotrophic organisms capable of fixing atmospheric dinitrogen (N2). However, the abundance and activity of diazotrophs can in turn be controlled by the availability of other potentially limiting nutrients, including phosphorus (P) and iron (Fe). Here we present high-resolution data (?0.3°) for dissolved iron, aluminum, and inorganic phosphorus that confirm the existence of a sharp north–south biogeochemical boundary in the surface nutrient concentrations of the (sub)tropical Atlantic Ocean. Combining satellite-based precipitation data with results from a previous study, we here demonstrate that wet deposition in the region of the intertropical convergence zone acts as the major dissolved iron source to surface waters. Moreover, corresponding observations of N2 fixation and the distribution of diazotrophic Trichodesmium spp. indicate that movement in the region of elevated dissolved iron as a result of the seasonal migration of the intertropical convergence zone drives a shift in the latitudinal distribution of diazotrophy and corresponding dissolved inorganic phosphorus depletion. These conclusions are consistent with the results of an idealized numerical model of the system. The boundary between the distinct biogeochemical systems of the (sub)tropical Atlantic thus appears to be defined by the diazotrophic response to spatial–temporal variability in external Fe inputs. Consequently, in addition to demonstrating a unique seasonal cycle forced by atmospheric nutrient inputs, we suggest that the underlying biogeochemical mechanisms would likely characterize the response of oligotrophic systems to altered environmental forcing over longer timescales. PMID:24367112

  19. Morphological, hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological changes and challenges in river restoration - the Thur River case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Luster, J.; Linde, N.; Perona, P.; Mitchell, E. A. D.; Barry, D. A.; Hollender, J.; Cirpka, O. A.; Schneider, P.; Vogt, T.; Radny, D.; Durisch-Kaiser, E.

    2014-06-01

    River restoration can enhance river dynamics, environmental heterogeneity and biodiversity, but the underlying processes governing the dynamic changes need to be understood to ensure that restoration projects meet their goals, and adverse effects are prevented. In particular, we need to comprehend how hydromorphological variability quantitatively relates to ecosystem functioning and services, biodiversity as well as ground- and surface water quality in restored river corridors. This involves (i) physical processes and structural properties, determining erosion and sedimentation, as well as solute and heat transport behavior in surface water and within the subsurface; (ii) biogeochemical processes and characteristics, including the turnover of nutrients and natural water constituents; and (iii) ecological processes and indicators related to biodiversity and ecological functioning. All these aspects are interlinked, requiring an interdisciplinary investigation approach. Here, we present an overview of the recently completed RECORD (REstored CORridor Dynamics) project in which we combined physical, chemical, and biological observations with modeling at a restored river corridor of the perialpine Thur River in Switzerland. Our results show that river restoration, beyond inducing morphologic changes that reshape the river bed and banks, triggered complex spatial patterns of bank infiltration, and affected habitat type, biotic communities and biogeochemical processes. We adopted an interdisciplinary approach of monitoring the continuing changes due to restoration measures to address the following questions: How stable is the morphological variability established by restoration? Does morphological variability guarantee an improvement in biodiversity? How does morphological variability affect biogeochemical transformations in the river corridor? What are some potential adverse effects of river restoration? How is river restoration influenced by catchment-scale hydraulics and which feedbacks exist on the large scale? Beyond summarizing the major results of individual studies within the project, we show that these overarching questions could only be addressed in an interdisciplinary framework.

  20. Biogeochemical characterization of a lithified paleosol: Implications for the interpretation of ancient Critical Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordt, Lee C.; Hallmark, Charles T.; Driese, Steven G.; Dworkin, Steven I.; Atchley, Stacy C.

    2012-06-01

    Modern soils are characterized by an array of physical, chemical, mineralogical, and biological laboratory analyses of samples taken from horizons of pedogenic profiles. In contrast, fossil soils (paleosols) are typically characterized from assays of whole-rock molecular oxides because of sample lithification where element sources are unconstrained. Here we for the first time subject a lithified paleosol to an array of modern soil analytical techniques and new pedotransfer functions, providing a glimpse into the colloidal world of an ancient Critical Zone as an analog to research conducted on a network of modern Critical Zones. This methodology provides a framework for decoding a previously unknown archive of terrestrial biogeochemical information at multiple temporal and spatial scales. Application to a paleosol within an early Paleocene Critical Zone reveals that many biogeochemical properties have been preserved since burial that are similar to modern clay-rich, Vertisols. The measured and calculated physical properties of this paleosol include clay content and mineralogy, bulk density and water retention, available water capacity, and coefficient of linear extensibility (shrink-swell potential). The chemical properties include cation exchange capacity, exchangeable cations, base saturation, and exchangeable sodium percentage. The solution properties electrical conductivity and pH seem reasonable, but are interpreted with less confidence because of their greater vulnerability to alteration from fluid flow. New pedotransfer functions to reconstruct pre-burial organic carbon and nitrogen contents provide invaluable information of organically-derived nutrient content. The sum of the measured properties of the early Paleocene paleosol in context of reconstructed regional environmental conditions indicate the presence of a mid-successional hardwood forest in a humid climate with high water holding capacity, high nutrient retention, and rapid flux of elements through biogeochemical cycling.

  1. Afforestation alters the composition of functional genes in soil and biogeochemical processes in South American grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Berthrong, Sean T; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Pineiro, Gervasio; Jackson, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    Soil microbes are highly diverse and control most soil biogeochemical reactions. We examined how microbial functional genes and biogeochemical pools responded to the altered chemical inputs accompanying land use change. We examined paired native grasslands and adjacent Eucalyptus plantations (previously grassland) in Uruguay, a region that lacked forests before European settlement. Along with measurements of soil carbon, nitrogen, and bacterial diversity, we analyzed functional genes using the GeoChip 2.0 microarray, which simultaneously quantified several thousand genes involved in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling. Plantations and grassland differed significantly in functional gene profiles, bacterial diversity, and biogeochemical pool sizes. Most grassland profiles were similar, but plantation profiles generally differed from those of grasslands due to differences in functional gene abundance across diverse taxa. Eucalypts decreased ammonification and N fixation functional genes by 11% and 7.9% (P < 0.01), which correlated with decreased microbial biomass N and more NH{sub 4}{sup +} in plantation soils. Chitinase abundance decreased 7.8% in plantations compared to levels in grassland (P = 0.017), and C polymer-degrading genes decreased by 1.5% overall (P < 0.05), which likely contributed to 54% (P < 0.05) more C in undecomposed extractable soil pools and 27% less microbial C (P < 0.01) in plantation soils. In general, afforestation altered the abundance of many microbial functional genes, corresponding with changes in soil biogeochemistry, in part through altered abundance of overall functional gene types rather than simply through changes in specific taxa. Such changes in microbial functional genes correspond with altered C and N storage and have implications for long-term productivity in these soils.

  2. Can spectroscopic analysis improve our understanding of biogeochemical processes in agricultural streams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieroza, Magdalena; Heathwaite, Ann Louise

    2015-04-01

    In agricultural catchments diffuse fluxes of nutrients, mainly nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from arable land and livestock are responsible for pollution of receiving waters and their eutrophication. Organic matter (OM) can play an important role in mediating a range of biogeochemical processes controlling diffuse pollution in streams and at their interface with surrounding land in the riparian and hyporheic zones. Thus, a holistic and simultaneous monitoring of N, P and OM fractions can help to improve our understanding of biogeochemical functioning of agricultural streams. In this study we build on intensive in situ monitoring of diffuse pollution in a small agricultural groundwater-fed stream in NW England carried out since 2009. The in situ monitoring unit captures high-frequency (15 minutes to hourly) responses of water quality parameters including total phosphorus, total reactive phosphorus and nitrate-nitrogen to changing flow conditions. For two consecutive hydrological years we have carried out additional spectroscopic water analyses to characterise organic matter components and their interactions with nutrient fractions. Automated and grab water samples have been analysed using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorbance and excitation-emission (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, a tryptophan sensor was trialled to capture in situ fluorescence dynamics. Our paper evaluates patterns in nutrient and OM responses to baseflow and storm flow conditions and provides an assessment of storage-related changes of automated samples and temperature and turbidity effects on in situ tryptophan measurements. The paper shows the value of spectroscopic measurements to understand biogeochemical and hydrological nutrient dynamics and quantifies analytical uncertainty associated with both laboratory-based and in situ spectroscopic measurements.

  3. Urbanization Impacts on Tree Canopies: The Unexplored Link Between Canopy Epiphytes and Pacific Northwest Forest Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, H.; Rosenstiel, T. N.

    2014-12-01

    Canopy-dwelling cryptogamic plants (i.e. lichens and mosses) serve important roles in biogeochemical cycles worldwide and are of particular importance to biogeochemical cycling in Pacific Northwest forests. Epiphytic lichens and mosses respond sensitively to both direct and indirect effects of global change, as evidenced by distinct changes in epiphyte community structure. Yet, few studies have explored how shifting epiphytic communities, resulting from changing climate and increasing air pollutant exposure, may greatly impact biogeochemical cycles of the forests they inhabit. We present the first study investigating how urbanization, as a proxy for global change, impacts epiphytic community structure and functional biodiversity and address the impending effects on Pacific Northwest forest biogeochemical cycles. We discuss the results of paired ground and arboreal epiphyte surveys across an urban to rural gradient in Portland, Oregon. Three research sites with varying distance (0km, 74km, and 109km) from urban center were surveyed and epiphytic biodiversity was described. Pronounced shifts in epiphyte community structure were observed downwind of the Portland metro region. These results suggest that the impacts of urbanization may have significant and surprisingly far-reaching impacts on forested ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest. The impacts of an altered ground and arboreal epiphytic community on Pacific Northwest forest biogeochemical processes will be discussed.

  4. BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING AND ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY OF PLUTONIUM RELEVANT TO LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP OF DOE SITES.

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCIS, A.J.; GILLOW, J.P.; DODGE, C.J.

    2006-11-16

    Pu is generally considered to be relatively immobile in the terrestrial environment, with the exception of transport via airborne and erosion mechanisms. More recently the transport of colloidal forms of Pu is being studied as a mobilization pathway from subsurface contaminated soils and sediments. The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for retardation of Pu transport.

  5. BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING AND ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY OF PLUTONIUM RELEVANT TO LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP OF DOE SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Dodge, C.J.

    2006-06-01

    Pu is generally considered to be relatively immobile in the terrestrial environment, with the exception of transport via airborne and erosion mechanisms. More recently the transport of colloidal forms of Pu is being studied as a mobilization pathway from subsurface contaminated soils and sediments. The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for retardation of Pu transport.

  6. Experiment explores inter-calibration of biogeochemical flux and nucleic acid measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhof, Lee; Corredor, Jorge; López, José; Paul, John; Bronk, Deborah; Cherrier, Jennifer

    In the ocean, biologically active elements undergo continuous cycling between the biota, the water column, and the atmosphere. Biological processes and the resultant air/sea exchange of atmospherically active gases are closely modulated by the availability and distribution of key elements. Such processes have been traditionally measured by incubation of representative microbial communities and tracking of end-product appearance or substrate disappearance. The recent advent of molecular techniques allows for the quantification of DNA and the RNA messenger responsible for the synthesis of the enzymes catalyzing specific biochemical processes. However, there is little information on how levels of gene expression for natural populations of micro-organisms correlate with biogeochemical processes.

  7. Biogeochemical study of termite mounds: a case study from Tummalapalle area of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Arveti, Nagaraju; Reginald, S; Kumar, K Sunil; Harinath, V; Sreedhar, Y

    2012-04-01

    Termite mounds are abundant components of Tummalapalle area of uranium mineralization of Cuddapah District of Andhra Pradesh, India. The systematic research has been carried out on the application of termite mound sampling to mineral exploration in this region. The distribution of chemical elements Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Co, Cr, Li, Rb, Sr, Ba, and U were studied both in termite soils and adjacent surface soils. Uranium accumulations were noticed in seven termite mounds ranging from 10 to 36 ppm. A biogeochemical parameter called "Biological Absorption Coefficient" of the termite mounds indicated the termite affected soils contained huge amounts of chemical elements than the adjacent soils. PMID:21594643

  8. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. II - Selective adsorption of mononucleotides on adsorbed polynucleotide templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the specific interaction step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The experimental system consisted of gypsum as the mineral to which an oligonucleotide template attaches (Poly-C or Poly-U) and (5-prime)-AMP, (5-prime)-GMP, (5-prime)-CMP and (5-prime)-UMP as the interacting biomonomers. When Poly-C or Poly-U were used as adsorbed templates, (5-prime)-GMP and (5-prime)-AMP, respectively, were observed to be the most strongly adsorbed species.

  9. Precipitation of Barite by Myxococcus xanthus: Possible Implications for the Biogeochemical Cycle of Barium

    PubMed Central

    González-Muñoz, Maria Teresa; Fernández-Luque, Belén; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisca; Ben Chekroun, Kaoutar; Arias, José María; Rodríguez-Gallego, Manuel; Martínez-Cañamero, Magdalena; de Linares, Concepción; Paytan, Adina

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial precipitation of barite (BaSO4) under laboratory conditions is reported for the first time. The bacterium Myxococcus xanthus was cultivated in a solid medium with a diluted solution of barium chloride. Crystallization occurred as a result of the presence of live bacteria and the bacterial metabolic activity. A phosphorous-rich amorphous phase preceded the more crystalline barite formation. These experiments may indicate the involvement of bacteria in the barium biogeochemical cycle, which is closely related to the carbon cycle. PMID:12957970

  10. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. I - formation of the template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the first adsorption step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The adsorption of Poly-C, Poly-U, Poly-A, Poly-G, and 5'-AMP, 5'-GMP, 5'-CMP and 5'-UMP onto gypsum was studied. It was found that under the conditions of the experiment, the polymers have a very high affinity for the mineral surface, while the monomers adsorb much less efficiently.

  11. Anthropogenic Signatures in Nutrient Loads Exported from Managed Catchments: Emergence of Effective Biogeochemical Stationarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, N. B.; Destouni, G.; Jawitz, J. W.; Thompson, S. E.; Rinaldo, A.; Sivapalan, M.; Rao, P. C.

    2010-12-01

    Examining the impacts of large-scale human modifications of watersheds (e.g., land-use intensification for food production; hydrologic modification though extensive tile-drainage, etc.) on the hydrologic and biogeochemical responses, and ecological impacts at various scales has been the focus of monitoring and modeling studies over the past two decades. Complex interactions between hydrology and biogeochemistry and the need to predict responses across scales has led to the development of detailed process based models that are computation intensive and calibration dependent. Despite the perceived complexity, our overall hypothesis is that human modifications and intensive management of these watersheds have led to more predictable responses, typical of an engineered, less-complex system rather than natural, complex systems. Thus, simpler and more efficient approaches can be used in these systems for predicting hydrologic and biogeochemical responses. It has been argued that human interferences and climate change may have contributed to the demise of hydrologic stationarity. However, our synthesis of observational data shows that anthropogenic impacts have also resulted in the emergence of effective biogeochemical stationarity in managed catchments. Long-term monitoring data from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB) and the Baltic Sea Drainage Basin (BSDB) reveal that inter-annual variations in loads (LT) for total-N (TN) and total-P (TP), and for geogenic constituents exported from a catchment are linearly correlated to discharge (QT), leading to temporal invariance of the flow-weighted concentration, Cf = (LT/QT). Emergence of this consistent pattern across diverse catchments is attributed to the anthropogenic legacy of accumulated nutrient sources generating memory, similar to ubiquitously present sources for geogenic constituents. These responses are characteristic of transport-limited systems. In contrast, in the absence of legacy sources in less-managed catchments, Cf values were highly variable and supply limited. We offer a theoretical explanation for the observed patterns at the event scale, and extend it to consider the stochastic nature of rainfall/flow patterns at annual scales. Our analysis suggests that (1) expected inter-annual variations in nutrient loads can be robustly predicted given discharge variations from hydro-climatic or anthropogenic forcing, and (2) water quality problems in receiving inland and coastal waters would persist until the accumulated storages of nutrients have been substantially depleted. The synthesis bears notable implications on catchment management and on global biogeochemical cycles.

  12. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  13. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    SciTech Connect

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

    2010-01-05

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

  14. Technical Note: Sampling and processing of mesocosm sediment trap material for quantitative biogeochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxhammer, T.; Bach, L. T.; Czerny, J.; Riebesell, U.

    2015-11-01

    Sediment traps are the most common tool to investigate vertical particle flux in the marine realm. However, the spatial decoupling between particle formation and collection often handicaps reconciliation of these two processes even within the euphotic zone. Pelagic mesocosms have the advantage of being closed systems and are therefore ideally suited to study how processes in natural plankton communities influence particle formation and settling in the ocean's surface. We therefore developed a protocol for efficient sample recovery and processing of quantitatively collected pelagic mesocosm sediment trap samples. Sedimented material was recovered by pumping it under gentle vacuum through a silicon tube to the sea surface. The particulate matter of these samples was subsequently concentrated by passive settling, centrifugation or flocculation with ferric chloride and we discuss the advantages of each approach. After concentration, samples were freeze-dried and ground with an easy to adapt procedure using standard lab equipment. Grain size of the finely ground samples ranges from fine to coarse silt (2-63 ?m), which guarantees homogeneity for representative subsampling, a widespread problem in sediment trap research. Subsamples of the ground material were perfectly suitable for a variety of biogeochemical measurements and even at very low particle fluxes we were able to get a detailed insight on various parameters characterizing the sinking particles. The methods and recommendations described here are a key improvement for sediment trap applications in mesocosms, as they facilitate processing of large amounts of samples and allow for high-quality biogeochemical flux data.

  15. Biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity as key drivers of ecosystem services provided by soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Rumpel, C.; Paustian, K.; Kuikman, P. J.; Elliott, J. A.; McDowell, R.; Griffiths, R. I.; Asakawa, S.; Bustamante, M.; House, J. I.; Sobocká, J.; Harper, R.; Pan, G.; West, P. C.; Gerber, J. S.; Clark, J. M.; Adhya, T.; Scholes, R. J.; Scholes, M. C.

    2015-06-01

    Soils play a pivotal role in major global biogeochemical cycles (carbon, nutrient and water), while hosting the largest diversity of organisms on land. Because of this, soils deliver fundamental ecosystem services, and management to change a soil process in support of one ecosystem service can either provide co-benefits to other services or can result in trade-offs. In this critical review, we report the state-of-the-art understanding concerning the biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity in soil, and relate these to the provisioning, regulating, supporting and cultural ecosystem services which they underpin. We then outline key knowledge gaps and research challenges, before providing recommendations for management activities to support the continued delivery of ecosystem services from soils. We conclude that although there are knowledge gaps that require further research, enough is known to start improving soils globally. The main challenge is in finding ways to share knowledge with soil managers and policy-makers, so that best-practice management can be implemented. A key element of this knowledge sharing must be in raising awareness of the multiple ecosystem services underpinned by soils, and the natural capital they provide. The International Year of Soils in 2015 presents the perfect opportunity to begin a step-change in how we harness scientific knowledge to bring about more sustainable use of soils for a secure global society.

  16. Influence of the phenols on the biogeochemical behavior of cadmium in the mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Jia, Hui; Yu, Junyi; Hong, Hualong; Yan, Chongling

    2016-02-01

    Phenols exert a great influence on the dynamic process of Cd in the soil-plant interface. We investigated the influence of phenols on the biogeochemical behavior of cadmium in the rhizosphere of Avicennia marina (Forsk) Vierh. All combinations of four levels of cadmium (0, 1, 2 and 4 mg/kg DW) and two levels of phenol (0 and 15 mg/kg DW) were included in the experimental design. We found that phenols facilitated increasing concentrations of exchangeable cadmium (Ex-Cd), acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and reactive solid-phase Fe (II) in sediments, and iron in plants, but inhibited Cd accumulation in iron plaque and roots. The concentrations of AVS and reactive solid-phase Fe (II) were significantly positively correlated with Cd treatment. As for the biogeochemical behavior of Cd in mangrove sediments, this research revealed that phenols facilitated activation and mobility of Cd. They disturbed the "source-sink" balance of Cd and turned it into a "source", whilst decreasing Cd absorption in A. marina. Additionally, phenols facilitated iron absorption in the plant and alleviated the Fe limit for mangrove plant growth. PMID:26598988

  17. Characterizing marine particles and their impact on biogeochemical cycles in the GEOTRACES program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert F.; Hayes, Christopher T.

    2015-04-01

    Trace elements and their isotopes (TEIs) are of priority interest in several subdisciplines of oceanography. For example, the vital role of trace element micronutrients in regulating the growth of marine organisms, which, in turn, may influence the structure and composition of marine ecosystems, is now well established (Morel and Price, 2003; Twining and Baines, 2013). Natural distributions of some TEIs have been severely impacted by anthropogenic emissions, leading to substantial perturbations of natural ocean inventories. Pb and Hg, for example, (Lamborg et al., 2002; Schaule and Patterson, 1981), may represent a significant threat to human food supply. Furthermore, much of our knowledge of past variability in the ocean environment, including the ocean's role in climate change, has been developed using TEI proxies archived in marine substrates such as sediments, corals and microfossils. Research in each of these areas relies on a comprehensive knowledge of the distributions of TEIs in the ocean, and on the sensitivity of these distributions to changing environmental conditions. With numerous processes affecting the regional supply and removal of TEIs in the ocean, a comprehensive understanding of the marine biogeochemical cycles of TEIs can be attained only by a global, coordinated, international effort. GEOTRACES, an international program designed to study the marine biogeochemical cycles of trace elements and their isotopes (Anderson et al., 2014; Henderson et al., 2007), aims to achieve these goals.

  18. Biogeochemical processes governing natural pyrite oxidation and release of acid metalliferous drainage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-ting; Li, Jin-tian; Chen, Lin-xing; Hua, Zheng-shuang; Huang, Li-nan; Liu, Jun; Xu, Bi-bo; Liao, Bin; Shu, Wen-sheng

    2014-05-20

    The oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals (principally pyrite) is responsible for the majority of acid metalliferous drainage from mine sites, which represents a significant environmental problem worldwide. Understanding the complex biogeochemical processes governing natural pyrite oxidation is critical not only for solving this problem but also for understanding the industrial bioleaching of sulfide minerals. To this end, we conducted a simulated experiment of natural pyrite oxidative dissolution. Pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial community revealed a distinct succession across three stages. At the early stage, a newly proposed genus, Tumebacillus (which can use sodium thiosulfate and sulfite as the sole electron donors), dominated the microbial community. At the midstage, Alicyclobacillus (the fifth most abundant genus at the early stage) became the most dominant genus, whereas Tumebacillus was still ranked as the second most abundant. At the final stage, the microbial community was dominated by Ferroplasma (the tenth most abundant genus at the early stage). Our geochemical and mineralogical analyses indicated that exchangeable heavy metals increased as the oxidation progressed and that some secondary sulfate minerals (including jarosite and magnesiocopiapite) were formed at the final stage of the oxidation sequence. Additionally, we propose a comprehensive model of biogeochemical processes governing the oxidation of sulfide minerals. PMID:24730689

  19. A Chloroflexi bacterium dechlorinates polychlorinated biphenyls in marine sediments under in situ-like biogeochemical conditions.

    PubMed

    Zanaroli, Giulio; Balloi, Annalisa; Negroni, Andrea; Borruso, Luigimaria; Daffonchio, Daniele; Fava, Fabio

    2012-03-30

    We investigated the reductive dechlorination of Aroclor 1254 PCBs by a coplanar PCB-dechlorinating microbial community enriched from an actual site contaminated marine sediment of the Venice lagoon in sterile slurry microcosms of the same sediment suspended in its site water, i.e., under biogeochemical conditions that closely mime those occurring in situ. The culture dechlorinated more than 75% of the penta- through hepta-chlorinated biphenyls to tri- and tetra-chlorinated congeners in 30 weeks. The dechlorination rate was reduced by the addition of H(2) and short chain fatty acids, which stimulated sulfate-reduction and methane production, and markedly increased by the presence of vancomycin or ampicillin. DGGE analysis of 16S rRNA genes on PCB-spiked and PCB-free cultures ruled out sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria and revealed the presence of a single Chloroflexi phylotype closely related to the uncultured bacteria m-1 and SF1 associated to PCB dechlorination. These findings suggest that a single dechlorinator is responsible for the observed extensive dechlorination of Aroclor 1254 and that a Chloroflexi species similar to those already detected in freshwater and estuarine contaminated sediments mediates PCB dechlorination in the marine sediment adopted in this study under biogeochemical conditions resembling those occurring in situ in the Brentella Canal of Venice Lagoon. PMID:22325634

  20. Environmental and biogeochemical changes following a decade's reclamation in the Dapeng (Tapong) Bay, southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, J.-J.; Huang, W.-C.; Yu, C.-S.

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the environmental and biogeochemical changes in Dapeng (formerly spelled Tapong) Bay, a semi-enclosed coastal lagoon in southwestern Taiwan, after two major reclamation works performed between 1999 and 2010. The lagoon was largely occupied by oyster culture racks and fish farming cages before December, 2002. Substantial external inputs of nutrients and organic carbon and the fairly long water exchange time (?) (10 ± 2 days) caused the lagoon to enter a eutrophic state, particularly at the inner lagoon, which directly received nutrient inputs. However, the entire lagoon showed autotrophic, and the estimated net ecosystem production (NEP) during the first stage was 5.8 mol C m-2 yr-1. After January, 2003, the aquaculture structures were completely removed, and the ? decreased to 6 ± 2 days. The annual mean concentrations of dissolved oxygen increased, and nutrients decreased substantially, likely due to improved water exchange, absence of feeding and increased biological utilization. The NEP increased 37% to 7.7 mol C m-2 yr-1 after structure removal. The second reclamation work beginning from July, 2006, focused on establishing artificial wetlands for wastewater treatment and on dredging bottom sediment. Although the ? did not change significantly (8 ± 3 days), substantial decreases in nutrient concentrations and dissolved organic matter continued. The NEP (14.3 mol C m-2 yr-1) increased 85% compared to that in the second stage. The data suggest that the reclamations substantially improved water quality, carbon and nutrient biogeochemical processes and budgets in this semi-enclosed ecosystem.

  1. Molecular organic tracers of biogeochemical processes in a saline meromictic lake (Ace Lake)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, S.; Rijpstra, W. I. C.; Kok, M.; Hopmans, E. C.; Summons, R. E.; Volkman, J. K.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2001-05-01

    The chemical structures, distribution and stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in a sediment core taken in meromictic Ace Lake (Antarctica) were analyzed to trace past biogeochemical cycling. Biomarkers from methanogenic archaea, methanotrophic bacteria and photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria were unambiguously assigned using organic geochemical understanding and by reference to what is known about the lake's present-day ecosystem. For instance, saturated and unsaturated 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosane, archaeol and sn2-hydroxyarchaeol were derived from methanogenic archaea. Carotenoid analysis revealed chlorobactene and isorenieratene derived from the green-colored and brown-colored strains of the green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae); isotopic analyses showed that they were 13C-enriched. Phytenes appear to be derived from photoautotrophs that use the Calvin-Benson cycle, while phytane has a different source, possibly within the archaea. The most 13C-depleted compounds (ca. -55‰) identified were 4-methyl-5?-cholest-8(14)-en-3?-ol, identified using an authentic standard, and co-occurring 4-methylsteradienes: these originate from the aerobic methanotrophic bacterium Methylosphaera hansonii. Lipids of photoautotrophic origin, steranes and alkenones, are relatively depleted (ca. -28 to -36‰) whilst archaeal biomarkers are relatively enriched in 13C (ca. -17 to -25‰). The structural and carbon isotope details of sedimentary lipids thus revealed aspects of in situ biogeochemical processes such as methane generation and oxidation and phototrophic sulfide oxidation.

  2. Contrasting biogeochemical characteristics of the Oubangui River and tributaries (Congo River basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouillon, Steven; Yambélé, Athanase; Gillikin, David P.; Teodoru, Cristian; Darchambeau, François; Lambert, Thibault; Borges, Alberto V.

    2014-06-01

    The Oubangui is a major tributary of the Congo River. We describe the biogeochemistry of contrasting tributaries within its central catchment, with watershed vegetation ranging from wooded savannahs to humid rainforest. Compared to a 2-year monitoring record on the mainstem Oubangui, these tributaries show a wide range of biogeochemical signatures, from highly diluted blackwaters (low turbidity, pH, conductivity, and total alkalinity) in rainforests to those more typical for savannah systems. Spectral analyses of chromophoric dissolved organic matter showed wide temporal variations in the Oubangui compared to spatio-temporal variations in the tributaries, and confirm that different pools of dissolved organic carbon are mobilized during different hydrological stages. ?13C of dissolved inorganic carbon ranged between -28.1‰ and -5.8‰, and was strongly correlated to both partial pressure of CO2 and to the estimated contribution of carbonate weathering to total alkalinity, suggesting an important control of the weathering regime on CO2 fluxes. All tributaries were oversaturated in dissolved greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O, CO2), with highest levels in rivers draining rainforest. The high diversity observed underscores the importance of sampling that covers the variability in subcatchment characteristics, to improve our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in the Congo Basin.

  3. Elucidating temperature effects on seasonal variations of biogeochemical turnover rates during riverbank filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Laxman; Greskowiak, Janek; Ray, Chittaranjan; Eckert, Paul; Prommer, Henning

    2012-03-01

    SummaryRiverbank filtration (RBF) is a mechanism by which undesired substances contained in infiltrating surface waters are attenuated during their passage across the riverbed and its underlying aquifer towards production wells. In this study, multi-component reactive transport modeling was used to analyze the biogeochemical processes that occur during subsurface passage at an existing RBF system - the Flehe Waterworks located along the Rhine River in Düsseldorf, Germany. The reactive transport model was established on the base of a conservative solute transport model for which temperature and chloride data served as calibration constraints. The model results showed that seasonal temperature changes superimposed by changes in residence time strongly affected the extent of the redox reactions along the flow path. The observed temporal, especially seasonal, changes in the breakthrough of dissolved oxygen were found to be best reproduced by the model when the temperature dependency of the biogeochemical processes was explicitly considered. High floods in the Rhine drastically reduced the travel time to the RBF well from an average travel time of 25-40 days to less than 8 days. On the other hand, low flow conditions increased the subsurface residence times between the Rhine River and the RBF well to about 60 days. The model results revealed that short term changes in the terminal electron acceptor consumption (biodegrdation extent) were solely attributed to fluctuations in residence time, while more gradual changes in biodegradation extent were due to both seasonal variations of the river water temperature and gradual changes in residence time.

  4. Biogeochemical impacts of wildfires over four millennia in a Rocky Mountain subalpine watershed.

    PubMed

    Dunnette, Paul V; Higuera, Philip E; McLauchlan, Kendra K; Derr, Kelly M; Briles, Christy E; Keefe, Margaret H

    2014-08-01

    Wildfires can significantly alter forest carbon (C) storage and nitrogen (N) availability, but the long-term biogeochemical legacy of wildfires is poorly understood. We obtained a lake-sediment record of fire and biogeochemistry from a subalpine forest in Colorado, USA, to examine the nature, magnitude, and duration of decadal-scale, fire-induced ecosystem change over the past c. 4250 yr. The high-resolution record contained 34 fires, including 13 high-severity events within the watershed. High-severity fires were followed by increased sedimentary N stable isotope ratios (?15N) and bulk density, and decreased C and N concentrations--reflecting forest floor destruction, terrestrial C and N losses, and erosion. Sustained low sediment C : N c. 20-50 yr post-fire indicates reduced terrestrial organic matter subsidies to the lake. Low sedimentary ?15N c. 50-70 yr post-fire, coincident with C and N recovery, suggests diminishing terrestrial N availability during stand development. The magnitude of post-fire changes generally scaled directly with inferred fire severity. Our results support modern studies of forest successional C and N accumulation and indicate pronounced, long-lasting biogeochemical impacts of wildfires in subalpine forests. However, even repeated high-severity fires over millennia probably did not deplete C or N stocks, because centuries between high-severity fires allowed for sufficient biomass recovery. PMID:24803372

  5. Assessing the utility of frequency dependent nudging for reducing biases in biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagman, Karl B.; Fennel, Katja; Thompson, Keith R.; Bianucci, Laura

    2014-09-01

    Bias errors, resulting from inaccurate boundary and forcing conditions, incorrect model parameterization, etc. are a common problem in environmental models including biogeochemical ocean models. While it is important to correct bias errors wherever possible, it is unlikely that any environmental model will ever be entirely free of such errors. Hence, methods for bias reduction are necessary. A widely used technique for online bias reduction is nudging, where simulated fields are continuously forced toward observations or a climatology. Nudging is robust and easy to implement, but suppresses high-frequency variability and introduces artificial phase shifts. As a solution to this problem Thompson et al. (2006) introduced frequency dependent nudging where nudging occurs only in prescribed frequency bands, typically centered on the mean and the annual cycle. They showed this method to be effective for eddy resolving ocean circulation models. Here we add a stability term to the previous form of frequency dependent nudging which makes the method more robust for non-linear biological models. Then we assess the utility of frequency dependent nudging for biological models by first applying the method to a simple predator-prey model and then to a 1D ocean biogeochemical model. In both cases we only nudge in two frequency bands centered on the mean and the annual cycle, and then assess how well the variability in higher frequency bands is recovered. We evaluate the effectiveness of frequency dependent nudging in comparison to conventional nudging and find significant improvements with the former.

  6. Role of zooplankton dynamics for Southern Ocean phytoplankton biomass and global biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Quéré, C.; Buitenhuis, E. T.; Moriarty, R.; Alvain, S.; Aumont, O.; Bopp, L.; Chollet, S.; Enright, C.; Franklin, D. J.; Geider, R. J.; Harrison, S. P.; Hirst, A.; Larsen, S.; Legendre, L.; Platt, T.; Prentice, I. C.; Rivkin, R. B.; Sathyendranath, S.; Stephens, N.; Vogt, M.; Sailley, S.; Vallina, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    Global ocean biogeochemistry models currently employed in climate change projections use highly simplified representations of pelagic food webs. These food webs do not necessarily include critical pathways by which ecosystems interact with ocean biogeochemistry and climate. Here we present a global biogeochemical model which incorporates ecosystem dynamics based on the representation of ten plankton functional types (PFTs); six types of phytoplankton, three types of zooplankton, and heterotrophic bacteria. We improved the representation of zooplankton dynamics in our model through (a) the explicit inclusion of large, slow-growing zooplankton, and (b) the introduction of trophic cascades among the three zooplankton types. We use the model to quantitatively assess the relative roles of iron vs. grazing in determining phytoplankton biomass in the Southern Ocean High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) region during summer. When model simulations do not represent crustacean macrozooplankton grazing, they systematically overestimate Southern Ocean chlorophyll biomass during the summer, even when there was no iron deposition from dust. When model simulations included the developments of the zooplankton component, the simulation of phytoplankton biomass improved and the high chlorophyll summer bias in the Southern Ocean HNLC region largely disappeared. Our model results suggest that the observed low phytoplankton biomass in the Southern Ocean during summer is primarily explained by the dynamics of the Southern Ocean zooplankton community rather than iron limitation. This result has implications for the representation of global biogeochemical cycles in models as zooplankton faecal pellets sink rapidly and partly control the carbon export to the intermediate and deep ocean.

  7. Contrasting biogeochemical characteristics of the Oubangui River and tributaries (Congo River basin)

    PubMed Central

    Bouillon, Steven; Yambélé, Athanase; Gillikin, David P.; Teodoru, Cristian; Darchambeau, François; Lambert, Thibault; Borges, Alberto V.

    2014-01-01

    The Oubangui is a major tributary of the Congo River. We describe the biogeochemistry of contrasting tributaries within its central catchment, with watershed vegetation ranging from wooded savannahs to humid rainforest. Compared to a 2-year monitoring record on the mainstem Oubangui, these tributaries show a wide range of biogeochemical signatures, from highly diluted blackwaters (low turbidity, pH, conductivity, and total alkalinity) in rainforests to those more typical for savannah systems. Spectral analyses of chromophoric dissolved organic matter showed wide temporal variations in the Oubangui compared to spatio-temporal variations in the tributaries, and confirm that different pools of dissolved organic carbon are mobilized during different hydrological stages. ?13C of dissolved inorganic carbon ranged between ?28.1‰ and ?5.8‰, and was strongly correlated to both partial pressure of CO2 and to the estimated contribution of carbonate weathering to total alkalinity, suggesting an important control of the weathering regime on CO2 fluxes. All tributaries were oversaturated in dissolved greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O, CO2), with highest levels in rivers draining rainforest. The high diversity observed underscores the importance of sampling that covers the variability in subcatchment characteristics, to improve our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in the Congo Basin. PMID:24954525

  8. Biogeochemical Changes at Early Stage After the Closure of Radioactive Waste Geological Repository in South Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Choung, Sungwook; Um, Wooyong; Choi, Seho; Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Kim, Sungpyo; Park, Jin beak; Kim, Suk-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Permanent disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the subterranean environment has been the preferred method of many countries, including Korea. A safety issue after the closure of a geological repository is that biodegradation of organic materials due to microbial activities generates gases that lead to overpressure of the waste containers in the repository and its disintegration with the release of radionuclides. As part of an ongoing large-scale in situ experiment using organic wastes and groundwater to simulate geological radioactive waste repository conditions, we investigated the geochemical alteration and microbial activities at an early stage (~63 days) intended to be representative of the initial period after repository closure. The increased numbers of both aerobes and facultative anaerobes in waste effluents indicate that oxygen content could be the most significant parameter to control biogeochemical conditions at very early periods of reaction (<35 days). Accordingly, the values of dissolved oxygen and redox potential were decreased. The activation of anaerobes after 35 days was supported by the increased concentration to ~50 mg L-1 of ethanol. These results suggest that the biogeochemical conditions were rapidly altered to more reducing and anaerobic conditions within the initial 2 months after repository closure. Although no gases were detected during the study, activated anaerobic microbes will play more important role in gas generation over the long term.

  9. Contrasting biogeochemical characteristics of the Oubangui River and tributaries (Congo River basin).

    PubMed

    Bouillon, Steven; Yambélé, Athanase; Gillikin, David P; Teodoru, Cristian; Darchambeau, François; Lambert, Thibault; Borges, Alberto V

    2014-01-01

    The Oubangui is a major tributary of the Congo River. We describe the biogeochemistry of contrasting tributaries within its central catchment, with watershed vegetation ranging from wooded savannahs to humid rainforest. Compared to a 2-year monitoring record on the mainstem Oubangui, these tributaries show a wide range of biogeochemical signatures, from highly diluted blackwaters (low turbidity, pH, conductivity, and total alkalinity) in rainforests to those more typical for savannah systems. Spectral analyses of chromophoric dissolved organic matter showed wide temporal variations in the Oubangui compared to spatio-temporal variations in the tributaries, and confirm that different pools of dissolved organic carbon are mobilized during different hydrological stages. ?(13)C of dissolved inorganic carbon ranged between -28.1‰ and -5.8‰, and was strongly correlated to both partial pressure of CO2 and to the estimated contribution of carbonate weathering to total alkalinity, suggesting an important control of the weathering regime on CO2 fluxes. All tributaries were oversaturated in dissolved greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O, CO2), with highest levels in rivers draining rainforest. The high diversity observed underscores the importance of sampling that covers the variability in subcatchment characteristics, to improve our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in the Congo Basin. PMID:24954525

  10. Biogeochemical implications of the ubiquitous colonization of marine habitats and redox gradients by Marinobacter species

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Kim M.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    The Marinobacter genus comprises widespread marine bacteria, found in localities as diverse as the deep ocean, coastal seawater and sediment, hydrothermal settings, oceanic basalt, sea-ice, sand, solar salterns, and oil fields. Terrestrial sources include saline soil and wine-barrel-decalcification wastewater. The genus was designated in 1992 for the Gram-negative, hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Since then, a further 31 type strains have been designated. Nonetheless, the metabolic range of many Marinobacter species remains largely unexplored. Most species have been classified as aerobic heterotrophs, and assessed for limited anaerobic pathways (fermentation or nitrate reduction), whereas studies of low-temperature hydrothermal sediments, basalt at oceanic spreading centers, and phytoplankton have identified species that possess a respiratory repertoire with significant biogeochemical implications. Notable physiological traits include nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidation, arsenic and fumarate redox cycling, and Mn(II) oxidation. There is also evidence for Fe(III) reduction, and metal(loid) detoxification. Considering the ubiquity and metabolic capabilities of the genus, Marinobacter species may perform an important and underestimated role in the biogeochemical cycling of organics and metals in varied marine habitats, and spanning aerobic-to-anoxic redox gradients. PMID:23734151

  11. Global Biogeochemical Fluxes Program for the Ocean Observatories Initiative: A Proposal. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, K. M.; Taylor, C.

    2010-12-01

    The overarching emphasis of the Global Biogeochemical Flux Ocean Observatories Initiative is to assess the role of oceanic carbon, both living and non-, in the Earth climate system. Modulation of atmospheric CO2 and its influence on global climate is a function of the quantitative capacity of the oceans to sequester organic carbon into deep waters. Critical to our understanding of the role of the oceans in the global cycling of carbon are the quantitative dynamics in both time and space of the fixation of CO2 into organic matter by surface ocean primary production and removal of this carbon to deep waters via the “biological pump”. To take the next major step forward in advancing our understanding of the oceanic biological pump, a global observation program is required that: (i) greatly improves constraints on estimates of global marine primary production (PP), a critical factor in understanding the global CO2 cycle and for developing accurate estimates of export production (EP); (ii) explores the spatiotemporal links between PP, EP and the biogeochemical processes that attenuate particulate organic carbon (POC) flux; (iii) characterizes microbial community structure and dynamics both in the surface and deep ocean; (iv) develops a comprehensive picture of the chemical and biological processes that take place from the surface ocean to the sea floor; (v) provides unique time-series samples for detailed laboratory-based chemical and biological characterization and tracer studies that will enable connections to be made between the operation of the biological pump at present and in the geologic past. The primary goal is to provide high quality biological and biogeochemical observational data for the modeling and prediction efforts of the global CO2 cycle research community. Crucial to the realization of the GBF-OOI is the development of reliable, long-term, time-series ocean observation platforms capable of precise and controlled placement of sophisticated biogeochemical sensors/samplers, and in situ experimental systems at a wide range of depths, including close proximity to the sea surface. Significant opportunities exist to exploit sensor miniaturization in combination with recent exponential improvements in “omics” technologies for measurement of nucleic acids, proteins and metabolites with unprecedented throughput and resolution. We will discuss the goals, philosophy, principal experimental and technical approaches and operational challenges. We will outline proposed mooring systems as well as means for accurate, spatiotemporal assessment of: (i) primary production, (ii) constraint of POC export flux with season and depth, (iii) assessment of microbial and zooplankton community structure/function throughout the water column, and (iv) collection and preservation of particulate and water samples for land-based examination of temporal and vertical variability of specific tracers, isotopes, nutrients, DOC and related substances for even more precise measurements of environmental biogeochemical properties. The GBF-OOI will become our Hubble for the sea.

  12. Role of sea ice in global biogeochemical cycles: emerging views and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancoppenolle, Martin; Meiners, Klaus M.; Michel, Christine; Bopp, Laurent; Brabant, Frédéric; Carnat, Gauthier; Delille, Bruno; Lannuzel, Delphine; Madec, Gurvan; Moreau, Sébastien; Tison, Jean-Louis; van der Merwe, Pier

    2013-11-01

    Observations from the last decade suggest an important role of sea ice in the global biogeochemical cycles, promoted by (i) active biological and chemical processes within the sea ice; (ii) fluid and gas exchanges at the sea ice interface through an often permeable sea ice cover; and (iii) tight physical, biological and chemical interactions between the sea ice, the ocean and the atmosphere. Photosynthetic micro-organisms in sea ice thrive in liquid brine inclusions encased in a pure ice matrix, where they find suitable light and nutrient levels. They extend the production season, provide a winter and early spring food source, and contribute to organic carbon export to depth. Under-ice and ice edge phytoplankton blooms occur when ice retreats, favoured by increasing light, stratification, and by the release of material into the water column. In particular, the release of iron - highly concentrated in sea ice - could have large effects in the iron-limited Southern Ocean. The export of inorganic carbon transport by brine sinking below the mixed layer, calcium carbonate precipitation in sea ice, as well as active ice-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, could play a central role in the marine carbon cycle. Sea ice processes could also significantly contribute to the sulphur cycle through the large production by ice algae of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), the precursor of sulphate aerosols, which as cloud condensation nuclei have a potential cooling effect on the planet. Finally, the sea ice zone supports significant ocean-atmosphere methane (CH4) fluxes, while saline ice surfaces activate springtime atmospheric bromine chemistry, setting ground for tropospheric ozone depletion events observed near both poles. All these mechanisms are generally known, but neither precisely understood nor quantified at large scales. As polar regions are rapidly changing, understanding the large-scale polar marine biogeochemical processes and their future evolution is of high priority. Earth system models should in this context prove essential, but they currently represent sea ice as biologically and chemically inert. Palaeoclimatic proxies are also relevant, in particular the sea ice proxies, inferring past sea ice conditions from glacial and marine sediment core records and providing analogues for future changes. Being highly constrained by marine biogeochemistry, sea ice proxies would not only contribute to but also benefit from a better understanding of polar marine biogeochemical cycles.

  13. Novel biogeochemical fingerprinting approaches to sediment source apportionment in catchments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungait, J.; Puttock, A.; Beniston, J. W.; Brazier, R. E.; Lal, R.; Collins, A.

    2013-12-01

    Apportioning the source of organic carbon in eroding sediments is important to constrain the scale of transport processes and to assess the impact of anthropogenic activity on environmental quality. Established biogeochemical techniques are used to trace organic inputs typically derived directly or indirectly from plants into soils, sediments and water using lipid biomarkers. Recently, advances in bulk and compound specific stable 13C isotope analyses have provided novel ways of exploring the source and residence times of organic matter in soils using the natural abundance stable 13C isotope signature of C3 and C4 plant end member values. However, the application of biogeochemical source tracing technologies at the molecular level at field to catchment scales has been slow to develop because of perceived problems with dilution of molecular-scale signals. This paper describes the results of recent experiments in natural and agricultural environments in the UK (Collins et al., 2013; Dungait et al., 2013) and United States (Puttock et al., 2012; Beniston et al., submitted) that have successfully applied new biogeochemical fingerprinting techniques using stable 13C isotope approaches and complementary modelling approaches to explore the transport of particulate and sediment-bound organic carbon at a range of scales from the small plot (m2) to field (ha) and small catchment (10's ha). References Beniston et al (submitted) The effects of crop residue removal on soil erosion and macronutrient dynamics on soils under no till for 42 years. Biogeosciences Collins et al (2013) Catchment source contributions to the sediment-bound organic matter degrading salmonid spawning gravels in a lowland river, southern England. Science of the Total Environment 456-457, 181-195. Dungait et al (2013) Microbial responses to the erosional redistribution of soil organic carbon in arable fields. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 60, 195-201. Puttock et al (2012) Stable carbon isotope analysis of fluvial sediment fluxes over two contrasting C4-C3 semi-arid vegetation transitions. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 26, 2386-2392

  14. Two decades and counting: 24-years of sustained open ocean biogeochemical measurements in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomas, M. W.; Bates, N. R.; Johnson, R. J.; Knap, A. H.; Steinberg, D. K.; Carlson, C. A.

    2013-09-01

    The Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) program has sampled the northwestern Sargasso Sea on a biweekly (January to April) to monthly basis since October 1988. The primary objective of the core BATS program continues to be an improved understanding of the time-variable processes and mechanisms that control the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and related elements in the surface ocean. With 24 years of measurements for most chemical, physical and biological variables, we have moved beyond descriptions of seasonal and interannual variability to examination of multi-year trends and potential controls, however there remain substantial gaps in our knowledge of the ecosystem mechanisms related to organic matter production, export and remineralization. While earlier BATS overviews have focused on describing seasonal and year-to-year variability, this overview provides new information on three long-standing biogeochemical questions in Sargasso Sea biogeochemistry. First, why is there a discrepancy between biological (i.e., sediment trap) and geochemical estimates of carbon export production? Winter storms and mesoscale eddies have now been clearly shown to contribute to annual nutrient budgets and carbon export production. Recent information on phytoplankton natural isotopic nitrogen composition, and data from profiling floats suggests that small phytoplankton are important contributors to new production in summer despite the apparent absence of a mechanism to entrain nitrate into the euphotic zone. These findings aid in closing the gap between these two different estimates of carbon export production. Second, what supports the seasonal drawdown of carbon dioxide in the absence of detectable nutrients? The zooplankton timeseries at BATS highlights the importance of zooplankton as a conduit for carbon removal due to grazing and vertical migration. Although increases in cellular elemental stoichiometry to values greater than the canonical Redfield Ratio, and the seasonal (and interannual) accumulation of euphotic zone dissolved organic carbon (DOC) without accumulation of DON in the surface ocean are also important explanations. Lastly, what are the sources of the elevated nitrate to phosphate ratio in the seasonal thermocline (N:P>30 on average)? While generally accepted that nitrogen fixation is the source of the additional nitrogen, new research suggests that export and remineralization of non-diazotroph particulate matter enriched in nitrogen (alternatively viewed as depleted in phosphorus) may also make substantial contributions. In addition, the ratio of particulate nitrogen to phosphorus captured in sediment traps has decreased from 50-75 to <50, possibly due to enhanced nitrogen remineralization. These and other findings from the core BATS observational program contribute to our improved understanding of biogeochemical cycles and ecosystem mechanisms in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean and how they are changing over time.

  15. Assimilation of surface data in a one-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model of the surface ocean: 2. Adjusting a simple trophic model to chlorophyll, temperature, nitrate, and pCO{sub 2} data

    SciTech Connect

    Prunet, P.; Minster, J.F.; Echevin, V.

    1996-03-01

    This paper builds on a previous work which produced a constrained physical-biogeochemical model of the carbon cycle in the surface ocean. Three issues are addressed: (1) the results of chlorophyll assimilation using a simpler trophic model, (2) adjustment of parameters using the simpler model and data other than surface chlorophyll concentrations, and (3) consistency of the main carbon fluxes derived by the simplified model with values from the more complex model. A one-dimensional vertical model coupling the physics of the ocean mixed layer and a description of biogeochemical processes with a simple trophic model was used to address these issues. Chlorophyll concentration, nitrate concentration, and temperature were used to constrain the model. The surface chlorophyll information was shown to be sufficient to constrain primary production within the photic layer. The simultaneous assimilation of chlorophyll, nitrate, and temperature resulted in a significant improvement of model simulation for the data used. Of the nine biological and physical parameters which resulted in significant variations of the simulated chlorophyll concentration, seven linear combinations of the mode parameters were constrained. The model fit was an improvement on independent surface chlorophyll and nitrate data. This work indicates that a relatively simple biological model is sufficient to describe carbon fluxes. Assimilation of satellite or climatological data coulc be used to adjust the parameters of the model for three-dimensional models. It also suggests that the main carbon fluxes driving the carbon cycle within surface waters could be derived regionally from surface information. 38 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Nitrous oxide emissions from cropland: A procedure for calibrating the DayCent biogeochemical model using inverse modelling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DayCent is a biogeochemical model of intermediate complexity widely used to simulate greenhouse gases (GHG), soil organic carbon (SOC) and nutrients in crop, grassland, forest and savannah ecosystems. Although this model has been applied to a wide range of ecosystems, it is still typically parameter...

  17. NATURE GEOSCIENCE | VOL 7 | MARCH 2014 | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience 173 emperature regulates almost all biogeochemical processes.

    E-print Network

    Chen, Jiquan

    almost all biogeochemical processes. Future climate warming will therefore have a profound effect and seasonal timescales. A synthesis of global air temperature data reveals a greater rate of warming in winter argue that ascertaining the effects of non-uniform climate warming on terrestrial ecosystems is a key

  18. Isotopic, geophysical and biogeochemical investigation of submarine groundwater discharge: IAEA-UNESCO intercomparison exercise at Mauritius Island

    E-print Network

    1 Isotopic, geophysical and biogeochemical investigation of submarine groundwater discharge: IAEA ABSTRACT Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into a shallow lagoon on the west coast of Mauritius Island of submarine waters was characterized by significant variability and heavy isotope enrichment and was used

  19. Using Stable Isotope Analysis to Determine Zooplankton Trophic Response to the Biogeochemical Gradient in a Coastal Tributary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of our research is to identify energy inputs that support lower food web production in a coastal tributary using the biogeochemical gradient that arises from the mixing of river and Great Lake water. We characterized the food web along the lower 35 km of the St. Louis Ri...

  20. Intercomparison of Biogeochemical Properties at Atlantic and Pacific Observatory Sites Using Ocean Data and a PARADIGM Model

    E-print Network

    Yoder, James S.

    Intercomparison of Biogeochemical Properties at Atlantic and Pacific Observatory Sites Using Ocean compare 34 locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with respect to key upper ocean ecological by SeaWiFS mean chlorophyll: low chlorophyll ocean gyres, comparatively high chlorophyll ocean margin

  1. Benthic biological and biogeochemical patterns and processes across an oxygen minimum zone (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea)

    E-print Network

    Levin, Lisa

    (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea) Gregory L. Cowie a,Ã, Lisa A. Levin b a The Sir John Murray Laboratories of the Arabian Sea. Hydrologic, sediment, and faunal characterizations were combined with in-situ and shipboard related work in the Arabian Sea, building the rationale for integrative biogeochemical and ecological

  2. in press, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, April 18, 2007 Carbon dioxide and oxygen fluxes in the Southern Ocean

    E-print Network

    Czaja, Arnaud

    in press, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, April 18, 2007 Carbon dioxide and oxygen fluxes College, London, UK Abstract. We analyze the variability of air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide and oxygen. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM), known to impact the variability of air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide, is also

  3. BIOGEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON REACTION OF SEDIMENTARY ORGANIC MATTER AND AQUEOUS SULFIDES IN HOLOCENE SEDIMENTS OF MUD LAKE FLORIDA: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    JOURNAL NRMRL-ADA-00133 Filley,T.R., Freeman, K.H., Wilkin*, R.T., and Hatcher, P.G. Biogeochemical Controls on Reaction of Sedimentary Organic Matter and Aqueous Sulfides in Holocene Sediments of Mud Lake Florida. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 66 (6):937-954...

  4. FORWARD AND INVERSE BIO-GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF MICROBIALLY INDUCED PRECIPITATION IN 0.5M COLUMNAR EXPERIMENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkouki, T. H.; Martinez, B.; Mortensen, B.; Dejong, J.; Weathers, T. S.; Spycher, N.; Ginn, T. R.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides threatens water supplies and ecosystem health at sites worldwide. One potential solution is immobilization in calcite where mineral precipitation is induced in situ by microbially-mediated ureolysis. Specifically, immobile aerobic biophases (cells or enzymes) mediate the conversion of urea to ammonium and carbonate, raising pH and promoting calcite precipitation. Divalent species such as strontium (including 90Sr, a common radionuclide contaminant) can co-precipitate, resulting in in situ immobilization. In waters that are saturated with respect to calcite, this represents a long-term sequestration mechanism. Calcite precipitation also enables control of mechanical properties of the medium through the cementation of particles thus increasing the shear strength and stiffness, while decreasing the permeability and compressibility. Challenges in application include design of the injectate aqueous chemistry (e.g., calcium, carbonate, urea, pH buffer, microbial nutrients) and selection of injection rates in order to control the timing and rate of calcite precipitation to generate the desired spatial distribution. Modeling ultimately requires incorporation of comprehensive reaction networks into transport simulators for non-uniform flow. To develop and validate the reaction network for use in both contaminant co-precipitation and subsurface structural modification applications, multicomponent biogeochemical modeling (TOUGHREACT v2) was applied in analyses of laboratory batch and column investigations of microbially-mediated calcite precipitation using Sporosarcina pasteurii. Column experiments included continuous and repeat pulse-flows, with cumulative flux equal in both cases. Aqueous chemistry and calcite distribution were monitored, as well as seismic shear waves that correlate to the stiffness of the column and thus to precipitation extent. TOUGHREACT was coupled with the inversion code UCODE to invert on observed pH and calcite abundance data to determine the effective urease concentrations and calcite precipitation rate (through the reactive calcite surface area). Simulations included both constant and spatially distributed urease concentrations to account for non-uniform distributions of bacteria in the column experiments. For the inversion of the model with constant distribution of urease, regression was initiated at several initial parameter values to test the uniqueness of the solution by searching the error surface for local minima. The calibrated model with distributed urease values shows a good agreement with the experimental calcite precipitation data, and will be used to predict the results of future pilot- and field-scale experiments with push-pull well configurations.

  5. A biogeochemical model for phosphorus and nitrogen cycling in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Part 1. Model development, initialization and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cappellen, P.; Powley, H. R.; Emeis, K.-C.; Krom, M. D.

    2014-11-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS) is the largest marine basin whose annual primary productivity is limited by phosphorus (P) rather than nitrogen (N). The basin is nearly entirely land-locked and receives substantial external nutrient fluxes, comparable for instance to those of the Baltic Sea. The biological productivity of the EMS, however, is among the lowest observed in the oceans. The water column exhibits very low P and N concentrations with N:P ratios in excess of the Redfield value. These unique biogeochemical features are analyzed using a mass balance model of the coupled P and N cycles in the EMS. The present paper describes the conceptual basis, quantitative implementation and sensitivity of the model. The model is initialized for the year 1950, that is, prior to the large increase in anthropogenic nutrient loading experienced by the EMS during the second half of the 20th century. In the companion paper, the model is used to simulate the P and N cycles during the period 1950-2000. The 1950 model set-up and sensitivity analyses support the following conclusions. Inorganic molar N:P ratios in excess of the 16:1 Redfield value observed in the water column reflect higher-than-Redfield N:P ratios of the external inputs, combined with negligible denitrification. Model simulations imply that the denitrification flux would have to increase by at least a factor of 14, relative to the 1950 flux, in order for the inorganic N:P ratio of the deep waters to approach the Redfield value. The higher-than-Redfield N:P ratios of dissolved and particulate organic matter in the EMS further imply the preferential regeneration of P relative to N during organic matter decomposition.

  6. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Honeyman, Bruce D.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Chin-Chang Hung; Diaz, Angelique; Tinnacher, Ruth; Roberts, Kimberly; Schwehr, Kathy

    2006-04-05

    The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation and immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this work is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  7. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2005-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  8. MAJOR RIVER PLUMES IN THE TROPICAL OCEAN: PHYSICAL AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL EXPRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, J M; Lopez,, J E; Brocco, J M,; Fuentes, B; Antoun, D; Lopez, H; Cabrera, R; Mendez, A

    2008-03-02

    The Caribbean and Western Tropical Atlantic receive massive inputs of Orinoco and Amazon River water carrying a load of organic and inorganic materials into waters characteristically devoid of these. The magnitude of riverine impact became evident as remote sensing became an ocean color monitoring tool. These observations depict riverine plumes, containing dissolved organic matter and phytoplankton well above background concentrations, being advected into the oligotrophic ocean. Subsequent research revealed that riverine intrusions radically modulate trophic balance and activity through changes in plankton abundance, composition and size distribution and last but not least: availability of solar irradiance. Moreover, riverine influence responds to climate processes and oceanic mesoscale processes bringing about significant spatial and temporal variability at annual and interannual scales. We discuss observations of physical and biogeochemical gradients in the Orinoco River Plume in the above context.

  9. The biogeochemical sulfur cycle in the marine boundary layer over the Northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Goldan, P. D.; Kuster, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    The major components of the marine boundary layer biogeochemical sulfur cycle were measured simultaneously onshore and off the coast of Washington State, U.S.A. during May 1987. Seawater dimethysulfide (DMS) concentrations on the continental shelf were strongly influenced by coastal upwelling. Concentration further offshore were typical of summer values (2.2 nmol/l) at this latitude. Although seawater DMS concentrations were high on the biologically productive continental shelf (2-12 nmol/l), this region had no measurable effect on atmospheric DMS concentrations. Atmospheric DMS concentrations (0.1-12 nmol/l), however, were extremely dependent upon wind speed and boundary layer height. Although there appeared to be an appreciable input of nonsea-salt sulfate to the marine boundary layer from the free troposphere, the local flux of DMS from the ocean to the atmosphere was sufficient to balance the remainder of the sulfur budget.

  10. Biogeochemical Cycles of Carbon and Sulfur on Early Earth (and on Mars?)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    The physical and chemical interactions between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere and biosphere can be examined for elements such as carbon (C) and sulfur (S) that have played central roles for both life and the environment. The compounds of C are highly important, not only as organic matter, but also as atmospheric greenhouse gases, pH buffers in seawater, oxidation-reduction buffers virtually everywhere, and key magmatic constituents affecting plutonism and volcanism. S assumes important roles as an oxidation-reduction partner with C and Fe in biological systems, as a key constituent in magmas and volcanic gases, and as a major influence upon pH in certain environments. These multiple roles of C and S interact across a network of elemental reservoirs interconnected by physical, chemical and biological processes. These networks are termed biogeochemical C and S cycles.

  11. A biogeochemical study of the coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi, in the North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Holligan, P.M.; Fernandez, E.; Aiken, J.; Burkill, P.H. ); Balch, W.M. ); Boyd, P. ); Finch, M. ); Groom, S.B. ); Malin, G. ); Muller, K. )

    1993-12-01

    Coccolithophores are a diverse group of marine phytoplankton that produce external plates, or coccoliths, of calcium carbonate. They are widely distributed in all oceans except polar waters, and are the major and often dominant component of calcite of marine sediments. Their ecology and physiology are poorly known. This paper reports on the first of two cruises to investigate the productivity and biogeochemical significance of Emiliania huxleyi in the North Atlantic. This focused on optics and air-sea gas exchange and provides the general context for more detailed analyses of the observations on the CO2 system in surface waters and on the production of organic matter and calcium carbonate by coccolithophores. 74 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Biogeochemical cycling of selenium in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presser, Theresa S.; Ohlendorf, Harry M.

    1987-11-01

    Subsurface agricultural drainage waters from western San Joaquin Valley, California, were found to contain elevated concentrations of the element selenium in the form of selenate. In 1978, these drainage waters began to replace previous input to Kesterson Reservoir, a pond system within Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge; this substitution was completed by 1982. In the 1983 nesting season, unusual rates of deformity and death in embryos and hatchlings of wild aquatic birds (up to 64% of eared grebe and American coot nests) occurred at the refuge and were attributed to selenium toxicosis. Features necessary for contamination to have taken place included geologic setting, climate, soil type, availability of imported irrigation water, type of irrigation, and the unique chemical properties of selenium. The mechanisms of biogeochemical cycling raise questions about other ecosystems and human exposure.

  13. Sleepers River, Vermont: a Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets Program site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, James B.

    2000-01-01

    The Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont was established by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1959 and is now operated jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL), will collaboration from several other Federal Agencies and Universities. The USGS has contributed to the understanding of hydrological processes and added a major biogeochemical cycling research component in the last 10 years of Sleepers River's 40-year history as a field laboratory. The USGS uses hydrologic measurements and chemical and isotopic tracing techniques to determine how water moves from the hillslope to the stream, and what processes cause chemical changes, such as neutralization of acid rain. Research results provide insights on how pollutants move through ecosystems, and how ecosystems may respond to climatic change.

  14. Interactive effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Zepp, R G; Erickson, D J; Paul, N D; Sulzberger, B

    2007-03-01

    This report assesses research on the interactions of UV radiation (280-400 nm) and global climate change with global biogeochemical cycles at the Earth's surface. The effects of UV-B (280-315 nm), which are dependent on the stratospheric ozone layer, on biogeochemical cycles are often linked to concurrent exposure to UV-A radiation (315-400 nm), which is influenced by global climate change. These interactions involving UV radiation (the combination of UV-B and UV-A) are central to the prediction and evaluation of future Earth environmental conditions. There is increasing evidence that elevated UV-B radiation has significant effects on the terrestrial biosphere with implications for the cycling of carbon, nitrogen and other elements. The cycling of carbon and inorganic nutrients such as nitrogen can be affected by UV-B-mediated changes in communities of soil organisms, probably due to the effects of UV-B radiation on plant root exudation and/or the chemistry of dead plant material falling to the soil. In arid environments direct photodegradation can play a major role in the decay of plant litter, and UV-B radiation is responsible for a significant part of this photodegradation. UV-B radiation strongly influences aquatic carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and metals cycling that affect a wide range of life processes. UV-B radiation changes the biological availability of dissolved organic matter to microorganisms, and accelerates its transformation into dissolved inorganic carbon and nitrogen, including carbon dioxide and ammonium. The coloured part of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) controls the penetration of UV radiation into water bodies, but CDOM is also photodegraded by solar UV radiation. Changes in CDOM influence the penetration of UV radiation into water bodies with major consequences for aquatic biogeochemical processes. Changes in aquatic primary productivity and decomposition due to climate-related changes in circulation and nutrient supply occur concurrently with exposure to increased UV-B radiation, and have synergistic effects on the penetration of light into aquatic ecosystems. Future changes in climate will enhance stratification of lakes and the ocean, which will intensify photodegradation of CDOM by UV radiation. The resultant increase in the transparency of water bodies may increase UV-B effects on aquatic biogeochemistry in the surface layer. Changing solar UV radiation and climate also interact to influence exchanges of trace gases, such as halocarbons (e.g., methyl bromide) which influence ozone depletion, and sulfur gases (e.g., dimethylsulfide) that oxidize to produce sulfate aerosols that cool the marine atmosphere. UV radiation affects the biological availability of iron, copper and other trace metals in aquatic environments thus potentially affecting metal toxicity and the growth of phytoplankton and other microorganisms that are involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling. Future changes in ecosystem distribution due to alterations in the physical and chemical climate interact with ozone-modulated changes in UV-B radiation. These interactions between the effects of climate change and UV-B radiation on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial and aquatic systems may partially offset the beneficial effects of an ozone recovery. PMID:17344963

  15. Interdisciplinary research in global biogeochemical cycling Nitrous oxide in terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, S. D.; Peterson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    NASA has begun an interdisciplinary research program to investigate various aspects of Global Biology and Global Habitability. An important element selected for the study of global phenomena is related to biogeochemical cycling. The studies involve a collaboration with recognized scientists in the areas of plant physiology, microbiology, nutrient cycling theory, and related areas. Selected subjects of study include nitrogen cycling dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems with special attention to biosphere/atmosphere interactions, and an identification of sensitive response variables which can be used in ecosystem models based on parameters derived from remotely sensed variables. A description is provided of the progress and findings over the past two years. Attention is given to the characteristics of nitrous oxide emissions, the approach followed in the investigations, the selection of study sites, radiometric measurements, and research in Sequoia.

  16. Holocene climate dynamics, biogeochemical cycles and ecosystem variability in the eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedl, Gerhard; Adloff, Fanny; Emeis, Kay; Grimm, Rosina; Maier-Reimer, Ernst; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Möbius, Jürgen; Müller-Navarra, Katharina

    2013-04-01

    The past variability of biogeochemical processes and marine ecosystems of the eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS) is documented in the form of organic-rich sapropels that occurred at northern hemisphere insolation maxima. In order to understand the processes leading from deglacial and Holocene climate variability to the formation of sapropel S1 via changed biogeochemical cycling in the EMS, we integrated results from global and regional Earth system model experiments with biogeochemical and micropaleontological proxy records. Our results suggest a high spatiotemporal variability of deep-water oxygenation and biogeochemical processes at the sea floor during the late glacial and early Holocene. Changes in trophic conditions of bathyal ecosystems along ocean margins are closely linked to the hydrology of the EMS borderlands; they reflect orbital and sub-orbital climate variations of the high northern latitudes and the African monsoon system. Local trophic conditions were particularly variable in the northern Aegean Sea as a response to changes in riverine runoff and Black Sea outflow. During the time of S1 deposition, average oxygen levels decreased exponentially with increasing water depth, suggesting a basin-wide shallowing of vertical convection superimposed by local signals. In the northernmost Aegean Sea, deep-water ventilation persisted during the early period of S1 formation, owing to temperature-driven local convection and the absence of low-salinity Black Sea outflow. At the same time, severe temporary dysoxia or even short anoxia occurred in the eastern Levantine basin at water depths as shallow as 900 m. This area was likely influenced by enhanced nutrient input of the Nile river that resulted in high organic matter fluxes and related high oxygen-consumption rates in the water column. In contrast, abyssal ecosystems of the Levantine and Ionian basins lack eutrophication during the early Holocene suggesting that enhanced productivity did not play a crucial role in basin-wide S1 formation. Instead, sapropel formation can be attributed to a long-term persistence of water column stratification. The modeled and observed trends of oxygen consumption rates and deep-water residence times date the initiation of stagnating deep-waters at the start of the deglacial period, thus several millennia prior to S1 deposition. Once oxygen levels fell below a critical threshold, bathyal and abyssal benthic ecosystems collapsed almost synchronously with onset of S1 deposition suggesting a rapid vertical propagation of the oxygen minimum layer. The recovery of bathyal deep-sea benthic ecosystems during the terminal phase of S1 formation is controlled by subsequently deeper convection and re-ventilation over a period of approximately 1500 years; the ultra-oligotrophic abyssal ecosystems reveal a considerably lower recovery potential. After the re-ventilation of the various sub-basins had been completed during the middle and late Holocene, deep-water renewal was more or less similar to recent rates. During that time, deep-sea ecosystem variability was driven by short-term changes in food quantity and quality as well as in seasonality, all of which are linked to millennial-scale changes in riverine runoff and associated nutrient input.

  17. Sedimentary Biogeochemical Indicators for Assessing the Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Blowout on Coastal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeal, K. S.; Guthrie, C. L.; Mishra, D.

    2013-05-01

    The impact of the Deepwater Horizon blowout on coastal wetlands can be understood through investigating carbon loading and microbial activity in salt marsh sediments. Carbon influx causes porewater sulfide to increase in wetland sediment, making it toxic and inhospitable to marsh vegetation. High sulfide levels due to increased microbial activity can lead to plant browning and mortality. Preliminary analyses at Marsh Point, MS indicated that sulfate reducing bacteria are more active in contaminated grass, producing sulfide concentrations 100x higher than in non-contaminated grass. Sediment electrode profiles, hydrocarbon contamination, and microbial community profiles were measured at three additional locations to capture the spatial sedimentary geochemical processes impacting salt marsh dieback. Findings indicate that response to contamination is variable due to physical and biogeochemical processes specific to each marsh. Temporal evaluation indicates that there is a lag in maximum response to contamination due to seasonal effects on microbial activity.

  18. Biogeochemical variability of plants at native and altered sites, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gough, L.P.; Severson, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The San Juan Basin is becoming a major energy resource region. The anticipated increase in strip mining for coal can be expected to alter the geochemical and biogeochemical environment. because such activities destroy the native vegetation communities, rearrange the rock strata, and disrupt natural soil development. This study investigated the variability in the biogeochemistry of native plant species at both undisturbed and altered sites and assessed the importance of the observed differences. Three studies are involved in this investigation: Study 1, the biogeochemical variability of native species found at sites throughout that part of the basin underlain by economically recoverable coal; Study 2, the biogeochemical variability of native species growing on soils considered favorable for use in the topsoiling of spoil areas; and Study 3, the biogeochemical variability of native species on rehabilitated sites at the San Juan coal mine. Summary statistics for concentrations of 35 elements (and ash yield) are reported in Study 1 for galleta grass, broom snakeweed, and fourwing saltbush. The concentrations of manganese, molybdenum, nickel, and uranium (and possibly iron and selenium) in galleta show regional patterns, with the highest values generally found in the south-central region and western edge of the study area. Differences in the concentration of elements between species was generally subtle (less than a factor of two) except for the following: ash yield of saltbush was two times that of the other plants; boron in snakeweed and saltbush was four times greater than in galleta; iron in galleta was two times greater than in saltbush; and, calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, and sulfur were generally highest in saltbush. Summary statistics (including the 95-percent expected range) for concentrations of 35 elements (and ash yield) are reported from Study 2 for galleta and broom snakeweed growing on the Sheppard, Shiprock, and Doak soil association. Significant regional (greater than 10 km) variation for aluminum, iron, sulfur, vanadium, and zirconium in galleta are reported; however, for most elements, a significant proportion of the variation in the data was measured locally (less than 0.1 km). This variation indicates that samples of galleta and snakeweed taken more than 10 km apart vary, in their element composition, little more than plants sampled as close together as 0.1 km. The concentrations of 35 elements (and ash yield) in alkali sacaton and fourwing saltbush, which were collected on a rehabilitation plot at the San Juan mine (Study 3), are compared with those of control samples of similar material from native sites from throughout the ,an Juan Basin. Concentrations of aluminum, arsenic, boron, cobalt, copper, fluorine, iron, lead, manganese, sodium, and uranium in samples of saltbush growing over spoil generally exceed the levels of these elements in control samples. For many elements, concentrations in mine samples are from two to five times higher 1 han concentrations in the control samples. Sodium concentrations i saltbush, however, were 100 times higher in mine samples than in control samples. This high concentration reflects a corresponding : OO-fold increase in the extractable sodium levels in spoil material s compared to C-horizon control samples. Sampled plants from the l1ine area, spaced relatively close together (5 m (meters) or less), vary greatly in their element compositions, apparently in response 1 J the heterogenous composition and element availability of the l1ine soils. Topsoiling to a depth of 20 cm (centimeters) does little to meliorate the uptake of elements from spoil by saltbush.

  19. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2006-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  20. Biogeochemical context impacts seawater pH changes resulting from atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, Mathilde; Hunter, Keith A.; Liss, Peter S.; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2014-02-01

    Seawater acidification can be induced both by absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and by atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen oxides and ammonia. Their relative significance, interplay, and dependency on water column biogeochemistry are not well understood. Using a simple biogeochemical model we show that the initial conditions of coastal systems are not only relevant for CO2-induced acidification but also for additional acidification due to atmospheric acid deposition. Coastal areas undersaturated with respect to CO2 are most vulnerable to CO2-induced acidification but are relatively least affected by additional atmospheric deposition-induced acidification. In contrast, the pH of CO2-supersaturated systems is most sensitive to atmospheric deposition. The projected increment in atmospheric CO2 by 2100 will increase the sensitivity of coastal systems to atmospheric deposition-induced acidification by up to a factor 4, but the additional annual change in proton concentration is at most 28%.

  1. Biogeochemical cycling of selenium in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, T.S.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Subsurface agricultural drainage waters from western San Joaquin Valley, California, were found to contain elevated concentrations of the element selenium in the form of selenate. In 1978, these drainage waters began to replace previous input to Kesterson Reservoir, a pond system within Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge; this substitution was completed by 1982. In the 1983 nesting season, unusual rates of deformity and death in embryos and hatchlings of wild aquatic birds (up to 64% of eared grebe and American coot nests) occurred at the refuge and were attributed to selenium toxicosis. Features necessary for contamination to have taken place included geologic setting, climate, soil type, availability of imported irrigation water, type of irrigation, and the unique chemical properties of selenium. The mechanisms of biogeochemical cycling raise questions about other ecosystems and human exposure.

  2. Biogeochemical cycles of Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems: long-term dynamics of the migration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, Alexey; Tsvetnova, Ol'ga; Klyashtorin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Biogeochemical migration is a dominant factor of the radionuclide transport through the biosphere. In the early XX century, V.I. Vernadskii, a Russian scientist known, noted about a special role living things play in transport and accumulation of natural radionuclide in various environments. The role of biogeochemical processes in migration and redistribution of technogenic radionuclides is not less important. In Russia, V. M. Klechkovskii and N.V. Timofeev-Ressovskii showed some important biogeochemical aspects of radionuclide migration by the example of global fallout and Kyshtym accident. Their followers, R.M. Alexakhin, M.A. Naryshkin, N.V. Kulikov, F.A. Tikhomirov, E.B. Tyuryukanova, and others also contributed a lot to biogeochemistry of radionuclides. In the post-Chernobyl period, this area of knowledge received a lot of data that allowed building the radioactive element balance and flux estimation in various biogeochemical cycles [Shcheglov et al., 1999]. Regrettably, many of recent radioecological studies are only focused on specific radionuclide fluxes or pursue some applied tasks, missing the holistic approach. Most of the studies consider biogeochemical fluxes of radioactive isotopes in terms of either dose estimation or radionuclide migration rates in various food chains. However, to get a comprehensive picture and develop a reliable forecast of environmental, ecological, and social consequences of radioactive pollution in a vast contaminated area, it is necessary to investigate all the radionuclide fluxes associated with the biogeochemical cycles in affected ecosystems. We believe such an integrated approach would be useful to study long-term environmental consequences of the Fukushima accident as well. In our long-term research, we tried to characterize the flux dynamics of the Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems and landscapes as a part of the integrated biogeochemical process. Our field studies were started in June of 1986 (less than two months after the accident) and have been continued up to now, focused on the most common forest ecosystems scattered over the contaminated areas of Russian Federation and Ukraine. A comprehensive analysis of the 137Cs and 90Sr biogeochemical fluxes shows that downward radionuclide fluxes (those directed from tree crowns to the soil) dominated over the upward fluxes (from the soil to forest vegetation) in the first years after the accident. Currently, the biological cycle in the contaminated ecosystems is a main factor impeding further vertical migration of long-lived radionuclides from upper soil layers to the ground water. The role of biota as a retardation factor depends on landscape type as well. In accumulative landscapes (with positive material balance), biota plays leading role in radionuclide retardation, while in eluvial landscapes (with the negative balance) soil absorbing complex serves as the dominant barrier for radionuclides leaching down the soil profile. The manifestation of both soil- and biota-driven factors depends on the radionuclide chemical speciation in the initial fallout. The latter factor is most important for 137Cs, yet less manifested for 90Sr. Among the biota components, fungi and forest vegetation are of particular importance for 137Cs and 90Sr accumulation, respectively. In summary, biogeochemical cycles of 137Cs and 90Sr in the investigated forest ecosystems serve as main factors impeding the radionuclide migration from the fallout to ground water. Larger-scale landscape factors determine the radionuclide flux intensity in the biogeochemical cycles and affect the radionuclide spatial variability in the contaminated biota components.

  3. How to `Elk-test' biogeochemical models in a data rich world? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichstein, M.; Ciais, P.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Carvalhais, N.; Dalmonech, D.; Jung, M.; Luo, Y.; Mahecha, M. D.; Moffat, A. M.; Tomelleri, E.; Zaehle, S.

    2010-12-01

    Process-oriented biogeochemical models are a primary tool that has been used to project future states of climate and ecosystems in the earth system in response to anthropogenic and other forcing, and receive tremendous attention also in the context us the planned assessment report AR5 by the IPCC. However, model intercomparison and data-model comparison studies indicate large uncertainties regarding predictions of global interactions between atmosphere and biosphere. Rigorous scientific testing of these models is essential but very challenging, largely because neither it is technically and ethically possible to perform global earth-scale experiments, nor do we have replicate Earths for hypothesis testing. Hence, model evaluations have to rely on monitoring data such as ecological observation networks, global remote sensing or short-term and small-scale experiments. Here, we critically examine strategies of how model evaluations have been performed with a particular emphasis on terrestrial ecosystems. Often weak ‘validations’ are being presented which do not take advantage of all the relevant information in the observed data, but also apparent falsifications are made, that are hampered by a confusion of system processes with system behavior. We propose that a stronger integration of recent advances in pattern-oriented and system-oriented methodologies will lead to more satisfying earth system model evaluation and development, and show a few enlightening examples from terrestrial biogeochemical modeling and other disciplines. Moreover it is crucial to take advantage of the multidimensional nature of arising earth observation data sets which should be matched by models simultaneously, instead of relying on univariate simple comparisons. A new critical model evaluation is needed to improve future IPCC assessments in order to reduce uncertainties by distinguishing plausible simulation trajectories from fairy tales.

  4. Water, energy, and biogeochemical budget research at Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, James B.; Sundquist, E.T.; Kendall, Carol

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has selected the Sleepers River Research Watershed (Sleepers River) near Danville, Vt., as one of five sites for the investigation of Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB). Sleepers River was chosen because it is a well-designed outdoor laboratory with a long history of hydrologic data collection and research, and also because it provides an ideal opportunity for collaboration among the U.S. Geological Survey, other Federal agencies, and universities at the site. The multiple subwatersheds at Sleepers River present a unique opportunity to investigate hydrologic, energy, and biogeochemical processes over a variety of spatial scales. This WEBB study builds on fundamental research on process mechanisms and rates at the plot scale (in this case, a hillslope). Results then are scaled up to interpret the hydrochemical response of first- and higher- order basins. Five research elements make up the Sleepers River WEBB project. Individually, each of the five elements is designed to investigate specific WEBB processes (such as CO2 efflux through a snowpack), address specific WEBB issues (such as scaling and flowpaths), or apply specific WEBB approaches (such as integrated chemical and physical study of a hillslope). The research elements overlap so that many of the processes investigated will be assessed in more than one way, thus allowing independent verification of research results. For example, flowpath information will be derived separately by use of isotopic tracers, conservative chemical solutes, and soil-moisture fluxes. Collectively, the five elements constitute an integrated approach to a comprehensive understanding of WEBB processes needed for the prediction of the effects of global change.

  5. The biogeochemical cycling of zinc and zinc isotopes in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.

    2014-10-01

    Zinc (Zn) is a marine micronutrient, with an overall oceanic distribution mirroring the major macronutrients, especially silicate. Seawater Zn isotope ratios (?66Zn) are a relatively new oceanographic parameter which may offer insights into the biogeochemical cycling of Zn. To date, the handful of published studies of seawater ?66Zn show the global deep ocean to be both remarkably homogeneous (approximately +0.5‰) and isotopically heavier than the marine sources of Zn (+0.1 to +0.3‰). Here we present the first high-resolution oceanic section of ?66Zn, from the U.S. GEOTRACES GA03 North Atlantic Transect, from Lisbon to Woods Hole. Throughout the surface ocean, biological uptake and release of isotopically light Zn, together with scavenging of heavier Zn, leads to large variability in ?66Zn. In the ocean below 1000 m, ?66Zn is generally homogeneous (+0.50 ± 0.14‰; 2 SD), though deviations from +0.5‰ allow us to identify specific sources of Zn. The Mediterranean Outflow is characterized by ?66Zn of +0.1 to +0.3‰, while margin sediments are a source of isotopically light Zn (-0.5 to -0.8‰), which we attribute to release of nonregenerated biogenic Zn. Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents are also a source of light Zn (close to -0.5‰), though Zn is not transported far from the vents. Understanding the biogeochemical cycling of Zn in the modern ocean begins to address the imbalance between the light ?66Zn signature of marine sources and the globally homogeneous deep oceans (?66Zn of +0.5‰) on long timescales, with overall patterns pointing to sediments as an important sink for isotopically light Zn throughout the oceans.

  6. Saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes alters the biogeochemical processing of organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, S. C.; Franklin, R. B.; Berrier, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental perturbations in wetlands affect the integrated plant-microbial-soil system, causing biogeochemical responses that can manifest at local to global scales. The objective of this study was to determine how saltwater intrusion affects carbon mineralization and greenhouse gas production in coastal wetlands. Working with tidal freshwater marsh soils that had experienced ~ 3.5 yr of in situ saltwater additions, we quantified changes in soil properties, measured extracellular enzyme activity associated with organic matter breakdown, and determined potential rates of anaerobic carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) production. Soils from the field plots treated with brackish water had lower carbon content and higher C : N ratios than soils from freshwater plots, indicating that saltwater intrusion reduced carbon availability and increased organic matter recalcitrance. This was reflected in reduced activities of enzymes associated with the hydrolysis of cellulose and the oxidation of lignin, leading to reduced rates of soil CO2 and CH4 production. The effects of long-term saltwater additions contrasted with the effects of short-term exposure to brackish water during three-day laboratory incubations, which increased rates of CO2 production but lowered rates of CH4 production. Collectively, our data suggest that the long-term effect of saltwater intrusion on soil CO2 production is indirect, mediated through the effects of elevated salinity on the quantity and quality of autochthonous organic matter inputs to the soil. In contrast, salinity, organic matter content, and enzyme activities directly influence CH4 production. Our analyses demonstrate that saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes affects the entire process of carbon mineralization, from the availability of organic carbon through its terminal metabolism to CO2 and/or CH4, and illustrate that long-term shifts in biogeochemical functioning are not necessarily consistent with short-term disturbance-type responses.

  7. Saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes alters the biogeochemical processing of organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, S. C.; Franklin, R. B.; Berrier, D. J.

    2013-07-01

    Environmental perturbations in wetlands affect the integrated plant-microbial-soil system, causing biogeochemical responses that can manifest at local to global scales. The objective of this study was to determine how saltwater intrusion affects carbon mineralization and greenhouse gas production in coastal wetlands. Working with tidal freshwater marsh soils that had experienced roughly 3.5 yr of in situ saltwater additions, we quantified changes in soil properties, measured extracellular enzyme activity associated with organic matter breakdown, and determined potential rates of anaerobic carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) production. Soils from the field plots treated with brackish water had lower carbon content and higher C : N ratios than soils from freshwater plots, indicating that saltwater intrusion reduced carbon availability and increased organic matter recalcitrance. This was reflected in reduced activities of enzymes associated with the hydrolysis of cellulose and the oxidation of lignin, leading to reduced rates of soil CO2 and CH4 production. The effects of long-term saltwater additions contrasted with the effects of short-term exposure to brackish water during three-day laboratory incubations, which increased rates of CO2 production but lowered rates of CH4 production. Collectively, our data suggest that the long-term effect of saltwater intrusion on soil CO2 production is indirect, mediated through the effects of elevated salinity on the quantity and quality of autochthonous organic matter inputs to the soil. In contrast, salinity, organic matter content, and enzyme activities directly influence CH4 production. Our analyses demonstrate that saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes affects the entire process of carbon mineralization, from the availability of organic carbon through its terminal metabolism to CO2 and/or CH4, and illustrate that long-term shifts in biogeochemical functioning are not necessarily consistent with short-term disturbance-type responses.

  8. Tracing biogeochemical and microbial variability over a complete oil sand mining and recultivation process.

    PubMed

    Noah, Mareike; Lappé, Michael; Schneider, Beate; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilkes, Heinz; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2014-11-15

    Recultivation of disturbed oil sand mining areas is an issue of increasing importance. Nevertheless only little is known about the fate of organic matter, cell abundances and microbial community structures during oil sand processing, tailings management and initial soil development on reclamation sites. Thus the focus of this work is on biogeochemical changes of mined oil sands through the entire process chain until its use as substratum for newly developing soils on reclamation sites. Therefore, oil sand, mature fine tailings (MFTs) from tailings ponds and drying cells and tailings sand covered with peat-mineral mix (PMM) as part of land reclamation were analyzed. The sample set was selected to address the question whether changes in the above-mentioned biogeochemical parameters can be related to oil sand processing or biological processes and how these changes influence microbial activities and soil development. GC-MS analyses of oil-derived biomarkers reveal that these compounds remain unaffected by oil sand processing and biological activity. In contrast, changes in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance and pattern can be observed along the process chain. Especially naphthalenes, phenanthrenes and chrysenes are altered or absent on reclamation sites. Furthermore, root-bearing horizons on reclamation sites exhibit cell abundances at least ten times higher (10(8) to 10(9) cells g(-1)) than in oil sand and MFT samples (10(7) cells g(-1)) and show a higher diversity in their microbial community structure. Nitrate in the pore water and roots derived from the PMM seem to be the most important stimulants for microbial growth. The combined data show that the observed compositional changes are mostly related to biological activity and the addition of exogenous organic components (PMM), whereas oil extraction, tailings dewatering and compaction do not have significant influences on the evaluated compounds. Microbial community composition remains relatively stable through the entire process chain. PMID:25201817

  9. Biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity as key drivers of ecosystem services provided by soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Rumpel, C.; Paustian, K.; Kuikman, P. J.; Elliott, J. A.; McDowell, R.; Griffiths, R. I.; Asakawa, S.; Bustamante, M.; House, J. I.; Sobocká, J.; Harper, R.; Pan, G.; West, P. C.; Gerber, J. S.; Clark, J. M.; Adhya, T.; Scholes, R. J.; Scholes, M. C.

    2015-11-01

    Soils play a pivotal role in major global biogeochemical cycles (carbon, nutrient, and water), while hosting the largest diversity of organisms on land. Because of this, soils deliver fundamental ecosystem services, and management to change a soil process in support of one ecosystem service can either provide co-benefits to other services or result in trade-offs. In this critical review, we report the state-of-the-art understanding concerning the biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity in soil, and relate these to the provisioning, regulating, supporting, and cultural ecosystem services which they underpin. We then outline key knowledge gaps and research challenges, before providing recommendations for management activities to support the continued delivery of ecosystem services from soils. We conclude that, although soils are complex, there are still knowledge gaps, and fundamental research is still needed to better understand the relationships between different facets of soils and the array of ecosystem services they underpin, enough is known to implement best practices now. There is a tendency among soil scientists to dwell on the complexity and knowledge gaps rather than to focus on what we do know and how this knowledge can be put to use to improve the delivery of ecosystem services. A significant challenge is to find effective ways to share knowledge with soil managers and policy makers so that best management can be implemented. A key element of this knowledge exchange must be to raise awareness of the ecosystems services underpinned by soils and thus the natural capital they provide. We know enough to start moving in the right direction while we conduct research to fill in our knowledge gaps. The lasting legacy of the International Year of Soils in 2015 should be for soil scientists to work together with policy makers and land managers to put soils at the centre of environmental policy making and land management decisions.

  10. Compound-specific isotopic analyses: a novel tool for reconstruction of ancient biogeochemical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Freeman, K. H.; Popp, B. N.; Hoham, C. H.

    1990-01-01

    Patterns of isotopic fractionation in biogeochemical processes are reviewed and it is suggested that isotopic fractionations will be small when substrates are large. If so, isotopic compositions of biomarkers will reflect those of their biosynthetic precursors. This prediction is tested by consideration of results of analyses of geoporphyrins and geolipids from the Greenhorn Formation (Cretaceous, Western Interior Seaway of North America) and the Messel Shale (Eocene, lacustrine, southern Germany). It is shown (i) that isotopic compositions of porphyrins that are related to a common source, but which have been altered structurally, cluster tightly and (ii) that isotopic differences between geolipids and porphyrins related to a common source are equal to those observed in modern biosynthetic products. Both of these observations are consistent with preservation of biologically controlled isotopic compositions during diagenesis. Isotopic compositions of individual compounds can thus be interpreted in terms of biogeochemical processes in ancient depositional environments. In the Cretaceous samples, isotopic compositions of n-alkanes are covariant with those of total organic carbon, while delta values for pristane and phytane are covariant with those of porphyrins. In this unit representing an open marine environment, the preserved acyclic polyisoprenoids apparently derive mainly from primary material, while the extractable, n-alkanes derive mainly from lower levels of the food chain. In the Messel Shale, isotopic compositions of individual biomarkers range from -20.9 to -73.4% vs PDB. Isotopic compositions of specific compounds can be interpreted in terms of origin from methylotrophic, chemautotrophic, and chemolithotrophic microorganisms as well as from primary producers that lived in the water column and sediments of this ancient lake.

  11. Interactive Effects of Urban Land Use and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouyat, R. V.

    2009-12-01

    Urban land-use change can affect biogeochemical cycles through altered disturbance regimes, landscape management practices (e.g., irrigation and fertilization), built structures, and altered environments (heat island effect, pollution, introduction of non-native species, loss of native species). As a result, the conversion of native to urban ecological systems has been shown to significantly affect carbon, nitrogen, and water cycles at local, regional, and global scales. These changes have created novel habitats and ecosystems, which have no analogue in the history of life. Nonetheless, some of the environmental changes occurring in urban areas are analogous to the changes expected in climate by the end of the century, e.g. atmospheric increase in CO2 and an increase in air temperatures, which can be utilized as a “natural experiment” to investigate global change effects on large scale ecosystem processes. Moreover, as analogues of expected future environments, urban ecological systems may act as reservoirs of plant and animal species for adjoining landscapes that are expected to undergo relatively rapid climate changes in the next 100 years. Urban land-use change by itself may contribute to changes in regional weather patterns and long-term changes in global climate, which will depend on the net effect of converting native systems to urban systems and the comparison of per capita “footprints” between urban, suburban, and rural inhabitants. My objectives are to 1) assess the impact of changes in urban land-use on climate change and in turn how climate change may affect urban biogeochemical cycles and 2) discuss the potential for urban ecosystems to mitigate green house gas emissions.

  12. Sea Level Rise Modifies Biogeochemical Cycles in Winyah Bay, South Carolina Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, A. T.; Conner, W.; Rhew, R. C.; Suhre, D.; Wang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Rising sea level along the relatively flat southeastern US coastal plain significantly changes both vegetation composition and salinity of coastal wetlands, eventually modifying ecosystem functions and biogeochemical processes of these wetlands. We conducted a two-year study to evaluate the dynamics and relationships among aboveground productivity, greenhouse and halocarbon gas emissions, nutrients, and dissolved organic matter of a freshwater forested wetland, a salt-impacted and degraded forested wetland, and a salt marsh in Winyah Bay, South Carolina, representing the salinity gradient and the transition from freshwater forested wetland to salt marsh due to sea level rise. The degraded forested wetland had significantly lower above-ground productivity with annual stem growth of 102 g/m^2/yr and litterfall of 392 g/m^2/yr compared to the freshwater forested wetland (230 and 612 g/m^2/yr, respectively). High methane emission [> 50 mmol/m2/day, n = 4] was only observed in the freshwater-forested wetland but there was a strong smell of sulfide noticed in the salt marsh, suggesting that different redox processes control the decomposition of natural organic matter along the salinity gradient. In addition, the largest CHCl3 [209 × 183 nmol/m2/day, n = 4] emission was observed in the degraded forested wetland, but net CH3Cl [257 × 190 nmol/m2/day, n = 4] and CH3Br [28 × 20 nmol/m2/day, n = 4] emissions were only observed in the salt marsh, suggesting different mechanisms in response to salt intrusion at that sites. The highest DOC concentration (28 - 42 mg/L) in monthly water samples was found in degraded forest wetland, followed by the freshwater forested wetland (19 - 38 mg/L) and salt marsh (9 - 18 mg/L). Results demonstrate that the salt-impacted degraded wetland has unique biogeochemical cycles that differ from unaltered freshwater forested wetland and salt marsh.

  13. Physical and biogeochemical modulation of ocean acidification in the central North Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Dore, John E.; Lukas, Roger; Sadler, Daniel W.; Church, Matthew J.; Karl, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is increasing at an accelerating rate, primarily due to fossil fuel combustion and land use change. A substantial fraction of anthropogenic CO2 emissions is absorbed by the oceans, resulting in a reduction of seawater pH. Continued acidification may over time have profound effects on marine biota and biogeochemical cycles. Although the physical and chemical basis for ocean acidification is well understood, there exist few field data of sufficient duration, resolution, and accuracy to document the acidification rate and to elucidate the factors governing its variability. Here we report the results of nearly 20 years of time-series measurements of seawater pH and associated parameters at Station ALOHA in the central North Pacific Ocean near Hawaii. We document a significant long-term decreasing trend of ?0.0019 ± 0.0002 y?1 in surface pH, which is indistinguishable from the rate of acidification expected from equilibration with the atmosphere. Superimposed upon this trend is a strong seasonal pH cycle driven by temperature, mixing, and net photosynthetic CO2 assimilation. We also observe substantial interannual variability in surface pH, influenced by climate-induced fluctuations in upper ocean stability. Below the mixed layer, we find that the change in acidification is enhanced within distinct subsurface strata. These zones are influenced by remote water mass formation and intrusion, biological carbon remineralization, or both. We suggest that physical and biogeochemical processes alter the acidification rate with depth and time and must therefore be given due consideration when designing and interpreting ocean pH monitoring efforts and predictive models. PMID:19666624

  14. Small pores in soils: Is the physico-chemical environment accurately reflected in biogeochemical models ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias K. D.; Riedel, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Free water is a prerequesite to chemical reactions and biological activity in earth's upper crust essential to life. The void volume between the solid compounds provides space for water, air, and organisms that thrive on the consumption of minerals and organic matter thereby regulating soil carbon turnover. However, not all water in the pore space in soils and sediments is in its liquid state. This is a result of the adhesive forces which reduce the water activity in small pores and charged mineral surfaces. This water has a lower tendency to react chemically in solution as this additional binding energy lowers its activity. In this work, we estimated the amount of soil pore water that is thermodynamically different from a simple aqueous solution. The quantity of soil pore water with properties different to liquid water was found to systematically increase with increasing clay content. The significance of this is that the grain size and surface area apparently affects the thermodynamic state of water. This implies that current methods to determine the amount of water content, traditionally determined from bulk density or gravimetric water content after drying at 105°C overestimates the amount of free water in a soil especially at higher clay content. Our findings have consequences for biogeochemical processes in soils, e.g. nutrients may be contained in water which is not free which could enhance preservation. From water activity measurements on a set of various soils with 0 to 100 wt-% clay, we can show that 5 to 130 mg H2O per g of soil can generally be considered as unsuitable for microbial respiration. These results may therefore provide a unifying explanation for the grain size dependency of organic matter preservation in sedimentary environments and call for a revised view on the biogeochemical environment in soils and sediments. This could allow a different type of process oriented modelling.

  15. Marine regime shifts in ocean biogeochemical models: a case study in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, C.; Cole, H.; Henson, S.; Yool, A.; Anderson, T. R.; de Mora, L.; Buitenhuis, E. T.; Butenschön, M.; Totterdell, I. J.; Allen, J. I.

    2015-08-01

    Regime shifts have been reported in many marine ecosystems, and are often expressed as an abrupt change occurring in multiple physical and biological components of the system. In the Gulf of Alaska, a regime shift in the late 1970s was observed, indicated by an abrupt increase in sea surface temperature and major shifts in the catch of many fish species. This late 1970s regime shift in the Gulf of Alaska was followed by another shift in the late 1980s, not as pervasive as the 1977 shift, but which nevertheless did not return to the prior state. A thorough understanding of the extent and mechanisms leading to such regime shifts is challenged by data paucity in time and space. We investigate the ability of a suite of ocean biogeochemistry models of varying complexity to simulate regime shifts in the Gulf of Alaska by examining the presence of abrupt changes in time series of physical variables (sea surface temperature and mixed layer depth), nutrients and biological variables (chlorophyll, primary productivity and plankton biomass) using change-point analysis. Our study demonstrates that ocean biogeochemical models are capable of simulating the late 1970s shift, indicating an abrupt increase in sea surface temperature forcing followed by an abrupt decrease in nutrients and biological productivity. This predicted shift is consistent among all the models, although some of them exhibit an abrupt transition (i.e. a significant shift from one year to the next), whereas others simulate a smoother transition. Some models further suggest that the late 1980s shift was constrained by changes in mixed layer depth. Our study demonstrates that ocean biogeochemical can successfully simulate regime shifts in the Gulf of Alaska region, thereby providing better understanding of how changes in physical conditions are propagated from lower to upper trophic levels through bottom-up controls.

  16. Seeking biogeochemical signatures of fish harvesting in the recent sediment record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, L.; Galbraith, E. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fish removal was the earliest major human influence on the marine environment and global fishing effort has increased by orders of magnitude since its ancient origins, depleting predatory fish biomass by as much as 90% (Myers and Worm, 2003). It stands to reason that any impact this may have had on ocean biogeochemistry could have been preserved in existing high-resolution palaeoceanographic records. A severe depletion of upper trophic levels may result in a top-down ecological regime shift, manifesting in the form of trophic cascades and alterations to nutrient cycling and carbon export. Changes of this nature might be recorded in the sedimentary record through proxies such as fish remains, total organic carbon, 15N, and microfossil assemblages. However, these high-resolution proxies are more typically interpreted as reflecting climatic or oceanographic changes. This project searches for sedimentary signals of fish harvesting by compiling existing paleoceanographic data and comparing it to historical and archaeological records of ecosystem exploitation. Hypotheses of potential sedimentary signatures and methods of analysis will be discussed and results from case studies such as the Peruvian Upwelling Zone, North Sea, and Scotian Shelf will be presented. Identifying a sedimentary signature of fish harvesting will clarify interpretations of recent palaeoceanographic proxies and help define the role that fish can play in biogeochemical dynamics. This will aid in parameterizing upper trophic levels in ocean biogeochemical models and establishing pre-human baselines for ecosystem-based fisheries management. References: Myers, R. A., and B. Worm (2003), Rapid worldwide depletion of predatory fish communities., Nature, 423(6937), 280-3, doi:10.1038/nature01610.

  17. The Utility of CDOM for Improving the Resolution of Riverine DOM Fluxes and Biogeochemical Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, R. G.; Aiken, G.; Mann, P. J.; Holmes, R. M.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.; Hernes, P.; Stubbins, A.

    2014-12-01

    A major historical limitation to geochemical studies assessing fluvial fluxes of dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been the issue of both temporal and spatial scaling. Examples will be presented from watersheds around the world highlighting how chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) measurements can be utilized as proxies for more intensive and expensive analytical analyses (e.g. molecular-level organic biomarkers). Utilizing these refined CDOM loads for terrigenous biomarkers results in improved temporal resolution and a significant change in flux estimates. Examining CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) flux data from an assortment of terrestrial biomes we establish a robust relationship between CDOM and DOC loads. The application of this relationship allows future studies to derive DOC loads from CDOM utilizing emerging in-situ or remote sensing technologies and thus refine river-to-ocean DOC fluxes, as well as exploit historic imagery to examine how fluxes may have changed. Calculated CDOM yields from a range of rivers are correlated to watershed percent wetland and highlight the importance of certain regions with respect to CDOM flux to the coastal ocean. This approach indicates that future studies might predict CDOM and DOC yields for different watershed types that could then be readily converted to loads providing for the estimation of CDOM and DOC export from ungauged watersheds. Examination of CDOM yields also highlights important geographical regions for future study with respect to the role of terrigenous CDOM in ocean color budgets and CDOM's role in biogeochemical processes. Finally, examples will be presented linking CDOM parameters to DOM composition and biogeochemical properties with the aim of providing measurements to improve the spatial and especially temporal resolution of the role DOM plays in fluvial networks.

  18. A biogeochemical comparison of two well-buffered catchments with contrasting histories of acid deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.; Kram, P.; Hruska, J.; Bullen, T.D.

    2004-01-01

    Much of the biogeochemical cycling research in catchments in the past 25 years has been driven by acid deposition research funding. This research has focused on vulnerable base-poor systems; catchments on alkaline lithologies have received little attention. In regions of high acid loadings, however, even well-buffered catchments are susceptible to forest decline and episodes of low alkalinity in streamwater. As part of a collaboration between the Czech and U.S. Geological Surveys, we compared biogeochemical patterns in two well-studied, well-buffered catchments: Pluhuv Bor in the western Czech Republic, which has received high loading of atmospheric acidity, and Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont, U.S.A., where acid loading has been considerably less. Despite differences in lithology, wetness, forest type, and glacial history, the catchments displayed similar patterns of solute concentrations and flow. At both catchments, base cation and alkalinity diluted with increasing flow, whereas nitrate and dissolved organic carbon increased with increasing flow. Sulfate diluted with increasing flow at Sleepers River, while at Pluhuv Bor the sulfate-flow relation shifted from positive to negative as atmospheric sulfur (S) loadings decreased and soil S pools were depleted during the 1990s. At high flow, alkalinity decreased to near 100 ??eq L-1 at Pluhuv Bor compared to 400 ??eq L-1 at Sleepers River. Despite the large amounts of S flushed from Pluhuv Bor soils, these alkalinity declines were caused solely by dilution, which was greater at Pluhuv Bor relative to Sleepers River due to greater contributions from shallow flow paths at high flow. Although the historical high S loading at Pluhuv Bor has caused soil acidification and possible forest damage, it has had little effect on the acid/base status of streamwater in this well-buffered catchment. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  19. The biogeochemical structuring role of horizontal stirring: Lagrangian perspectives on iron delivery downstream of the Kerguelen Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Ovidio, F.; Della Penna, A.; Trull, T. W.; Nencioli, F.; Pujol, M.-I.; Rio, M.-H.; Park, Y.-H.; Cotté, C.; Zhou, M.; Blain, S.

    2015-10-01

    Field campaigns are instrumental in providing ground truth for understanding and modeling global ocean biogeochemical budgets. A survey however can only inspect a fraction of the global oceans, typically a region hundreds of kilometers wide for a temporal window of the order of (at most) several weeks. This spatiotemporal domain is also the one in which the mesoscale activity induces through horizontal stirring a strong variability in the biogeochemical tracers, with ephemeral, local contrasts which can easily mask the regional and seasonal gradients. Therefore, whenever local in situ measures are used to infer larger-scale budgets, one faces the challenge of identifying the mesoscale structuring effect, if not simply to filter it out. In the case of the KEOPS2 investigation of biogeochemical responses to natural iron fertilization, this problem was tackled by designing an adaptive sampling strategy based on regionally optimized multisatellite products analyzed in real time by specifically designed Lagrangian diagnostics. This strategy identified the different mesoscale and stirring structures present in the region and tracked the dynamical frontiers among them. It also enabled back trajectories for the ship-sampled stations to be estimated, providing important insights into the timing and pathways of iron supply, which were explored further using a model based on first-order iron removal. This context was essential for the interpretation of the field results. The mesoscale circulation-based strategy was also validated post-cruise by comparing the Lagrangian maps derived from satellites with the patterns of more than one hundred drifters, including some adaptively released during KEOPS2 and a subsequent research voyage. The KEOPS2 strategy was adapted to the specific biogeochemical characteristics of the region, but its principles are general and will be useful for future in situ biogeochemical surveys.

  20. The biogeochemical structuring role of horizontal stirring: Lagrangian perspectives on iron delivery downstream of the Kerguelen plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Ovidio, F.; Della Penna, A.; Trull, T. W.; Nencioli, F.; Pujol, I.; Rio, M. H.; Park, Y.-H.; Cotté, C.; Zhou, M.; Blain, S.

    2015-01-01

    Field campaigns are instrumental in providing ground truth for understanding and modelling global ocean biogeochemical budgets. A survey however can only inspect a fraction of the global oceans, typically a region 100s km wide for a temporal window of the order of (at most) several weeks. This spatiotemporal domain is also the one in which the mesoscale activity induces through horizontal stirring a strong variability in the biogeochemical tracers, with ephemeral, local contrasts which can easily mask the regional and seasonal gradients. Therefore, whenever local in-situ measures are used to infer larger scale budgets one faces the challenge of identifying the mesoscale structuring effect, if not simply to filter it out. In the case of the KEOPS2 investigation of biogeochemical responses to natural iron fertilization, this problem was tackled by designing an adaptive sampling strategy based on regionally-optimized multisatellite products analyzed in real time by specifically designed Lagrangian diagnostics. This strategy identified the different mesoscale and stirring structures present in the region and tracked the dynamical frontiers among them. It also enabled back-trajectories for the ship sampled stations to be estimated, providing important insights into the timing and pathways of iron supply, which were explored further using model based on first order iron removal. This context was essential for the interpretation of the field results. The mesoscale circulation based strategy was also validated post-cruise by comparing the Lagrangian maps derived from satellite with the patterns of more than one hundred drifters adaptively released during KEOPS2 and a subsequent research voyage. The KEOPS2 strategy was adapted to the specific biogeochemical characteristics of the region, but its principles are general and will be useful for future in-situ biogeochemical surveys.

  1. Extracellular enzyme activity and microbial diversity measured on seafloor exposed basalts from Loihi seamount indicate the importance of basalts to global biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Jacobson Meyers, Myrna E; Sylvan, Jason B; Edwards, Katrina J

    2014-08-01

    Seafloor basalts are widely distributed and host diverse prokaryotic communities, but no data exist concerning the metabolic rates of the resident microbial communities. We present here potential extracellular enzyme activities of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) measured on basalt samples from different locations on Loihi Seamount, HI, coupled with analysis of prokaryotic biomass and pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The community maximum potential enzyme activity (Vmax) of LAP ranged from 0.47 to 0.90 nmol (g rock)(-1) h(-1); the Vmax for AP was 28 to 60 nmol (g rock)(-1) h(-1). The Km of LAP ranged from 26 to 33 ?M, while the Km for AP was 2 to 7 ?M. Bacterial communities on Loihi basalts were comprised primarily of Alpha-, Delta-, andGammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. The putative ability to produce LAP is evenly distributed across the most commonly detected bacterial orders, but the ability to produce AP is likely dominated by bacteria in the orders Xanthomonadales, Flavobacteriales, and Planctomycetales. The enzyme activities on Loihi basalts were compared to those of other marine environments that have been studied and were found to be similar in magnitude to those from continental shelf sediments and orders of magnitude higher than any measured in the water column, demonstrating that the potential for exposed basalts to transform organic matter is substantial. We propose that microbial communities on basaltic rock play a significant, quantifiable role in benthic biogeochemical processes. PMID:24907315

  2. Extracellular Enzyme Activity and Microbial Diversity Measured on Seafloor Exposed Basalts from Loihi Seamount Indicate the Importance of Basalts to Global Biogeochemical Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Sylvan, Jason B.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2014-01-01

    Seafloor basalts are widely distributed and host diverse prokaryotic communities, but no data exist concerning the metabolic rates of the resident microbial communities. We present here potential extracellular enzyme activities of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) measured on basalt samples from different locations on Loihi Seamount, HI, coupled with analysis of prokaryotic biomass and pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The community maximum potential enzyme activity (Vmax) of LAP ranged from 0.47 to 0.90 nmol (g rock)?1 h?1; the Vmax for AP was 28 to 60 nmol (g rock)?1 h?1. The Km of LAP ranged from 26 to 33 ?M, while the Km for AP was 2 to 7 ?M. Bacterial communities on Loihi basalts were comprised primarily of Alpha-, Delta-, andGammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. The putative ability to produce LAP is evenly distributed across the most commonly detected bacterial orders, but the ability to produce AP is likely dominated by bacteria in the orders Xanthomonadales, Flavobacteriales, and Planctomycetales. The enzyme activities on Loihi basalts were compared to those of other marine environments that have been studied and were found to be similar in magnitude to those from continental shelf sediments and orders of magnitude higher than any measured in the water column, demonstrating that the potential for exposed basalts to transform organic matter is substantial. We propose that microbial communities on basaltic rock play a significant, quantifiable role in benthic biogeochemical processes. PMID:24907315

  3. Biogeochemical controls on Diel cycling of stable isotopes of dissolved O2 and dissolved inorganic carbon in the Big Hole River, Montana.

    PubMed

    Parker, Stephen R; Poulson, Simon R; Gammons, Christopher H; DeGrandpre, Michael D

    2005-09-15

    Rivers with high biological productivity typically show substantial increases in pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration during the day and decreases at night, in response to changes in the relative rates of aquatic photosynthesis and respiration. These changes, coupled with temperature variations, may impart diel (24-h) fluctuations in the concentration of trace metals, nutrients, and other chemical species. A better understanding of diel processes in rivers is needed and will lead to improved methods of data collection for both monitoring and research purposes. Previous studies have used stable isotopes of dissolved oxygen (DO) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as tracers of geochemical and biological processes in streams, lakes, and marine systems. Although seasonal variation in 6180 of DO in rivers and lakes has been documented, no study has investigated diel changes in this parameter. Here, we demonstrate large (up to 13%o) cycles in delta18O-DO for two late summer sampling periods in the Big Hole River of southwest Montana and illustrate that these changes are correlated to variations in the DO concentration, the C-isotopic composition of DIC, and the primary productivity of the system. The magnitude of the diel cycle in delta18O-DO was greater in August versus September because of the longer photoperiod and warmer water temperatures. This study provides another biogeochemical tool for investigating the O2 and C budgets in rivers and may also be applicable to lake and groundwater systems. PMID:16201639

  4. Metagenomics, single cell genomics, and steady-state free energy flux provide insight into the biogeochemical cycling of deep, meteoric water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnabosco, C.; Lau, C. M.; Ryan, K.; Kieft, T. L.; Snyder, L.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Hendrickson, S.; Pullin, M. J.; Slater, G. F.; Simkus, D.; Borgonie, G.; van Heerden, E.; Kuloyo, O.; Maleke, M.; Tlalajoe, T.; Vermeulen, J.; Vermeulen, F.; Munro, A.; Pienaar, M.; Stepanauskas, R.; Grim, S. L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    Prior to the onset of high-throughput sequencing, the study of biogeochemical cycling in the terrestrial deep subsurface was limited to geochemical, thermodynamic, culture dependent microbial and low-throughput molecular analyses. Here, we present an integration of these traditional methods with high-throughput metagenomic and single cell analysis of 3.1 km deep water collected from a borehole (TT107) located in AngloGold Ashanti's TauTona Au Mine of South Africa and intersecting a fracture within a Witwatersrand Supergroup quartzite. The low salinity fracture water encountered at this depth is meteoric in origin and has a subsurface residence time on the order of a few thousand years. Aqueous geochemistry and estimated steady-state free energy flux values suggest that redox reactions are driven by the oxidation of abundant, energy-rich substrates including H2, CO, CH4, formate, and propanoate. The majority of the metagenome's sequences related to the phyla Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, which contain several bacterial species that are likely to exhibit chemoautotrophic metabolism. Sequence data confirms that many of these bacteria have the ability reduce of sulfur and nitrogen species via dissimilatory pathways. Thermincola were the most abundant firmicutes at this location and were sequenced at the single cell level. Notably, Thermincola sp. are capable of reducing metals and may utilize energy rich manganese reduction pathways at TT107. The CH4 at this site is of abiological origin (?13C-C1-3 = -43.5 to -44.3 VPDB; ?2H-C1-3 = -345 to -200 VSMOW) despite the metagenome containing several sequences that are closely related to methanogens in the archaeal phyla Euryarchaeota. Alternatively, these archaea may belong to a group of euryarchaetoa commonly referred to as anaerobic mehanotrophic archaea (ANME) - suggesting that anaerobic oxidation (AOM) of abiogenic CH4 coupled to the reduction of sulfate species may be occurring at this site. Sequences for pmoA and sMMO genes are also present indicating the potential for aerobic oxidation of the abiogenic hydrocarbons at low pO2. Gene products involved in microbial denitrification and N2 fixation were also identified. Together, these results provide a new, multi-dimensional picture of the biogeochemical cycling and microbial communities within the Witwatersrand Supergroup and terrestrial deep subsurface.

  5. Upscaling the coupled water flow and heat transfer in the subsurface - Comparison between numerical and field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviercoski, R. F.; Efendiev, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Yuan, Y. J.

    2015-10-01

    The simultaneous movement of liquid water, water vapor, and heat in the vadose zone plays a critical role in the overall water and energy balance of the near surface environment. Moisture near the soil surface is influenced by evaporation, precipitation, liquid water flow, and water vapor flow, most of which are strongly coupled. The demand for mathematical models that take into account spatial and temporal scales for the shallow soil are now-a-days more imperative given that: (a) the critical role that such processes play in the global water and energy balance; (b) the interplay between spatial and temporal scales in the near surface region is not well understood. The new contributions in this paper are: the coupled model is revisited and some modifications are proposed aiming to represent the surface/subsurface interaction more accurately; the spatial upscaled coupled model is presented. The models are validated by comparing numerical results between the fine-scale and upscaled models and data for both, moisture and temperature. The field data comes from a detailed controlled experiment from Riverside-CA, with measurements taken at 2, 7 and 12 cm below the surface.

  6. Prosthesis coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reswick, J. B.; Mooney, V.; Bright, C. W.; Owens, L. J. (inventors)

    1979-01-01

    A coupling for use in an apparatus for connecting a prosthesis to the bone of a stump of an amputated limb is described which permits a bio-compatible carbon sleeve forming a part of the prosthesis connector to float so as to prevent disturbing the skin seal around the carbon sleeve. The coupling includes a flexible member interposed between a socket that is inserted within an intermedullary cavity of the bone and the sleeve. A lock pin is carried by the prosthesis and has a stem portion which is adapted to be coaxially disposed and slideably within the tubular female socket for securing the prosthesis to the stump. The skin around the percutaneous carbon sleeve is able to move as a result of the flexing coupling so as to reduce stresses caused by changes in the stump shape and/or movement between the bone and the flesh portion of the stump.

  7. Assessing the Hydrochemical Response of High Elevation Forest Watersheds to Climate Change and Atmospheric Deposition Using a Biogeochemical Model (PnET- BGC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmokhtarian, A.; Driscoll, C.; Campbell, J.; Hayhoe, K.

    2009-05-01

    Climate is an important regulator of the hydrology and biogeochemistry of forest watersheds. To assess the potential impacts of climate change, a multi-faceted approach is required that is capable of resolving multiple climatic and other anthropogenic stressors likely to simultaneously affect ecosystems over the coming decades. The ecological responses to climate change have been assessed by observational, gradient, laboratory and field studies; however, models are the only practical approach to investigate how future changes in climate are likely to interact with other drivers of global change such as atmospheric deposition and land disturbance over broad regions. Biogeochemical watershed models are an important tool to help to understand the long-term effects of climate change on ecosystems. In this study, we are using the biogeochemical model (PnET-BGC) coupled with long-term measurements to evaluate the effects of potential future changes in temperature, precipitation, solar radiation and atmospheric CO2 on pools and fluxes of major elements at 14 diverse, intensively studied, high-elevation watersheds. Future emissions scenarios were developed from monthly output from three atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs; HadCM3, PCM, GFDL) in conjunction with potential lower and upper bounds of projected atmospheric CO2 (550 and 970 ppm by 2099, respectively). Here we report on long-term site measurements and PnET-BGC predictions for the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBR) in the White Mountains, New Hampshire, and Huntington Wildlife Forest (HWF) in the Adirondack Mountains, New York (two of the 14 sites), indicating a broad range of hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to changing climate. AOGCM results over the 21st century indicate an average increase in temperature ranging from 1.9 to 6.9°C and 1.9 to 7.0°C with simultaneous increases in precipitation ranging from 12.5 to 13.9% and 11.9 to 12.2% above the long term mean (1970-1999) for HBR and HWF, respectively. The increases in temperature are greater at higher latitudes, and precipitation patterns are changing. Long-term measurements and watershed modeling results show a significant shift in hydrology with earlier spring discharge (snowmelt), greater evapotranspiration, and later snowpack development. Model results also show an increase in NO3- leaching due to large increases in net mineralization and nitrification. The extent of this response is dependent on the fertilization effect that increasing atmospheric CO2 has on forest vegetation. The watershed responses of other major elements such as SO42- and Ca2+, and chemical characteristics such as pH and ANC to changes in climate varied due to site characteristics. Model predictions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations showed increases at both sites. Model projections also suggest marked decreases in soil exchangeable calcium, magnesium and potassium with simultaneous decline in soil base saturation and Al/Ca ratio over the next century. These changes are mainly attributed to elevated leaching losses of nitrate. A sensitivity analysis showed that the temperature is the key driver of watershed responses to future climate change resulting in the greatest response of the simulated changes.

  8. Using NMR, SIP, and MS measurements for monitoring subsurface biogeochemical reactions at the Rifle IFRC site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosier, C. L.; Keating, K.; Williams, K. H.; Robbins, M.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Grunewald, E.; Walsh, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site is located on a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado (USA). Although removal of tailings and contaminated surface materials was completed in 1996, residual uranium contamination of groundwater and subsurface sediments remains. Since 2002, research at the site has primarily focused on quantifying uranium mobility associated with stimulated and natural biogeochemical processes. Uranium mobility at the Rifle IFRC site is typically quantified through direct sampling of groundwater; however, direct sampling does not provide information about the solid phase material outside of the borehole and continuous measurements are not always possible due to multiple constraints. Geophysical methods have been suggested as a minimally invasive alternative approach for long term monitoring of biogeochemical reactions associated with uranium remediation. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), spectral induced polarization (SIP), and magnetic susceptibility (MS) are considered as potential geophysical methods for monitoring the biogeochemical reactions occurring at the Rifle IFRC site. Additionally, a pilot field study using an NMR borehole-logging tool was carried out at the Rifle IFRC site. These methods are sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical subsurface properties that occur as a result of bioremediation efforts; specifically, changes in the redox state and chemical form of iron, production of iron sulfide minerals, production of the magnetic mineral magnetite, and associated changes in the pore geometry. Laboratory experiments consisted of monitoring changes in the NMR, SIP and MS response of an acetate-amended columns packed with sediments from the Rifle IFRC site over the course of two months. The MS values remained relatively stable throughout the course of the experiment suggesting negligible production of magnetic phases (e.g. magnetite, pyrrhotite) as a result of enhanced microbial activity. However, both the SIP and NMR measurements were found to change as the experiment progressed. Changes in NMR and SIP values are attributed to the microbially induced formation of iron sulfide minerals and changes in the pore geometry. Continuous borehole NMR data were collected at the Rifle IFRC site using the Javelin NMR logging tool developed by Vista Clara Inc. Data were collected in two wells, one at a site that had previously been treated with an acetate amendment, and the second at a background (e.g. control) site. Results from the control well suggest very limited variation in NMR values. However, in the acetate amended well we observed a significant decrease in the mean of echoes (proportional to T2 and free water content) as the water table fluctuated from spring runoff. This decrease appeared to be more pronounced at longer echo spacing, suggesting changes in NMR values are potentially the result of alteration in hydrological properties resulting from microbial biomass and/or mineral accumulation in the pore space.

  9. Hawaii and Beyond: Volcanic Islands as Model Systems for Biogeochemical and Human Ecodynamic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Hawaiian Islands provide an excellent natural lab for understanding geochemical and ecosystem processes. The most important features are: a) increasing volcano age with distance from the hotspot, b) asymmetric rainfall distribution imposed by the northeasterly trade winds and orographic processes, creating wet windward and dry leeward landscapes, c) an impoverished vegetation assemblage allowing the same species to grow in strongly varying climate and soil conditions, d) the ability to hold topography relatively constant over long time scales by sampling on volcanic shield remnants that are preserved even on the oldest high island, Kauai, and e) a long-term topographic evolution that carves the gently sloping shield surfaces into steep-sided, amphitheater headed, relatively flat floored valleys. Although deeply incised valleys are well represented in Kauai, the later stages of volcanic island evolution are not well expressed in the exposed Hawaiian Islands. Therefore, I also consider examples from the Society and Gambier Islands in French Polynesia to demonstrate the biogeochemical and human ecodynamic impacts of valley expansion and subsidence leading to drowning of all but the highest elevation interfluves. In Hawaii, I and many colleagues have characterized the details of biogeochemical processes such as: a) variations in oxygen isotopes in soil water and soil minerals, b) changing nutrient sources using Sr, Ca, and Mg isotopes, c) mineral - carbon sorption and its implications for carbon storage in soils and for mineral ripening, and d) the development of leaching and redox driven pedogenic thresholds. Here, I address how these biogeochemical features influence human land-use decisions in prehistoric Hawaii and elsewhere in the Pacific. Polynesian radiation into the eastern Pacific occurred rapidly after 1300 y bp. Although they carried with them a kitchen garden each new island presented a different environmental challenge. They were sensitive to topographic and weathering conditions and adjusted their agricultural efforts accordingly. On young minimally eroded islands they favored dryland agriculture in the uplands - there being nowhere to establish extensive irrigation systems - whereas on older islands they favored irrigated lands in the extensive eroded valleys - the soil nutrient status being too depleted in the uplands. Thus Hawaii has most dryland agriculture and Kauai has most irrigated agriculture. Islands such as Easter Island created a problem because the upland soils were nutrient depleted and there were no valleys. On Moorea, valleys provided substantial areas for irrigation. However much of the uplands had infertile lateritic soils, which in places are covered by landslide deposits that contained very rocky and nutrient-rich soils. Archeological surveys demonstrate that religious and house features were sited on the lateritic soils whereas agriculture was practiced on the landslide deposits. The Gambier Islands are composed of steep highly eroded slopes and small valleys. The valleys were the only place where agriculture could be developed and it is clear that they were the locus of considerable alluvial/colluvial deposition during prehistory and even more so during historic times.

  10. Seasonal Variations of Biogeochemical Characteristics in Predominantly Anaerobic Groundwater From a Riverine Alluvial Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, D.; Ha, K.; Kim, K.; Ko, K.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrogeochemical parameters were investigated for groundwater from six multi-level wells (up to 30 m deep) in a riverine alluvial aquifer with intense agricultural activities of rice, barley and vegetable cultivation during two sampling campaigns in rainy summer (July) and dry spring (March) season to identify seasonal variation in biogeochemical processes in the aquifer. The alluvial aquifer is located in flooldplains of Mangyeong River, western part of South Korea near the city of Jeonju. pH, concentrations of Na, Cl, Ca, F have little difference between the two sampling periods. Electrical conductivity (EC) and concentrations of HCO3, Mg, SO4 slightly increased as a whole from rainy season to dry season. Dissolved concentrations of major ions in river water increased by more than three fold during the seasons. These feature indicates that the groundwater system is relatively stable and less affected by the river in hydrogeochemical aspects. Dissolve oxygen (DO) concentrations were less than 1 mg/L for most of the wells whereas two wells turned to aerobic conditions in dry season which can be attributed to removal of stagnant water in the paddy fields. NO3 concentrations decreased significantly in dry season at most well points near the paddy fields. This indicates that denitrification is dominant over nitrate supply by infiltrating water from the land surface which is likely to be significantly decreased after harvesting of rice during the dry season. However, NO3 increased in upper zones (<10 m) in two wells near the barley and vegetable fields, which suggest continued nitrate supply from the crop fields to the upper part of the aquifer during the season. Fe concentrations have relatively small variations in most of wells for two sampling periods. However, from rainy season to dry season, Fe concentrations significantly increased more than two fold in two wells whereas NO3 concentration decreased below detection limit from 2 to 8 mg/L. The increase of Fe resulted in the increase of HCO3 concentrations by two fold and significant increase of EC, which even transformed hydrogeochemical pattern of major ions in those intervals, which can be attributed to the much higher proton consumption in iron reduction than in denitrification. This is indicative of the seasonal change in electron-accepting processes from nitrate reduction to iron reduction along with decrease in nitrate supply from the land surface. Seasonal variations in concentrations of DO, NO3, and Fe show that the temporal change in agricultural activities on land surface significantly affects biogeochemical processes in an alluvial aquifer. Denitrification of agriculturally derived NO3 and iron reduction in the alluvial aquifer can significanlty affect water chemistry of the river.

  11. Elucidating Geochemical and Biogeochemical U(VI) Reduction Via Soil Sterilization at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, T. L.; Jardine, P. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Ginder-Vogel, M. A.; Fendorf, S. E.; Baldwin, M. E.

    2005-12-01

    The adsorption and reduction of U(VI) onto sterilized and nonsterilized soil from the Oak Ridge Reservation was studied to distinguish biogeochemical versus geochemical effects on metal reduction. The Oak Ridge soil under investigation is a saprolite sequence of interbedded weathered shale and limestone obtained at the capillary fringe with a pH near 7.6. Experiments were conducted on unaltered soils as well as subsamples of the soil that were pre-treated to remove free oxides and/or organic matter. Soils were sterilized by either steam sterilization at 1210C or by ?-irradiation using a Cobalt-60 source with a ?-ray dosage of 20kGy. Sterile and nonsterile U(VI) batch experiments were completed aerobically over a reaction time of 400 hours. The reactions were buffered using 25mM HEPES and NaHCO3. Initial U(VI) concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 10 ppm. The effects of sterilization on bacterial population, soil mineralogy, pH, ?-potential, cation exchange capacity, redox potential, and soil organic matter (SOM) were identified. Sterilization by irradiation was >99.99% efficient and steam sterilization was approximately 99% efficient. Major mineralogy, soil pH, and clay mineral ?-potential were unaffected by the sterilization techniques. The cation exchange capacity of the irradiated soils decreased from 40 to 30 cmolc/kg. Sterilization by irradiation caused some degradation of the SOM, as determined by UV-VIS, however the results were practically insignificant due to the small quantity of SOM in the Oak Ridge soil (<0.1%). The redox potential of the soil before and after sterilization is being tested. Results indicate that the removal of U(VI) from solution onto untreated soils was significantly increased in soil sterilized by ?-irradiation compared to nonsterilized soil and suggests that geochemical processes, rather than biogeochemical processes, controlled U(VI) sorption/reduction in these soils. Results of experiments completed using soils pre-treated with H2O2 to remove soil organic matter (SOM) indicate that SOM was not a major sorbent of U(VI). Batch experiments completed on soils that contained no free oxide minerals indicate that Fe and Mn oxides were an important control of U(VI) transformations in the studied soil. Future experiments will quantify the effects of Fe, SOM, and indigenous microorganisms on U(VI) sorption and reduction at Oak Ridge.

  12. Isotope biogeochemical assessment of natural biodegradation processes in open cast pit mining landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Christina; Knöller, Kay; Koschorreck, Matthias; Ussath, Maria; Hoth, Nils

    2014-05-01

    In Germany, a major share of the energy production is based on the burning of lignite from open cast pit mines. The remediation and re-cultivation of the former mining areas in the Lusatian and Central German lignite mining district is an enormous technical and economical challenge. After mine closures, the surrounding landscapes are threatened by acid mine drainage (AMD), i.e. the acidification and mineralization of rising groundwater with metals and inorganic contaminants. The high content of sulfur (sulfuric acid, sulfate), nitrogen (ammonium) and iron compounds (iron-hydroxides) deteriorates the groundwater quality and decelerates sustainable development of tourism in (former) mining landscapes. Natural biodegradation or attenuation (NA) processes of inorganic contaminants are considered to be a technically low impact and an economically beneficial solution. The investigations of the stable isotope compositions of compounds involved in NA processes helps clarify the dynamics of natural degradation and provides specific informations on retention processes of sulfate and nitrogen-compounds in mine dump water, mine dump sediment, and residual pit lakes. In an active mine dump we investigated zones where the process of bacterial sulfate reduction, as one very important NA process, takes place and how NA can be enhanced by injecting reactive substrates. Stable isotopes signatures of sulfur and nitrogen components were examined and evaluated in concert with hydrogeochemical data. In addition, we delineated the sources of ammonium pollution in mine dump sediments and investigated nitrification by 15N-labeling techniques to calculate the limit of the conversion of harmful ammonium to nitrate in residual mining lakes. Ultimately, we provided an isotope biogeochemical assessment of natural attenuation of sulfate and ammonium at mine dump sites and mining lakes. Also, we estimated the risk potential for water in different compartments of the hydrological system. In laboratory experiments, we tested reactive materials that may speed up the process of bacterial sulfate reduction. In in-situ experiments, we quantified nitrification rates. Based on the results, we are able to suggest promising technical measures that enhance natural attenuation processes at mine dump site and in mining lakes. The natural water cycle in lignite mining landscapes is heavily impacted by human activities. Basically, nature is capable of cleaning itself to a certain extent after mining activities stopped. However, it is our responsibility to support biogeochemical processes to make them more efficient and more sustainable. Isotopic monitoring proved to be an excellent tool for assessing the relevance and performance of different re-cultivation measures for a positive long-term development of the water quality in large-scale aquatic systems affected by the impact of lignite mining.

  13. Biogeochemical Impact of Long-Range Transported Dust over Northern South China Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Wang, S. H.; Hsu, N. C.

    2011-01-01

    Transpacific transport and impact of Asian dust aerosols have been well documented (e.g., results from ACE-Asia and regional follow-on campaigns), but little is known about dust invasion to the South China Sea (SCS). On 19-21 March 2010, a fierce Asian dust storm affected large areas from the Gobi deserts to the West Pacific, including Taiwan and Hong Kong. As a pilot study of the 7-SEAS (Seven South East Asian Studies) in the northern SCS, detailed characteristics of long-range transported dust aerosols were first observed by a comprehensive set of ground-based instruments deployed at the Dongsha islands (20deg42'52" N, 116deg43'51" E). Aerosol measurements such as particle mass concentrations, size distribution, optical properties, hygroscopicity, and vertical profiles help illustrate the evolution of this dust outbreak. Our results indicate that these dust particles were mixed with anthropogenic and marine aerosols, and transported near the surface. Satellite assessment of biogeochemical impact of dust deposition into open oceans is hindered by our current inability in retrieving areal dust properties and ocean colors over an extensive period of time, particularly under the influence of cloudy conditions. In this paper, we analyze the changes of retrieved Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration over the northern SCS, considered as oligotophic waters in the spring, from long-term SeaWiFS measurements since 1997. Over the past decade, six long-range transported dust events are identified based on spatiotemporal evolutions of PM10 measurements from regional monitoring stations, with the aid of trajectory analysis. Multi-year composites of Chl-a imagery for dust event and non-dust background during March-April are applied to overcome insufficient retrievals of Chl-a due to cloudy environment. Due to anthropogenic modification within a shallow boundary layer off the densely populated and industrial southeast coast of China, the iron ion activation of deliquescent dust particles enhances the efficiency of fertilization for biological productivity. Compared to the West Pacific, the marine ecosystem in the northern SCS is much more susceptible to the biogeochemical impact of long-range transported Asian dust.

  14. Anthropogenic and Climate Influences on Biogeochemical Dynamics and Molecular-Level Speciation of Soil Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, D.; Lehmann, J; Kinyangi, J; Pell, A; Theis , J; Riha , S; Ngoze, S; Amelung, W; du Preez, C; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    The soil environment is a primary component of the global biogeochemical sulfur (S) cycle, acting as a source and sink of various S species and mediating oxidation state changes. However, ecological significance of the various S forms and the impacts of human intervention and climate on the amount and structural composition of these compounds are still poorly understood. We investigated the long-term influences of anthropogenically mediated transitions from natural to managed ecosystems on molecular-level speciation, biogeochemical dynamics, and the apparent temperature sensitivity of S moieties in temperate, subtropical, and tropical environments with mean annual temperature (MAT) ranging from 5C to 21C, using elemental analysis and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Land-use and land-cover changes led to the depletion of total soil S in all three ecoregions over a period of up to 103 years. The largest decline occurred from tropical forest agroecosystems (67% Kakamega and 76% Nandi, Kenya), compared to losses from temperate (36% at Lethbridge, Canada, and 40% at Pendleton, USA) and subtropical (48% at South Africa) grassland agroecosystems. The total S losses correlated significantly with MAT. Anthropogenic interventions profoundly altered the molecular-level composition and resulted in an apparent shift in oxidation states of organic S from native ecosystems composed primarily of S moieties in intermediate and highly reduced oxidation states toward managed agroecosystems dominated by organic S rich in strongly oxidized functionalities. The most prominent change occurred in thiols and sulfides, the proportion of which decreased by 46% (Lethbridge) and 57% (Pendleton) in temperate agroecosystems, by 46% in subtropical agroecosystems, and by 79% (Nandi) and 81% (Kakamega) in tropical agroecosystems. The proportion of organic S directly linked to O increased by 81%, 168%, 40%, 92%, and 85%, respectively. Among the various organic S functionalities, thiols and sulfides seem to have higher apparent temperature sensitivity, and thus these organic S moieties may become prone to losses due to land-use changes, even from the cooler regions of the world if MAT of these regions rise in the future.

  15. Clio: An Autonomous Vertical Sampling Vehicle for Global Ocean Biogeochemical Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakuba, M.; Gomez-Ibanez, D.; Saito, M. A.; Dick, G.; Breier, J. A., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    We report the preliminary design of a fast vertical profiling autonomous underwater vehicle, called Clio, designed to cost-effectively improve the understanding of marine microorganism ecosystem dynamics on a global scale. The insights into biogeochemical cycles to be gained from illuminating the relationships between ocean life and chemistry have led to establishment of the GEOTRACES program. The nutrient and trace element profiles generated by GEOTRACES will provide insight into what is happening biogeochemically, but not how it is happening, i.e., what biochemical pathways are active? Advances in sequencing technology and in situ preservation have made it possible to study the genomics (DNA), transcriptomics (RNA), proteomics (proteins and enzymes), metabolomics (lipids and other metabolites), and metallomics (metals), associated with marine microorganisms; however, these techniques require sample collection. To this end, Clio will carry two to four SUspended Particle Rosette (SUPR) multi-samplers to depths of 6000 m. Clio is being designed specifically to complement the GEOTRACES program—to operate simultaneously and independently of the wire-based sampling protocols developed for GEOTRACES. At each GEOTRACES ocean transect sampling station, Clio will be deployed from the ship, transit vertically to the seafloor, and then ascend to, and stop at up to 32 sampling depths, where it will filter up to 150 l of seawater per sample. Filtered samples for RNA will be administered a dose of preservative (RNALater) in situ. Clio must efficiently hold station at multiple depths between the surface and 6000 m, but also move rapidly between sampling depths. It must be chemically clean and avoid disturbing the water column while sampling. Clio must be operationally friendly, requiring few personnel to operate, and have minimal impact on shipboard operations. We have selected a positively-buoyant thruster-driven design with a quasi-isopycnal construction. Our simulations indicate the vehicle can complete dives that mirror their GEOTRACES counterparts within the station time alloted. The simulation includes the effects of material/housing compressibility and thermal expansion, and employs a global average T/S profile from the Levitus 1982 climatology.

  16. Biogeochemical cycling in an annual grassland matrix: Responses and feedbacks to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Wendy Wen-Ting

    I used empirical methods and model simulations to examine the effects of altered rainfall, climate warming, and grazing management on biogeochemical cycling in a Northern California annual grassland landscape. Greenhouse gas fluxes from ecosystems in the annual grassland matrix create feedbacks to climate change and my primary research aim was to measure the magnitude of fluxes and their major environmental controls along multiple spatial and temporal scales. A multi-year field experiment in the Sierra Foothills of Northern California tested the effects of 50% increased rainfall quantity and a longer wet season on annual grassland net primary production, soil respiration, nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes, inorganic nitrogen cycling, litter decomposition, net ecosystem production, and other ecosystem functions. Changes in rainfall timing had a much stronger effect on soil respiration relative to altered wet-season rainfall totals, with implications that a longer or later wet season could result in significant losses of soil carbon (C). On a regional scale, I assessed the radiative warming potential of inland freshwater wetlands situated within the annual grassland matrix and contrasted this value with that of annual grasslands. Three years of monthly flux measurements revealed that spring-fed wetlands emitted more N2O and methane (CH4) than grasslands on a per-area basis, but that more radiative warming potential was attributable to grasslands when scaled up to the state. I conducted a laboratory incubation of grassland soils subjected to a range of temperature and wet-up levels. Temperature was a good linear predictor of cumulative CO 2 fluxes over the experiment but was a poorer predictor of N2O production, which was more strongly limited by moisture availability. Finally, I employed the DayCent soil organic matter model to explore longer-term effects of altered climate and grazing intensity on soil C storage, plant dynamics, and N2O emissions. According to the model, warming and wet-season extension increased both CO2 and N2O fluxes, whereas grazing removal caused divergent effects, enhancing N2O emissions and decreasing CO2 fluxes. In sum, these findings contribute toward a better understanding of how global change and ecosystem management affect biogeochemical fluxes and ecosystem stability.

  17. Sea change: Charting the course for biogeochemical ocean time-series research in a new millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Matthew J.; Lomas, Michael W.; Muller-Karger, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Ocean time-series provide vital information needed for assessing ecosystem change. This paper summarizes the historical context, major program objectives, and future research priorities for three contemporary ocean time-series programs: The Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT), the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS), and the CARIACO Ocean Time-Series. These three programs operate in physically and biogeochemically distinct regions of the world's oceans, with HOT and BATS located in the open-ocean waters of the subtropical North Pacific and North Atlantic, respectively, and CARIACO situated in the anoxic Cariaco Basin of the tropical Atlantic. All three programs sustain near-monthly shipboard occupations of their field sampling sites, with HOT and BATS beginning in 1988, and CARIACO initiated in 1996. The resulting data provide some of the only multi-disciplinary, decadal-scale determinations of time-varying ecosystem change in the global ocean. Facilitated by a scoping workshop (September 2010) sponsored by the Ocean Carbon Biogeochemistry (OCB) program, leaders of these time-series programs sought community input on existing program strengths and for future research directions. Themes that emerged from these discussions included: 1. Shipboard time-series programs are key to informing our understanding of the connectivity between changes in ocean-climate and biogeochemistry 2. The scientific and logistical support provided by shipboard time-series programs forms the backbone for numerous research and education programs. Future studies should be encouraged that seek mechanistic understanding of ecological interactions underlying the biogeochemical dynamics at these sites. 3. Detecting time-varying trends in ocean properties and processes requires consistent, high-quality measurements. Time-series must carefully document analytical procedures and, where possible, trace the accuracy of analyses to certified standards and internal reference materials. 4. Leveraged implementation, testing, and validation of autonomous and remote observing technologies at time-series sites provide new insights into spatiotemporal variability underlying ecosystem changes. 5. The value of existing time-series data for formulating and validating ecosystem models should be promoted. In summary, the scientific underpinnings of ocean time-series programs remain as strong and important today as when these programs were initiated. The emerging data inform our knowledge of the ocean's biogeochemistry and ecology, and improve our predictive capacity about planetary change.

  18. Physical and biogeochemical correlates of spatio-temporal variation in the ?13C of marine macroalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Andrew P.; Hyndes, Glenn A.; Carvalho, Matheus C.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon isotope ratios (13C/12C) can be used to trace sources of production supporting food chains, as ?13C undergoes relatively small and predictable increases (?0.5‰) through each trophic level. However, for this technique to be precise, variation in ?13C signatures of different sources of production (baseline sources) must be clearly defined and distinct from each other. Despite this, ?13C in the primary producers of marine systems are highly variable over space and time, due to the complexity of physical and biogeochemical processes that drive ?13C variation at the base of these foodwebs. We measured spatial and temporal variation in the ?13C of two species of macroalgae that are important dietary components of grazers over temperate reefs: the small kelp Ecklonia radiata, and the red alga Plocamium preissianum, and related any variation to a suite of physical and biogeochemical variables. Patterns in ?13C variation, over different spatial (10 s m to 100 km) and temporal scales (weeks to seasons), differed greatly between taxa, but these were partly explained by the ?13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and light. However, while the ?13C in E. radiata was not related to water temperature, a highly significant proportion of the spatio-temporal variation in ?13C of P. preissianum was explained by temperature alone. Accordingly, we applied this relationship to project (across temperate Australasia) and forecast (in time, south-western Australia) patterns in P. preissianum ?13C. The mean projected ?13C for P. preissianum in the study region varied by only ?1‰ over a 12-month period, compared to ?3‰ over 2000 km. This illustrates the potential scale in the shift of ?13C in baseline food sources over broad scales, and its implications to food web studies. While we show that those relationships differ across taxonomic groups, we recommend developing models to explain variability in ?13C of other baseline sources to facilitate the interpretation of variation in ?13C of consumers in food webs, particularly where data for baselines are absent over broad scales.

  19. Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Connections between Uplands and Streams in Contrasting Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanley, J. B.; Webb, R. M.; Hjerdt, K. N.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Peters, N. E.; Burns, D. A.; Aulenbach, B. T.; Campbell, D. H.; Clow, D. W.; Mast, M. A.; Walker, J. F.; Hunt, R. J.; Troester, J. W.; Larsen, M. C.

    2004-12-01

    We used combinations of hydrometric, chemical, and isotopic evidence to evaluate linkages between upland and riparian zones at the 5 small watersheds of the U.S. Geological Survey Water Energy and Biogeochemical Budget (WEBB) program. These sites span a broad range of climate and topography. At Sleepers River, Vermont, snowmelt induced the water table on hillslopes to rise into the highly transmissive upper soil. The close timing of the groundwater and stream hydrographs suggests a large contribution of hillslope water to the stream. However, the chemistry of these upland groundwaters indicates that only limited areas of convergent groundwater flow directly contribute to streamflow. At Panola Mountain, Georgia, a thin saturated zone develops on the hillslope during large rainstorms. This hillslope groundwater is chemically distinct from riparian groundwater, and transits the riparian zone near land surface with little mixing. Based on chemical mixing analysis, the hillslope contributes up to 30% of the streamwater during moderate to large-sized rainstorms. The Trout Lake site in Wisconsin is a low-lying landscape in highly conductive sandy glacial outwash.Hillslope water chemistry is considerably more dilute (i.e. less evolved) than the regional groundwater that supplies baseflow. The lack of chemical response in streamwater during storms suggests that hillslope water makes a minimal contribution relative to regional groundwater flow. In the alpine/subalpine watershed of Loch Vale, Colorado, much of the subsurface flow occurs on steep slopes of talus. Water in the talus flow has a wide range of residence times. The talus deposits are biogeochemically active and play an important role in maintaining summer baseflow, regulating seasonal changes in streamwater chemistry, and exporting nitrogen from atmospheric deposition. The tropical Icacos watershed in the Luquillo mountains of Puerto Rico receives 4 meters of rainfall annually and has high physical and chemical weathering rates. Streamwater chemistry during baseflow is strongly controlled by groundwater interaction with weathered bedrock. Most hillslope runoff occurs through near-surface macropores with limited soil interaction. This source dominates during storms resulting in stream chemistry that resembles that of the extremely dilute precipitation.We will compare these field observations at each site with the aid of TOPMODEL-based simulation of residence times and observed water quality on the hillslope and riparian saturated zones.

  20. Study of Impact of Groundwater Cascading on Bio-Geochemical Parameters of Lake Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Y. A.; Stumpf, A.

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater Cascading (GC) is a specific type of thermohaline circulation, in which dense water formed over the continental shelf descends down the continental slope to a greater depth. This process is a major component of ventilation of intermediate and abyssal waters, hence affecting thermohaline circulation and global climate. The resulting flows produce an irreversible exchange of oceanic and shelf waters and takes an important role in bio-geochemical cycles by removal of phytoplankton, carbon and chlorophyll from productive areas. Because it can take decades or more for the subducted water to re-surface, water cascades contribute to long term climatic variability. It is common to consider formation of dense water by cooling, evaporation or freezing in the surface layer. GC can provide an alternative mechanism of dense water formation on the shelf. We are working on the estimation of the impact of GC on the bio-geochemical parameters of Lake Michigan. GC and groundwater discharge (GD) through permeable sediments is an important pathway for fluid, solute, and energy transport including freshwater, nutrients, trace metals, bacteria, and other land based pollutants. Given the vast population, agriculture, and industry surrounding Lake Michigan including Chicago area, there is high potential that the groundwater exchange in this environment can significantly contribute dissolved nutrients, heavy metal contaminants and organic pollutants to the lake. These pollutants are likely to impact both water quality and ecosystem health and must be considered by area managers and ecosystem modelers in order to fully understand the water, nutrient, and metal budgets of the lake under influence of climate change. It is important to obtain reliable quantitative estimates of both in coming and outgoing fluxes of fresh cold waters. In situation that incoming groundwater is cold enough to occupy the lower part of the lake water column, transport processes in the bottom boundary layer dominate the removal of discharged water from the coastal zone. Physical mechanisms of such removal seem to be similar to the mechanisms of dense water cascades off the continental shelf over the shelf break. We investigate the physical mechanisms of the removal of groundwater from the coastal zone of Lake Michigan to try to get a quantification of off-shore fluxes and transport pathways for GD/GC and chemical species from the shelf through numerical modeling of the processes in the bottom boundary layer. We are using numerical modeling of the GD fluxes and transport pathways of dense water flow in the bottom boundary layer of Lake Michigan using a set of process oriented numerical models of GC. Some results of this study will be presented during the session.

  1. Biogeochemical and metabolic responses to the flood pulse in a semiarid floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valett, H.M.; Baker, M.A.; Morrice, J.A.; Crawford, C.S.; Molles, M.C., Jr.; Dahm, C. N.; Moyer, D.L.; Thibault, J.R.; Ellis, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    Flood pulse inundation of riparian forests alters rates of nutrient retention and organic matter processing in the aquatic ecosystems formed in the forest interior. Along the Middle Rio Grande (New Mexico, USA), impoundment and levee construction have created riparian forests that differ in their inter-flood intervals (IFIs) because some floodplains are still regularly inundated by the flood pulse (i.e., connected), while other floodplains remain isolated from flooding (i.e., disconnected). This research investigates how ecosystem responses to the flood pulse relate to forest IFI by quantifying nutrient and organic matter dynamics in the Rio Grande floodplain during three years of experimental flooding of the disconnected floodplain and during a single year of natural flooding of the connected floodplain. Surface and subsurface conditions in paired sites (control, flood) established in the two floodplain types were monitored to address metabolic and biogeochemical responses. Compared to dry controls, rates of respiration in the flooded sites increased by up to three orders of magnitude during the flood pulse. In the disconnected forest, month-long experimental floods produced widespread anoxia of four-week duration during each of the three years of flooding. In contrast, water in the connected floodplain remained well oxygenated (3-8 ppm). Material budgets for experimental floods showed the disconnected floodplain to be a sink for inorganic nitrogen and suspended solids, but a potential source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Compared to the main stem of the Rio Grande, flood-water on the connected floodplain contained less nitrate, but comparable concentrations of DOC, phosphate-phosphorus, and ammonium-nitrogen. Results suggest that floodplain IFI drives metabolic and biogeochemical responses during the flood pulse. Impoundment and fragmentation have altered floodplains from a mosaic of patches with variable IFI to a bimodal distribution. Relatively predictable flooding occurs in the connected forest, while inundation of the disconnected forest occurs only as the result of managed application of water. In semiarid floodplains, water is scarce except during the flood pulse. Ecosystem responses to the flood pulse are related to the IFI and other measures of flooding history that help describe spatial variation in ecosystem function.

  2. Spatial Scaling Patterns of C, N and P Loads in Engineered Watersheds: Hydrologic vs. Biogeochemical Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, N. B.; Rao, P. C.; S, Z.; Ye, S.; Botter, G.; Sivapalan, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-05-01

    Understanding nutrient dynamics in diverse ecosystems is critical in evaluating ecological impacts (e.g., eutrophication; coastal hypoxia) from increased loads of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and carbon (C). The linkage between the hydrologic and the biogeochemical cycles is crucial for predicting nutrient cycling in these ecosystems. Examining the impacts of large-scale human modifications of watersheds (e.g., land-use intensification for food production; hydrologic modification though extensive tile-drainage, etc.) on the hydrologic and biogeochemical responses, and ecological impacts at various scales has been the focus of large-scale monitoring and modeling studies over the past two decades. Non-linear interactions between the climate (rainfall, evapotranspiration) and landscape are modified by the fractal river network to generate emergent scaling patterns of runoff that has been studied in considerable detail. The role of biogeochemistry as an additional non-linear filter that modifies the runoff signature to generate emergent patterns of nutrient loads has received much less attention. While scaling behavior of streamflow has been observed to be a function of the time scales of rainfall and catchment response, scaling patterns of nutrient loads would also be dependent on the time scales of the contaminant input function, and reaction time scales within various components of the system (hillslope, riparian zones, stream network). We examined the hydrologic and water-quality monitoring data available for the Mississippi River Basin, and found consistent linear relationships between area-normalized annual discharge (Q; L3L-2T-1) and area- normalized annual nutrient loads (ML-2T-1) at all spatial scales, ranging from first-order watersheds (~101 to 102 km2) to the entire river basin (~3x106 km2). By comparing the load-discharge data for conservative constituents (e.g., bicarbonate) with that for more-reactive constituents (nitrate, phosphate, pesticides), we estimated the effective attenuation rate constants at each spatial scale. We derived explicit analytical expressions for reproducing the reported scale-dependence of the nutrient attenuation rate constants. Finally, we used a simple hillslope-network model to investigate the spatial scaling patterns of nutrient loads as a function of the transport and reaction time scales. Implications of these results to predicting water quality impacts of land-use and climate change are discussed.

  3. The MIRACLE Project: An integrated approach to understanding biogeochemical cycling of mercury and its relationship with lagoon clam farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covelli, Stefano

    2012-11-01

    The "MIRACLE" Project was aimed at two specific issues: understanding Hg biogeochemical cycling in the Marano and Grado Lagoon and testing the coexistence of clam farming with Hg contamination in the sediments. Mercury contamination was measured in several matrices (water, sediment, biota) and its mobility was tested along with its speciation in relation to biogeochemical processes occurring in the lagoon environment, where bacterial communities have a primary role in converting Hg to its more toxic form, methylmercury (MeHg). Bioaccumulation of the Hg species was investigated on natural and seeded clams (Ruditapes philippinarum), the most important commercial bivalves in the Lagoon. The Editorial summarizes the main results obtained from this multidisciplinary study and reported in the Special Issue.

  4. Spatial and temporal controls on biogeochemical indicators at the small-scale interface between a contaminated aquifer and wetland surface water 

    E-print Network

    Baez-Cazull, Susan Enid

    2009-05-15

    This high-resolution biogeochemical study investigated spatial and temporal variability in the mixing interface zones within a wetland-aquifer system near a municipal landfill in the city of Norman, Oklahoma. Steep ...

  5. ASSESSMENT OF INTRINSIC BIOREMEDIATION OF A COAL-TAR AFFECTED AQUIFER USING TWO-DIMENSIONAL REACTIVE TRANSPORT AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL MASS BALANCE APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Expedited site characterization and groundwater monitoring using direct-push technology and conventional monitoring wells were conducted at a former manufactured gas plant site. Biogeochemical data and heterotrophic plate counts support the presence of microbially mediated remedi...

  6. SHIMMER (1.0): a novel mathematical model for microbial and biogeochemical dynamics in glacier forefield ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. A.; Anesio, A. M.; Singarayer, J. S.; Heath, M. R.; Arndt, S.

    2015-10-01

    SHIMMER (Soil biogeocHemIcal Model for Microbial Ecosystem Response) is a new numerical modelling framework designed to simulate microbial dynamics and biogeochemical cycling during initial ecosystem development in glacier forefield soils. However, it is also transferable to other extreme ecosystem types (such as desert soils or the surface of glaciers). The rationale for model development arises from decades of empirical observations in glacier forefields, and enables a quantitative and process focussed approach. Here, we provide a detailed description of SHIMMER, test its performance in two case study forefields: the Damma Glacier (Switzerland) and the Athabasca Glacier (Canada) and analyse sensitivity to identify the most sensitive and unconstrained model parameters. Results show that the accumulation of microbial biomass is highly dependent on variation in microbial growth and death rate constants, Q10 values, the active fraction of microbial biomass and the reactivity of organic matter. The model correctly predicts the rapid accumulation of microbial biomass observed during the initial stages of succession in the forefields of both the case study systems. Primary production is responsible for the initial build-up of labile substrate that subsequently supports heterotrophic growth. However, allochthonous contributions of organic matter, and nitrogen fixation, are important in sustaining this productivity. The development and application of SHIMMER also highlights aspects of these systems that require further empirical research: quantifying nutrient budgets and biogeochemical rates, exploring seasonality and microbial growth and cell death. This will lead to increased understanding of how glacier forefields contribute to global biogeochemical cycling and climate under future ice retreat.

  7. MOPS-1.0: towards a model for the regulation of the global oceanic nitrogen budget by marine biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriest, I.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-09-01

    Global models of the oceanic nitrogen cycle are subject to many uncertainties regarding the representation of the relevant biogeochemical processes and of the feedbacks between nitrogen sources and sinks that determine space- and timescales on which the global nitrogen budget is regulated. We investigate these aspects using a global model of ocean biogeochemistry that explicitly considers phosphorus and nitrogen, including pelagic denitrification and nitrogen fixation as sink and source terms of fixed nitrogen, respectively. The model explores different parameterizations of organic matter sinking speed, oxidant affinity of oxic and suboxic remineralization, and regulation of nitrogen fixation by temperature and different stoichiometric ratios. Examination of the initial transient behavior of different model setups initialized from observed biogeochemical tracer distributions reveal changes in simulated nitrogen inventories and fluxes particularly during the first centuries. Millennial timescales have to be resolved in order to bring all biogeochemical and physical processes into a dynamically consistent steady state. Analysis of global properties suggests that not only particularly particle sinking speed but also the parameterization of denitrification determine the extent of oxygen minimum zones, global nitrogen fluxes, and hence the oceanic nitrogen inventory. However, the ways and directions in which different parameterizations of particle sinking, nitrogen fixation, and denitrification affect the global diagnostics are different suggesting that these may, in principle, be constrained independently from each other. Analysis of the model misfit with respect to observed biogeochemical tracer distributions and fluxes suggests a particle flux profile close to the one suggested by Martin et al. (1987). Simulated pelagic denitrification best agrees with the lower values between 59 and 84 Tg N yr-1 recently estimated by other authors.

  8. Seasonal Variation in Floodplain Biogeochemical Processing in a Restored Headwater Stream.

    PubMed

    Jones, C Nathan; Scott, Durelle T; Guth, Christopher; Hester, Erich T; Hession, W Cully

    2015-11-17

    Stream and river restoration activities have recently begun to emphasize the enhancement of biogeochemical processing within river networks through the restoration of river-floodplain connectivity. It is generally accepted that this practice removes pollutants such as nitrogen and phosphorus because the increased contact time of nutrient-rich floodwaters with reactive floodplain sediments. Our study examines this assumption in the floodplain of a recently restored, low-order stream through five seasonal experiments. During each experiment, a floodplain slough was artificially inundated for 3 h. Both the net flux of dissolved nutrients and nitrogen uptake rate were measured during each experiment. The slough was typically a source of dissolved phosphorus and dissolved organic matter, a sink of NO3(-), and variable source/sink of ammonium. NO3(-) uptake rates were relatively high when compared to riverine uptake, especially during the spring and summer experiments. However, when scaled up to the entire 1 km restoration reach with a simple inundation model, less than 0.5-1.5% of the annual NO3(-) load would be removed because of the short duration of river-floodplain connectivity. These results suggest that restoring river-floodplain connectivity is not necessarily an appropriate best management practice for nutrient removal in low-order streams with legacy soil nutrients from past agricultural landuse. PMID:26463837

  9. Biogeochemical and ecological impacts of livestock grazing in semi-arid southeastern Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, D.P.; Neff, J.C.; Reynolds, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Relatively few studies have examined the ecological and biogeochemical effects of livestock grazing in southeastern Utah. In this study, we evaluated how grazing has affected soil organic carbon and nitrogen to a depth of 50 cm in grasslands located in relict and actively-grazed sites in the Canyonlands physiographic section of the Colorado Plateau. We also evaluated differences in plant ground cover and the spatial distribution of soil resources. Results show that areas used by domestic livestock have 20% less plant cover and 100% less soil organic carbon and nitrogen compared to relict sites browsed by native ungulates. In actively grazed sites, domestic livestock grazing also appears to lead to clustered, rather than random, spatial distribution of soil resources. Magnetic susceptibility, a proxy for soil stability in this region, suggests that grazing increases soil erosion leading to an increase in the area of nutrient-depleted bare ground. Overall, these results, combined with previous studies in the region, suggest that livestock grazing affects both plant cover and soil fertility with potential long-term implications for the sustainability of grazing operations in this semi-arid landscape. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical and biogeochemical cont