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Sample records for surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction

  1. Ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction for the determination of Cd and Ni in tea and water samples.

    PubMed

    Ezoddin, Maryam; Taghizadeh, Tayebeh; Majidi, Behrooz

    2014-01-01

    A microextraction method based on ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification using solidification of a floating organic droplet (UASEME-SFO) was evaluated for simultaneous determination of Cd and Ni in water and tea samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In the UASEME-SFO technique, Triton X-100 was used as an emulsifier to accelerate the emulsification of the extraction solvent into a sample solution and hasten the mass transfer of the analytes. Analytes form a complex and are extracted into 1-dodecanol which was used as an extraction solvent. Some parameters such as type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and concentration of the surfactant, ultrasound extraction time, reagent concentration, centrifuge conditions and salt concentration were investigated. Under optimum conditions, calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.3-100 and 0.6-180 microg L(-1) with detection limits of 0.11 and 0.20 microg L(-1) for Cd and Ni, respectively. The accuracy of the method was confirmed by parallel analyses using the certified reference material of water and tea samples. The recoveries of the analytes in tea leaves, tea infusions and water samples were in the range of 96.5-105.1%. PMID:25145194

  2. Rapid screening of five phthalate esters from beverages by ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction coupled with gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongyuan; Cheng, Xiaoling; Yan, Kuo

    2012-10-21

    A rapid ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction (UASEME) method coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) is proposed for the rapid screening of five phthalate esters in bottled beverages. In the UASEME procedure, a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) was used as the emulsifier, without application of any organic dispersive solvents typically required in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Triton X-100 as the emulsifier accelerated the formation of fine droplets from the extraction solvent in the sample solution under ultrasound radiation, thus combining the advantages of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (UAEME). Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factors of the five analytes ranged from 230 to 288 fold and the recoveries ranged from 89.3% to 100.1%. The limits of detection (LODs) based on signal to noise of 3 were 0.41-0.79 μg L(-1). Intra-assay and inter-assay precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD), were ≤5.46% and 5.81%, respectively. The proposed UASEME-GC/FID method was demonstrated to be simple, practical and environmentally friendly for the determination of trace phthalate esters in beverage samples. PMID:22932997

  3. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of carbamates in juices by micellar electrokinetic chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moreno-González, David; Huertas-Pérez, José F; García-Campaña, Ana M; Gámiz-Gracia, Laura

    2015-07-01

    A new method based on vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction has been developed for the extraction of carbamate pesticides in juice samples prior to their determination by micellar electrokinetic chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. This sample treatment allowed the satisfactory extraction and the extract clean-up of 25 carbamates from different fruit and vegetal juices (banana, tomato, and peach). In this study, the addition of ammonium perfluorooctanoate in the aqueous sample in combination with vortex agitation, provided very clean extracts with short extraction times. Under optimized conditions, recoveries of the proposed method for these pesticides from fortified juice samples ranged from 81% to 104%, with relative standard deviations lower than 15%. Limits of quantification were between 2.3µgkg(-)(1) and 4.7µgkg(-)(1), showing the high sensitivity of this fast and simple method. PMID:25882424

  4. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of triazine herbicides in water samples by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran-Hong; Liu, Dong-Hui; Yang, Zhong-Hua; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Peng

    2012-07-01

    A novel method based on the combination of microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) and vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction (VSLLME) was developed for the determination of five triazine herbicides (simazine, atrazine, ametryn, prometryn, and terbutryn) in water samples. The five triazine herbicides were baseline separated by using the microemulsion buffer containing a 10 mmol/L borate buffer at pH 9.5, 2.5% (w/v) SDS as surfactant, 0.8% (w/v) ethyl acetate as oil phase, and 6.0% (w/v) 1-butanol as cosurfactant. The optimum extraction conditions of VSLLME were as follows: 100 μL chloroform was used as extraction solvent, 5.0 × 10⁻⁵ mol/L Tween-20 was chosen as the surfactant to enhance the emulsification, and the extraction process was carried out by vortex mixing for 3 min. Under these optimum experimental conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 2.0-200.0 ng/mL, with the correlation coefficients (r²) varying from 0.9927 to 0.9958. The detection limits of the method varied from 0.41 to 0.62 ng/mL. The purposed method was applied to the determination of five triazine herbicides in real water samples, and the recoveries were between 80.6 and 107.3%. PMID:22821495

  5. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction of biogenic amines in fermented foods before their simultaneous analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Donthuan, Jaruwan; Yunchalard, Sirinda; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2014-11-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive, and environmentally friendly method, based on modified dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was developed for the simultaneous determination of five biogenic amines in fermented food samples. Biogenic amines were derivatized with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate, extracted by vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction, and then analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Five biogenic amine compounds were separated within 30 min using a C18 column and gradient elution with acetonitrile and 1% acetic acid. Factors influencing the derivatization and extraction efficiency such as type and volume of extraction solvent, type, and concentration of surfactant, pH, salt addition, and vortex time were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the method provided the enrichment factors in the range of 161-553. Good linearity was obtained from 0.002-0.5 mg/L for cadaverine and tyramine, 0.003-1 mg/L for tryptamine and histamine, and 0.005-1 mg/L for spermidine with coefficient of determination (R(2) ) > 0.992. The limits of detection ranged from 0.0010 to 0.0026 mg/L. The proposed method was successfully applied to analysis of biogenic amines in fermented foods such as fermented fish (plaa-som), wine and beer where good recoveries were obtained in the range of 83.2-112.5% PMID:25142110

  6. Ionic-liquid-based, manual-shaking- and ultrasound-assisted, surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction for the determination of three fungicide residues in juice samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochu; You, Xiangwei; Liu, Fengmao; Hou, Fan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    A novel manual-shaking- and ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction method was developed for the determination of three fungicides in juice samples. In this method, the ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide, instead of a volatile organic solvent was used as the extraction solvent. The surfactant, NP-10, was used as an emulsifier to enhance the dispersion of the water-immiscible ionic liquid into an aqueous phase, which accelerated the mass transfer of the analytes. Organic dispersive solvent typically required in common dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction methods was not necessary. In addition, manual shaking for 15 s before ultrasound to preliminarily mix the extraction solvent and the aqueous sample could greatly shorten the time for dispersing the ionic liquid into aqueous solution by ultrasound irradiation. Several experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including type and volume of extraction solvent, type and concentration of surfactant, extraction time, and pH, were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, good linearity with the correlation coefficients (γ) higher than 0.9986 and high sensitivity with the limit of detection ranging from 0.4 to 1.6 μg/L were obtained. The average recoveries ranged from 61.4 to 86.0% for spiked juice, with relative standard deviations from 1.8 to 9.7%. The proposed method was demonstrated to be a simple, fast, and efficient method for the analysis of the target fungicides in juice samples. PMID:25394281

  7. Determination of Lead in Water Samples Using a New Vortex-Assisted, Surfactant-Enhanced Emulsification Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Combined with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Lu, Ying; Mmereki, Daniel; Pan, Weiliang; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Guangming; Mao, Yufeng; Su, Xaioxuan

    2016-04-01

    A low toxic solvent-based vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction (LT-VSLLME) combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for the extraction and determination of lead (Pb) in water samples. In the LT-VSLLME method, the extraction solvent was dispersed into the aqueous samples by the assistance of vortex agitator. Meanwhile, the addition of a surfactant, which acted as an emulsifier, could enhance the speed of the mass-transfer from aqueous samples to the extraction solvent. The influences of analytical parameters, including extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, pH, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and extraction time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a good relative standard deviation of 3.69% at 10 ng L(-1) was obtained. The calibration graph showed a linear pattern in the ranges of 5-30 ngL(-1), with a limit of detection of 0.76 ng L(-1). The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 5-30 ngL(-1). The enrichment factor was 320. The procedure was applied to wastewater and river water, and the accuracy was assessed through the analysis of the recovery experiments. PMID:26614355

  8. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop combined with high performance liquid chromatography for determination of naproxen and nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Mohammad; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Abbasi, Bijan

    2015-12-18

    A novel, rapid, simple and green vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction method based on solidification of floating organic drop was developed for simultaneous separation/preconcentration and determination of ultra trace amounts of naproxen and nabumetone with high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection. Some parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of analytes such as type and volume of extractant, type and concentration of surfactant, sample pH, KCl concentration, sample volume, and vortex time were investigated and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graph exhibited linearity in the range of 3.0-300.0ngL(-1) for naproxen and 7.0-300.0ngL(-1) for nabumetone with a good coefficient of determination (R(2)>0.999). The limits of detection were 0.9 and 2.1ngL(-1). The relative standard deviations for inter- and intra-day assays were in the range of 5.8-10.1% and 3.8-6.1%, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of naproxen and nabumetone in urine, water, wastewater and milk samples and the accuracy was evaluated through recovery experiments. PMID:26627589

  9. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet combined with HPLC for the determination of neonicotinoid pesticides.

    PubMed

    Vichapong, Jitlada; Burakham, Rodjana; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2013-12-15

    A microextraction procedure based on vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet (VSLLME-SFO) for preconcentration of neonicotinoid pesticides, including acetamiprid, clotianidin, nitenpyram, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam, has been developed. In VSLLME-SFO process, the addition of surfactant (as an emulsifier), could be enhance the mass-transfer from the aqueous solution into the extraction solvent. The extraction solvent could be dispersed into the aqueous by vortex process. Other experimental parameters affected the extraction efficiency, including the kind and concentration of salt, concentration and volume of HCl, kind and concentration of surfactant and its volume, kind and volume of extraction solvent, vortex time and the centrifugation extraction time, were also optimized. The optimum extraction conditions of VSLLME-SFO were 10.00 mL of sample, 0.3% (w/v) Na2SO4, 50 µL of 0.050 mol L(-1) SDS, 1.0 mol L(-1) HCl (400 µL), 150 µL of octanol, vortex time 1 min and centrifugation time 10 min. The sediment phase was analyzed by subjecting it to HPLC using a mobile phase of 25% acetonitrile in water, at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1), and photodiode array detection at 254 nm. Under the optimum extraction conditions, high enrichment factors (20-100 fold) and low limit of detection (0.1-0.5 μg L(-1)) could be obtained. This method provided high sensitivity, low toxic organic solvents used, and simplicity of the extraction processes. The proposed method was successfully applied in the analysis of neonicotinoids in fruit juice and water samples. PMID:24209333

  10. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast determination of cadmium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; Lu, Ying; He, Qiang; Mmereki, Daniel; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhong, Zhihui; Zhao, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    A novel vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet (VSLLME-SFO) was developed for the fast, simple and efficient determination of cadmium (Cd) in water samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). In the VSLLME-SFO process, the addition of surfactant (as an emulsifier), could enhance the mass transfer from the aqueous solution into the extraction solvent. The extraction solvent could be dispersed into the aqueous phase under vigorous shaking with the vortex. In this paper, we investigated the influences of analytical parameters, including pH, extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and vortex time, on the extraction efficiency of Cd. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection was 0.16 μg/L. The analyte enrichment factor was 37.68. The relative standard deviation was 3.2% (10 μg/L, n = 10) and the calibration graph was linear, ranging from 0.5 to 30 μg/L. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of ultra-trace Cd in river water and wastewater samples. PMID:27232416

  11. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop followed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for speciation of antimony (ΙΙΙ, V).

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Mohammad; Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Arbab-Zavar, Mohammad Hossein; Eftekhari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (VASEME-SFO) was used for preconcentration and speciation of antimony (ΙΙΙ, V) followed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In this procedure, Triton X-114 was used as emulsifier and 1-undecanol was used as extraction solvent. This method is based on the complexation of Sb(ΙΙΙ) with dithizone (as complexing agent) at pH 2 and extraction of the resulting hydrophobic complex into the extraction solvent (1-undecanol) with vortex-assisted liquid phase microextraction, whereas Sb(V) remained in solution. Sb(ΙΙΙ) in extraction solvent was directly analyzed by ETAAS after dilution with ethanol, and Sb(V) was calculated by subtracting Sb(ΙΙΙ) from the total antimony after reducing Sb(V) to Sb(ΙΙΙ) by L-cysteine. Under the optimized condition, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.4-8 μg L(-1) of Sb(ΙΙΙ) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995. The detection limit based on three times of the standard deviation of the blank (n = 8) was 0.09 μg L(-1). The validation and the recovery of the proposed method were performed by the analysis of a certified reference material and spike method. The obtained results were in very good agreements with certified values. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of antimony species at trace levels in different water samples. PMID:25404541

  12. Ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic droplet used for the simultaneous determination of six fungicide residues in juices and red wine.

    PubMed

    You, Xiangwei; Wang, Suli; Liu, Fengmao; Shi, Kaiwei

    2013-07-26

    A novel ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction technique based on the solidification of a floating organic droplet followed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection was developed for simultaneous determination of six fungicide residues in juices and red wine samples. The low-toxicity solvent, 1-dodecanol, was used as an extraction solvent. For its low density and proper melting point near room temperature, the extractant droplet was collected easily by solidifying it at a low temperature. The surfactant, Tween 80, was used as an emulsifier to enhance the dispersion of the water-immiscible extraction solvent into an aqueous phase, which hastened the mass-transfer of the analytes. Organic dispersive solvent typically required in common dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction methods was not used in the proposed method. Some parameters (e.g., the type and volume of extraction solvent, the type and concentration of surfactant, ultrasound extraction time, salt addition, and volume of samples) that affect the extraction efficiency were optimized. The proposed method showed a good linearity within the range of 5μgL(-1)-1000μgL(-1), with the correlation coefficients (γ) higher than 0.9969. The limits of detection for the method ranged from 0.4μgL(-1) to 1.4μgL(-1). Further, this simple, practical, sensitive, and environmentally friendly method was successfully applied to determine the target fungicides in juice and red wine samples. The recoveries of the target fungicides in red wine and fruit juice samples were 79.5%-113.4%, with relative standard deviations that ranged from 0.4% to 12.3%. PMID:23473514

  13. Comparison of air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction and ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons determination in hookah water.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Maryam; Bazregar, Mohammad; Daneshfar, Ali; Asghari, Alireza

    2015-07-01

    In this work, two disperser-free microextraction methods, namely, air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction and ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction are compared for the determination of a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous samples, followed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The effects of various experimental parameters upon the extraction efficiencies of both methods are investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the enrichment factors and limits of detection were found to be in the ranges of 327-773 and 0.015-0.05 ng/mL for air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction and 406-670 and 0.015-0.05 ng/mL for ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction, respectively. The linear dynamic ranges and extraction recoveries were obtained to be in the range of 0.05-120 ng/mL (R(2) ≥ 0.995) and 33-77% for air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction and 0.05-110 ng/mL (R(2) ≥ 0.994) and 41-67% for ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction, respectively. To investigate this common view among some people that smoking hookah is healthy due to the passage of smoke through the hookah water, samples of both the hookah water and hookah smoke were analyzed. PMID:25989415

  14. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction for the determination of phenolic compounds in olive oils.

    PubMed

    Reboredo-Rodríguez, P; Rey-Salgueiro, L; Regueiro, J; González-Barreiro, C; Cancho-Grande, B; Simal-Gándara, J

    2014-05-01

    A reliable, sensitive and effective method based on ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction (USAEME) coupled to HPLC-DAD has been developed to identify and quantify several target phenolic compounds from extra virgin olive oils (EVOO). This approach is based on the emulsification of a microvolume of polar organic extractant in a non-polar liquid sample by ultrasound radiation and further separation of both liquid phases by centrifugation. The percentage of methanol/water (v/v) in the extractant, the volume of extractant, and the extraction time as three effective parameters on the extraction were optimised by a central composite design (Box-Behnken response surface) method. The optimised method presented recoveries in EVOO between 91% and 115% for the target analytes (except vanillin with 65%) and a satisfactory precision with relative standard deviations (RSD%) lower than 8.4% for repeatability and reproducibility. The method showed good linearity and limits of detection and quantification were in the range 0.001-0.14 and 0.004-0.47mg/kg, respectively. After method validation, it was successfully applied to the analysis of three EVOO samples. All target compounds were detected in all analysed samples. Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol were the major phenolic compounds, followed by pinoresinol and luteolin. PMID:24360429

  15. Determination of melamine in soil samples using surfactant-enhanced hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction followed by HPLC–UV using experimental design

    PubMed Central

    Sarafraz Yazdi, Ali; Raouf Yazdinezhad, Samaneh; Heidari, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant-enhanced hollow fiber liquid phase (SE-HF-LPME) microextraction was applied for the extraction of melamine in conjunction with high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC–UV). Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was added firstly to the sample solution at pH 1.9 to form hydrophobic ion-pair with protonated melamine. Then the protonated melamine–dodecyl sulfate ion-pair (Mel–DS) was extracted from aqueous phase into organic phase immobilized in the pores and lumen of the hollow fiber. After extraction, the analyte-enriched 1-octanol was withdrawn into the syringe and injected into the HPLC. Preliminary, one variable at a time method was applied to select the type of extraction solvent. Then, in screening step, the other variables that may affect the extraction efficiency of the analyte were studied using a fractional factorial design. In the next step, a central composite design was applied for optimization of the significant factors having positive effects on extraction efficiency. The optimum operational conditions included: sample volume, 5 mL; surfactant concentration, 1.5 mM; pH 1.9; stirring rate, 1500 rpm and extraction time, 60 min. Using the optimum conditions, the method was analytically evaluated. The detection limit, relative standard deviation and linear range were 0.005 μg mL−1, 4.0% (3 μg mL−1, n = 5) and 0.01–8 μg mL−1, respectively. The performance of the procedure in extraction of melamine from the soil samples was good according to its relative recoveries in different spiking levels (95–109%). PMID:26644934

  16. A new coupling of spectrophotometric determination with ultrasound-assisted emulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaodong; Kong, Lamei; Chen, Meihui; Deng, Qingwen; Zhao, Xia; Guo, Jie

    2012-11-01

    In this work, a new coupling of spectrophotometric determination with preconcentration method named as ultrasound-assisted emulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UAE-DLLME) for trace silver was firstly established. Disperser solvent in traditional DLLME was substituted by ultrasound-assisted emulsification, which could afford more effective emulsification and make the extraction method greener. The extraction was accomplished efficiently in only 3 min during ultrasound-assisted emulsification. Compared to traditional DLLME, the established pretreatment was simpler, greener and more effective. The UAE-DLLME technique was effectively coupled with ordinary spectrophotometer to improve the analytical performance and expand the application of spectrophotometric determination. The factors influencing UAE-DLLME, such as concentration of chelating agent, kind and volume of extractant, pH, conditions of phase separation, ultrasound extraction time and instrumental conditions, were studied in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for silver was 0.45 μg L-1, with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF) of 35. The established method was applied to the determination of trace silver in real and certified reference samples with satisfactory analytical results.

  17. A new coupling of spectrophotometric determination with ultrasound-assisted emulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace silver.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaodong; Kong, Lamei; Chen, Meihui; Deng, Qingwen; Zhao, Xia; Guo, Jie

    2012-11-01

    In this work, a new coupling of spectrophotometric determination with preconcentration method named as ultrasound-assisted emulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UAE-DLLME) for trace silver was firstly established. Disperser solvent in traditional DLLME was substituted by ultrasound-assisted emulsification, which could afford more effective emulsification and make the extraction method greener. The extraction was accomplished efficiently in only 3 min during ultrasound-assisted emulsification. Compared to traditional DLLME, the established pretreatment was simpler, greener and more effective. The UAE-DLLME technique was effectively coupled with ordinary spectrophotometer to improve the analytical performance and expand the application of spectrophotometric determination. The factors influencing UAE-DLLME, such as concentration of chelating agent, kind and volume of extractant, pH, conditions of phase separation, ultrasound extraction time and instrumental conditions, were studied in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for silver was 0.45 μg L(-1), with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF) of 35. The established method was applied to the determination of trace silver in real and certified reference samples with satisfactory analytical results. PMID:22902575

  18. Novel coupling of surfactant assisted emulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with spectrophotometric determination for ultra trace nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Qingwen; Chen, Meihui; Kong, Lamei; Zhao, Xia; Guo, Jie; Wen, Xiaodong

    2013-03-01

    In this work, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was improved and the preconcentration method named as surfactant assisted emulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SAE-DLLME) was established for ultra trace nickel preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination. Non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) was used as emulsifier and Triton X-114 (TX-114) was investigated as comparison. Disperser solvent was substituted by surfactant, which could afford more effective emulsification and make the extraction relatively greener. The extraction was accomplished efficiently in only 1 min during manual shaking. Compared to traditional DLLME, the developed SAE-DLLME pretreatment was simple, rapid and effective. The improved extraction technique was firstly coupled with traditional spectrophotometer to improve the analytical performance and expand the application of spectrophotometric determination. The influence factors relevant to SAE-DLLME including extraction parameters and instrumental conditions, were studied in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for nickel was 0.24 μg L-1, with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF) of 23.

  19. Development of ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction for determination of thiocynate ion in human urine and saliva samples.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mahdi; Daryanavard, Seyed Mosayeb; Abdolhosseini, Sana

    2013-02-15

    Ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAE-ME) procedure coupled with UV-vis spectrophotometric measurement has been developed for determination of thiocyanate ion (SCN(-)) in water and biological fluids samples. The method is based on protonation of SCN(-) ions in acidic medium and extraction of thiocyanic acid into fine droplets of chloroform as an extraction solvent contains rhodamine B (RhB). The RhB was protonated in presence of thiocynanic acid to form highly colored ion-pair complex of [thiocynate][RhBH(+)] in chloroform, which used for subsequent spectrophotometric determination of SCN(-) ions. Experimental parameters for both spectrophotometric reaction and USAE-ME procedure have been optimized. Under optimized conditions the calibration curve for SCN(-) showed good linearity in the range of 38.0-870.0ngmL(-1) (R(2)=0.9967). The limit of detection (S/N=3) and preconcentration factor were 5.0ngmL(-1) and 40, respectively. Relative standard deviation for determination of 200ngmL(-1) of SCN(-) was 2.8% (n=5). The proposed method has been successfully applied for determination of SCN(-) ion in tap water, mineral bottled water and human saliva and urine samples with an average recovery of 99.2%. PMID:23353810

  20. Development of ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on solidification of a floating organic droplet for determination of organochlorine pesticides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Shu, Bin; Yang, Zhaoguang; Lee, Hsiaowan; Qiu, Bo; Li, Haipu

    2016-02-01

    An ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic droplet followed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of 13 organochlorine pesticides in water samples. In the proposed method, ultrasound was applied to achieve the emulsification without addition of any dispersive solvent. In consequence, the volume of extraction phase remained unaffected by the ion strength of aqueous phase and high extraction recoveries were obtained. It was also found that dilution of the floating phase with acetone was necessary for preventing peak splitting in chromatogram. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method provided good sensitivity (the detection limits of organochlorine pesticides ranged from 1.3 to 3.9 ng/L) and good repeatability of extraction (below 6.5%, n = 5). The recoveries in reservoir and river water samples were between 75.8% and 96.9%. PMID:26631905

  1. Ionic liquid-based ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography for the determination of four fungicides in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei; Wang, Fang; Wan, Qin

    2013-02-15

    A highly efficient and environmentally friendly sample preparation method termed ionic liquid-based ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (IL-USAEME) combined with high performance liquid chromatography has been developed for the determination of four fungicides (azoxystrobin, diethofencarb, pyrimethanil and kresoxim-methyl) in water samples. In this novel approach, ionic liquid (IL) was used as extraction solvent in place of the organic solvent used in conventional USAEME assay, and there is no need for using organic dispersive solvent which is typically required in the common dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method. Various parameters that affect the extraction efficiency, such as the kind and volume of IL, ultrasound emulsification time, extraction temperature and salt addition were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum extraction condition, the linearities of calibration curves were in the range from 3 to 5000 ng mL(-1) for target analytes with the correlation coefficient higher than 0.9992. The enrichment factors and the limits of detection were in the range of 88-137 and 0.73-2.2 ng mL(-1), depending on the analytes. The environmental water samples were successfully analyzed using the proposed method, and the relative recoveries at fortified levels of 50 and 100 ng mL(-1) were in the range of 83.9%-116.2%. PMID:23597988

  2. Development of an ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction method for the determination of chlorpyrifos and organochlorine pesticide residues in honey samples using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Mir-Michael; Arefhosseini, Seyedrafie; Alizadeh Nabili, Ali Akbar; Mahmoudpour, Mansour; Nemati, Mahboob

    2016-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and efficient ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction method followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode was developed for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in honey samples. The type and volume of organic extraction solvent, pH, effect of added salt content, and centrifuging time and speed were investigated. Under the optimum extraction conditions, 30 μL of 1, 2-dibromoethane (extraction solvent) was immersed into an ultrasonic bath for 1 min at 40°C. The limits of detection and quantification for all target pesticides were 0.003-0.06 and 0.01-0.2 ng/g, respectively. The extraction recovery was 91-100% and the enrichment factors were 168-192. The relative standard deviation for the method was <6% for intraday (n = 6) and <8% for interday precision (n = 4). The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides in honey samples. PMID:27214344

  3. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction with simultaneous derivatization coupled to fibre optics-based cuvetteless UV-vis micro-spectrophotometry for formaldehyde determination in cosmetic samples.

    PubMed

    Lavilla, Isela; Cabaleiro, Noelia; Pena, Francisco; de la Calle, Inmaculada; Bendicho, Carlos

    2010-07-26

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction in combination with fibre optics-based cuvetteless UV-vis micro-spectrophotometry has been proposed as a novel method for the determination of formaldehyde in water-based cosmetics such as shampoo, conditioner and shower gel. The use of a powerful cup-horn sonoreactor allows simultaneous extraction and derivatization of the samples without any pre-treatment. The type and volume of organic extractant solvent, need for a disperser solvent, sonication conditions (sonication time and amplitude), ionic strength and centrifuging time have been carefully studied. Matrix effects were also evaluated. The European official method for quantification of formaldehyde in cosmetic products was used for comparison purposes. An important improvement in sensitivity and sample throughput as well as miniaturization was achieved. A limit of detection of 0.02 microg g(-1) of formaldehyde and a repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation of 5.9% were obtained. PMID:20638500

  4. Ultrasound-Assisted Emulsification Microextraction Based on Solidification Floating Organic Drop Trace Amounts of Manganese Prior to Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Determination

    PubMed Central

    Mohadesi, Alireza; Falahnejad, Masoumeh

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on solidification floating organic drop method is described for preconcentration of trace amounts of Mn (II). 2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5 diethylaminophenol was added to a solution of Mn+2 at ph = 10.0. After this, 1-undecanol was added to the solution as an extraction solvent, and solution was stirred. Several factors influencing the microextraction efficiency, such as pH, the amount of chelating agent, nature and volume of extraction solvent, the volume of sample solution, stirring rate, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. Then sample vial was cooled by inserting into an ice bath, and the solidified was transferred into a suitable vial for immediate melting. Finally the sample was injected into a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Under the optimum condition the linear dynamic range was 0.50–10.0 ng mL−1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9926, and the detection limit of 0.3 ng mL−1 was obtained. The enrichment factor was 160. The proposed method was successfully applied for separation and determination of manganese in sea, rain, tap, and river water samples. PMID:22645504

  5. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on solidification floating organic drop trace amounts of manganese prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Mohadesi, Alireza; Falahnejad, Masoumeh

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on solidification floating organic drop method is described for preconcentration of trace amounts of Mn (II). 2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5 diethylaminophenol was added to a solution of Mn(+2) at ph = 10.0. After this, 1-undecanol was added to the solution as an extraction solvent, and solution was stirred. Several factors influencing the microextraction efficiency, such as pH, the amount of chelating agent, nature and volume of extraction solvent, the volume of sample solution, stirring rate, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. Then sample vial was cooled by inserting into an ice bath, and the solidified was transferred into a suitable vial for immediate melting. Finally the sample was injected into a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Under the optimum condition the linear dynamic range was 0.50-10.0 ng mL(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9926, and the detection limit of 0.3 ng mL(-1) was obtained. The enrichment factor was 160. The proposed method was successfully applied for separation and determination of manganese in sea, rain, tap, and river water samples. PMID:22645504

  6. Ionic liquid-based totally organic solvent-free emulsification microextraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography for the determination of three acaricides in fruit juice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaheng; Liang, Zhe; Guo, Hao; Gao, Peng; Lu, Runhua; Zhou, Wenfeng; Zhang, Sanbing; Gao, Haixiang

    2013-10-15

    A novel, totally organic solvent-free emulsification microextraction (TEME) technique using ionic liquids (ILs) is proposed in this study. Seven bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquids were synthesized. After comparing the physicochemical properties of the ionic liquids and their application to microextraction experiments, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C6MIM][NTf2]), which has moderate surface tension and viscosity, was selected as the extraction solvent. The dispersion of ILs and mass transfer were accelerated by ultrasound irradiation and temperature control processes. Therefore, no dispersive organic solvent was needed. Several variables, such as ionic liquid volume, duration of the ultrasound extraction, dispersion temperature, ionic strength and centrifugation time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.1-600 μg L(-1) for chlorfenapyr and fenpyroximate and 0.5-600 μg L(-1) for spirodiclofen, with correlation coefficients of 0.9994-0.9999. The enrichment factors were between 261 and 285. The limits of detection (LODs) were 0.02-0.06 μg L(-1). Real fruit juice samples (at fortified levels of 10 μg L(-1) and 30 μg L(-1)) were successfully analyzed using the proposed method. The relative recoveries and enrichment factors were in the range of 92-104%. PMID:24054632

  7. In situ emulsification microextraction using a dicationic ionic liquid followed by magnetic assisted physisorption for determination of lead prior to micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Masood; Beiraghi, Asadollah; Seidi, Shahram

    2015-08-19

    For the first time, a simple and efficient in situ emulsification microextraction method using a dicationic ionic liquid followed by magnetic assisted physisorption was presented to determine trace amounts of lead. In this method, 400 μL of 1.0 mol L(-1) lithium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide aqueous solution, Li[NTf2], was added into the sample solution containing 100 μL of 1.0 mol L(-1) 1,3-(propyl-1,3-diyl) bis (3-methylimidazolium) chloride, [pbmim]Cl2, to form a water immiscible ionic liquid, [pbmim][NTf2]2. This new in situ formed dicationic ionic liquid was applied as the acceptor phase to extract the lead-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (Pb-APDC) complexes from the sample solution. Subsequently, 30 mg of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were added into the sample solution to collect the fine droplets of [pbmim][NTf2]2, physisorptively. Finally, MNPs were eluted by acetonitrile, separated by an external magnetic field and the obtained eluent was subjected to micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for further analysis. Comparing with other microextraction methods, no special devices and centrifugation step are required. Parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as extraction time, pH, concentration of chelating agent, amount of MNPs and coexisting interferences were studied. Under the optimized conditions, this method showed high extraction recovery of 93% with low LOD of 0.7 μg L(-1). Good linearity was obtained in the range of 2.5-150 μg L(-1) with determination coefficient (r(2)) of 0.9921. Relative standard deviation (RSD%) for seven repeated measurements at the concentration of 10 μg L(-1) was 4.1%. Finally, this method was successfully applied for determination of lead in some water and plant samples. PMID:26343434

  8. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification solidified floating organic drops microextraction of ultra trace amount of Te (IV) prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Fathirad, Fariba; Afzali, Daryoush; Mostafavi, Ali; Ghanbarian, Maryam

    2012-01-15

    In the present study, a new, simple and efficient method for the preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of Te (IV) is developed using ultrasound-assisted emulsification solidified floating organic drops microextraction (USAE-SFODME) before graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry determination. In this method, tellurium is extracted into the fine droplets of 1-undecanol after chelate formation with the water soluble ligand, ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). Several factors such as pH, chelating agent amount, type and volume of the extracting solvent, sonication and centrifuging time that influence the extraction and complex formation are optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph is linear in the range of 0.01-0.24ngmL(-1) of tellurium in the original solution, with limit of detection of 0.003ngmL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for seven replicated determinations of tellurium ion at 0.08ngmL(-1) concentration level is calculated as 3.4%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Te (IV) in a standard soil and several water samples. PMID:22265571

  9. Ultrasound-assisted temperature-controlled ionic liquid emulsification microextraction coupled with capillary electrophoresis for the determination of parabens in personal care products.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Li, Zheng; Jia, Qiong; Zhou, Weihong

    2016-07-01

    We developed a CE and ultrasound-assisted temperature-controlled ionic liquid emulsification microextraction method for the determination of four parabens (methyl paraben, ethyl paraben, propyl paraben, and butyl paraben) in personal care products including mouthwash and toning lotion. In the proposed extraction procedure, ionic liquid (IL, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate) was used as extraction solvent, moreover, no disperser solvent was needed. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency including volume of IL, heating temperature, ultrasonic time, extraction time, sample pH, ionic strength, and centrifugation time were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the method was found to be linear over the range of 3-500 ng/mL with coefficient of determination (R(2) ) in the range of 0.9990-0.9998. The LODs and LOQs for the four parabens were 0.45-0.72 ng/mL and 1.50-2.40 ng/mL, respectively. Intraday and interday precisions (RSDs, n = 5) were in the range of 5.4-6.8% and 7.0-8.7%, respectively. The recoveries of parabens at different spiked levels ranged from 71.9 to 119.2% with RSDs less than 9.5%. PMID:26990303

  10. Evaluation of the contamination of spirits by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of twelve polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), included in the list of priority pollutants, in different spirits has been obtained by means of a rapid and sensitive method based on gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The environmentally friendly ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) technique allowed the easy and effective preconcentration of the PAHs from the sample matrices. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, such as the nature and volume of the extractant solvent, and the addition of salt, as well as the sonication parameters were investigated and optimized. The absence of matrix effects under the optimized conditions allowed the sample quantification against aqueous standards. Detection limits ranged between 1.8 and 6.3 ng L(-1), depending on the compound. Different spirit samples were successfully analyzed using the proposed method, and contents of up to 0.9 μg L(-1) were found. Relative recoveries at fortified levels of 0.2 and 1 μg L(-1) were in the range 84-118%. PMID:26212977

  11. Development of an ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction method for the determination of the main compounds causing cork taint in wines.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, C; Sáenz-González, Cristina; Pérez-del-Notario, Nuria; González-Sáiz, José María

    2012-03-16

    In this work, an ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction method has been optimised for the determination in wine of haloanisoles (2,4,6-trichloranisole (TCA), 2,3,4,6-tetrachloroanisole (TeCA), 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA) and pentachloranisole (PCA)) responsible for the so-called cork taint. Their halophenolic precursors (2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP), 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (TeCP), 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP)) have also been simultaneously determined. For this purpose, parameters affecting the USAEME-derivatisation procedure were exhaustively investigated. Firstly, extraction solvent, basic conditions and extraction time were selected to, subsequently, employ experimental design methodology for the simultaneous optimisation of the volumes of acetic anhydride and extraction solvent, temperature and ionic strength conditions. Once optimised, the evaluation of the analytical performance of the method confirmed its suitability for the determination of the studied compounds in wines. The proposed method showed satisfactory linearity (correlation coefficients over 0.981), repeatability (below 10.9%) and inter-day precision (below 11.0%). Detection limits obtained were similar or even lower than previously reported. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of real samples. To our knowledge, this is the first time that USAME method has been optimised for the simultaneous determination of haloanisoles and halophenols in wine. PMID:22326186

  12. Determination of personal care products and hormones in leachate and groundwater from Polish MSW landfills by ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Kapelewska, Justyna; Kotowska, Urszula; Wiśniewska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Determination of the endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in leachate and groundwater samples from the landfill sites is very important because of the proven harmful effects of these compounds on human and animal organisms. A method combining ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for simultaneous determination of seven personal care products (PCPs): methylparaben (MP), ethylparaben (EP), propylparaben (PP), buthylparaben (BP), benzophenone (BPh), 3-(4-methylbenzylidene)camphor (4-MBC), N,N-diethyltoluamide (DEET), and two hormones: estrone (E1) and β-estradiol (E2) in landfill leachate and groundwater samples. The limit of detection (LOD)/limit of quantification (LOQ) values in landfill leachate and groundwater samples were in the range of 0.003-0.083/0.009-0.277 μg L(-1) and 0.001-0.015/0.002-0.049 μg L(-1), respectively. Quantitative recoveries and satisfactory precision were obtained. All studied compounds were found in the landfill leachates from Polish municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills; the concentrations were between 0.66 and 202.42 μg L(-1). The concentration of pollutants in groundwater samples was generally below 0.1 μg L(-1). PMID:26381788

  13. Chemometric-based determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous samples using ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction combined to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahmadvand, Mohammad; Sereshti, Hassan; Parastar, Hadi

    2015-09-25

    In the present research, ultrasonic-assisted emulsification-microextraction (USAEME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been proposed for analysis of thirteen environmental protection agency (EPA) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aqueous samples. Tetrachloroethylene was selected as extraction solvent. The main parameters of USAEME affecting the efficiency of the method were modeled and optimized using a central composite design (CCD). Under the optimum conditions (9μL for extraction solvent, 1.15% (w/v) NaCl (salt concentration) and 10min for ultrasonication time), preconcentration factor (PF) of the PAHs was in the range of 500-950. In order to have a comprehensive analysis, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) as a second-order calibration algorithm was used for resolution, identification and quantification of the target PAHs in the presence of uncalibrated interferences. The regression coefficients and relative errors (REs, %) of calibration curves of the PAHs were in the satisfactory range of 0.9971-0.9999 and 1.17-6.59%, respectively. Furthermore, analytical figures of merit (AFOM) for univariate and second-order calibrations were obtained and compared. As an instance, the limit of detections (LODs) of target PAHs were in the range of 1.87-18.9 and 0.89-6.49ngmL(-1) for univariate and second-order calibration, respectively. Finally, the proposed strategy was used for determination of target PAHs in real water samples (tap and hookah waters). The relative recoveries (RR) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 68.4-109.80% and 2.15-6.93%, respectively. It was concluded that combination of multivariate chemometric methods with USAEME-GC-MS can be considered as a new insight for the analysis of target analytes in complex sample matrices. PMID:26319375

  14. Rapid analysis of chlorinated anilines in environmental water samples using ultrasound assisted emulsification microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet followed by HPLC-UV detection.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Abilasha; Ponnusamy, Vinoth Kumar; Jen, Jen-Fon

    2012-08-15

    The present study demonstrates a simple, rapid and efficient method for the determination of chlorinated anilines (CAs) in environmental water samples using ultrasonication assisted emulsification microextraction technique based on solidification of floating organic droplet (USAEME-SFO) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection. In this extraction method, 1-dodecanol was used as extraction solvent which is of lower density than water, low toxicity, low volatility, and low melting point (24 °C). After the USAEME, extraction solvent could be collected easily by keeping the extraction tube in ice bath for 2 min and the solidified organic droplet was scooped out using a spatula and transferred to another glass vial and allowed to thaw. Then, 10 μL of extraction solvent was diluted with mobile phase (1:1) and taken for HPLC-UV analysis. Parameters influencing the extraction efficiency, such as the kind and volume of extraction solvent, volume of sample, ultrasonication time, pH and salt concentration were thoroughly examined and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the method showed good linearity in the concentration range of 0.05-500 ng mL(-1) with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9948 to 0.9957 for the three target CAs. The limit of detection based on signal to noise ratio of 3 ranged from 0.01 to 0.1 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) varied from 2.1 to 6.1% (n=3) and the enrichment factors ranged from 44 to 124. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to analyze real water samples and the relative recoveries of environmental water samples ranged from 81.1 to 116.9%. PMID:22841080

  15. Emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction based on deep eutectic solvent: An extraction method for the determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water samples.

    PubMed

    Khezeli, Tahere; Daneshfar, Ali; Sahraei, Reza

    2015-12-18

    In this study, for the first time, a simple, inexpensive and sensitive method named emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction based on deep eutectic solvent (ELLME-DES) was used for the extraction of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene (BTE) and seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water samples. In a typical experiment, 100μL of DES (as water-miscible extraction solvent) was added to 1.5mL of sample solution containing target analytes. A homogeneous solution was formed immediately. Injection of 100μL of THF (as emulsifier agent) into homogeneous solution provided a turbid state. After extraction, phase separation (aqueous phase/DES rich phase) was performed by centrifugation. DES rich phase was withdrawn by a micro-syringe and submitted to isocratic reverse-phase HPLC with UV detection. Under optimum conditions obtained by response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF), the calibration graphs were linear in the concentration range from 10 to 200μg/L for benzene, 10-400μg/L for toluene, 1-400μg/L for ethylbenzene, biphenyl, chrysene and fluorene, and 0.1-400μg/L for anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, phenanthrene and pyrene. The coefficients of determination (r(2)) and limits of detection were 0.9924-0.9997 and 0.02-6.8μg/L, respectively. This procedure was successfully applied to the determination of target analytes in spiked water samples. The relative mean recoveries ranged from 93.1 to 103.3%. PMID:26614169

  16. Application of ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction for simultaneous determination of aminophenol isomers in human urine, hair dye, and water samples using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Alireza; Fazl-Karimi, Hamidreza; Barfi, Behruz; Rajabi, Maryam; Daneshfar, Ali

    2014-08-01

    Aminophenol isomers (2-, 3-, and 4-aminophenols) are typically classified as industrial pollutants with genotoxic and mutagenic effects due to their easy penetration through the skin and membranes of human, animals, and plants. In the present study, a simple and efficient ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction procedure coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector was developed for preconcentration and determination of these compounds in human fluid and environmental water samples. Effective parameters (such as type and volume of extraction solvent, pH and ionic strength of sample, and ultrasonication and centrifuging time) were investigated and optimized. Under optimum conditions (including sample volume: 5 mL; extraction solvent: chloroform, 80 µL; pH: 6.5; without salt addition; ultrasonication: 3.5 min; and centrifuging time: 3 min, 5000 rpm min(-1)), the enrichment factors and limits of detection were ranged from 42 to 51 and 0.028 to 0.112 µg mL(-1), respectively. Once optimized, analytical performance of the method was studied in terms of linearity (0.085-157 µg mL(-1), r (2) > 0.998), accuracy (recovery = 88.6- 101.7%), and precision (repeatability: intraday precision < 3.98%, and interday precision < 5.12%). Finally, applicability of the method was evaluated by the extraction and determination of these compounds in human urine, hair dye, and real water samples. PMID:24275645

  17. Sensitive determination of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole in water samples by ultrasound assisted emulsification microextraction prior to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Ariel R; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2010-06-15

    A novel application of an ultrasound assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) technique is proposed for the extraction and preconcentration of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) from water samples prior to its determination by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). USAEME employs a non-polar high-density solvent (extractant solvent), which forms an oil-in-water emulsion (O/W) in the aqueous sample bulk assisted by ultrasonic radiation. Several factors including, solvent type and volume, extraction time, extraction temperature, shaking mode and matrix modifiers were studied and optimized over the relative recovery of the target analyte. An aliquot of 5mL water sample was conditioned by adding 150microL 6.15molL(-1) sodium chloride and 300microL 0.05molL(-1) phosphate buffer (pH 6), and finally extracted with 40microL chloroform by using USAEME technique. Under the optimal experimental conditions 2,4,6-TCA was quantitatively extracted achieving an enrichment factor (EF) of 555. The detection limit (LOD), calculated as three times the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), was 0.2ngL(-1) and the RSD was 6.3% (n=5) when 1ngL(-1) 2,4,6-TCA standard mixture was analyzed. The coefficients of estimation of the calibration curves obtained following the proposed methodology was >or=0.997 and the linear working range was 1-5000ngL(-1). Finally, the proposed technique was successfully applied for extraction and determination of the 2,4,6-TCA in water samples. Recovery studies lead values >or=94%, which showed a successfully robustness of the analytical methodology for determination of nanogram per liter of 2,4,6-TCA in water samples. PMID:20441935

  18. Determination of molybdenum in plants by vortex-assisted emulsification solidified floating organic drop microextraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oviedo, Jenny A.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2013-08-01

    A fast and sensitive procedure for extraction and preconcentration of molybdenum in plant samples based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and discrete nebulization was developed. 8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) was used as complexing agent. The experimental conditions established were: 0.5% m v- 1 of 8-HQ, 60 μL of 1-undecanol as the extractant phase, 2 min vortex extraction time, centrifugation for 2 min at 2000 rpm, 10 min into an ice bath and discrete nebulization by introducing 200 μL of solution. The calibration curve was linear from 0.02 to 4.0 mg L- 1 with a limit of detection of 4.9 μg L- 1 and an enhancement factor of 67. The relative standard deviations for ten replicate measurements of 0.05 and 1.0 mg L- 1 Mo were 6.0 and 14.5%, respectively. The developed procedure was applied for determining molybdenum in corn samples and accuracy was proved using certified reference materials.

  19. Novel solvent-free microwave-assisted extraction coupled with low-density solvent-based in-tube ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction for the fast analysis of organophosphorus pesticides in soils.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi-Song; Yan, Cheing-Tong; Ponnusamy, Vinoth Kumar; Jen, Jen-Fon

    2013-07-01

    A novel and rapid solventless microwave-assisted extraction coupled with low-density solvent-based in-tube ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction has been developed for the efficient determination of nine organophosphorus pesticides in soils by GC analysis with microelectron capture detection. A specially designed, homemade glass tube inbuilt with a scaled capillary tube was used as an extraction device to collect and measure the separated extractant phase easily. Parameters affecting the efficiencies of the developed method were thoroughly investigated. From experimental results, the following conditions were selected for the extraction of organophosphorus pesticides from 1.0 g of soil sample to 5 mL of aqueous solution under 226 W of microwave irradiation for 2.5 min followed by ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction with 20 μL toluene for 30 s and then centrifugation at 3200 rpm for 3 min. Detections were linear in the range of 0.25-10 ng/g with detection limits between 0.04 and 0.13 ng/g for all target analytes. The applicability of the method to real samples was assessed on agricultural contaminated soils and the recoveries ranged between 91.4 and 101.3%. Compared to other methods, the present method was shown to be highly competitive in terms of sensitivity, cost, eco-friendly nature, and analysis speed. PMID:23681938

  20. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Annual report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, D.T.

    1994-08-01

    In this report, the authors present the results of experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, the authors have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil, and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties.

  1. Surfactant-enhanced aquifier remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    Surfactants can be used to rapidly remove NAPL from contaminated aquifers. They are effective for virtually any organic contaminant. Use in LNAPL contaminated sites requires adequate hydraulic conductivity and control of flow using either hydraulic or physical methods. The presence of DNAPL requires consideration of vertical mobility; a competent confining layer (aquitard) is required if additional aquifers are present at greater depths. Surfactant processes, whether based upon mobilization or solubilization, can be effective at mass removal, but cannot be expected to provide resortation to drinking water standards. The fraction of mass removal, and the cost of remediation using surfactants are dependent upon a sites hydrogeology. Both minimization of cost and maximization of NAPL removal requires detailed characterization of sites contaminant distribution and hydrogeology. Assessment of the feasibility of surfactant-enhanced remediation is dependent upon a detailed site characterization.

  2. Ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent based on emulsification liquid phase microextraction combined with microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry for valence speciation of chromium(III/VI) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-11-01

    A new type of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been prepared and used as extraction solvents for ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent based emulsification liquid phase microextraction method (UA-DES-ELPME) for the determination and speciation of total chromium, chromium(III) and chromium(VI). The chromium concentration in DES rich phase (extraction phase) was determined by using microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS). The detection limit (LOD), the quantification limit (LOQ), preconcentration factor and relative standard deviation were found as 5.5µgL(-1), 18.2µgL(-1), 20 and 6%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed method was evaluated by the analysis of water the certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified environmental water and TMDA-54.4 Fortified Lake Water) and addition-recovery tests for water samples. PMID:27591663

  3. Ligandless, ion pair-based and ultrasound assisted emulsification solidified floating organic drop microextraction for simultaneous preconcentration of ultra-trace amounts of gold and thallium and determination by GFAAS.

    PubMed

    Fazelirad, Hamid; Taher, Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-15

    In the present work, a new, simple and efficient method for simultaneous preconcentration of ultra-trace amounts of gold and thallium is developed using an ion pair based-ultrasound assisted emulsification-solidified floating organic drop microextraction procedure before graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry determination. This methodology was used to preconcentrate the ion pairs formed between AuCl(4)(-) and TlCl(4)(-) and [C(23)H(42)]N(+) in a microliter-range volume of 1-undecanol. Several factors affecting the microextraction efficiency, such as HCl volume, type and volume of extraction solvent, sonication time, sample volume, temperature, ionic strength and [C(23)H(42)]NCl volume were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the enrichment factor of 441 and 443 and calibration graphs of 2.2-89 and 22.2-667 ng L(-1) for gold and thallium were obtained, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precision of ± 4.4 and ± 4.9% for Au and ± 4.8 and ± 5.4% for Tl were obtained. The detection limit was 0.66 ng L(-1) for Au and 4.67 ng L(-1) for Tl. The results show that the liquid-liquid pretreatment using ion pair forming, is sensitive, rapid, simple and safe method for the simultaneous preconcentration of gold and thallium. The method was successfully applied for determination of gold and thallium in natural water and hair samples. PMID:23200402

  4. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. [Annual report], 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, D.T.

    1995-03-01

    In this report, we present the results of our experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, we have (1) investigated the effect of surfactant on the equilibrium and transient interfacial tension, (2) investigated the kinetics of oil removal from a silica surface, and (3) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension. The results of the studies conducted during the course of this project are presented.

  5. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, D.T.

    1995-09-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultra-low tension. In addition, the novel concept of pH gradient design to optimize flood water conditions will be tested.

  6. A new 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ionic liquid based ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction for the determination of organic ultraviolet filters in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Ge, Dandan; Lee, Hian Kee

    2012-08-17

    A novel microextraction approach termed ionic liquid based ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (IL-USAEME) combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) was developed for the preconcentration and detection of organic ultraviolet (UV) filters in environmental water samples. An ionic liquid (IL) was used in place of an organic solvent as in conventional USAEME. In the study, orthogonal array designs (OAD) were employed for the optimization of the extraction parameters: type of IL, pH of the sample, extraction volume, ultrasonic time and salt concentration. In the first step, a mixed level OAD matrix, OA(16) (4(1) × 2(12)) was employed for the initial optimization. Based on the results of the first step, an ultra-hydrophobic IL, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate was chosen as the IL extractant and sample pH was set at a value of 3. Ultrasonic time, extraction volume and salt concentration were further optimized in the second step by an OA(16) (4(5)) matrix. Under the latter optimized conditions, calibration curves with coefficients of estimation higher than 0.997 over the concentration range of 5 and 1000 ng/ml, and the relative standard deviations for six replicates of the extraction from 2.6 to 6.6% were obtained. The limits of detection for four organic UV filters were between 0.5 and 1 ng/ml. The validated technique was applied to the analysis of organic UV filters in environmental water samples. PMID:22771059

  7. SIMULATION OF SURFACTANT-ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is currently under active investigation as one of the most promising alternatives to conventional pump-and-treat remediation for aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase organic liquids. An existing three-dimensional finite-di...

  8. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, D.T.

    1996-05-01

    In this report, we present the results of our experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12. 0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, we have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties, (5) investigated the effect of surfactant on the equilibrium and transient interfacial tension, (6) investigated the kinetics of oil removal from a silica surface, and (7) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, accounting for added surfactant. The results of the studies conducted during the course of this project are discussed.

  9. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Final report 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, D.T.

    1995-12-01

    In this report, the authors present the results of their experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, the authors have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil, and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties, (5) investigated the effect of surfactant on the equilibrium and transient interfacial tension, (6) investigated the kinetics of oil removal from a silica surface, and (7) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, accounting for added surfactant. The results of the studies conducted during the course of this project are summarized.

  10. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.

    1991-10-01

    The Tucker sand of Helper (KS) field is a candidate for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The geology of the Helper site is typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. The Tucker sand of Helper field was deposited in a fluvial dominated deltaic environment. Helper oil can be mobilized with either chemical system 2 or chemical system 3, as described in this report. Oil fields in the Gulf Coast region are also good candidates for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The results from laboratory tests conducted in Berea sandstone cores with oil brine from Helper (KS) field are encouraging. The crude oil is viscous and non-acidic and, yet, was mobilized by the chemical formulations described in this report. Significant amounts of the oil were mobilized under simulated reservoir conditions. The results in Berea sandstone cores were encouraging and should be verified by tests with field core. Consumption of alkali, measured with field core, was very low. Surfactant loss appeared to be acceptable. Despite the good potential for mobilization of Helper oil, certain reservoir characteristics such as low permeability, compartmentalization, and shallow depth place constraints on applications of any chemical system in the Tucker sand. These constraints are typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. Although Hepler field is not a perfect reservoir in which to apply surfactant- enhanced alkaline flooding, Hepler oil is particularly amenable to mobilization by surfactant-enhanced alkaline systems. A field test is recommended, dependent upon final evaluation of well logs and cores from the proposed pilot area. 14 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION WITH SURFACTANT REGENERATION/REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation was conducted during the spring of 1999 at Marine Corps Base, Camp LeJeune, NC. A PCE-DNAPL zone was identified and delineated by extensive soil sampling in 1997, and was further characteized by a partitioning interwell t...

  12. MEASUREMENT OF MASS TRANSFER RATES FOR SURFACTANT-ENHANCED SOLUBILIZATION OF NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS. (R825405)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced solubilization of residual, nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants is an emerging, subsurface remediation technology. The potential for nonequilibrium conditions is investigated for surfactant-enhanced solubilization of a NAPL, trichloroethylene (TCE), in...

  13. Practical Considerations and Challenges Involved in Surfactant Enhanced Bioremediation of Oil

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Sagarika; Jasmine, Jublee

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant enhanced bioremediation (SEB) of oil is an approach adopted to overcome the bioavailability constraints encountered in biotransformation of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) pollutants. Fuel oils contain n-alkanes and other aliphatic hydrocarbons, monoaromatics, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although hydrocarbon degrading cultures are abundant in nature, complete biodegradation of oil is rarely achieved even under favorable environmental conditions due to the structural complexity of oil and culture specificities. Moreover, the interaction among cultures in a consortium, substrate interaction effects during the degradation and ability of specific cultures to alter the bioavailability of oil invariably affect the process. Although SEB has the potential to increase the degradation rate of oil and its constituents, there are numerous challenges in the successful application of this technology. Success is dependent on the choice of appropriate surfactant type and dose since the surfactant-hydrocarbon-microorganism interaction may be unique to each scenario. Surfactants not only enhance the uptake of constituents through micellar solubilization and emulsification but can also alter microbial cell surface characteristics. Moreover, hydrocarbons partitioned in micelles may not be readily bioavailable depending on the microorganism-surfactant interactions. Surfactant toxicity and inherent biodegradability of surfactants may pose additional challenges as discussed in this review. PMID:24350261

  14. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project. Annual report, Revision

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.

    1991-10-01

    The Tucker sand of Helper (KS) field is a candidate for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The geology of the Helper site is typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. The Tucker sand of Helper field was deposited in a fluvial dominated deltaic environment. Helper oil can be mobilized with either chemical system 2 or chemical system 3, as described in this report. Oil fields in the Gulf Coast region are also good candidates for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The results from laboratory tests conducted in Berea sandstone cores with oil brine from Helper (KS) field are encouraging. The crude oil is viscous and non-acidic and, yet, was mobilized by the chemical formulations described in this report. Significant amounts of the oil were mobilized under simulated reservoir conditions. The results in Berea sandstone cores were encouraging and should be verified by tests with field core. Consumption of alkali, measured with field core, was very low. Surfactant loss appeared to be acceptable. Despite the good potential for mobilization of Helper oil, certain reservoir characteristics such as low permeability, compartmentalization, and shallow depth place constraints on applications of any chemical system in the Tucker sand. These constraints are typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. Although Hepler field is not a perfect reservoir in which to apply surfactant- enhanced alkaline flooding, Hepler oil is particularly amenable to mobilization by surfactant-enhanced alkaline systems. A field test is recommended, dependent upon final evaluation of well logs and cores from the proposed pilot area. 14 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Surfactant-enhanced low-pH alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A. and Co., Columbia, MD . Research Div.); Lorenz, P.B. )

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports sodium bicarbonate investigated as a potential alkaline agent in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding because it has very little tendency to dissolve silicate minerals. In experiments performed with Wilmington, CA, crude oil and three types of surfactants, the bicarbonate/surfactant combination caused a marked lowering of interfacial tension (IFT). Bicarbonate protected the surfactant against divalent cations and reduced adsorption of surfactant and polymer on various minerals. Coreflood test confirm that sodium bicarbonate plus surfactant can be an effective alternative to the high-pH flooding process.

  16. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, D.T.

    1994-06-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultra-low tension. In addition, the novel concept of pH gradient design to optimize flood water conditions will be tested. Last quarter we investigated the phase behavior and the regions where in the middle phase occurs. The optimum phase was found to go through a maximum with pH, sodium concentration and surfactant concentration. The optimum pH is about 12.0 to 13.5, the optimum sodium concentration is about 0.513 mol/liter, and the optimum surfactant concentration is about 0.2%. The effect of surfactant type was also investigated. Petrostep B-105 was found to give the most middle phase production. This quarter, we investigated the contact angle of Long Beach oil, Adena oil, and a model oil on a solid glass surface in contact with an aqueous alkaline solution both with and without added preformed surfactant. The contact angle with Long Beach and Adena oils showed oil-wet conditions, whereas the model oil showed both oil-wet and water-wet conditions depending on the pH of the aqueous phase. The addition of surfactant to the alkaline solution resulted in making the system less oil-wet. Spreading of the oil on the glass surface was observed in all three systems investigated.

  17. Optimization of modified dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the simultaneous preconcentration and determination of nitrazepam and midazolam drugs: An experimental design.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Nasser; Farsimadan, Sahar; Chamjangali, Mansour Arab; Bagherian, Ghadam Ali

    2015-05-01

    A simple, sensitive, and rapid microextraction method, namely, ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplet method coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was developed for the simultaneous preconcentration and determination of nitrazepam and midazolam. The significant parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were considered using Plackett-Burman design as a screening method. To obtain the optimum conditions with consideration of the selected significant variables, a Box-Behnken design was used. The microextraction procedure was performed using 29.1 μL of 1-undecanol, 1.36% (w/v) of NaCl, 10.0 μL of sodium dodecyl sulfate (25.0 μg mL(-1)), and 1.0 μL of Tween80 (25.0 μg mL(-1)) as an emulsifier in an extraction time of 20.0 min at pH 7.88. In order to investigate the validation of the developed method, some validation parameters including the linear dynamic range, repeatability, limit of detection, and recoveries were studied under the optimum conditions. The detection limits of the method were 0.017 and 0.086 ng mL(-1) for nitrazepam and midazolam, respectively. The extraction recovery percentages for the drugs studied were above 91.0 with acceptable relative standard deviation. The proposed methodology was successfully applied for the determination of these drugs in a number of human serum samples. PMID:25755221

  18. Surfactant-enhanced spreading: Experimental achievements and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, N M; Trybala, A; Arjmandi-Tash, O; Starov, V

    2016-07-01

    Surfactants are broadly used to improve wetting properties of aqueous formulations. The improvement is achieved by essential reduction of liquid/air and solid/liquid interfacial tensions resulting in the decrease of contact angle. For moderately hydrophobic substrates, there is a range of surfactants providing complete wetting of substrate. With the decrease of substrate surface energy, this range of surfactants reduces very quickly and only trisiloxane surfactant solutions are capable to wet completely such highly hydrophobic substrates as polypropylene and parafilm. That is why these surfactants are referred to as superspreaders. The most intriguing feature of wetting surfactant solutions is their ability to spread much faster than pure liquids with spread area, S, being proportional to time, t, S~t, as compared to S~t(0.2) for pure liquids, which wet completely the solid substrate. Trisiloxane surfactant solutions spread faster than other aqueous surfactant solutions, which also provide complete wetting, being superspreaders in the sense of spreading rate as well. The mechanism of fast spreading of surfactant solutions on hydrophobic substrates and much higher spreading rates for trisiloxane solutions are to be explained. Below the available experimental data on superspreading and surfactant-enhanced spreading are analysed/summarised, and possible mechanisms governing the fast spreading are discussed. PMID:26282600

  19. Beyond dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Leong, Mei-I; Fuh, Ming-Ren; Huang, Shang-Da

    2014-03-28

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and other dispersion liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) methods have been developed since the first DLLME method was reported in 2006. DLLME is simple, rapid, and affords high enrichment factor, this is due to the large contact surface area of the extraction solvent. DLLME is a method suitable for the extraction in many different water samples, but it requires using chlorinated solvents. In recent years, interest in DLLME or dispersion LPME has been focused on the use of low-toxicity solvents and more conveniently practical procedures. This review examines some of the most interesting developments in the past few years. In the first section, DLLME methods are separated in two categories: DLLME with low-density extraction solvent and DLLME with high-density extraction solvent. Besides these methods, many novel special devices for collecting low-density extraction solvent are also mentioned. In addition, various dispersion techniques with LPME, including manual shaking, air-assisted LPME (aspirating and injecting the extraction mixture by syringe), ultrasound-assisted emulsification, vortex-assisted emulsification, surfactant-assisted emulsification, and microwave-assisted emulsification are described. Besides the above methods, combinations of DLLME with other extraction techniques (solid-phase extraction, stir bar sorptive extraction, molecularly imprinted matrix solid-phase dispersion and supercritical fluid extraction) are introduced. The combination of nanotechnique with DLLME is also introduced. Furthermore, this review illustrates the application of DLLME or dispersion LPME methods to separate and preconcentrate various organic analytes, inorganic analytes, and samples. PMID:24582396

  20. SURFACTANT ENHANCED SOLUBILIZATION OF RESIDUAL DODECANE IN SOIL COLUMNS 1. MATHEMATICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model is developed to describe surfactant enhanced solubilization of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) in porous media. he model incorporates aqueous phase transport equations for organic and surfactant components as well as a mass balance on the organic phase. ate-...

  1. FIELD DEMONSTRATION STUDIES OF SURFACTANT-ENHANCED SOLUBILIZATION AND MOBILIZATION AT HILL AIR FORCE BASE, UTAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced subsurface remediation can dramatically improve contaminant removal rates compared to the traditional pump-and-treat technology. Surfactants can be used to significantly enhance the solubilization of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) constituents, or they can b...

  2. SURFACTANT-ENHANCED SOLUBILIZATION OF RESIDUAL DODECANE IN SOIL COLUMNS - 2. MATHEMATICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model is developed to describe surfactant-enhanced solubilization of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) in porous media. The model incorporates aqueous-phase transport equations for organic and surfactant components as well as a mass balance for the organic phase. Ra...

  3. Streamline simulation of surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tunison, D.I.

    1996-12-01

    Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) are a recognized source of groundwater contamination. Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) shows promise in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness over traditional `pump and treat` NAPL remediation processes. Laboratory results are not always consistent with the effects observed in field applications because of the complex interactions that occur in the subsurface. Mathematical modeling is required to enable accurate prediction and understanding of SEAR.

  4. Measurement of mass-transfer rates for surfactant-enhanced solubilization of nonaqueous phase liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.S.; Zhong, L.; Pope, G.A.

    1999-09-01

    Surfactant-enhanced solubilization of residual, non-aqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants is an emerging, subsurface remediation technology. The potential for nonequilibrium conditions is investigated for surfactant-enhanced solubilization of a NAPL, trichlorethylene (TCE), in a model porous medium. The surfactant formulation consists of an anionic surfactant, sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate, an alcohol, and an electrolyte in aqueous solution. Batch solubilization experiments are conducted to assess the significant of chemical rate limitations. Surfactant flood experiments are conducted in packed columns with residual TCE. Mass-transfer rate coefficients are determined as a function of aqueous-phase pore velocity, NAPL volumetric fraction, and surfactant concentration. A correlation for predicting mass-transfer rate coefficients as a function of system properties is developed. The mass-transfer rate coefficients and correlation are obtained by fitting a transport simulator to the column effluent concentration results. Significant differences are found between the correlation developed here and correlations developed for other NAPL--surfactant systems. The correlation predicts near-linear dependences of mass-transfer rates on the NAPL volumetric fraction and pore velocity. Using the Damkohler number, the degree of nonequilibrium behavior in surfactant-enhanced NAPL solubilization is analyzed for a range of conditions. Nonequilibrium conditions are found to be significant at relatively low NAPL volumetric fractions.

  5. Modeling surfactant-enhanced nonaqueous-phase liquid remediation of porous media

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.D.; Oostrom, M.

    1998-12-01

    A mathematical model is developed to investigate the main processes associated with surfactant-enhanced nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) remediation of porous media. The model couples four nonlinear mass balance conservation equations (i.e., water, NAPL-phase organic, aqueous-phase organic, and aqueous-phase surfactant) that incorporate aqueous- and NAPL-phase migration and transport of aqueous-phase dissolved surfactant and organics. Rate-limited solubilization of the organic into the aqueous phase is represented by a linear driving force expression and is dependent on the surfactant-enhanced equilibrium concentration. Surfactant-enhanced mobilization of the NAPL phase is incorporated using surfactant concentration-dependent interfacial tension lowering, scaled relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure relations, and trapping number-dependent effective residual saturations for the nonwetting liquid. Sorption of surfactant is assumed to conform to a Langmuir isotherm model, whereas organic sorption is modeled using a linear isotherm with a surfactant and soil-organic content-dependent retardation coefficient. The model is used to simulate experiments described by Pennel et al. (1996) in which the NAPL perchloroethylene was flushed from sand columns using different surfactant solutions.

  6. Application of Optimized Vortex-Assisted Surfactant-Enhanced DLLME for Preconcentration of Thymol and Carvacrol, and Their Determination by HPLC-UV: Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Roosta, Mostafa; Khodadoust, Saeid; Daneshfar, Ali

    2015-08-01

    A novel vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (VASEDLLME-HPLC) was developed for the determination of thymol and carvacrol (phenolic compound). In this method, the extraction solvent (CHCl3) was dispersed into the aqueous samples via a vortex agitator and addition of the surfactant (Triton X-100). The preliminary experiments were undertaken to select the best extraction solvent and surfactant. The influences of effective variables were investigated using a Plackett-Burman 2(7-4) screening design and then, the significant variables were optimized by using a central composite design combined with desirability function. Working under optimum conditions specified as: 140 µL CHCl3, 0.08% (w/v, Triton X-100), 3 min extraction time, 6 min centrifugation at 4,500 rpm, pH 7, 0.0% (w/v) NaCl permit achievement of high and reasonable linear range over 0.005-4.0 mg L(-1) with R(2) = 0.9998 (n = 10). The separation of thymol and carvacrol was achieved in <14 min using a C18 column and an isocratic binary mobile phase acetonitrile-water (55:45, v/v) with a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1). The VASEDLLME is applied for successful determination of carvacrol and thymol in different thyme and pharmaceutical samples with relative standard deviation <4.7% (n = 5). PMID:25637132

  7. A comparison of various modes of liquid-liquid based microextraction techniques: determination of picric acid.

    PubMed

    Burdel, Martin; Šandrejová, Jana; Balogh, Ioseph S; Vishnikin, Andriy; Andruch, Vasil

    2013-03-01

    Three modes of liquid-liquid based microextraction techniques--namely auxiliary solvent-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, auxiliary solvent-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with low-solvent consumption, and ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction--were compared. Picric acid was used as the model analyte. The determination is based on the reaction of picric acid with Astra Phloxine reagent to produce an ion associate easily extractable by various organic solvents, followed by spectrophotometric detection at 558 nm. Each of the compared procedures has both advantages and disadvantages. The main benefit of ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction is that no hazardous chlorinated extraction solvents and no dispersive solvent are necessary. Therefore, this procedure was selected for validation. Under optimized experimental conditions (pH 3, 7 × 10(-5) mol/L of Astra Phloxine, and 100 μL of toluene), the calibration plot was linear in the range of 0.02-0.14 mg/L and the LOD was 7 μg/L of picric acid. The developed procedure was applied to the analysis of spiked water samples. PMID:23381802

  8. Remediation of Nitrobenzene Contaminated Soil by Combining Surfactant Enhanced Soil Washing and Effluent Oxidation with Persulfate

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jingchun; Gao, Weiguo; Qian, Linbo; Han, Lu; Chen, Yun; Chen, Mengfang

    2015-01-01

    The combination of surfactant enhanced soil washing and degradation of nitrobenzene (NB) in effluent with persulfate was investigated to remediate NB contaminated soil. Aqueous solution of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS, 24.0 mmol L-1) was used at a given mass ratio of solution to soil (20:1) to extract NB contaminated soil (47.3 mg kg-1), resulting in NB desorption removal efficient of 76.8%. The washing effluent was treated in Fe2+/persulfate and Fe2+/H2O2 systems successively. The degradation removal of NB was 97.9%, being much higher than that of SDBS (51.6%) with addition of 40.0 mmol L-1 Fe2+ and 40.0 mmol L-1 persulfate after 15 min reaction. The preferential degradation was related to the lone pair electron of generated SO4•−, which preferably removes electrons from aromatic parts of NB over long alkyl chains of SDBS through hydrogen abstraction reactions. No preferential degradation was observed in •OH based oxidation because of its hydrogen abstraction or addition mechanism. The sustained SDBS could be reused for washing the contaminated soil. The combination of the effective surfactant-enhanced washing and the preferential degradation of NB with Fe2+/persulfate provide a useful option to remediate NB contaminated soil. PMID:26266532

  9. Effect of surfactant phase behavior on emulsification.

    PubMed

    Kaizu, Kazuhiro; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2016-03-15

    In order to improve our understanding of the effects that the equilibrium phase behavior and structure of amphiphiles have on the emulsification process and the properties of emulsions stabilized by these amphiphiles, we have exploited the known phase behavior of polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene-polyoxyethylene (POE-POP-POE) amphiphilic block copolymers (Pluronics) in the presence of two immiscible solvents. Specifically, we considered ternary systems consisting of Pluronic F38, L64, P84, P104, or L121 with water and p-xylene which exhibit a very rich phase behavior, including a variety of water-continuous and oil-continuous lyotropic liquid crystalline (LLC) phases. We prepared emulsions having the same (final) compositions but through different emulsification paths, and evaluated the emulsions on the basis of homogeneity and droplet size. We found finer and more homogenous emulsions to result when O/lamellar gel structures (as revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering) were formed during the emulsification process, or when the emulsification path traversed the lamellar LLC phase. This can be attributed to the favorable properties of the lamellar structure: high oil solubilization capacity with concurrent facile dispersibility in water, relatively low interfacial tension, and relatively low viscosity. The findings reported here are relevant to the preparation of emulsions for diverse applications such as skin-care products, pharmaceuticals, food products, coatings, inks, agrochemicals, oil dispersants, and nanomaterials synthesis. PMID:26724700

  10. Visualization of surfactant enhanced NAPL mobilization and solubilization in a two-dimensional micromodel

    SciTech Connect

    ZHONG,LIRONG; MAYER,ALEX; GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.

    2000-03-08

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation is an emerging technology for aquifers contaminated with nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). A two-dimensional micromodel and image capture system were applied to observe NAPL mobilization and solubilization phenomena. In each experiment, a common residual NAPL field was established, followed by a series of mobilization and solubilization experiments. Mobilization floods included pure water floods with variable flow rates and surfactant floods with variations in surfactant formulations. At relatively low capillary numbers (N{sub ca}<10{sup {minus}3}), the surfactant mobilization floods resulted in higher NAPL saturations than for the pure water flood, for similar N{sub ca}.These differences in macroscopic saturations are explained by differences in micro-scale mobilization processes. Solubilization of the residual NAPL remaining after the mobilization stage was dominated by the formation of dissolution fingers, which produced nonequilibrium NAPL solubilization. A macroemulsion phase also as observed to form spontaneously and persist during the solubilization stage of the experiments.

  11. SURFACTANT ENHANCED RECOVERY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE FROM A POROUS MEDIUM CONTAINING LOW PERMEABILITY LENSES. 2. NUMERICAL SIMULATION. (R825409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A numerical model of surfactant enhanced solubilization was developed and applied to the simulation of nonaqueous phase liquid recovery in two-dimensional heterogeneous laboratory sand tank systems. Model parameters were derived from independent, small-scale, ...

  12. Membrane emulsification to produce perfume microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xuemiao

    Microencapsulation is an efficient technology to deliver perfume oils from consumer products onto the surface of fabrics. Microcapsules having uniform size/mechanical strength, may provide better release performance. Membrane emulsification in a dispersion cell followed by in-situ polymerization was used to prepare narrow size distribution melamine-formaldehyde (MF) microcapsules containing several types of oil-based fragrances or ingredients. Investigated in this study are the parameters impacting to the size and size distribution of the droplets and final MF microcapsules. A pilot plant-scale cross-flow membrane system was also used to produce MF microcapsules, demonstrating that the membrane emulsification process has potential to be scaled up for industrial applications. In this study, health and environmental friendly poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microcapsules with narrow size distribution were also prepared for the first time using the dispersion cell membrane emulsification system. Characterization methods previously used for thin-shell microcapsules were expanded to analyse microcapsules with thick shells. The intrinsic mechanical properties of thick shells were determined using a micromanipulation technique and finite element analysis (FEM). The microcapsules structure was also considered in the determination of the permeability and diffusivity of the perfume oils in good solvents..

  13. Partitioning of phenanthrene into surfactant hemi-micelles on the bacterial cell surface and implications for surfactant-enhanced biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Lanzon, Jacquelyn B; Brown, Derick G

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the ability of a surfactant to enhance the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOC) requires the formation of surfactant hemi-micelles on the bacterial cell surface and subsequent partitioning of HOC into the hemi-micelles. However, the studies did not provide direct evidence of HOC partitioning into surfactant hemi-micelles on the bacterial cell surface. In this study, direct evidence is provided to demonstrate that the nonionic surfactant Brij 30 forms hemi-micelles on the bacterial cell surface and that phenanthrene sorption at the bacterial surface is enhanced by the surfactant. These results are in agreement with the current theory describing surfactant-enhanced HOC bioavailability. This enhanced bioavailability is put into context with microbial kinetics and system partitioning processes, and it is demonstrated that the addition of surfactant can enhance, have no effect, or inhibit HOC biodegradation depending upon surfactant concentration and microbial growth rate. Understanding these non-linear relationships between surfactant-enhanced HOC bioavailability, biodegradation kinetics, and system partitioning will assist in the design and implementation of surfactant-enhanced bioremediation programs. PMID:23764610

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF PILOT-SCALE PERVAPORATION SYSTEMS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND REMOVAL FROM A SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION FLUID. II. HOLLOW FIBER MEMBRANE MODULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale demonstration of pervaporation-based removal of volatile organic compounds from a surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) fluid has been conducted at USEPA's Test & Evaluation Facility using hollow fiber membrane modules. The membranes consisted of microporous...

  15. Field demonstration of surfactant-enhanced solubilization of DNAPL at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Jeffrey; Acosta, Edgar; Annable, Michael D.; Brooks, Michael C.; Enfield, Carl G.; Harwell, Jeffrey H.; Hasegawa, Mark; Knox, Robert C.; Rao, P. Suresh C.; Sabatini, David A.; Shiau, Ben; Szekeres, Erika; Wood, A. Lynn

    2006-01-01

    This study reports on a surfactant-based flood for tetrachloroethylene (PCE) removal from a control test cell at the Dover National Test Site. The surfactant formulation (sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate (Aerosol-MA® or AMA), isopropanol and calcium chloride) was able to achieve a high concentration of PCE in swollen micelles (supersolubilization) without vertical PCE migration. The hydraulic system included eight screened wells that were operated in both vertical circulation and line drive configurations. After 10 pore volumes of flushing, the overall PCE removal was 68% (65% of which corresponded to the surfactant flooding alone). In addition, the residual PCE saturation was reduced from 0.7% to 0.2%, and the concentration of PCE in the groundwater was reduced from 37-190 mg/L before the flushing to 7.3 mg/L after flooding. Recycling the surfactant solution reduced the required surfactant mass (and thus cost, and waste) by 90%. Close to 80% of the total PCE removal was obtained during the first five pore volumes which were operated in an upward vertical circulation flow scheme. No free oil phase was observed during the test. Further analysis of multilevel sampler data suggests that most of the trapped oil remaining in the cell was likely localized in secluded regions of the aquifer, which helps explain the lower PCE groundwater concentration after remedial activities. In summary, this field study demonstrated the feasibility of surfactant-enhanced remediation to reduce the mass in the source zone and significantly reduce the PCE aqueous concentration and therefore the risk associated with the contaminant plume.

  16. Nano-encapsulated PCM via Pickering Emulsification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuezhen; Zhang, Lecheng; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Jia, Lisi; Sam Mannan, M.; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2015-08-01

    We designed a two-step Pickering emulsification procedure to create nano-encapsulated phase changing materials (NEPCMs) using a method whose simplicity and low energy consumption suggest promise for scale-up and mass production. Surface-modified amphiphilic zirconium phosphate (ZrP) platelets were fabricated as the Pickering emulsifiers, nonadecane was chosen as the core phase change material (PCM), and polystyrene, the shell material. The resultant capsules were submicron in size with remarkable uniformity in size distribution, which has rarely been reported. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) characterization showed that the capsulation efficiency of NEPCMs, and they were found to be thermal stable, as characterized by the DSC data for the sample after 200 thermal cycles. NEPCMs exhibit superior mechanical stability and mobility when compared with the well-developed micro-encapsulated phase change materials (MEPCMs). NEPCMs find useful applications in thermal management, including micro-channel coolants; solar energy storage media; building temperature regulators; and thermal transfer fabrics.

  17. Effect of cation exchange on surfactant-enhanced solubilization of trichloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, J. A.; Sawyer, T. E.; Schroth, M. H.; Humphrey, M. D.; Istok, J. D.

    2000-11-01

    The objective of this study was to develop the single-well push-pull test as a diagnostic tool for assessing the potential for cation exchange to adversely affect the phase behavior of sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate surfactant (Aerosol MA 80-I) and its solubilization of trichloroethene (TCE) in the subsurface. Laboratory push-pull tests were conducted on a model natural aquifer sediment collected from a TCE-contaminated field site and a test solution consisting of 36,800 mg/l (3.7 wt.%) sulfosuccinate, 100,000 mg/l (10 wt.%) isopropanol, and 3200 mg/l (0.32 wt.%) KBr. Laboratory experiments were designed to simulate conditions occurring during single-well, "push-pull" tests. In batch experiments conducted in the presence of excess TCE, the test solution gave a Winsor Type I system with an enhanced aqueous TCE solubility of 26,700 mg/l and a solution density of 1.000 g/cm 3. The sulfosuccinate surfactant was transported conservatively in sediment packs containing no TCE. However, increasing concentrations of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ resulting from cation exchange caused the TCE solubilization potential of the injected surfactant to exceed values predicted from the solubilization isotherm. Sulfosuccinate surfactant transport was strongly retarded in sediment packs containing 5 vol.% residual TCE because cation exchange resulted in the formation of a Winsor Type II system, which resulted in the partitioning of the sulfosuccinate surfactant into the residual TCE phase. Conservative sulfosuccinate transport was observed in a separate sediment pack containing 5 vol.% residual TCE when a 130 meq/l Na + pre-flush was used to reduce quantities of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ in the sediment pack prior to sulfosuccinate injection. The results of this study emphasize the importance of cation exchange on the performance of surfactant-enhanced TCE solubilization and demonstrate the utility of the push-pull test for predicting the potentially deleterious effects of cation exchange on surfactant phase

  18. Low-frequency ac electro-flow-focusing microfluidic emulsification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng; Kim, Haejune; Luo, Dawei; Marquez, Manuel; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2010-04-01

    Applications of electric field, using either dc or high-frequency ac field, have shown many advantages in emulsification. We further develop this technique by a detailed study on low-frequency ac electro-flow-focusing (EFF) microfluidic emulsification. Counter-intuitively, the droplet size variation is not monotonic with the electric field, in contrary to the dc-EFF emulsification. This phenomenon originates from a relaxation oscillation of flow rate through the Taylor cone. Particularly, a continuous droplet size decrease was obtained at the voltage ramp-up stage. This emulsification process was modeled in analog to the accumulation and release of charges in an RC electric circuit with an adjustable resistor.

  19. Nano-encapsulated PCM via Pickering Emulsification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuezhen; Zhang, Lecheng; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Jia, Lisi; Sam Mannan, M; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2015-01-01

    We designed a two-step Pickering emulsification procedure to create nano-encapsulated phase changing materials (NEPCMs) using a method whose simplicity and low energy consumption suggest promise for scale-up and mass production. Surface-modified amphiphilic zirconium phosphate (ZrP) platelets were fabricated as the Pickering emulsifiers, nonadecane was chosen as the core phase change material (PCM), and polystyrene, the shell material. The resultant capsules were submicron in size with remarkable uniformity in size distribution, which has rarely been reported. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) characterization showed that the capsulation efficiency of NEPCMs, and they were found to be thermal stable, as characterized by the DSC data for the sample after 200 thermal cycles. NEPCMs exhibit superior mechanical stability and mobility when compared with the well-developed micro-encapsulated phase change materials (MEPCMs). NEPCMs find useful applications in thermal management, including micro-channel coolants; solar energy storage media; building temperature regulators; and thermal transfer fabrics. PMID:26278332

  20. Nano-encapsulated PCM via Pickering Emulsification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuezhen; Zhang, Lecheng; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Jia, Lisi; Sam Mannan, M.; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2015-01-01

    We designed a two-step Pickering emulsification procedure to create nano-encapsulated phase changing materials (NEPCMs) using a method whose simplicity and low energy consumption suggest promise for scale-up and mass production. Surface-modified amphiphilic zirconium phosphate (ZrP) platelets were fabricated as the Pickering emulsifiers, nonadecane was chosen as the core phase change material (PCM), and polystyrene, the shell material. The resultant capsules were submicron in size with remarkable uniformity in size distribution, which has rarely been reported. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) characterization showed that the capsulation efficiency of NEPCMs, and they were found to be thermal stable, as characterized by the DSC data for the sample after 200 thermal cycles. NEPCMs exhibit superior mechanical stability and mobility when compared with the well-developed micro-encapsulated phase change materials (MEPCMs). NEPCMs find useful applications in thermal management, including micro-channel coolants; solar energy storage media; building temperature regulators; and thermal transfer fabrics. PMID:26278332

  1. Pentachlorophenol removal from water using surfactant-enhanced filtration through low-pressure thin film composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yogesh; Popat, K M; Brahmbhatt, H; Ganguly, B; Bhattacharya, A

    2008-06-15

    Removal of pentachlorophenol from water is investigated using the surfactant-enhanced cross-flow membrane filtration technique in which anionic surfactant; sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is the carrier of pentachlorophenol. The separation performances are studied by varying SDS concentrations (

  2. DEMONSTRATION OF PILOT-SCALE PREVAPORATION SYSTEMS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND REMOVAL FROM A SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION FLUID. I. SPIRAL WOUND MEMBRANE MODULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the summer of 1996, a pilot-scale demonstration of a surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) process for removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) from soils was conducted at Hill Air Force Base in Layton, Utah. Five thousand gallons of the extracted DNAP...

  3. Researches and applications of the ultrasonic emulsifications and dispersions.

    PubMed

    Quanlu, Li; Yinhong, Zhang; Jing, Wu

    2013-11-01

    This paper defines power ultrasonics and their two important directions: Ultrasonic emulsification and dispersion from a practical point of view, brief reports on recent research results are ultrasonic emulsification to be used for the preparation of composite electrorheological fluid, and ultrasonic dispersion to be used dispersion as a new type cold cloud catalytic agent metaldehyde [CH3CH]4-6 (this is used for artificial rain), etc., and produce good results or gain progress. Then, the principle and applications of power ultrasonics (including magnetostriction type ultrasonic transducer and piezoelectric type ultrasonic transducer) in the emulsification or dispersion, are pointed out. Also, ultrasonic extensive applications in chemistry, materials, and life sciences are briefly introduced. PMID:24180765

  4. Fabrication of a uniformly sized fenofibrate microemulsion by membrane emulsification.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Roshan; Lee, Dong Won; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2013-01-01

    Fenofibrate-loaded microemulsions composed of Labrafil M 1944 CS, Capryol PGMC and fenofibrate as the dispersed phase and Labrasol in demineralised water as the continuous phase were prepared by utilising a Shirasu-porous-glass (SPG) membrane emulsification technique. The process parameters were optimised by adjusting the feed pressure (15-45 kPa), agitator speed (250-800 rpm) and temperature of the continuous phase (25-45°C). As a result, narrowly distributed microemulsions were obtained via SPG membrane emulsification at an agitator speed of 250 rpm, a feed pressure of 30 kPa and a continuous phase temperature of 25°C. Furthermore, TEM images clearly showed that the microemulsion prepared by SPG membrane emulsification had a uniform, spherical morphology with a narrow size distribution. Our results indicated that the SPG membrane emulsification technique is highly efficient for the preparation of narrowly distributed microemulsions with relatively smaller particle sizes compared with the common stirring method. PMID:22657749

  5. Structured microparticles with tailored properties produced by membrane emulsification.

    PubMed

    Vladisavljević, Goran T

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of membrane emulsification routes for fabrication of structured microparticles with tailored properties for specific applications. Direct (bottom-up) and premix (top-down) membrane emulsification processes are discussed including operational, formulation and membrane factors that control the droplet size and droplet generation regimes. A special emphasis was put on different methods of controlled shear generation on membrane surface, such as cross flow on the membrane surface, swirl flow, forward and backward flow pulsations in the continuous phase and membrane oscillations and rotations. Droplets produced by membrane emulsification can be used for synthesis of particles with versatile morphology (solid and hollow, matrix and core/shell, spherical and non-spherical, porous and coherent, composite and homogeneous), which can be surface functionalised and coated or loaded with macromolecules, nanoparticles, quantum dots, drugs, phase change materials and high molecular weight gases to achieve controlled/targeted drug release and impart special optical, chemical, electrical, acoustic, thermal and magnetic properties. The template emulsions including metal-in-oil, solid-in-oil-in-water, oil-in-oil, multilayer, and Pickering emulsions can be produced with high encapsulation efficiency of encapsulated materials and narrow size distribution and transformed into structured particles using a variety of solidification processes, such as polymerisation (suspension, mini-emulsion, interfacial and in-situ), ionic gelation, chemical crosslinking, melt solidification, internal phase separation, layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition, particle self-assembly, complex coacervation, spray drying, sol-gel processing, and molecular imprinting. Particles fabricated from droplets produced by membrane emulsification include nanoclusters, colloidosomes, carbon aerogel particles, nanoshells, polymeric (molecularly imprinted, hypercrosslinked, Janus and core

  6. Shifts in microbial community structure during in situ surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingwen; Li, Feng; Zhan, Yu; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to reveal the microbial mechanism of in situ surfactant-enhanced bioremediation (SEBR). Various concentrations of rhamnolipids, Tween 80, and sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS) were separately sprayed onto soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for years. Within 90 days, the highest level of degradation (95 %) was observed in the soil treated with rhamnolipids (10 mg/kg), followed by 92 % degradation with Tween 80 (50 mg/kg) and 90 % degradation with SDBS (50 mg/kg). The results of the microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) suggest that bacteria dominated the enhanced PAH biodegradation (94 % of the maximum contribution). The shift of bacterial community structure during the surfactant treatment was analyzed by using the 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing. In the presence of surfactants, the number of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and Sphingomonas increased from 2-3 to 15-30 % at the end of the experiment (two to three times of control). Gene prediction with phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states (PICRUSt) shows that the PAH-degrading genes, such as 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate dioxygenase and PAH dioxygenase large subunit, significantly increased after the surfactant applications (p < 0.05). The findings of this study provide insights into the surfactant-induced shifts of microbial community, as well as critical factors for efficient bioremediation. PMID:27068902

  7. Investigation of surfactant-enhanced dissolution of entrapped nonaqueous phase liquid chemicals in a two-dimensional groundwater flow field.

    PubMed

    Saba, T; Illangasekare, T H; Ewing, J

    2001-09-01

    Because of their low solubility, waste chemicals in the form of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) that are entrapped in subsurface formations act as long-term sources of groundwater contamination. In the design of remediation schemes that use surfactants, it is necessary to estimate the mass transfer rate coefficients under multi-dimensional flow fields that exit at field sites. In this study, we investigate mass transfer under a two-dimensional flow field to obtain an understanding of the basic mechanisms of surfactant-enhanced dissolution and to quantify the mass transfer rates. Enhanced dissolution experiments in a two-dimensional test cell were conducted to measure rates of mass depletion from entrapped NAPLs to a flowing aqueous phase containing a surfactant. In situ measurement of transient saturation changes using a gamma attenuation system revealed dissolution patterns that are affected by the dimensionality of the groundwater flow field. Numerical modeling of local flow fields that changed with time, due to depletion of NAPL sources, enabled the examination of the basic mechanisms of NAPL dissolution in complex groundwater systems. Through nonlinear regression analysis, mass transfer rates were correlated to porous media properties, NAPL saturation and aqueous phase velocity. Results from the experiments and numerical analyses were used to identify deficiencies in existing methods of analysis that uses assumptions of one-dimensional flow, homogeneity of aquifer properties, local equilibrium and idealized transient mass transfer. PMID:11530927

  8. The effect of polymer-surfactant interaction on the rheological properties of surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding formulations

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1993-02-01

    Surfactant-enhanced, lower pH (weak) alkaline chemicals are effective for mobilizing residual oil. Polymer is used for mobility control because if mobility control is lost, then oil recovery is reduced. The ability to maintain mobility control during surfactant-alkaline flooding can be adversely affected by chemical interaction. In this work, interaction between polymers and surfactants was shown to be affected by pH, ionic strength, crude oil, and the properties of the polymers and surfactants. Polymer-surfactant interaction (phase separation, precipitation, and viscosity loss) occurred between most of the polymers and surfactants that were tested. Polymer-surfactant interaction is difficult to eliminate, and no method was found for completely eliminating interaction. Polymer-surfactant interaction occurred at optimal salinity and below optimal salinity. Polymer-surfactant interaction had an adverse effect on polymer rheology; however, the adverse effect of interaction on polymer rheology was lessened when oil was present. Increasing the pH of chemical systems further reduced the adverse effects of interaction on polymer rheology.

  9. Emulsification in turbulent flow: 3. Daughter drop-size distribution.

    PubMed

    Tcholakova, Slavka; Vankova, Nina; Denkov, Nikolai D; Danner, Thomas

    2007-06-15

    Systematic set of experiments is performed to clarify the effects of several factors on the size distribution of the daughter drops, which are formed as a result of drop breakage during emulsification in turbulent flow. The effects of oil viscosity, etaD, interfacial tension, sigma, and rate of energy dissipation in the turbulent flow, epsilon, are studied. As starting oil-water premixes we use emulsions containing monodisperse oil drops, which have been generated by membrane emulsification. By passing these premixes through a narrow-gap homogenizer, working in turbulent regime of emulsification, we monitor the changes in the drop-size distribution with the emulsification time. The experimental data are analyzed by using a new numerical procedure, which is based on the assumption (supported by the experimental data) that the probability for formation of daughter drops with diameter smaller than the maximum diameter of the stable drops, demulsification time. We found that the breakage of a single "mother" drop leads to the formation of multiple daughter drops, and that the number and size distribution of these daughter drops depend strongly on the viscosity of the dispersed phase. Different scaling laws are found to describe the experimental results for the oils of low and high viscosity. The obtained results for the daughter drop-size distribution are in a reasonably good agreement with the experimental results reported by other authors. In contrast, the comparison with several basic model functions, proposed in the literature, does not show good agreement and the possible reasons are discussed. The proposed numerical procedure allows us to describe accurately the evolution of all main characteristics of the drop-size distribution during emulsification, such as the number and volume averaged diameters, and the distributive and cumulative functions by

  10. Methodological aspects of sample preparation for the determination of carbamate residues: a review.

    PubMed

    Santaladchaiyakit, Yanawath; Srijaranai, Supalax; Burakham, Rodjana

    2012-09-01

    This review covers recent developments in sample preparations and analytical techniques for determination of residues of carbamate pesticides. Special attention is paid to the newly established microextraction techniques, including cloud-point extraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, and ultrasound-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction. In addition, extractions using a variety of solvents, as well as miniaturized and on-line sample preparation systems, are discussed. Applications of the different methods for the determination of carbamate pesticide residues in food and environmental matrices are included. PMID:22997028

  11. Effect of back pressure on emulsification of lipid nanodispersions in a high-pressure homogenizer.

    PubMed

    Saheki, Akira; Seki, Junzo; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2012-01-17

    We examined the effect of 0-20% back pressure, which functions as a resistance to emulsification in a high-pressure homogenizer, on emulsification of lipid nanodispersions (emulsion and liposomes) less than 100 nm in diameter. Back pressure in the range of 0.9-3.8% of the emulsification pressure enhanced the emulsification, and the particle diameter of lipid nanodispersion was the smallest at 2% back pressure. The back pressure effect was independent of the actual pressure, which was regarded as the difference between the emulsification and the back pressures. The mechanism of the back pressure effect was considered to be enhancement of emulsification by suppression of collapse cavitation in the high-pressure emulsification module. This back pressure effect appeared in emulsification of emulsion and liposomes, and was seen predominantly in the early emulsification phase (within 10 passages). The particles of lipid nanodispersions prepared at 2% back pressure with adequate re-circulation achieved physicochemically optimal diameter with a narrow size distribution, and were more stable at 60°C for 7 days than particles prepared with 20% back pressure. Our results indicate that emulsification with a low level of back pressure is effective for production of stable lipid nanodispersions with narrow size distribution. PMID:22108638

  12. Coalescence during emulsification. 2. Role of small molecule surfactants.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Lloyd; Svereika, Aileen

    2003-05-15

    An oil-soluble hexadecyl pyrene (HDP) probe is used to monitor coalescence of hexadecane oil-in-water emulsions, during emulsification, in stirred systems and in a high-pressure homogenizer (microfluidizer), when small molecule surfactants are used as emulsifiers. The effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate concentration and salt concentration on the amount of coalescence and final drop size is studied. The behavior of oil-soluble surfactants and mixtures of oil-soluble and water-soluble surfactants on emulsification performance is also discussed. For high-pressure homogenizers, the drop sizes obtained are found to depend mostly on the ability of surfactants to stabilize the drops against coalescence, rather than their ability to reduce the interfacial tension. Increasing oil phase fractions increase the coalescence rate, because of the increase in collision frequency, which, in turn, impacts the drop size of the homogenized emulsion. PMID:16256561

  13. Emulsification in turbulent flow 2. Breakage rate constants.

    PubMed

    Vankova, Nina; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai D; Vulchev, Vassil D; Danner, Thomas

    2007-09-15

    Systematic experimental study of the effects of several factors on the breakage rate constant, k(BR), during emulsification in turbulent flow is performed. These factors are the drop size, interfacial tension, viscosity of the oil phase, and rate of energy dissipation in the flow. As starting oil-water premixes we use emulsions containing monodisperse oil drops, which have been generated by the method of membrane emulsification. By passing these premixes through a narrow-gap homogenizer, working in turbulent regime of emulsification, we study the evolution of the number concentration of the drops with given diameter, as a function of the emulsification time. The experimental data are analyzed by a kinetic scheme, which takes into account the generation of drops of a given size (as a result of breakage of larger drops) and their disappearance (as a result of their own breakage process). The experimental results for k(BR) are compared with theoretical expressions from the literature and their modifications. The results for all systems could be described reasonably well by an explicit expression, which is a product of: (a) the frequency of collisions between drops and turbulent eddies of similar size, and (b) the efficiency of drop breakage, which depends on the energy required for drop deformation. The drop deformation energy contains two contributions, originating from the drop surface extension and from the viscous dissipation inside the breaking drop. In the related subsequent paper, the size distribution of the daughter drops formed in the process of drop breakage is analyzed for the same experimental systems. PMID:17553511

  14. Controlled double emulsification utilizing 3D PDMS microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fu-Che; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a PDMS emulsification device that is capable of generating water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions in a controlled manner. Specially designed 3D microchannels are utilized to steer the independently driven water- and oil-phase flows (especially to restrict the attachment of the middle oil-phase flow on the channel surfaces), and to break the continuous flows into monodisperse double emulsions. In addition to channel geometries and fluid flow rates, surfactants and osmotic agents are employed to facilitate the breakup process and stabilize the resulting emulsion structures. In the prototype demonstration, two-level SU-8 molds were fabricated to duplicate PDMS microstructures, which were surface treated and bonded irreversibly to form 3D microchannels. Throughout the emulsification trials, dripping was intentionally induced to generate monodisperse double emulsions with single or multiple aqueous droplets inside each oil drop. It is found that the overall and core sizes of the resulting double emulsions could be adjusted independently, mainly by varying the outer and inner fluid flow rates, respectively. As such, the presented double emulsification device could potentially realize the controllability on emulsion structure and size distribution, which is desired for a variety of biological and pharmaceutical applications.

  15. Thin-film microextraction.

    PubMed

    Bruheim, Inge; Liu, Xiaochuan; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2003-02-15

    The properties of a thin sheet of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane as an extraction phase were examined and compared to solid-phase microextraction (SPME) PDMS-coated fiber for application to semivolatile analytes in direct and headspace modes. This new PDMS extraction approach showed much higher extraction rates because of the larger surface area to extraction-phase volume ratio of the thin film. Unlike the coated rod formats of SPME using thick coatings, the high extraction rate of the membrane SPME technique allows larger amounts of analytes to be extracted within a short period of time. Therefore, higher extraction efficiency and sensitivity can be achieved without sacrificing analysis time. In direct membrane SPME extraction, a linear relationship was found between the initial rate of extraction and the surface area of the extraction phase. However, for headspace extraction, the rates were somewhat lower because of the resistance to analyte transport at the sample matrix/headspace barrier. It was found that the effect of this barrier could be reduced by increasing either agitation, temperature, or surface area of the sample matrix/headspace interface. A method for the determination of PAHs in spiked lake water samples was developed based on the membrane PDMS extraction coupled with GC/MS. A linearity of 0.9960 and detection limits in the low-ppt level were found. The reproducibility was found to vary from 2.8% to 10.7%. PMID:12622398

  16. Microextraction of priority pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Leepipatriboon, S.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the priority pollutants, e.g., aromatic hydrocarbons, halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and halogenated alkanes and alkenes have been studied by a microextraction technique. The compounds studied were benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene for aromatic hydrocarbons; chlorobenzene, m-dichlorobenzene, p-dichlorobenzene, and o-dichlorobenzene for halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons; and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, choloroform, ethylene chloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, methylene chloride, bromodichloromethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, trichloroethylene and bromoform for halogenated alkanes and alkenes. The organic solvent-to-water sample ratios of study were 1:9, 5:5 and 8:2, respectively. Solvent extractability effect of carbon disulfide, methylene chloride and hexane or iso-octane and the effect of salts, e.g., saturated sodium chloride solution, saturated sodium sulfate solution, 2.00 g of sodium chloride and 2.00 g of sodium sulfate on the percent recovery were investigated in this study. This technique is based on the extraction into an organic solvent phase followed by the measurement of the peak area by a flame ionization detector. Gas chromatography and the internal standard technique were used throughout the stud. The gas chromatographic conditions for each system of study were reported. The standard deviation of this study ranged from 1-16%. The distribution constant, K{sub D}, and the results of percent recovery for each compound are discussed.

  17. Tandem dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction as an efficient method for determination of basic drugs in complicated matrices.

    PubMed

    Bazregar, Mohammad; Rajabi, Maryam; Yamini, Yadollah; Saffarzadeh, Zahra; Asghari, Alireza

    2016-01-15

    A simple and efficient approach is introduced for the improvement of the clean-up and applicability of the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method in complicated matrices. For this purpose, two dispersive microextraction methods were combined, and the tandem dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (TDLLME) method was provided. At first, using the ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) method, the tricyclic anti-depressant (TCA) drugs nortriptyline, imipramine, and amitriptyline, as the model compounds, contained in an aqueous sample solution (8.0 mL), were extracted into an organic solvent (35 μL). Then by utilizing the air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) method, these analytes were simply back-extracted into 50 μL of an aqueous acceptor phase. By performing this convenient extraction method, a high sample clean-up was obtained; the overall extraction time was 7 min. The back-extraction step could be performed in less than 2 min, and very simple tools were required for this purpose. The response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the optimization of the experimental parameters so that the volumes 95 and 50 μL were obtained for the organic solvent and the acceptor phase, respectively, and the pH values of 11.25 and 1.75 were obtained for the donor and acceptor phases, respectively, as the optimal extraction conditions. Under the optimized conditions, TDLLME-HPLC-UV provided a good linearity in the range of 2.5-5000 ng mL(-1), low limits of detection (0.7-1.0 ng mL(-1)), good extraction repeatabilities (relative standard deviations below 6.2%, n=5), and enrichment factors (EFs) of 50-101. Finally, the developed method was successfully used for the determination of the mentioned drugs in the wastewater and human plasma samples. PMID:26711155

  18. Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, P.F.; Dudley, R.J.; Churchill, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of three structurally related, non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-45, Triton X-100 and Triton X-165, as well as the oleophilic fertilizer, Inipol EAP 22, on the rate of biodegradation of phenanthrene by pure bacterial cultures. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of these surfactants to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The results indicate that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons can lead to enhanced biodegradation rates by two Pseudomonas saccharophila strains. However, the experiments also suggest that some surfactants can inhibit aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by certain bacteria. The data also support the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental clean-up technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil-contaminated Alaskan beaches.

  19. Dispersive suspended microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Yu; Lu, Yue-Le; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Hui

    2011-11-14

    A novel sample pre-treatment technique termed dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) has been developed for the determination of eight organophosphorus pesticides (ethoprophos, malathion, chlorpyrifos, isocarbophos, methidathion, fenamiphos, profenofos, triazophos) in aqueous samples. In this method, both extraction and two phases' separation process were performed by the assistance of magnetic stirring. After separating the two phases, 1 μL of the suspended phase was injected into GC for further instrument analysis. Varieties of experiment factors which could affect the experiment results were optimized and the following were selected: 12.0 μL p-xylene was selected as extraction solvent, extraction speed was 1200 rpm, extraction time was 30 s, the restoration speed was 800 rpm, the restoration time was 8 min, and no salt was added. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detections (LODs) varied between 0.01 and 0.05 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSDs, n=6) ranged from 4.6% to 12.1%. The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 0.1-100.0 μg L(-1). Correlation coefficients (r) varied from 0.9964 to 0.9995. The enrichment factors (EFs) were between 206 and 243. In the final experiment, the developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in wine and tap water samples and the obtained recoveries were between 83.8% and 101.3%. Compared with other pre-treatment methods, DSME has its own features and could achieve satisfied results for the analysis of trace components in complicated matrices. PMID:22023861

  20. Some physicochemical remarks on spontaneous emulsification of vitreal tamponades.

    PubMed

    Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; dell'Omo, Roberto; Zeppa, Lucio; Bufalo, Gennaro; Cardone, Michele; Romano, Mario; Ambrosone, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of gravitational instability in determining the emulsification of vitreal tamponades is discussed. Theoretical results and numerical simulations indicate that the spontaneous formation of water-silicon oil is a rare event and that the very low concentration of surface active agents cannot justify the systematic formation of emulsions. The gravitational instabilities seem to play the main role. Our theoretical results seem in agreement with the experimental evidences; furthermore they indicate a future research line for the improvement of endotamponades. Indeed, the use of biodegradable antifoam may avoid the formation of bubbles and delay the formation of emulsions. PMID:25133159

  1. Some Physicochemical Remarks on Spontaneous Emulsification of Vitreal Tamponades

    PubMed Central

    dell'Omo, Roberto; Zeppa, Lucio; Bufalo, Gennaro; Cardone, Michele; Romano, Mario; Ambrosone, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of gravitational instability in determining the emulsification of vitreal tamponades is discussed. Theoretical results and numerical simulations indicate that the spontaneous formation of water-silicon oil is a rare event and that the very low concentration of surface active agents cannot justify the systematic formation of emulsions. The gravitational instabilities seem to play the main role. Our theoretical results seem in agreement with the experimental evidences; furthermore they indicate a future research line for the improvement of endotamponades. Indeed, the use of biodegradable antifoam may avoid the formation of bubbles and delay the formation of emulsions. PMID:25133159

  2. Ultrasound-assisted liquid-phase microextraction based on a nanostructured supramolecular solvent.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Morteza; Yamini, Yadollah; Tayyebi, Moslem; Asiabi, Hamid

    2013-05-01

    Novel ultrasonically enhanced supramolecular solvent microextraction (USESSM) then high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection have been used for extraction and determination of phthalates in water and cosmetics. Coacervates consisting of decanoic acid-based nano-structured aggregates, specifically reverse micelles, have been used the first time as solvents for ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME). Sonication accelerated mass transfer of the target analytes into the nano-structured solvent from the aqueous sample, thus reducing extraction time. Several conditions affecting extraction efficiency, for example the concentrations of major components of the supramolecular solvent (tetrahydrofuran and decanoic acid), sample solution pH, salt addition, and ultrasonication time, were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, preconcentration of the analytes ranged from 176 to 412-fold and the linear range was 0.5-100 μg L(-1), with correlation coefficients (R(2)) ≥ 0.9984. The detection sensitivity of the method was excellent, with limits of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) in the range 0.10-0.70 μg L(-1) and precision in the range 4.1-11.7 % (RSD, n = 5). This method was successfully used for analysis of phthalates in water and cosmetics, with good recovery of spiked phthalates (91.0-108.5 %). PMID:23417551

  3. Manufacture of poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres using membrane emulsification.

    PubMed

    Bux, Jaiyana; Manga, Mohamed S; Hunter, Timothy N; Biggs, Simon

    2016-07-28

    Accurate control of particle size at relatively narrow polydispersity remains a key challenge in the production of synthetic polymer particles at scale. A cross-flow membrane emulsification (XME) technique was used here in the preparation of poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres at a 1-10 l h(-1) scale, to demonstrate its application for such a manufacturing challenge. XME technology has previously been shown to provide good control over emulsion droplet sizes with careful choice of the operating conditions. We demonstrate here that, for an appropriate formulation, equivalent control can be gained for a precursor emulsion in a batch suspension polymerization process. We report here the influence of key parameters on the emulsification process; we also demonstrate the close correlation in size between the precursor emulsion and the final polymer particles. Two types of polymer particle were produced in this work: a solid microsphere and an oil-filled matrix microcapsule.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298430

  4. Liquid Phase Micro-Extraction of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate Anionic Surfactants in Aqueous Samples

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Niklas; Otrembska, Paulina; Villar, Mercedes; Jönsson, Jan Åke

    2011-01-01

    Hollow fiber liquid phase micro-extraction (LPME) of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) from aqueous samples was studied. Ion pair extraction of C10, C11, C12 and C13 homologues was facilitated with trihexylamine as ion-pairing agent, using di-n-hexylether as solvent for the supported liquid membrane (SLM). Effects of extraction time, acceptor buffer concentration, stirring speed, sample volume, NaCl and humic acids were studied. At 10–50 μg L−1 linear R2-coefficients were 0.99 for C10 and C11 and 0.96 for C12. RSD was typically ∼15%. Three observations were especially made. Firstly, LPME for these analytes was unusually slow with maximum enrichment observed after 15–24 h (depending on sample volume). Secondly, the enrichment depended on LAS sample concentration with 35–150 times enrichment below ∼150 μg L−1 and 1850–4400 times enrichment at 1 mg L−1. Thirdly, lower homologues were enriched more than higher homologues at low sample concentrations, with reversed conditions at higher concentrations. These observations may be due to the fact that LAS and the amine counter ion themselves influence the mass transfer at the water-SLM interface. The observations on LPME of LAS may aid in LPME application to other compounds with surfactant properties or in surfactant enhanced membrane extraction of other compounds. PMID:24957870

  5. Influence of post-emulsification drying processes on the microencapsulation of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Lane, Majella E; Brennan, Fiona S; Corrigan, Owen I

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, methods used to microencapsulate Human Serum Albumin (HSA) in a biodegradable polymer were compared for their effects on the physicochemical characteristics of HSA-loaded microparticles and on the release and integrity of encapsulated HSA. The polymer used was poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (75:25) (PLGA) (Boehringer Ingelheim, Resomer RG 752, MW 20,900). Microparticles were formulated by (i) w/o/w emulsification and freeze-drying (EFD) or (ii) w/o/w emulsification and spray-drying (ESD). Particle morphology and size were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and by laser diffraction analysis. Loading, encapsulation efficiency and protein release were determined using a commercial protein assay kit. Protein integrity was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. Particles produced by emulsification/spray-drying exhibited greater diversity in shape than those produced by emulsification/freeze-drying. Additionally, protein loading values were significantly higher for particles produced by emulsification/spray-drying rather than particles produced by emulsification/freeze-drying. The structural integrity of encapsulated protein was confirmed for particles produced by both processes. The fraction of HSA released was similar for both formulations. The emulsification/spray-drying technique described appears to be a rapid and efficient method for the preparation of PLGA microparticles loaded with a model protein. PMID:16274944

  6. Solid phase microextraction field kit

    DOEpatents

    Nunes, Peter J.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-08-16

    A field kit for the collection, isolation and concentration of trace amounts of high explosives (HE), biological weapons (BW) and chemical weapons (CW) residues in air, soil, vegetation, swipe, and liquid samples. The field kit includes a number of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) fiber and syringe assemblies in a hermetically sealed transportation container or tubes which includes a sampling port, a number of extra SPME fiber and syringe assemblies, the fiber and syringe assemblies including a protective cap for the fiber, and an extractor for the protective cap, along with other items including spare parts, protective glove, and an instruction manual, all located in an airtight container.

  7. Enhanced oil recovery by surfactant-enhanced volumetric sweep efficiency: First annual report for the period September 30, 1985-September 30, 1986. [Sandpacks

    SciTech Connect

    Harwell, J H; Scamehorn, J F

    1987-05-01

    Surfactant-enhanced volumetric sweep efficiency is a novel EOR method which utilizes precipitation/coacervation of surfactants to plug the most permeable regions of the reservoir, improving the efficiency of a waterflooding operation. This technique does not rely on reduction of interfacial tension between aqueous and oleic phases to enhance oil recovery. Therefore, even though surfactants are involved, this new technique is not a substitute or improvement on classical surfactant flooding; however, it has the potantial to compete with polymer flooding as an alternative sweep efficiency improvement method. In surfactant-enhanced volumetric sweep efficiency, a slug containing one kind of surfactant is injected into the reservoir, followed by a brine spacer. This is followed by injection of a second kind of surfactant which has lower adsorption than the first surfactant used. Anionic and cationic surfactants are one possible combination for this application. These may form either a precipitate or a coacervate upon mixing. Phase boundaries for some specific systems of this type have been determined over a wide range of conditions and a model developed to describe this behavior. Another possibility is the use of nonionic surfactants, which may form coacervate under proper conditions. The adsorption behavior of mixtures of anionic and nonionic surfactants was measured to aid in modeling the chromatographic effects with these surfactants in the reservoir. Studies with sandpacks of different permeabilities in parallel configuration using mixtures of anionic and cationic surfactants have demonstrated the capability of this method to reduce flow rates through a more permeable sandpack more than that through a less permeable sandpack. 4 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Ultrasonic emulsification of food-grade nanoemulsion formulation and evaluation of its bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Vijayalakshmi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2013-01-01

    Basil oil (Ocimum basilicum) nanoemulsion was formulated using non-ionic surfactant Tween80 and water by ultrasonic emulsification method. Process of nanoemulsion development was optimized for parameters such as surfactant concentration and emulsification time to achieve minimum droplet diameter with high physical stability. Surfactant concentration was found to have a negative correlation with droplet diameter, whereas emulsification time had a positive correlation with droplet diameter and also with intrinsic stability of the emulsion. Stable basil oil nanoemulsion with droplet diameter 29.3 nm was formulated by ultrasonic emulsification for 15 min. Formulated nanoemulsion was evaluated for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli by kinetics of killing experiment. Fluorescence microscopy and FT-IR results showed that nanoemulsion treatment resulted alteration in permeability and surface features of bacterial cell membrane. PMID:22954686

  9. Microfluidic EDGE emulsification: the importance of interface interactions on droplet formation and pressure stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Sami; Bliznyuk, Olesya; Rovalino Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin

    2016-05-01

    The fact that interactions of components with interfaces can influence processes is well-known; e.g. deposit accumulation on heat exchangers and membrane fouling lead to additional resistances against heat and mass transfer, respectively. In microfluidic emulsification, the situation is even more complex. Component accumulation at the liquid/liquid interface is necessary for emulsion stability, while undesired at the solid/liquid interface where it may change wettability. For successful emulsification both aspects need to be controlled, and that is investigated in this paper for o/w emulsification with microfluidic EDGE devices. These devices were characterised previously, and can be used to detect small wettability changes through e.g. the pressure stability of the device. We used various oil/emulsifier combinations (alkanes, vegetable oil, surfactants and proteins) and related droplet size and operational pressure stability to component interactions with the solid surface and liquid interface. Surfactants with a strong interaction with glass always favour emulsification, while surfactants that have week interactions with the surface can be replaced by vegetable oil that interacts strongly with glass, resulting in loss of emulsification. Our findings clearly show that an appropriate combination of construction material and emulsion components is needed to achieve successful emulsification in microfluidic EDGE devices.

  10. Microfluidic EDGE emulsification: the importance of interface interactions on droplet formation and pressure stability

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Sami; Bliznyuk, Olesya; Rovalino Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The fact that interactions of components with interfaces can influence processes is well-known; e.g. deposit accumulation on heat exchangers and membrane fouling lead to additional resistances against heat and mass transfer, respectively. In microfluidic emulsification, the situation is even more complex. Component accumulation at the liquid/liquid interface is necessary for emulsion stability, while undesired at the solid/liquid interface where it may change wettability. For successful emulsification both aspects need to be controlled, and that is investigated in this paper for o/w emulsification with microfluidic EDGE devices. These devices were characterised previously, and can be used to detect small wettability changes through e.g. the pressure stability of the device. We used various oil/emulsifier combinations (alkanes, vegetable oil, surfactants and proteins) and related droplet size and operational pressure stability to component interactions with the solid surface and liquid interface. Surfactants with a strong interaction with glass always favour emulsification, while surfactants that have week interactions with the surface can be replaced by vegetable oil that interacts strongly with glass, resulting in loss of emulsification. Our findings clearly show that an appropriate combination of construction material and emulsion components is needed to achieve successful emulsification in microfluidic EDGE devices. PMID:27230981

  11. Microfluidic EDGE emulsification: the importance of interface interactions on droplet formation and pressure stability.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Sami; Bliznyuk, Olesya; Rovalino Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The fact that interactions of components with interfaces can influence processes is well-known; e.g. deposit accumulation on heat exchangers and membrane fouling lead to additional resistances against heat and mass transfer, respectively. In microfluidic emulsification, the situation is even more complex. Component accumulation at the liquid/liquid interface is necessary for emulsion stability, while undesired at the solid/liquid interface where it may change wettability. For successful emulsification both aspects need to be controlled, and that is investigated in this paper for o/w emulsification with microfluidic EDGE devices. These devices were characterised previously, and can be used to detect small wettability changes through e.g. the pressure stability of the device. We used various oil/emulsifier combinations (alkanes, vegetable oil, surfactants and proteins) and related droplet size and operational pressure stability to component interactions with the solid surface and liquid interface. Surfactants with a strong interaction with glass always favour emulsification, while surfactants that have week interactions with the surface can be replaced by vegetable oil that interacts strongly with glass, resulting in loss of emulsification. Our findings clearly show that an appropriate combination of construction material and emulsion components is needed to achieve successful emulsification in microfluidic EDGE devices. PMID:27230981

  12. Ultrasound-assisted temperature-controlled ionic-liquid dispersive liquid-phase microextraction method for simultaneous determination of anethole, estragole, and para-anisaldehyde in different plant extracts and human urine: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Maryam; Haji-Esfandiari, Sudabeh; Barfi, Behruz; Ghanbari, Hanieh

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the performances of four ionic-liquid-based microextraction methods, ionic-liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME), ionic-liquid-based ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (IL-USA-ME), temperature-controlled ionic-liquid dispersive liquid-phase microextraction (TC-IL-DLME), and ultrasound-assisted temperature-controlled ionic-liquid dispersive liquid-phase microextraction (USA-TC-IL-DLME), were investigated for extraction of three bioactive compounds (anethole, estragole, and anisaldehyde) from different plant extracts and human urine. Anethole and estragole were chosen because they can alter cellular processes positively or negatively, and an efficient method is needed for their extraction and sensitive determination in the samples mentioned. Because there is no previous report on the separation of anethole and estragole (structural isomers), first, simultaneous gradient elution and flow programming were used. The microextraction methods were then applied and compared for analysis of these compounds in plant extracts and human urine by use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effect of conditions on extraction efficiency was studied and under the optimum conditions, the best enrichment factors (58-64), limits of detection (14-18 ng mL(-1)), limits of quantification (47-60 ng mL(-1)), and recovery (94.4-101.7 %) were obtained by use of USA-TC-IL-DLME. The optimized conditions were used to determine anethole, estragole, and para-anisaldehyde in fennel, anise, and tarragon extracts and in human urine. PMID:24817361

  13. Cross-Interface Emulsification for Generating Size-Tunable Droplets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Zheng, Xu; Tao, Yi; Du, Wenbin

    2016-03-15

    We report cross-interface emulsification (XiE), a simple method for the generation of monodisperse droplets of controllable volumes from picoliter to nanoliter. A device is set up in which a fused-silica capillary is vibrating across the surface of the continuous phase (mineral oil) in a reservoir, and the flow of the dispersed phase (aqueous solution) in the capillary is segmented into monodisperse droplets at the air/oil interface. We find that the volume of droplets is mainly dominated by the flow rate and vibrating frequency and not significantly influenced by other factors, such as the viscosity of the continuous phase and dispersed phase, the inner diameter of the capillary (20-100 μm), or the shape of the tip (tapered or flat). These features reflect high robustness, flexibility, and precision of XiE for on-demand volume control of droplets. The droplets automatically assemble into planar monolayer droplet arrays (PMDA) in flat-bottomed microwells of 96-well plates, offering excellent convenience for imaging of droplets. As a representative application, we carry out digital loop-mediated isothermal amplification using PMDAs with multivolume droplets for the absolute quantification of nucleic acids. Our results demonstrate that XiE is simple and controllable for the production of monodisperse size-tunable droplets, and it offers opportunities for common laboratories, even without microfabrication facilities, to perform digital quantification, single cell analysis, and other biochemical assays with high throughput. PMID:26849419

  14. Manufacture of large uniform droplets using rotating membrane emulsification.

    PubMed

    Vladisavljević, Goran T; Williams, Richard A

    2006-07-01

    A new rotating membrane emulsification system using a stainless steel membrane with 100 microm laser drilled pores was used to produce oil/water emulsions consisting of 2 wt% Tween 20 as emulsifier, paraffin wax as dispersed oil phase and 0.01-0.25 wt% Carbomer (Carbopol ETD 2050) as stabilizer. The membrane tube, 1 cm in diameter, was rotated inside a stationary glass cylinder, diameter of 3 cm, at a constant speed in the range 50-1500 rpm. The oil phase was introduced inside the membrane tube and permeated through the porous wall moving radially into the continuous phase in the form of individual droplets. Increasing the membrane rotational speed increased the wall shear stress which resulted in a smaller average droplet diameter being produced. For a constant rotational speed, the average droplet diameter increased as the stabilizer content in the continuous phase was lowered. The optimal conditions for producing uniform emulsion droplets were a Carbomer content of 0.1-0.25 wt% and a membrane rotational speed of 350 rpm, under which the average droplet diameter was 105-107 microm and very narrow coefficients of variation of 4.8-4.9%. A model describing the operation is presented and it is concluded that the methodology holds potential as a manufacturing protocol for both coarse and fine droplets and capsules. PMID:16563411

  15. Emulsification Characteristics Using a Dynamic Woven Metal Microscreen Membrane.

    PubMed

    Sabouni, Rana; Gomaa, Hassan G; Liu, Jiangshan; Zhu, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    An oscillatory emulsification system for the production of oil in water emulsions using a commercially available low-cost woven metal microscreen (WMMS) is investigated. The system allows for independent control of both the oscillation frequencies and amplitudes such that it provides two degrees of freedom for controlling the emulsion properties. The investigations included the production of both surfactant and particle-stabilized emulsions. The average droplet size was found to decrease when both the oscillation frequency and amplitude was increased. For surfactant-stabilized emulsions, using bi-surfactants in both the continuous and dispersed phases resulted in a smaller droplet size due to lower interfacial tension. For particle-stabilized emulsions, both the hydrodynamics of the system and the hydrophobic and hydrophilic nature of the stabilizing particles influenced the interfacial properties at the oil-water interface, which in turn affected the final droplet size and distribution with potential droplet breakage. In absence of the latter, a simple torque balance model can be used to reasonably predict the average emulsion droplet size. PMID:27331821

  16. Emulsification Characteristics Using a Dynamic Woven Metal Microscreen Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sabouni, Rana; Gomaa, Hassan G.; Liu, Jiangshan; Zhu, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    An oscillatory emulsification system for the production of oil in water emulsions using a commercially available low-cost woven metal microscreen (WMMS) is investigated. The system allows for independent control of both the oscillation frequencies and amplitudes such that it provides two degrees of freedom for controlling the emulsion properties. The investigations included the production of both surfactant and particle-stabilized emulsions. The average droplet size was found to decrease when both the oscillation frequency and amplitude was increased. For surfactant-stabilized emulsions, using bi-surfactants in both the continuous and dispersed phases resulted in a smaller droplet size due to lower interfacial tension. For particle-stabilized emulsions, both the hydrodynamics of the system and the hydrophobic and hydrophilic nature of the stabilizing particles influenced the interfacial properties at the oil–water interface, which in turn affected the final droplet size and distribution with potential droplet breakage. In absence of the latter, a simple torque balance model can be used to reasonably predict the average emulsion droplet size. PMID:27331821

  17. Water fluxes and encapsulation efficiency in double emulsions: impact of emulsification and osmotic pressure unbalance.

    PubMed

    Nollet, Maxime; Mercé, Manuel; Laurichesse, Eric; Pezon, Annaïck; Soubabère, Olivier; Besse, Samantha; Schmitt, Véronique

    2016-03-30

    We study the influence of the emulsification process on encapsulation efficiency of drugs in double water-in-oil-in-water emulsions. Two drugs were used, first vitamin B12 which can be considered as a model drug and secondly a suspension of Cydia pomonella Granulovirus (CpGV), a virus used in organic agriculture to protect fruits against the Carpocapse insect. Encapsulation is measured by classical UV-Vis spectroscopy method. Additionally we show that rheology is a useful tool to determine water exchanges during emulsification. In a two-step emulsification process, using rotor-stator mixers, encapsulation reaches high levels, close to 100% whatever the flowing regime. This encapsulation decreases only if two conditions are fulfilled simultaneously: (i) during the second emulsification step the flow is turbulent and (ii) it leads to excessive fragmentation inducing formation of too small drops. We also investigate the effect of a deliberate loss of osmotic pressure balance on the encapsulation and characterize the induced water fluxes. We show that encapsulation of vitamin B12 is not affected by the osmotic pressure unbalance, while water exchanges, if they exist, are very fast and aim at restoring equilibrium. As a consequence, the emulsification efficiency is not very sensitive to osmotic stresses provided that the interfaces resist mechanically. PMID:26936127

  18. Nanoemulsions prepared by a low-energy emulsification method applied to edible films.

    PubMed

    Bilbao-Sáinz, Cristina; Avena-Bustillos, Roberto J; Wood, Delilah F; Williams, Tina G; McHugh, Tara H

    2010-11-24

    Catastrophic phase inversion (CPI) was used as a low-energy emulsification method to prepare oil-in-water (O/W) nanoemulsions in a lipid (Acetem)/water/nonionic surfactant (Tween 60) system. CPIs in which water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) are transformed into oil-in-water emulsions (O/W) were induced by changes in the phase ratio. Dynamic phase inversion emulsification was achieved by slowly increasing the water volume fraction (fw) to obtain O/W emulsions from water in oil emulsions. Composition and processing variables were optimized to minimize droplet size and polydispersity index (PdI). It was found that addition of the continuous phase to the dispersed phase following the standard CPI procedure resulted in the formation of oil droplets with diameters of 100-200 nm. Droplet size distribution during CPI and emulsification time depended on stirring speed and surfactant concentration. Droplet sizes in the inverted emulsions were compared to those obtained by direct emulsification: The process time to reach droplet sizes of around 100 nm was reduced by 12 times by using CPI emulsification. The Acetem/water nanoemulsion was also used as a carrier to incorporate oregano and cinnamon essential oils into soy protein edible films. The resulting composite films containing oregano oil showed better moisture barrier and mechanical properties compared to soy protein films. PMID:20977191

  19. Scaling-up parameters for site restoration process using surfactant-enhanced soil washing coupled with wastewater treatment by Fenton and Fenton-like processes.

    PubMed

    Bandala, Erick R; Cossio, Horacio; Sánchez-Lopez, Adriana D; Córdova, Felipe; Peralta-Herández, Juan M; Torres, Luis G

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of scaling-up parameters for a site restoration process using a surfactant-enhanced soil washing (SESW) process followed by the application of advanced oxidation processes (Fenton and photo-Fenton) was performed. For the SESW, different parameters were varied and the soil washing efficiency for pesticide (2,4-D) removal assessed. The resulting wastewater was treated using the Fenton reaction in the absence and presence of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for pesticide removal. Results showed that agitation speed of 1550 rpm was preferable for the best pesticide removal from contaminated soil. It was possible to wash contaminated soils with different soil concentrations; however the power drawn was higher as the soil concentration increased. Complete removal of the pesticide and the remaining surfactant was achieved using different reaction conditions. The best degradation conditions were for the photo-Fenton process using [Fe(II)] = 0.3 mM; [H2O2] = 4.0 mM where complete 2,4-D and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) removal was observed after 8 and 10 minutes of reaction, respectively. Further increase in the hydrogen peroxide or iron salt concentration did not show any improvement in the reaction rate. Kinetic parameters, i.e. reaction rate constant and scaling-up parameters, were determined. It was shown that, by coupling both processes (SESW and AOPs), it is possible the restoration of contaminated sites. PMID:23530350

  20. Surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric determination of total aflatoxins from wheat samples after magnetic solid-phase extraction using modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manafi, Mohammad Hanif; Allahyari, Mehdi; Pourghazi, Kamyar; Amoli-Diva, Mitra; Taherimaslak, Zohreh

    2015-07-01

    The extraction and preconcentration of total aflatoxins (including aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, and G2) using magnetic nanoparticles based solid phase extraction (MSPE) followed by surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric detection was proposed. Ethylene glycol bis-mercaptoacetate modified silica coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles as an efficient antibody-free adsorbent was successfully applied to extract aflatoxins from wheat samples. High surface area and strong magnetization properties of magnetic nanoparticles were utilized to achieve high enrichment factor (97), and satisfactory recoveries (92-105%) using only 100 mg of the adsorbent. Furthermore, the fast separation time (less than 10 min) avoids many time-consuming cartridge loading or column-passing procedures accompany with the conventional SPE. In determination step, signal enhancement was performed by formation of Triton X-100 micelles around the analytes in 15% (v/v) acetonitrile-water which dramatically increase the sensitivity of the method. Main factors affecting the extraction efficiency and signal enhancement of the analytes including pH of sample solution, desorption conditions, extraction time, sample volume, adsorbent amount, surfactant concentration and volume and time of micelle formation were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, wide linear range of 0.1-50 ng mL-1 with low detection limit of 0.03 ng mL-1 were obtained. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction and preconcentration of aflatoxins in three commercially available wheat samples and the results were compared with the official AOAC method.

  1. In situ, field-scale evaluation of surfactant-enhanced DNAPL recovery using a single-well, ``push-pull'' test

    SciTech Connect

    Istok, J.D.; Field, J.A.

    1999-10-01

    The overall goal of this project was to further develop the single-well, ``push-pull'' test method as a feasibility assessment and site-characterization tool for studying the fundamental fate and transport behavior of injected surfactants and their ability to solubilize and mobilize dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface. The specific objectives were to develop a modified push-pull test for use in identifying and quantifying the effects of sorption, precipitation, and biodegradation on the fate and transport of injected surfactants, use the developed test method to quantify the effects of these processes on the ability of injected surfactants to solubilize and mobilize residual phase trichloroethane (TCE), and demonstrate the utility of the developed test method for performing site characterization and feasibility studies for surfactant-enhanced DNAPL recovery systems in the field. The results from the intermediate-scale laboratory experiments conducted for this project indicate that the single-well, push-pull test method can provide quantitative information on the effectiveness of injected surfactants in enhancing DNAPL solubilization in natural aquifer sediments. Specifically, the results of this research demonstrate the ability of the single-well, push-pull test to characterize the behavior of multi-component surfactants in the presence of natural aquifer sediment under laboratory and in-situ field conditions.

  2. The effect of polymer-surfactant interaction on the rheological properties of surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding formulations. [Phase separation, precipitation and viscosity loss

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1993-02-01

    Surfactant-enhanced, lower pH (weak) alkaline chemicals are effective for mobilizing residual oil. Polymer is used for mobility control because if mobility control is lost, then oil recovery is reduced. The ability to maintain mobility control during surfactant-alkaline flooding can be adversely affected by chemical interaction. In this work, interaction between polymers and surfactants was shown to be affected by pH, ionic strength, crude oil, and the properties of the polymers and surfactants. Polymer-surfactant interaction (phase separation, precipitation, and viscosity loss) occurred between most of the polymers and surfactants that were tested. Polymer-surfactant interaction is difficult to eliminate, and no method was found for completely eliminating interaction. Polymer-surfactant interaction occurred at optimal salinity and below optimal salinity. Polymer-surfactant interaction had an adverse effect on polymer rheology; however, the adverse effect of interaction on polymer rheology was lessened when oil was present. Increasing the pH of chemical systems further reduced the adverse effects of interaction on polymer rheology.

  3. Microextraction techniques in therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Khalil; Hatami, Mehdi; Matin, Amir Abbas

    2012-08-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), as part of clinical process of medical treatments, is commonly used to maintain 'therapeutic' drug concentrations. TDM is useful to identify the causes of unwanted or unexpected responses, to prevent unnecessary diagnostic testing, to improve clinical outcomes, and even to save lives. The determination of drug concentration in blood samples requires an excellent sample preparation procedure. Recent trends in sample preparation include miniaturization, automation, high-throughput performance, on-line coupling with analytical instruments and low-cost operation through extremely low or no solvent consumption. Microextraction techniques, such as liquid- and solid-phase microextraction, have these advantages over the traditional techniques. This paper reviews the recent developments in microextraction techniques used for drug monitoring in serum, plasma or blood samples. PMID:22767149

  4. Emulsification-Induced Homohelicity in Racemic Helical Polymer for Preparing Optically Active Helical Polymer Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Biao; Deng, Jinrui; Deng, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Optically active nano- and microparticles have constituted a significant category of advanced functional materials. However, constructing optically active particles derived from synthetic helical polymers still remains as a big challenge. In the present study, it is attempted to induce a racemic helical polymer (containing right- and left-handed helices in equal amount) to prefer one predominant helicity in aqueous media by using emulsifier in the presence of chiral additive (emulsification process). Excitingly, the emulsification process promotes the racemic helical polymer to unify the helicity and directly provides optically active nanoparticles constructed by chirally helical polymer. A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the emulsification-induced homohelicity effect. The present study establishes a novel strategy for preparing chirally helical polymer-derived optically active nanoparticles based on racemic helical polymers. PMID:26829250

  5. Emulsification in turbulent flow 1. Mean and maximum drop diameters in inertial and viscous regimes.

    PubMed

    Vankova, Nina; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai D; Ivanov, Ivan B; Vulchev, Vassil D; Danner, Thomas

    2007-08-15

    Systematic experimental study of the effects of several factors on the mean and maximum drop sizes during emulsification in turbulent flow is performed. These factors include: (1) rate of energy dissipation, epsilon; (2) interfacial tension, sigma; (3) viscosity of the oil phase, eta(D); (4) viscosity of the aqueous phase, eta(C); and (5) oil volume fraction, Phi. The emulsions are prepared by using the so-called "narrow-gap homogenizer" working in turbulent regime of emulsification. The experiments are performed at high surfactant concentration to avoid the effect of drop-drop coalescence. For emulsions prepared in the inertial turbulent regime, the mean and the maximum drop sizes increase with the increase of eta(D) and sigma, and with the decrease of epsilon. In contrast, Phi and eta(C) affect only slightly the mean and the maximum drop sizes in this regime of emulsification. These results are described very well by a theoretical expression proposed by Davies [Chem. Eng. Sci. 40 (1985) 839], which accounts for the effects of the drop capillary pressure and the viscous dissipation inside the breaking drops. The polydispersity of the emulsions prepared in the inertial regime of emulsification does not depend significantly on sigma and epsilon. However, the emulsion polydispersity increases significantly with the increase of oil viscosity, eta(D). The experiments showed also that the inertial turbulent regime is inappropriate for emulsification of oils with viscosity above ca. 500 mPa s, if drops of micrometer size are to be obtained. The transition from inertial to viscous turbulent regime of emulsification was accomplished by a moderate increase of the viscosity of the aqueous phase (above 5 mPa s in the studied systems) and/or by increase of the oil volume fraction, Phi>0.6. Remarkably, emulsions with drops of micrometer size are easily formed in the viscous turbulent regime of emulsification, even for oils with viscosity as high as 10,000 mPa s. In this regime

  6. Ensemble of surrogates-based optimization for identifying an optimal surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation strategy at heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Lu, Wenxi; Hou, Zeyu; Zhao, Haiqing; Na, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify an optimal surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) strategy for aquifers contaminated by dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) based on an ensemble of surrogates-based optimization technique. A saturated heterogeneous medium contaminated by nitrobenzene was selected as case study. A new kind of surrogate-based SEAR optimization employing an ensemble surrogate (ES) model together with a genetic algorithm (GA) is presented. Four methods, namely radial basis function artificial neural network (RBFANN), kriging (KRG), support vector regression (SVR), and kernel extreme learning machines (KELM), were used to create four individual surrogate models, which were then compared. The comparison enabled us to select the two most accurate models (KELM and KRG) to establish an ES model of the SEAR simulation model, and the developed ES model as well as these four stand-alone surrogate models was compared. The results showed that the average relative error of the average nitrobenzene removal rates between the ES model and the simulation model for 20 test samples was 0.8%, which is a high approximation accuracy, and which indicates that the ES model provides more accurate predictions than the stand-alone surrogate models. Then, a nonlinear optimization model was formulated for the minimum cost, and the developed ES model was embedded into this optimization model as a constrained condition. Besides, GA was used to solve the optimization model to provide the optimal SEAR strategy. The developed ensemble surrogate-optimization approach was effective in seeking a cost-effective SEAR strategy for heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated sites. This research is expected to enrich and develop the theoretical and technical implications for the analysis of remediation strategy optimization of DNAPL-contaminated aquifers.

  7. Surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric determination of total aflatoxins from wheat samples after magnetic solid-phase extraction using modified Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manafi, Mohammad Hanif; Allahyari, Mehdi; Pourghazi, Kamyar; Amoli-Diva, Mitra; Taherimaslak, Zohreh

    2015-07-01

    The extraction and preconcentration of total aflatoxins (including aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, and G2) using magnetic nanoparticles based solid phase extraction (MSPE) followed by surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric detection was proposed. Ethylene glycol bis-mercaptoacetate modified silica coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles as an efficient antibody-free adsorbent was successfully applied to extract aflatoxins from wheat samples. High surface area and strong magnetization properties of magnetic nanoparticles were utilized to achieve high enrichment factor (97), and satisfactory recoveries (92-105%) using only 100mg of the adsorbent. Furthermore, the fast separation time (less than 10 min) avoids many time-consuming cartridge loading or column-passing procedures accompany with the conventional SPE. In determination step, signal enhancement was performed by formation of Triton X-100 micelles around the analytes in 15% (v/v) acetonitrile-water which dramatically increase the sensitivity of the method. Main factors affecting the extraction efficiency and signal enhancement of the analytes including pH of sample solution, desorption conditions, extraction time, sample volume, adsorbent amount, surfactant concentration and volume and time of micelle formation were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, wide linear range of 0.1-50 ng mL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.03 ng mL(-1) were obtained. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction and preconcentration of aflatoxins in three commercially available wheat samples and the results were compared with the official AOAC method. PMID:25804513

  8. Pilot-scale demonstration of surfactant-enhanced PCE solubilization at the Bachman Road site. 1. Site characterization and test design.

    PubMed

    Abriola, Linda M; Drummond, Chad D; Hahn, Ernest J; Hayes, Kim F; Kibbey, Tohren C G; Lemke, Lawrence D; Pennell, Kurt D; Petrovskis, Erik A; Ramsburg, C Andrew; Rathfelder, Klaus M

    2005-03-15

    A pilot-scale demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) was conducted to recover dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) tetrachloroethene (PCE) from a sandy glacial outwash aquifer underlying a former dry cleaning facility at the Bachman Road site in Oscoda, MI. Part one of this two-part paper describes site characterization efforts and a comprehensive approach to SEAR test design, effectively integrating laboratory and modeling studies. Aquifer coring and drive point sampling suggested the presence of PCE-DNAPL in a zone beneath an occupied building. A narrow PCE plume emanating from the vicinity of this building discharges into Lake Huron. The shallow unconfined aquifer, characterized by relatively homogeneous fine-medium sand deposits, an underlying clay layer, and the absence of significant PCE transformation products, was judged suitable for the demonstration of SEAR. Tween 80 was selected for application based upon its favorable solubilization performance in batch and two-dimensional sand tank treatability studies, biodegradation potential, and regulatory acceptance. Three-dimensional flow and transport models were employed to develop a robust design for surfactant delivery and recovery. Physical and fiscal constraints led to an unusual hydraulic design, in which surfactant was flushed across the regional groundwater gradient, facilitating the delivery of concentrations of Tween 80 exceeding 1% (wt) throughout the treatment zone. The potential influence of small-scale heterogeneity on PCE-DNAPL distribution and SEAR performance was assessed through numerical simulations incorporating geostatistical permeability fields based upon available core data. For the examined conditions simulated PCE recoveries ranged from 94to 99%. The effluent treatment system design consisted of low-profile air strippers coupled with carbon adsorption to trap off-gas PCE and discharge of treated aqueous effluent to a local wastewater treatment plant. The

  9. Fabrication of starch-based microparticles by an emulsification-crosslinking method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch-based microparticles (MPs) fabricated by a water-in-water (w/w) emulsification-crosslinking method could be used as a controlled-release delivery vehicle for food bioactives. Due to the processing route without the use of toxic organic solvents, it is expected that these microparticles can be...

  10. Interfacial Properties of Raw and Roasted Peanut Oils as Related to Emulsification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roasted peanut oil is a unique product that can impart a desirable roasted peanut flavor in various emulsified formulations. Emulsification properties are a function of the oil physical properties, which include interfacial tension, viscosity, and density among others. These physical properties ha...

  11. Emulsification by high frequency ultrasound using piezoelectric transducer: formation and stability of emulsifier free emulsion.

    PubMed

    Kaci, Messaouda; Meziani, Smail; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira; Gillet, Guillaume; Desjardins-Lavisse, Isabelle; Desobry, Stephane

    2014-05-01

    Emulsifier free emulsion was developed with a new patented technique for food and cosmetic applications. This emulsification process dispersed oil droplets in water without any emulsifier. Emulsions were prepared with different vegetable oil ratios 5%, 10% and 15% (v/v) using high frequency ultrasounds generated by piezoelectric ceramic transducer vibrating at 1.7 MHz. The emulsion was prepared with various emulsification times between 0 and 10h. Oil droplets size was measured by laser granulometry. The pH variation was monitored; electrophoretic mobility and conductivity variation were measured using Zêtasizer equipment during emulsification process. The results revealed that oil droplets average size decreased significantly (p<0.05) during the first 6h of emulsification process and that from 160 to 1 μm for emulsions with 5%, 10% and from 400 to 29 μm for emulsion with 15% of initial oil ratio. For all tested oil ratios, pH measurement showed significant decrease and negative electrophoretic mobility showed the accumulation of OH(-) at oil/water interface leading to droplets stability in the emulsion. The conductivity of emulsions showed a decrease of the ions quantity in solution, which indicated formation of positive charge layer around OH(-) structure. They constitute a double ionic layer around oil particles providing emulsion stability. This study showed a strong correlation between turbidity measurement and proportion of emulsified oil. PMID:24315670

  12. Formation of oil-in-water emulsions from natural emulsifiers using spontaneous emulsification: sunflower phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Komaiko, Jennifer; Sastrosubroto, Ashtri; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-18

    This study examined the possibility of producing oil-in-water emulsions using a natural surfactant (sunflower phospholipids) and a low-energy method (spontaneous emulsification). Spontaneous emulsification was carried out by titrating an organic phase (oil and phospholipid) into an aqueous phase with continuous stirring. The influence of phospholipid composition, surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR), initial phospholipids location, storage time, phospholipid type, and preparation method was tested. The initial droplet size depended on the nature of the phospholipid used, which was attributed to differences in phospholipid composition. Droplet size decreased with increasing SOR and was smallest when the phospholipid was fully dissolved in the organic phase rather than the aqueous phase. The droplets formed using spontaneous emulsification were relatively large (d > 10 μm), and so the emulsions were unstable to gravitational separation. At low SORs (0.1 and 0.5), emulsions produced with phospholipids had a smaller particle diameter than those produced with a synthetic surfactant (Tween 80), but at a higher SOR (1.0), this trend was reversed. High-energy methods (microfluidization and sonication) formed significantly smaller droplets (d < 10 μm) than spontaneous emulsification. The results from this study show that low-energy methods could be utilized with natural surfactants for applications for which fine droplets are not essential. PMID:26528859

  13. Nanoemulsions prepared by a low-energy emulsification method applied to edible films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catastrophic phase inversion (CPI) was used as a low-energy emulsification method to prepare oil-in-water (O/W) nanoemulsions in a lipid (Acetem)/water/nonionic surfactant (Tween 60) system. CPIs in which water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) are transformed into oil-in-water emulsions (O/W) were induced by ...

  14. New developments in microextraction techniques in bioanalysis. A review.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-González, Juan Antonio; Fernández-Torres, Rut; Bello-López, Miguel Ángel; Ramos-Payán, María

    2016-01-28

    In recent years, the interest in new extraction methods with lower sample volume requirements, simpler equipment and handling, and lower reagent consumption, has led to the development of a series of microextraction methods based on extraction phases in the microliter order. Nowadays, many references can be found for several of these methods, which imply a wide range of applications referred to both the analyte and the sample nature. In this paper, recent developments in both well-established microextraction techniques (solid phase microextraction, hollow-fiber liquid phase microextraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, etc.) and recently appeared microextraction procedures (nanoextraction systems, microchip devices, etc.) for the clinical analysis of biological samples will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:26755133

  15. Ionic-liquid-based surfactant-emulsified microextraction procedure accelerated by ultrasound radiation followed by high-performance liquid chromatography for the simultaneous determination of antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zare, Fahimeh; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Daneshfar, Ali

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, an efficient and environmental friendly method of ionic-liquid-based emulsified microextraction procedure accelerated by ultrasound radiation has been developed. Subsequently, its performance was compared with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and ultrasound-assisted surfactant-based emulsification microextraction methods. The optimization of experimental conditions was carried out by combination of central composite design and response surface methodology. The optimum conditions of variables were set as follows: 50 μL of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (extracting solvent), 10 min ultrasound time, and 10 min vortex time for agitating 6 mL sample solution in pH 3 in the presence of 4 mg sodium dodecyl sulfate without addition of salt and 200 μL of methanol as diluent solvent. Under these conditions, the responses are linear for doxepin and perphenazine in the range of 0.3-1000 and 5-1000 μg/L, respectively. The limits of detection were 0.1 μg/L for doxepin and 1 μg/L for perphenazine. Relative standard deviations were lower than 3.5 for the determination of both species. Finally, the method was used for the preconcentration and determination of doxepin and perphenazine in urine sample with relative recoveries in the range of 89-98%. PMID:25545187

  16. Effects of Temperature on the Emulsification in Surfactant-Water-Oil Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yin-Quan; Zou, Xian-Wu; Xiong, Ping-Fan

    The effect of temperature on the emulsification has been investigated by discontinuous molecular dynamic simulation. When a large oil drop is put in water, on one hand the mixing entropy makes it divide into small oil drops; on the other hand the interactions among particles drives the small oil drops fowards aggregation. The evolution of the mean size of oil drops obeys the exponential delay law. There exist an active temperature, at which, the addition of surfactants has obvious effect on the emulsification. The surfactants with low HLB value (e.g. H1T3) make the dispersity of emulsion decrease, and the surfactants with high HLB value (e.g. H2T2 and H3T1) make a contribution to increase the dispersity of emulsion.

  17. Tuneable stability of nanoemulsions fabricated using spontaneous emulsification by biopolymer electrostatic deposition.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Amir Hossein; Zeeb, Benjamin; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, David Julian

    2015-10-01

    Nanoemulsions can be formed spontaneously from surfactant-oil-water systems using low energy methods. In this work, we showed that the droplets in oil-in-water nanoemulsions fabricated by spontaneous emulsification could be coated with an anionic biopolymer (beet pectin) using electrostatic deposition. Nanoemulsions were formed by titrating oil (medium chain triglycerides) and surfactant (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monostearate+lauric arginate) mixtures into an aqueous solution (10 mM citrate buffer, pH 4). Lauric arginate was used to generate a positive charge on the droplet surfaces, thereby enabling subsequent electrostatic deposition of anionic pectin. Extensive droplet aggregation occurred when intermediate pectin concentrations were used due to bridging flocculation. However, stable anionic pectin-coated lipid droplets could be formed at high pectin concentrations. These results demonstrate the possibility of tailoring the functionality of lipid nanodroplets produced by spontaneous emulsification. PMID:26070187

  18. Production of alginate microspheres by internal gelation using an emulsification method.

    PubMed

    Chan, L; Lee, H; Heng, P

    2002-08-21

    Alginate is a natural polysaccharide found in brown algae. Alginates are widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries and have been employed as a matrix for the entrapment of drugs, macromolecules and biological cells. Alginate microspheres can be produced by the external or internal gelation method using calcium salts. The addition of calcium chloride solution in the final phase of production of microspheres by external gelation method using an emulsification technique causes the disruption of the equilibrium of the system being stirred, resulting in a significant degree of clumping of microspheres. Therefore, in this study, production of alginate microspheres by the internal gelation method using a modified emulsification technique was explored. The influence of calcium salt, added in varying amounts and at different stages, on the morphology of the microspheres was investigated. The effects of other hardening agents and different drying methods were also studied. PMID:12176259

  19. Controlled microfluidic emulsification of oil in a clay nanofluid: Role of salt for Pickering stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholamipour-Shirazi, A.; Carvalho, M. S.; Fossum, J. O.

    2016-07-01

    Research on emulsions is driven by their widespread use in different industries, such as food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and oil recovery. Emulsions are stabilized by suitable surfactants, polymers, solid particles or a combination of them. Microfluidic emulsification is the process of droplet formation out of two or more liquids under strictly controlled conditions, without pre-emulsification step. Microfluidic technology offers a powerful tool for investigating the properties of emulsions themselves. In this work stable oil in water emulsions were formed with hydrophilic Laponite RD® nanoparticles adsorbed at the interface of the oil phase and aqueous clay nanofluid in a T junction microfluidic chip. Emulsion stability up to at least 40 days could be observed.

  20. Cross-flow membrane emulsification technique for fabrication of drug-loaded particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Thanh Ha; Phuong Tuyen Dao, Thi; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Dam Le, Duy; Chien Dang, Mau

    2013-12-01

    Cross-flow membrane emulsification is a new technique which was used in this study to achieve uniform and controllable emulsion systems. In this method, the droplet is individually formed at the pore on the surface of membrane in the more mild, controllable and efficient way as compared to traditional emulsification techniques. In this study, we used silicon nitride membranes of very precise parameters of pore size, shape and inter-pore distance in order to create curcumin loaded poly(d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles. It was demonstrated that more uniform and pore-size dependent particles was created by using different membrane pore sizes (ø200 nm, ø450 nm and ø2 μm). Other factors that could impact particle size and morphology such as membrane polarity, concentration and volume of two phases were investigated. Further tests on comparison to mechanical stirring method were also realized.

  1. A Mutant Strain of a Surfactant-Producing Bacterium with Increased Emulsification Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingmei; Yao, Jianming; Pan, Renrui; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-06-01

    As reported in this paper, a strain of oil-degrading bacterium Sp-5-3 was determined to belong to Enterobacteriaceae, which would be useful for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The aim of our study was to generate a mutant using low energy N+ beam implantation. With 10 keV of energy and 5.2 × 1014 N+/cm2 of dose - the optimum condition, a mutant, S-34, was obtained, which had nearly a 5-fold higher surface and a 13-fold higher of emulsification activity than the wild type. The surface activity was measured by two methods, namely, a surface tension measuring instrument and a recording of the repulsive circle of the oil film; the emulsification activity was scaled through measuring the separating time of the oil-fermentation mixture. The metabolic acid was determined as methane by means of gas chromatography.

  2. Water with low concentration of surfactant in dispersed solvent-assisted emulsion dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Yee; Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2013-07-26

    A novel sample preparation method, "water with low concentration of surfactant in dispersed solvent-assisted emulsion dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (WLSEME)", coupled with gas chromatography using an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was developed for the analysis of the organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), heptachlor, α-endosulfan, 4,4-DDE, 2,4-DDD and endrin, in aqueous samples. A microsyringe is used to withdrew and discharge 10-12μL of the extraction solvent and 60-120μL of water as the dispersed solvent (containing 1mgL(-1), Tween 80) 4 times within 10s to form a cloudy emulsified solution in the syringe. This is then injected into an 8mL aqueous sample spiked with all above OCPs. Dodecyl acetate and 2-dodecanol were both selected as extraction solvents to optimize their conditions separately. The total extraction time was about 0.5min. Under optimum conditions, using dodecyl acetate (12μL) as extraction solvent, the linear range of the method was 10-1000ngL(-1) for all OCPs, and the the limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 1 to 5ngL(-1). The absolute recoveries and relative recoveries were from 20.8 to 43.5% and 83.2 to 109.8% for lake water, and 19.9-49.2% and 85.4-115.9% for seawater respectively. In the second method, 2-dodecanol as extraction solvent, the linear range was from 5 to 5000ngL(-1) for the target compounds, and the LODs were between 0.5 and 2ngL(-1). The absolute recoveries and relative recoveries ranged from 25.7 to 42.2% and 96.3-111.2% for sea water, and 22.4-41.9% and 90.7-107.9% for stream water. This could solve several problems, which commonly occur in ultrasound-assisted emulsification micro-extraction (USAEME), dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) and other assisted emulsification methods. These problems include analyte degradation, increased solubility of the extraction solvent and analyte, and high toxicity and large volume of the organic solvent used. PMID:23566919

  3. Linking Findings in Microfluidics to Membrane Emulsification Process Design: The Importance of Wettability and Component Interactions with Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Schroën, Karin; Ferrando, Montse; de Lamo-Castellví, Silvia; Sahin, Sami; Güell, Carme

    2016-01-01

    In microfluidics and other microstructured devices, wettability changes, as a result of component interactions with the solid wall, can have dramatic effects. In emulsion separation and emulsification applications, the desired behavior can even be completely lost. Wettability changes also occur in one phase systems, but the effect is much more far-reaching when using two-phase systems. For microfluidic emulsification devices, this can be elegantly demonstrated and quantified for EDGE (Edge-base Droplet GEneration) devices that have a specific behavior that allows us to distinguish between surfactant and liquid interactions with the solid surface. Based on these findings, design rules can be defined for emulsification with any micro-structured emulsification device, such as direct and premix membrane emulsification. In general, it can be concluded that mostly surface interactions increase the contact angle toward 90°, either through the surfactant, or the oil that is used. This leads to poor process stability, and very limited pressure ranges at which small droplets can be made in microfluidic systems, and cross-flow membrane emulsification. In a limited number of cases, surface interactions can also lead to lower contact angles, thereby increasing the operational stability. This paper concludes with a guideline that can be used to come to the appropriate combination of membrane construction material (or any micro-structured device), surfactants and liquids, in combination with process conditions. PMID:27187484

  4. Spontaneous Emulsification of Triolein Induced by Mixed Micellar Solutions of Sodium Polyoxyethylene Alkyl Ether Sulfate and Dodecyldimethyl Amine Oxide.

    PubMed

    Endo, Chika; Ito, Yoshiko; Akabane, Chika; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Sakai, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    A new mechanism of spontaneous emulsification without any salts or co-solvents is described, and is related to the dilatational behavior. Spontaneous emulsification can reduce the time required to remove oily soils from hard surfaces and enhance the detergency, because this type of emulsification requires no external mechanical work. In this paper, we focused on triolein, the main component of food oils and human sebum soil, and tried to induce spontaneous emulsification by using mixed micellar solutions of sodium polyoxyethylene alkyl ether sulfate and N, N-dimethyldodecylamine oxide (AES/DDAO). We characterized the dilatation of the oil/water interface using dynamic interfacial tension and elasticity measurements. This study confirmed that the degree of spontaneous emulsification can be enhanced by controlling the molar ratio of DDAO to AES. This enhancement can be attributed to an increased rate of decrease in the dynamic interfacial tension (i.e., a decreased interface dilatational elasticity), allowing for much greater suppression of the Marangoni effect. Further, we determined that one of the reasons for the decrease in the interface dilatational elasticity is the increasing number of micelles near the oil drop interface, which results from a decrease in the electrostatic repulsion between the micelles and the drop interface. Therefore, controlling the molar ratio of a mixed anionic/amphoteric surfactant solution is an effective way to induce spontaneous emulsification in the absence of salts or co-solvents. PMID:26250425

  5. Linking Findings in Microfluidics to Membrane Emulsification Process Design: The Importance of Wettability and Component Interactions with Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schroën, Karin; Ferrando, Montse; de Lamo-Castellví, Silvia; Sahin, Sami; Güell, Carme

    2016-01-01

    In microfluidics and other microstructured devices, wettability changes, as a result of component interactions with the solid wall, can have dramatic effects. In emulsion separation and emulsification applications, the desired behavior can even be completely lost. Wettability changes also occur in one phase systems, but the effect is much more far-reaching when using two-phase systems. For microfluidic emulsification devices, this can be elegantly demonstrated and quantified for EDGE (Edge-base Droplet GEneration) devices that have a specific behavior that allows us to distinguish between surfactant and liquid interactions with the solid surface. Based on these findings, design rules can be defined for emulsification with any micro-structured emulsification device, such as direct and premix membrane emulsification. In general, it can be concluded that mostly surface interactions increase the contact angle toward 90°, either through the surfactant, or the oil that is used. This leads to poor process stability, and very limited pressure ranges at which small droplets can be made in microfluidic systems, and cross-flow membrane emulsification. In a limited number of cases, surface interactions can also lead to lower contact angles, thereby increasing the operational stability. This paper concludes with a guideline that can be used to come to the appropriate combination of membrane construction material (or any micro-structured device), surfactants and liquids, in combination with process conditions. PMID:27187484

  6. Probing insulin bioactivity in oral nanoparticles produced by ultrasonication-assisted emulsification/internal gelation

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Marlene A; Abrahim-Vieira, Bárbara; Oliveira, Claudia; Fonte, Pedro; Souza, Alessandra M T; Lira, Tammy; Sequeira, Joana A D; Rodrigues, Carlos R; Cabral, Lúcio M; Sarmento, Bruno; Seiça, Raquel; Veiga, Francisco; Ribeiro, António J

    2015-01-01

    Alginate–dextran sulfate-based particles obtained by emulsification/internal gelation technology can be considered suitable carriers for oral insulin delivery. A rational study focused on the emulsification and particle recovery steps was developed in order to reduce particles to the nanosize range while keeping insulin bioactivity. There was a decrease in size when ultrasonication was used during emulsification, which was more pronounced when a cosurfactant was added. Ultrasonication add-on after particle recovery decreased aggregation and led to a narrower nanoscale particle-size distribution. Insulin encapsulation efficiency was 99.3%±0.5%, attributed to the strong pH-stabilizing electrostatic effect between insulin and nanoparticle matrix polymers. Interactions between these polymers and insulin were predicted using molecular modeling studies through quantum mechanics calculations that allowed for prediction of the interaction model. In vitro release studies indicated well-preserved integrity of nanoparticles in simulated gastric fluid. Circular dichroism spectroscopy proved conformational stability of insulin and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique showed rearrangements of insulin structure during processing. Moreover, in vivo biological activity in diabetic rats revealed no statistical difference when compared to nonencapsulated insulin, demonstrating retention of insulin activity. Our results demonstrate that alginate–dextran sulfate-based nanoparticles efficiently stabilize the loaded protein structure, presenting good physical properties for oral delivery of insulin. PMID:26425087

  7. Drop formation using ferrofluids driven magnetically in a step emulsification device.

    PubMed

    Kahkeshani, Soroush; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-07-01

    We present a microfluidic droplet generation technique, where instead of pumps, only magnetic field gradient strength adjusted by the position of an external magnet is used for controllable emulsification of ferrofluid containing solutions. Uniform droplet generation at frequencies O(1-100) Hz per channel for long periods of time (10s of minutes) were easily achieved. In this method, adding magnetic nanoparticles (10 nm) into aqueous solutions imparts a magnetic body force on the fluid in the presence of an external magnetic field gradient. Consequently, the aqueous fluid moves toward the position of an external magnet and towards a junction with a larger width and height oil filled reservoir. Emulsification occurs at the junction due to a rapid change in surface tension forces due to the abrupt change in channel height. Droplet generation rate could be controlled by adjusting surface tension/viscosity, number of channels, and strength of the magnetic force. The geometry of the channel, rather than flow rates or magnetic force, plays the dominant role in defining the droplet size. In addition, reagents mixed with ferrofluids could also be introduced from two or more separate inlets and mixed prior to emulsification as they move toward the step driven by magnetic force. Mixing reagents on chip and forming droplets all within a small foot-print defined by movement of an external magnet is a unique feature of this method suitable for point-of-care diagnostics and other bioengineering applications. PMID:27250530

  8. Probing insulin bioactivity in oral nanoparticles produced by ultrasonication-assisted emulsification/internal gelation.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marlene A; Abrahim-Vieira, Bárbara; Oliveira, Claudia; Fonte, Pedro; Souza, Alessandra M T; Lira, Tammy; Sequeira, Joana A D; Rodrigues, Carlos R; Cabral, Lúcio M; Sarmento, Bruno; Seiça, Raquel; Veiga, Francisco; Ribeiro, António J

    2015-01-01

    Alginate-dextran sulfate-based particles obtained by emulsification/internal gelation technology can be considered suitable carriers for oral insulin delivery. A rational study focused on the emulsification and particle recovery steps was developed in order to reduce particles to the nanosize range while keeping insulin bioactivity. There was a decrease in size when ultrasonication was used during emulsification, which was more pronounced when a cosurfactant was added. Ultrasonication add-on after particle recovery decreased aggregation and led to a narrower nanoscale particle-size distribution. Insulin encapsulation efficiency was 99.3%±0.5%, attributed to the strong pH-stabilizing electrostatic effect between insulin and nanoparticle matrix polymers. Interactions between these polymers and insulin were predicted using molecular modeling studies through quantum mechanics calculations that allowed for prediction of the interaction model. In vitro release studies indicated well-preserved integrity of nanoparticles in simulated gastric fluid. Circular dichroism spectroscopy proved conformational stability of insulin and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique showed rearrangements of insulin structure during processing. Moreover, in vivo biological activity in diabetic rats revealed no statistical difference when compared to nonencapsulated insulin, demonstrating retention of insulin activity. Our results demonstrate that alginate-dextran sulfate-based nanoparticles efficiently stabilize the loaded protein structure, presenting good physical properties for oral delivery of insulin. PMID:26425087

  9. Centrifugal step emulsification applied for absolute quantification of nucleic acids by digital droplet RPA.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Friedrich; Schwemmer, Frank; Trotter, Martin; Wadle, Simon; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix; Paust, Nils

    2015-07-01

    Aqueous microdroplets provide miniaturized reaction compartments for numerous chemical, biochemical or pharmaceutical applications. We introduce centrifugal step emulsification for the fast and easy production of monodisperse droplets. Homogenous droplets with pre-selectable diameters in a range from 120 μm to 170 μm were generated with coefficients of variation of 2-4% and zero run-in time or dead volume. The droplet diameter depends on the nozzle geometry (depth, width, and step size) and interfacial tensions only. Droplet size is demonstrated to be independent of the dispersed phase flow rate between 0.01 and 1 μl s(-1), proving the robustness of the centrifugal approach. Centrifugal step emulsification can easily be combined with existing centrifugal microfluidic unit operations, is compatible to scalable manufacturing technologies such as thermoforming or injection moulding and enables fast emulsification (>500 droplets per second and nozzle) with minimal handling effort (2-3 pipetting steps). The centrifugal microfluidic droplet generation was used to perform the first digital droplet recombinase polymerase amplification (ddRPA). It was used for absolute quantification of Listeria monocytogenes DNA concentration standards with a total analysis time below 30 min. Compared to digital droplet polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR), with processing times of about 2 hours, the overall processing time of digital analysis was reduced by more than a factor of 4. PMID:25947077

  10. Water-in-oil emulsification in a non-uniform alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Suhwan; Saveliev, Alexei

    2015-11-01

    The emulsification of a water microdroplet placed in castor oil was performed using a non-uniform alternating electric field formed in the pin-to-plate geometry. A non-uniform electric field of ~40 kV/mm alternating with a frequency of 6.7 kHz was generated near the pin electrode. The applied frequency exceeded charge relaxation frequency of castor oil (0.3 Hz) and was below charge relaxation frequency of deionized water (7.8 kHz) used in the experiments. The emulsification process was captured with a CCD camera. The emulsification process started with entrainment of the water droplet in the high electric filed region near the pin electrode under the dielectrophoretic force. Upon touching the pin, the microdroplet was disintegrated in numerous channels and secondary droplets. The process continued by entrainment of secondary droplets and continuous size reduction. Three droplet breakup mechanisms were identified: drop elongation and capillary breakup, ac electrospraying of individual droplets, chain and bridge formation and decay. The quasi-steady narrow size distribution of emulsified water droplets with diameters close to 1 μm was formed after a few minutes. The generated emulsion was confined near the needle electrode due to the dielectrophoretic force. The emulsion had a well-defined boundary with a shape resembling a pendant drop suspended on the pin electrode.

  11. Solid drop based liquid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Sobhi, Hamid Reza; Farahani, Hadi; Norouzi, Parviz; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Kashtiaray, Amir

    2010-04-16

    Solid drop based liquid-phase microextraction (SDLPME) is a novel sample preparation technique possessing obvious advantages of simple operation with a high pre-concentration factor, low cost and low consumption of organic solvent. SDLPME coupled with gas chromatography (GC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) has been widely applied to the analyses of a different variety of samples. The basic principles, parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, and the latest applications of SDLPME are reviewed in this article. PMID:19962710

  12. Fluorous receptor-facilitated solid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dujuan; Weber, Stephen

    2014-09-19

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) is a widely accepted solvent-free extraction technique that usually uses a polymer sorbent as the extraction phase. In this work, we have developed receptor-doped fluorous films for solid phase microextraction. The hydrophobic and lipophobic properties of the fluorous films in principle reduce the polymer-water distribution coefficients of solutes other than those that can form noncovalent interactions with the fluorous receptor. This strategy should improve extraction selectivity. We found that the addition of a fluorous carboxylic acid (Krytox 157 FSH) to a fluorous film (Teflon AF 2400) increased the polymer-water distribution coefficients of quinoline, a nitrogen heterocycle. We studied the effects of receptor concentration and solute concentration on the distribution coefficients based on 96-well vessel SPME. We then coated this receptor doped fluorous polymer on a stainless steel fiber for SPME. Compared to a commonly used SPME fiber made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), it showed a preference for the nitrogen heterocyclic compound over a non-heterocyclic control, phenol. To our knowledge, this is the first reported receptor-doped fluorous SPME. PMID:25092595

  13. Impact of the emulsification-diffusion method on the development of pharmaceutical nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Quintanar-Guerrero, David; Zambrano-Zaragoza, María de la Luz; Gutierrez-Cortez, Elsa; Mendoza-Munoz, Nestor

    2012-12-01

    Nanotechnology is having a profound impact in many scientific fields and it has become one of the most important and exciting discipline. Like all technological advances, nanotechnology has its own scientific basis with a broad interdisciplinary effect. Perhaps, we are witnessing an exponential growth of nanotechnology, reflection of this is the important increase in the number of patents, scientific papers and specialized "nano" meetings and journals. The impact in the pharmaceutical area is related to the use of colloidal drug delivery systems as carriers for bioactive agents, in particular, the nanoparticle technology. The term nanoparticles designates solid submicronic particles formed of acceptable materials (e.g. polymers, lipids, etc.) containing an active substance. It includes both nanospheres (matricial systems) and nanocapsules (membrane systems). The knowledge of the nanoparticle preparation methods is a key issue for the formulator involved with drug-delivery research and development. In general, the methods based on preformed polymers, in particular biodegradable polymers, are preferred due to their easy implementation and lower potential toxicity. One of the most widely used methods to prepare polymeric nanoparticles is emulsification-diffusion. This method has been discussed in some reviews that compile research works but has a small number of patents. In this review, the emulsification-diffusion method is discussed from a technological point of view in order to show the operating conditions and formulation variables from data extracted of recent patents and experimental works. The main idea is to provide the reader with a general guide for formulators to make decisions about the usefulness of this method to develop specific nanoparticulate systems. The first part of this review provides an overview of the emulsification-diffusion method to prepare polymeric nanoparticles, while the second part evaluates the influence of preparative variables on the

  14. Emulsification efficiency of adsorbed chitosan for bacterial cells accumulation at the oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Archakunakorn, Somwit; Charoenrat, Nattapat; Khamsakhon, Somruethai; Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Wongkongkatep, Pravit; Suphantharika, Manop; Wongkongkatep, Jirarut

    2015-04-01

    The use of bacterial cell or biocatalyst for industrial synthetic chemistry is on the way of significant growth since the biocatalyst requires low energy input compared to the chemical synthesis and can be considered as a green technology. However, majority of natural bacterial cell surface is hydrophilic which allows poor access to the hydrophobic substrate or product. In this study, Escherichia coli (E. coli) as a representative of hydrophilic bacterial cells were accumulated at the oil-water interface after association with chitosan at a concentration range of 0.75-750 mg/L. After association with negatively charged E coli having a ζ potential of -19.9 mV, a neutralization of positively charged chitosan occurred as evidenced by an increase in the ζ potential value of the mixtures with increasing chitosan concentration up to +3.5 mV at 750 mg/L chitosan. Both emulsification index and droplet size analysis revealed that chitosan-E. coli system is an excellent emulsion stabilizer to date because the threshold concentration was as low as 7.5 mg/L or 0.00075% w/v. A dramatic increase in the surface hydrophobicity of the E. coli as evidenced by an increase in contact angle from 19 to 88° with increasing chitosan concentration from 0 to 750 mg/L, respectively, resulted in an increase in the stability of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by chitosan-E. coli system. The emulsion was highly stable even the emulsification was performed under 20% salt condition, or temperature ranged between 20 and 50 °C. Emulsification was failed when the oil volume fraction was higher than 0.5, indicating that no phase inversion occurred. The basic investigation presented in this study is a crucial platform for its application in biocatalyst industry and bioremediation of oil spill. PMID:25341365

  15. Simultaneous derivatization and extraction of chlorophenols in water samples with up-and-down shaker-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Deng; Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2014-03-01

    A new up-and-down shaker-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UDSA-DLLME) for extraction and derivatization of five chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 4-chloro-2-methylphenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichloro-phenol, and pentachlorophenol) has been developed. The method requires minimal solvent usage. The relatively polar, water-soluble, and low-toxicity solvent 1-heptanol (12 μL) was selected as the extraction solvent and acetic anhydride (50 μL) as the derivatization reagent. With the use of an up-and-down shaker, the emulsification of aqueous samples was formed homogeneously and quickly. The derivatization and extraction of chlorophenols were completed simultaneously in 1 min. The common requirement of disperser solvent in DLLME could be avoided. After optimization, the linear range covered over two orders of magnitude, and the coefficient of determination (r (2)) was greater than 0.9981. The detection limit was from 0.05 to 0.2 μg L(-1), and the relative standard deviation was from 4.6 to 10.8 %. Real samples of river water and lake water had relative recoveries from 90.3 to 117.3 %. Other emulsification methods such as vortex-assisted, ultrasound-assisted, and manual shaking-enhanced ultrasound-assisted methods were also compared with the proposed UDSA-DLLME. The results revealed that UDSA-DLLME performed with higher extraction efficiency and precision compared with the other methods. PMID:23727731

  16. Influence of emulsification process on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by layered double hydroxide particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nana; Zhang, Li; Sun, Dejun

    2015-04-28

    This paper reports the influence of emulsification process on the packing of layered double hydroxide (LDH) particles at the aqueous/oil phase interface and the properties of the resulting Pickering emulsions. Emulsions prepared by ultrasonication display superior long-term stability and gel-like characteristics at the dispersed phase volume fraction well below the random close packing limit, whereas emulsions with same compositions prepared by vortex mixing show some extent of sedimentation and liquid-like behaviors. Rheological measurements demonstrate that the zero-shear elastic modulus and yield stress of gel-like emulsions exhibit power-law dependences on particle concentration and independence on aqueous/oil phase ratio. The microstructural origin of this behavior is investigated by optical microscopy, revealing the droplets become strongly adhesive and a heterogeneous percolating network is formed among neighboring droplets. Fluorescent confocal microscopy measurements further confirm that the droplet adhesion is due to particle layers bridging opposite interfaces. In contrast, homogeneous, isolated, and densely packed droplets are present in emulsions prepared by vortex mixing, which results in these systems being dominantly viscous like the suspending fluid. This study shows that the emulsification process can be used as a trigger to modify long-term stability and rheology of solid-stabilized multiphase mixtures, which greatly expands their potential technological applications. PMID:25853297

  17. Spontaneous Emulsification of a Metal Drop Immersed in Slag Due to Dephosphorization: Surface Area Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assis, Andre N.; Warnett, Jason; Spooner, Stephen; Fruehan, Richard J.; Williams, Mark A.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2015-04-01

    When a chemical reaction occurs between two immiscible liquids, mass transfer is continuously taking place at the liquid-liquid interface. Several studies have shown that if the species being exchanged between the two liquids are surface-active, a very pronounced decrease in interfacial tension can occur which can lead to a phenomenon called spontaneous emulsification. In steelmaking, this behavior has been observed for several reactions that involve the transfer of impurities from molten steel to a molten-oxide slag but little quantification has been made. This work focuses on spontaneous emulsification due to the dephosphorization of a Fe-P drop immersed in a basic oxygen furnace type slag. An Au-image furnace attached to a confocal scanning laser microscope was used to rapidly heat and cool the samples at different times, and X-ray computerized tomography was used to perform the surface area calculations of the samples where the slag/steel reaction was allowed to occur for distinct times. The results show that the surface area of the metal drop rapidly increases by over one order of magnitude during the first 60 seconds of the reaction while the chemical reaction is occurring at a fast rate. Once the reaction slows down, approximately after 60 seconds, the droplets start to coalesce back together minimizing the surface area and returning to a geometry close to its equilibrium shape.

  18. Optimization of folic acid nano-emulsification and encapsulation by maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions.

    PubMed

    Assadpour, Elham; Maghsoudlou, Yahya; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Aalami, Mehran

    2016-05-01

    Due to susceptibility of folic acid like many other vitamins to environmental and processing conditions, it is necessary to protect it by highly efficient methods such as micro/nano-encapsulation. Our aim was to prepare and optimize real water in oil nano-emulsions containing folic acid by a low energy (spontaneous) emulsification technique so that the final product could be encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. A non ionic surfactant (Span 80) was used for making nano-emulsions at three dispersed phase/surfactant ratios of 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0. Folic acid content was 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0mg/mL of dispersed phase by a volume fraction of 5.0, 8.5, and 12%. The final optimum nano-emulsion formulation with 12% dispersed phase, a water to surfactant ratio of 0.9 and folic acid content of 3mg/mL in dispersed phase was encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. It was found that the emulsification time for preparing nano-emulsions was between 4 to 16h based on formulation variables. Droplet size decreased at higher surfactant contents and final nano-emulsions had a droplet size<100nm. Shear viscosity was higher for those formulations containing more surfactant. Our results revealed that spontaneous method could be used successfully for preparing stable W/O nano-emulsions containing folic acid. PMID:26806649

  19. Emulsification and antioxidation of biosurfactant extracts from Chinese medicinal herbs fermentation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunyeh; Lin, Tachen; Shieh, Youmin

    2015-10-01

    Much attention has been paid to biosurfactants produced using microorganisms, but little direct evidence for the development of natural biosurfactants combined with Chinese medicinal herbs are available. We investigated the emulsification and antioxidation of biosurfactant extracts from Chinese medicinal herb fermentation (BECMHF) in vitro and their application in water retention capacity and the skin prick and allergy test (SPAT) index for skin cells. The results showed that the water retention capacity of BECMHF was positively associated with the emulsification index. The SPAT index of 8 Chinese medicinal herbs was 0 at a 1% or 2% concentration, suggesting no sensitivity or adverse effects on the skin cells. Eight BECMHFs produced using Alcaligenes piechaudii CC-ESB2 exhibited antioxidant capabilities, including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and superoxide scavenging activity, and superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity at a concentration of 10 mg/ml. The mechanism involved inhibitory effects on nitrite, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and reactive oxygen species (ROSs) generation. BECMHFs exhibit favorable antioxidative properties in health food and satisfactory emulsifying and moisturizing characteristics in cosmetic formulations, which have potential applications in the health food and cosmetic industries, respectively. PMID:25812919

  20. Preparation of uniform-sized agarose beads by microporous membrane emulsification technique.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing-Zhu; Wang, Lian-Yan; Ma, Guang-Hui; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2007-07-01

    Uniform-sized agarose beads were prepared by membrane emulsification technique in this study. Agarose was dissolved in boiling water (containing 0.9% sodium chloride) and used as water phase. A mixture of liquid paraffin and petroleum ether containing 4 wt% of hexaglycerin penta ester (PO-500) emulsifier was used as oil phase. At 55 degrees C, the water phase permeated through uniform pores of microporous membrane into the oil phase by a pressure of nitrogen gas to form uniform W/O emulsion. Then the emulsion was cooled down to room temperature under gentle agitation to form gel beads. The effect of oil phase, emulsifier, especially temperature on the uniformity of the beads were investigated and interpreted from interfacial tension between water phase and oil phase. Under optimized condition, the coefficient variation (C.V.) showing the size distribution of the beads was under 15%. This was the first report to prepare uniform agarose beads by membrane emulsification, and to investigate the effect of temperature on the size distribution of the droplets and beads. The beads with different size can be prepared by using membranes with different pore size, and the result showed that there was a linear relationship between the average diameter of beads and pore size of the membranes; beads with diameter from 15 to 60 microm were able to obtain in this study. PMID:17362974

  1. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Canney, Michael S.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound. PMID:22088025

  2. Preparation of lipid nanoemulsions by premix membrane emulsification with disposable materials.

    PubMed

    Gehrmann, Sandra; Bunjes, Heike

    2016-09-25

    The possibility to prepare nanoemulsions as drug carrier systems on small scale was investigated with disposable materials. For this purpose premix membrane emulsification (premix ME) as a preparation method for nanoemulsions with narrow particle size distributions on small scale was used. The basic principle of premix ME is that the droplets of a coarse pre-emulsion get disrupted by the extrusion through a porous membrane. In order to implement the common preparation setup for premix ME with disposable materials, the suitability of different syringe filters (made from polyethersulfone, cellulose acetate, cellulose ester and nylon) and different pharmaceutically relevant emulsifiers (phospholipids, polysorbate 80 and sucrose laurate) for the preparation of nanoemulsions was investigated. Already the preparation of the premix could be realized by emulsification with the help of two disposable syringes. As shown for a phospholipid-stabilized emulsion, the polyethersulfone filter was the most appropriate one and was used for the study with different emulsifiers. With this syringe filter, the median particle size of all investigated emulsions was below 500nm after 21 extrusion cycles through a 200nm filter and a subsequent extrusion cycle through a 100nm filter. Furthermore, the particle size distribution of the polysorbate 80- and sucrose laurate-stabilized emulsions prepared this way was very narrow (span value of 0.7). PMID:27477104

  3. Microencapsulation by Membrane Emulsification of Biophenols Recovered from Olive Mill Wastewaters

    PubMed Central

    Piacentini, Emma; Poerio, Teresa; Bazzarelli, Fabio; Giorno, Lidietta

    2016-01-01

    Biophenols are highly prized for their free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities. Olive mill wastewaters (OMWWs) are rich in biophenols. For this reason, there is a growing interest in the recovery and valorization of these compounds. Applications for the encapsulation have increased in the food industry as well as the pharmaceutical and cosmetic fields, among others. Advancements in micro-fabrication methods are needed to design new functional particles with target properties in terms of size, size distribution, and functional activity. This paper describes the use of the membrane emulsification method for the fine-tuning of microparticle production with biofunctional activity. In particular, in this pioneering work, membrane emulsification has been used as an advanced method for biophenols encapsulation. Catechol has been used as a biophenol model, while a biophenols mixture recovered from OMWWs were used as a real matrix. Water-in-oil emulsions with droplet sizes approximately 2.3 times the membrane pore diameter, a distribution span of 0.33, and high encapsulation efficiency (98% ± 1% and 92% ± 3%, for catechol and biophenols, respectively) were produced. The release of biophenols was also investigated. PMID:27171115

  4. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Canney, Michael S; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound. PMID:22088025

  5. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification of cosmetic samples prior to elemental analysis by different atomic spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Lavilla, I; Cabaleiro, N; Costas, M; de la Calle, I; Bendicho, C

    2009-11-15

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted emulsification with a probe system is proposed as a rapid and simple sample treatment for atomic spectrometric determinations (Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry, Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Cold Vapour Atomic Absorption Spectrometry) of trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, Sr and Zn) in cosmetic samples such as shampoos, gel (hair gel), crèmes (body milk, hair conditioner) and oil (body oil). The type of dispersion medium, the sample mass-to-dispersion medium volume ratio, as well as the parameters related to the ultrasound-assisted emulsification (sonication amplitude and treatment time) were exhaustively studied. Only 1 min of ultrasonic shaking and a dispersion medium containing 0.5% (w/v) of SDS+3% (v/v) of HNO(3) or HCl allows obtaining a stable emulsion at least for 3 months. Thermal programs, nebulization of emulsions, speed of pumps and concentration of reagents used in cold vapour generation were optimized. Calibration using aqueous standards was feasible in all cases. Calibration by the standard addition method and recovery studies was also applied for validation. Microwave-assisted digestion and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry were used for comparison purposes. Relative standard deviations from analysis of five independent emulsions were less than 9% in all cases. PMID:19782199

  6. A method for estimating effective coalescence rates during emulsification from oil transfer experiments.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Andreas; Trägårdh, Christian; Bergenståhl, Björn

    2012-05-15

    The Oil Transfer Technique (OTT) was developed by Taisne et al. [1] to measure coalescence during emulsification and has been applied since in several studies. One of the main drawbacks of this technique is that it only gives a qualitative measure of coalescence. This paper proposes a new evaluation method of OTT experimental results for estimating qualitative coalescence rates, e.g. for investigating the scaling of coalescence with emulsification parameters (such as homogenizing pressure, and emulsifier concentration). The method is based on comparison with simulated OTT experiments using bivariate Population Balance Equation models. Simulations have been performed under a wide variety of conditions in order to investigate the influence of assumptions on coalescence and fragmentation kernels. These investigations show that the scaling of coalescence rates could be determined accurately when the scaling of efficient residence time of drops in the active region of homogenization is known. The proposed evaluation method is also exemplified by analyzing OTT data from two previously published studies. PMID:22369981

  7. Solid phase microextraction device using aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-06-14

    A sample collection substrate of aerogel and/or xerogel materials bound to a support structure is used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) device. The xerogels and aerogels may be organic or inorganic and doped with metals or other compounds to target specific chemical analytes. The support structure is typically formed of a glass fiber or a metal wire (stainless steel or kovar). The devices are made by applying gel solution to the support structures and drying the solution to form aerogel or xerogel. Aerogel particles may be attached to the wet layer before drying to increase sample collection surface area. These devices are robust, stable in fields of high radiation, and highly effective at collecting gas and liquid samples while maintaining superior mechanical and thermal stability during routine use. Aerogel SPME devices are advantageous for use in GC/MS analyses due to their lack of interfering background and tolerance of GC thermal cycling.

  8. Offline solid phase microextraction sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, Chris A.

    2008-12-16

    An offline solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling apparatus for enabling SPME samples to be taken a number of times from a previously collected fluid sample (e.g. sample atmosphere) stored in a fused silica lined bottle which keeps volatile organics in the fluid sample stable for weeks at a time. The offline SPME sampling apparatus has a hollow body surrounding a sampling chamber, with multiple ports through which a portion of a previously collected fluid sample may be (a) released into the sampling chamber, (b) SPME sampled to collect analytes for subsequent GC analysis, and (c) flushed/purged using a fluidically connected vacuum source and purging fluid source to prepare the sampling chamber for additional SPME samplings of the same original fluid sample, such as may have been collected in situ from a headspace.

  9. Ferrofluid-based liquid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Yufeng; Lee, Hian Kee

    2010-11-19

    A new mode of liquid-phase microextraction based on a ferrofluid has been developed. The ferrofluid was composed of silica-coated magnetic particles and 1-octanol as the extractant solvent. The 1-octanol was firmly confined within the silica-coated particles, preventing it from being lost during extraction. Sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were used as model compounds in the development and evaluation of the extraction procedure in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. The optimal conditions were as follows: 20mL sample volume, 10mg of the silica-coated magnetic particles (28mg of ferrofluid), agitation at 20Hz, 20min extraction time, and 2min by sonication with 100μL acetonitrile as the final extraction solvent. Under optimal extraction conditions, enrichment factors ranging from 102- to 173-fold were obtained for the analytes. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification were in the range of 16.8 and 56.7pgmL(-1) and 0.06 and 0.19ngmL(-1), respectively. The linearities were between 0.5-100 and 1-100ngmL(-1) for different PAHs. As the ferrofluid can respond to and be attracted by a magnet, the extraction can be easily achieved by reciprocating movement of an external magnet that served to agitate the sample. No other devices were needed in this new approach of extraction. This new technique is affordable, efficient and convenient for microextraction, and offers portability for potential onsite extraction. PMID:20961552

  10. Monolithic microextraction tips by emulsion photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2009-03-20

    Monoliths formed by photopolymerization are excellent means for fabricating functional elements in miniaturized microdevices such as microextraction tips which are becoming important for sample preparation. Various silica-based and polymer-based materials have been used to fabricate monoliths with through pores of several nm to 4 microm. However, the back pressure created by such methods is still considered to be high for microtips that use suction forces to deliver the liquid. In this study, we demonstrated that emulsion techniques such as oil-in-water can be used to form monoliths with large through pores (>20 microm), and with rigid structures on small (10 microL) and large (200 microL) pipette tips by photopolymerization. We further showed that, with minor modifications, various functionalized particles (5-20 microm) can be added to form stable emulsions and successfully encapsulated into the monoliths for qualitative and quantitative solid-phase microextractions for a diverse application. Due to high permeability and large surface area, quick equilibration can be achieved by pipetting to yield high recovery rates. Using tryptic digests of ovalbumin as the standard, we obtained a recovery yield of 90-109% (RSD: 10-16%) with a loading capacity of 3 mug for desalting tips immobilized with C18 beads. Using tryptic digests of beta-casein and alpha-casein as standards, we showed that phosphopeptides were substantially enriched by tips immobilized with immobilized metal affinity chromatography or TiO(2) materials. Using estrogenic compounds as standards, we obtained a recovery yield of 95-108% (RSD: 10-12%) and linear calibration curves ranging from 5 to 100 ng (R(2)>0.99) for Waters Oasis HLB tips immobilized with hydrophilic beads. PMID:19203757

  11. Self-emulsification of alkaline-dissolved clove bud oil by whey protein, gum arabic, lecithin, and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangchao; Zhang, Yue; Pan, Kang; Critzer, Faith; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2014-05-14

    Low-cost emulsification technologies using food ingredients are critical to various applications. In the present study, a novel self-emulsification technique was studied to prepare clove bud oil (CBO) emulsions, without specialized equipment or organic solvents. CBO was first dissolved in hot alkaline solutions, added at 1% v/v into neutral solutions with 1% w/v emulsifier composed of whey protein concentrate (WPC), gum arabic, lecithin, or their equal mass mixtures, and adjusted to pH 7.0. The self-emulsification process did not affect UV-vis absorption spectrum, reversed-phase HPLC chromatogram, or antimicrobial activity of CBO against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, and Salmonella Enteritidis. The entrapment efficiency after extraction by petroleum ether was determined to be about 80%. Most emulsions were stable during 7 days of storage. Emulsions prepared with WPC had smaller particles, whereas emulsions prepared with emulsifier mixtures had more stable particle dimensions. The studied self-emulsification technique may find numerous applications in the preparation of low-cost food emulsions. PMID:24758517

  12. Investigation into the Cause of Spontaneous Emulsification of a Free Steel Droplet; Validation of the Chemical Exchange Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, Stephen; Assis, Andre N.; Warnett, Jason; Fruehan, Richard; Williams, Mark A.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-05-01

    Small Fe-based droplets have been heated to a molten phase suspended within a slag medium to replicate a partial environment within the basic oxygen furnace (BOF). The confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) has been used as a heating platform to interrogate the effect of impurities and their transfer across the metal/slag interface, on the emulsification of the droplet into the slag medium. The samples were then examined through X-ray computer tomography (XCT) giving the mapping of emulsion dispersion in 3D space, calculating the changing of interfacial area between the two materials, and changes of material volume due to material transfer between metal and slag. Null experiments to rule out thermal gradients being the cause of emulsification have been conducted as well as replication of the previously reported study by Assis et al.[1] which has given insights into the mechanism of emulsification. Finally chemical analysis was conducted to discover the transfer of oxygen to be the cause of emulsification, leading to a new study of a system with undergoing oxygen equilibration.

  13. Investigation into the Cause of Spontaneous Emulsification of a Free Steel Droplet; Validation of the Chemical Exchange Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, Stephen; Assis, Andre N.; Warnett, Jason; Fruehan, Richard; Williams, Mark A.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-08-01

    Small Fe-based droplets have been heated to a molten phase suspended within a slag medium to replicate a partial environment within the basic oxygen furnace (BOF). The confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) has been used as a heating platform to interrogate the effect of impurities and their transfer across the metal/slag interface, on the emulsification of the droplet into the slag medium. The samples were then examined through X-ray computer tomography (XCT) giving the mapping of emulsion dispersion in 3D space, calculating the changing of interfacial area between the two materials, and changes of material volume due to material transfer between metal and slag. Null experiments to rule out thermal gradients being the cause of emulsification have been conducted as well as replication of the previously reported study by Assis et al.[1] which has given insights into the mechanism of emulsification. Finally chemical analysis was conducted to discover the transfer of oxygen to be the cause of emulsification, leading to a new study of a system with undergoing oxygen equilibration.

  14. A Simple Organic Solvent-Free Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Method for the Determination of Potentially Toxic Metals as 2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)phenol Complex from Food and Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Barfi, Behruz; Rajabi, Maryam; Asghari, Alireza

    2016-04-01

    An organic solvent-free method was developed to extract some potentially toxic metals, as complexed with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)phenol, from different real samples prior to their determination by microsampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The method, named ionic liquid-based ultrasound-enhanced air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-USE-AALLME), is based upon withdrawing and pushing out a mixture of an aqueous sample and an IL (as the extraction solvent) for several times into a conical test tube using a single syringe, placed in an ultrasound bath (as the enhancing mass transfer agent) during the extraction process. Different effective parameters were studied, and at the optimized conditions, limits of detection, linear dynamic ranges, and enrichment factors were ranged from 0.9 to 2.2 μg L(-1), 3.0 to 1023 μg L(-1), and 20 ± 2 to 22 ± 2, respectively. After optimization, the method was successfully applied to determine Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cr(3+) in different biological (hair and nail), vegetable (coriander, parsley, and tarragon), fruit juice (apple, orange, and peach), and water (tap, mineral, and wastewater) samples. The proposed method was compared with two other IL-based and disperser solvent-free methods (i.e., IL-based air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction and IL-based ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction) to demonstrate its performance. PMID:26329998

  15. Green aspects, developments and perspectives of liquid phase microextraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Spietelun, Agata; Marcinkowski, Łukasz; de la Guardia, Miguel; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-02-01

    Determination of analytes at trace levels in complex samples (e.g. biological or contaminated water or soils) are often required for the environmental assessment and monitoring as well as for scientific research in the field of environmental pollution. A limited number of analytical techniques are sensitive enough for the direct determination of trace components in samples and, because of that, a preliminary step of the analyte isolation/enrichment prior to analysis is required in many cases. In this work the newest trends and innovations in liquid phase microextraction, like: single-drop microextraction (SDME), hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME), and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) have been discussed, including their critical evaluation and possible application in analytical practice. The described modifications of extraction techniques deal with system miniaturization and/or automation, the use of ultrasound and physical agitation, and electrochemical methods. Particular attention was given to pro-ecological aspects therefore the possible use of novel, non-toxic extracting agents, inter alia, ionic liquids, coacervates, surfactant solutions and reverse micelles in the liquid phase microextraction techniques has been evaluated in depth. Also, new methodological solutions and the related instruments and devices for the efficient liquid phase micoextraction of analytes, which have found application at the stage of procedure prior to chromatographic determination, are presented. PMID:24401382

  16. Uniform titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) microcapsules prepared by glass membrane emulsification with subsequent solvent evaporation.

    PubMed

    Supsakulchai, A; Ma, G H; Nagai, M; Omi, S

    2002-01-01

    Anatase-type titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) was encapsulated using an Shirasu porous glass (SPG) membrane emulsification technique and followed by solvent evaporation. The oil phase, consisting of fine#10; powder of anatase TiO(2), Disperbyk-180, the hydrophobic oil phase additive, and polymer wall solution, was pushed through the membrane pores into the aqueous phase of poly(vinyl alcohol) and sodium dodecyl sulfate to form the solid-in-oil-in water, (S/O)/W, emulsion droplets. Three types of styrene-based copolymer poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) (PS-AA), poly(styrene-co-2-ethyl hexyl acrylate) (PS-2EHA) and poly(styrene-co-dimethyl aminoethylmethacrylate) (PS-DMAEMA) were used as an encapsulating shell. Uniform droplets were successfully obtained by modifying the oil phase using methyl laurate or hexadecanol as the oil phase additive, together with carefully monitoring the emulsification flow rate during the emulsification. The (S/O)/W emulsion was gently stirred in a sealed reactor, and evacuation of solvent started under moderate heating with increasing a vacuum intensity. Those uniform-sized TiO(2) microcapsules revealed fine porous morphologies on their surfaces as a result of a mild phase separation induced from the addition of the oil phase additive. The encapsulation efficiency was influenced by the stability of TiO(2) in the oil phase, the polymer wall employed, and the operational control of the glass membrane emulsification process. The membrane emulsification process could prepare the TiO(2) microcapsules with about approximately 6-8.5 wt% of encapsulation loadings. PS-AA and PS-2EHA copolymers provided better encapsulation efficiency compared to PS-DMAEMA. SPG membranes with 1.42, 2.8, 5.25, 7.0, or 9.5 microm were employed and 2-20 microm microcapsules were subsequently obtained. PMID:12396381

  17. Effect of interfacial free energy on the formation of polymer microcapsules by emulsification/freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Yin, Weisi; Yates, M Z

    2008-02-01

    Hollow polymer microparticles with a single opening on the surface were formed by freeze-drying aqueous polymer colloids swollen with solvent. The results show that the particle morphology is due to phase separation in the polymer emulsion droplets upon freezing in liquid nitrogen, and that morphological changes are driven largely by lowering interfacial free energy. The effects of added surfactant, volume fraction of solvent, type of solvent, and processing conditions on the particle morphology were examined and compared to theoretical predictions. The dried hollow particles were resuspended in a dispersing media and exposed to a second swelling solvent to close the surface opening and form microcapsules. The interfacial free energy difference between the inside and outside surfaces is the driving force for closing the hole on the surface. The emulsification/freeze-drying technique can be used to encapsulate hydrophilic additives in the core of the microcapsules, demonstrating the potential of the technique in controlled-release applications. PMID:18173290

  18. Preparation of solid lipid nanoparticles by a solvent emulsification-diffusion technique.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Michele; Debernardi, Francesca; Caputo, Otto

    2003-05-12

    A preparation method for nanoparticles based on the emulsification of a butyl lactate or benzyl alcohol solution of a solid lipid in an aqueous solution of different emulsifiers, followed by dilution of the emulsion with water, was used to prepare glyceryl monostearate nanodispersions with narrow size distribution. To increase the lipid load the process was conducted at 47+/-2 degrees C and in order to reach submicron size a high-shear homogenizer was used. Particle size of the solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) was affected by using different emulsifiers and different lipid loads. By using lecithin and taurodeoxycholic acid sodium salt, on increasing the GMS percentage from 2.5 to 10% an increase of the mean diameter from 205 to 695 nm and from 320 to 368nm was observed for the SLN prepared using benzyl alcohol and butyl lactate, respectively. Transmission electron micrographs of SLN reveal nanospheres with a smooth surface. PMID:12711170

  19. Scale-up of nanoemulsion produced by emulsification and solvent diffusion.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Khalil; Vauthier, Christine; Huang, Nicolas; Menas, Assia; Ringard-Lefebvre, Catherine; Anselmi, Cecilia; Stambouli, Moncef; Rosilio, Veronique; Vachon, Jean-Jacques; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2012-11-01

    The scale-up of nanoemulsions (NEs) produced by emulsification and solvent diffusion process was successfully achieved in the present work. Up to 1500 mL of NEs were produced with olive oil, castor oil, almond oil, or Arlamol™ E by using a Y-shaped mixer device. NE droplet sizes were significantly modulated from 290 to 185 nm by changing the process parameters without modification of the formulation composition. Smaller NE droplet sizes were obtained by (1) decreasing the internal diameter of the Y-mixer from 5 to 0.8 mm, (2) increasing the flow rates of the organic and the aqueous phases upon mixing, and (3) increasing the temperature of the experiment from 5°C to 40°C. All the results of NE diameters (d(sc) ) expressed as a function of the Reynolds number (Re) and the shear rate inside the Y-mixer (\\documentclass{article}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\begin{document}\\pagestyle{empty}$\\dot \\gamma$\\end{document}) showed the existence of typical power-law relationships: d(sc) = 10(2.82) Re(- 0.14) and \\documentclass{article}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\begin{document}\\pagestyle{empty}$d_{{\\rm sc}} = 10^{2.60} \\dot \\gamma ^{- 0.06}$\\end{document}, respectively. The existence of these power-laws for NE formation by emulsification and solvent diffusion process has never been reported in the literature yet and constitutes a new finding in this work. We definitely proved that the high turbulences created upon NE formation are the most important parameter allowing to decrease droplet size. PMID:22886515

  20. Solvent-free microextraction techniques in gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Laaks, Jens; Jochmann, Maik A; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2012-01-01

    Microextraction techniques represent a major part of modern sample preparation in the analysis of organic micropollutants. This article provides a short overview of recent developments in solvent-free microextraction techniques. From the first open-tubular trap techniques in the mid-1980s to recent packed-needle devices, different implementations of in-needle packings for microextraction are discussed with their characteristic benefits, shortcomings and possible sampling modes. Special emphasis is placed on methods providing full automation and solvent exclusion. In this context, in-tube extraction and the needle trap are discussed, with an overview of current research on new sorbent materials, together with the requirements for more efficient method development. PMID:22057686

  1. Conductive polymer-based microextraction methods: a review.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Habib; Ayazi, Zahra; Naderi, Mehrnoush

    2013-03-12

    Conductive polymers (CPs) are classified as materials which exhibit highly reversible redox behavior and the unusual combined properties of metal and plastics. CPs, due to their multifunctionality, ease of synthesis and their stability, have attracted more attentions in different fields of research, including sample preparation. CPs along with several commercial hydrophilic sorbents, are alternative to the commercially available hydrophobic sorbents which despite their high specific surface areas, have poor interactions and retentions in the extraction of polar compounds. This review covers a general overview regarding the recent progress and new applications of CPs toward their synthesis and use in novel extraction and microextraction techniques including solid phase microextraction (SPME), electrochemically controlled solid-phase microextraction (EC-SPME) and other relevant techniques. Furthermore the contribution of nano-structured CPs in these methodologies is also reviewed. PMID:23452781

  2. Using Single Drop Microextraction for Headspace Analysis with Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Daniel; Wood, Derrick C.; Miller, James M.

    2008-07-01

    Headspace (HS) gas chromatography (GC) is commonly used to analyze samples that contain non-volatiles. In 1996, a new sampling technique called single drop microextraction, SDME, was introduced, and in 2001 it was applied to HS analysis. It is a simple technique that uses equipment normally found in the undergraduate laboratory, making it ideal for instructional use, especially to illustrate HS analysis or as an alternative to solid-phase microextraction (SPME) to which it is very similar. The basic principles and practice of HS-GC using SDME are described, including a complete review of the literature. Some possible experiments are suggested using water and N -methylpyrrolidone (NMP) as solvents.

  3. Theory and practice of solid phase microextraction

    SciTech Connect

    Pawliszyn, J.; Zhang, Zhouyao; Gorecki, T.

    1995-12-31

    Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) involves exposing a fused silica fibre that has been coated with a non-volatile polymeric liquid to a sample or its headspace. The absorbed analytes are thermally desorbed in the injector of a gas chromatograph (GC) or GC-mass spectrometer. The fibre is contained in a syringe-like SPME device to facilitate convenient handling. This method can be applied to liquid, gaseous or headspace samples. All three sample can be analyzed on the same instrument without modifications to the GC and the extraction and the sample injection process can be fully automated using conventional autosampler. The fibre can be used to extract target analytes directly in the field without collecting a sample. Because of its cylindrical geometry it cannot be plugged. All three sample types can be analyzed on the isothermal instrument. Advantageous of SPME will be discussed using important applications - semi-volatile and volatile compounds in air, aqueous matrices and in the headspace above dirty aqueous samples, slurries and soils.

  4. Dispersive micro-solid phase extraction using magnetic nanoparticle modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes coupled with surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetry for sensitive determination of lomefloxacin and ofloxacin from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Amoli-Diva, Mitra; Pourghazi, Kamyar; Hajjaran, Somayeh

    2016-03-01

    A dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) procedure coupled with surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric detection was developed for determination of ofloxacin and lomefloxacin from biological and environmental samples. The D-μ-SPE procedure was performed using magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle grafted multi-walled carbon nanotube as an efficient adsorbent. The main factors affecting the signal enhancement (including surfactant concentration and pH) and extraction efficiency (including pH, extraction time, sample volume, amount of magnetic adsorbent, and desorption conditions) were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curves were linear (R(2)˃0.9995) over the concentration range of 50-450 ng mL(-1) with detection limits (LOD) of 12 and 15 ng mL(-1) for ofloxacin and lomefloxacin respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD %) of 1.9 and 2.1% (C=100 ng mL(-1), n=5) and the enrichment factor of 192 and 188 were achieved for ofloxacin and lomefloxacin respectively. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the extraction and preconcentration of these drugs in biological (plasma and urine) samples. PMID:26706503

  5. Rapid ionic liquid-based ultrasound assisted dual magnetic microextraction to preconcentrate and separate cadmium-4-(2-thiazolylazo)-resorcinol complex from environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sumaira; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Soylak, Mustafa

    2014-04-01

    A rapid and innovative microextraction technique named as, ionic liquid-based ultrasound-assisted dual magnetic microextraction (IL-UA-DMME) was developed for the preconcentration and extraction of trace cadmium from environmental and biological samples, prior to analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The proposed method has many obvious advantages, including evading the use of organic solvents and achieved high extraction yields by the combination of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and magnetic mediated-solid phase extraction (MM-SPE). In this approach ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4mim][PF6] play an important role to extract the cadmium-4-(2-thiazolylazo)-resorcinol (Cd-TAR) complex from acid digested sample solutions and ultrasonic irradiation was applied to assist emulsification. After then, dispersed small amount of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in sample solutions to salvaged the IL and complete phase separation was attained. Some analytical parameters that influencing the efficiency of proposed (IL-UA-DMME) method, such as pH, volume of IL, ligand concentration, ultra-sonication time, amount of Fe3O4 MNPs, sample volume and matrix effect were optimized. Limit of detection (LOD) and enrichment factor (EF) of the method under optimal experimental conditions were found to be 0.40μgL(-1) and 100, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of 50μgL(-1) Cd was 4.29%. The validity and accuracy of proposed method, was assessed to analyzed certified reference materials of fortified lake water TMDA-54.4, SPS-WW2 waste water, spinach leaves 1570a and also checked by standard addition method. The obtained values showed good agreement with the certified values and sufficiently high recovery were found in the range of 98.1-101% for Cd. The proposed method was facile, rapid and successfully applied for the determination of Cd in environmental and different biological samples. PMID

  6. Using Single Drop Microextraction for Headspace Analysis with Gas Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Daniel; Wood, Derrick C.; Miller, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Headspace (HS) gas chromatography (GC) is commonly used to analyze samples that contain non-volatiles. In 1996, a new sampling technique called single drop microextraction, SDME, was introduced, and in 2001 it was applied to HS analysis. It is a simple technique that uses equipment normally found in the undergraduate laboratory, making it ideal…

  7. Micro-extraction techniques in analytical toxicology: short review.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, R J; Morgan, P E; Spencer, E P; Whelpton, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses new developments in plasma micro-extraction techniques in the context of established micro-extraction and protein precipitation methodology. Simple liquid-liquid solvent extraction (LLE) of plasma with direct GC or HPLC analysis of the resulting extract has been used for many years. Butyl acetate and methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) give efficient extraction of many drugs and metabolites from small volumes of plasma or whole blood at an appropriate pH, and form the upper layer, thus simplifying extract removal. Butyl acetate does not interfere with NPD, ECD or MS in GC, whilst MTBE has a relatively low UV cutoff (220 nm). Thus, HPLC eluents that use a high proportion of an organic component allow MTBE extracts to be analysed directly. 'Salting-out' and extractive derivatization using acetic anhydride or phenylboronic acid can be used with appropriate analytes. As regards protein precipitation, an important consideration is lowering the pH, although this is not feasible with acid-labile analytes. More recent developments include sold-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and liquid-phase micro-extraction (LPME). This latter technique especially may prove invaluable as analytes that cannot easily be extracted with LLE can be isolated simply at low cost with a minimum of apparatus. PMID:16779788

  8. Emulsification of algal oil with soy lecithin improved DHA bioaccessibility but did not change overall in vitro digestibility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xinjie; Wang, Qi; Li, Weili; Wright, Amanda J

    2014-11-01

    Oil emulsification facilitates digestive lipolysis and subsequent lipid bioaccessibility. This study aimed to understand the effects of emulsification on DHA-rich algal oil digestion and bioaccessibility. An oil/water emulsion (50 : 44 : 6 oil-water-soy lecithin) was subjected to an in vitro digestion model with gastric pH 1.6 or 4.0 and particle size distributions, duodenal stage lipolysis and DHA bioaccessibility were determined. The emulsion was destabilized at gastric pH 1.6, with subsequent slow duodenal lipolysis. With gastric pH 4.0, the emulsion structure remained intact, initial lipolysis proceeded rapidly and DHA bioaccessibility was higher than for bulk oil, a mixture of oil, water and soy lecithin, and the gastric pH 1.6 destabilized emulsion (p < 0.05). However, the extent of lipolysis was not affected by emulsification or gastric pH. Therefore, the presence of an intact emulsion at the start of duodenal digestion, while not impacting the extent of lipolysis, did impact the initial lipolysis and DHA bioaccessibility. PMID:25208938

  9. Preparation and properties of PLGA microspheres containing hydrophilic drugs by the SPG (shirasu porous glass) membrane emulsification technique.

    PubMed

    Ito, Fuminori; Honnami, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Hiroyoshi; Kanamura, Kiyoshi; Makino, Kimiko

    2008-11-15

    In the present paper, monodisperse poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres containing the hydrophilic model drug, blue dextran (BLD), were manufactured by the solvent evaporation method and the shirasu porous glass (SPG) membrane emulsification technique. In order to prepare PLGA microspheres with a higher drug loading efficiency by the membrane emulsification technique, the test of stability and productivity of the primary emulsion (w(1)/o emulsion) was preliminary examined by change species or concentration of the oil-soluble surfactant and the ratio of water and organic solvent. The primary emulsion (w(1)/o) composed of the BLD aqueous solution and dichloromethane (DCM) dissolved PLGA was prepared with the micro homogenizer. The secondary emulsion (w(1)/o/w(2)) was prepared by the SPG membrane emulsification technique. BLD/PLGA microspheres of various micro level sizes of 2.0-10 microm prepared by variation of pore size of the using SPG membrane. The highly monodisperse BLD/PLGA microspheres were also manufactured by added polyethylene glycol (PEG) into the water phase, as reported in a previous paper. The initial release rate of the drug from such microspheres controlled than the sample manufactured without an additive. PMID:18774278

  10. Role of medium-chain fatty acids in the emulsification mechanistics of self-micro-emulsifying lipid formulations

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Naser M.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective of the present study was to design and develop stable o/w microemulsions comprising Miglyol 812, Imwitor 988 and Tagat TO as a non ionic surfactant. This was based on particle size measurements and phase behavior studies. The empirical role of incorporating medium-chain mono/di-glycerides in the lipid matrix in the mechanistic processes of emulsification was also established in various simulating physiological conditions. Methods The efficiency of self-emulsification was evaluated under conditions of varying key compositions in the lipid mixtures; oil, cosurfactant and surfactant. Droplet diameter was measured using laser diffraction and light scattering techniques. Equilibrium phase studies were performed and phase boundaries were determined for the lipid–water systems. Results Microemulsion systems were produced from blends of Miglyol 812, Imwitor 988 and Tagat TO. An optimized formulation consisted of {Miglyol 812/Imwitor 988} and Tagat TO spontaneously self-emulsified in water producing dispersions with droplet diameters of ∼50 nm. Phase equilibrium diagrams have revealed significant enhancement in the water-solubilized region (L2) without any presence of liquid crystalline materials. Conclusions Potential SMEDDS formulations for the bioavailability enhancement of poorly water-soluble compounds were developed by mixing blends of {Miglyol 812/Imwitor 988} and Tagat TO as a non-ionic surfactant. ‘Diffusion and stranding’ appears to be the dominant mechanism of emulsification. PMID:25561872

  11. Highly effective emulsification/demulsification with a CO2-switchable superamphiphile.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peipei; Wang, Zengzi; Xu, Zhenghe; Hao, Jingcheng; Sun, Dejun

    2016-10-15

    This article reports a systematic study on a highly CO2-responsive superamphiphile (D-OA) in preparation of CO2-switchable oil-in-water emulsions. The D-OA was assembled with Jeffamine D 230 and oleic acid (HOA) via electrostatic interaction, which was characterized using FT-IR, (1)HNMR, surface tension, and interfacial tension techniques. The assembled gemini-like superamphiphile D-OA was shown to have a low cmc value and adsorb quickly at the paraffin oil/water interface, decreasing the interfacial tension effectively. Highly stable O/W emulsions were obtained by mixing D-OA aqueous solution and paraffin oil. After bubbling CO2 through the stable emulsions for just 20s, quick phase separation was observed; while upon removal of CO2 by bubbling N2 at 60°C, stable emulsions were recreated. The reversible assembly and disassembly of the D-OA superamphiphile by adding or removing CO2 were considered as the cause of demulsification and re-emulsification processes. The rapid and complete demulsification of the system in response to CO2 addition and removal may have potential applications in emulsion-based fabrication/separation and enhanced oil recovery processes. PMID:27442147

  12. Improved Low pH Emulsification Properties of Glycated Peanut Protein Isolate by Ultrasound Maillard Reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Chen, Jianshe; Wu, Kegang; Yu, Lin

    2016-07-13

    In this work, peanut protein isolate (PPI) was grafted with maltodextrin (MD) through the ultrasound-assisted Maillard reaction. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed a link between PPI and MD. The substantially increased accessibility of the major subunits (conarachin, acidic subunit of arachin, and basic subunit of arachin) in PPI under high-intensity ultrasound treatment led to changes in the degree of graft (DG), zeta-potential, protein solubility, and surface hydrophobicity of conjugates. Emulsion systems (20% v/v oil, 2.0% w/v PPI equivalent, pH 3.8) formed by untreated PPI, PPI-MDC (PPI-MD conjugates obtained with wet-heating alone), and UPPI-MDC (PPI-MD conjugates obtained with ultrasound-assisted wet heating) were characterized using a light-scatter particle size analyzer and confocal laser scanning microscope. Results showed that emulsions of untreated PPI and PPI-MDC were not stable due to immediate bridging flocculation and coalescence of droplets, whereas that formed by UPPI-MDC with 32.4% DG was stable with a smaller mean droplet size. It was believed that high-intensity ultrasound promoted production of glycated PPI, which was soluble and surface active at pH 3.8 and thus improved emulsification properties for UPPI-MDC. This study shows that glycated PPI by ultrasound-assisted Maillard reaction is an effective emulsifying agent for low pH applications. PMID:27329355

  13. Crocin loaded nano-emulsions: Factors affecting emulsion properties in spontaneous emulsification.

    PubMed

    Mehrnia, Mohammad-Amin; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Makhmal-Zadeh, Behzad S; Maghsoudlou, Yahya

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous emulsification may be used for encapsulating bioactive compounds in food and pharmaceutical industry. It has several advantages over high energy and other low energy methods including, protecting sensitive compounds against severe conditions of high energy method and its ability to minimize surfactant, removal of cosurfactant and thermal stability compared with other low energy methods. In this study, we examined possibility of encapsulating highly soluble crocin in W/O micro-emulsions using spontaneous method which further could be used for making double emulsions. Nonionic surfactants of Span 80 and polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) were used for making micro-emulsions that showed the high potential of PGPR for spontaneous method. Surfactant to water ratio (SWR%) was evaluated to find the highest amount of aqueous phase which can be dispersed in organic phase. Droplet size decreased by increasing SWR toward the SWR=100% which had the smallest droplet size and then increased at higher levels of surfactant. By increasing SWR, shear viscosity increased which showed the high effect of PGPR on rheological properties. This study shows in addition to W/O micro-emulsions, spontaneous method could be used for preparing stable O/W micro-emulsions. PMID:26708427

  14. Nutraceutical delivery systems: resveratrol encapsulation in grape seed oil nanoemulsions formed by spontaneous emulsification.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; McClements, David Julian

    2015-01-15

    The aim of this work was to fabricate nanoemulsions-based delivery systems to encapsulate resveratrol. Nanoemulsions were formed using spontaneous emulsification method: 10% oil phase (grape seed oil plus orange oil) and 10% surfactant (Tween 80) were titrated into 80% aqueous phase. An optimum orange oil-to-grape seed oil ratio of 1:1(w/w) formed small droplets (d ≈ 100 nm) with good stability to droplet growth. The maximum amount of resveratrol that could be dissolved in the oil phase was 120 ± 10 μg/ml. The effect of droplet size on the chemical stability of encapsulated resveratrol was examined by preparing systems with different mean droplet diameters of 220 ± 2; 99 ± 3; and 45 ± 0.4 nm. Encapsulation of resveratrol improved its chemical stability after exposure to UV-light: 88% retention in nanoemulsions compared to 50% in dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO). This study showed that resveratrol could be encapsulated within low-energy nanoemulsion-based delivery systems and protected against degradation. PMID:25148980

  15. Influence of rheology of dispersion media in the preparation of polymeric microspheres through emulsification method.

    PubMed

    Khare, Piush; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan microspheres as drug delivery system have attained importance and attracted the attention of researchers in last few years. This study was aimed toward the elucidation of the effect of viscosity of external oil phase on the properties of microspheres prepared by emulsification method. Chitosan microspheres were prepared utilizing oil phase of different viscosity viz. castor oil, heavy liquid paraffin, light liquid paraffin and mixture of light paraffin, and petroleum ether (1:1 v/v ratio). Microspheres prepared in highly viscous castor oil exhibited an average size of 11.52+/-0.57 microm with a percentage drug entrapment of 43.12+/-2.14. On the other hand, very small microspheres of 3.15+/-0.04 microm and 68.87+/-1.03% drug entrapment were obtained when mixture of liquid paraffin and petroleum ether was utilized as oil phase. Effect of viscosity on percent mucoadhesion, percent drug entrapment, zeta potential, percent process yield, etc. of microspheres has been observed. In vitro drug release in phosphate buffer pH 7.4 was determined for different batch of microspheres. The results revealed a difference in the drug release pattern of the different microspheres prepared as a function of viscosity of different oil phase. Use of low viscose oil resulted in the formulation of spherical and small size microspheres. This work was a part of our ongoing thrust and project to develop microparticulate drug delivery system. PMID:19882250

  16. Preparation of regular sized Ca-alginate microspheres using membrane emulsification method.

    PubMed

    You, J O; Park, S B; Park, H Y; Haam, S; Chung, C H; Kim, W S

    2001-01-01

    Monodisperse Ca-alginate microspheres were prepared using the membrane emulsification method. Three ionic types of drugs (anionic, cationic and non-ionic) were incorporated into the microspheres, and the effects of sodium alginate concentration and the pressure applied during the dispersing process on the properties of the microspheres were examined. Monodisperse microspheres were obtained when the concentration of alginate solution was 2 wt% and the pressure applied was 0.4 x 10(5) Pa. The mean size of microspheres was approximately 4 microm. Lidocaine x HCl (cationic), sodium salicylate (anionic) and 4-acetamidophenol (non-ionic) were selected as ionic model drugs and included in the alginate microspheres. Lidocaine x HCl (cationic drug) release was more retarded than that of the anionic drug, because of the electrostatic attraction between the negative charge of the ionized carboxyl group in the alginate chain and the positive charge of the cationic drug. In acidic release medium, a slow release was observed due to the low swelling characteristic and the increased viscosity of alginate, regardless of ionic type of drug. PMID:11428680

  17. Advances in membrane emulsification. Part B: recent developments in modelling and scale-up approaches.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Fotis; Lloyd, David M; Hancocks, Robin D; Pawlik, Aleksandra K

    2014-03-15

    Membrane emulsification is a promising process for formulating emulsions and particulates. It offers many advantages over conventional 'high-shear' processes with narrower size distribution products, higher batch repeatability and lower energy consumption commonly demonstrated at a small scale. Since the process was first introduced around 25 years ago, understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved during microstructure formation has advanced significantly leading to the development of modelling approaches that predict processing output; e.g. emulsion droplet size and throughput. The accuracy and ease of application of these models is important to allow for the development of design equations which can potentially facilitate scale-up of the process and meet the manufacturer's specific requirements. Part B of this review considers the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of models developed to predict droplet size, flow behaviour and other phenomena (namely droplet-droplet interactions), with presentation of the appropriate formulae where necessary. Furthermore, the advancement of the process towards an industrial scale is also highlighted with additional recommendations by the authors for future work. PMID:24122852

  18. Preparation of stable food-grade double emulsions with a hybrid premix membrane emulsification system.

    PubMed

    Eisinaite, Viktorija; Juraite, Dovile; Schroën, Karin; Leskauskaite, Daiva

    2016-09-01

    In this study we demonstrate that food-grade double emulsions can be successfully prepared using a hybrid premix emulsification system. A coarse emulsion containing beetroot juice as inner water phase, sunflower oil as oil phase and 0.5% or 1.0% whey protein isolate solution as outer water phase was prepared using a rotor stator system. This emulsion was further refined, using a bed of glass beads (diameter 71μm), through which the emulsion was pushed at different applied pressure (200-500kPa) and number of passes (1-5). All applied pressures lead to much smaller droplets while the juice remained encapsulated (>98%). The viscosity of the emulsions increased due to swelling of the internal water phase, and this implies that it is possible to encapsulate the components efficiently at relatively low internal water phase fraction at which the emulsions can be handled easily, while allowing them to obtain their final viscosity later. PMID:27041298

  19. Spontaneous emulsification of nifedipine-loaded self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Weerapol, Yotsanan; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Kumpugdee-Vollrath, Mont; Sriamornsak, Pornsak

    2015-04-01

    Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) can be used to improve dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs. The objective of this study was to prepare SNEDDS by using ternary phase diagram and investigate their spontaneous emulsifying property, dissolution of nifedipine (NDP), as well as the pharmacokinetic profile of selected SNEDDS formulation. The results showed that the composition of the SNEDDS was a great importance for the spontaneous emulsification. Based on ternary phase diagram, the region giving the SNEDDS with emulsion droplet size of less than 300 nm after diluting in aqueous medium was selected for further formulation. The small-angle X-ray scattering curves showed no sharp peak after dilution at different percentages of water, suggesting non-ordered structure. The system was found to be robust in different dilution volumes; the droplet size was in nanometer range. In vitro dissolution study showed remarkable increase in dissolution of NDP from SNEDDS formulations compared with NDP powders. The pharmacokinetic study of selected SNEDDS formulation in male Wistar rats revealed the improved maximum concentration and area under the curve. Our results proposed that the developed SNEDDS formations could be promising to improve the dissolution and oral bioavailability of NDP. PMID:25367002

  20. Effect of emulsification and spray-drying microencapsulation on the antilisterial activity of transcinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Nga-Thi-Thanh; Lejmi, Raja; Gharsallaoui, Adem; Dumas, Emilie; Degraeve, Pascal; Thanh, Mai Le; Oulahal, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Spray-dried redispersible transcinnamaldehyde (TC)-in-water emulsions were prepared in order to preserve its antibacterial activity; 5% (w/w) TC emulsions were first obtained with a rotor-stator homogeniser in the presence of either soybean lecithin or sodium caseinate as emulsifiers. These emulsions were mixed with a 30% (w/w) maltodextrin solution before feeding a spray-dryer. The antibacterial activity of TC alone, TC emulsions with and without maltodextrin before and after spray-drying were assayed by monitoring the growth at 30 °C of Listeria innocua in their presence and in their absence (control). Whatever the emulsifier used, antilisterial activity of TC was increased following its emulsification. However, reconstituted spray-dried emulsions stabilised by sodium caseinate had a higher antibacterial activity suggesting that they better resisted to spray-drying. This was consistent with observation that microencapsulation efficiencies were 27.6% and 78.7% for emulsions stabilised by lecithin and sodium caseinate, respectively. PMID:26398167

  1. Air sampling with solid phase microextraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martos, Perry Anthony

    There is an increasing need for simple yet accurate air sampling methods. The acceptance of new air sampling methods requires compatibility with conventional chromatographic equipment, and the new methods have to be environmentally friendly, simple to use, yet with equal, or better, detection limits, accuracy and precision than standard methods. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) satisfies the conditions for new air sampling methods. Analyte detection limits, accuracy and precision of analysis with SPME are typically better than with any conventional air sampling methods. Yet, air sampling with SPME requires no pumps, solvents, is re-usable, extremely simple to use, is completely compatible with current chromatographic equipment, and requires a small capital investment. The first SPME fiber coating used in this study was poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a hydrophobic liquid film, to sample a large range of airborne hydrocarbons such as benzene and octane. Quantification without an external calibration procedure is possible with this coating. Well understood are the physical and chemical properties of this coating, which are quite similar to those of the siloxane stationary phase used in capillary columns. The log of analyte distribution coefficients for PDMS are linearly related to chromatographic retention indices and to the inverse of temperature. Therefore, the actual chromatogram from the analysis of the PDMS air sampler will yield the calibration parameters which are used to quantify unknown airborne analyte concentrations (ppb v to ppm v range). The second fiber coating used in this study was PDMS/divinyl benzene (PDMS/DVB) onto which o-(2,3,4,5,6- pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) was adsorbed for the on-fiber derivatization of gaseous formaldehyde (ppb v range), with and without external calibration. The oxime formed from the reaction can be detected with conventional gas chromatographic detectors. Typical grab sampling times were as small as 5 seconds

  2. Production of BCG alginate-PLL microcapsules by emulsification/internal gelation.

    PubMed

    Esquisabel, A; Hernández, R M; Igartua, M; Gascón, A R; Calvo, B; Pedraz, J L

    1997-01-01

    A biocompatible emulsification method for microencapsulation of live cells and enzymes within a calcium alginate matrix applied to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been developed. Small-diameter alginate beads (microcapsules) were formed via internal gelation of an alginate solution emulsified within vegetable oil. Five different oils (sesame, sweet almond, perhydrosqualene, camomile and jojoba) were used. The rheological analysis of the oils showed a Newtonian behaviour, with viscosities = 30.0, 37.7, 51.2, 59.3 and 67.1 mPa.s for perhydrosqualene, jojoba, camomile, sesame and sweet almond oil respectively. The particle size of the microcapsules obtained ranged from 30.3 microns for the microcapsules prepared with sweet almond oil to 57.0 microns for those made with perhydrosqualene. The mean particle diameter obtained was found to be dependent on the viscosity of the oil employed, according to the equation: phi (micron) = 76.6-0.628 eta (mPa.s) (r2 = 0.943). The encapsulated BCG was identified by the Difco TB stain set K, followed by observation under optical microscopy. Freeze-drying of the microcapsules was carried out to ensure their stability during storage. Two batches of microcapsules (those prepared with sesame and jojoba oil) and four types of cryoprotectors (glucose, trehalose, mannitol and sorbitol), at three concentration levels (5, 10 and 20% w/v) were studied. The parameters evaluated were particle size, physical appearance, reconstitution of lyophilizates and microscopical evaluation. For both batches of microcapsules the best results were obtained with trehalose 5%, showing particle sizes of 42.1 microns in the case of the microcapsules prepared with sesame oil, and of 45.3 microns for those prepared with jojoba. PMID:9292438

  3. Preparation and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles containing cyclosporine by the emulsification-diffusion method

    PubMed Central

    Urbán-Morlán, Zaida; Ganem-Rondero, Adriana; Melgoza-Contreras, Luz María; Escobar-Chávez, José Juan; Nava-Arzaluz, María Guadalupe; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2010-01-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have been used for carrying different therapeutic agents because they improve absorption and bioavailability. The aim of the study was to prepare lipidic nanoparticles containing cyclosporine (CyA) by the emulsification-diffusion method and to study their physicochemical stability. Glyceryl behenate (Compritol® ATO 888) and lauroyl macrogolglycerides (Gelucire® 44/14) were used as carrier materials. Nanoparticles with good stability were obtained with Gelucire®, while it was difficult to obtain stable systems with Compritol®. Systems with Gelucire® were characterized by particle size, Z-potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. Particle size and Z-potential were evaluated for at least three months. With a high CyA content (≥60 mg) in Gelucire® SLNs, variations in size were greater and particle size also increased over time in all batches; this effect may have been caused by a probable expulsion of the drug due to the lipid’s partial rearrangement. While the Z-potential decreased 10 mV after three months, this effect may be explained by the superficial properties of the drug that make the molecules to be preferably oriented at the solid-liquid interface, causing a change in the net charge of the particle. SEM confirmed size and shape of the nanoparticles. DSC studies evidenced that CyA affects the lipid structure by a mechanism still unknown. The entrapment efficiency was higher than 92%, and CyA release from SLNs was relatively fast (99.60% in 45 min). PMID:20856836

  4. SURFACTANT ENHANCED PHOTO-OXIDATION OF WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initial research projects using the nonionic surfactant Brij-35 established that this surfactant could successfully adsolublize aromatic organic pollutants such as anthracene, naphthalene, benzoic acid, chlorophenol, and benzene onto the surface of TiO2 par...

  5. Analysis of biosurfactants from industrially viable Pseudomonas strain isolated from crude oil suggests how rhamnolipids congeners affect emulsification property and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Das, Palashpriya; Yang, Xin-Ping; Ma, Luyan Z.

    2014-01-01

    Rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced mainly by Pseudomonas sp. had been reported to possess a wide range of potential industrial application. These biosurfactants are produced as monorhamnolipid (MRL) and di-rhamnolipid (DRL) congeners. The present study deals with rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by three bacterial isolates from crude oil. Biosurfactants produced by one of the strains (named as IMP67) was found to be very efficacious based on its critical micelle concentration value and hydrocarbon emulsification property. Strikingly, antimicrobial, and anti-biofilm potential of this biosurfactant were higher than biosurfactants produced by other two strains. Thin layer chromatography analysis and rhamnose quantification showed that the rhamnolipids of IMP67 had more MRL congeners than biosurfactants of the other two strains. Emulsification and antimicrobial actions were affected by manual change of MRL and DRL congener proportions. Increase of MRL proportion enhanced emulsification index and antimicrobial property to Gram negative bacteria. This result indicated that the ratio of MRL and DRL affected the emulsification potentials of rhamnolipids, and suggested that high emulsification potentials might enhance rhamnolipids to penetrate the cell wall of Gram negative bacteria. In line with this finding, rhamnolipids of IMP67 also reduced the MIC of some antibiotics against bacteria, suggesting their synergistic role with the antibiotics. PMID:25566212

  6. Effect of ultrasound radiation duration on emulsification and demulsification of paraffin oil and surfactant solution/brine using Hele-shaw models.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Hossein; Mohammadian, Erfan; Asadullah, Mohammad; Azdarpour, Amin; Rafati, Roozbeh

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound technique is one of the unconventional enhanced oil recovery methods which has been of interest for more than six decades. However, the majority of the oil recovery mechanisms under ultrasound reported in the previous studies are theoretical. Emulsification is one of the mechanisms happening at the interface of oil and water in porous media under ultrasound. Oppositely, ultrasound is one of the techniques using in oil industry for demulsification of oil/water emulsion. Therefore, the conditions in which emulsification becomes dominant over demulsification under ultrasound should be more investigated. Duration of ultrasound radiation could be one of the factors affecting emulsification and demulsification processes. In this study a technique was developed to investigate the effect of long and short period of ultrasound radiation on emulsification and demulsification of paraffin oil and surfactant solution in porous media. For this purpose, the 2D glass Hele-shaw models were placed inside the ultrasonic bath under long and short period of radiation of ultrasound. A microscope was used above the model for microscopic studies on the interface of oil and water. Diffusion of phases and formation of emulsion were observed in both long and short period of application of ultrasound at the beginning of ultrasound radiation. However, by passing time, demulsification and coalescence of brine droplets inside emulsion was initiated in long period of ultrasound application. Therefore, it was concluded that emulsification could be one of the significant oil recovery mechanisms happening in porous media under short period of application of ultrasound. PMID:25616638

  7. Solid Phase Microextraction for the Analysis of Nuclear Weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D M

    2001-06-01

    This document is a compendium of answers to commonly asked questions about solid phase microextraction as it relates to the analysis of nuclear weapons. We have also included a glossary of terms associated with this analytical method as well as pertinent weapons engineering terminology. Microextraction is a new collection technique being developed to nonintrusively sample chemicals from weapon headspace gases for subsequent analysis. The chemicals that are being targeted outgas from the high explosives and other organic materials used in the weapon assembly. This technique is therefore a valuable tool to: (1) remotely detect and assess the aging of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and, in some cases, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) organic materials; and (2) identify potential compatibility issues (i.e., materials interactions) that should be more carefully monitored during surveillance tear-downs. Microextraction is particularly attractive because of the practical constraints inherent to the weapon surveillance procedure. To remain transparent to other core surveillance activities and fall within nuclear safety guidelines, headspace analysis of the weapons requires a procedure that: (1) maintains ambient temperature conditions; (2) allows practical collection times of less than 20 min; (3) maintains the integrity of the weapon gas volume; (4) provides reproducible and quantitative results; and (5) can identify all possible targets.

  8. Conformational stability of a model protein (bovine serum albumin) during primary emulsification process of PLGA microspheres synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Feirong; Singh, Jagdish

    2003-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the conformational stability of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), during the primary emulsification process of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres preparation. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was utilized to assess the conformational structure of BSA during primary emulsification in the presence and absence of PLGA. Three excipients [i.e. mannitol, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)] were investigated for their stabilizing effect on BSA during emulsification process. The DSC profile of intact BSA was best fitted by a non-2-state model with two peaks, which have midpoint temperatures (T(m1), 60.9 +/- 0.4 degrees C and T(m2), 66.4 +/- 1.0 degrees C), respectively, and a total calorimetric enthalpy Delta H(tot) of 599 +/- 42 kJ/mol. After emulsifying BSA aqueous solution with methylene chloride, an additional apparent peak at a higher temperature was observed. The T(m) of this peak was 77.4 +/- 0.8 degrees C. HP-beta-CD was able to suppress the occurrence of an additional peak, whereas mannitol failed. SDS increased the thermal stability of BSA dramatically. Furthermore, HP-beta-CD increased BSA recovery from 72 +/- 8% to 89 +/- 7% after extraction from w/o in the presence of PLGA. These results provided evidence that HP-beta-CD could be a promising excipient for conformational stability of BSA during synthesis of PLGA microspheres. PMID:12818819

  9. Microchannel arrays with improved accessibility and use for cell studies and emulsification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yuji; Kikuchi, Hiroko E.; Kuboki, Yoshinori; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi

    2000-03-01

    Arrays of microgrooves (groove width; 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, and 14 micrometer, groove interval; width x3, x10, and x20, one size and interval per chip) each connecting a center well and a side edge of a silicon substrate were created by photolithography and anisotropic wet etching. A penetrating hole was made by sand blast at the substrate center for the access to the center well. By tightly covering the substrate surface with a glass plate, the microgroove arrays were converted to microchannel arrays having one ends open at the side edges of the substrate. These microchannel arrays were used for cell trapping for microinjection and also used for emulsification. Poplar (Populus alba) protoplasts were used for the test of cell trapping. Cells showed a very large variation in size and irregularity in shape, and, furthermore, the protoplast preparation contained a number of cell membrane fragments and chloroplasts. Despite the cell size and shape variations and obstruction by the admixtures, many cells could be trapped by aspiration at the channel ends because of their openness to the outside free space and also their large multiplicity in parallel. The free space outside the side of the substrate allowed a free manipulation of a glass micropipette under microscopic observation using transmitted illumination. The microscopic observation direction nearly perpendicular to the movement directions of the micropipette further allowed the movement of the pipette tip nearly always in focus. These led to an easy pointing and puncturing. In addition, the cell trapping points in a line made successive approach to adjacent cells easier. Soybean oil containing 1.5 wt% polyoxyethylene(20)sorbitan monoolete as a surfactant was forced to flow into physiological saline filling the outside of the substrate through the microchannels. Regularly sized oil particles were created by this process with a variation coefficient (S.D./mean) 16% of their diameter. This variation, which is

  10. Preparation and characterization of paclitaxel nanosuspension using novel emulsification method by combining high speed homogenizer and high pressure homogenization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zhao, Xiuhua; Zu, Yuangang; Zhang, Yin

    2015-07-25

    The aim of this study was to develop an alternative, more bio-available, better tolerated paclitaxel nanosuspension (PTXNS) for intravenous injection in comparison with commercially available Taxol(®) formulation. In this study, PTXNS was prepared by emulsification method through combination of high speed homogenizer and high pressure homogenization, followed by lyophilization process for intravenous administration. The main production parameters including volume ratio of organic phase in water and organic phase (Vo:Vw+o), concentration of PTX, content of PTX and emulsification time (Et), homogenization pressure (HP) and passes (Ps) for high pressure homogenization were optimized and their effects on mean particle size (MPS) and particle size distribution (PSD) of PTXNS were investigated. The characteristics of PTXNS, such as, surface morphology, physical status of paclitaxel (PTX) in PTXNS, redispersibility of PTXNS in purified water, in vitro dissolution study and bioavailability in vivo were all investigated. The PTXNS obtained under optimum conditions had an MPS of 186.8 nm and a zeta potential (ZP) of -6.87 mV. The PTX content in PTXNS was approximately 3.42%. Moreover, the residual amount of chloroform was lower than the International Conference on Harmonization limit (60 ppm) for solvents. The dissolution study indicated PTXNS had merits including effect to fast at the side of raw PTX and sustained-dissolution character compared with Taxol(®) formulation. Moreover, the bioavailability of PTXNS increased 14.38 and 3.51 times respectively compared with raw PTX and Taxol(®) formulation. PMID:26027492

  11. Microchannel emulsification study on formulation and stability characterization of monodisperse oil-in-water emulsions encapsulating quercetin.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Nauman; Kobayashi, Isao; Neves, Marcos A; Uemura, Kunihiko; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Nabetani, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The study used microchannel emulsification (MCE) to encapsulate quercetin in food grade oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions. A silicon microchannel plate (Model WMS 1-2) comprised of 10,300 discrete 10×104μm microslots was connected to a circular microhole with an inner diameter of 10μm. 1% (w/w) Tween 20 was used as optimized emulsifier in Milli-Q water, while 0.4mgml(-1) quercetin in different oils served as a dispersed phase. The MCE was carried by injecting the dispersed phase at 2mlh(-1). Successful emulsification was conducted below the critical dispersed phase flux, with a Sauter mean diameter of 29μm and relative span factor below 0.25. The O/W emulsions remained stable in terms of droplet coalescence at 4 and 25°C for 30days. The encapsulation efficiency of quercetin in the O/W emulsions was 80% at 4°C and 70% at 25°C during the evaluated storage period. PMID:27374502

  12. Microextraction techniques for the determination of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds from plants: a review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui; Wang, Juan; Li, Donghao

    2013-10-17

    Vegetables and fruits are necessary for human health, and traditional Chinese medicine that uses plant materials can cure diseases. Thus, understanding the composition of plant matrix has gained increased attention in recent years. Since plant matrix is very complex, the extraction, separation and quantitation of these chemicals are challenging. In this review we focus on the microextraction techniques used in the determination of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (such as esters, alcohols, aldehydes, hydrocarbons, ketones, terpenes, sesquiterpene, phenols, acids, plant secondary metabolites and pesticides) from plants (e.g., fruits, vegetables, medicinal plants, tree leaves, etc.). These microextraction techniques include: solid phase microextraction (SPME), stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), single drop microextraction (SDME), hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (DLLME), and gas purge microsyringe extraction (GP-MSE). We have taken into consideration papers published from 2008 to the end of January 2013, and provided critical and interpretative review on these techniques, and formulated future trends in microextraction for the determination of volatile and semivolatile compounds from plants. PMID:24091369

  13. Determination of steroid hormones in biological and environmental samples using green microextraction techniques: an overview.

    PubMed

    Aufartová, Jana; Mahugo-Santana, Cristina; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan; Nováková, Lucie; Solich, Petr

    2011-10-17

    Residues of steroid hormones have become a cause for concern because they can affect the biological activity of non-target organisms. Steroid hormones are a potential risk for wildlife and humans through the consumption of contaminated food or water. Their determination requires extraction and clean-up steps, prior to detection, to reach low concentration levels. In recent years, a great effort has been made to develop new analytical methodologies, such as microextraction techniques, that reduce environmental pollution. Researchers have modified old methods to incorporate procedures that use less-hazardous chemicals or that use smaller amounts of them. They are able to do direct analysis using miniaturised equipment and reduced amounts of solvents and wastes. These accomplishments are the main objectives of green analytical chemistry. In this overview, we focus on microextraction techniques for the determination of steroid hormones in biological (e.g., human urine, human serum, fish, shrimp and prawn tissue and milk) and environmental (e.g., wastewaters, surface waters, tap waters, river waters, sewage sludges, marine sediments and river sediments) samples. We comment on the most recent applications in sorptive-microextraction modes, such as solid phase microextraction (SPME) with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), in-tube solid-phase microextraction (IT-SPME), stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and microextraction in packed sorbent (MEPS). We also describe liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) approaches reported in the literature that are applied to the determination of steroid hormones. PMID:21907019

  14. Multi-residue method for determination of 58 pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products in water using solvent demulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Rombaldi, Caroline; Arias, Jean Lucas de Oliveira; Marube, Liziane Cardoso; Primel, Ednei Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and efficient sample pretreatment using solvent-based de-emulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SD-DLLME) coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was studied for the extraction of 58 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and pesticides from water samples. Type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH, salt addition, amount of salt and type of demulsification solvent were evaluated. Limits of quantification (LOQ) in the range from 0.0125 to 1.25 µg L(-1) were reached, and linearity was in the range from the LOQ of each compound to 25 μg L(-1). Recoveries ranged from 60% to 120% for 84% of the compounds, with relative standard deviations lower than 29%. The proposed method demonstrated, for the first time, that sample preparation by SD-DLLME with determination by LC-MS/MS can be successfully used for the simultaneous extraction of 32 pesticides and 26 PPCPs from water samples. The entire procedure, including the extraction of 58 organic compounds from the aqueous sample solution and the breaking up of the emulsion after extraction with water, rather than with an organic solvent, was environmentally friendly. In addition, this technique was less expensive and faster than traditional techniques. Finally, the analytical method under study was successfully applied to the analysis of all 58 pesticides and PPCPs in surface water samples. PMID:26695317

  15. Progress of solid-phase microextraction coatings and coating techniques.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guibin; Huang, Minjia; Cai, Yaqi; Lv, Jianxia; Zhao, Zongshan

    2006-07-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has been popular as an environmentally friendly sample pretreatment technique to extract a very wide range of analytes. This is partly owing to the development of SPME coatings. One of the key factors affecting the extraction performances, such as the sensitivity, selectivity, and reproducibility, is the properties of the coatings on SPME fibers. This paper classifies the materials used as SPME coatings and introduces some common preparation techniques of SPME coating in detail, such as sol-gel technique, electrochemical polymerization technique, particle direct pasting technique, restricted access matrix SPME technique, and molecularly imprinted SPME technique. PMID:16884587

  16. Evaluation of microextraction/capillary column gas chromatography for monitoring industrial outfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Thielen, D.R.; Olsen, G.; Davis, A.; Bajor, E.; Stefanovski, J.; Chodkowski, J.

    1987-01-01

    Microextraction and capillary-column gas chromatography techniques are applied to plant discharge streams for repetitive wastewater discharge permit analyses. This combination allows the analyst to reduce sample preparation since microextraction replaces both purge-and-trap for volatiles and microextraction for semi-volatiles. An additional advantage is the elimination of a concentration step, which is ,ften a major contributor to low method recoveries. The overall procedure is shown to be more precise than purge-and-trap but slightly less precise than conventional extraction. The results of each method are shown to be equivalent.

  17. [Preparation and characterization of tetrandrine-loaded PLGA nanocomposite particles by premix membrane emulsification coupled with spray-drying method].

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Zhu, Hua-Xu; Guo, Li-Wei; Pan, Lin-Mei; Li, Bo; Shi, Fei-Yan; Lu, Jin

    2014-11-01

    For effective inhalable dry-powder drug delivery, tetrandrine-PLGA (polylactic-co-glycolic acid) nanocomposite particles have been developed to overcome the disadvantages of nanoparticles and microparticles. The primary nanoparticles were prepared by using premix membrane emulsification method. To prepare second particles, they were spray dried. The final particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dry laser particle size analysis, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared analysis (IR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The average size of the primary particles was (337.5 ± 6.2) nm, while that second particles was (3.675 ± 0.16) μm which can be decomposed into primary nanoparticles in water. And the second particles were solid sphere-like with the drug dispersed as armorphous form in them. It is a reference for components delivery to lung in a new form. PMID:25757290

  18. Effect of emulsification-diffusion parameters on the formation of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) particles.

    PubMed

    Göz, Eda; Karakeçili, Ayşe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of various production parameters on the formation and particle size of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) PHBV particles prepared by the emulsification-diffusion technique. The increase in homogenization time and speed caused a decrease in particle size. No particle formation was observed below 2% (w/v) PHBV in the organic phase. Smaller particle size and narrower size distribution were observed when polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was used as a stabilizer, when compared to didodecyldimethylammonium bromide. Submicron particles of 531 ± 150 nm size were obtained with 2% (w/v) PVA at 17 500 rpm and 15 min homogenization conditions with dichloromethane as the organic solvent. PMID:25058033

  19. Development of a novel environmentally friendly electropolymerization of water-insoluble monomers in aqueous electrolytes using acoustic emulsification.

    PubMed

    Asami, Ryosuke; Fuchigami, Toshio; Atobe, Mahito

    2006-11-21

    Electropolymerization of water-insoluble monomers, such as 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT), 3,4-dimethylthiophene (3,4-DiMeTh), 3-methylthiophene (3-MeTh), and 3-ethylthiophene (3-EtTh), proceeded successfully in aqueous electrolytes using acoustic emulsification. Ultrasonication to the water-insoluble monomer/aqueous electrolyte mixtures allowed the formation of very stable emulsions having the characteristic of giving narrow monomer droplet size distributions in the submicrometer range in aqueous electrolytes without added surfactants, and the smooth electropolymerization in the emulsions took place via direct electron transfer between the electrode and the water-insoluble monomer droplets. In this kind of electron-transfer system, the supporting electrolyte should be dissolved not only in the aqueous phase but also in the monomer droplets and contribute to the formation of an electric bilayer inside the droplets. The properties of a polymer EDOT film obtained by the present method were also investigated. PMID:17107030

  20. Preparation of Multifunctional Liposomes as a Stable Vaccine Delivery-Adjuvant System by Procedure of Emulsification-Lyophilization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes have been proven to be useful carriers for vaccine antigens and can be modified as a versatile vaccine adjuvant-delivery system (VADS). To fulfill efficiently both functions of adjuvant and delivery, the liposomes are often modified with different functional molecules, such as lipoidal immunopotentiators, APC (antigen-presenting cell) targeting ligands, steric stabilization polymers, and charged lipids. Also, to overcome the weakness of instability, vaccines are often lyophilized as a dry product. In this chapter the procedure of emulsification-lyophilization (PEL) is introduced as an efficient method for preparing a stable anhydrous precursor to the multifunctional liposomes which bear dual modifications with APC targeting molecule of the mannosylated cholesterol and the adjuvant material of monophosphoryl lipid A. The techniques and procedures for synthesis of APC targeting molecule, i.e., the mannosylated cholesterol, and for characterization of the multifunctional liposomes are also described. PMID:27076327

  1. Preparation of uniform sized chitosan microspheres by membrane emulsification technique and application as a carrier of protein drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Yan; Ma, Guang-Hui; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2005-08-18

    The control of size and size distribution of microspheres is necessary for obtaining repeatable controlled release behavior. The chitosan microspheres were prepared by a membrane emulsification technique in this study. Chitosan was dissolved in 1 wt.% aqueous acetic acid containing 0.9 wt.% sodium chloride, which was used as a water phase. A mixture of liquid paraffin and petroleum ether 7:5 (v/v) containing PO-500 emulsifier was used as an oil phase. The water phase was permeated through the uniform pores of a porous glass membrane into the oil phase by the pressure of nitrogen gas to form W/O emulsion. Then GST (Glutaraldehyde Saturated Toluene) as crosslinking agent was slowly dropped into the W/O emulsion to solidify the chitosan droplets. The preparation condition for obtaining uniform-sized microspheres was optimized. The microspheres with different size were prepared by using the membranes with different pore size, and there was a linear relationship between the diameter of microspheres and pore size of the membranes when the microspheres were in the range of micron size. The smallest chitosan microspheres obtained was 0.4 mum in diameter. This is the first report for preparing the uniform-sized chitosan microspheres by membrane emulsification technique. Uniform chitosan microspheres were further used as a carrier of protein drug. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model drug was loaded in the microspheres and released in vitro. The effects of pH value, diameter and crosslinking degree of microspheres, and BSA concentration on loading efficiency and release behavior were discussed. PMID:15922472

  2. Preparation of insulin-loaded PLA/PLGA microcapsules by a novel membrane emulsification method and its release in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Huang, Shan-Shan; Wan, Yin-Hua; Ma, Guang-Hui; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2006-08-01

    Uniform-sized biodegradable PLA/PLGA microcapsules loading recombinant human insulin (rhI) were successfully prepared by combining a Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG) membrane emulsification technique and a double emulsion-evaporation method. An aqueous phase containing rhI was used as the inner water phase (w1), and PLA/PLGA and Arlacel 83 were dissolved in a mixture solvent of dichloromethane (DCM) and toluene, which was used as the oil phase (o). These two solutions were emulsified by a homogenizer to form a w1/o primary emulsion. The primary emulsion was permeated through the uniform pores of a SPG membrane into an outer water phase by the pressure of nitrogen gas to form the uniform w1/o/w2 droplets. The solid polymer microcapsules were obtained by simply evaporating solvent from droplets. Various factors of the preparation process influencing the drug encapsulation efficiency and the drug cumulative release were investigated systemically. The results indicated that the drug encapsulation efficiency and the cumulative release were affected by the PLA/PLGA ratio, NaCl concentration in outer water phase, the inner water phase volume, rhI-loading amount, pH-value in outer water phase and the size of microcapsules. By optimizing the preparation process, the drug encapsulation efficiency was high up to 91.82%. The unique advantage of preparing drug-loaded microcapsules by membrane emulsification technique is that the size of microcapsules can be controlled accurately, and thus the drug cumulative release profile can be adjusted just by changing the size of microcapsules. Moreover, much higher encapsulation efficiency can be obtained when compared with the conventional mechanical stirring method. PMID:16814994

  3. Applications of liquid-phase microextraction techniques in natural product analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yunyan; Chen, Xuan; Hu, Shuang; Bai, Xiaohong

    2014-11-14

    Over the last years, liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) as a simple, rapid, practical and effective sample-preparation technique, coupled with various instrumental analytical methods, has been increasingly and widely used to research and determine trace or ultra-micro-levels of both inorganic and organic analytes from different matrix-complex samples. In this review, different kinds of LPMEs such as single drop liquid-phase microextraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, and hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction are summarized and recent applications of LPMEs in trace compounds in vivo and in vitro from different natural product matrice analysis such as tea, vegetables, seeds, herbs, and galenical are also discussed. Finally, future developments and applications of LPMEs in complex sample analysis are prospected. PMID:25441339

  4. Emerging Environmental Contaminants and Soled Phase Microextraction: Janusz Pawliszyn's Legacy in the Environmental Arena

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) has revolutionized the way samples are extracted, enabling rapid, automated, and solventless extraction of many different sample types, including air, water, soil, and biological samples. As such, SPME is widely used for environmental, food, fo...

  5. EVALUATION OF SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION FOR THE ANALYSIS OF HYDROPHILIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two commercially available solid phase microextractions (SPME) fibers, polyacrylate and carboxem/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), were evaluated for their ability to extract hydrophilic compounds from drinking water. Conditions, such as desorption time, desorption temperature, sample...

  6. Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) Fibers for Preconcentration of Organics in Titan's Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodyss, R.; Beauchamp, P. M.

    2012-10-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers are a simple and reliable means for extracting and concentrating organic trace species from liquid hydrocarbon solutions, making them an attractive approach for chemical analysis of Titan's lakes.

  7. Solid phase microextraction analysis of B83 SLTS and Core B compatibility test units

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D M; Ithaca, J; King, H A; Malcolm, S

    1999-03-26

    Solid phase microextraction has permitted the efficient collection and analysis of a broad range of volatile and semivolatile compounds outgassed from materials. In 1998, we implemented a microextraction protocol at Mason and Hanger, Pantex Plant, for the analysis of weapons and compatibility test units. The chemical information that was obtained from this work is interpreted by determining the source and outgas mechanism for each compound in the weapon signature, which is a task only accomplished by analysis of material standards.

  8. Microextraction by Packed Sorbent (MEPS) and Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME) as Sample Preparation Procedures for the Metabolomic Profiling of Urine

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Catarina; Cavaco, Carina; Perestrelo, Rosa; Pereira, Jorge; Câmara, José S.

    2014-01-01

    For a long time, sample preparation was unrecognized as a critical issue in the analytical methodology, thus limiting the performance that could be achieved. However, the improvement of microextraction techniques, particularly microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME), completely modified this scenario by introducing unprecedented control over this process. Urine is a biological fluid that is very interesting for metabolomics studies, allowing human health and disease characterization in a minimally invasive form. In this manuscript, we will critically review the most relevant and promising works in this field, highlighting how the metabolomic profiling of urine can be an extremely valuable tool for the early diagnosis of highly prevalent diseases, such as cardiovascular, oncologic and neurodegenerative ones. PMID:24958388

  9. Method for preparing a solid phase microextraction device using aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2006-10-24

    A sample collection substrate of aerogel and/or xerogel materials bound to a support structure is used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) device. The xerogels and aerogels may be organic or inorganic and doped with metals or other compounds to target specific chemical analytes. The support structure is typically formed of a glass fiber or a metal wire (stainless steel or kovar). The devices are made by applying gel solution to the support structures and drying the solution to form aerogel or xerogel. Aerogel particles may be attached to the wet layer before drying to increase sample collection surface area. These devices are robust, stable in fields of high radiation, and highly effective at collecting gas and liquid samples while maintaining superior mechanical and thermal stability during routine use. Aerogel SPME devices are advantageous for use in GC/MS analyses due to their lack of interfering background and tolerance of GC thermal cycling.

  10. COHORT SAFETY AND EFFICACY STUDY OF SILURON2000 EMULSIFICATION-RESISTANT SILICONE OIL AND F4H5 IN THE TREATMENT OF FULL-THICKNESS MACULAR HOLE

    PubMed Central

    Pinxten, Anne-Marie; Wong, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate safety and efficacy of using Siluron2000 silicone oil in the treatment of full-thickness macular hole by comparing its propensity to emulsify with emulsification of the “gold standard” Siluron5000, and to assess safety and efficacy of F4H5 (perfluorobutylpentane) in removing emulsified oil droplets from the eye. Methods: A single-center, randomized controlled parallel group trial in 72 patients undergoing vitrectomy for treatment of full-thickness macular hole. The study comprises four treatment groups. First, the total patient group was divided into 2 study arms of 36 patients each, receiving either Siluron2000 or Siluron5000 after vitrectomy with a 3-month follow-up after vitrectomy. Second, F4H5 was used during oil removal in half of the patients in each study arm (18 patients within each study arm) with follow-up at 6 weeks after oil removal. Oil droplets were counted within the removed oil; residual emulsification bubbles were quantified using ultrasound imaging. Results: Safety and efficacy of the oils were comparable. Injection and removal time of Siluron2000 oil was significantly less than that of Siluron5000 oil. Patients treated with F4H5 had borderline significantly less emulsification droplets than those not treated with F4H5. Conclusion: Siluron2000 silicone oil seems to be equally safe and effective as Siluron5000 oil but allows for better handling with the potential of reducing procedure time. The application of F4H5 seems to be safe and effective in reducing residual emulsification. PMID:26066703

  11. Evaluation of protein structural changes and water mobility in chicken liver paste batters prepared with plant oil substituting pork back-fat combined with pre-emulsification.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guoyuan; Han, Minyi; Kang, Zhuangli; Zhao, Yingying; Xu, Xinglian; Zhu, Yingying

    2016-04-01

    Protein structural changes and water mobility properties in chicken liver paste batters prepared with plant oil (sunflower and canola oil combinations) substituting 0-40% pork back-fat combined with pre-emulsification were studied by Raman spectroscopy and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Results showed that pre-emulsifying back-fat and plant oil, including substituting higher than 20% back-fat with plant oil increased the water- and fat-binding (p<0.05) properties, formed more even and fine microstructures, and gradually decreased the NMR relaxation times (T21a, T21b and T22), which was related to the lower fluid losses in chicken liver paste batters. Raman spectroscopy revealed that compared with a control, there was a decrease (p<0.05) in α-helix content accompanied by an increase (p<0.05) in β-sheet structure when substituting 20-40% back-fat with plant oil combined with pre-emulsification. Pre-emulsification and plant oil substitution changed tryptophan and tyrosine doublet hydrophobic residues in chicken liver paste batters. PMID:26593506

  12. Preparation and evaluation of water-in-soybean oil-in-water emulsions by repeated premix membrane emulsification method using cellulose acetate membrane.

    PubMed

    Muhamad, Ida Idayu; Quin, Chang Hui; Selvakumaran, Suguna

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the preparation of formulated water- in-soybean oil-in-water emulsions by repeated premix membrane emulsification method using a cellulose acetate membrane. The effect of selective membrane emulsification process parameters (concentration of the emulsifiers, number of passes of the emulsions through the membrane and storage temperature) on the properties and stability of the developed emulsions were also investigated. 1, 3, 6, 8-pyrenetetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PTSA) was used as a hydrophilic model ingredient for the encapsulation of bioactive substances. W/O emulsions with 7 wt% (weight percentage) PGPR displays homogeneous and very fine dispersions, with the median diameter at 0.640 μm. Meanwhile, emulsions prepared by membrane emulsification (fine W/O/W) showed the highest stability at Tween 80 concentrations of 0.5 wt.% (weight percentage). It concluded that at 7 wt.% (weight percentage) PGPR concentration and 0.5 wt.% (weight percentage) Tween 80 concentrations, the most uniform particles with minimum mean size of oil drops (9.926 μm) were obtained after four passes through the membrane. Thus, cellulose acetate membrane can be used for preparing a stable W/O/W emulsions by repeated premix ME due to low cost and relatively easy to handle. PMID:27413211

  13. Determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics via ionic-liquid-based, salt-induced, dual microextraction in swine feed.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huili; Gao, Ming; Gao, Jiajia; Yu, Nana; Huang, Hong; Yu, Qing; Wang, Xuedong

    2016-09-01

    In conventional microextraction procedures, the disperser (organic solvent or ionic liquid) is left in the aqueous phase and discarded after finishing the microextraction process. Because the disperser is water-soluble, it results in low extraction recovery for polar compounds. In this investigation, an ionic-liquid-based microextraction (ILBME) was integrated with salting-out assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (SALLME) to build an ionic-liquid-based, salt-induced, dual microextraction (ILSDME) for isolation of five fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) with high polarity (log P, -1.0 to 1.0). The proposed ILSDME method incorporates a dual microextraction by converting the disperser in the ILBME to the extractor in the SALLME. Optimization of key factors was conducted by integrating single-factor experiments and central composite design. The optimized experimental parameters were 80 μL [C8MIM][PF6] as extractor, 505 μL acetone as disperser, pH = 2.0, 4.1 min extraction time, and 4.2 g of Na2SO4. Under optimized conditions, high ERs (90.6-103.2 %) and low LODs (0.07-0.61 μg kg(-1)) were determined for five FQs in swine feed. Experimental precision based on RSDs was 1.4-5.2 % for intra-day and 2.4-6.9 % for inter-day analyses. The combination of ILBME with SALLME increased FQ recoveries by 15-20 % as compared with SALLME, demonstrating that the ILSDME method can enhance extraction efficiency for polar compounds compared to single-step microextraction. Therefore, the ILSDME method developed in this study has wide application for pretreatment of moderately to highly polar pollutants in complex matrices. Graphical Abstract A dual microextraction was developed by integrating ionic-liquid-based microextraction with salting-out assisted liquid-liquid microextraction for isolation of five fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) with high polarity (log P = -1.0 to 1.0). The principle of dual microextraction is based on converting the remaining disperser from

  14. Nano-liter droplet libraries from a pipette: step emulsificator that stabilizes droplet volume against variation in flow rate.

    PubMed

    Dutka, Filip; Opalski, Adam S; Garstecki, Piotr

    2016-05-24

    Many modern analytical assays, for example, droplet digital PCR, or screening of the properties of single cells or single mutated genes require splitting a liquid sample into a number of small (typically ca. nano-liter in volume) independent compartments or droplets. This calls for a method that would allow splitting small (microliter) samples of liquid into libraries of nano-liter droplets without any dead volume or waste. Step emulsification allows for facile protocols that require delivery of only the sample liquid, yet they typically exhibit dependence of the droplet size on the rate at which the sample is injected. Here, we report a novel microfluidic junction that reduces the dependence of the volume of droplets on the rate of injection. We also demonstrate generation of tightly monodisperse nanoliter droplets by introduction of solely the dispersed phase into the system from an automatic pipette. The method presented here can readily be used and can replace the sophisticated devices typically used to generate libraries of nano-liter droplets from liquid samples. PMID:27161389

  15. The effect of calcium on the composition and physical properties of whey protein particles prepared using emulsification.

    PubMed

    Westerik, Nieke; Scholten, Elke; Corredig, Milena

    2015-06-15

    Protein microparticles were formed through emulsification of 25% (w/w) whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions containing various concentrations of calcium (0.0-400.0mM) in an oil phase stabilized by polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR). The emulsions were heated (at 80°C) and the microparticles subsequently re-dispersed in an aqueous phase. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed that control particles and those prepared with 7.4mM calcium were spherical and smooth. Particles prepared with 15.0mM calcium gained an irregular, cauliflower-like structure, and at concentrations larger than 30.0mM, shells formed and the particles were no longer spherical. These results describe, for the first time, the potential of modulating the properties of dense whey protein particles by using calcium, and may be used as structuring agents for the design of functional food matrices with increased protein and calcium content. PMID:25660860

  16. Spray dried double emulsions containing procyanidin-rich extracts produced by premix membrane emulsification: effect of interfacial composition.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Rikkert; Güell, Carme; Ferrando, Montserrat

    2015-07-01

    Spray drying of procyanidin-loaded W1/O/W2 emulsions produced by premix membrane emulsification (ME) enabled to produce microcapsules containing procyanidins. The interface of the emulsion droplets prior to spray drying was stabilized with several hydrophilic emulsifiers (whey protein (WPI), WPI-carboxylmethyl cellulose, WPI-gum Arabic, and WPI-chitosan). Their effect on procyanidin encapsulation efficiency, water activity, moisture and oil content, and microcapsule size distribution was investigated. Furthermore, the microstructure and droplet size distribution of redispersed microcapsules were analyzed. Although premix ME produced W1/O/W2 emulsions with a narrow droplet size distribution regardless the hydrophilic emulsifier (main peak of droplet size distribution around 9 μm), microcapsules after spray drying and double emulsions after redispersion showed profound differences in sizes depending on the interfacial composition. WPI-CMC stabilized microcapsules not only showed the highest procyanidin content (5.3 g kg(-1)) but also gave the narrowest particle size distribution with the lowest particle size for both microcapsules and the corresponding emulsions after rehydration (7.7 and 9.9 μm respectively). PMID:25704709

  17. Pickering emulsions stabilized by soft microgels: influence of the emulsification process on particle interfacial organization and emulsion properties.

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Wolfs, Mélanie; Pinaud, Florent; Lapeyre, Véronique; Sellier, Elisabeth; Schmitt, Véronique; Ravaine, Valérie

    2013-10-01

    This work reports a new evidence of the versatility of soft responsive microgels as stabilizers for Pickering emulsions. The organization of microgels at the oil-water interface is a function of the preparation pathway. The present results show that emulsification energy can be used as a trigger to modify microgel deformation at the oil-water interface and their packing density: high shear rates bring strong flattening of the microgels, whereas low shear rates lead to dense monolayers, where the microgels are laterally compressed. As a consequence, the resulting emulsions have opposite behavior in terms of flocculation, which arises from bridging between neighboring drops and is strongly dependent on their surface coverage. This strategy can be applied to any microgel which can sufficiently adsorb at low shear rates, i.e. small microgels or lightly cross-linked ones. The control of the organization of microgels at the interface does not only modify emulsion end-use properties but also constitutes a new tool for the development of Janus-type microgels, obtained by chemical modification of the adsorbed microgels. PMID:24050149

  18. Continuous synthesis of drug-loaded nanoparticles using microchannel emulsification and numerical modeling: effect of passive mixing.

    PubMed

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Isabel; Uson, Laura; Larrea, Ane; Miana, Mario; Sebastian, Victor; Arruebo, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    By using interdigital microfluidic reactors, monodisperse poly(d,l lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (NPs) can be produced in a continuous manner and at a large scale (~10 g/h). An optimized synthesis protocol was obtained by selecting the appropriated passive mixer and fluid flow conditions to produce monodisperse NPs. A reduced NP polydispersity was obtained when using the microfluidic platform compared with the one obtained with NPs produced in a conventional discontinuous batch reactor. Cyclosporin, an immunosuppressant drug, was used as a model to validate the efficiency of the microfluidic platform to produce drug-loaded monodisperse poly(d,l lactic-co-glycolic acid) NPs. The influence of the mixer geometries and temperatures were analyzed, and the experimental results were corroborated by using computational fluid dynamic three-dimensional simulations. Flow patterns, mixing times, and mixing efficiencies were calculated, and the model supported with experimental results. The progress of mixing in the interdigital mixer was quantified by using the volume fractions of the organic and aqueous phases used during the emulsification-evaporation process. The developed model and methods were applied to determine the required time for achieving a complete mixing in each microreactor at different fluid flow conditions, temperatures, and mixing rates. PMID:27524896

  19. Emulsification and size control of insulating and/or viscous liquids in liquid-liquid systems by electrostatic dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, M.; Saito, M.; Hatori, T. )

    1993-03-15

    Electrostatic atomization has been utilized in applications such as electrostatic printing, paint spraying, thin-film coating, production of ultrafine powders, and control of fuel spraying. Electrostatic emulsification of insulating and/or viscous liquids which have been impossible to disperse by ordinary methods was studied using a liquid/distilled-water system. A dc potential was applied to a capillary nozzle to produce droplets. The size of the droplets decreased with increasing potential. The mean droplet diameter (corresponding to the applied potential) could be varied over a wide range (from several mm to [mu]m). A very fine cloudy emulsion (mean diameter of c.a. 5 [mu]m) having a narrow size distribution was obtained by applying approximately -3500 V to the nozzle. In the case of liquids with low viscosity, i.e., kerosene and carbon tetrachloride, droplets were produced regularly from the cusp of the meniscus formed at the nozzle tip. On the other hand, for castor oil, a highly viscous liquid, a liquid thread was drawn out from the meniscus and then disintegrated into small droplets. The mean diameter of the caster oil droplets was larger (one order of magnitude) than that of the low viscosity kerosene at the same applied potential.

  20. Effects of aldehydes and methods of cross-linking on properties of calcium alginate microspheres prepared by emulsification.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lai Wah; Heng, Paul W S

    2002-03-01

    Calcium alginate microspheres were prepared by an emulsification method and cross-linked with various aldehydes using different methods. Methanal and pentanedial produced low aggregation of microspheres while octanal and octadecanal produced the opposite effect. The latter two aldehydes displaced very little calcium ions from the alginate microspheres, indicating that the aggregation was due to the tackiness imparted by the aldehydes to the microsphere surface. Higuchi's model was not applicable to the drug release from microspheres in this study. The microspheres treated with methanal or pentanedial showed comparable dissolution T75% values which were significantly higher than that of the control. In contrast, octanal and octadecanal produced microspheres with lower dissolution T75% values. The drug contents of the microspheres treated with aldehydes were significantly lower than that of the control. There was insignificant interaction between the aldehydes and the drug. However, the aldehydes were found to impart acidity to the aqueous solution to varying extents, resulting in varying drug loss from the microspheres. The properties of the microspheres were also markedly affected by the method of incorporating the aldehyde. Soaking the microspheres in methanal solution produced microspheres with marked aggregation and low drug content. PMID:11808537

  1. Influence of the primary emulsification procedure on the characteristics of small protein-loaded PLGA microparticles for antigen delivery.

    PubMed

    Wischke, C; Borchert, H-H

    2006-06-01

    Microparticles prepared from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) using a W1/O/W2 double emulsion solvent evaporation method are suitable vehicles for the delivery of proteins to antigen presenting cells, e.g. dendritic cells. In this study, the influence of different techniques for the preparation of the primary W1/O emulsion was investigated with respect to the protein localization within the microparticles, morphological characteristics of these particles, protein burst release and the native state of the released protein. Bovine serum albumin bearing fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-BSA) was used as model protein. A static micromixer was applied for the preparation of the W1/O/W2 double emulsion. Employing a rotor-stator homogenizer (Ultra-Turrax) for primary emulsification, microcapsules with a high burst release were produced, because nearly all FITC-BSA was attached to the outside of the particle wall. Using a high pressure homogenizer or an ultrasonic procedure resulted in the formation of microspheres with homogeneous protein distribution and a reduced burst release. PMID:16854818

  2. Emulsification properties of a novel hydrocolloid (Angum gum) for d-limonene droplets compared with Arabic gum.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Seid Mahdi; Beheshti, Peyman; Assadpour, Elham

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the emulsification properties of a native biopolymer namely Angum gum (Ang) for use as a food flavor encapsulant in spray drying encapsulation was investigated and the results were compared with Arabic gum (Arg) stabilized emulsions. After gum extraction, gum dispersions with maltodextrin were prepared in water (in 1-5% concentrations) and emulsified with 5 and 10% d-limonene using high pressure homogenization. Statistical analysis of emulsion droplet size data revealed a significant difference between flavor level, gum type and droplet size at α=0.05. The results showed that increasing the Arg level leads to a decrease in emulsion droplet size, while increasing Ang content results in bigger droplet sizes. However, no significant differences were observed in droplet size. Also, droplet size data revealed that Ang-emulsified droplets at 2% gum and 5% flavor level had the lowest d32, d43 and the highest specific surface area by high-pressure homogenizer which could be mentioned as the optimum level of this native gum. PMID:23817096

  3. Mechanistic studies for monodisperse exenatide-loaded PLGA microspheres prepared by different methods based on SPG membrane emulsification.

    PubMed

    Qi, Feng; Wu, Jie; Yang, Tingyuan; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-10-01

    Poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres have been widely prepared by many methods, including solvent evaporation, solvent extraction and the co-solvent method. However, very few studies have compared the properties of microspheres fabricated by these methods. This is partly because the broad size distribution of the resultant particles severely complicates the analysis and affects the reliability of the comparison. To this end, uniform-sized PLGA microspheres have been prepared by Shirasu porous glass premix membrane emulsification and used to encapsulate exenatide, a drug for treating Type 2 diabetes. Based on this technique, the influences on the properties of microspheres fabricated by the aforementioned three methods were intensively investigated, including in vitro release, degradation and pharmacology. We found that these microspheres presented totally different release behaviors in vitro and in vivo, but exhibited a similar trend of PLGA degradation. Moreover, the internal structural evolution visually demonstrated these release behaviors. We selected for further examination the microsphere prepared by solvent evaporation because of its constant release rate, and explored its pharmacodynamics, histology, etc., in more detail. This microsphere when injected once showed equivalent efficacy to that of twice-daily injections of exenatide with no inflammatory response. PMID:24952071

  4. Optimization of the preparation of loperamide-loaded poly (L-lactide) nanoparticles by high pressure emulsification-solvent evaporation.

    PubMed

    Ueda, M; Kreuter, J

    1997-01-01

    The entrapment of loperamide hydrochloride (LPM) in biodegradable polymeric drug carriers such as nanoparticles might enable its passage across the blood-brain barrier. The optimization of the preparation of the LPM-loaded PLA nanoparticles was performed employing high pressure emulsification-solvent evaporation. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized by particle size, distribution, thermal analysis, and drug release profiles. The partition of LPM into the organic phase increased with an increase in pH of the aqueous phase and with addition of lipophilic surfactants such as sorbitan fatty acid esters, resulting in an increase in the drug entrapment in the nanoparticles. Evaporation of the organic phase under reduced pressure and the addition of ethanol in the organic phase yielded a high drug entrapment due to the rapid polymer precipitation. The addition of the sorbitan fatty acid esters further increased the drug entrapment even at higher LPM concentrations. The results of thermal analysis suggest that LPM was homogeneously dispersed in the amorphous polymer matrix. The in vitro release of the drug from nanoparticles was biphasic, with a fast initial phase, followed by a second slower phase. Different drug release profiles from nanoparticles can be achieved by addition of sorbitan fatty acid esters, or the employment of different solvents as the organic phase. PMID:9292435

  5. Liquid phase microextraction for the analysis of trace elements and their speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Xia, Linbo

    2013-08-01

    Trace/ultra-trace elements and their speciation analysis in complex matrices usually require sample preparation procedures to achieve sample clean-up and analyte preconcentration. Sample preparation is often the bottleneck in trace elements and their speciation analysis which has a direct impact on accuracy, precision and limits of detection and is often the rate-determining step of the analytical process. Recent trends in sample preparation include miniaturization, automation, high-throughput performance and reduction in solvent/sample consumption and operation time. Liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) technique as a novel and promising alternative in sample preparation can meet these requirements and has become a very efficient sample preparation technique. This review updates the state of art of LPME for trace elements and their speciation analysis and discusses its promising prospects. The major thrust of the article highlights the applications of LPME including single-drop microextraction (SDME), hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (DLLME) and solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME) to the fields of elemental and their speciation analysis by atomic spectrometry-based methods, especially inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. General and specific concepts, different extraction formats and characteristics of LPME are described and compared, along with examples of recent innovations and applications presented to demonstrate its potential for trace elements and their speciation analysis in biological and environmental fields. Moreover, the application potential and an outlook on the combination of LPME and atomic spectrometry-based techniques for inorganic analysis are commentated.

  6. Solvent-impregnated agarose gel liquid phase microextraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water.

    PubMed

    Loh, Saw Hong; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Hasan, Mohamed Noor

    2013-08-01

    A new microextraction procedure termed agarose gel liquid phase microextraction (AG-LPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the determination of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water. The technique utilized an agarose gel disc impregnated with the acceptor phase (1-octanol). The extraction procedure was performed by allowing the solvent-impregnated agarose gel disc to tumble freely in the stirred sample solution. After extraction, the agarose gel disc was removed and subjected to centrifugation to disrupt its framework and to release the impregnated solvent, which was subsequently withdrawn and injected into the GC-MS for analysis. Under optimized extraction conditions, the new method offered high enrichment factors (89-177), trace level LODs (9-14ngL(-1)) and efficient extraction with good relative recoveries in the range of 93.3-108.2% for spiked drinking water samples. AG-LPME did not exhibit any problems related to solvent dissolution, and it provided high extraction efficiencies that were comparable to those of hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) and significantly higher than those of agarose film liquid phase microextraction (AF-LPME). This technique employed a microextraction format and utilized an environmentally compatible solvent holder that supported the green chemistry concept. PMID:23809804

  7. Directly suspended droplet microextraction in combination with microvolume UV-vis spectrophotometry for determination of phosphate.

    PubMed

    Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Cabaleiro, Noelia; de la Calle, Inmaculada; Costas, Marta; Gil, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-08-15

    A miniaturized methodology for the determination of phosphate in waters has been developed by combining directly suspended droplet microextraction (DSDME) with microvolume spectrophotometry. The method is based on the extraction of the ion pair formed between 12-molybdophosphate and malachite green onto a microdrop of methyl isobutyl ketone and subsequent spectrophotometric determination with no dilution. An enrichment factor of 325 was obtained after 7.5 min of microextraction. The detection limit was 6.1 nM phosphate and the repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation, was 2.7% (n=6). The method was successfully applied to the determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in different freshwater samples. PMID:21726744

  8. Evolution of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Yamini, Yadollah; Faraji, Mohammad

    2010-04-16

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) has become a very popular environmentally benign sample-preparation technique, because it is fast, inexpensive, easy to operate with a high enrichment factor and consumes low volume of organic solvent. DLLME is a modified solvent extraction method in which acceptor-to-donor phase ratio is greatly reduced compared with other methods. In this review, in order to encourage further development of DLLME, its combination with different analytical techniques such as gas chromatography (GC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) will be discussed. Also, its applications in conjunction with different extraction techniques such as solid-phase extraction (SPE), solidification of floating organic drop (SFO) and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) are summarized. This review focuses on the extra steps in sample preparation for application of DLLME in different matrixes such as food, biological fluids and solid samples. Further, the recent developments in DLLME are presented. DLLME does have some limitations, which will also be discussed in detail. Finally, an outlook on the future of the technique will be given. PMID:20005521

  9. Solid-phase microextraction of VOCs in water

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, K.; Shirey, R.; Mani, V.

    1996-12-31

    The measurement of very low concentrations of organic compounds in the environment has been a subject of research for many years. Recently, the sample preparation in the analysis of aqueous samples has been achieved by solid phase microextraction (SPME). This method has been shown to be fast, inexpensive, solventless, portable and automatable. SPME has several advantages over conventional liquid-liquid extraction. SPME has been shown to be quantitative technique for volatile and semivolatile compounds from gaseous and liquid samples. The quantization by SPME is also linear over four orders of magnitude. As this method can reach a detection limit of 15 ppt (parts per trillion) for several compounds and can be easily automated, the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the environment, in particular, water samples, is highly advantageous by this method. This study will describe the analysis of volatile organics, BTEX, and halogenated organics in water. The lowest limit of detection, linearity, and other parameters will be discussed. The analysis of a soil sample taken near an oil storage tank for VOCs by SPME will be described. A comparison between different fibers (different types of coating materials and film thickness) using different columns will be described in this work.

  10. Evaluation of Time-Temperature Integrators (TTIs) with Microorganism-Entrapped Microbeads Produced Using Homogenization and SPG Membrane Emulsification Techniques.

    PubMed

    Rahman, A T M Mijanur; Lee, Seung Ju; Jung, Seung Won

    2015-12-28

    A comparative study was conducted to evaluate precision and accuracy in controlling the temperature dependence of encapsulated microbial time-temperature integrators (TTIs) developed using two different emulsification techniques. Weissela cibaria CIFP 009 cells, immobilized within 2% Na-alginate gel microbeads using homogenization (5,000, 7,000, and 10,000 rpm) and Shirasu porous glass (SPG) membrane technologies (10 μm), were applied to microbial TTIs. The prepared micobeads were characterized with respect to their size, size distribution, shape and morphology, entrapment efficiency, and bead production yield. Additionally, fermentation process parameters including growth rate were investigated. The TTI responses (changes in pH and titratable acidity (TA)) were evaluated as a function of temperature (20°C, 25°C, and 30°C). In comparison with conventional methods, SPG membrane technology was able not only to produce highly uniform, small-sized beads with the narrowest size distribution, but also the bead production yield was found to be nearly 3.0 to 4.5 times higher. However, among the TTIs produced using the homogenization technique, poor linearity (R(2)) in terms of TA was observed for the 5,000 and 7,000 rpm treatments. Consequently, microbeads produced by the SPG membrane and by homogenization at 10,000 rpm were selected for adjusting the temperature dependence. The Ea values of TTIs containing 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 g microbeads, prepared by SPG membrane and conventional methods, were estimated to be 86.0, 83.5, and 76.6 kJ/mol, and 85.5, 73.5, and 62.2 kJ/mol, respectively. Therefore, microbial TTIs developed using SPG membrane technology are much more efficient in controlling temperature dependence. PMID:26370796