Science.gov

Sample records for surfactants

  1. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  2. Surfactant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novakovic, M.; Abend, P.G.

    1987-09-29

    A surfactant composition is described for subsequent addition to a soap slurring comprising an acyloxy alkane sulfonate salt. The sulfonate salt is present in an amount by weight of about 44 percent of about 56 percent. The polyol is present in an amount by weight of about 2 percent to about 6 percent, and water is present in an amount by weight of 26 to 36 percent. The composition constituting a solid reversible solution at ambient temperature and having a solids content of about 58 to 72 percent, whereby subsequent addition of the surfactant composition to a soap slurry results in formation of a soap/detergent bar having a smooth texture, uniform wear properties and a lack of grittiness.

  3. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  4. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  5. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  6. Towards unravelling surfactant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Mathieu; Panda, Satyananda

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant transport arises in many natural or industrial settings. Examples include lipid tear layers in the eye, pulmonary surfactant replacement therapy, or industrial coating flows. Flows driven by the surface tension gradient which arises as a consequence of surfactant concentration inhomogeneity, also known as Marangoni-driven flows, have attracted the attention of fluid dynamists for several decades and has led to the development of sophisticated models and the undeniable advancement of the understanding of such flows. Yet, experimental confirmation of these models has been hampered by the difficulty in reliably and accurately measuring the surfactant concentration and its temporal evolution. In this contribution, we propose a methodology which may help shed some light on surfactant transport at the surface of thin liquid films. The surface stress induced by surfactant concentration induces a flow at the free surface which is visible and measurable. In the context of thin film flows for which the lubrication approximation hold, we demonstrate how the knowledge of this free surface flow field provides sufficient information to reconstruct the surfactant tension field. From the surface tension and an assumed equation of state, the local surfactant concentration can also be calculated and other transport parameters such as the surfactant surface diffusivity indirectly inferred. In this contribution, the proposed methodology is tested with synthetic data generated by the forward solution of the governing partial differential equations in order to illustrate the feasibility of the algorithm and highlight numerical challenges.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions surfactant dysfunction surfactant dysfunction Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  8. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  9. SURFACTANTS AND SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the limitations of pump-and-trat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the application...

  10. Advances in reactive surfactants.

    PubMed

    Guyot, A

    2004-05-20

    The study of reactive surfactants and their applications in the synthesis of latexes for waterborne coatings has been recently boosted by two successive European programmes, involving all together eight academic and five industrial laboratories. The most significant results were obtained using surfactants derived from maleic and related anhydrides, or both nonionic and anionic reactive polymeric surfactants. Such surfactants are able to improve the stability of styrenic and acrylic latexes vs. various constraints, such as electrolyte addition, freeze-thawing tests or extraction with alcohol or acetone. The properties of films used in waterborne coatings are also improved in case of water exposure (less water uptake, dimensional stability), as well as improved weatherability, and blocking properties. Formulations for woodstain varnishes, metal coating of printing inks, based on the use of simple polymerizable surfactants, are now in the market. PMID:15072924

  11. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Jamison, Gregory M.; Wheeler, David R.; Loy, Douglas A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Long, Timothy M.; McElhanon, James R.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Staiger, Chad L.

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  12. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties. PMID:26869216

  13. Waterflooding employing amphoteric surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Stournas, S.

    1980-08-05

    Process for the recovery of oil from a subterranean oil reservoir involving the injection into the reservoir of an aqueous solution of an amphoteric surfactant having an inner quaternary ammonium group linked to a terminal sulfonate or carboxylate group is described. The amphoteric surfactants may be employed in relatively low concentrations within the range of 0.0005 to 0.1% by weight and injected in a slug of at least 0.5 pv. The apparatus may be applied in situations in which the reservoir waters and/or the waters employed in formulating the surfactant solution contain relatively high amounts of divalent metal ions. Specifically described amphoteric surfactants include hydrocarby dialkyl or dihydroxyalkyl ammonium alkane sulfonates and carboxylates in which the hydrocarbyl group contains from 8 to 26 carbon atoms. 29 claims.

  14. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is composed of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:23026158

  15. Genetic disorders of surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant reduces surface tension at the air-liquid interface in the alveolus, thereby maintaining lung volumes during the respiratory cycle. In premature newborn infants, the lack of surfactant causes atelectasis and respiratory failure, characteristic of respiratory of distress syndrome. Surfactant is comprised of lipids and associated proteins that are required for surfactant function. Surfactant proteins B and C and a lamellar body associated transport protein, ABCA3 play critical roles in surfactant synthesis and function. Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins cause lethal respiratory distress in newborn infants. This review discusses the clinical and pathological findings associated with these inherited disorders of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:16798578

  16. Surfactant mixing rules applied to surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses surfactant mixing rules which have been used to describe crude oil/alkali/surfactant phase behavior, using David Lloydminster crude oil and the surfactant Neodol 25-3S. It was found that at a fixed salinity and alkali concentration, a specific mole fraction of synthetic surfactant to petroleum soap was required to produce optimal phase behavior as the water-to-oil ratio varied. This methodology is useful in understanding the relationship between the variables of water-to-oil ratio and synthetic surfactant concentration in phase behavior systems that produce a petroleum soap.

  17. Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, P.F.; Dudley, R.J.; Churchill, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of three structurally related, non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-45, Triton X-100 and Triton X-165, as well as the oleophilic fertilizer, Inipol EAP 22, on the rate of biodegradation of phenanthrene by pure bacterial cultures. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of these surfactants to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The results indicate that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons can lead to enhanced biodegradation rates by two Pseudomonas saccharophila strains. However, the experiments also suggest that some surfactants can inhibit aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by certain bacteria. The data also support the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental clean-up technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil-contaminated Alaskan beaches.

  18. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  19. Diseases of pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  20. Surfactant studies for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, G.C.

    1990-12-20

    Objectives of this project include: select economical/practical surfactants for use in coal liquefaction; screen surfactants for the proposed work through simple laboratory screening tests; and check the survivability of the selected surfactants at 350{degrees}C and 2000 psi using a 1-hour residence time for the thermal treatment in a stirred autoclave. Surfactant screening studies have shown the lignin sulfonate salt being the best candidate studied. Based upon the findings from the screening studies and practical considerations (e.g., potential cost, thermal survivability and recycling recovery), two surfactant choices in the anionic and nonionic categories were tested further in the autoclave reactor and engineering experiments at JPL. The goal of the autoclave work was to engineering experiments at JPL. The goal of the autoclave work was to determine the effects of surfactants on coal liquefaction performance and to test surfactant survivability. A eight of (8) autoclave experiments using 100 grams of as-received coal were performed. Two commercial surfactant choices were evaluated. They were: Sodium Lignin Sulfonate (LS) as a colloidal (heterogenous) surfactant of anionic type; and Triton X-100 (TRI) (trade name of a polyoxyethylated tert-octyphenol) as a liquid (homogenous) surfactant of nonionic type. Two additional reference tests were performed. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Surfactants and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Seely, S

    1977-01-01

    In previous publications (1,2) the hypothesis was put forward that atheroma is caused by some pathogen or metabolic fault which impairs the transportability of cholesterol in the plasma. The lipoproteins containing the faulty metabolites are assumed to be incapable of traversing the capillary endothelium and continue to circulate uselessly in the blood stream, possibly giving rise to hypercholesterolaemia, until captured by lipophages which, if they can successfully complete their journey, void them into the gall bladder. The present paper takes the argument a step further by pointing out that the types of substances most likely to cause the described impairment are surfactants. A surfactant finding its way into the plasma could separate cholesterol from its carrier protein and itself become its carrier. The complex would still be kept in suspension in the plasma, but unable to cross biological barriers like the capillary endothelium. An important argument in favour of the hypothesis is that it can offer an explanation of the long-standing medical mystery of the connection between atheroma and the hardness or softness of the water supply. Infant deaths from coronary occlusion present a similar enigma. The paper points out that surfactants can conceivably find their way into infants' feeding bottles. PMID:593183

  2. Clouding behaviour in surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha; Padhan, Susanta K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, Bijay K

    2011-02-17

    A study on the phenomenon of clouding and the applications of cloud point technology has been thoroughly discussed. The phase behaviour of clouding and various methods adopted for the determination of cloud point of various surfactant systems have been elucidated. The systems containing anionic, cationic, nonionic surfactants as well as microemulsions have been reviewed with respect to their clouding phenomena and the effects of structural variation in the surfactant systems have been incorporated. Additives of various natures control the clouding of surfactants. Electrolytes, nonelectrolytes, organic substances as well as ionic surfactants, when present in the surfactant solutions, play a major role in the clouding phenomena. The review includes the morphological study of clouds and their applications in the extraction of trace inorganic, organic materials as well as pesticides and protein substrates from different sources. PMID:21296314

  3. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1984-12-11

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with either a petroleum sulfonate or an alkaryl sulfonate. A surfactant system containing the above surfactant useful in enhanced oil recovery processes is also provided.

  4. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-02-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs.

  5. Interaction of nonionic surfactant AEO9 with ionic surfactants*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-guo; Yin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    The interaction in two mixtures of a nonionic surfactant AEO9 (C12H25O(CH2CH2O)9H) and different ionic surfactants was investigated. The two mixtures were AEO9/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and AEO9/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at molar fraction of AEO9, α AEO9=0.5. The surface properties of the surfactants, critical micelle concentration (CMC), effectiveness of surface tension reduction (γ CMC), maximum surface excess concentration (Γ max) and minimum area per molecule at the air/solution interface (A min) were determined for both individual surfactants and their mixtures. The significant deviations from ideal behavior (attractive interactions) of the nonionic/ionic surfactant mixtures were determined. Mixtures of both AEO9/SDS and AEO9/CTAB exhibited synergism in surface tension reduction efficiency and mixed micelle formation, but neither exhibited synergism in surface tension reduction effectiveness. PMID:15909351

  6. Novel Approaches to Surfactant Administration

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Samir; Donn, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy has been the mainstay of treatment for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome for more than twenty years. For the most part, surfactant is administered intratracheally, followed by mechanical ventilation. In recent years, the growing interest in noninvasive ventilation has led to novel approaches of administration. This paper will review these techniques and the associated clinical evidence. PMID:23243504

  7. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  8. NATURAL SURFACTANTS IN PAPER RECYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to introduce new types of surfactants based on renewable materials (sugar surfactants) for use in ink removal from recycled paper. By applying green chemistry approaches we not only will solve an important industry and environmental problem but...

  9. Surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Improved process of coal liquefaction utilizing nonaqueous surfactant has increased oil yield from 50 to about 80%. Asphaltene molecule formation of colloid particles is prevented by surfactant. Separated molecules present more surface area for hydrogenation reaction. Lower requirements for temperature, pressure, and hydrogen lead to reduction in capital and operation costs.

  10. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  11. Computer simulations of lung surfactant.

    PubMed

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Tieleman, D Peter

    2016-10-01

    Lung surfactant lines the gas-exchange interface in the lungs and reduces the surface tension, which is necessary for breathing. Lung surfactant consists mainly of lipids with a small amount of proteins and forms a monolayer at the air-water interface connected to bilayer reservoirs. Lung surfactant function involves transfer of material between the monolayer and bilayers during the breathing cycle. Lipids and proteins are organized laterally in the monolayer; selected species are possibly preferentially transferred to bilayers. The complex 3D structure of lung surfactant and the exact roles of lipid organization and proteins remain important goals for research. We review recent simulation studies on the properties of lipid monolayers, monolayers with phase coexistence, monolayer-bilayer transformations, lipid-protein interactions, and effects of nanoparticles on lung surfactant. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26922885

  12. On-line surfactant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, K.I.; Neal, E.E.; Soran, P.D.; Smith, B.

    1995-04-01

    This group has developed a process to extract metal ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The process uses water soluble polymers to complex metal ions. The metal/polymer complex is concentrated by ultrafiltration and the metals are recovered by a pH adjustment that frees the metal ions. The metal ions pass through the ultrafiltration membrane and are recovered in a concentrated form suitable for reuse. Surfactants are present in one of the target waste streams. Surfactants foul the costly ultrafiltration membranes. It was necessary to remove the surfactants before processing the waste stream. This paper discusses an on-line device the authors fabricated to monitor the process stream to assure that all the surfactant had been removed. The device is inexpensive and sensitive to very low levels of surfactants.

  13. Surfactant induced autophobing.

    PubMed

    Bera, B; Duits, M H G; Cohen Stuart, M A; van den Ende, D; Mugele, F

    2016-05-18

    Surfactant adsorption in a three-phase system and its influence on wetting properties are relevant in various applications. Here, we report a hitherto not observed phenomenon, namely the retraction of an aqueous drop on hydrophilic solid substrates (which we refer to as 'autophobing') in ambient oil containing water-insoluble fatty acids, caused by the deposition of these fatty acids from the ambient oil onto the solid substrate. AFM measurements confirm that the surfactant is deposited on the solid by the moving contact line. This leads to a more hydrophobic substrate, the retraction of the contact line and a concomitant increase in the contact angle. The deposition process is enabled by the formation of a reaction product between deprotonated fatty acids and Ca(2+) ions at the oil/water interface. We investigate how the transition to a new equilibrium depends on the concentrations of the fatty acids, the aqueous solute, the chain lengths of the fatty acid, and the types of alkane solvent and silica or mica substrates. This phenomenon is observed on both substrates and for all explored combinations of fatty acids and solvents and thus appears to be generic. In order to capture the evolution of the contact angle, we develop a theoretical model in which the rate of adsorption at the oil-water interface governs the overall kinetics of autophobing, and transfer to the solid is determined by a mass flux balance (similar to a Langmuir Blodgett transfer). PMID:27102975

  14. Surfactant protein B deficiency: insights into surfactant function through clinical surfactant protein deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M W

    2001-01-01

    Surfactant protein B (SP-B) deficiency is a disorder of surfactant function with complete or transient absence of SP-B in term neonates. SP-B, 1 of 4 described surfactant-associated proteins, plays a key role in surfactant metabolism, particularly in intracellular packaging of surfactant components, formation of tubular myelin, and the presentation of the surfactant phospholipid monolayer to the air-fluid interface within the alveolus. Neonates with clinical SP-B deficiency best demonstrate the key role of SP-B in surfactant function. "Classic" deficiency results in severe respiratory failure in term infants and death unless lung transplantation is performed. Because the initial description of complete deficiency secondary to a homozygous frameshift mutation in codon 121 of the SP-B cDNA, partial deficiencies with differing genetic backgrounds and less severe clinical courses have been reported. These partial deficiency states may provide a clearer picture of genotype/phenotype relationships in SP-B function and surfactant metabolism. SP-B deficiency or dysfunction may be more common than once thought and may play a significant role in neonatal lung disease. PMID:11202476

  15. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1985-03-12

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with a polynuclear aromatic compound having a molecular weight of at least 155. A novel surfactant system useful in enhanced oil recovery containing the above surfactant is also provided. In addition, an improved process for the enhanced recovery of oil is provided utilizing the novel surfactant system.

  16. Genetic disorders of surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Xu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Adaptation to air breathing at birth requires the precise orchestration of cellular processes to initiate fluid clearance, enhance pulmonary blood flow, and to synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant needed to reduce surface tension at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic programs regulating the synthesis of the surfactant proteins and lipids required for the production and function of pulmonary surfactant are highly conserved across vertebrates, and include proteins that regulate the synthesis and packaging of pulmonary surfactant proteins and lipids. Surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and -C) are small, uniquely hydrophobic proteins that play important roles in the stability and spreading of surfactant lipids in the alveolus. Deletion or mutations in SP-B and -C cause acute and chronic lung disease in neonates and infants. SP-B and -C are synthesized and packaged with surfactant phospholipids in lamellar bodies. Normal lamellar body formation requires SP-B and a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of ATP-dependent membrane-associated transport proteins, ABCA3. Mutations in ABCA3 cause fatal respiratory disease in newborns and severe chronic lung disease in infancy. Expression of SP-B, -C, and ABCA3 are coregulated during late gestation by transcriptional programs influenced by thyroid transcription factor-1 and forkhead box a2, transcription factors that regulate both differentiation of the respiratory epithelium and transcription of genes required for perinatal adaptation to air breathing. PMID:15985750

  17. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations. PMID:12640270

  18. Surfactant-enhanced aquifier remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    Surfactants can be used to rapidly remove NAPL from contaminated aquifers. They are effective for virtually any organic contaminant. Use in LNAPL contaminated sites requires adequate hydraulic conductivity and control of flow using either hydraulic or physical methods. The presence of DNAPL requires consideration of vertical mobility; a competent confining layer (aquitard) is required if additional aquifers are present at greater depths. Surfactant processes, whether based upon mobilization or solubilization, can be effective at mass removal, but cannot be expected to provide resortation to drinking water standards. The fraction of mass removal, and the cost of remediation using surfactants are dependent upon a sites hydrogeology. Both minimization of cost and maximization of NAPL removal requires detailed characterization of sites contaminant distribution and hydrogeology. Assessment of the feasibility of surfactant-enhanced remediation is dependent upon a detailed site characterization.

  19. Protein recovery from surfactant precipitation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu Ian; Stuckey, David C

    2011-01-01

    The recovery of lysozyme from an aqueous solution containing precipitated lysozyme-AOT complexes formed by the direct addition of sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) to a lysozyme solution was studied using both solvents, and a counterionic surfactant. Ethanol,methanol and solvent mixtures dissolved the surfactant precipitate and recovered lysozyme as a solid. Recovery efficiency and protein stability varied with the type of solvent used. An entirely different method of recovery was also evaluated using a counterionic surfactant: tri-octylmethylammonium chloride (TOMAC) which bound to AOT releasing lysozyme into solution.Complete recovery (100%) of lysozyme was achieved at a molar ratio of 2:1(TOMAC:AOT), and the original protein activity was maintained in the final aqueous phase.The recovered lysozyme retained its secondary structure as observed in circular dichroism(CD) spectra. Specific activity studies show that counterionic surfactant extraction does not alter the biological activity of the enzyme. PMID:22235487

  20. Pulmonary Surfactant: An Immunological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chroneos, Zissis C.; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Shepherd, Virginia L.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant has two crucial roles in respiratory function; first, as a biophysical entity it reduces surface tension at the air water interface, facilitating gas exchange and alveolar stability during breathing, and, second, as an innate component of the lung's immune system it helps maintain sterility and balance immune reactions in the distal airways. Pulmonary surfactant consists of 90% lipids and 10% protein. There are four surfactant proteins named SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D; their distinct interactions with surfactant phospholipids are necessary for the ultra-structural organization, stability, metabolism, and lowering of surface tension. In addition, SP-A and SP-D bind pathogens, inflict damage to microbial membranes, and regulate microbial phagocytosis and activation or deactivation of inflammatory responses by alveolar macrophages. SP-A and SP-D, also known as pulmonary collectins, mediate microbial phagocytosis via SP-A and SP-D receptors and the coordinated induction of other innate receptors. Several receptors (SP-R210, CD91/calreticulin, SIRPα, and toll-like receptors) mediate the immunological functions of SP-A and SP-D. However, accumulating evidence indicate that SP-B and SP-C and one or more lipid constituents of surfactant share similar immuno-regulatory properties as SP-A and SP-D. The present review discusses current knowledge on the interaction of surfactant with lung innate host defense. PMID:20054141

  1. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  2. Surfactant therapy and spontaneous diuresis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R; John, E; Diaz-Blanco, J; Ortega, R; Fornell, L; Vidyasagar, D

    1989-03-01

    The effect of artificial surfactant therapy on renal function and the onset of spontaneous diuresis was prospectively evaluated in 19 infants with hyaline membrane disease in a double-blind, controlled study. Twelve infants were in the surfactant group; seven infants received placebo (0.9% saline solution). There was no difference in the time of onset of spontaneous diuresis (as defined by output greater than or equal to 80% of intake). The glomerular filtration rate, determined by endogenous creatinine clearance, was also similar in the surfactant- and placebo-treated infants during the first 3 days of life. The fractional excretion of sodium was significantly higher in the placebo group at 24 hours and 36 hours. Infants in the placebo group had a higher negative sodium balance than those in the surfactant group. Ventilatory status improved significantly soon after surfactant treatment, as evidenced by improvement in the alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure ratio and by a lower mean airway pressure. These data suggest that ventilatory status can be improved without diuresis; the factors that regulate diuresis are multiple and not fully understood. PMID:2646416

  3. CHARACTERISTICS OF SURFACTANTS IN TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavior of a number of anionic, nonionic and cationic surfactants in manipulations associated with toxicity identification evaluations was studied. t was found that toxicity of the surfactants could be removed from aqueous samples via aeration, apparently through sublation. ...

  4. Polymer/surfactant transport in micellar flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, C.S.; Kellerhals, G.E.

    1981-10-01

    For the surfactant formulations used (particular surfactant concentration, surfactant type, cosolvent type, cosolvent concentration, etc.), the results show that surfactant systems containing polymer as a mobility control agent may exhibit adverse polymer transport behavior during flow through porous media. Polymer generally lagged behind the surfactant even though the two species were injected simultaneously in the surfactant slug. This poor polymer transport definitely could have a detrimental effect on the efficiency of a micellar flooding process in the field. Phase studies show that when some surfactant systems containing xanthan gum are mixed with crude oil at various salinities, a polymer-rich, gel-like phase forms. The polymer lag phenomenon in core tests can be related to phase separation due to divalent cations generated in situ as a result of ion exchange with the clays and the surfactant. 18 refs.

  5. Biofoams and natural protein surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring foam constituent and surfactant proteins with intriguing structures and functions are now being identified from a variety of biological sources. The ranaspumins from tropical frog foam nests comprise a range of proteins with a mixture of surfactant, carbohydrate binding and antimicrobial activities that together provide a stable, biocompatible, protective foam environment for developing eggs and embryos. Ranasmurfin, a blue protein from a different species of frog, displays a novel structure with a unique chromophoric crosslink. Latherin, primarily from horse sweat, but with similarities to salivary, oral and upper respiratory tract proteins, illustrates several potential roles for surfactant proteins in mammalian systems. These proteins, together with the previously discovered hydrophobins of fungi, throw new light on biomolecular processes at air–water and other interfaces. This review provides a perspective on these recent findings, focussing on structure and biophysical properties. PMID:20615601

  6. Removal of surfactants from hydrocarbons with alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, R.P.; Poling, D.E.; Stefanidakis, G.

    1984-02-07

    A method is disclosed for removing hydrocarbon-soluble anionic surfactants from gasoline or kerosene boiling range hydrocarbons. The method comprises (a) contacting a hydrocarbon mixture containing surfactants with a lower alcohol which is miscible with the hydrocarbon mixture to extract the surfactants; (b) contacting the mixture with water or caustic solution to extract the lower alcohol and surfactants from the hydrocarbon mixture; (c) separating the water or caustic solution from the hydrocarbons; and (d) removing the hydrocarbons.

  7. Genetic Disorders of Surfactant Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Susan E.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Nogee, Lawrence M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding the surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) and the phospholipid transporter, ABCA3, are associated with respiratory distress and interstitial lung disease in the pediatric population. Expression of these proteins is regulated developmentally, increasing with gestational age, and is critical for pulmonary surfactant function at birth. Pulmonary surfactant is a unique mixture of lipids and proteins that reduces surface tension at the air-liquid interface, preventing collapse of the lung at the end of expiration. SP-B and ABCA3 are required for the normal organization and packaging of surfactant phospholipids into specialized secretory organelles, known as lamellar bodies, while both SP-B and SP-C are important for adsorption of secreted surfactant phospholipids to the alveolar surface. In general, mutations in the SP-B gene SFTPB are associated with fatal respiratory distress in the neonatal period, and mutations in the SP-C gene SFTPC are more commonly associated with interstitial lung disease in older infants, children, and adults. Mutations in the ABCA3 gene are associated with both phenotypes. Despite this general classification, there is considerable overlap in the clinical and histologic characteristics of these genetic disorders. In this review, similarities and differences in the presentation of these disorders with an emphasis on their histochemical and ultrastructural features will be described, along with a brief discussion of surfactant metabolism. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of lung disease caused by mutations in these genes will also be discussed. PMID:19220077

  8. Agglutination of lung surfactant with glucan.

    PubMed Central

    De Lucca, A J; Brogden, K A; French, A D

    1992-01-01

    Respirable cotton dust, implicated in the pathogenesis of byssinosis, contains a number of bioactive compounds. These include lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tannins, bacterial peptides, byssinosin, iacinilene C, and 1,3-beta-D-glucan. The exact aetiological agent of byssinosis in such dust has not been definitively identified nor has its mechanism of action on lower lung surfaces been determined. In the present study 1,3-beta-D-glucan, Enterobacter agglomerans LPS, and ovine pulmonary surfactant were mixed in varying combinations. After incubation, their characteristics were determined by sucrose density centrifugation, TLC, and carbohydrate analysis. Precipitates were found in mixtures containing surfactant-glucan and surfactant-glucan-LPS, but not in surfactant-LPS. Precipitates were not seen in the surfactant, LPS, and glucan controls. The formation of a precipitate did not increase the density of the surfactant glucan mixture when compared by density gradient centrifugation with the surfactant control. The interaction between surfactant and glucan was analysed by molecular modelling. The energy of a surfactant-glucan complex (60.07 kcal/mol) was calculated to be much lower than the sum of glucan (47.09 kcal/mol) and surfactant (30.98 kcal/mol) when added separately. The results indicate that 1,3-beta-D-glucan does interact with surfactant and this complex may play a part in the pathogenesis of byssinosis by altering lung physiology maintained by pulmonary surfactant. Images PMID:1463675

  9. SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION WITH SURFACTANT REGENERATION/REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation was conducted during the spring of 1999 at Marine Corps Base, Camp LeJeune, NC. A PCE-DNAPL zone was identified and delineated by extensive soil sampling in 1997, and was further characteized by a partitioning interwell t...

  10. Surfactant and allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Carla; Hohlfeld, Jens M

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of unique proteins and lipids that covers the airway lumen. Surfactant prevents alveolar collapse and maintains airway patency by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Furthermore, it provides a defence against antigen uptake by binding foreign particles and enhancing cellular immune responses. Allergic asthma is associated with chronic airway inflammation and presents with episodes of airway narrowing. The pulmonary inflammation and bronchoconstriction can be triggered by exposure to allergens or pathogens present in the inhaled air. Pulmonary surfactant has the potential to interact with various immune cells which orchestrate allergen- or pathogen-driven episodes of airway inflammation. The complex nature of surfactant allows multiple sites of interaction, but also makes it susceptible to external alterations, which potentially impair its function. This duality of modulating airway physiology and immunology during inflammatory conditions, while at the same time being prone to alterations accompanied by restricted function, has stimulated numerous studies in recent decades, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:23896983

  11. Aerosol delivery of synthetic lung surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is a widely accepted technique of non-invasive respiratory support in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome due to lack of lung surfactant. If this approach fails, the next step is often intubation, mechanical ventilation (MV) and intratracheal instillation of clinical lung surfactant. Objective. To investigate whether aerosol delivery of advanced synthetic lung surfactant, consisting of peptide mimics of surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) and synthetic lipids, during nCPAP improves lung function in surfactant-deficient rabbits. Methods. Experimental synthetic lung surfactants were produced by formulating 3% Super Mini-B peptide (SMB surfactant), a highly surface active SP-B mimic, and a combination of 1.5% SMB and 1.5% of the SP-C mimic SP-Css ion-lock 1 (BC surfactant), with a synthetic lipid mixture. After testing aerosol generation using a vibrating membrane nebulizer and aerosol conditioning (particle size, surfactant composition and surface activity), we investigated the effects of aerosol delivery of synthetic SMB and BC surfactant preparations on oxygenation and lung compliance in saline-lavaged, surfactant-deficient rabbits, supported with either nCPAP or MV. Results. Particle size distribution of the surfactant aerosols was within the 1–3 µm distribution range and surfactant activity was not affected by aerosolization. At a dose equivalent to clinical surfactant therapy in premature infants (100 mg/kg), aerosol delivery of both synthetic surfactant preparations led to a quick and clinically relevant improvement in oxygenation and lung compliance in the rabbits. Lung function recovered to a greater extent in rabbits supported with MV than with nCPAP. BC surfactant outperformed SMB surfactant in improving lung function and was associated with higher phospholipid values in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid; these findings were irrespective of the type of ventilatory support

  12. An anionic surfactant for EOR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagir, Muhammad; Tan, Isa M.; Mushtaq, Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    This work is to investigate the new anionic surfactants for the Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) application. Sulfonated anionic surfactant was produced by attaching SO3 to an ethoxylated alcohol to increase the performance of the surfactant. Methallyl chloride and ethoxylated alcohol was reacted followed by the reaction with sodium bisulfite to produce anionic sulfonated surfactant in 80.3 % yield. The sulfonation reaction parameters such as reactants mole ratio, reaction temperature and catalyst amount were optimized. The generation and stability of foam from the synthesized surfactant is also tested and results are reported. The synthesized novel surfactant was further investigated for the effect on the CO2 mobility in porous media and the findings are presented here. This in house developed surfactant has a great potential for CO2- EOR applications.

  13. Interactions of surfactants with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Heerklotz, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Surfactants are surface-active, amphiphilic compounds that are water-soluble in the micro- to millimolar range, and self-assemble to form micelles or other aggregates above a critical concentration. This definition comprises synthetic detergents as well as amphiphilic peptides and lipopeptides, bile salts and many other compounds. This paper reviews the biophysics of the interactions of surfactants with membranes of insoluble, naturally occurring lipids. It discusses structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of membrane-water partitioning, changes in membrane properties induced by surfactants, membrane solubilisation to micelles and other phases formed by lipid-surfactant systems. Each section defines and derives key parameters, mentions experimental methods for their measurement and compiles and discusses published data. Additionally, a brief overview is given of surfactant-like effects in biological systems, technical applications of surfactants that involve membrane interactions, and surfactant-based protocols to study biological membranes. PMID:19079805

  14. The Role of Surfactant in Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Christopher Cheng-Hwa; Ma, Sze

    2012-01-01

    The key feature of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the insufficient production of surfactant in the lungs of preterm infants. As a result, researchers have looked into the possibility of surfactant replacement therapy as a means of preventing and treating RDS. We sought to identify the role of surfactant in the prevention and management of RDS, comparing the various types, doses, and modes of administration, and the recent development. A PubMed search was carried out up to March 2012 using phrases: surfactant, respiratory distress syndrome, protein-containing surfactant, protein-free surfactant, natural surfactant, animal-derived surfactant, synthetic surfactant, lucinactant, surfaxin, surfactant protein-B, surfactant protein-C. Natural, or animal-derived, surfactant is currently the surfactant of choice in comparison to protein-free synthetic surfactant. However, it is hoped that the development of protein-containing synthetic surfactant, such as lucinactant, will rival the efficacy of natural surfactants, but without the risks of their possible side effects. Administration techniques have also been developed with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and selective surfactant administration now recommended; multiple surfactant doses have also reported better outcomes. An aerosolised form of surfactant is being trialled in the hope that surfactant can be administered in a non-invasive way. Overall, the advancement, concerning the structure of surfactant and its mode of administration, offers an encouraging future in the management of RDS. PMID:22859930

  15. Surfactant transport on viscous bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Omar; Craster, Richard; Warner, Mark

    2001-11-01

    We model the external delivery of surfactant to pulmonary airways, an integral part of Surfactant Replacement Therapy (SRT), a method of treatment of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in neonates. We examine the spreading dynamics of insoluble surfactant by Marangoni stresses along the mucus-perciliary liquid bilayers that line the inside of airways. The bilayer is modelled as a thin highly viscous mucus surface film (mucus) overlying a much less viscous perciliary liquid layer (PCL); this is appropriate for small airways. By exploiting this large viscosity constrast, a variant of standard lubrication theory is adopted wherein terms, which would have otherwise been neglected in the lubrication approximation, are promoted in order to model correctly the presence of the mucus. Inclusion of van der Waals forces in the model permit the study of the effect of this mucus 'skin' on the possibility of bilayer rupture, a potential cause of failure of SRT. We find that increasing the viscosity contrast and initial mucus layer thickness delays the onset of rupture, while increasing the relative significance of Marangoni stresses leads to more marked thinning and rapid bilayer rupture [1]. [1] O. K. Matar, R. V. Craster and M. R. Warner, submitted to J. Fluid Mech. (2001).

  16. Hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex as a function of surfactant structure.

    PubMed

    Devínsky, Ferdinand; Pisárcik, Martin; Lacko, Ivan

    2009-06-01

    The present study deals with the determination of hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex in sodium bromide solution using the dynamic light scattering method. Cationic gemini surfactants with polymethylene spacer of variable length were used for the interaction with DNA. The scattering experiments were performed at constant DNA and sodium bromide concentrations and variable surfactant concentration in the premicellar and micellar regions as a function of surfactant spacer length. It was found that the DNA conformation strongly depends on the polymethylene spacer length as well as on the surfactant concentration relative to the surfactant critical micelle concentration. Gemini surfactant molecules with 4 methylene groups in the spacer were found to be the least efficient DNA compacting agent in the region above the surfactant cmc. Gemini molecules with the shortest spacer length (2 methylene groups) and the longest spacer length (8 methylene groups) investigated showed the most efficient DNA compaction ability. PMID:19592712

  17. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-05-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on water/air interfaces, the latter gives an impression of surfactant adsorption to a hydrophobic surface and illustrates the importance of the CMC for the adsorption process. Then attention is paid to the most important types of soil particles: humic and fulvic acids, silica, metal oxides and layered aluminosilicates. Information is provided on their structure, surface properties and primary (proton) charge characteristics, which are all important for surfactant binding. Subsequently, the adsorption of different types of surfactants on these individual soil components is discussed in detail, based on mainly experimental results and considering the specific (chemical) and electrostatic interactions, with hydrophobic attraction as an important component of the specific interactions. Adsorption models that can describe the features semi-quantitatively are briefly discussed. In the last part of the paper some trends of surfactant adsorption on soils are briefly discussed together with some complications that may occur and finally the consequences of surfactant adsorption for soil colloidal stability and permeability are considered. When we seek to understand the fate of surfactants in soil and aqueous environments, the hydrophobicity and charge density of the soil or soil particles, must be considered together with the structure, hydrophobicity and charge of the surfactants, because these factors affect the adsorption. The pH and ionic strength are important parameters with respect to the charge density of the particles. As surfactant adsorption influences soil structure and permeability, insight in surfactant adsorption to soil particles is useful for good soil management. PMID

  18. Intensification of evaporation processes using surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifullin, V. N.; Sharifullin, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of a group of low molecular surfactants on the evaporation rate during nucleate boiling of water is investigated. It is found that the vaporization rate and heat flux from the heater increase by 4-8% in an electric boiler with surfactants. The analysis of the process based on the model of the phase contact surface restoration made it possible to formulate the mechanism of the effect of considered surfactants.

  19. Surfactant Therapy of ALI and ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, K; Willson, D; Notter, RH

    2011-01-01

    This article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its utility in mitigating clinical acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Biophysical research has documented that lung surfactant dysfunction can be reversed or mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration, and multiple studies in animals with ALI/ARDS have shown that respiratory function and pulmonary mechanics in vivo can be improved by exogenous surfactant administration. Exogenous surfactant therapy is a routine intervention in neonatal intensive care, and is life-saving in preventing or treating the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS) in premature infants. In applications relevant for lung injury-related respiratory failure and ALI/ARDS, surfactant therapy has been shown to be beneficial in term infants with pneumonia and meconium aspiration lung injury, and in children up to age 21 with direct pulmonary forms of ALI/ARDS. However, extension of exogenous surfactant therapy to adults with respiratory failure and clinical ALI/ARDS remains a challenge. Coverage here reviews clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients with ALI/ARDS, particularly focusing on its potential advantages in patients with direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes. Also discussed is the rationale for mechanism-based therapies utilizing exogenous surfactant in combination with agents targeting other aspects of the multifaceted pathophysiology of inflammatory lung injury. Additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactant therapy in ALI/ARDS are also described, including the difficulty of effectively delivering surfactants to injured lungs and the existence of activity differences between clinical surfactant drugs. PMID:21742216

  20. Cholesterol-mediated surfactant dysfunction is mitigated by surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Hiansen, Joshua Qua; Keating, Eleonora; Aspros, Alex; Yao, Li-Juan; Bosma, Karen J; Yamashita, Cory M; Lewis, James F; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-03-01

    The ability of pulmonary surfactant to reduce surface tension at the alveolar surface is impaired in various lung diseases. Recent animal studies indicate that elevated levels of cholesterol within surfactant may contribute to its inhibition. It was hypothesized that elevated cholesterol levels within surfactant inhibit human surfactant biophysical function and that these effects can be reversed by surfactant protein A (SP-A). The initial experiment examined the function of surfactant from mechanically ventilated trauma patients in the presence and absence of a cholesterol sequestering agent, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. The results demonstrated improved surface activity when cholesterol was sequestered in vitro using a captive bubble surfactometer (CBS). These results were explored further by reconstitution of surfactant with various concentrations of cholesterol with and without SP-A, and testing of the functionality of these samples in vitro with the CBS and in vivo using surfactant depleted rats. Overall, the results consistently demonstrated that surfactant function was inhibited by levels of cholesterol of 10% (w/w phospholipid) but this inhibition was mitigated by the presence of SP-A. It is concluded that cholesterol-induced surfactant inhibition can actively contribute to physiological impairment of the lungs in mechanically ventilated patients and that SP-A levels may be important to maintain surfactant function in the presence of high cholesterol within surfactant. PMID:25522687

  1. Hemolysis by surfactants--A review.

    PubMed

    Manaargadoo-Catin, Magalie; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Pougnas, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    An overview of the use of surfactants for erythrocyte lysis and their cell membrane action mechanisms is given. Erythrocyte membrane characteristics and its association with the cell cytoskeleton are presented in order to complete understanding of the erythrocyte membrane distortion. Cell homeostasis disturbances caused by surfactants might induce changes starting from shape modification to cell lysis. Two main mechanisms are hypothesized in literature which are osmotic lysis and lysis by solubilization even if the boundary between them is not clearly defined. Another specific mechanism based on the formation of membrane pores is suggested in the particular case of saponins. The lytic potency of a surfactant is related to its affinity for the membrane and the modification of the lipid membrane curvature. This is to be related to the surfactant shape defined by its hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties but also by experimental conditions. As a consequence, prediction of the hemolytic potency of a given surfactant is challenging. Several studies are focused on the relation between surfactant erythrolytic potency and their physico-chemical parameters such as the critical micellar concentration (CMC), the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), the surfactant membrane/water partition coefficient (K) or the packing parameter (P). The CMC is one of the most important factors considered even if a lytic activity cut-off effect points out that the only consideration of CMC not enough predictive. The relation K.CMC must be considered in addition to the CMC to predict the surfactant lytic capacity within the same family of non ionic surfactant. Those surfactant structure/lytic activity studies demonstrate the requirement to take into account a combination of physico-chemical parameters to understand and foresee surfactant lytic potency. PMID:26687805

  2. Oil recovery by fluorochemical surfactant waterflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, T.W.

    1984-07-17

    The instant invention relates to the recovery of oil from subterranean oil reservoirs involving the injection of an aqueous based liquid containing a fluorochemical surfactant possessing an oleophobic-hydrophobic fluoroaliphatic group, a hydrophilic group and an oleophilic group, optionally in conjugation with a conventional enhanced oil recovery surfactant.

  3. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

  4. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  5. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  6. Measuring surfactant concentration in plating solutions

    DOEpatents

    Bonivert, William D.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Hachman, John T.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the concentration of surfactants in a electrolyte containing metal ions includes applying a DC bias voltage and a modulated voltage to a counter electrode. The phase angle between the modulated voltage and the current response to the modulated voltage at a working electrode is correlated to the surfactant concentration.

  7. SURFACTANT ENHANCED PHOTO-OXIDATION OF WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initial research projects using the nonionic surfactant Brij-35 established that this surfactant could successfully adsolublize aromatic organic pollutants such as anthracene, naphthalene, benzoic acid, chlorophenol, and benzene onto the surface of TiO2 par...

  8. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction. PMID:21722913

  9. A surfactant film spreading regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nikishov, V.I.

    1984-06-01

    Interest has recently increased in the study of the mechanisms whereby oil spills spread over sea and ocean surfaces. In the later stages of this process, when the petroleum film thickness becomes sufficiently small, the main forces determining the growth of its horizontal dimensions are surface tension and viscosity. In this case the flow characteristics do not depend on total quantity of spreading substance nor its surface concentration distribution. However, in the final stages of the spreading process the film becomes so thin that it is necessary to consider the effect of surface concentration distribution of the material on the process. Similar problems occur in the study of the spreading of a surfactant in the case where the total quantity of material is small and the surface tension regime sets in quickly. Therefore, the author examines here the spreading of a film in a regime wherein it is necessary to consider the total quantity of surfactant present, initially located on the surface of a viscous incompressible liquid.

  10. Sequential treatments of premature lambs with an artificial surfactant and natural surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, M; Jobe, A; Jacobs, H; Jones, S J

    1981-01-01

    To test an artificial surfactant in vivo, six 120-d gestational age lambs were treated at birth with a mixture of a 9:1 M ratio of [14C]dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPC) and phosphatidylglycerol at a dose of 100 mg DPC/kg. Nine other lambs were not treated. The mean PO2 values of the lambs treated with artificial surfactant were 65.7 +/- 11 mm Hg vs. 24.8 +/- 1.6 mm Hg for the untreated lambs (P less than 0.001). All lambs then were treated with 50 mg/natural surfactant lipid per kg, which promptly improved PO2 in all lambs. The PO2 values of those lambs previously treated with artificial surfactant remained greater than 100 mm Hg for 2.5 +/- 0.5 h vs. 0.9 +/- 0.3 h for lambs untreated with artificial surfactant (P less than 0.01). The pH and PCO2 values were not strikingly different between the two groups of lambs. Airway samples taken from lambs treated with artificial surfactant before treatment with natural surfactant had minimal surface tensions of 32 +/- 2.9 dyn/cm, whereas the artificial surfactant reisolated from these samples by centrifugation had minimum surface tension of 0 dyn/cm. The minimum surface tension of artificial surfactant was inhibited by fetal lung fluid from the premature lambs, whereas the minimum surface tension of natural surfactant was much less sensitive to inhibition. Artificial surfactant did not improve the pressure-volume characteristics of unventilated premature lung, whereas natural surfactant did. The change in specific activity of [14C]DPC following treatment with natural surfactant indicated that approximately 50% of the DPC initially administered was no longer associated with the airways. PMID:6790576

  11. Rhamnolipids--next generation surfactants?

    PubMed

    Müller, Markus Michael; Kügler, Johannes H; Henkel, Marius; Gerlitzki, Melanie; Hörmann, Barbara; Pöhnlein, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2012-12-31

    The demand for bio-based processes and materials in the petrochemical industry has significantly increased during the last decade because of the expected running out of petroleum. This trend can be ascribed to three main causes: (1) the increased use of renewable resources for chemical synthesis of already established product classes, (2) the replacement of chemical synthesis of already established product classes by new biotechnological processes based on renewable resources, and (3) the biotechnological production of new molecules with new features or better performances than already established comparable chemically synthesized products. All three approaches are currently being pursued for surfactant production. Biosurfactants are a very promising and interesting substance class because they are based on renewable resources, sustainable, and biologically degradable. Alkyl polyglycosides are chemically synthesized biosurfactants established on the surfactant market. The first microbiological biosurfactants on the market were sophorolipids. Of all currently known biosurfactants, rhamnolipids have the highest potential for becoming the next generation of biosurfactants introduced on the market. Although the metabolic pathways and genetic regulation of biosynthesis are known qualitatively, the quantitative understanding relevant for bioreactor cultivation is still missing. Additionally, high product titers have been exclusively described with vegetable oil as sole carbon source in combination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Competitive productivity is still out of reach for heterologous hosts or non-pathogenic natural producer strains. Thus, on the one hand there is a need to gain a deeper understanding of the regulation of rhamnolipid production on process and cellular level during bioreactor cultivations. On the other hand, there is a need for metabolizable renewable substrates, which do not compete with food and feed. A sustainable bioeconomy approach should

  12. Preparation and characterization of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianxi; Qing, Yanhong; Wang, Tong; Zhu, Runliang; Wei, Jingming; Tao, Qi; Yuan, Peng; He, Hongping

    2011-08-15

    A series of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites (ZSMMs) were synthesized using montmorillonite and three zwitterionic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths at different concentrations [0.2-4.0 cation exchange capacity (CEC)]. These ZSMMs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis and differential thermo-gravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses. The zwitterionic surfactant could be intercalated into the interlayer spaces of montmorillonites and causing interlayer space-swelling. From XRD measurements, the amount of the surfactants loaded and the basal spacing increased with surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. One endothermic DTG peak occurred at ~390 °C, which was assigned to the decomposition of the zwitterionic surfactant on the organo-montmorillonites from 0.2 to 0.6 CEC. When the surfactant loading was increased, a new endothermic peak appeared at ~340 °C. From the microstructures of these ZSMMs, the mechanism of zwitterionic surfactant adsorption was proposed. At relatively low loadings of the zwitterionic surfactant, most of surfactants enter the spacing by an ion-exchange mechanism and are adsorbed onto the interlayer cation sites. When the concentration of the zwitterionic surfactant exceeds the CEC of montmorillonite, the surfactant molecules then adhere to the surface-adsorbed surfactant. Some surfactants enter the interlayers, whereas the others are attached to the clay surface. When the concentration of surfactant increases further beyond 2.0 CEC, the surfactants may occupy the inter-particle space within the house-of-cards aggregate structure. PMID:21575956

  13. Pinchoff dynamics of surfactant covered viscous threads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios; Matar, Omar; Craster, Richard

    2001-11-01

    We study the breakup of a viscous thread covered with insoluble surfactant. One-dimensional evolution equations for the interface location, surfactant concentration and axial velocity are derived in the long wavelength approximation. The effect of surfactant is parameterized by its initial concentration, its strength and the Schmidt number, Sc, the ratio of kinematic viscosity to surface diffusion. Numerical solutions suggest that the presence of surfactant, which gives rise to Marangoni stresses, affect drastically the transient dynamics. The effective radius of the satellite formed during breakup decreases with increasing initial concentration and surfactant strength. For Sc > 10, increasing Sc has little effect on satellite effective radius [1]. These numerical solutions also show that the self-similar breakup dynamics of a surfactant-free viscous thread in the vicinity of the pinchoff region [2] are preserved even in the presence of surfactant. [1] R. V. Craster, O. K. Matar and D. T. Papageorgiou, submitted to Phys. Fluids (2001). [2] J. Eggers, Phys. Rev. Lett., 71, 3458 (1993).

  14. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Morozova, Elena; Lysyakova, Ludmila; Kasyanenko, Nina; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-01

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  15. A study of surfactant-assisted waterflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Scamehorn, J F; Harwell, J H

    1990-09-01

    In surfactant-assisted waterflooding, a surfactant slug is injected into a reservoir, followed by a brine spacer, followed by second surfactant slug. The charge on the surfactant in the first slug has opposite sign to that in the second slug. When the two slugs mix in the reservoir, a precipitate or coacervate is formed which plugs the permeable region of the reservoir. Subsequently injected water or brine is forced through the low permeability region of the reservoir, increasing sweep efficiency of the waterflood, compared to a waterflood not using surfactants. In this part of the work, two major tasks are performed. First, core floods are performed with oil present to demonstrate the improvement in incremental oil production, as well as permeability modification. Second, a reservoir simulation model will be proposed to further delineate the optimum strategy for implementation of the surfactant-assisted waterflooding, as well as indicate the reservoir types for which it would be most effective. Surfactants utilized were sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride. 44 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  17. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. PMID:26057244

  18. Aqueous Foam Stabilized by Tricationic Amphiphilic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerschap, Seth; Marafino, John; McKenna, Kristin; Caran, Kevin; Feitosa, Klebert; Kevin Caran's Research Group Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The unique surface properties of amphiphilic molecules have made them widely used in applications where foaming, emulsifying or coating processes are needed. The development of novel architectures with multi-cephalic/tailed molecules have enhanced their anti-bacterial activity in connection with tail length and the nature of the head group. Here we report on the foamability of two triple head double, tail cationic surfactants (M-1,14,14, M-P, 14,14) and a triple head single tail cationic surfactant (M-1,1,14) and compare them with commercially available single headed, single tailed anionic and cationic surfactants (SDS,CTAB and DTAB). The results show that bubble rupture rate decrease with the length of the carbon chain irrespective of head structure. The growth rate of bubbles with short tailed surfactants (SDS) and longer, single tailed tricationic surfactants (M-1,1,14) was shown to be twice as high as those with longer tailed surfactants (CTAB, M-P,14,14, M-1,14,14). This fact was related to the size variation of bubbles, where the foams made with short tail surfactants exhibited higher polydispersivity than those with short tails. This suggests that foams with tricationic amphiphilics are closed linked to their tail length and generally insensitive to their head structure.

  19. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-15

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  20. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Johannes H.; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Globally the change towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application. PMID:25852670

  1. Surfactant-Assisted Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    Obtaining liquid fuels from coal which are economically competitive with those obtained from petroleum based sources is a significant challenge for the researcher as well as the chemical industry. Presently, the economics of coal liquefaction are not favorable because of relatively intense processing conditions (temperatures of 430 degrees C and pressures of 2200 psig), use of a costly catalyst, and a low quality product slate of relatively high boiling fractions. The economics could be made more favorable by achieving adequate coal conversions at less intense processing conditions and improving the product slate. A study has been carried out to examine the effect of a surfactant in reducing particle agglomeration and improving hydrodynamics in the coal liquefaction reactor to increase coal conversions...

  2. Surfactant-Templated Mesoporous Metal Oxide Nanowires

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Hongmei; Lin, Qianglu; Baber, Stacy; Naalla, Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    We demore » monstrate two approaches to prepare mesoporous metal oxide nanowires by surfactant assembly and nanoconfinement via sol-gel or electrochemical deposition. For example, mesoporous Ta 2 O 5 and zeolite nanowires are prepared by block copolymer Pluronic 123-templated sol-gel method, and mesoporous ZnO nanowires are prepared by electrodeposition in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant, in porous membranes. The morphologies of porous nanowires are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses.« less

  3. Precipitation of mixtures of anionic and cationic surfactants; 3: Effect of added nonionic surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Shiau, B.J.; Harwell, J.H.; Scamehorn, J.F. . Inst. for Applied Surfactant Research)

    1994-10-15

    The precipitation of an anionic surfactant by a cationic surfactant in the presence of a nonionic surfactant is examined. The precipitation domains for sodium dodecyl sulfate/dodecyl-pyridinium chloride were measured over a wide range of surfactant concentrations as a function of nonylphenol polyethoxylate concentration. Increasing the nonylphenol polyethoxylate concentration decreases the tendency for precipitation to occur. A model for predicting precipitation domains in ternary surfactant mixtures has been developed and verified experimentally. The model allows the nonionic surfactant to affect the precipitation behavior only by lowering the critical micelle concentration of the mixture. Small deviations between theory and experiments along part of the anionic-rich micelle boundary result from adsorption of SDS on the precipitate which gives the microcrystals a negative charge and prevents their growth to a visible size.

  4. Influence of surfactant charge on antimicrobial efficacy of surfactant-stabilized thyme oil nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Ziani, Khalid; Chang, Yuhua; McLandsborough, Lynne; McClements, David Julian

    2011-06-01

    Thyme oil-in-water nanoemulsions stabilized by a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80, T80) were prepared as potential antimicrobial delivery systems (pH 4). The nanoemulsions were highly unstable to droplet growth and phase separation, which was attributed to Ostwald ripening due to the relatively high water solubility of thyme oil. Ostwald ripening could be inhibited by incorporating ≥75% of corn oil (a hydrophobic material with a low water solubility) into the nanoemulsion droplets. The electrical characteristics of the droplets in the nanoemulsions were varied by incorporating ionic surfactants with different charges after homogenization: a cationic surfactant (lauric arginate, LAE) or an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). The antifungal activity of nanoemulsions containing positive, negative, or neutral thymol droplets was then conducted against four strains of acid-resistant spoilage yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces bailli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, and Brettanomyces naardenensis. The antifungal properties of the three surfactants (T80, LAE, SDS) were also tested in the absence of thymol droplets. Both ionic surfactants showed strong antifungal activity in the absence of thymol droplets, but no antimicrobial activity in their presence. This effect was attributed to partitioning of the antimicrobial surfactant molecules between the oil droplet and microbial surfaces, thereby reducing the effective concentration of active surfactants available to act as antimicrobials. This study shows oil droplets may decrease the efficacy of surfactant-based antimicrobials, which has important consequences for formulating effective antimicrobial agents for utilization in emulsion-based food and beverage products. PMID:21520914

  5. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, Taku; Ishida, Junji; Kato, Akira; Ichinose, Taro; Ariestanti, Donna Maretta; Takahashi, Tomoya; Ito, Kunitoshi; Abe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+) and Ig-Hepta(-/-) mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i) balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii) surfactant secretion, and (iii) a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake) in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space. PMID:23922714

  6. Aggregation of sulfosuccinate surfactants in water

    SciTech Connect

    Magid, L.J.; Daus, K.A.; Butler, P.D.; Quincy, R.B.

    1983-12-22

    The aggregation of sodium di-n-alkyl sulfosuccinates in water (H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O at 45/sup 0/C) has been investigated. A self-consistent picture of the dependence of sodium ion binding on surfactant concentration is obtained from emf measurements, conductimetry, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. The concentration dependence of the micellar agregation number for the sulfosuccinates and related double-tailed surfactants depends markedly on surfactant solubility. A sphere-to-disk transition in micellar shape, which might have been expected as a precursor to formation of a lamellar mesophase, was not observed as the surfactant concentration was increased. 8 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Functionalized lipids and surfactants for specific applications.

    PubMed

    Kepczynski, Mariusz; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic lipids and surfactants that do not exist in biological systems have been used for the last few decades in both basic and applied science. The most notable applications for synthetic lipids and surfactants are drug delivery, gene transfection, as reporting molecules, and as support for structural lipid biology. In this review, we describe the potential of the synergistic combination of computational and experimental methodologies to study the behavior of synthetic lipids and surfactants embedded in lipid membranes and liposomes. We focused on select cases in which molecular dynamics simulations were used to complement experimental studies aiming to understand the structure and properties of new compounds at the atomistic level. We also describe cases in which molecular dynamics simulations were used to design new synthetic lipids and surfactants, as well as emerging fields for the application of these compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26946243

  8. Solar energy storage using surfactant micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, R. C.; Marwadi, P. R.; Latha, P. K.; Bhise, S. B.

    1982-09-01

    The results of experiments designed to test the soluble reduced form of thionine dye as a suitable solar energy storage agent inside the hydrophobic core of surfactant micelles are discussed. Aqueous solutions of thionine, methylene blue, cetyl pyridinium bromide, sodium lauryl sulphate, iron salts, and iron were employed as samples of anionic, cationic, and nonionic surfactants. The solutions were exposed to light until the dye disappeared, and then added drop-by-drop to surfactant solutions. The resultant solutions were placed in one cell compartment while an aqueous solution with Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions were placed in another, with the compartments being furnished with platinum electrodes connected using a saturated KCl-agar bridge. Data was gathered on the short circuit current, maximum power, and internal resistance encountered. Results indicate that dye-surfactant systems are viable candidates for solar energy storage for later conversion to electrical power.

  9. Fluorescence studies of polymer surfactant association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, M. da G.; Burrows, H. D.; Formosinho, S. J.; Lindman, B.

    2001-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been successfully used for the study of central issues of solutions of surfactants and associating polymers. Different fluorescence techniques and methods are uniquely adapted to investigate problems in this field and can, by using extrinsic or intrinsic probes, provide information on molecular association, microstructure and molecular dynamics. This constitutes an important contribution to the understanding and control of macroscopic properties, as well as to their biological functions and technical applications. Important aspects of these mixed systems, related to their self-assembly, are: formation of micelles and hydrophobic microdomains in general; size and shape of surfactant molecular aggregates; formation and stability of vesicles; intra- vs. intermolecular association in polymers; conformational changes in polymers as affected by polymer-surfactant association; surfactant organization in adsorbed layers; kinetic aspects of the formation and disintegration of self-assembly structures; residence times of molecules in microdomains and migration of active molecules. Some of these issues will be addressed in this paper.

  10. Surfactant improves irrigant penetration into unoperated sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Rohrer, Joseph W.; Dion, Greg R.; Brenner, Pryor S.; Abadie, Wesley M.; McMains, Kevin C.; Thomas, Roy F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Saline irrigations are proving to be a valuable intervention in the treatment of chronic sinusitis. The use of surfactants is a well established additive to topical treatments known to reduce surface tension and may prove to be a simple, nonoperative intervention to improve intrasinus douching penetration. Methods: Six 30-mL, flat-bottomed medicine cups with circular holes cut through the bottom center and varying in diameter from 1 to 6 mm were created with punch biopsies. Water, saline, saline/dye, and saline/dye/surfactant were compared for maximum holding pressure via these modeled ostia. Holding pressures also were determined for cups with septal mucosa fused to the bottom with holes ranging from 1 to 6 mm. In addition, analysis was carried out with blood and blood/surfactant. Finally, five thawed, fresh-frozen cadaver heads were evaluated before any sinus surgery with water/dye and water/dye/surfactant for intrasinus penetration. Results: Surfactant significantly improved the ability of all solutions to penetrate ostia in both the plastic cup and fused septal mucosa model. All nonsurfactant-containing solutions were not statistically different from one another, nor did surfactant change the ostial penetration of blood. Surfactant significantly improved the ability of sinus irrigant to penetrate unoperated sinus cavities (3.12 vs 3.5, p = .021). Conclusions: The addition of surfactant to saline irrigation improves ostial penetration in undissected and undiseased cadavers. This has practical implications for unoperated patients seeking care for sinus-related symptoms in that we have now described a method for improving topical treatment of target sinus mucosa prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22643945

  11. Spatial and Temporal Control of Surfactant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent progress on approaches leading to spatial and temporal control of surfactant systems. The approaches revolve around the use of redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants. Perspectives are presented on experiments that have realized approaches for active control of interfacial properties of aqueous surfactant systems, reversible control of microstructures and nanostructures formed within bulk solutions, and in situ manipulation of the interactions of surfactants with polymers, DNA and proteins. A particular focus of this review is devoted to studies of amphiphiles that contain the redox-active group ferrocene – reversible control of the oxidation state of ferrocene leads to changes in the charge/hydrophobicity of these amphiphiles, resulting in substantial changes in their self-assembly. Light-sensitive surfactants containing azobenzene, which undergo changes in shape/polarity upon illumination with light, are a second focus of this review. Examples of both redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants that lead to large (> 20mN/m) and spatially localized (~mm) changes in surface tensions on a time scale of seconds are presented. Systems that permit reversible transformations of bulk solution nanostructures – such as micelle-to-vesicle transitions or monomer-to-micelle transitions – are also described. The broad potential utility of these emerging classes of amphiphiles are illustrated by the ability to drive changes in functional properties of surfactant systems, such as rheological properties and reversible solubilization of oils, as well as the ability to control interactions of surfactants with biomolecules to modulate their transport into cells. PMID:19665723

  12. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins and their analogues.

    PubMed

    Walther, Frans J; Waring, Alan J; Sherman, Mark A; Zasadzinski, Joseph A; Gordon, Larry M

    2007-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and four surfactant-associated proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). Its major function in the lung alveolus is to reduce surface tension at the air-water interface in the terminal airways by the formation of a surface-active film enriched in surfactant lipids, hence preventing cellular collapse during respiration. Surfactant therapy using bovine or porcine lung surfactant extracts, which contain only polar lipids and native SP-B and SP-C, has dramatically improved the therapeutic outcomes of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). One important goal of surfactant researchers is to replace animal-derived therapies with fully synthetic preparations based on SP-B and SP-C, produced by recombinant technology or peptide synthesis, and reconstituted with selected synthetic lipids. Here, we review recent research developments with peptide analogues of SP-B and SP-C, designed using either the known primary sequence and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the native proteins or, alternatively, the known 3D structures of closely homologous proteins. Such SP-B and SP-C mimics offer the possibility of studying the mechanisms of action of the respective native proteins, and may allow the design of optimized surfactant formulations for specific pulmonary diseases (e.g., acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)). These synthetic surfactant preparations may also be a cost-saving therapeutic approach, with better quality control than may be obtained with animal-based treatments. PMID:17575474

  13. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (SS-6656, Alfoterra 35, 38, 63,65,68) have been identified which can change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. All the carbonate surfaces (Lithographic Limestone, Marble, Dolomite and Calcite) show similar behavior with respect to wettability alteration with surfactant 4-22. Anionic surfactants (5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38 and Alfoterra-68), which lower the interfacial tension with a West Texas crude oil to very low values (<10{sup -2} nM/m), have also been identified. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability, mobilization, and imbibition studies.

  14. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate wettability. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

  15. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Imbibition in an originally oil-wet 2D capillary is the fastest in the case of Alf-38 and slowest in the case of DTAB (among the surfactants studied). Force of adhesion studies and contact angle measurements show that greater wettability alteration is possible with these anionic surfactants than the cationic surfactant studied. The water imbibition rate does not increase monotonically with an increase in the surfactant concentration. A numerical model has been developed that fits the rate of imbibition. Plans for the next quarter include conducting simulation and imbibition studies.

  16. SURFACTANT - POLYMER INTERACTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1998-10-01

    The goal of this research is to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, adsorption and mobility control. Surfactant--polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation high adsorption and viscous/heterogeneity fingering. A mixture comprising a ''pseudo oil'' with appropriate surfactant and polymer has been selected to study micellar-polymer chemical flooding. The physical properties and phase behavior of this system have been determined. A surfactant-polymer slug has been designed to achieve high efficiency recovery by improving phase behavior and mobility control. Recovery experiments have been performed on linear cores and a quarter 5-spot. The same recovery experiments have been simulated using a commercially available simulator (UTCHEM). Good agreement between experimental data and simulation results has been achieved.

  17. Turbulent drag reduction in nonionic surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamano, Shinji; Itoh, Motoyuki; Kato, Katsuo; Yokota, Kazuhiko

    2010-05-01

    There are only a few studies on the drag-reducing effect of nonionic surfactant solutions which are nontoxic and biodegradable, while many investigations of cationic surfactant solutions have been performed so far. First, the drag-reducing effects of a nonionic surfactant (AROMOX), which mainly consisted of oleyldimethylamineoxide, was investigated by measuring the pressure drop in the pipe flow at solvent Reynolds numbers Re between 1000 and 60 000. Second, we investigated the drag-reducing effect of a nonionic surfactant on the turbulent boundary layer at momentum-thickness Reynolds numbers Reθ from 443 to 814 using two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry systems. At the temperature of nonionic surfactant solutions, T =25 °C, the maximum drag reduction ratio for AROMOX 500 ppm was about 50%, in the boundary layer flow, although the drag reduction ratio was larger than 60% in pipe flow. Turbulence statistics and structures for AROMOX 500 ppm showed the behavior of typical drag-reducing flow such as suppression of turbulence and modification of near-wall vortices, but they were different from those of drag-reducing cationic surfactant solutions, in which bilayered structures of the fluctuating velocity vectors were observed in high activity.

  18. Surfactant mediated polyelectrolyte self-assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Monojoy; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Pincus, Phillip A.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2015-11-25

    Self-assembly and dynamics of polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant complex (PES) is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The complexation is systematically studied for five different PE backbone charge densities. At a fixed surfactant concentration the PES complexation exhibits pearl-necklace to agglomerated double spherical structures with a PE chain decorating the surfactant micelles. The counterions do not condense on the complex, but are released in the medium with a random distribution. The relaxation dynamics for three different length scales, polymer chain, segmental and monomer, show distinct features of the charge and neutral species; the counterions are fastest followed by the PE chain and surfactants. The surfactant heads and tails have the slowest relaxation due to their restricted movement inside the agglomerated structure. At the shortest length scale, all the charge and neutral species show similar relaxation dynamics confirming Rouse behavior at monomer length scales. Overall, the present study highlights the structure-property relationship for polymer-surfactant complexation. These results will help improve the understanding of PES complex and should aid in the design of better materials for future applications.

  19. Surfactant mediated polyelectrolyte self-assembly

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Goswami, Monojoy; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Pincus, Phillip A.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2015-11-25

    Self-assembly and dynamics of polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant complex (PES) is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The complexation is systematically studied for five different PE backbone charge densities. At a fixed surfactant concentration the PES complexation exhibits pearl-necklace to agglomerated double spherical structures with a PE chain decorating the surfactant micelles. The counterions do not condense on the complex, but are released in the medium with a random distribution. The relaxation dynamics for three different length scales, polymer chain, segmental and monomer, show distinct features of the charge and neutral species; the counterions are fastest followed by the PE chain andmore » surfactants. The surfactant heads and tails have the slowest relaxation due to their restricted movement inside the agglomerated structure. At the shortest length scale, all the charge and neutral species show similar relaxation dynamics confirming Rouse behavior at monomer length scales. Overall, the present study highlights the structure-property relationship for polymer-surfactant complexation. These results will help improve the understanding of PES complex and should aid in the design of better materials for future applications.« less

  20. DNA interaction with cis- and trans- isomers of photosensitive surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unksov, I. N.; Kasyanenko, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Interaction between DNA and photosensitive cationic surfactant in a solution is studied. Studies were conducted to examine the impact of the surfactant in its cis- conformation on the size of DNA molecule and also to investigate the phase behavior of the system depending on DNA and surfactant concentration. We conclude that trans- isomer of surfactant requires its smaller concentration to reach the DNA compaction compared with cis- isomer received by UV radiation of solutions. Studies of DNA-surfactant systems were performed by means of spectrophotometry and viscometry. Variation of surfactant concentration enables us to determine the precipitation zone on phase diagram. From the viscosity study it can be indicated that precipitation zone is narrower for UV-radiated surfactant and it shifts to higher surfactant concentration. Also we examine the reversibility of DNA compaction in systems with the surfactant in its trans- form.

  1. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  2. Anionic surfactant - Biogenic amine interactions: The role of surfactant headgroup geometry.

    PubMed

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun

    2016-03-15

    Oligoamines and biogenic amines (naturally occurring oligoamines) are small flexible polycations. They interact strongly with anionic surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS. This results in enhanced adsorption and the formation of layered structures and the formation of layered structures at the air-water interface which depends on surfactant concentration and solution pH. The effect of changing the surfactant headgroup geometry on that interaction and subsequent adsorption is reported here. Neutron reflectivity, NR, results for the surface adsorption of the anionic surfactant sodium diethylene glycol monododecyl ether sulfate, SLES, with the biogenic amine, spermine, are presented, and contrasted with previous data for SDS/spermine mixtures. The enhancement in the adsorption of the surfactant at the air-water interface where monolayer adsorption occurs is similar for both surfactants. However the regions of surfactant concentration and solution pH where surface multilayer adsorption occurs is less extensive for the SLES/spermine mixtures, and occurs only at low pH. The results show how changing the headgroup geometry by the introduction of the ethylene oxide linker group between the alkyl chain and sulfate headgroup modifies the polyamine - surfactant interaction. The increased steric constraint from the polyethylene oxide group disrupts the conditions for surface multilayer formation at the higher pH values. This has important consequences for applications where the modification or manipulation of the surface properties are required. PMID:26724704

  3. Surfactant Delivery into the Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James; Filoche, Marcel

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a multiscale, compartmentalized model of surfactant and liquid delivery into the lung. Assuming liquid plug propagation, the airway compartment accounts for the plug's volume deposition (coating) on the airway wall, while the bifurcation compartment accounts for plug splitting from the parent airway to the two daughter airways. Generally the split is unequal due to gravity and geometry effects. Both the deposition ratio RD (deposition volume/airway volume), and the splitting ratio, RS, of the daughters volumes are solved independently from one another. Then they are used in a 3D airway network geometry to achieve the distribution of delivery into the lung. The airway geometry is selected for neonatal as well as adult applications, and can be advanced from symmetric, to stochastically asymmetric, to personalized. RD depends primarily on the capillary number, Ca, while RS depends on Ca, the Reynolds number, Re, the Bond number, Bo, the dose volume, VD, and the branch angles. The model predicts the distribution of coating on the airway walls and the remaining plug volume delivered to the alveolar region at the end of the tree. Using this model, we are able to simulate and test various delivery protocols, in order to optimize delivery and improve the respiratory function.

  4. Branching mechanisms in surfactant micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Subas; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    The mechanisms of branch formation in surfactant micelles of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) in presence of sodium salicylate (NaSal) counter ions in water are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The curvature energy associated with the formation of micelle branches and the effect of branching on the solution viscosity are quantified. Highly curved surfaces are energetically stabilized by a higher density of binding counter ions near the branch points. Simulations show that micellar branches result in a significant reduction in the solution viscosity as observed in experiments [Dhakal & Sureshkumar, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 024905 (2015)]. This reduction in viscosity has long been attributed to the sliding motion of micelle branches across the main chain. However, to date, such dynamics of micelle branches have never been visualized in either experiments or simulations. Here, we explicitly illustrate and quantify, for the first time, how branches slide along the micelle contour to facilitate stress relaxation. We acknowledged the computational resources provided by XSEDE which is supported by NSF Grant Number OCI-1053575 and the financial support by National Science Foundation under Grants 1049489 and 1049454.

  5. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces

  6. Selection of surfactant in remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by comparison of surfactant effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Yueming; Chen, Tao; Li, Linhui; Wang, Guanzhu

    2014-01-01

    With an aim to select the most appropriate surfactant for remediation of DDT-contaminated soil, the performance of nonionic surfactants Tween80, TX-100, and Brij35 and one anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) in enhancement of DDT water solubility and desorption of DDT from contaminated soil and their adsorption onto soil and ecotoxicities were investigated in this study. Tween80 had the highest solubilizing and soil-washing ability for DDT among the four experimental surfactants. The adsorption loss of surfactants onto soil followed the order of TX-100 > Tween80 > Brij35 > SDBS. The ecotoxicity of Tween80 to ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) was lowest. The overall performance considering about the above four aspects suggested that Tween80 should be selected for the remediation of DDT-contaminated soil, because Tween80 had the greatest solubilizing and soil-washing ability for DDT, less adsorption loss onto soil, and the lowest ecotoxicity in this experiment. PMID:23900948

  7. Surfactant-enhanced low-pH alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A. and Co., Columbia, MD . Research Div.); Lorenz, P.B. )

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports sodium bicarbonate investigated as a potential alkaline agent in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding because it has very little tendency to dissolve silicate minerals. In experiments performed with Wilmington, CA, crude oil and three types of surfactants, the bicarbonate/surfactant combination caused a marked lowering of interfacial tension (IFT). Bicarbonate protected the surfactant against divalent cations and reduced adsorption of surfactant and polymer on various minerals. Coreflood test confirm that sodium bicarbonate plus surfactant can be an effective alternative to the high-pH flooding process.

  8. Growing Characteristics of Fine Ice Particles in Surfactant Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Kosuke; Komoda, Yoshiyuki; Usui, Hiromoto; Okada, Kazuto; Fujisawa, Ryo

    Time variation characteristics of ice particles in a surfactant solution have been investigated. The effect of surfactants on corrosion characteristics was also studied. The results were compared with those treated with poly(vinyl alcohol). From the results, the present surfactant, cetyl dimethyl betaine was not found to be effective on preventing Ostward ripening of ice particles as poly(vinyl alcohol) showed. Then, it was concluded some effective technology has to be installed with surfactants when this surfactant treatment is realized. On the corrosion characteristics, it was found that the present surfactant shows the same level as tap water.

  9. Isolation of Surfactant-Resistant Bacteria from Natural, Surfactant-Rich Marine Habitats▿

    PubMed Central

    Plante, Craig J.; Coe, Kieran M.; Plante, Rebecca G.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental remediation efforts often utilize either biodegradative microbes or surfactants, but not in combination. Coupling both strategies holds the potential to dramatically increase the rate and extent of remediation because surfactants can enhance the bioavailability of contaminants to microbes. However, many surfactants permeabilize bacterial cell membranes and are effective disinfectants. An important goal then is to find or genetically modify microorganisms that possess both desirable degradative capabilities and the ability to thrive in the presence of surfactants. The guts of some marine invertebrates, particularly deposit feeders, have previously been shown to contain high levels of biosurfactants. Our primary aim was to mine these natural, surfactant-rich habitats for surfactant-resistant bacteria. Relative to sediment porewaters, the gut contents of two polychaete deposit feeders, Nereis succinea and Amphitrite ornata, exhibited a significantly higher ratio of bacteria resistant to both cationic and anionic surfactants. In contrast, bacteria in the gut fluids of a holothuroid, Leptosynapta tenuis, showed surfactant susceptibility similar to that of bacteria from sediments. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the majority of surfactant-resistant isolates were previously undescribed species of the genus Vibrio or were of a group most closely related to Spongiobacter spp. We also tested a subset of resistant bacteria for the production of biosurfactants. The majority did produce biosurfactants, as demonstrated via the oil-spreading method, but in all cases, production was relatively weak under the culture conditions employed. Novel surfactant-resistant, biosurfactant-producing bacteria, and the habitats from which they were isolated, provide a new source pool for potential microorganisms to be exploited in the in situ bioremediation of marine sediments. PMID:18586977

  10. Counterion specificity of surfactants based on dicarboxylic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Romain; Tropsch, Jürgen; Holmberg, Krister

    2009-10-15

    The behavior in solution of a series of amino acid-based surfactants having two carboxyl groups separated by a spacer of one, two, or three carbon atoms has been investigated. All three surfactants precipitated on addition of acid, but the aspartate surfactant (with a two-carbon spacer) was considerably more resistant to precipitation than the aminomalonate surfactant (one-carbon spacer) and the glutamate surfactant (three-carbon spacer). The interactions with the monovalent counterions lithium, sodium, and potassium were investigated by conductivity. It was found that lithium ions bound the strongest and potassium ions the weakest to the surfactant micelles. These results were interpreted using the hard and soft acid-base theory. Comparing the three surfactants with respect to binding of one specific counterion, sodium, showed that the aminomalonate surfactant, which has the shortest spacer, bound sodium ions the strongest and the glutamate surfactant, which has the longest spacer, had the lowest affinity for the counterion. Also that could be explained by the hard and soft acid-base concept. The glutamate surfactant was found to be considerably more resistant to calcium ions than the two other surfactants. This was attributed to this surfactant forming an intermolecular complex with the calcium ion at the air-water interface while the aminomalonate and the aspartate surfactants, with shorter distance between the carboxylate groups could form six- and seven-membered intramolecular calcium complexes. PMID:19608191

  11. Analysis of supercooling activities of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Terauchi, Ryuji; Tochigi, Hiroshi; Takaoka, Hisao; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2014-08-01

    Supercooling-promoting activities (SCAs) of 25 kinds of surfactants including non-ionic, anionic, cationic and amphoteric types were examined in solutions (buffered Milli-Q water, BMQW) containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, silver iodide (AgI) or BMQW alone, which unintentionally contained unidentified ice nucleators, by a droplet freezing assay. Most of the surfactants exhibited SCA in solutions containing AgI but not in solutions containing the INB E. ananas or BMQW alone. SCAs of many surfactants in solutions containing AgI were very high compared with those of previously reported supercooling-promoting substances. Cationic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (C16TAC), at concentrations of 0.01% (w/v) exhibited SCA of 11.8 °C, which is the highest SCA so far reported. These surfactants also showed high SCAs at very low concentrations in solutions containing AgI. C16TAB exhibited SCA of 5.7 °C at a concentration of 0.0005% (w/v). PMID:24792543

  12. Surface shear inviscidity of soluble surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Zell, Zachary A.; Nowbahar, Arash; Mansard, Vincent; Leal, L. Gary; Deshmukh, Suraj S.; Mecca, Jodi M.; Tucker, Christopher J.; Squires, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    Foam and emulsion stability has long been believed to correlate with the surface shear viscosity of the surfactant used to stabilize them. Many subtleties arise in interpreting surface shear viscosity measurements, however, and correlations do not necessarily indicate causation. Using a sensitive technique designed to excite purely surface shear deformations, we make the most sensitive and precise measurements to date of the surface shear viscosity of a variety of soluble surfactants, focusing on SDS in particular. Our measurements reveal the surface shear viscosity of SDS to be below the sensitivity limit of our technique, giving an upper bound of order 0.01 μN·s/m. This conflicts directly with almost all previous studies, which reported values up to 103–104 times higher. Multiple control and complementary measurements confirm this result, including direct visualization of monolayer deformation, for SDS and a wide variety of soluble polymeric, ionic, and nonionic surfactants of high- and low-foaming character. No soluble, small-molecule surfactant was found to have a measurable surface shear viscosity, which seriously undermines most support for any correlation between foam stability and surface shear rheology of soluble surfactants. PMID:24563383

  13. Rheology of Natural Lung Surfactant Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Coralie; Waring, Alan; Zsadzinski, Joseph

    2004-03-01

    The lung surfactant (LS) is a lipoprotein mixture lining the inside of the pulmonary alveoli which has the ability to lower the surface tension of the air-liquid hypophase interface to value near zero thus reducing the work of breathing and which also prevents the alveolar collapse. A lack or malfunction of lung surfactant, as it is often the case for premature infants, leads to respiratory distress syndrome. RDS can be treated by supplying replacement LS to the infants and several medications derived from natural sources, are now widely used. The lung surfactant is adsorbed at the air-liquid interface and is subjected to incessant compression expansion cycles therefore Langmuir monolayers provide a suitable model to investigate the physical properties of lung surfactant films. Using a magnetic needle rheometer, we measured the shear viscosity of natural lung surfactant spread at the air-liquid interface upon compression and expansion cycles for three different formulations. The shear viscosity of Survanta changes by orders of magnitude along one cycle while for Curosurf samples it changes only slightly and for Infasurf films it remains constant. These different behaviors can be explained by differences in composition between the three formulations leading to different organizations on the molecular scale.

  14. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-03-31

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (Alfoterra 35, 38) recover more than 40% of the oil in about 50 days by imbibition driven by wettability alteration in the core-scale. Anionic surfactant, Alfoterra-68, recovers about 28% of the oil by lower tension aided gravity-driven imbibition in the core-scale. Residual oil saturation showed little capillary number dependence between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -2}. Wettability alteration increases as the number of ethoxy groups increases in ethoxy sulfate surfactants. Plans for the next quarter include conducting mobilization, and imbibition studies.

  15. Self-Assembly of Gemini Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yethiraj, Arun; Mondal, Jagannath; Mahanthappa, Mahesh

    2013-03-01

    The self-assembly behavior of Gemini (dimeric or twin-tail) dicarboxylate disodium surfactants is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. This gemini architecture, in which two single tailed surfactants are joined through a flexible hydrophobic linker, has been shown to exhibit concentration-dependent aqueous self-assembly into lyotropic phases including hexagonal, gyroid, and lamellar morphologies. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally observed phases at similar amphiphile concentrations in water, including the unusual ability of these surfactants to form gyroid phases over unprecedentedly large amphiphile concentration windows. We demonstrate quanitative agreement between the predicted and experimentally observed domain spacings of these nanostructured materials. Through careful conformation analyses of the surfactant molecules, we show that the gyroid phase is electrostatically stabilized related to the lamellar phase. By starting with a lamellar phase, we show that decreasing the charge on the surfactant headgroups by carboxylate protonation or use of a bulkier tetramethyl ammonium counterion in place of sodium drives the formation of a gyroid phase.

  16. 2-DE using hemi-fluorinated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Starita-Geribaldi, Mireille; Thebault, Pascal; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frederic; Geribaldi, Serge

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis of hemi-fluorinated zwitterionic surfactants was realized and assessed for 2-DE, a powerful separation method for proteomic analysis. These new fluorinated amidosulfobetaine (FASB-p,m) were compared to their hydrocarbon counterparts amidosulfobetaine (ASB-n) characterized by a hydrophilic polar head, a hydrophobic and lipophilic tail, and an amido group as connector. The tail of these FASB surfactants was in part fluorinated resulting in the modulation of its lipophilicity (or oleophobicity). Their effect on the red blood cell (RBC) membrane showed a specific solubilization depending on the length of the hydrophobic part. A large number of polypeptide spots appeared in the 2-DE patterns by using FASB-p,m. The oleophobic character of these surfactants was confirmed by the fact that Band 3, a highly hydrophobic transmembrane protein, was not solubilized by these fluorinated structures. The corresponding pellet was very rich in Band 3 and could then be solubilized by using a strong detergent such as amidosulfobetaine with an alkyl tail containing 14 carbon atoms (ASB-14). Thus, these hemi-fluorinated surfactants appeared as powerful tools when used at the first step of a two-step solubilization strategy using a hydrocarbon homologous surfactant in the second step. PMID:17577887

  17. SURFACTANT - POLYMER INTERACTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1997-09-01

    The goal of this research is to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, adsorption and mobility control. Surfactant--polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation, high adsorption and viscous/heterogeneity fingering. This report contains data concerning selection of appropriate fluids for use in laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. A mixture comprising a ''pseudo oil'' with appropriate surfactant and polymer is proposed. The properties of this system has been determined. The experimental set-up has been conditioned for use and experiments involving the aforementioned system have already started. A commercial simulator has been acquired for use in reproducing the experiments. A graduate student has been trained in its use. Linear stability analysis equations have been developed and phase maps for one and two-dimensions are currently computed.

  18. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-10-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Simulation studies indicate that both wettability alteration and gravity-driven flow play significant role in oil recovery from fractured carbonates. Anionic surfactants (Alfoterra 35, 38) recover about 55% of the oil in about 150 days by imbibition driven by wettability alteration and low tension in the core-scale. Anionic surfactant, Alfoterra-68, recovers about 40% of the oil by lower tension aided gravity-driven imbibition in the core-scale. Cationic surfactant, DTAB recovers about 35% of the oil. Plans for the next quarter include conducting simulation and imbibition studies.

  19. Fullerene surfactants and their use in polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, Kwan-Yue; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi

    2015-12-15

    Fullerene surfactant compounds useful as interfacial layer in polymer solar cells to enhance solar cell efficiency. Polymer solar cell including a fullerene surfactant-containing interfacial layer intermediate cathode and active layer.

  20. Probing nanoparticle effect in protein-surfactant complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-06-01

    SANS experiments have been carried to probe the role of anionic silica nanoparticles in the anionic BSA protein-cationic DTAB surfactant complexes. In protein-surfactant complex, surfactant molecules aggregate to form micelle-like clusters along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The nanoparticle aggregation mediated by oppositely charged protein-surfactant complex coexists with the free protein-surfactant complexes in the nanoparticle-protein-surfactant system. There is rearrangement of micelles in adsorbed protein-surfactant complex on nanoparticles in leading to their (nanoparticle) aggregation. On the other hand, the unfolding of protein in free protein-surfactant complex is found to be significantly enhanced in presence of nanoparticles.

  1. Synthesis of mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite by using zwitterions surfactant

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite (mn-HAP) was successfully synthesized via a novel micelle-templating method using lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid as zwitterionic surfactant. The systematic use of such a surfactant in combination with microwave energy inputenables the precise contr...

  2. Surfactant mediated liquid phase exfoliation of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Rekha; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-10-01

    Commercialization of graphene based applications inevitably requires cost effective mass production. From the early days of research on graphene, direct liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) of graphite has been considered as the most promising strategy to produce high-quality mono or few-layer graphene sheets in solvent dispersion forms. Substantial success has been achieved thus far in the LPE of graphene employing numerous solvent systems and suitable surfactants. This invited review article principally showcase the recent research progress as well as shortcomings of surfactant assisted LPE of graphene. In particular, a comprehensive assessment of the quality and yield of the graphene sheets produced by different categories of the surfactants are summarized. Future direction of LPE methods is also proposed for the eventual success of commercial applications.

  3. Nanotube Dispersions Made With Charged Surfactant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuper, Cynthia; Kuzma, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Dispersions (including monodispersions) of nanotubes in water at relatively high concentrations have been formulated as prototypes of reagents for use in making fibers, films, and membranes based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Other than water, the ingredients of a dispersion of this type include one or more charged surfactant(s) and carbon nanotubes derived from the HiPco(TradeMark) (or equivalent) process. Among reagents known to be made from HiPco(TradeMark)(or equivalent) SWNTs, these are the most concentrated and are expected to be usable in processing of bulk structures and materials. Test data indicate that small bundles of SWNTs and single SWNTs at concentrations up to 1.1 weight percent have been present in water plus surfactant. This development is expected to contribute to the growth of an industry based on applied carbon nanotechnology. There are expected to be commercial applications in aerospace, avionics, sporting goods, automotive products, biotechnology, and medicine.

  4. Natural surfactants used in cosmetics: glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Lourith, N; Kanlayavattanakul, M

    2009-08-01

    Cosmetic surfactant performs detergency, wetting, emulsifying, solubilizing, dispersing and foaming effects. Adverse reactions of chemical synthesis surfactant have an effect on environment and humans, particularly severe in long term. Biodegradability, low toxicity and ecological acceptability which are the benefits of naturally derived surfactant that promises cosmetic safety are, therefore, highly on demand. Biosurfactant producible from microorganisms exhibiting potential surface properties suitable for cosmetic applications especially incorporate with their biological activities. Sophorolipids, rhamnolipids and mannosylerythritol lipids are the most widely used glycolipids biosurfactant in cosmetics. Literatures and patents relevant to these three glycolipids reviewed were emphasizing on the cosmetic applications including personal care products presenting the cosmetic efficiency, efficacy and economy benefits of glycolipids biosurfactant. PMID:19496839

  5. Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1992-01-01

    A phase 2 study was initiated to investigate surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction, with the objective of quantifying the enhancement in liquid yields and product quality. This publication covers the first quarter of work. The major accomplishments were: the refurbishment of the high-pressure, high-temperature reactor autoclave, the completion of four coal liquefaction runs with Pittsburgh #8 coal, two each with and without sodium lignosulfonate surfactant, and the development of an analysis scheme for the product liquid filtrate and filter cake. Initial results at low reactor temperatures show that the addition of the surfactant produces an improvement in conversion yields and an increase in lighter boiling point fractions for the filtrate.

  6. Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 study has been initiated to investigate surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction, with the objective of quantifying the enhancement in liquid yields and product quality. This report covers the second quarter of work. The major accomplishments were: completion of coal liquefaction autoclave reactor runs with Illinois number 6 coal at processing temperatures of 300, 325, and 350 C, and pressures of 1800 psig; analysis of the filter cake and the filtrate obtained from the treated slurry in each run; and correlation of the coal conversions and the liquid yield quality to the surfactant concentration. An increase in coal conversions and upgrading of the liquid product quality due to surfactant addition was observed for all runs.

  7. When do water-insoluble polyion-surfactant ion complex salts "redissolve" by added excess surfactant?

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Salomé; Gustavsson, Charlotte; Gudmundsson, Christian; Linse, Per; Piculell, Lennart

    2011-01-18

    The redissolution of water-insoluble polyion-surfactant ion complexes by added excess of surfactant has systematically been investigated in experimental and theoretical phase equilibrium studies. A number of stoichiometric polyion-surfactant ion "complex salts" were synthesized and they consisted of akyltrimethylammonium surfactant ions of two different alkyl chain lengths (C(12)TA(+) and C(16)TA(+)) combined with homopolyions of polyacrylate of two different lengths (PA(-)(25) and PA(-)(6000)) or copolyions of acrylate and the slightly hydrophobic nonionic comonomers N-isopropylacrylamide (PA(-)-co-NIPAM) or N,N-dimethylacrylamide (PA(-)-co-DAM). The complex salts were mixed with water and excess alkyltrimethylammonium surfactant with either bromide or acetate counterions (C(n)TABr or C(n)TAAc). Factors promoting efficient redissolution were (i) very short polyions, (ii) a large fraction of NIPAM or DAM comonomers, and (iii) acetate, rather than bromide, as the surfactant counterion. Added C(12)TAAc gave an efficient redissolution of C(12)TAPA(25) but virtually no redissolution of C(12)TAPA(6000). A very efficient redissolution by added C(12)TAAc was obtained for PA(-)-co-NIPAM with 82 mol % of NIPAM. The C(12)TAPA-co-NIPAM/C(12)TAAc/H(2)O ternary phase diagram closely resembled the corresponding diagram for the much-studied pair cationic hydroxyethyl cellulose-(sodium) dodecyl sulfate. The simple Flory-Huggins theory adopted for polyelectrolyte systems successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental phase diagrams for the homopolyion systems, including the effect of the surfactant counterion. The efficient redissolution found for certain copolyion systems was explained by the formation of soluble polyion-surfactant ion complexes carrying an excess of surfactant ions through an additional hydrophobic attraction. PMID:21166446

  8. A study of the thermodynamic properties of surfactant mixtures: Mixed micelle formation and mixed surfactant adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Lopata, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    The volumetric mixing in anionic/nonionic, cationic/nonionic, and anionic/cationic mixed micelles was determined by examining the total surfactant apparent molar volumes at total surfactant concentrations much greater than the mixture critical micelle concentration. The mixed surfactant systems investigated were: sodium dodecyl sulfate and a polyethoxylated nonylphenol, at 0.15 M NaCl and with no added NaCl; cetyl pyridinium chloride and polyethoxylated nonylphenol, at 0.03 M NaCl; and sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride, at 0.15 M NaCl. The results of this study suggest that the electrostatic interactions in the mixed micelles do no significantly effect the molar volume of the mixed micelle. Therefore, the micelle hydrophobic core dominates the volumetric mixing in mixed micelles. The adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate and a polyethoxylated nonylphenol and well defined mixtures thereof was measured on gamma alumina. A pseudo-phase separation model to describe mixed anionic/nonionic admicelle (adsorbed surfactant aggregate) formation was developed. In this model, regular solution theory was used to describe the anionic/nonionic surfactant interactions in the mixed admicelle and a patch-wise adsorption model was used to describe surfactant adsorption on a heterogeneous surface. Regular solution theory was tested on specific homogeneous surface patches by examining constant total surfactant adsorption levels. For the adsorption of binary surfactant mixtures adsorbing at total equilibrium concentrations above the mixture critical micelle concentration, simultaneous solution of the pseudo-phase separation models for mixed admicelle and mixed micelle formation predicts that the surfactant compositions in the monomer, micelle, and admicelle pseudo-phases are constant at a constant total adsorption level.

  9. Surfactant-Polymer Interaction for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2002-01-07

    The goal of this research was to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, oil solubility in the displacing fluid and mobility control. Surfactant-polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation and viscous/heterogeneity fingering.

  10. Adhesion of latex films. Influence of surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Charmeau, J.Y.; Kientz, E.; Holl, Y.

    1996-12-31

    In the applications of film forming latexes in paint, paper, coating, adhesive, textile industries, one of the most important property of latex films is adhesion onto a support. From the point of view of adhesion, latex films have two specificities. The first one arises from the particular structure of the film which is usually not homogeneous but retains to a certain extent the memory of the particles it was made from. These structure effects are clearly apparent when one compares mechanical or adhesion properties of pure latex films and of films of the same polymers but prepared from a solution. Latex films show higher Young`s moduli and lower adhesion properties than solution films. The second specificity of latex films comes from the presence of the surfactant which was used in the synthesis and as stabilizer for the latex. Most industrial latexes contain low amounts of surfactant, typically in the range 0.1 to 2-3 wt%. However, being usually incompatible with the polymer, the surfactant is not homogeneously distributed in the film. It tends to segregate towards the film-air or film-support interfaces or to form domains in the bulk of the film. Distribution of surfactants in latex films has been studied by several authors. The influence of the surfactant on adhesion, as well as on other properties, is thus potentially very important. This article presents the results of the authors investigation of surfactant effects on adhesion properties of latex films. To the authors knowledge, there is no other example, in the open literature, of this kind of study.

  11. Effects of selected surfactants on soil microbial activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants (surface-active agents) facilitate and accentuate the emulsifying, dispersing, spreading, and wetting properties of liquids. Surfactants are used in industry to reduce the surface tension of liquid and to solubilize compounds. For agricultural pest management, surfactants are an import...

  12. Surfactant Dynamics: Spreading and Wave Induced Dynamics of a Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Stephen Lee

    Material adsorbed to the surface of a fluid - for instance crude oil in the ocean, biological surfactant on ocular or pulmonary mucous, or emulsions - can form a 2-dimensional mono-molecular layer. These materials, called surfactants, can behave like a compressible viscous 2-dimensional fluid, and can generate surface stresses that influence the sub-fluid's bulk flow. Additionally, the sub-fluid's flow can advect the surfactant and generate gradients in the surfactant distribution and thereby generate gradients in the interfacial properties. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurements of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer at the surface, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface motion and the evolving density field. In this dissertation, I will present a novel method for measuring the spatiotemporal dynamics of the surfactant surface density through the fluorescence emission of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine, a lipid, and we will compare the surfactant dynamics to the dynamics of the surface morphology.With this method, we will consider the inward and outward spreading of a surfactant on a thin fluid film as well as the advection of a surfactant by linear and non-linear gravity-capillary waves. These two types of surfactant coupled fluid flows will allow us to probe well-accepted assumptions about the coupled fluid-surfactant dynamics. In chapter 1, we review the models used for understanding the spreading of a surfactant on a thin fluid film and the motion of surfactant on a linear gravity-capillary wave. In chapter 2, we will present the experimental methods used in this dissertation. In chapter 3, we will study the outward spreading of a localized region of surfactant and show that the spreading of a monolayer is considerably different from the spreading of thicker-layered surfactant. In chapter 4, we will investigate the inward spreading of a surfactant into a circular surfactant-free region and show that hole closure and

  13. Surfactant replacement therapy for adult respiratory distress syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Evans, D A; Wilmott, R W; Whitsett, J A

    1996-05-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy may have a role in the treatment of ARDS in children. The current studies suggest that rapid instillation of exogenous surfactant is more effective than slow tracheal instillation or aerosolized delivery. Studies suggest that exogenous surfactant given early in the development of ARDS is more effective than therapy provided late in the course of the disease. Natural surfactants appear to be more effective than artificial surfactants due to the presence of SP-B and SP-C, which prevent inhibition of the exogenous surfactant by the protein leakage into the alveolus that is characteristic of ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy appears to be safe and well tolerated. A surfactant that can be delivered by aerosol would be useful since this is more easily tolerated by the patients, requires less surfactant, and would be more cost effective when compared with tracheal instillation. Aerosolized surfactant could be given to patients who have not yet required mechanical ventilation, thus potentially preventing the progression of the acute lung injury to respiratory failure. The recent failure of a large multi-center trial of aerosolized Exosurf for the treatment of sepsis-related ARDS72 may have been due to the failure of the delivery system as opposed to the surfactant used in the trial; therefore, further research into aerosol delivery systems is needed. There may be different responses to exogenous surfactant therapy by patients with ARDS of different etiologies, such as aspiration pneumonia, sepsis, or trauma. Well-planned placebo-controlled trials will be required to determine these differences. The data supporting the role of surfactant replacement for the treatment of ARDS in children is growing. However, before widespread use of surfactant is considered, a multi-center, placebo-controlled trial will be required to establish the safety and efficacy of surfactant replacement in such patients. PMID:8726159

  14. Pulmonary surfactant proteins and polymer combinations reduce surfactant inhibition by serum.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen W; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Echaide, Mercedes; Taeusch, H William

    2011-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an inflammatory condition that can be associated with capillary leak of serum into alveoli causing inactivation of surfactant. Resistance to inactivation is affected by types and concentrations of surfactant proteins, lipids, and polymers. Our aim was to investigate the effects of different combinations of these three components. A simple lipid mixture (DPPC/POPG) or a more complex lipid mixture (DPPC/POPC/POPG/cholesterol) was used. Native surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C obtained from pig lung lavage were added either singly or combined at two concentrations. Also, non-ionic polymers polyethylene glycol and dextran and the anionic polymer hyaluronan were added either singly or in pairs with hyaluronan included. Non-ionic polymers work by different mechanisms than anionic polymers, thus the purpose of placing them together in the same surfactant mixture was to evaluate if the combination would show enhanced beneficial effects. The resulting surfactant mixtures were studied in the presence or absence of serum. A modified bubble surfactometer was used to evaluate surface activities. Mixtures that included both SP-B and SP-C plus hyaluronan and either dextran or polyethylene glycol were found to be the most resistant to inhibition by serum. These mixtures, as well as some with either SP-B or SP-C with combined polymers were as or more resistant to inactivation than native surfactant. These results suggest that improved formulations of lung surfactants are possible and may be useful in reducing some types of surfactant inactivation in treating lung injuries. PMID:21741354

  15. Surfactants on cleanup detail in paper mills

    SciTech Connect

    Longhini, D.

    1996-06-01

    From pulp production to paper coating, surfactants are involved in almost every facet of pulp and paper manufacturing. Within the industry, the role of surface-active agents is growing every larger with the demand for recycled paper. In the US, for example, The American Forest and Paper Assn. has established an ambitious goal of recovering 50% of the paper used in the US by 2000. By then, paper producers in North America are expected to have invested more than $10 billion in recycling equipment, and be spending more than $300 million/yr on drinking chemicals, including surfactants. Surfactants will also serve the industry indirectly, as additives in the production and formulation of products sold to the paper industry, including biocides, retention aids and water-treatment polymers. Providing higher-quality paper while reducing dependence on virgin pulp, requires manufacturing technologies and process chemicals that can restore wastepaper to its original state. Achieving those goals will depend on the development of novel surfactants through close collaboration with mill customers, and pioneering research in surface science, polymer engineering and organic chemistry.

  16. Synthesis of Novel Organosilicon Gemini Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Li, L. J.; Wang, E. F.

    A series of organosilicon gemini surfactants was synthesized from γ-(2. 3-epoxypropoxy) propytrimethoxysilane. hexametliyldisiloxane and polyethylene glycol. The target compounds were confirmed by IR. 1H NMR. Surface properties of the target compounds were measured. The critical micelle concentration values of 1-3 were 8mmol, 5mmol, and 3 mmol, respectively.

  17. Photosensitive surfactants: Micellization and interaction with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Roxlau, Julian; Brezesinski, Gerald; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Recently, photosensitive surfactants have re-attracted considerable attention. It has been shown that their association with oppositely charged biologically important polyelectrolytes, such as DNA or microgels, can be efficiently manipulated simply by light exposure. In this article, we investigate the self-assembly of photosensitive surfactants as well as their interactions with DNA by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Critical micelle concentration (CMC), standard micellization enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy were determined in different conditions (ionic strengths and temperatures) for a series of cationic surfactants with an azobenzene group in their tail. It is shown, that aggregation forces of photosensitive units play an important role in the micellization giving the major contribution to the micellization enthalpy. The onset of the aggregation can be traced from shift of the absorption peak position in the UV-visible spectrum. Titration UV-visible spectroscopy is used as an alternative, simple, and sensitive approach to estimate CMC. The titration UV-visible spectroscopy was also employed to investigate interactions (CAC: critical aggregation concentration, precipitation, and colloidal stabilization) in the DNA-surfactant complex.

  18. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have acquired field oil and core samples and field brine compositions from Marathon. We have conducted preliminary adsorption and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Receding contact angles increase with surfactant adsorption. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

  19. SURFACTANT FLUSH: HOW WELL DID IT WORK?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Oklahoma Corporation Commission through a contract with Surbec-Art, Inc. of Norman Oklahoma has remediated TPH contamination at a gasoline spill at Golden, Oklahoma. Residual gasoline was removed from the subsurface using a flush of surfactant, followed by in situ bioremedia...

  20. Determination of surfactants by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Heinig, K; Vogt, C

    1999-10-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has been increasingly used during the past few years for the separation and determination of surfactants. These substances are applied in many household and industrial products such as laundry detergents, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, often as homologous and isomeric mixtures. Product development and control as well as toxicological and environmental analyses require selective and sensitive analytical methods. This review presents capillary electrophoretic techniques to determine important representatives of cationic, anionic, and neutral surfactants. The application of different buffer additives such as organic solvents, cyclodextrins or micelles to enhance the resolution of complex mixtures is discussed. Besides direct and indirect UV and fluorescence detection, examples for conductivity and mass spectrometric detection are also given. Derivatization procedures to improve the detectability and implement charge in neutral analytes are described. The successful use of capillary electrophoresis for surfactant determinations has proven that it can serve as a routine technique in many real-world applications. Robust, validated methods for the quantitation of single compounds, such as alkylbenzene sulfonates, sodium dodecyl sulfate and benzalkonium salts, are now available. Characteristic peak patterns (fingerprint analysis) can be used for the identification of surfactants in multicomponent formulations (e.g. ethoxylates and phosphonates). PMID:10596832

  1. Biodegradation potential of photocatalyzed surfactant washwater.

    PubMed

    Maillacheruvu, K; Buck, L; Lee, E

    2001-01-01

    Enhanced release of hydrophobic compounds from a soil matrix can be achieved by use of soil-washing or soil-flushing using various surfactants. However, the surfactants used in achieving the desorption of organic contaminants may also cause a problem in subsequent removal/disposal of these contaminants. UV radiation in the presence of TiO2 as a pre-treatment step to achieve initial (or partial) breakdown of naphthalene and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) using batch experiments indicated that 56% to 88% naphthalene degradation occurred within 30 minutes to one hour. Preliminary results on the estimate of the batch aerobic biodegradation potential of photocatalyzed washwater containing naphthalene and SDS suggested that SDS was the major carbon and energy source for an activated sludge enrichment culture and an enrichment culture obtained from microorganisms at a contaminated site. Continuous-flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) with with a solids retention time (SRT) of 4 days were not effective, but an SRT of 8 days was successful in biodegrading the naphthalene and surfactant. These results indicated that photocatalytic treatment as a pre-treatment step followed by a biodegradation step may offer potential in cleaning up surfactant washwaters containing organic contaminants. PMID:11501312

  2. Surfactants treatment of crude oil contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Urum, Kingsley; Pekdemir, Turgay; Copur, Mehmet

    2004-08-15

    This study reports experimental measurements investigating the ability of a biological (rhamnolipid) and a synthetic (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) surfactant to remove the North Sea Ekofisk crude oil from various soils with different particle size fractions under varying washing conditions. The washing parameters and ranges tested were as follows: temperature (5 to 50 degrees C), time (5 to 20 min), shaking speed (80 to 200 strokes/min), volume (5 to 20 cm3), and surfactant concentration (0.004 to 5 mass%). The contaminated soils were prepared in the laboratory by mixing crude oil and soils using a rotating cylindrical mixer. Two contamination cases were considered: (1) weathered contamination was simulated by keeping freshly contaminated soils in a fan assisted oven at 50 degrees C for 14 days, mimicking the weathering effect in a natural hot environment, and (2) nonweathered contamination which was not subjected to the oven treatment. The surfactants were found to have considerable potential in removing crude oil from different contaminated soils and the results were comparable with those reported in literature for petroleum hydrocarbons. The removal of crude oil with either rhamnolipid or SDS was within the repeatability range of +/-6%. The most influential parameters on oil removal were surfactant concentration and washing temperature. The soil cation exchange capacity and pH also influenced the removal of crude oil from the individual soils. However, due to the binding of crude oil to soil during weathering, low crude oil removal was achieved with the weathered contaminated soil samples. PMID:15271574

  3. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-10-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the best hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (35-62% OOIP) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Core-scale simulation results match those of the experiments. Initial capillarity-driven imbibition gives way to a final gravity-driven process. As the matrix block height increases, surfactant alters wettability to a lesser degree, or permeability decreases, oil production rate decreases. The scale-up to field scale will be further studied in the next quarter.

  4. Potential commercial applications of microbial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Banat, I M; Makkar, R S; Cameotra, S S

    2000-05-01

    Surfactants are surface-active compounds capable of reducing surface and interfacial tension at the interfaces between liquids, solids and gases, thereby allowing them to mix or disperse readily as emulsions in water or other liquids. The enormous market demand for surfactants is currently met by numerous synthetic, mainly petroleum-based, chemical surfactants. These compounds are usually toxic to the environment and non-biodegradable. They may bio-accumulate and their production, processes and by-products can be environmentally hazardous. Tightening environmental regulations and increasing awareness for the need to protect the ecosystem have effectively resulted in an increasing interest in biosurfactants as possible alternatives to chemical surfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic compounds of microbial origin with considerable potential in commercial applications within various industries. They have advantages over their chemical counterparts in biodegradability and effectiveness at extreme temperature or pH and in having lower toxicity. Biosurfactants are beginning to acquire a status as potential performance-effective molecules in various fields. At present biosurfactants are mainly used in studies on enhanced oil recovery and hydrocarbon bioremediation. The solubilization and emulsification of toxic chemicals by biosurfactants have also been reported. Biosurfactants also have potential applications in agriculture, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, detergents, personal care products, food processing, textile manufacturing, laundry supplies, metal treatment and processing, pulp and paper processing and paint industries. Their uses and potential commercial applications in these fields are reviewed. PMID:10855707

  5. SIMULATION OF SURFACTANT-ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is currently under active investigation as one of the most promising alternatives to conventional pump-and-treat remediation for aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase organic liquids. An existing three-dimensional finite-di...

  6. Surfactant loss: Effects of temperature, salinity, and wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, L.A.; Gall, B.L.; Crocker, M.E.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-05-01

    Adsorption of sodium dodecylsulfate, Triton X-100, decyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactants onto silica gel and Berea sandstone mineral surfaces has been studied as a function of temperature, solution salt concentration, and mineral surface wettability. Adsorption studies using a flow calorimeter were conducted using pure surfactants and minerals. The studies were then extended to the adsorption of one type of commercial surfactant onto both consolidated and crushed Berea sandstone using column techniques. This has allowed the comparison of different methods to evaluate surfactant losses from flowing rather than static surfactant solutions. 20 refs., 15 figs., 37 tabs.

  7. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  8. Thermally stable surfactants and compositions and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2008-09-02

    There are provided novel thermally stable surfactants for use with fillers in the preparation of polymer composites and nanocomposites. Typically, surfactants of the invention are urethanes, ureas or esters of thiocarbamic acid having a hydrocarbyl group of from 10 to 50 carbons and optionally including an ionizable or charged group (e.g., carboxyl group or quaternary amine). Thus, there are provided surfactants having Formula I: ##STR00001## wherein the variables are as defined herein. Further provided are methods of making thermally stable surfactants and compositions, including composites and nanocomposites, using fillers coated with the surfactants.

  9. Surfactant therapy: the current practice and the future trends

    PubMed Central

    Altirkawi, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of surfactant preparations used in the prevention and treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a well known fact; however, many controversies remain. The debate over which surfactant to be used, when and what is the best mode of delivery is still raging. Currently, animal-derived surfactants are preferred and clearly recommended by various practice guidelines, but new synthetic surfactants containing peptides that mimic the action of surfactant proteins are emerging and they seem to have a comparable efficacy profile to the natural surfactants. It is hoped that with further improvements, they will outperform their natural counterparts in terms of reliability and cost-effectiveness. Early surfactant administration was shown to further reduce the risk of RDS and its complications. However, as nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is becoming increasingly the preferred first-line therapy for RDS, the less invasive approaches of respiratory support along with early selective surfactant administration (e.g. INSURE) appears to provide a better option. Although neonatal RDS is still the main indication of surfactant therapy, other pathological processes received considerable attention and major research has been dedicated to explore the role of surfactant in their management, Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) and congenital pneumonia are two worthy examples. The most updated practice guidelines do recommend the use of endotracheal instillation as the preferred mode of surfactant delivery. However, aerosolization and other non-invasive methods are being investigated with some success; nonetheless, further improvements are very much in need. PMID:27493353

  10. Comparative study of clinical pulmonary surfactants using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Fan, Qihui; Wang, Yi E.; Neal, Charles R.; Zuo, Yi Y.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical pulmonary surfactant is routinely used to treat premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, and has shown great potential in alleviating a number of neonatal and adult respiratory diseases. Despite extensive study of chemical composition, surface activity, and clinical performance of various surfactant preparations, a direct comparison of surfactant films is still lacking. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to characterize and compare four animal-derived clinical surfactants currently used throughout the world, i.e., Survanta, Curosurf, Infasurf and BLES. These modified-natural surfactants are further compared to dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a synthetic model surfactant of DPPC:palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) (7:3), and endogenous bovine natural surfactant. Atomic force microscopy reveals significant differences in the lateral structure and molecular organization of these surfactant preparations. These differences are discussed in terms of DPPC and cholesterol contents. We conclude that all animal-derived clinical surfactants assume a similar structure of multilayers of fluid phospholipids closely attached to an interfacial monolayer enriched in DPPC, at physiologically relevant surface pressures. This study provides the first comprehensive survey of the lateral structure of clinical surfactants at various surface pressures. It may have clinical implications on future application and development of surfactant preparations. PMID:21439262

  11. Lung surfactants and different contributions to thin film stability.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Eline; Bhamla, M Saad; Kao, Peter; Fuller, Gerald G; Vermant, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The surfactant lining the walls of the alveoli in the lungs increases pulmonary compliance and prevents collapse of the lung at the end of expiration. In premature born infants, surfactant deficiency causes problems, and lung surfactant replacements are instilled to facilitate breathing. These pulmonary surfactants, which form complex structured fluid-fluid interfaces, need to spread with great efficiency and once in the alveolus they have to form a thin stable film. In the present work, we investigate the mechanisms affecting the stability of surfactant-laden thin films during spreading, using drainage flows from a hemispherical dome. Three commercial lung surfactant replacements Survanta, Curosurf and Infasurf, along with the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), are used. The surface of the dome can be covered with human alveolar epithelial cells and experiments are conducted at the physiological temperature. Drainage is slowed down due to the presence of all the different lung surfactant replacements and therefore the thin films show enhanced stability. However, a scaling analysis combined with visualization experiments demonstrates that different mechanisms are involved. For Curosurf and Infasurf, Marangoni stresses are essential to impart stability and interfacial shear rheology does not play a role, in agreement with what is observed for simple surfactants. Survanta, which was historically the first natural surfactant used, is rheologically active. For DPPC the dilatational properties play a role. Understanding these different modes of stabilization for natural surfactants can benefit the design of effective synthetic surfactant replacements for treating infant and adult respiratory disorders. PMID:26307946

  12. Lung injury and surfactant metabolism after hyperventilation of premature lambs.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, M; Kallapur, S; Michna, J; Jobe, A H

    2000-03-01

    We asked whether lung injury and surfactant metabolism differed in preterm lambs after a 1-h period of hyperventilation to P(CO2) values of 25-30 mm Hg. The lambs then were surfactant treated and conventionally ventilated (CV) or high-frequency oscillatory ventilated (HFOV) for an additional 1 or 8 h. The results were compared with lambs that were not hyperventilated or surfactant treated but were ventilated with CV or HFOV. The 1-h hyperventilation resulted in increased alveolar protein, increased recovery of intravascular [131I]albumin in the lungs, and an increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA. There were no differences between CV or HFOV in alveolar or total lung recoveries of saturated phosphatidylcholine (Sat PC), tracer doses of [14C]Sat PC and [125I]surfactant protein-B, or in percent Sat PC in large aggregate surfactant in surfactant-treated lambs. The lambs not hyperventilated or treated with surfactant had lower large aggregate pools and lower recoveries of [14C]Sat PC and [125I]surfactant protein-B in total lungs than for the surfactant-treated lungs, but there were no differences between the CV and HFOV groups. Hyperventilation followed by surfactant treatment resulted in a mild injury, but the subsequent use of CV or HFOV did not result in differences in surfactant metabolism. PMID:10709742

  13. Pulmonary surfactants and their role in pathophysiology of lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant is an agent that decreases the surface tension between two media. The surface tension between gaseous-aqueous interphase in the lungs is decreased by the presence of a thin layer of fluid known as pulmonary surfactant. The pulmonary surfactant is produced by the alveolar type-II (AT-II) cells of the lungs. It is essential for efficient exchange of gases and for maintaining the structural integrity of alveoli. Surfactant is a secretory product, composed of lipids and proteins. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol are the major lipid constituents and SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D are four types of surfactant associated proteins. The lipid and protein components are synthesized separately and are packaged into the lamellar bodies in the AT-II cells. Lamellar bodies are the main organelle for the synthesis and metabolism of surfactants. The synthesis, secretion and recycling of the surfactant lipids and proteins is regulated by complex genetic and metabolic mechanisms. The lipid-protein interaction is very important for the structural organization of surfactant monolayer and its functioning. Alterations in surfactant homeostasis or biophysical properties can result in surfactant insufficiency which may be responsible for diseases like respiratory distress syndrome, lung proteinosis, interstitial lung diseases and chronic lung diseases. The biochemical, physiological, developmental and clinical aspects of pulmonary surfactant are presented in this article to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of these diseases. PMID:23441475

  14. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins strongly induce negative curvature.

    PubMed

    Chavarha, Mariya; Loney, Ryan W; Rananavare, Shankar B; Hall, Stephen B

    2015-07-01

    The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C greatly accelerate the adsorption of vesicles containing the surfactant lipids to form a film that lowers the surface tension of the air/water interface in the lungs. Pulmonary surfactant enters the interface by a process analogous to the fusion of two vesicles. As with fusion, several factors affect adsorption according to how they alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, suggesting that adsorption proceeds via a rate-limiting structure with negative curvature, in which the hydrophilic face of the phospholipid leaflets is concave. In the studies reported here, we tested whether the surfactant proteins might promote adsorption by inducing lipids to adopt a more negative curvature, closer to the configuration of the hypothetical intermediate. Our experiments used x-ray diffraction to determine how the proteins in their physiological ratio affect the radius of cylindrical monolayers in the negatively curved, inverse hexagonal phase. With binary mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), the proteins produced a dose-related effect on curvature that depended on the phospholipid composition. With DOPE alone, the proteins produced no change. With an increasing mol fraction of DOPC, the response to the proteins increased, reaching a maximum 50% reduction in cylindrical radius at 5% (w/w) protein. This change represented a doubling of curvature at the outer cylindrical surface. The change in spontaneous curvature, defined at approximately the level of the glycerol group, would be greater. Analysis of the results in terms of a Langmuir model for binding to a surface suggests that the effect of the lipids is consistent with a change in the maximum binding capacity. Our findings show that surfactant proteins can promote negative curvature, and support the possibility that they facilitate adsorption by that mechanism. PMID:26153706

  15. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.

    1991-10-01

    The Tucker sand of Helper (KS) field is a candidate for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The geology of the Helper site is typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. The Tucker sand of Helper field was deposited in a fluvial dominated deltaic environment. Helper oil can be mobilized with either chemical system 2 or chemical system 3, as described in this report. Oil fields in the Gulf Coast region are also good candidates for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The results from laboratory tests conducted in Berea sandstone cores with oil brine from Helper (KS) field are encouraging. The crude oil is viscous and non-acidic and, yet, was mobilized by the chemical formulations described in this report. Significant amounts of the oil were mobilized under simulated reservoir conditions. The results in Berea sandstone cores were encouraging and should be verified by tests with field core. Consumption of alkali, measured with field core, was very low. Surfactant loss appeared to be acceptable. Despite the good potential for mobilization of Helper oil, certain reservoir characteristics such as low permeability, compartmentalization, and shallow depth place constraints on applications of any chemical system in the Tucker sand. These constraints are typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. Although Hepler field is not a perfect reservoir in which to apply surfactant- enhanced alkaline flooding, Hepler oil is particularly amenable to mobilization by surfactant-enhanced alkaline systems. A field test is recommended, dependent upon final evaluation of well logs and cores from the proposed pilot area. 14 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Status of surfactants as penetration enhancers in transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Som, Iti; Bhatia, Kashish; Yasir, Mohd.

    2012-01-01

    Surfactants are found in many existing therapeutic, cosmetic, and agro-chemical preparations. In recent years, surfactants have been employed to enhance the permeation rates of several drugs via transdermal route. The application of transdermal route to a wider range of drugs is limited due to significant barrier to penetration across the skin which is associated with the outermost stratum corneum layer. Surfactants have effects on the permeability characteristics of several biological membranes including skin. They have the potential to solubilize lipids within the stratum corneum. The penetration of the surfactant molecule into the lipid lamellae of the stratum corneum is strongly dependent on the partitioning behavior and solubility of surfactant. Surfactants ranging from hydrophobic agents such as oleic acid to hydrophilic sodium lauryl sulfate have been tested as permeation enhancer to improve drug delivery. This article reviews the status of surfactants as permeation enhancer in transdermal drug delivery of various drugs. PMID:22368393

  17. SURFACTANT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY AND FOAM MOBILITY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller; Gary A. Pope; Richard E. Jackson

    2004-02-01

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. Also, the addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of surfactant and significant reduction of surfactant adsorption. In addition to reduction of interfacial tension to ultra-low values, surfactants and alkali can be designed to alter wettability to enhance oil recovery. An alkaline surfactant process is designed to enhance spontaneous imbibition in fractured, oil-wet, carbonate formations. It is able to recover oil from dolomite core samples from which there was no oil recovery when placed in formation brine.

  18. Atomic force microscopy analysis of rat pulmonary surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiujun; Keating, Eleonora; Tadayyon, Seyed; Possmayer, Fred; Zuo, Yi Y; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2011-10-01

    Pulmonary surfactant facilitates breathing by forming a surface tension reducing film at the air-liquid interface of the alveoli. The objective was to characterize the structure of surfactant films using endogenous rat surfactant. Solid-support surfactant films, at different surface pressures, were obtained using a Langmuir balance and were analyzed using atomic force microscopy. The results showed a lipid film structure with three distinct phases: liquid expanded, liquid ordered and liquid condensed. The area covered by the liquid condensed domains increased as surface pressure increased. The presence of liquid ordered phase within these structures correlated with the cholesterol content. At a surface pressure of 50 mN/m, stacks of bilayers appeared. Several structural details of these films differ from previous observations made with goat and exogenous surfactants. Overall, the data indicate that surfactant films demonstrate phase separation at low surface pressures and multilayer formation at higher pressure, features likely important for normal surfactant function. PMID:21704443

  19. Structure and Conformational Dynamics of DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant and DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant/DNA Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pietralik, Zuzanna; Krzysztoń, Rafał; Kida, Wojciech; Andrzejewska, Weronika; Kozak, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Amphiphilic dicationic surfactants, known as gemini surfactants, are currently studied for gene delivery purposes. The gemini surfactant molecule is composed of two hydrophilic “head” groups attached to hydrophobic chains and connected via molecular linker between them. The influence of different concentrations of 1,5-bis (1-imidazolilo-3- decyloxymethyl) pentane chloride (gemini surfactant) on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayers with and without the presence of DNA was investigated using Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation and differential scanning calorimetry. With increasing concentration of surfactant in DMPC/DNA systems, a disappearance of pretransition and a decrease in the main phase transition enthalpy and temperature were observed. The increasing intensity of diffraction peaks as a function of surfactant concentration also clearly shows the ability of the surfactant to promote the organisation of lipid bilayers in the multilayer lamellar phase. PMID:23571492

  20. An overview of pulmonary surfactant in the neonate: genetics, metabolism, and the role of surfactant in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Nkadi, Paul O; Merritt, T Allen; Pillers, De-Ann M

    2009-06-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids (PL) and proteins (SP) that reduce surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the alveolus. It is made up of about 70-80% PL, mainly dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 10% SP-A, B, C and D, and 10% neutral lipids, mainly cholesterol. Surfactant is synthesized, assembled, transported and secreted into the alveolus where it is degraded and then recycled. Metabolism of surfactant is slower in newborns, especially preterm, than in adults. Defective pulmonary surfactant metabolism results in respiratory distress with attendant morbidity and mortality. This occurs due to accelerated breakdown by oxidation, proteolytic degradation, inhibition or inherited defects of surfactant metabolism. Prenatal corticosteroids, surfactant replacement, whole lung lavage and lung transplantation have yielded results in managing some of these defects. Gene therapy could prove valuable in treating inherited defects of surfactant metabolism. PMID:19299177

  1. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller

    2006-09-09

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A mixture of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. The mixture is single phase for higher salinity or calcium concentrations than that for either surfactant used alone. This makes it possible to inject the surfactant slug with polymer close to optimal conditions and yet be single phase. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. It uses partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide for mobility control. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of naphthenic soap and significant reduction of synthetic surfactant adsorption. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT takes advantage of the observation that the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Even for a fixed ratio of soap to surfactant, the range of salinity for low IFT was wider than that reported for surfactant systems in the literature. Low temperature, forced displacement experiments in dolomite and silica sandpacks demonstrate that greater than 95% recovery of the waterflood remaining oil is possible with 0.2% surfactant concentration, 0.5 PV surfactant slug, with no alcohol. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the role of soap/surfactant ratio on passage of the profile through the ultralow IFT region, the importance of a wide salinity range of low IFT, and the importance of the viscosity of the surfactant slug. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs as well as a

  2. LNAPL Removal from Unsaturated Porous Media using Surfactant Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2012-11-19

    A series of unsaturated column experiments was performed to evaluate light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) fate and removal during surfactant solution infiltration. Surfactant-LNAPL phase behavior tests were conducted to optimize the remedial solutions. Packed sand and site sediment columns were first processed to establish representative LNAPL smear zone under unsaturated conditions. Infiltration of low-concentration surfactant was then applied in a stepwise flush mode, with 0.3 column pore volume (PV) of solution in each flush. The influence of infiltrated surfactant solution volume and pH on LNAPL removal was assessed. A LNAPL bank was observed at the very front of the first surfactant infiltration in each column, indicating that a very low surfactant concentration is needed to reduce the LNAPL-water interfacial tension sufficiently enough to mobilize trapped LNAPL under unsaturated conditions. More LNAPL was recovered as additional steps of surfactant infiltration were applied. Up to 99% LNAPL was removed after six infiltration steps, with less than 2.0 PV of total surfactant solution application, suggesting surfactant infiltration may be an effective method for vadose zone LNAPL remediation. The influence of pH tested in this study (3.99~10.85) was insignificant because the buffering capacity of the sediment kept the pH in the column higher than the zero point charge, pHzpc, of the sediment and therefore the difference between surfactant sorption was negligible.

  3. Pulmonary surfactant adsorption is increased by hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Taeusch, H William; Dybbro, Eric; Lu, Karen W

    2008-04-01

    In acute lung injuries, inactivating agents may interfere with transfer (adsorption) of pulmonary surfactants to the interface between air and the aqueous layer that coats the interior of alveoli. Some ionic and nonionic polymers reduce surfactant inactivation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested directly whether an ionic polymer, hyaluronan, or a nonionic polymer, polyethylene glycol, enhanced adsorption of a surfactant used clinically. We used three different methods of measuring adsorption in vitro: a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer; a King/Clements device; and a spreading trough. In addition we measured the effects of both polymers on surfactant turbidity, using this assay as a nonspecific index of aggregation. We found that both hyaluronan and polyethylene glycol significantly increased the rate and degree of surfactant material adsorbed to the surface in all three assays. Hyaluronan was effective in lower concentrations (20-fold) than polyethylene glycol and, unlike polyethylene glycol, hyaluronan did not increase apparent aggregation of surfactant. Surfactant adsorption in the presence of serum was also enhanced by both polymers regardless of whether hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol was included with serum in the subphase or added to the surfactant applied to the surface. Therefore, endogenous polymers in the alveolar subphase, or exogenous polymers added to surfactant used as therapy, may both be important for reducing inactivation of surfactant that occurs with various lung injuries. PMID:18065212

  4. Cycle-Induced Flow and Surfactant Transport in an Alveolus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. H.

    2002-11-01

    The flow and transport in an alveolus are of fundamental importance to partial liquid ventilation, surfactant transport, pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways and gene therapy. We model the system in which an alveolus is partially filled with liquid in the presence of surfactants. Assuming a circular interface due to sufficiently strong surface tension, we can apply two-dimensional bipolar coordinates to describe the system. We then combine analytical and numerical techniques to solve the Stokes flow and the surfactant concentration. In the absence of surfactants, there is no steady streaming because of reversibility of the Stokes flow. The presence of surfactants however induces a non-trivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns (e.g., number of vortices) depend on the parameters, especially on the ratio of inspiration to expiration periods (I:E ratio). Either smaller or larger I:E ratio exhibits two primary vortices but the direction of primary vortices for small I:E is opposite to large I:E. Extension to soluble surfactants is also discussed. For sufficiently high surfactant bulk concentration, the surfactant transport is sorption-controlled and soluble surfactants diminish the size of steady vortices near the alveolar opening. For the estimated steady velocity u 10-5 cm/s, the corresponding Peclet number is 10-7/ D_m. Therefore, for Dm <= 10-7 cm^2/s, the convective transport dominates.

  5. SURFACTANT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY AND FOAM MOBILITY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller; Gary A. Pope; Richard E. Jackson

    2004-07-01

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactants makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. Also, the addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of surfactant and significant reduction of surfactant adsorption. In addition to reduction of interfacial tension to ultra-low values, surfactants and alkali can be designed to alter wettability to enhance oil recovery. An alkaline surfactant process is designed to enhance spontaneous imbibition in fractured, oil-wet, carbonate formations. It is able to recover oil from dolomite core samples from which there was no oil recovery when placed in formation brine. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluted to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs. UTCHEM is a reservoir simulator specially designed for surfactant EOR. A dual-porosity version is demonstrated as a potential scale-up tool for fractured reservoirs.

  6. Role of Silicone Surfactant in Flexible Polyurethane Foam.

    PubMed

    Zhang; Macosko; Davis; Nikolov; Wasan

    1999-07-15

    Grafted copolymers which consist of a polydimethylsiloxane backbone and polyethylene oxide-co-propylene oxide pendant groups are used as surfactants to stabilize the foam cells in the flexible polyurethane foaming process. The mechanical properties of the cured polyurethane foam such as air permeability and foam cell size are affected significantly by the structure of the silicone surfactant used in the formulation. It is shown that silicone surfactant has an important impact on both the bubble generation and the cell window stabilization stage. A series of silicone surfactants with different structures was tested. Surfactants with higher silicone content will provide lower surface tension and thus help increase the number of air bubbles introduced during mixing. These air bubbles serve as the starting point for foam cell growth. As a result, the cured polyurethane foam made with higher silicone content surfactant has a smaller bubble size. It is also shown that silicone surfactant can reduce the cell window drainage rate due to the surface tension gradient along the cell window. The Gibbs film elasticity, the dynamic film elasticity, and the film drainage rate were measured for the first time versus surfactant composition. Surfactants with longer siloxane backbones are shown to give higher film elasticity. Using the vertical film drainage and foam column tests, it is shown that surfactants with higher film elasticity will yield slower drainage rate and better foam cell stability. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10419661

  7. Surfactant-enhanced spreading: Experimental achievements and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, N M; Trybala, A; Arjmandi-Tash, O; Starov, V

    2016-07-01

    Surfactants are broadly used to improve wetting properties of aqueous formulations. The improvement is achieved by essential reduction of liquid/air and solid/liquid interfacial tensions resulting in the decrease of contact angle. For moderately hydrophobic substrates, there is a range of surfactants providing complete wetting of substrate. With the decrease of substrate surface energy, this range of surfactants reduces very quickly and only trisiloxane surfactant solutions are capable to wet completely such highly hydrophobic substrates as polypropylene and parafilm. That is why these surfactants are referred to as superspreaders. The most intriguing feature of wetting surfactant solutions is their ability to spread much faster than pure liquids with spread area, S, being proportional to time, t, S~t, as compared to S~t(0.2) for pure liquids, which wet completely the solid substrate. Trisiloxane surfactant solutions spread faster than other aqueous surfactant solutions, which also provide complete wetting, being superspreaders in the sense of spreading rate as well. The mechanism of fast spreading of surfactant solutions on hydrophobic substrates and much higher spreading rates for trisiloxane solutions are to be explained. Below the available experimental data on superspreading and surfactant-enhanced spreading are analysed/summarised, and possible mechanisms governing the fast spreading are discussed. PMID:26282600

  8. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies

  9. Evaluation of mixed surfactants for improved chemical flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; French, T.R.; Lorenz, P.B.

    1993-02-01

    Phase behavior studies were conducted using combinations of a primary surfactant component and several ethoxylated surfactants. The objective of the study is to evaluate combinations of surfactants, anionic-nonionic and anionic-anionic mixtures, that would yield favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The dependence of the solution behavior on the additive surfactant structure, surfactant type, oil, surfactant proportion, salinity, HLB, and temperature was observed. The results showed that the ethoxylated surfactants can improve the solution behavior of the overall system. The increase in optimum salinity range of these solutions corresponded to an increase in the degree of ethoxylation of additive surfactant, up to a certain limit. The nonionic surfactant additives yielded much higher salinities compared to the results from the ethoxylated anionics tested. The proportion of surfactant component in solution was critical in achieving a balance between the solubilization capacity and the enhancement in the system's salinity tolerance. Some combinations of these types of surfactants showed improved solution behavior with favorable solubilization capacity. The phase inversion temperature (PIT) method has been shown to be a relatively fast method for screening candidate surfactant systems. Comparisons were made using both the conventional salinity scan and the PIT method on selected chemical systems. The results showed good agreement between the salinity regions determined using both methods. A difference in the dependence of optimal salinity on HLB was observed for the different nonionics tested. The linear alkyl alcohol ethoxylates exhibited a behavior distinct from the dialkyl phenols at similar HLB levels with and without the primary sulfonate component in the solution. Other experiments performed at NIPER have shown that surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding has good potential for the recovery of oil from Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR No. 3).

  10. Evaluation of mixed surfactants for improved chemical flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; French, T.R.; Lorenz, P.B.

    1993-02-01

    Phase behavior studies were conducted using combinations of a primary surfactant component and several ethoxylated surfactants. The objective of the study is to evaluate combinations of surfactants, anionic-nonionic and anionic-anionic mixtures, that would yield favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The dependence of the solution behavior on the additive surfactant structure, surfactant type, oil, surfactant proportion, salinity, HLB, and temperature was observed. The results showed that the ethoxylated surfactants can improve the solution behavior of the overall system. The increase in optimum salinity range of these solutions corresponded to an increase in the degree of ethoxylation of additive surfactant, up to a certain limit. The nonionic surfactant additives yielded much higher salinities compared to the results from the ethoxylated anionics tested. The proportion of surfactant component in solution was critical in achieving a balance between the solubilization capacity and the enhancement in the system`s salinity tolerance. Some combinations of these types of surfactants showed improved solution behavior with favorable solubilization capacity. The phase inversion temperature (PIT) method has been shown to be a relatively fast method for screening candidate surfactant systems. Comparisons were made using both the conventional salinity scan and the PIT method on selected chemical systems. The results showed good agreement between the salinity regions determined using both methods. A difference in the dependence of optimal salinity on HLB was observed for the different nonionics tested. The linear alkyl alcohol ethoxylates exhibited a behavior distinct from the dialkyl phenols at similar HLB levels with and without the primary sulfonate component in the solution. Other experiments performed at NIPER have shown that surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding has good potential for the recovery of oil from Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR No. 3).

  11. The surfactant system protects both fetus and newborn.

    PubMed

    Hallman, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant complex and its individual components decrease surface tension, silence inflammatory responses, bind and destroy air-borne microbes, facilitate phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages and bind endogenous and exogenous molecules. Surfactant components generally decrease harmful inflammatory responses. New exogenous surfactants and new indications for surfactant therapy remain to be studied. At term the pool of human surfactant from developing airways extends to the amniotic cavity and to the gastrointestinal tract. Preterm labor-inducing inflammatory ligands (interleukin-1 or lipopolysaccharide) cause a robust induction of surfactant complex and lower the risk of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The effect of antenatal glucocorticoid therapy is complementary. According to transgenic experiments or genetic evidence in humans, surfactant proteins A, D or C (SP-A, SP-D, SP-C), expressed in fetal tissue, influence the onset of term or preterm labor. After birth, the surface tension-reducing and the inflammation-silencing effects of exogenous and endogenous surfactant are complementary. Surfactant proteins influence the genetic predisposition of RDS, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and airway infections in early infancy. Moderate to severe BPD has a strong genetic predisposition. Deleterious mutations of SP-B, ABCA3 or SP-C cause congenital interstitial lung disease that mimics the phenotype of established severe BPD. I propose that lung surfactant protects both the fetus and the newborn. Surfactant ameliorates inflammatory responses that are harmful to the mother, fetus and infant. In chorioamnionitis, inflammatory ligands are carried from the fetal membranes to the alveolar space via amniotic fluid and developing airways. They induce surfactant synthesis and secretion. Surfactant ameliorates severe inflammatory responses in fetal compartments and promotes spontaneous preterm birth. PMID:23736009

  12. Hydrogels of sodium alginate in cationic surfactants: Surfactant dependent modulation of encapsulation/release toward Ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Suraya; Chat, Oyais Ahmad; Maswal, Masrat; Ashraf, Uzma; Rather, Ghulam Mohammad; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2015-11-20

    The interaction of cetyltrimethylammoium bromide (CTAB) and its gemini homologue (butanediyl-1,4-bis (dimethylcetylammonium bromide), 16-4-16 with biocompatible polymer sodium alginate (SA) has been investigated in aqueous medium. Addition of K2CO3 influences viscoelastic properties of surfactant impregnated SA via competition between electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Viscosity of these polymer-surfactant systems increases with increase in concentration of K2CO3, and a cryogel is formed at about 0.5M K2CO3 concentration. The thermal stability of gel (5% SA+0.5M K2CO3) decreases with increase in surfactant concentration, a minimum is observed with increase in 16-4-16 concentration. The impact of surfactant addition on the alginate structure vis-à-vis its drug loading capability and release thereof was studied using Ibuprofen (IBU) as the model drug. The hydrogel with 16-4-16 exhibits higher IBU encapsulation and faster release in comparison to the one containing CTAB. This higher encapsulation-cum-faster release capability has been related to micelle mediated solubilization and greater porosity of the hydrogel with gemini surfactant. PMID:26344266

  13. Bioavailability enhancement by addition of surfactant and surfactant-like compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    The bioavailability and microbial degradation of contaminant compounds (e.g., toluene and naphthalene) were enhanced by adding synthetic surfactants, biosurfactants, and nutrients with surfactant like properties. In addition to enhanced contaminant degradation, these surfactant compounds have the potential to change the availability of natural organic matter (NOM), and thus may affect overall site bioremediation. Two bacterial bioreporter strains that are induced by toluene or naphthalene were used to directly measure contaminant bioavailability. A cell-free biosurfactant product, Tween-80, and an oleophilic fertilizer were added to aqueous suspensions and soil slurries containing toluene or naphthalene. The addition of these surfactant compounds at or below the critical micelle concentration (CMC) enhanced bioavailability as measured by increased levels of bioluminescence. Bioluminescence data were coupled with gas chromatographic analyses. The addition of Tween-80 increased not only the bioavailability of the contaminants but also, in a separate assay, the bioavailability of recalcitrant NOM. The enhanced NOM bioavailability was inferred from measurements of biomass by optical density increases and plate counts. Thus, adding surfactant compounds for enhanced contaminant degradation has the potential to introduce additional competition for nutrients and microbial metabolism, a significant area of concern for in situ site remediation.

  14. The effects of alkylammonium counterions on the aggregation of fluorinated surfactants and surfactant ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Pottage, Matthew J; Greaves, Tamar L; Garvey, Christopher J; Tabor, Rico F

    2016-08-01

    The effects of organic counterions with varying carbon number on surfactant aggregation have been analysed by coupling perfluorooctanoate surfactant anions with various alkylammonium counterions. Both the degree of substitution (primary to tertiary) and alkyl chain length (0-3 carbons) of the counterions were varied to provide a comprehensive matrix of geometries and lipophilicities. Surface activity was measured using pendant drop tensiometry, while temperature-controlled small-angle neutron scattering was used to probe changes in aggregation morphology. It was found that the use of such alkylammonium counterions resulted in a strong preference for bilayer formation even at low surfactant concentration (<2wt%), when compared to simple inorganic counterions such as sodium which favour near-spherical micelles. At increased temperatures, some counterions led to unique phase behaviour wherein a transition between two structurally different lamellar phases is seen, rationalised as a transition into a microscopic phase separation wherein a surfactant-rich lamellar phase coexists with a dilute micellar phase. The results indicate that aggregation is controlled by a delicate balance of counterion size, hydrophilicity and diffuseness of charge, providing new methods for the subtle control of surfactant solutions. PMID:27156087

  15. Microemulsion-based lycopene extraction: Effect of surfactants, co-surfactants and pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Rigi, Atefeh; Abbasi, Soleiman

    2016-04-15

    Lycopene is a potent antioxidant that has received extensive attention recently. Due to the challenges encountered with current methods of lycopene extraction using hazardous solvents, industry calls for a greener, safer and more efficient process. The main purpose of present study was application of microemulsion technique to extract lycopene from tomato pomace. In this respect, the effect of eight different surfactants, four different co-surfactants, and ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments on lycopene extraction efficiency was examined. Experimental results revealed that application of combined ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments, saponin as a natural surfactant, and glycerol as a co-surfactant, in the bicontinuous region of microemulsion was the optimal experimental conditions resulting in a microemulsion containing 409.68±0.68 μg/glycopene. The high lycopene concentration achieved, indicates that microemulsion technique, using a low-cost natural surfactant could be promising for a simple and safe separation of lycopene from tomato pomace and possibly from tomato industrial wastes. PMID:26617046

  16. Liquid and surfactant delivery into pulmonary airways

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, David; Fujioka, Hideki; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the mechanisms by which liquids and surfactants can be delivered into the pulmonary airways. These are instilled and transported throughout the lung in clinical therapies such as surfactant replacement therapy, partial liquid ventilation and drug delivery. The success of these treatments is contingent on the liquid distribution and the delivery to targeted regions of the lung. The targeting of a liquid plug can be influenced by a variety of factors such as the physical properties of the liquid, the interfacial activity, the gravitational orientation, instillation method and propagation speed. We provide a review of experimental and theoretical studies that examine these effects in single tubes or channels, in tubes with single bifurcations and in the whole lung. PMID:18585985

  17. Surfactants and interfacial phenomena, 2nd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen

    1989-01-01

    The second edition of this monograph on surfactants has been updated to reflect recent advances in our knowledge of theory and practices. New applications run the gamut from microelectronics and magnetic recording, to biotechnology and nonconventional energy conversion. There is a new chapter on the interactions between surfactants. New sections have been added, and original sections expanded, on such topics as ultralow liquid-liquid interfacial tension; microemulsions, miniemulsions, and multiple emulsions; liquid crystal formation; hydrotropy; and steric forces in the stabilization of dispersions. There is also new material on lime soap dispersing agents; fabric softeners, adsorption and wetting of solid surfaces, both equilibrium and none-equilibrium; the relationship between adsorption and micellation in aqueous solutions and its effect on surface tension reduction; and factors determining micellar structure and shape.

  18. Surfactant protein D in human lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hartl, D; Griese, M

    2006-06-01

    The lung is continuously exposed to inhaled pollutants, microbes and allergens. Therefore, the pulmonary immune system has to defend against harmful pathogens, while an inappropriate inflammatory response to harmless particles must be avoided. In the bronchoalveolar space this critical balance is maintained by innate immune proteins, termed surfactant proteins. Among these, surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays a central role in the pulmonary host defence and the modulation of allergic responses. Several human lung diseases are characterized by decreased levels of bronchoalveolar SP-D. Thus, recombinant SP-D has been proposed as a therapeutical option for cystic fibrosis, neonatal lung disease and smoking-induced emphysema. Furthermore, SP-D serum levels can be used as disease activity markers for interstitial lung diseases. This review illustrates the emerging role of SP-D translated from in vitro studies to human lung diseases. PMID:16684127

  19. Amphipols: Polymeric surfactants for membrane biology research.

    SciTech Connect

    Popot, J.-L.; Berry, E.A.; Charvolin, D.; Creuzenet, C.; Ebel, C.; Engelman, D.M.; Flotenmeyer, M.; Giusti, F.; Gohon, Y.; Hong, Q.; Lakey, J.H.; Leonard, K.; Shuman, H.A.; Timmins, P.; Warschawski, D.E.; Zito, F.; Zoonens, M.; Pucci, B.; Tribet, C.

    2003-06-20

    Membrane proteins classically are handled in aqueous solutions as complexes with detergents. The dissociating character of detergents, combined with the need to maintain an excess of them, frequently results in more or less rapid inactivation of the protein under study. Over the past few years, we have endeavored to develop a novel family of surfactants, dubbed amphipols (APs). APs are amphiphilic polymers that bind to the transmembrane surface of the protein in a noncovalent but, in the absence of a competing surfactant, quasi-irreversible manner. Membrane proteins complexed by APs are in their native state, stable, and they remain water soluble in the absence of detergent or free APs. An update is presented of the current knowledge about these compounds and their demonstrated or putative uses in membrane biology.

  20. Surfactant controlled synthesis of crystalline phosphovanadate nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Asnani, Minakshi; Thomas, Jency; Sen, Prasenjit; Ramanan, Arunachalam . E-mail: aramanan@chemistry.iitd.ac.in

    2007-04-12

    Phosphovanadate nanorods were obtained in a reaction of vanadium (V) oxide as a precursor and a cationic surfactant, dodecylpyridinium chloride, as structure directing template at pH {approx}3 at room temperature. The composition and morphology of the nanorods was established by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The obtained nanorods have diameters of 40-60 nm with lengths up to 1 {mu}m. The effect of reaction parameters such as concentration of surfactant and pH of the solution on the growth of nanorods has been investigated. A plausible mechanism involving the coalescence of nanoparticle 'seeds' leading to one-dimensional nanorods is also discussed. The same reaction when performed under hydrothermal condition, keeping other reaction parameters unchanged, resulted in the formation of phosphovanadate nanospheres of diameter 10-15 nm.

  1. Surfactant chemical technology works for environmental jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, J.T. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on surface active agents that have been employed in mining and mineral processing operations for many years. They are beginning to find increasing use as tools to deal with pressing environmental problems in the industry. Surface active agents are attracting particular attention from mining operators as environmental regulations as well as safety and health standards continue to tighten. These surfactants comprise a variety of products that have different end uses. They promote foaming, wetting, emulsification and crystal growth modification, among other functions. And they are generally environmentally friendly and non-toxic. Among the major environmental issues facing mine operators are effluent control, dust and fume suppression, acid drainage control and soil reclamation and remediation. Surfactants have already been put to work in each of these areas.

  2. Polymer enrichment decelerates surfactant membranes near interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipfert, F.; Frielinghaus, H.; Holderer, O.; Mattauch, S.; Monkenbusch, M.; Arend, N.; Richter, D.

    2014-04-01

    Close to a planar surface, lamellar structures are imposed upon otherwise bulk bicontinuous microemulsions. Thermally induced membrane undulations are modified by the presence of the rigid interface. While it has been shown that a pure membrane's dynamics are accelerated close to the interface, we observed nearly unchanged relaxation rates for membranes spiked with large amphiphilic diblock copolymers. An increase of the polymer concentration by a factor of 2-3 for the first and second surfactant membrane layers was observed. We interpret the reduced relaxation times as the result of an interplay between the bending rigidity and the characteristic distance of the first surfactant membrane to the rigid interface, which causes the hydrodynamic and steric interface effects described in Seifert's theory. The influence of these effects on decorated membranes yields a reduction of the frequencies and an amplification of the amplitudes of long-wavelength undulations, which are in accordance to our experimental findings.

  3. The Equilibrium Spreading Tension of Pulmonary Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Maayan P; Hall, Stephen B

    2015-12-01

    Monomolecular films at an air/water interface coexist at the equilibrium spreading tension (γ(e)) with the bulk phase from which they form. For individual phospholipids, γ(e) is single-valued, and separates conditions at which hydrated vesicles adsorb from tensions at which overcompressed monolayers collapse. With pulmonary surfactant, isotherms show that monolayers compressed on the surface of bubbles coexist with the three-dimensional collapsed phase over a range of surface tensions. γ(e) therefore represents a range rather than a single value of surface tension. Between the upper and lower ends of this range, rates of collapse for spread and adsorbed films decrease substantially. Changes during adsorption across this narrow region of coexistence between the two- and three-dimensional structures at least partially explain how alveolar films of pulmonary surfactant become resistant to collapse. PMID:26583569

  4. Biosurfactants: a sustainable replacement for chemical surfactants?

    PubMed

    Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2012-09-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants produced by bacteria and yeasts provide significant opportunities to replace chemical surfactants with sustainable biologically produced alternatives in bulk commercial products such as laundry detergents and surface cleaners. Sophorolipids are already available in sufficient yield to make their use feasible while rhamnolipids and mannosylerythritol lipids require further development. The ability to tailor the biosurfactant produced to the specific needs of the product formulation will be an important future step. PMID:22618240

  5. Use of micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration at low surfactant concentrations and with anionic-nonionic surfactant mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Fillipi, B.R.; Brant, L.W.; Scamehorn, J.F.; Christian, S.D.

    1999-05-01

    Micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration is a separation technique which can be used to remove metal ions or dissolved organics from water. Metal ions bind to the surface of negatively charged micelles of an anionic surfactant while organic solutes tend to dissolve or solubilized within the micelles. The mixture is then forced through an ultrafiltration membrane with pore sizes small enough to block passage of the micelles and associated metal ions and/or dissolved organics. Monomeric or unassociated surfactant passes through the membrane and does not contribute to the separation. This paper considers advantages of addition of small concentrations of nonionic surfactant to an anionic surfactant; the resulting anionic-nonionic mixed micelles exhibit negative deviation from ideality of mixing which leads to a smaller fraction of the surfactant being present as monomer and a subsequently larger fraction present in the micellar form. The addition of nonionic surfactant improved the separation of divalent zinc substantially at total concentrations above the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of the anionic surfactant. Both zinc and tert-butylphenol (a nonionic organic solute) show unexpected rejection at surfactant concentrations moderately below the cmc, where micelles are absent. This is considered as due to a higher surfactant concentration in the gel layer adjacent to the membrane where micelles are present. Reduction of this rejection at lower transmembrane pressure drops supports this mechanism. Some rejection of zinc was observed in the absence of surfactant but not of tert-butylphenol, indicating an additional effect of membrane charge for ionic solutes.

  6. Partitioning of phenanthrene into surfactant hemi-micelles on the bacterial cell surface and implications for surfactant-enhanced biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Lanzon, Jacquelyn B; Brown, Derick G

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the ability of a surfactant to enhance the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOC) requires the formation of surfactant hemi-micelles on the bacterial cell surface and subsequent partitioning of HOC into the hemi-micelles. However, the studies did not provide direct evidence of HOC partitioning into surfactant hemi-micelles on the bacterial cell surface. In this study, direct evidence is provided to demonstrate that the nonionic surfactant Brij 30 forms hemi-micelles on the bacterial cell surface and that phenanthrene sorption at the bacterial surface is enhanced by the surfactant. These results are in agreement with the current theory describing surfactant-enhanced HOC bioavailability. This enhanced bioavailability is put into context with microbial kinetics and system partitioning processes, and it is demonstrated that the addition of surfactant can enhance, have no effect, or inhibit HOC biodegradation depending upon surfactant concentration and microbial growth rate. Understanding these non-linear relationships between surfactant-enhanced HOC bioavailability, biodegradation kinetics, and system partitioning will assist in the design and implementation of surfactant-enhanced bioremediation programs. PMID:23764610

  7. Adaptations to hibernation in lung surfactant composition of 13-lined ground squirrels influence surfactant lipid phase segregation properties.

    PubMed

    Suri, Lakshmi N M; Cruz, Antonio; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Staples, James F; Possmayer, Fred; Orgeig, Sandra; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lines the entire alveolar surface, serving primarily to reduce the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Surfactant films adsorb as a monolayer interspersed with multilayers with surfactant lipids segregating into different phases or domains. Temperature variation, which influences lipid physical properties, affects both the lipid phase segregation and the surface activity of surfactants. In hibernating animals, such as 13-lined ground squirrels, which vary their body temperature, surfactant must be functional over a wide range of temperatures. We hypothesised that surfactant from the 13-lined ground squirrel, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, would undergo appropriate lipid structural re-arrangements at air-water interfaces to generate phase separation, sufficient to attain the low surface tensions required to remain stable at both low and high body temperatures. Here, we examined pressure-area isotherms at 10, 25 and 37°C and found that surfactant films from both hibernating and summer-active squirrels reached their highest surface pressure on the Wilhelmy-Langmuir balance at 10°C. Epifluorescence microscopy demonstrated that films of hibernating squirrel surfactant display different lipid micro-domain organisation characteristics than surfactant from summer-active squirrels. These differences were also reflected at the nanoscale as determined by atomic force microscopy. Such re-arrangement of lipid domains in the relatively more fluid surfactant films of hibernating squirrels may contribute to overcoming collapse pressures and support low surface tension during the normal breathing cycle at low body temperatures. PMID:23506681

  8. Therapeutic surfactant-stripped frozen micelles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumiao; Song, Wentao; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Unsal, Hande; Federizon, Jasmin; Rzayev, Javid; Sukumaran, Dinesh K.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Injectable hydrophobic drugs are typically dissolved in surfactants and non-aqueous solvents which can induce negative side-effects. Alternatives like ‘top-down' fine milling of excipient-free injectable drug suspensions are not yet clinically viable and ‘bottom-up' self-assembled delivery systems usually substitute one solubilizing excipient for another, bringing new issues to consider. Here, we show that Pluronic (Poloxamer) block copolymers are amenable to low-temperature processing to strip away all free and loosely bound surfactant, leaving behind concentrated, kinetically frozen drug micelles containing minimal solubilizing excipient. This approach was validated for phylloquinone, cyclosporine, testosterone undecanoate, cabazitaxel and seven other bioactive molecules, achieving sizes between 45 and 160 nm and drug to solubilizer molar ratios 2–3 orders of magnitude higher than current formulations. Hypertonic saline or co-loaded cargo was found to prevent aggregation in some cases. Use of surfactant-stripped micelles avoided potential risks associated with other injectable formulations. Mechanistic insights are elucidated and therapeutic dose responses are demonstrated. PMID:27193558

  9. How surfactants influence evaporation-driven flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liepelt, Robert; Marin, Alvaro; Rossi, Massimiliano; Kähler, Christian J.

    2014-11-01

    Capillary flows appear spontaneously in sessile evaporating drops and give rise to particle accumulation around the contact lines, commonly known as coffee-stain effect (Deegan et al., Nature, 1997). On the other hand, out-of-equilibrium thermal effects may induce Marangoni flows in the droplet's surface that play an important role in the flow patterns and in the deposits left on the substrate. Some authors have argued that contamination or the presence of surfactants might reduce or eventually totally annul the Marangoni flow (Hu & Larson, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2006). On the contrary, others have shown an enhancement of the reverse surface flow (Sempels et al., Nat. Commun., 2012). In this work, we employ Astigmatic Particle Tracking Velocimetry (APTV) to obtain the 3D3C evaporation-driven flow in both bulk and droplet's surface, using surfactants of different ionic characters and solubility. Our conclusions lead to a complex scenario in which different surfactants and concentrations yield very different surface-flow patterns, which eventually might influence the colloidal deposition patterns.

  10. Surfactants for separation processes: Enhanced ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Sadaoui, Z.; Azoug, C.; Charbit, G.; Charbit, F.

    1998-08-01

    Pollution by toxic metal compounds is a deep concern in all industrial countries. A process based on enhanced ultrafiltration is proposed in order to separate cadmium and chromate ions from wastewater. Inorganic membranes (zirconium oxide coated on carbon) are used in the separation cell, and ionic surfactants (NaDS or CTABr) are added in the effluent. The surfactants, which entrap metal ions present in the feed, are retained by the membrane barrier and thus the permeate is clear of metal compounds. This paper is devoted to precise experimental fields in which the permeate is lower than 0.2 g{center_dot}m{sup {minus}3} for cadmium and 0.1 g{center_dot}m{sup {minus}3} for chromate, these concentrations being the standards for European countries. The paper presents only experimental results describing the influence of operating conditions on the efficiency of the separation; a theory of rejection of pure surfactant by the same membranes has recently been published. As long as the feed concentration is less than or equal to 150 g{center_dot}m{sup {minus}3} for cadmium or 20 g{center_dot}m{sup {minus}3} for hexavalent chromium (respectively, 750 or 200 times the norm), a satisfactory permeate is obtained in a single stage process at 25 and 30 C; more than 99% of metallic ions is retained.

  11. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B.; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient. PMID:26534840

  12. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B.; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient.

  13. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient. PMID:26534840

  14. Therapeutic surfactant-stripped frozen micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yumiao; Song, Wentao; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Unsal, Hande; Federizon, Jasmin; Rzayev, Javid; Sukumaran, Dinesh K.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-05-01

    Injectable hydrophobic drugs are typically dissolved in surfactants and non-aqueous solvents which can induce negative side-effects. Alternatives like `top-down' fine milling of excipient-free injectable drug suspensions are not yet clinically viable and `bottom-up' self-assembled delivery systems usually substitute one solubilizing excipient for another, bringing new issues to consider. Here, we show that Pluronic (Poloxamer) block copolymers are amenable to low-temperature processing to strip away all free and loosely bound surfactant, leaving behind concentrated, kinetically frozen drug micelles containing minimal solubilizing excipient. This approach was validated for phylloquinone, cyclosporine, testosterone undecanoate, cabazitaxel and seven other bioactive molecules, achieving sizes between 45 and 160 nm and drug to solubilizer molar ratios 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than current formulations. Hypertonic saline or co-loaded cargo was found to prevent aggregation in some cases. Use of surfactant-stripped micelles avoided potential risks associated with other injectable formulations. Mechanistic insights are elucidated and therapeutic dose responses are demonstrated.

  15. Evaulation of irritation potential of surfactant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Turkoglu, M; Sakr, A

    1999-12-01

    Irritation potential of sodium laureth sulfate (SLES) alone, and in combination with lauryl glucoside (LG), polysorbate 20 (PS) and cocoamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) was tested in 13 human subjects. Four main and six sub-formulations were prepared and evaluated. Formulations were applied to the forearm as a 24 h close patch study. Irritation was scored by two different methods using an in vivo clinical protocol based on visual scoring and on the stratum corneum capacitance measurement. Irritation was found to be dose dependent. At 2 mg/patch level ten subjects did not show any skin reaction. At 20 mg/patch level eleven subjects showed a broad range of skin irritation. The highest irritation was observed with the formula that contained SLES, LG, and cocamide DEA together. Among the sub-formulations, cocamide DEA showed the highest irritation grade. A statistically significant correlation was observed between visual, clinical and corneometer scores. It was concluded that the irritation potential of surfactants was related to the total surfactant concentration, application mode, and the thermodynamic activity of molecules in the solution as well as the chemical structure of the surfactant molecules. PMID:18503452

  16. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-10-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Alfoterra-38 (0.05 wt%), Alfoterra-35 (0.05 wt%), SS-6656 (0.05 wt%), and DTAB (1 wt%) altered the wettability of the initially oil-wet calcite plate to an intermediate/water-wet state. Low IFT ({approx}10{sup -3} dynes/cm) is obtained with surfactants 5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability and mobilization studies.

  17. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory imbibition tests show that imbibition rate is not very sensitive to the surfactant concentration (in the range of 0.05-0.2 wt%) and small amounts of trapped gas saturation. It is however very sensitive to oil permeability and water-oil-ratio. Less than 0.5 M Na2CO3 is needed for in situ soap generation and low adsorption; NaCl can be added to reach the necessary total salinity. The simulation result matches the laboratory imbibition experimental data. Small fracture spacing and high permeability would be needed for high rate of recovery.

  18. Interactions of anionic surfactants with methemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Gebicka, Lidia; Banasiak, Ewa

    2011-03-01

    Interactions of two anionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) at concentrations below and above critical micelle concentration with methemoglobin (metHb) have been investigated by conventional as well as by stopped-flow absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The absorption spectra of metHb in AOT reverse micelles have been also analyzed. Both surfactants in their monomeric form convert metHb to reversible hemichrome. This is connected with a diminution of peroxidase-like activity of metHb and with an increase of the susceptibility of heme for a damage by H(2)O(2). In micellar solutions of AOT and SDS as well as in AOT reverse micelles pentacoordinated ferric species seems to be the predominant form of this protein. It has been concluded, basing on a kinetic analysis, that conformational changes in the heme environment of metHb as induced by both surfactants occur independently of the alterations in the tertiary structure of this protein. PMID:21131182

  19. Therapeutic surfactant-stripped frozen micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumiao; Song, Wentao; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Unsal, Hande; Federizon, Jasmin; Rzayev, Javid; Sukumaran, Dinesh K; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2016-01-01

    Injectable hydrophobic drugs are typically dissolved in surfactants and non-aqueous solvents which can induce negative side-effects. Alternatives like 'top-down' fine milling of excipient-free injectable drug suspensions are not yet clinically viable and 'bottom-up' self-assembled delivery systems usually substitute one solubilizing excipient for another, bringing new issues to consider. Here, we show that Pluronic (Poloxamer) block copolymers are amenable to low-temperature processing to strip away all free and loosely bound surfactant, leaving behind concentrated, kinetically frozen drug micelles containing minimal solubilizing excipient. This approach was validated for phylloquinone, cyclosporine, testosterone undecanoate, cabazitaxel and seven other bioactive molecules, achieving sizes between 45 and 160 nm and drug to solubilizer molar ratios 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than current formulations. Hypertonic saline or co-loaded cargo was found to prevent aggregation in some cases. Use of surfactant-stripped micelles avoided potential risks associated with other injectable formulations. Mechanistic insights are elucidated and therapeutic dose responses are demonstrated. PMID:27193558

  20. Estimation hydrophilic-lipophilic balance number of surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawignya, Harsa; Prasetyaningrum, Aji; Dyartanti, Endah R.; Kusworo, Tutuk D.; Pramudono, Bambang

    2016-02-01

    Any type of surfactant has a hydrophilic-lipophilic balance number (HLB number) of different. There are several methods for determining the HLB number, with ohysical properties of surfactant (solubility cloud point and interfacial tension), CMC methods and by thermodynamics properties (Free energy Gibbs). This paper proposes to determined HLB numbers from interfelation methods. The result of study indicated that the CMC method described by Hair and Moulik espesially for nonionic surfactant. The application of exess Gibbs free energy and by implication activity coefficient provides the ability to predict the behavior of surfactants in multi component mixtures of different concentration. Determination of HLB number by solubility and cloud point parameter is spesific for anionic and nonionic surfactant but this methods not available for cationic surfactants.

  1. Rheological properties of ovalbumin hydrogels as affected by surfactants addition.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Messina, Paula V; Dodero, Veronica I; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-04-01

    The gel properties of ovalbumin mixtures with three different surfactants (sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate and sodium dodecanoate) have been studied by rheological techniques. The gel elasticities were determined as a function of surfactant concentration and surfactant type. The fractal dimension of the formed structures was evaluated from plots of storage modulus against surfactant concentration. The role of electrostatic, hydrophobic and disulfide SS interactions in these systems has been demonstrated to be the predominant. The viscosity of these structures tends to increase with surfactant concentration, except for the fluorinated one. Unfolded ovalbumin molecules tend to form fibrillar structures that tend to increase with surfactant concentration, except for the fluorinated one. This fact has been related to the particular nature of this molecule. PMID:21262258

  2. Surfactant-induced postsynthetic modulation of Pd nanoparticle crystallinity.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wei, Y.; Zhu, L.; Li, D.; Jiang, J. S.; Markovic, N. M.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Sun, S.

    2011-02-01

    Modulation of Pd nanoparticle (NP) crystallinity is achieved by switching the surfactants of different binding strengths. Pd NPs synthesized in the presence of weak binding surfactants such as oleylamine possess polyhedral shapes and a polycrystalline nature. When oleylamine is substituted by trioctylphosphine, a much stronger binding surfactant, the particles become spherical and their crystallinity decreases significantly. Moreover, the Pd NPs reconvert their polycrystalline structure when the surfactant is switched back to oleylamine. Through control experiments and molecular dynamics simulation, we propose that this unusual nanocrystallinity transition induced by surfactant exchange was resulted from a counterbalance between the surfactant binding energy and the nanocrystal adhesive energy. The findings represent a novel postsynthetic approach to tailoring the structure and corresponding functional performance of nanomaterials.

  3. Infrared imaging of a solid phase surfactant monolayer.

    PubMed

    Conover, T A; Saylor, J R

    2006-08-01

    A new method for visualizing solid phase surfactant monolayers is presented. This method utilizes infrared (IR) imaging of the surface of a warm subphase covered by the monolayer. When the subphase is deep, natural convection occurs, resulting in a complex surface temperature field that is easily visualized using an IR camera. The presence of a surfactant monolayer changes the hydrodynamic boundary condition at the interface, dramatically altering the surface temperature field, and permitting the differentiation of surfactant-covered and surfactant-free regions. In this work, solid phase monolayers are imaged using this IR method. Fractures in the monolayer are dramatically visualized because of the sudden elimination of surfactant in the region opened up by the crack. The method is demonstrated in a wind/water tunnel, where a stearic acid monolayer is deposited and a crack is created through shear on the surfactant surface, created by suddenly increasing the velocity of the air over the water. PMID:16863234

  4. [Pulmonary surfactant homeostasis associated genetic abnormalities and lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaojing; Sun, Xiuzhu; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng; Zhao, Xueming; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Huabin; Liu, Yan

    2016-08-10

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is synthesized and secreted by alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells, which is a complex compound formed by proteins and lipids. Surfactant participates in a range of physiological processes such as reducing the surface tension, keeping the balance of alveolar fluid, maintaining normal alveolar morphology and conducting host defense. Genetic disorders of the surfactant homeostasis genes may result in lack of surfactant or cytotoxicity, and lead to multiple lung diseases in neonates, children and adults, including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, interstitial pneumonia, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper has provided a review for the functions and processes of pulmonary surfactant metabolism, as well as the connection between disorders of surfactant homeostasis genes and lung diseases. PMID:27455022

  5. Enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Ooshima, H.; Sakata, M.; Harano, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of surfactants on enzymatic saccharification of cellulose have been studied. Nonionic, amphoteric, and cationic surfactants enhanced the saccharification, while anionic surfactant did not. Cationic and anionic surfactants denatured cellulase in their relatively low concentrations, namely, more than 0.008 and 0.001%, respectively. Using nonionic surfactant Tween 20, which is most effective to the enhancement (e.g., the fractional conversion attained by 72 h saccharification of 5 wt % Avicel in the presence of 0.05 wt % Tween 20 is increased by 35%), actions of surfactant have been examined. As the results, it was suggested that Tween 20 plays an important role in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose and that Tween 20 disturbs the adsorption of endoglucanase on cellulose, i.e., varies the adsorption balance of endo- and exoglucanase, resulting in enhancing the reaction. The influence of Tween 20 to the saccharification was found to remain in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of Avicel.

  6. Investigation of Polymer-Surfactant and Polymer-Drug-Surfactant Miscibility for Solid Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Gumaste, Suhas G; Gupta, Simerdeep Singh; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2016-09-01

    In a solid dispersion (SD), the drug is generally dispersed either molecularly or in the amorphous state in polymeric carriers, and the addition of a surfactant is often important to ensure drug release from such a system. The objective of this investigation was to screen systematically polymer-surfactant and polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility by using the film casting method. Miscibility of the crystalline solid surfactant, poloxamer 188, with two commonly used amorphous polymeric carriers, Soluplus® and HPMCAS, was first studied. Then, polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility was determined using itraconazole as the model drug, and ternary phase diagrams were constructed. The casted films were examined by DSC, PXRD and polarized light microscopy for any crystallization or phase separation of surfactant, drug or both in freshly prepared films and after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 7, 14, and 30 days. The miscibility of poloxamer 188 with Soluplus® was <10% w/w, while its miscibility with HPMCAS was at least 30% w/w. Although itraconazole by itself was miscible with Soluplus® up to 40% w/w, the presence of poloxamer drastically reduced its miscibility to <10%. In contrast, poloxamer 188 had minimal impact on HPMCAS-itraconazole miscibility. For example, the phase diagram showed amorphous miscibility of HPMCAS, itraconazole, and poloxamer 188 at 54, 23, and 23% w/w, respectively, even after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 1 month. Thus, a relatively simple and practical method of screening miscibility of different components and ultimately physical stability of SD is provided. The results also identify the HPMCAS-poloxamer 188 mixture as an optimal surface-active carrier system for SD. PMID:27301752

  7. Surfactant effects on environmental behavior of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    The potential effects of adjuvants, including surfactants used in pesticide formulation, have been extensively studied for many small organic chemicals, but similar investigation on pesticides is limited in most cases. Solubilizing effects leading to the apparently increased water solubility of a pesticide are commonly known through the preparation of formulations, but fundamental profiles, especially for a specific monodisperse surfactant, are not fully studied. Reduced volatilization of a pesticide from the formulation can be explained by analogy of a very simple organic chemical, but the actual mechanism for the pesticide is still obscure. In contrast, from the point of view of avoiding groundwater contamination with a pesticide, adsorption/desorption profiles in the presence of surfactants and adjuvants have been examined extensively as well as pesticide mobility in the soil column. The basic mechanism in micelle-catalyzed hydrolysis is well known, and theoretical approaches including the PPIE model have succeeded in explaining the observed effects of surfactants, but its application to pesticides is also limited. Photolysis, especially in an aqueous phase, is in the same situation. The dilution effect in the real environment would show these effects on hydrolysis and photolysis to be much less than expected from the laboratory basic studies, but more information is necessary to examine the practical extent of the effects in an early stage of applying a pesticide formulation to crops and soil. Many adjuvants, including surfactants, are biodegradable in the soil environment, and thus their effects on the biodegradation of a pesticide in soil and sediment may be limited, as demonstrated by field trials. Not only from the theoretical but also the practical aspect, the foliar uptake of pesticide in the presence of adjuvants has been investigated extensively and some prediction on the ease of foliar uptake can be realized in relation to the formulation technology

  8. Surfactant and its role in the pathobiology of pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Jennifer R; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex surface-active substance comprised of key phospholipids and proteins that has many essential functions. Surfactant's unique composition is integrally related to its surface-active properties, its critical role in host defense, and emerging immunomodulatory activities ascribed to surfactant lipids. Together these effector functions provide for lung stability and protection from a barrage of potentially virulent infectious pathogens. PMID:21945366

  9. Surfactant/polymer chemical flooding. Volumes 1-2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The two reprint volumes on surfactant/polymer flooding of necessity contain papers on the subject of chemical flooding. The subject was narrowed to include only surfactant/polymer flooding. An overview of chemical flooding is given. Some of the titles are: Surfactant/Oil/Brine phase behavior; Miscellar Flooding-compositional effects on oil displacement; relationships of trapped oil saturation to petrophysical properties of porous media; mobilization of waterflood residual oil; and microemulsion phase behavior.

  10. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller; Gary A. Pope

    2005-07-01

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A combination of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of surfactant and significant reduction of surfactant adsorption. In addition to reduction of interfacial tension to ultra-low values, surfactants and alkali can be designed to alter wettability to enhance oil recovery. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT is more challenging since the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the interdependence of the various components for oil recovery. An alkaline surfactant process is designed to enhance spontaneous imbibition in fractured, oil-wet, carbonate formations. It is able to recover oil from dolomite core samples from which there was no oil recovery when placed in formation brine. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs. UTCHEM is a reservoir simulator specially designed for surfactant EOR. It has been modified to represent the effects of a change in wettability. Simulated case studies demonstrate the effects of wettability.

  11. Solution properties and electrospinning of phosphonium gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hemp, Sean T; Hudson, Amanda G; Allen, Michael H; Pole, Sandeep S; Moore, Robert B; Long, Timothy E

    2014-06-14

    Bis(diphenylphosphino)alkanes quantitatively react with excess 1-bromododecane to prepare novel phosphonium gemini surfactants with spacer lengths ranging from 2 to 4 methylenes (12-2/3/4-12P). Dodecyltriphenylphosphonium bromide (DTPP), a monomeric surfactant analog, was readily water soluble, however, in sharp contrast, phosphonium gemini surfactants were poorly soluble in water due to two hydrophobic tails and relatively hydrophobic cationic head groups containing phenyl substituents. Isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal a measurable critical micelle concentration for the 12-2-12P phosphonium gemini surfactant in water at 25 °C. Subsequent studies in 50/50 v/v water-methanol at 25 °C showed a CMC of 1.0 mM for 12-2-12P. All phosphonium gemini surfactants effectively complexed nucleic acids, but failed to deliver nucleic acids in vitro to HeLa cells. The solution behavior of phosphonium gemini surfactants was investigated in chloroform, which is an organic solvent where reverse micellar structures are favored. Solution rheology in chloroform explored the solution behavior of the phosphonium gemini surfactants compared to DTPP. The 12-2-12P and 12-3-12P gemini surfactants were successfully electrospun from chloroform to generate uniform fibers while 12-4-12P gemini surfactant and DTPP only electrosprayed to form droplets. PMID:24733359

  12. Infasurf and Curosurf: Theoretical and Practical Considerations with New Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy N.; Cunsolo, Stephanie M.; Gal, Peter; Ransom, J. Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Type II pneumocytes, normally responsible for surfactant production and release, are insufficiently formed and differentiated in the premature infant born before 34 weeks' gestation. Without an adequate amount of pulmonary surfactant, alveolar surface tension increases, leading to collapse and decreased lung compliance. Pulmonary surfactants are naturally occurring substances made of lipids and proteins. They lower surface tension at the interface between the air in the lungs, specifically at the alveoli, and the blood in the capillaries. This review examines the relative benefits of the two most recently marketed surfactants, calfactan (Infasurf) and poractant alfa (Curosurf). PMID:23300398

  13. Pulmonary surfactant: no mere paint on the alveolar wall.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, T E

    1996-12-01

    The gas-liquid interface within the alveolus is completely lined with a complex mixture of lipids and unique proteins termed pulmonary surfactant, which both reduces surface tension and permits it to vary directly with the radius of curvature. In this way it minimizes the work of breathing and permits alveoli of different sizes to exist in equilibrium. However, surfactant does far more in that it also controls fluid balance in the lung and appears to play a key role in host defence. Either a deficiency in surfactant or an aberrant surfactant results in atelectasis and oedema. The surfactant system is very dynamic: alveolar surfactant phosphatidylcholine, the principal component, having a half life of only a few hours, with as much as 85% being recycled. Although distortion of the alveolar type II cell is now accepted as the principal stimulus for release, much remains to be discovered of modulating factors and intracellular signalling in the control of surfactant homeostasis. Likewise, many questions remain concerning the control of synthesis of the surfactant phospholipids, neutral lipids and proteins and their assembly into the tubular myelin form of alveolar surfactant, the refining of the monolayer with breathing, the control of re-uptake of different components into the type II cells and the roles of the proteins. PMID:9441113

  14. Flexible polyelectrolyte conformation in the presence of oppositely charged surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, P S; Diehl, A

    2007-10-01

    Conformational behavior of flexible polyelectrolytes in the presence of monovalent cationic surfactants is examined. A simple model is presented for the formation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes in salt-free solutions in the framework of the Debye-Hückel-Bjerrum-Manning and Flory theories, including explicitly the hydrophobic interactions between the associated surfactant molecules on the polyelectrolyte. The distribution of complexes is calculated as a function of the surfactant concentration and a discrete conformational transition between an elongated coil and a compact globule was found, in agreement with experimental observations. PMID:17995019

  15. Theory of Energy Level Tuning in Quantum Dots by Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Wang, Lin-Wang; Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Team

    2015-03-01

    Besides quantum confinement that provides control of the quantum dot (QD) band gap, surface ligands allow control of the absolute energy levels. We theoretically investigate energy level tuning in PbS QD by surfactant exchange. We perform direct calculations of real-size QD with various surfactants within the frame of the density functional theory and explicitly analyze the influence of the surfactants on the electronic properties of the QD. This work provides a hint for predictable control of the absolute energy levels and their fine tuning within 3 eV range by modification of big and small surfactants that simultaneously passivate the QD surface.

  16. The interactions between surfactants and vesicles: Dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuei-Chun; Lin, Chun-Min; Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Sheng, Yu-Jane

    2009-06-01

    The interactions between surfactants and vesicles formed by double-tail amphiphiles are investigated by the dissipative particle dynamics. As the surfactant concentration is increased, vesicle solubilization can be generally described by the three-stage hypothesis including vesicular region, vesicle-micelle coexistence, and mixed micellar region. We study the partition of surfactants between the bilayer phase and the aqueous phase where a higher value of K indicates that more surfactant molecules are incorporated in the bilayer. It is found that ln(K-1) is proportional to the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), which depicts the degree of hydrophilicity associated with a surfactant. As the overall hydrophilicity of surfactants increases, i.e., higher HLB, K declines and vice versa. When the amounts of surfactants reach a critical point, the solubilization begins and the coexistence of vesicles and mixed micelles is observed. Further increase in the surfactant concentration results in total collapse of the vesicle. Consistent with experimental observations, the three stages are identified through the vesicle size-surfactant concentration relation. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the process of the vesicle solubilization and confirm the validity of the three-stage hypothesis.

  17. Partitioning of naphthalene to gemini surfactant-treated alumina.

    PubMed

    Neupane, D; Park, J W

    2000-09-01

    Partitioning of naphthalene to anionic surfactants adsorbed on alumina in the aqueous phase was studied for immobilization of the contaminant in the subsurface. Three anionic surfactants with different molecular structures were used: a conventional (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, SDDBS), a gemini (dialkylated disulfonated diphenyl oxide with alkyl chain length of 12, DADS-C12), and a dianionic (monoalkylated disulfonated diphenyl oxide with alkyl chain length of 12, MADS-C12). Sorption of the surfactants onto alumina was studied in a series of batch experiments and the effectiveness of the adsorbed surfactants onto aluminum oxide as a sorptive phase for naphthalene was compared. PMID:10834382

  18. Washing of soils spiked with various pollutants by surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.C.C.; Chang, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, the batch-type of washing with surfactant solutions was employed for the treatment of soils artificially contaminated with various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals. 15 industrial grade surfactants were tested. Washing was conducing by adding surfactant solution to the soils and mixing for one hour, then centrifuging it and analyzing the supernatant. Deionized water was used for soil washing for comparison. Results indicated that deionized water performed as well as Surfactant No. 1 in washing VOC-contaminated soils. Therefore, it is concluded that the VOCs tested can be easily washed from soils by rain water. In washing PAH-contaminated soils, nonionic surfactants performed better than anionic surfactants in terms of removal efficiency. The amphoteric surfactant performed worst in washing PAH-contaminated soils. Generally, surfactants are useful in removing cadmium from soils, but are not useful for the removal of lead and copper. Amphoteric, anionic, and low pH cationic surfactants were the most effective of those tested. For PAH/heavy metals-contaminated soils, removal efficiencies were lower than that of soils containing a single contaminant.

  19. Pulmonary surfactant surface tension influences alveolar capillary shape and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Machiko; Weaver, Timothy E; Grant, Shawn N; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2009-10-01

    Alveolar capillaries are located in close proximity to the alveolar epithelium and beneath the surfactant film. We hypothesized that the shape of alveolar capillaries and accompanying oxygenation are influenced by surfactant surface tension in the alveolus. To prove our hypothesis, surfactant surface tension was regulated by conditional expression of surfactant protein (SP)-B in Sftpb(-/-) mice, thereby inhibiting surface tension-lowering properties of surfactant in vivo within 24 hours after depletion of Sftpb. Minimum surface tension of isolated surfactant was increased and oxygen saturation was significantly reduced after 2 days of SP-B deficiency in association with deformation of alveolar capillaries. Intravascularly injected 3.2-mum-diameter microbeads through jugular vein were retained within narrowed pulmonary capillaries after reduction of SP-B. Ultrastructure studies demonstrated that the capillary protrusion typical of the normal alveolar-capillary unit was reduced in size, consistent with altered pulmonary blood flow. Pulmonary hypertension and intrapulmonary shunting are commonly associated with surfactant deficiency and dysfunction in neonates and adults with respiratory distress syndromes. Increased surfactant surface tension caused by reduction in SP-B induced narrowing of alveolar capillaries and oxygen desaturation, demonstrating an important role of surface tension-lowering properties of surfactant in the regulation of pulmonary vascular perfusion. PMID:19202005

  20. TOXICITY COMPARISON OF BIOSURFACTANTS AND SYNTHETIC SURFACTANTS USED IN OIL SPILL REMEDIATION TO TWO ESTUARINE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative environmental toxicities of synthetic and biogenic surfactants used in oil spill remediation efforts are not well understood. Acute and chronic toxicities of three synthetic surfactants and three microbially produced surfactants were determined and compared in this s...

  1. PROPERTIES OF FOOD GRADE (EDIBLE) SURFACTANTS AFFECTING SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this research, several food grade (edible) surfactants are systematically evaluated for various loss mechanisms: precipitation, adsorption, and coacervation (for nonionic surfactants). Cloud points for the polyethoxylate sorbitan (T-MAZ) surfactants are much higher than aquife...

  2. HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS AND MICELLAR PARTITIONING OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into surfactant micelles affects the apparent vapor-liquid equilibrium of VOCs in surfactant solutions. This partitioning will complicate removal of VOCs from surfactant solutions by standard separation processes. Headspace expe...

  3. Effect of ionic surfactants on the iridescent color in lamellar liquid crystalline phase of a nonionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinjiang; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Goh; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Ohtani, Bunsho; Tsujii, Kaoru

    2007-01-15

    A nonionic surfactant, n-dodecyl glyceryl itaconate (DGI), self-assembles into bilayer membranes in water having a spacing distance of sub-micrometer in the presence of small amounts of ionic surfactants, and shows beautiful iridescent color. Ionic surfactants have strong effects on this iridescent system. We have interestingly found that the iridescent color changes with time after mixing DGI and ionic surfactants and the color in equilibrium state changes greatly with concentration of the ionic surfactants. The time-dependent color change results from the transformation of DGI aggregate structure after being mixed with ionic surfactant. It is first found that the iridescent color of this nonionic system can be changed from red to deep blue by altering the concentration of ionic surfactants added even though the total concentration of surfactant is almost constant. Such large blue shift of the iridescent color in equilibrium state cannot be fully explained by the ordinary undulation theory applied so far for this phenomenon. The flat lamellar sheets tend to curve by increasing the concentration of ionic surfactants to form separated onion-like and/or myelin-like structures. These separated structures of lamellar system result in the decrease of spacing distance between bilayer membranes because some vacant spaces necessarily appear among these structures. PMID:17046012

  4. The effect of polymer-surfactant interaction on the rheological properties of surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding formulations

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1993-02-01

    Surfactant-enhanced, lower pH (weak) alkaline chemicals are effective for mobilizing residual oil. Polymer is used for mobility control because if mobility control is lost, then oil recovery is reduced. The ability to maintain mobility control during surfactant-alkaline flooding can be adversely affected by chemical interaction. In this work, interaction between polymers and surfactants was shown to be affected by pH, ionic strength, crude oil, and the properties of the polymers and surfactants. Polymer-surfactant interaction (phase separation, precipitation, and viscosity loss) occurred between most of the polymers and surfactants that were tested. Polymer-surfactant interaction is difficult to eliminate, and no method was found for completely eliminating interaction. Polymer-surfactant interaction occurred at optimal salinity and below optimal salinity. Polymer-surfactant interaction had an adverse effect on polymer rheology; however, the adverse effect of interaction on polymer rheology was lessened when oil was present. Increasing the pH of chemical systems further reduced the adverse effects of interaction on polymer rheology.

  5. Adsorption of polyoxyethylenic surfactants on quartz, kaolin, and dolomite: A correlation between surfactant structure and solid surface nature

    SciTech Connect

    Nevskaia, D.M.; Guerrero-Ruiz, A.; Lopez-Gonzalez, J.deD.

    1996-08-10

    Adsorption of a surfactant at a liquid-solid interface makes up the basis of many technological processes such as detergency, flotation, water treatment, and enhanced oil recovery. The influence of variables such as adsorption temperature, polar chain length, and nature of functional groups on the adsorption, from aqueous solutions, of various surfactants (TX-114, TX-100, TX-165, TX-305, NP1P4E, NP4P1E, NP4S, NP10S, and NP25S) has been investigated. Several nonporous solids, including various samples of quartz, kaolin, and dolomite, were studied. Conformational changes of adsorbed surfactant molecules on one quartz, when the oxyethylenic length of Tritons increases, have been detected. For all the other solid samples the surface is not completely covered by Tritons. On quartz, the surfactants are adsorbed by hydrogen bonds between the surfactant`s ether groups and the silanol groups of the solid surface. These hydroxyl groups must be free and sufficiently separated from other hydroxyls of the solid surface. When the number of propoxy groups increases (from NP1P4E to NP4P1E) the adsorbed amount of surfactant on the solid studied decreases. Anionic surfactants are adsorbed on quartz in lower amounts than the corresponding nonionic surfactants. However, the adsorbed amounts of Tritons and sulfated Tritons on kaolin are similar, probably due to the positive charges on the edges of this material.

  6. Nucleate pool boiling heat transfer in aqueous surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasekar, Vivek Mahadeorao

    Saturated, nucleate pool boiling in aqueous surfactant solutions is investigated experimentally. Also, the role of Marangoni convection, driven both by temperature and surfactant concentration gradients at the vapor-liquid interface of a nucleating bubble is computationally explored. Experimental measurements of dynamic and equilibrium sigma using the maximum bubble pressure method indicate dynamic sigma to be higher than the corresponding equilibrium value, both at room and elevated temperatures. Also, nonionic surfactants (Triton X-100, Triton X-305) show larger sigma depression than anionic surfactants (SDS, SLES), and a normalized representation of their dynamic adsorption isotherms is shown to be helpful in generalizing the surfactant effectiveness to reduce surface tension. The dynamic sigma has a primary role in the modification of bubble dynamics and associated heat transfer, and is dictated by the adsorption kinetics of the surfactant molecules at boiling temperatures. In general, an enhancement in heat transfer is observed, which is characterized by an early incipience and an optimum boiling performance at or around the critical micelle concentration of the surfactant. The optimum performances, typically in the fully developed boiling regime ( q''w > 100 kW/m2), show a reverse trend with respect to surfactant molecular weights M, i.e., higher molecular weight additives promote lower enhancement. Normalized boiling performance using the respective solution's dynamic sigma correlates heat transfer coefficient by M-0.5 for anionics and M 0 for nonionics. This has been shown to be brought about by the surfactant concentration and its interfacial activity in a concentration sublayer around the growing vapor bubble, which governs the bubble growth behavior through the mechanism of dynamic sigma. The ionic nature of the surfactant influences the thickness and molecular makeup of the enveloping sublayer, thereby affecting the bubble dynamics and boiling heat

  7. Surfactant enhanced disinfection of the human norovirus surrogate, tulane virus with organic acids and surfactant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human infection with foodborne viruses can occur following consumption of contaminated food, person-to-person body contact, or release of aerosols. Combinatorial treatments of surfactants and organic acids may have synergistic or additive mechanisms to inactivate foodborne viruses and prevent outbr...

  8. Effect of salt and surfactant concentration on the structure of polyacrylate gel/surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Peter; Unga, Johan; Hansson, Per

    2007-09-20

    Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to elucidate the structure of crosslinked polyacrylate gel/dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide complexes equilibrated in solutions of varying concentrations of surfactant and sodium bromide (NaBr). Samples were swollen with no ordering (micelle free), or they were collapsed with either several distinct peaks (cubic Pm3n) or one broad correlation peak (disordered micellar). The main factor determining the structure of the collapsed complexes was found to be the NaBr concentration, with the cubic structure existing up to approximately 150 mM NaBr and above which only the disordered micellar structure was found. Increasing the salt concentration decreases the polyion mediated attractive forces holding the micelles together causing swelling of the gel. At sufficiently high salt concentration the micelle-micelle distance in the gel becomes too large for the cubic structure to be retained, and it melts into a disordered micellar structure. As most samples were above the critical micelle concentration, the bulk of the surfactant was in the form of micelles in the solution and the surfactant concentration thereby had only a minor influence on the structure. However, in the region around 150 mM NaBr, increasing the surfactant concentration, at constant NaBr concentration, was found to change the structure from disordered micellar to ordered cubic and back to disordered again. PMID:17715959

  9. Characterization of Phase and Emulsion Behavior, Surfactant Retention, and Oil Recovery for Novel Alcohol Ethoxycarboxylate Surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Lebone T. Moeti; Ramanathan Sampath

    1998-05-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Clark Atlanta University under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-97FT97278 during the period October 01, 1997 to April 01, 1998 which covers the first six months of the project. During this reporting period, laboratory space to set up the surfactant characterization measurement system in the Research Science Center was made available. A Ph.D. student in Chemistry was identified and is supported as a Graduate Research Assistant in this project. Her contribution towards this project will form her Ph.D. thesis. The test matrix to perform salinity and temperature scans was established. Supply requests to obtain refined hydrocarbon, surfactant, and crude were processed and supplies obtained. A temperature bath with a control unit to perform temperature scans was obtained on loan from Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV. The setting up of the temperature control unit, and associated chiller with water circulation lines is in progress. Tests were conducted on several hybrid surfactants to identify the best surfactants for future experimental work that yield almost equal volumes of top, middle, and bottom phases when mixed with oil and water. The student reviewed the current literature in the subject area, and modeling efforts that were established in previous studies to predict electrical conductivities and inversion phenomena. These activities resulted in one published conference paper, and one student poster paper during this reporting period.

  10. Foam stabilisation using surfactant exfoliated graphene.

    PubMed

    Sham, Alison Y W; Notley, Shannon M

    2016-05-01

    Liquid-air foams have been stabilised using a suspension of graphene particles at very low particle loadings. The suspension was prepared through the liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in the presence of the non-ionic tri-block surfactant, Pluronic® F108. The graphene particles possess an extremely high aspect ratio, with lateral dimensions of between 0.1 and 1.3 μm as evidenced by TEM imaging. The particles were shown to exhibit a number of other properties known to favour stabilisation of foam structures. Particle surface activity was confirmed through surface tension measurements, suggesting the particles favour adsorption at the air-water interface. The evolution of bubble size distributions over time indicated the presence of particles yielded improvements to foam stability due to a reduction in disproportionation. Foam stability measurements showed a non-linear relationship between foam half-life and graphene concentration, indicative of the rate at which particles adsorb at bubble surfaces. The wettability of the graphene particles was altered upon addition of alkali metal chlorides, with the stability of the foams being enhanced according to the series Na(+)>Li(+)>K(+)>Cs(+). This effect is indicative of the relative hydration capacity of each salt with respect to the surfactant, which is adsorbed along the graphene plane as a result of the exfoliation process. Thus, surfactant exfoliated graphene particles exhibit a number of different features that demonstrate efficient application of high-aspect ratio particles in the customisation and enhancement of foams. PMID:26890385

  11. Interaction between DNA and cationic surfactants: effect of DNA conformation and surfactant headgroup.

    PubMed

    Dias, Rita S; Magno, Luís M; Valente, Artur J M; Das, Dibyendu; Das, Prasanta K; Maiti, Souvik; Miguel, Maria G; Lindman, Björn

    2008-11-20

    The interactions between DNA and a number of different cationic surfactants, differing in headgroup polarity, were investigated by electric conductivity measurements and fluorescence microscopy. It was observed that, the critical association concentration (cac), characterizing the onset of surfactant binding to DNA, does not vary significantly with the architecture of the headgroup. However, comparing with the critical micelle concentration (cmc) in the absence of DNA, it can be inferred that the micelles of a surfactant with a simple quaternary ammonium headgroup are much more stabilized by the presence of DNA than those of surfactants with hydroxylated head-groups. In line with previous studies of polymer-surfactant association, the cac does not vary significantly with either the DNA concentration or its chain length. On the other hand, a novel observation is that the cac is much lower when DNA is denaturated and in the single-stranded conformation, than for the double-helix DNA. This is contrary to expectation for a simple electrostatically driven association. Thus previous studies of polyelectrolyte-surfactant systems have shown that the cac decreases strongly with increasing linear charge density of the polyion. Since double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) has twice as large linear charge density as single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), the stronger binding in the latter case indicates an important role of nonelectrostatic effects. Both a higher flexibility of ssDNA and a higher hydrophobicity due to the exposed bases are found to play a role, with the hydrophobic interaction argued to be more important. The significance of hydrophobic DNA-surfactant interaction is in line with other observations. The significance of nonelectrostatic effects is also indicated in significant differences in cac between different surfactants for ssDNA but not for dsDNA. For lower concentrations of DNA, the conductivity measurements presented an "anomalous" feature, i.e., a second inflection point

  12. Size separation of analytes using monomeric surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Wei, Wei

    2005-04-12

    A sieving medium for use in the separation of analytes in a sample containing at least one such analyte comprises a monomeric non-ionic surfactant of the of the general formula, B-A, wherein A is a hydrophilic moiety and B is a hydrophobic moiety, present in a solvent at a concentration forming a self-assembled micelle configuration under selected conditions and having an aggregation number providing an equivalent weight capable of effecting the size separation of the sample solution so as to resolve a target analyte(s) in a solution containing the same, the size separation taking place in a chromatography or electrophoresis separation system.

  13. Surfactant Proteins in Smoking-Related Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Andriana I; Papiris, Spyridon; Papadaki, Georgia; Manali, Effrosyni D; Roussou, Aneza; Spathis, Aris; Karakitsos, Petros; Kostikas, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a highly surface-active mixture of proteins and lipids that is synthesized and secreted in the alveoli by type II epithelial cells and is found in the fluid lining the alveolar surface. The protein part of surfactant constitutes two hydrophilic proteins (SP-A and SP-D) that regulate surfactant metabolism and have immunologic functions, and two hydrophobic proteins (SP-B and SP-C), which play a direct role in the organization of the surfactant structure in the interphase and in the stabilization of the lipid layers during the respiratory cycle. Several studies have shown that cigarette smoke seems to affect, in several ways, both surfactant homeostasis and function. The alterations in surfactants' biophysical properties caused by cigarette smoking, contribute to the development of several smoking related lung diseases. In this review we provide information on biochemical and physiological aspects of the pulmonary surfactant and on its possible association with the development of two major chronic diseases of the lung known to be related to smoking, i.e. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Additional information on the possible role of surfactant protein alterations and/or dysfunction in the combination of these two conditions, recently described as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are also provided. PMID:26420367

  14. Effect of polymer-surfactant association on colloidal force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, John; Jaykumar, T.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Raj, Baldev; Mondain-Monval, O.

    2002-07-01

    We investigate the forces between emulsion droplets in the presence of neutral polymer-surfactant complexes. The polymer used in our experiment was statistical copolymer of polyvinyl alcohol. The anionic surfactant used is sodiumdodecyl sulphate, the cationic surfactants are cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide, and the nonionic surfactant is nonylphenol ethoxylate (NP10). It has been found that the force profiles in the presence of surfactant-polymer complexes follow an exponential scaling with a characteristic decay length, close to the radius of gyration of the polymer alone. A continuous increase in the onset of repulsion is observed in the case of all three ionic surfactants, whereas no such variation was noticed in the case of nonionic surfactant, NP10. The experimental observations suggest that in the presence of charged surfactant molecules or micelles, the neutral polymer chain at the interface is converted into partial polyelectrolytes, where the charges on the chain repel each other and the electrostatic repulsion collectively leads to chain stretching. These results suggest that the associative polymers can be potential candidates for making the emulsions stable for a sufficiently long period.

  15. Can surfactants affect management of non-water repellent soils?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants affect the water relations of water repellent soils but may or may not affect those of wettable soils. We studied the effects of three surfactants, Aquatrols IrrigAid Gold®, an ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymer, and an alkyl polyglycoside, along with untreated tap water as ...

  16. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation. PMID:21923733

  17. Surfactant roles in modern sample preparation techniques: a review.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Morteza; Yamini, Yadollah

    2012-09-01

    The pressure to decrease organic solvent usage in laboratories is increasing. Thus miniaturization and improvement of sample handling using alternatives is a challenge that has been discussed by several researchers. From this perspective, surfactant-based sample preparations were an educated choice. Since the introduction of cloud point extraction by Watanabe, considerable studies have been focused on the chemical properties of surfactants in the extraction methods. The unique properties of surfactants make them flexible agents for different miniaturized sample preparation techniques based on solid- or liquid-phase extraction. As a result, the use of surfactants with different roles in sample-preparation methodologies (such as surfactant as an emulsifier, surfactant rich phase as an extraction medium, ion pair-based extraction, hemimicelle/admicelle extraction, surfactant-coated magnetic nanoparticle, solid-phase microextraction with micellar desorption) is an important contribution to minimizing the problems arising from preliminary operations, which are the weakest step in analytical measurement. This paper reviews the literature dealing with the application of surfactant-based sample preparations to the separation and the preconcentration of organic and inorganic species. PMID:22887709

  18. The Influence of Surfactants on the Zeta Potential of Coals

    SciTech Connect

    Marsalek, R.

    2009-07-01

    The surface of three different kinds of coal was modified by three surfactants (cationic, anionic, and non-ionic). Changes on coal surface were examined by the zeta potential technique. The influence of the dispersion of pH, concentration of surfactants, and contact time were investigated. The most significant change in zeta potential resulting from adding surfactants was observed in activated coal (hydrophobic surface, largest BET surface area). Adding the cationic surfactant led to an increase of the zeta potential, contrary to measuring done in water. The anionic surfactant decreased the value of the zeta potential; however, this change was not too remarkable. The results proved that even a very low concentration of the cationic surfactant (0.01 mmol/L) causes a remarkable change of the zeta potential. On the other hand, a similar effect was observed until the concentration of the anionic surfactant reached about 10 mmol/L. The mechanism of binding surfactants is not simple, but preferential hydrophobic interactions were discovered.

  19. Synthetic pulmonary surfactant preparations: new developments and future trends.

    PubMed

    Mingarro, Ismael; Lukovic, Dunja; Vilar, Marçal; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipid-protein complex that coats the interior of the alveoli and enables the lungs to function properly. Upon its synthesis, lung surfactant adsorbs at the interface between the air and the hypophase, a capillary aqueous layer covering the alveoli. By lowering and modulating surface tension during breathing, lung surfactant reduces respiratory work of expansion, and stabilises alveoli against collapse during expiration. Pulmonary surfactant deficiency, or dysfunction, contributes to several respiratory pathologies, such as infant respiratory distress syndrome (IRDS) in premature neonates, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children and adults. The main clinical exogenous surfactants currently in use to treat some of these pathologies are essentially organic extracts obtained from animal lungs. Although very efficient, natural surfactants bear serious defects: i) they could vary in composition from batch to batch; ii) their production involves relatively high costs, and sources are limited; and iii) they carry a potential risk of transmission of animal infectious agents and the possibility of immunological reaction. All these caveats justify the necessity for a highly controlled synthetic material. In the present review the efforts aimed at new surfactant development, including the modification of existing exogenous surfactants by adding molecules that can enhance their activity, and the progress achieved in the production of completely new preparations, are discussed. PMID:18288994

  20. PHASE BEHAVIOR OF WATER/PERCHLOROETHYLENE/ANIONIC SURFACTANT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Winsor Type I (o/w), Type II (w/o), and Type III (middle phase) microemulsions have been generated for water and perchloroethylene (PCE) in combination with anionic surfactants and the appropriate electrolyte concentration. The surfactant formulation was a combination of sodium d...

  1. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes' properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate - for the first time - complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules. PMID:25669583

  2. Surfactants selectively ablate enteric neurons of the rat jejunum.

    PubMed

    Fox, D A; Epstein, M L; Bass, P

    1983-11-01

    Surfactants, a group of nonspecific membrane perturbating substances, can cause nerve damage. Various concentrations of the cationic surfactants benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and benzethonium chloride, the anionic surfactants sodium ricinoleate, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate and sodium lauryl sulfate and the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 were applied to the serosal surface of the rat jejunum every 5 min for 0.5 hr and then rinsed off with saline. Thirty days after surfactant application, the treated and an untreated segment of jejunum were removed and examined histologically. All surfactants which were tested significantly reduced the number of ganglion cells in the myenteric plexus. In addition, sodium ricinoleate significantly reduced the number of ganglion cells in the submucosal plexus. Higher concentrations of the cationic agents BAC and benzethonium chloride caused a generalized tissue damage including disruption of the smooth muscle, lymphocytic infiltration, intestinal perforation and death. Using BAC as a prototype surfactant, peptidergic neuron distribution and gut electrical activity were examined. BAC treatment markedly reduced the immunoreactivity of somatostatin, substance P, met-enkephalin and vasoactive intestinal peptide in the myenteric plexus. In addition, the electric properties of the smooth muscle were altered. BAC treatment resulted in an erratic, markedly distorted basic electric rhythm and an alteration in spike potential generation. These studies demonstrate that surfactants in appropriate concentrations selectively ablate the myenteric neurons and alter peptidergic neuron distribution and gut electrical parameters in the rat jejunum. PMID:6195330

  3. Surfactant-assisted liquefaction of particulate carbonaceous substances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A slurry of carbonaceous particles such as coal containing an oil soluble polar substituted oleophilic surfactant, suitably an amine substituted long chain hydrocarbon, is liquefied at high temperature and high hydrogen presence. The pressure of surfactant results in an increase in yield and the conversion product contains a higher proportion of light and heavy oils and less asphaltene than products from other liquefaction processes.

  4. Effect of Surfactants on Red Imported Fire Ants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eleven surfactants were evaluated for their immobilizing and killing effects against the red imported fire ant. Reported here are the data on workers. Research on other castes is in progress. Although fire ants can be immobilized in most aqueous surfactant solutions within minutes, they can recov...

  5. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes’ properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate – for the first time – complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules.

  6. Effects of isoelectronic and halide surfactants on compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Alexander David

    Isoelectronic surfactants Sb, Bi, and N, have proven to increase the doping efficiency of Zn while concurrently reducing the unintentional impurities C, Si, and S in GaP. Additionally, surfactant Sb and N have demonstrated that altering the incorporation efficiency in GaP is also possible with a surfactant surface coverage of less than one. Halide surfactants Br and Cl were shown to systematically destroy ordering in GaInP. Furthermore, a distinct correlation between increasing surfactant Br or Cl in the vapor and surface roughness was evident. This work is presented in three main sections. First, surfactants Sb and Bi, from the pyrolysis of TMSb and TMBi, were examined to determine the effect on Zn doping in GaP. The data demonstrate that the incorporation of Zn can be increased by an order of magnitude in GaP to a value of approximately 1020 cm-3, the highest value reported to date. Additionally, these same surfactants lead to significant decreases in carbon contamination during growth. At high growth temperatures, the reduction can be as large as 100 x in GaP. Second, the role of steps versus the singular surface between steps was studied by using a surfactant fractional surface coverage of less than one. When surfactant Sb was used, the Zn concentration was increased and C was reduced. However, there was no discernable change in incorporation efficiency over the entire range of surfactant Sb studied. Interestingly, surfactant N showed a linear increase in the Zn doping the with amount of surfactant present during growth resulting in an increase of 2 x at the highest flow rate used. Third, halide surfactants Br and Cl, carbon-tetrabromide and carbon-tetrachloride, were studied for their effects on ordering in GaInP. Bromine systematically decreased the amount of CuPt ordering observed by photoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy. Both surfactants Br and Cl were shown to significantly increase the surface roughness, which is postulated to be the

  7. Aqueous Gemini Surfactant Self-Assembly into Complex Lyotropic Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanthappa, Mahesh; Sorenson, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    In spite of the potentially wide-ranging applications of aqueous bicontinuous lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs), the discovery of amphiphiles that reliably form these non-constant mean curvature morphologies over large phase windows remains largely serendipitous. Recent work has established that cationic gemini surfactants exhibit a pronounced tendency to form bicontinuous cubic (e.g. gyroid) phases as compared to their parent single-tail amphiphiles. The universality of this phenomenon in other surfactant systems remains untested. In this paper, we will report the aqueous LLC phase behavior of a new class of anionic gemini surfactants derived from long chain carboxylic acids. Our studies show that these new surfactants favor the formation of non-constant mean curvature gyroid and primitive (``Plumber's Nightmare'') structures over amphiphile concentration windows up to 20 wt% wide. Based on these observations, we will discuss insights gained into the delicate force balance governing the self-assembly of these surfactants into aqueous bicontinuous LLCs.

  8. The removal of anionic surfactants from water in coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Jadwiga; Elektorowicz, Maria

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory study on the effectiveness of the coagulation process in removing surfactants from water. The application of traditional coagulants (aluminium sulfate and iron chlorides) has not brought satisfactory results, the reduction in anionic surfactant (AS) content reached 7.6% and 10%, respectively. Adding cationic polyelectrolyte (Zetag-50) increased the removal efficiency to 24%. Coagulation using a polyelectrolyte alone proved to be more efficient, the reduction in surfactant content fluctuated at a level of about 50%. Complete surfactant removal was obtained when powdered activated carbon was added 5 minutes before the basic coagulant to the coagulation process. The efficiency of surfactant coagulation also increased after the application of powdered clinoptilolite, but to a smaller degree. Then the removal of AS was found to be improved by dosing powdered clinoptilolite simultaneously or with short delay after the addition of the basic coagulant. PMID:23837351

  9. Micellization properties of cardanol as a renewable co-surfactant.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Antonella; Guernelli, Susanna; Zaccheroni, Nelsi; Zappacosta, Romina; Genovese, Damiano; De Crescentini, Lucia; Riela, Serena

    2015-09-21

    With the aim to improve the features of surfactant solutions in terms of sustainability and renewability we propose the use of hydrogenated natural and sustainable plant-derived cardanol as an additive to commercial surfactants. In the present study we demonstrated that its addition, in amounts as high as 10%, to commercial surfactants of different charge does not significantly affect surfactant properties. Conversely, the presence of hydrogenated cardanol can strongly affect spectrophotometric determination of CMC if preferential interactions with the dyes used take place. This latter evidence may be profitably exploited in surfactant manufacturing by considering that the concurrent presence of a rigid organic molecule such as Orange OT and 10% hydrogenated cardanol decreases the CMC of CTAB up to 65 times. PMID:26223697

  10. Regulation of surfactant secretion in alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A

    2007-08-01

    Molecular mechanisms of surfactant delivery to the air/liquid interface in the lung, which is crucial to lower the surface tension, have been studied for more than two decades. Lung surfactant is synthesized in the alveolar type II cells. Its delivery to the cell surface is preceded by surfactant component synthesis, packaging into specialized organelles termed lamellar bodies, delivery to the apical plasma membrane and fusion. Secreted surfactant undergoes reuptake, intracellular processing, and finally resecretion of recycled material. This review focuses on the mechanisms of delivery of surfactant components to and their secretion from lamellar bodies. Lamellar bodies-independent secretion is also considered. Signal transduction pathways involved in regulation of these processes are discussed as well as disorders associated with their malfunction. PMID:17496061