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Sample records for surgical oncology patients

  1. Surgical Technique Refinements in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jeffrey C.; Shah, Jatin P.

    2010-01-01

    The head and neck region poses a challenging arena for oncologic surgery. Diseases and their treatment can affect a myriad of functions, including sight, hearing, taste, smell, breathing, speaking, swallowing, facial expression and appearance. This review discusses several areas where refinements in surgical techniques have led to improved patient outcomes. This includes surgical incisions, neck lymphadenectomy, transoral laser microsurgery, minimally invasive thyroid surgery, and the use of vascularized free flaps for oromandibular reconstruction. PMID:20512941

  2. Journal of Surgical Oncology Quantitative Comparison of Surgical Margin Histology Following Excision

    E-print Network

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Journal of Surgical Oncology Quantitative Comparison of Surgical Margin Histology Following, and histological effect were compared on the same breast tissue cut with each excision instrument. A probability

  3. Repeat Partial Nephrectomy: Surgical, Functional and Oncological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shuch, Brian; Linehan, W. Marston; Bratslavsky, Gennady

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of Review The greater utilization of partial nephrectomy and ablative procedures has increased the incidence of patients presenting with local renal recurrence. The choice to either perform a partial or radical nephrectomy in these situations can be a challenging decision. Recent Findings Repeat and salvage partial nephrectomy, while challenging and potentially associated with increased complications, offers patients the ability to maintain excellent renal functional outcomes and promising oncologic outcomes at intermediate follow up. Summary Surgeons should be familiar with the surgical complications and the functional and oncologic outcomes of re-operative nephron-sparing surgery. Recent data and outcome analysis support utilization of these procedures in patients presenting with either local recurrence or de novo lesions in the ipsilateral kidney. PMID:21788903

  4. Clinical Outcome Analysis in 'High-Risk' Versus 'Low-Risk' Patients Eligible For National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 Trial: Five-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh R. Christensen, Michael E.; Hodge, C. Wesley; Adkison, Jarrod B.; Das, Rupak K.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To report the local control and overall survival outcomes after lumpectomy followed by accelerated partial breast irradiation in high-risk patients as defined by the current inclusion criteria for the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 Intergroup trial. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 273 women with early-stage breast cancer were treated using either multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (n = 247) or MammoSite (n = 26). Patients received 32-34 Gy in 8-10 twice-daily fractions using high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy. All patients met the initial inclusion criteria for the Intergroup trial and were separated into two groups: high-risk patients (representing the cohort that remained eligible for the Intergroup trial) who satisfied one or more of the 'high-risk' criteria (age <50 years, estrogen receptor negative, and/or positive lymph nodes; n = 90), and low-risk patients who comprised the remainder of the cohort (n = 183). The outcomes of the two cohorts were analyzed and compared. Results: The median follow-up of the entire cohort was 48.5 months. No significant difference was found in outcomes at 5 years between the low- and high-risk groups, with a local control rate of 97.8% vs. 93.6%, crude local recurrence rate of 2.2% (n = 4) vs. 4.4% (n = 4), and overall survival rate of 92.1% vs. 89.5%, respectively. Conclusion: At 5 years, no statistically significant difference was found in outcomes for patients deemed to be at greater risk in the current National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 Intergroup trial. These clinical data support the inclusion of this 'high-risk' population in this important ongoing study.

  5. Thyroid Disorders in the Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease and cancer diagnoses are common conditions likely to coexist. Optimal management requires appropriate diagnostic testing and consideration of a number of factors, including overall health status and prognosis. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can lead to a number of symptoms that may affect not only quality of life but can interfere with the patient’s ability to tolerate cancer treatment. Imaging studies performed for cancer staging can identify incidental structural abnormalities in the thyroid, which should be assessed with dedicated neck ultrasonography and possibly fine-needle aspiration. Incidental thyroid cancer is most often less urgent than the patient’s presenting malignancy and can be addressed surgically when appropriate in the context of other treatments (i.e., chemotherapy). Providers working in an oncology setting, as well as primary care providers, should be aware of medications that are associated with hormonal abnormalities. Any patient with a history of neck or brain radiation therapy is at risk of developing hypothyroidism and possibly other endocrinopathies. Complex or very ill patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that utilizes the experience of a knowledgeable endocrinologist. PMID:26649243

  6. Robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology: evolution of a new surgical paradigm.

    PubMed

    Boggess, John F

    2007-01-01

    Robotic surgical platforms were first developed with telesurgery in mind. Conceptualized by NASA and the military to provide surgical expertise to remote locations, some telesurgical success has been documented, but progress has been held back by communication bandwidth limitations. Telepresence surgery, where the surgeon is in proximity to the patient but is provided with an ergonomic console equipped with three-dimensional vision and autonomous control of wristed laparoscopic surgical instruments and energy sources, has shown efficacy first in cardiac and then urologic cancer surgery. Interest is currently focused on the application of this technology in the field of gynecology, with techniques being described to perform simple hysterectomy, myomectomy, tubal anastomosis, and pelvic reconstruction procedures. This article will review the application of robotic- and computer-assisted surgery in the specialty of gynecologic oncology. PMID:25484936

  7. Surgical care quality and oncologic outcome after D2 gastrectomy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mrena, Johanna; Mattila, Anne; Böhm, Jan; Jantunen, Ismo; Kellokumpu, Ilmo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine the quality of surgical care and long-term oncologic outcome after D2 gastrectomy for gastric cancer. METHODS: From 1999 to 2008, a total of 109 consecutive patients underwent D2 gastrectomy without routine pancreaticosplenectomy in a multimodal setting at our institution. Oncologic outcomes together with clinical and histopathologic data were analyzed in relation to the type of surgery performed. Staging was carried out according to the Union for International Cancer Control criteria of 2002. Patients were followed-up for five years at the outpatient clinic. The primary measure of outcome was long-term survival with the quality of surgery as a secondary outcome measure. Clinical data were retrospectively collected from the patient records, and causes of death were obtained from national registries. RESULTS: A total of 109 patients (58 men) with a mean age of 67.4 ± 11.2 years underwent total gastrectomy or gastric resection with D2 lymph node dissection. The tumor stage distribution was as follows: stage?I, (27/109) 24.8%; stage II, (31/109) 28.4%; stage III, (41/109) 37.6%; and stage IV, (10/109) 9.2%. Forty patients (36.7%) received chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. The five-year overall survival rate for all 109 patients was 45.0%, and was 47.1% for the 104 patients treated with curative R0 resection. The five-year disease-specific survival rates were 53.0% and 55.8%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, body mass index and tumor stage were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (both P < 0.01), whereas body mass index, tumor stage, tumor site, Lauren classification, and lymph node invasion were prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival (all P < 0.05). Postoperative 30-d mortality was 1.8% and 30-d, surgical (including three anastomotic leaks, two of which were treated conservatively), and general morbidities were 26.6%, 12.8%, and 14.7%, respectively. CONCLUSION: D2 dissection is a safe surgical option for gastric cancer, providing quality surgical care and long-term oncologic outcomes that are in line with current Western standards. PMID:26715812

  8. [Current problems in surgical oncology: 1. Theoretical models in oncology and their implications in surgical therapy].

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, C

    2011-01-01

    Cancer biology has proven to be far more complex than imagined twenty years ago. While current treatment strategies (i.e., surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation) are successful in many cancers, they all have limitations. In some types of solid tumors some survival progress has been recorded, such in the case of breast and colorectal cancer, but these improvements are probably mainly due to screening programmes and earlier detection than to more-effective treatment. In other tumor types the mortality certainly increased: the death rate from lung cancer rose from 43 to 53 per 100,000 people from 1975 to 2005, the death rate from melanoma has risen nearly 30 percent, and death rate from liver and bile-duct cancer almost doubled, from 2.8 to 5.3 per 100,000. Cancer is commonly viewed as minimally controlled by modern medicine, especially when compared with other major diseases (Sharon Begley, 2008). Either directly from the phenomenological observation or through the biological model, mathematicians and biologists can generate mathematical models aimed at describing the biological phenomenon. The analysis of the solution properties by mathematical methods will give a description of the dynamics resulting in a deeper insight into the problem. The models can be implemented numerically to give rise to in silico models. The quality of the modeling process can be tested, validating the results of the simulations with experiments and clinical data. The theoretical predictions generated from the models may optimize the experimental protocol by identifying the most promising candidates for further clinical investigation. The speed with which large numbers of simulations can be performed may reduce the number of animal experiments and identify new experimental programmes and optimal cancer therapy schedules. However, it is clear that surgical decisions in cancer therapy are strongly driven by the theoretical hypotheses of local tumor evolution and malignant cells dissemination. For 60 years cancer was seen as a disease that arose in one location and spread through the lymphatic system first to nearby lymph nodes and subsequently to other organs. This theory of "contiguous" development of metastases has become known as the Virchow-Halsted theory. After 1954 an alternative theory was formulated by B. Fisher stating "that breast cancer is a systemic disease". Following the therapeutic implications of this "systemic theory," the disease has been attacked in recent years by chemotherapy and hormone therapy to the whole body. In 1994 S. Hellman stated the case for what he calls the "spectrum theory." He observed that there are intermediate tumor states between purely localized lesions and widely metastatic. Such clinical circumstances are not accounted for by either the contiguous (Halsted theory) or the systemic (systemic theory) hypotheses and supports the idea that loco-regional therapies (surgery and radiotherapy) may be useful in some cases. So, it is obvious that the extent and the role of cancer surgery are direct consequences of our theoretical understanding of cancer natural history. The genetical, pathological and clinical heterogeneity of cancers suggest new theoretical approaches based on chaos and fractal theory. PMID:21523955

  9. [Geriatric intervention in oncology for elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Saint-Jean, O; LeGuen, J

    2015-10-01

    Half of all cancers occur in patients older than 70 years. National cancer plans in France promote the emergence of geriatric oncology, whose aim is that every elder cancer patient receives a pertinent treatment, according to his frailty. Geriatric intervention has been evaluated in various conditions or patients since 30 years. Meta-analysis has shown the benefits on autonomy and mortality. But benefits are related to the organization of geriatric care, especially when integrated care is provided. Literature on geriatric oncology is relatively poor. But it is certain that a geriatric comprehensive assessment provided a lot of important information for the care of cancer patients, leading to a modification of cancer treatment in many cases. Randomized trials will soon begin to evaluate the benefits of geriatric integrated care for elder cancer patients, in terms of mortality and quality of life. Actually, in oncogeriatic coordination units, pilot organizations are developed for the satisfaction of patients and professionals. PMID:26344438

  10. Non-surgical oncology – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 19

    PubMed Central

    Arends, J.; Zuercher, G.; Dossett, A.; Fietkau, R.; Hug, M.; Schmid, I.; Shang, E.; Zander, A.

    2009-01-01

    Reduced nutritional state is associated with unfavourable outcomes and a lower quality of life in patients with malignancies. Patients with active tumour disease frequently have insufficient food intake. The resting energy expenditure in cancer patients can be increased, decreased, or remain unchanged compared to predicted values. Tumours may result in varying degrees of systemic pro-inflammatory processes with secondary effects on all significant metabolic pathways. Therapeutic objectives are to stabilise nutritional state with oral/enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition (PN) and thus to prevent or reduce progressive weight loss. The maintenance or improvement of quality of life, and the increase in the effectiveness and a reduction in the side-effects of antitumor therapy are further objectives. Indications for PN in tumour patients are essentially identical to those in patients with benign illnesses, with preference given to oral or enteral nutrition when feasible. A combined nutritional concept is preferred if oral or enteral nutrition are possible but not sufficient. There are generally no accepted standards for ideal energy and nutrient intakes in oncological patients, particularly when exclusive artificial nutrition is administered. The use of PN as a general accompaniment to radiotherapy or chemotherapy is not indicated, but PN is indicated in chronic severe radiogenic enteritis or after allogenic transplantation with pronounced mucositis or GvH-related gastrointestinal damage for prolonged periods, with particular attention to increased risk of bleeding and infection. No PN is necessary in the terminal phase. PMID:20049066

  11. Optimising surgical management of elderly cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Hodigere Sripathy Jois; Pope, Daniel; Gennari, Roberto; Audisio, Riccardo A

    2005-01-01

    Background Elderly population is on rise. It is an ethical dilemma how aggressive one should be when it comes to treat cancer in elderly. Presumed fear of increased postoperative morbidity and mortality has resulted in delivery of sub-optimal cancer surgery. Methods In this review article we visit physiology of the aged, tools available to assess surgical risks in oncogeriatric patients, and current practice in the management of common cancers encountered in surgical oncology, with the view of increasing awareness on optimising surgical management of senior patients with cancer. A pubmed search for cancer, surgery, elderly, was carried out. Results Cancer is on rise with increasing age predominantly affecting breast, gastrointestinal tract and lung. Increasingly more surgeons are offering surgery to elderly cancer patient but selection bias is prevalent. Available data reflect short and long-term outcome of cancer surgery in elderly is not greatly different to that of younger patient. Declining physiological reserve along with inability to respond adequately to physiological stress are salient age related changes. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is not tested in surgical patient. There is need for a tool to define individualised operative risk. Preoperative assessment of cancer in elderly is designed to offer this information based on functional status of an individual utilising currently available tools of risk assessment. Conclusion All elderly cancer patients should be offered optimal treatment depending on their functional status not on chronological age. Oncogeriatric patient would benefit from dedicated multidisciplinary approach. Recruitment of elderly cancer patients to more clinical trials is needed to enhance our knowledge and to offer optimum treatment to this unique subgroup. PMID:15788092

  12. Improving patient safety in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Hendee, William R.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-15

    Beginning in the 1990s, and emphasized in 2000 with the release of an Institute of Medicine report, healthcare providers and institutions have dedicated time and resources to reducing errors that impact the safety and well-being of patients. But in January 2010 the first of a series of articles appeared in the New York Times that described errors in radiation oncology that grievously impacted patients. In response, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American Society of Radiation Oncology sponsored a working meeting entitled ''Safety in Radiation Therapy: A Call to Action''. The meeting attracted 400 attendees, including medical physicists, radiation oncologists, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, hospital administrators, regulators, and representatives of equipment manufacturers. The meeting was cohosted by 14 organizations in the United States and Canada. The meeting yielded 20 recommendations that provide a pathway to reducing errors and improving patient safety in radiation therapy facilities everywhere.

  13. Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care This is a composite measure ... Clinical Data Warehouse. Age Group Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care by Age Group uzrc-9bvr ...

  14. [Sophrology for patients in oncology].

    PubMed

    Barré, Chantal; Falcou, Marie-Christine; Mosseri, Véronique; Carrié, Sylvie; Dolbeault, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    It is important to support patients with cancer during their care pathway and even beyond. They undergo long and difficult treatments, all anxiety-causing situations and sources of stress. Sophrological techniques help patients to find calm, lessen their fears and offer them the opportunity to work on themselves through simple easily reproducible exercises. This observation has been verified by a study carried out at the Institut Curie with patients undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:26567064

  15. Participation in surgical oncology clinical trials: gender-, race/ethnicity-, and age-based disparities. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers determined the enrollment fraction (EF), defined as the number of trial enrollees in Cancer Therapeutics Evaluation Program (CTEP) studies divided by the estimated U.S. cancer cases in each demographic group from the period 2000-2002. Women comprised 83.95% of the participants in NCI-sponsored trials, due to the fact that 74.66% of enrollees to surgical oncology trials participated in large breast cancer studies. African-American and Hispanic patients were underrepresented in NCI-sponsored surgical trials relative to their proportion of cancer incidence.

  16. Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recommended Care Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care This is a composite measure based on individual ... Age Group Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care by Age Group uzrc-9bvr Download these data » ...

  17. Abdominal surgical emergencies in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Dumont, F; Goéré, D; Honoré, C; Elias, D

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergency in an advanced oncologic setting is defined as an acute life-threatening abdominal pathology in a patient with incurable cancer. These include bowel obstruction, infections and, more rarely, hemorrhage. To benefit the patient, surgery should both increase the survival and improve the quality of life. These two goals are of equal importance and must be achieved together. This is difficult because these patients are frail, often malnourished and have a poor performance status. They also have a high risk of post-operative morbidity and mortality, a major risk of symptom recurrence and a limited life expectancy. For patients near the end-of-life, a therapeutic decision for surgical intervention must respect ethical and legal standards. This review reports the surgical outcomes and median survival of these patients, specifies rules that must be known and respected, and presents non-operative interventional alternatives. PMID:26548722

  18. Thrombelastography in the surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Bischof, D; Dalbert, S; Zollinger, A; Ganter, M T; Gantner, M T; Hofer, C K

    2010-02-01

    Coagulopathy in surgical patients is an important factor in triggering major perioperative complications, i.e., intra- or postoperative bleeding and thrombo-embolic events associated with an increased mortality and morbidity. Different methods exist to assess the coagulation status of patients before, during and after surgery. Routine coagulation tests have long been considered to be the clinical standard. However, these tests have considerable limitations. Information regarding the kinetics of clot formation, clot strength, interaction of the coagulation components, platelet function and fibrinolysis is not available. Moreover, there is an important delay in obtaining test results. In contrast, thrombelastography and thrombelastometry, which both measure the visco-elastic properties of whole blood, allow the dynamic assessment of a developing clot, from fibrin formation to clot strengthening and clot lysis. Both techniques are increasingly being used in daily clinical practice in order to detect perioperative coagulopathy and to guide predominantly pro-coagulant therapy in different settings. This article provides an overview of both techniques, thrombelastography (TEG) and thrombelastometry (ROTEM), and their field of perioperative application considering of recently published data. PMID:20150854

  19. Delirium in Older Surgical Patients Threatens Recovery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_154547.html Delirium in Older Surgical Patients Threatens Recovery Sudden confusion is a postoperative complication ... 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Preventing postsurgical delirium in older patients can help ensure a successful recovery, a new ...

  20. ENDOSCOPIC ASSESSMENT OF BLADDER TUMOURS: Accuracy of Endoscopic Staging and Grading with Fiberoptic and Digital Cystoscopes Michael A.S. Jewett, Karen Hersey, Kamal Mattar, Mischel G. Neill, Ethan Grober, Raquel Lopez, Anushiya Sathiananthan, Gina Lockwood, Andrew Evans, Emily Seto and Neil Fleshner Department of Surgical Oncology/Urology, Pathology and Medical Engineering

    Cancer.gov

    GENITOURINARY ONCOLOGY BIOMARKER RESEARCH Karen Chadwick1 , Ken Evans3, Andrew Evans2, Neil Fleshner1 The Departments of Surgical Oncology (Urology)1 and Pathology2, the University Health Network and the Ontario Cancer BioMarker Network3 ABSTRACT The genitourinary (GU) oncology division at Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) has developed a site-specific BioBank to serve as a central repository for biospecimens obtained from patients attending out-patient clinics within the division.

  1. Oncological and functional results of open, robot-assisted and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: does surgical approach and surgical experience matter?

    PubMed

    Herrmann, T R; Rabenalt, R; Stolzenburg, J U; Liatsikos, E N; Imkamp, F; Tezval, H; Gross, A J; Jonas, U; Burchardt, M

    2007-04-01

    The treatment of prostate cancer has undergone a fundamental change in the last decade. New surgical and nonsurgical minimal invasive methods have evolved. As the methodology of the different treatments is commonly known to urologists, this article focuses on oncological and functional outcome of open retropubic (ORP), trans- or extraperitoneal endoscopical (LRP), and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP), based on personal experience and review of the literature. A MEDLINE search was performed to review the literature on LRP and RALP between 1982 and 2007 with special emphasis on oncological and functional results, technical considerations, comparison of LRP and RALP to ORP, laparoscopic training, historical aspects, and cost-efficiency of the techniques. Based on diligent training and proctoring programs, a continuous dissemination of laparoscopic techniques takes place. There is a trend towards the extraperitoneal access in most of the minimal invasive programs at least in the European community. Mid-term outcomes of LRP and short-term outcomes of RALP achieved equivalence to open surgery with regards to complications, oncologic and functional results. Distinct advantages of LRP include less postoperative pain, lower transfusion rates, shorter convalescence, and better cosmetics. In contrast to RALP, LRP reaches cost-equivalence with open surgery in selected centers. LRP and RALP reproduce the short-term results of open surgery while providing the advantages of a minimal access. Video-assisted teaching improves the transfer of anatomical knowledge and technical knowhow, but the discussion about the longer learning curve for laparoscopy handling remains. The future will show if European centers adopt the use of robots comparable to the United States. PMID:17354014

  2. Quality in Action Ensuring Head and Neck Oncology Patients Receive

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    Quality in Action Ensuring Head and Neck Oncology Patients Receive Recommended Pretreatment Dental Care at Erie County Medical Center, Buffalo, NY Abstract Purpose: Head and neck (H&N) cancer therapy of the head and neck (H&N) are treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy (RT), or a multimodality

  3. Drug repurposing in oncology-patient and health systems opportunities.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Francesco; Sukhatme, Vikas P; Bouche, Gauthier

    2015-12-01

    In most countries, healthcare service budgets are not likely to support the current explosion in the cost of new oncology drugs. Repurposing the large arsenal of approved, non-anticancer drugs is an attractive strategy to offer more-effective options to patients with cancer, and has the substantial advantages of cheaper, faster and safer preclinical and clinical validation protocols. The potential benefits are so relevant that funding of academically and/or independently driven preclinical and clinical research programmes should be considered at both national and international levels. To date, successes in oncology drug repurposing have been limited, despite strong evidence supporting the use of many different drugs. A lack of financial incentives for drug developers and limited drug development experience within the non-profit sector are key reasons for this lack of success. We discuss these issues and offer solutions to finally seize this opportunity in the interest of patients and societies, globally. PMID:26483297

  4. [Patient information duties in radiation oncology].

    PubMed

    Pourel, N; Py, B; Safran, D

    2014-10-01

    Patient information duties are a basic task of radiation oncologists in their daily practice. This article is essentially a factsheet on legal obligations, the value of written informed consent and information documents that ought to be given to patient. PMID:25201635

  5. Platelet transfusion goals in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Josephson, Cassandra D

    2015-12-01

    Despite the advances in platelet component preparation and transfusion support over the years, platelet products remain a limited resource due to their short (5 day) shelf life, and therefore their optimal use in the non-bleeding thrombocytopenic patient continue to draw much attention. There have been a number of national and international guidelines for platelet transfusion therapy in patients with hematologic diseases, some within the last 1-2 years that have incorporated key randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which address issues, such as the optimal platelet dose, the most appropriate threshold for prophylactic platelet transfusions, and whether prophylactic platelet transfusions are superior to therapeutic-only platelet transfusion practices for the prevention life-threatening bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. This review highlights key RCTs and recent systematic reviews focused on optimal platelet transfusion therapy in adult and pediatric patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia secondary to chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), discuss how recent innovations in platelet component processing may affect transfusion efficiency, and introduce renewed concepts on adjuvant therapies to prevent bleeding in the hypoproliferative thrombocytopenic patient. PMID:26637759

  6. Robotic surgery in urological oncology: patient care or market share?

    PubMed

    Kaye, Deborah R; Mullins, Jeffrey K; Carter, H Ballentine; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2015-01-01

    Surgical robotic use has grown exponentially in spite of limited or uncertain benefits and large costs. In certain situations, adoption of robotic technology provides value to patients and society. In other cases, however, the robot provides little or no increase in surgical quality, with increased expense, and, therefore, does not add value to health care. The surgical robot is expensive to purchase, maintain and operate, and can contribute to increased consumerism in relation to surgical procedures, and increased reliance on the technology, thus driving future increases in health-care expenditure. Given the current need for budget constraints, the cost-effectiveness of specific procedures must be evaluated. The surgical robot should be used when cost-effective, but traditional open and laparoscopic techniques also need to be continually fostered. PMID:25535000

  7. Oncological and surgical outcomes of minimally invasive versus open esophagectomy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a matched-pair comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenli; Zhou, Yongxin; Feng, Jing; Mei, Yunqing

    2015-01-01

    Only a few series have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and the benefits of this approach. This report describes the results of a pair-matched comparative study between minimally invasive and open esophagectomy (OE) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Patients were retrospectively matched in pairs for the following criteria: age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) score, clinical TNM stage, tumor location, and type of resection. A total of 97 patients undergoing MIE were compared with patients undergoing OE during the same period. Operative, postoperative, and oncologic outcomes were compared. Significantly less bleeding was observed in the MIE group (P = 0.001). Transfusion was required for three patients in the MIE group and ten patients in the OE group (P = 0.044). Overall morbidity was similar in the two groups. The hospital stay was significantly shorter for the patients undergoing MIE (P = 0.027). The surgical margin and tumor stage were not affected by MIE. The overall survival rates in the MIE group were 54% at 5 years and 46% in the OE group (P = 0.631). The disease-free survival rates in the MIE group were 45% at 5 years, 41% in the OE group (P = 0.704). In summary, MIE for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma for selected patients gave a better postoperative outcome without oncologic consequences.

  8. Pathogenesis of infection in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ping; Fang, Xiangming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite the application of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy and advanced technologies, infection remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. Understanding the pathogenesis of surgical infection would offer new insights into the development of biomarkers to predict and stratify infection in patients, and to explore specific strategies to minimize this serious postoperative complication. Recent findings The acute nonspecific inflammatory response triggered by endogenous danger signals evoked by surgical insult is beneficial, while paradoxically associated with reduced resistance to infection. There is growing evidence indicating that primed inflammation by surgical insult exaggerates the dysregulation of the immune-inflammatory response to the invasion of pathogens postoperatively. Innate immune receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), contribute to detecting both pathogen-associated molecular patterns and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns, and to further amplifying inflammatory responses to infection. Current evidence shows the fascinating role of non-TLRs in the process of infection. Non-TLRs, such as membrane-associated triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells family, cytosolic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors and nuclear receptor nuclear family 4 subgroup A receptors, are also crucial in triggering the immune responses and mounting an effective defense against surgical insults and the second hit of infection. Summary Understanding the pivotal role of non-TLRs in sensing exogenous and endogenous molecules, and the influence of primed systemic inflammation and depressed immune status on the defense against pathogen after surgical insult, would be helpful to fully explore the relevant sophisticated phenomena of surgical infection, and to elucidate the occurrence of heterogeneous constellations of clinical signs and symptoms among this special population. PMID:26126129

  9. Prevention of VTE in Nonorthopedic Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, David A.; Wren, Sherry M.; Karanicolas, Paul J.; Arcelus, Juan I.; Heit, John A.; Samama, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: VTE is a common cause of preventable death in surgical patients. Methods: We developed recommendations for thromboprophylaxis in nonorthopedic surgical patients by using systematic methods as described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines. Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: We describe several alternatives for stratifying the risk of VTE in general and abdominal-pelvic surgical patients. When the risk for VTE is very low (< 0.5%), we recommend that no specific pharmacologic (Grade 1B) or mechanical (Grade 2C) prophylaxis be used other than early ambulation. For patients at low risk for VTE (?1.5%), we suggest mechanical prophylaxis, preferably with intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC), over no prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at moderate risk for VTE (?3%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we suggest low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (Grade 2B), low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 2B), or mechanical prophylaxis with IPC (Grade 2C) over no prophylaxis. For patients at high risk for VTE (?6%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we recommend pharmacologic prophylaxis with LMWH (Grade 1B) or low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 1B) over no prophylaxis. In these patients, we suggest adding mechanical prophylaxis with elastic stockings or IPC to pharmacologic prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at high risk for VTE undergoing abdominal or pelvic surgery for cancer, we recommend extended-duration, postoperative, pharmacologic prophylaxis (4 weeks) with LMWH over limited-duration prophylaxis (Grade 1B). For patients at moderate to high risk for VTE who are at high risk for major bleeding complications or those in whom the consequences of bleeding are believed to be particularly severe, we suggest use of mechanical prophylaxis, preferably with IPC, over no prophylaxis until the risk of bleeding diminishes and pharmacologic prophylaxis may be initiated (Grade 2C). For patients in all risk groups, we suggest that an inferior vena cava filter not be used for primary VTE prevention (Grade 2C) and that surveillance with venous compression ultrasonography should not be performed (Grade 2C). We developed similar recommendations for other nonorthopedic surgical populations. Conclusions: Optimal thromboprophylaxis in nonorthopedic surgical patients will consider the risks of VTE and bleeding complications as well as the values and preferences of individual patients. PMID:22315263

  10. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH URETERAL RUPTURES].

    PubMed

    Komjakov, B K; Guliev, B G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the causes of ureteral ruptures and the types surgical procedures used for their management. Over the period from 2006 to 2014, 7 patients with ureteral ruptures underwent surgical treatment in the Mechnikov N-WSMU clinic. All of them were males aged 50 to 71 years. In all cases, the ureter was injured during ureteroscopy and contact lithotripsy. In two patients the right ureter was cut off at the border of the upper and middle third, in four--at 3-4 cm below pyeloureteral segment, one patient diagnosed with a complete separation of the ureter from the kidney pelvis. Patients, who have suffered a detachment of the ureter in other hospitals, previously underwent surgical exploration of the retroperitoneal space, drainage of the kidney by pyelonephrostomy (5) and ureterocutaneostomy (1). In a case of a patient with an injury that occurred in our clinic, laparoscopic nephrectomy with autologous renal transplantation was carried out. Five patients with extended ureter defects underwent ileo-ureteroplasty. The patient with left ureterocutaneostomy underwent nephrovesical bypass. Patency of the upper urinary tract and kidney function were restored in all patients, all of them were relieved from external drains. The duration of the intestinal plastic averaged 160 minutes, laparoscopic nephrectomy with autologous transplantation--210 min and nephrovesical bypass--110 min. Blood transfusion was required only in autologous graft patient. The ureteral rupture is a serious complication of ureteral endourological procedures in upper urinary tract. It requires such complicated reconstructive operations as autologous transplantation of the kidney or intestinal ureteroplasty. PMID:26390553

  11. The 2013 Society of Surgical Oncology Susan G. Komen for the Cure Symposium: MRI in breast cancer: where are we now?

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Sarah; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Bleicher, Richard J; McCready, David R; King, Tari A

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely applied in the contemporary management of patients with breast cancer and as a screening tool for those at increased risk; however, prospective evidence that the use of breast MRI improves patient outcomes remains limited to screening of known BRCA mutation carriers or women at increased risk based on a strong family history. Despite this, the role of MRI in the routine evaluation of the newly diagnosed breast cancer patient remains a subject of much debate, with widely divergent views on the value of MRI in selecting local therapy. The application of MRI in patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy is an area of active investigation, with several potential benefits, including predicting response to therapy. We review the current state of the literature on the topics of MRI for screening, MRI and short-term surgical outcomes, MRI and long-term surgical outcomes, and MRI and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as presented at the 2013 Society of Surgical Oncology Susan G. Komen for the Cure Symposium, 9 March 2013. PMID:24145992

  12. Implanted Cardiac Defibrillator Care in Radiation Oncology Patient Population

    SciTech Connect

    Gelblum, Daphna Y. Amols, Howard

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To review the experience of a large cancer center with radiotherapy (RT) patients bearing implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) to propose some preliminary care guidelines as we learn more about the devices and their interaction with the therapeutic radiation environment. Methods and Materials: We collected data on patients with implanted ICDs treated with RT during a 2.5-year period at any of the five Memorial Sloan-Kettering clinical campuses. Information regarding the model, location, and dose detected from the device, as well as the treatment fields, fraction size, and treatment energy was collected. During this time, a new management policy for these patients had been implemented requiring treatment with low-energy beams (6 MV) and close surveillance of the patients in partnership with their electrophysiologist, as they received RT. Results: During the study period, 33 patients were treated with an ICD in place. One patient experienced a default of the device to its initial factory setting that was detected by the patient hearing an auditory signal from the device. This patient had initially been treated with a 15-MV beam. After this episode, his treatment was replanned to be completed with 6-MV photons, and he experienced no further events. Conclusion: Patients with ICDs and other implanted computer-controlled devices will be encountered more frequently in the RT department, and proper management is important. We present a policy for the safe treatment of these patients in the radiation oncology environment.

  13. Evaluation of Patient Enrollment in Oncology Phase I Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    van der Biessen, Diane A.J.; Cranendonk, Merlijn A.; Schiavon, Gaia; van der Holt, Bronno; Wiemer, Erik A.C.; Eskens, Ferry A.L.M.; Verweij, Jaap; de Jonge, Maja J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. For anticancer drug development, it is crucial that patients participate in early-phase clinical trials. The main aim of this study was to gain insight into the motivations and other variables influencing patients in their decision to participate in phase I oncology trials. Materials and Methods. Over a period of 25 months, all patients who were informed about (specific) phase I trials in our cancer center were retrospectively included in this study. Data on providing informed consent and final phase I enrollment were collected. Results. In total, 365 patients, with a median age of 59 years and a median World Health Organization performance status score of 1, were evaluated. The majority of patients (71%) were pretreated with systemic therapy, with a median of two lines. After specific study information had been given, 145 patients (40%) declined informed consent, 54% of them mainly because of low expectations regarding treatment benefits and concerns about potential side effects. Patients who had received previous systemic therapy consented more frequently than others. After initial consent, 61 patients (17%) still did not receive study treatment, mostly because of secondary withdrawal of consent or rapid clinical deterioration prior to first dosing. Discussion. After specific referral to our hospital for participation in early clinical trials, only 44% of all patients who were informed about a specific phase I trial eventually participated. Reasons for both participation and nonparticipation were diverse. Patient participation rates could be improved by forming an experienced and dedicated study team. PMID:23429738

  14. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc.), to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc.), and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.). These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS) has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person's job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information. PMID:19052391

  15. Positive patient experiences in an Australian integrative oncology centre

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of cancer patients’ utilising complementary and integrative therapies (CIT) within integrative oncology centres across Western Australia. Methods Across four locations 135 patients accessed CIT services whilst undergoing outpatient medical treatment for cancer. Of the 135 patients, 66 (61?±?12 y; female n?=?45; male n?=?21) agreed to complete a personal accounts questionnaire consisting of open-ended questions designed to explore patients’ perceptions of CIT. All results were transcribed into nVivo (v9) and using thematic analysis, key themes were identified. Results Of the 66 participants, 100% indicated they would “recommend complementary therapies to other patients” and 92% stated “CIT would play a significant role in their future lifestyle”. A mean score of 8?±?1 indicated an improvement in participants’ perception of wellbeing following a CIT session. Three central themes were identified: empowerment, support and relaxation. Fourteen sub-themes were identified, with all themes clustered into a framework of multifaceted views held by cancer patients in relation to wellbeing, role of significant others and control. Conclusions Exploration of patients’ experiences reveals uniformly positive results. One of the key merits of the environment created within the centres is patients are able to work through their cancer journey with an increased sense of empowerment, without placing them in opposition to conventional medical treatment. In order to effectively target integrative support services it is crucial to explore the experiences of patients in their own words and use those forms of expression to drive service delivery. PMID:24886476

  16. Surgical jejunostomy in aspiration risk patients.

    PubMed Central

    Weltz, C R; Morris, J B; Mullen, J L

    1992-01-01

    One hundred patients underwent laparotomy for independent jejunal feeding tube placement. Neurologic disease was present in 50%, and obtundation (28) and oropharyngeal dysmotility (25) were the most common indications for enteral feeding. The post-pyloric route was chosen because of aspiration risk in almost all (94%) patients. Postoperative (30-day) mortality rate was 21%, because of cardiopulmonary failure in most (18). One death resulted directly from aspiration of tube feeds. Two surgical complications required reoperation: one wound dehiscence and one small bowel obstruction. Four wound infections occurred. Two patients underwent reoperation after tube removal, and four tubes required fluoroscopically guided reinsertion for peritubular drainage (2), removal (1), and occlusion (1). Aspiration pneumonia was present in 18 patients preoperatively and in eight postoperatively. None of the patients with feeding-related preoperative aspiration pneumonia (13) had a recurrence while fed by jejunostomy. Three patients developed postoperative aspiration pneumonia before initiation of jejunostomy feedings. Jejunostomy may be performed with low morbidity rate and substantial reduction of feeding-related aspiration pneumonia, and is the feeding route of choice in aspiration risk patients. PMID:1546899

  17. Surgical Management of the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Seth M.; Haynes, David S.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the surgical management of children receiving cochlear implants. It identifies preoperative considerations to select patients likely to benefit, contraindications, some new surgical techniques, complications, special considerations (otitis media, meningitis, head growth, inner ear malformations, and cochlear obstruction).…

  18. [Dental and oncological status of patients with tongue carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Davydov, A B; Lebedev, S N; Lebedeva, Iu V; Davydova, O B

    2015-01-01

    After the supervision over patients with cancer of mucous membrane of oral cavity (MMOC) admitted for treatment in the Tver Regional Clinical Oncological Hospital (TRCOH), the analysis of 427 primary revealed cases of cancer of mobile part of the tongue MPoT (S 02) was carried out. The study included retrospective analysis of case records of 237 patients treated from 1997 to 2013 with the diagnosis of MPoT and prospective examination of 190 patients treated by authors in specialized departments of TRCOH. On the basis of questioning of 67 III-IV stages tongue carcinoma patients at the age of 50-59 years clinical course features, cancer risk factors and oral care patterns were studied. It was revealed that patients often make decision to see an oncologist to meet relatives wishes, prefer self-treatment, trust hearings and quacks or simply hope for self-recovery. Studying of dental status revealed high prevalence and intensity of caries. All males and the majority of sampled women weren't informed about additional methods of oral cavity hygiene (dental floss, mouthwashes, gels) and had unsatisfactory or bad level of Fedorov-Volodkina hygienic index. We revealed a high necessity in treatment of caries and its complications, an average of 3.61 and 2.73 teeth needed filling and 4,43 and 1.77 teeth - extraction in male and female patients, correspondently. The received data identify a great need for dental treatment and patient education in patients with tongue malignancy. PMID:25909610

  19. Safety of pull-type and introducer percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes in oncology patients: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) allows long-term tube feeding. Safety of pull-type and introducer PEG placement in oncology patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies is unknown. Methods Retrospective analysis of 299 patients undergoing PEG tube placement between January 2006 and December 2008 revealed 57 oncology patients. All patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancy were treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. In case of high-grade stenosis introducer Freka® Pexact PEG tube was placed (n = 24) and in all other patients (n = 33) conventional pull-type PEG tube. Short-term complications and mortality rates were compared. Results Patients' characteristics and clinical status were comparable in both groups. Short-term complications were encountered in 11/24 (48%) introducer PEG patients as compared to only 4/33 (12%) pull-type PEG patients (P < 0.05). Accidental removal of the introducer PEG tube occurred in 4/24 (17%) with need for surgical intervention in 1 vs. 0/33 (0%, P < 0.05). Wound infection occurred in 3/24 (12%) leading to septic shock and admission to intensive care unit (ICU) in 1 vs. 3/33 (9%, NS). Finally, 3/24 gastrointestinal perforations (12%) resulted from a difficult placement procedure vs. 1/33 (3%), leading to urgent surgical intervention and admission to ICU. Two introducer PEG patients died at ICU, resulting in an overall mortality rate of 8% vs. 0% (P = 0.091). Conclusion The introducer Freka® Pexact PEG procedure for long-term tube feeding may lead to significantly higher complication and mortality rates in patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. It is suggested to use the conventional pull-type PEG tube placement in this group of patients, if possible. PMID:21410958

  20. [Surgical treatment of patients with severe fecal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Frolov, S A; Titov, A Iu; Poletov, N N; Kostarev, I V; Fomenko, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study is improvement of clinical and functional results of surgical treatment of patients with severe fecal incontinence. 79 patients with complete fecal incontinence were included in the study. The technique of surgical intervention was choosed in depending on the localization of structural and functional disorders of the rectum closing apparatus. Complex treatment in pre-operative and post-operative periods was directed on the improvement of functional results. Long-term results (6-24 months) were traced in 63 patients after surgical treatment and complex post-operative rehabilitation. Good and satisfactory results were identified in 57 (90.5%) patients, unsatisfactory results - in 6 (9.5%) patients. Choice of surgical technique in depending on the localization of structural and functional disorders of the rectum closing apparatus and combination of surgical correction with complex functional rehabilitation allow to increase treatment efficiency. Also it improves closing function in the most patients. PMID:24816384

  1. [Evidence and recommendations for oncologic clinical exercise - a personalized treatment concept for cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Baumann, Freerk Theeagnus; Hallek, Michael; Meyer, Janika; Galvão, Daniel Abido; Bloch, Wilhelm; Elter, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Oncological treatments can lead to acute and chronic cancer related toxicities. In recent years, a large number of clinical studies have reported positive effects of exercise to the bio-psycho-social regeneration of cancer patients. However, very few evidence-based programs have been implemented into practice with little opportunity for cancer patients to engage in such programs. Reviews and RCT studies on exercise and cancer are showing that specific exercise programs have a positive impact on fatigue syndrome, urinary incontinence, lymphedema, polyneuropathy, arthralgia, and androgen deprivation related toxicities. With the increasing evidence for exercise oncology interventions, recommendations arising from clinical trials should be translated into clinical practice and this should be viewed as an important next step in this fast moving field of exercise oncology. For that the personalized treatment concept "Oncologic clinical exercise" (OTT) was developed. PMID:26402184

  2. The Use of Art in the Medical Decision-Making Process of Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of written informed consent in the 1970s created expectations of shared decision making between doctors and patients that has led to decisional conflict for some patients. This study utilized a collaborative, intrinsic case study approach to the decision-making process of oncology patients who participated in an open art therapy…

  3. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  4. A Practical Approach to the Oncology Patient With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lindsey P; Clarke, Brian A

    2015-12-01

    Left ventricular systolic dysfunction is a significant cause of morbidity among cancer patients in whom this unfortunate complication develops. Investigation and management of chemotherapy- and radiation-induced cardiomyopathy in the emerging field of cardio-oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach between cardiology and oncology departments. The purpose of this article is to provide a practical approach to the cardiologist's assessment and management of cancer treatment-related cardiomyopathies. PMID:26321357

  5. Geriatric oncology: comparing health related quality of life in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Population ageing is increasing the number of people annually diagnosed with cancer worldwide, once most types of tumours are age-dependent. High-quality healthcare in geriatric oncology requires a multimodal approach and should take into account stratified patient outcomes based on factors other than chronological age in order to develop interventions able to optimize oncology care. This study aims to evaluate the Health Related Quality of Life in head and neck cancer patients and compare the scores in geriatric and younger patients. Methods Two hundred and eighty nine head and neck cancer patients from the Oncology Portuguese Institute participated in the Health Related Quality of Life assessment. Two patient groups were considered: the geriatric (? 65 years old, n = 115) and the younger (45-60 years old, n= 174). The EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35 questionnaires were used. Results Head and neck cancer patients were mostly males, 77.4% within geriatric group and 91.4% among younger patients group. The most frequent tumour locations were similar in both groups: larynx, oral cavity and oropharynx - base of the tongue. At the time of diagnosis, most of younger male patients were at disease stage III/IV (55.9%) whereas the majority of younger female patients were at disease stage I/II (83.4%). The geriatric patient distribution was found to be similar in any of the four disease stages and no gender differences were observed. We found that age (geriatrics scored generally worse), gender (females scored generally worse), and tumour site (larynx tumours denounce more significant problems between age groups) clearly influences Health Related Quality of Life perceptions. Conclusions Geriatric oncology assessments signalize age-independent indicators that might guide oncologic geriatric care optimization. Decision-making in geriatric oncology must be based on tumour characteristics and chronological age but also on performance status evaluation, co-morbidity, and patient reported outcomes assessment. PMID:21232097

  6. Resecting diffuse low-grade gliomas to the boundaries of brain functions: a new concept in surgical neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Duffau, H

    2015-12-01

    The traditional dilemma making surgery for diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGGs) challenging is underlain by the need to optimize tumor resection in order to significantly increase survival versus the risk of permanent neurological morbidity. Development of neuroimaging led neurosurgeons to achieve tumorectomy according to the oncological limits provided by preoperative or intraoperative structural and metabolic imaging. However, this principle is not coherent, neither with the infiltrative nature of DLGGs nor with the limited resolution of current neuroimaging. Indeed, despite technical advances, MRI still underestimates the actual spatial extent of gliomas, since tumoral cells are present several millimeters to centimeters beyond the area of signal abnormalities. Furthermore, cortical and subcortical structures may be still crucial for brain functions despite their invasion by this diffuse tumoral disease. Finally, the lack of reliability of functional MRI has also been demonstrated. Therefore, to talk about "maximal safe resection" based upon neuroimaging is a non-sense, because oncological MRI does not show the tumor and functional MRI does not show critical neural pathways. This review proposes an original concept in neuro-oncological surgery, i.e. to resect DLGG to the boundaries of brain functions, thanks to intraoperative electrical mapping performed in awake patients. This paradigmatic shift from image-guided resection to functional mapping-guided resection, based upon an accurate study of brain connectomics and neuroplasticity in each patient throughout tumor removal has permitted to solve the classical dilemma, by increasing both survival and quality of life in DLGG patients. With this in mind, brain surgeons should also be neuroscientists. PMID:25907410

  7. The WHO surgical safety checklist: survey of patients’ views

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Stephanie Jane; Rout, Shantanu; Caris, Jochem; Moorthy, Krishna; Mayer, Erik; Darzi, Ara; Sevdalis, Nick; Vincent, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that full implementation of the WHO surgical safety checklist across NHS operating theatres is still proving a challenge for many surgical teams. The aim of the current study was to assess patients’ views of the checklist, which have yet to be considered and could inform its appropriate use, and influence clinical buy-in. Method Postoperative patients were sampled from surgical wards at two large London teaching hospitals. Patients were shown two professionally produced videos, one demonstrating use of the WHO surgical safety checklist, and one demonstrating the equivalent periods of their operation before its introduction. Patients’ views of the checklist, its use in practice, and their involvement in safety improvement more generally were captured using a bespoke 19-item questionnaire. Results 141 patients participated. Patients were positive towards the checklist, strongly agreeing that it would impact positively on their safety and on surgical team performance. Those worried about coming to harm in hospital were particularly supportive. Views were divided regarding hearing discussions around blood loss/airway before their procedure, supporting appropriate modifications to the tool. Patients did not feel they had a strong role to play in safety improvement more broadly. Conclusions It is feasible and instructive to capture patients’ views of the delivery of safety improvements like the checklist. We have demonstrated strong support for the checklist in a sample of surgical patients, presenting a challenge to those resistant to its use. PMID:25038036

  8. Fertility Protection in Female Oncology Patients: How Should Patients Be Counseled?

    PubMed Central

    Findeklee, S.; Lotz, L.; Heusinger, K.; Hoffmann, I.; Dittrich, R.; Beckmann, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Protecting the fertility of patients with oncologic disease is becoming more and more important, as fulfilling the wish to have children is increasingly occurring at a later stage in life and long-term survival rates after cancer are continuing to improve. A number of fertility-preserving options exist. In addition to techniques which have been around for some time such as medical ovarian suppression, ovarian transposition, and organ-preserving surgery, there are other, more recent, innovative methods which have developed over the last few years such as cryopreservation of oocytes or ovarian tissue transplantation after completing cancer therapy. As every procedure has its specific advantages and disadvantages, informed patient consent is essential. The physician?s aim must be to select the optimal procedure for each patient. The extent of patients? information about the options to preserve fertility in women with oncologic disease remains limited. One of the main reasons for this is that clinicians are not sure how to inform patients about existing procedures and methods. The aim of this review article is to provide help in clinical practice.

  9. Hepatocellular carcinoma in central Sydney: a 10 year review of patients seen in a medical oncology department

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Desmond; Findlay, Michael; Boyer, Michael; Tattersall, Martin H.

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To report a single Australian oncology unit’s experience with the management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in the context of a literature review of the current management issues. METHODS: Retrospective case record review of 76 patients with diagnosis of HCC referred to the unit between 1984 and 1995. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients had adequate records for analysis. Thirty-six (56%) were migrants with half from Southeast Asia. Twenty-four p atients had a documented viral aetiology. Nine (14%) of 51 patients with pathological confirmation of HCC had normal alpha-fetoprotein levels. Median survival of the 20 patients managed palliatively was 5 weeks compared to 16 weeks for the cohort overall. Surgery in 16 patients rendered all initially disease free with a median survival of 88 weeks. Chemoembolisation induced tumor responses in 5 of the 11 patients so treated. Systemic chemotherapy and tamoxifen treatment caused tumor response in two of 12 and one of 25 respectively. CONCLUSION: Prolonged survival of patients with HCC depends on early detection of small tumors suitable for surgical resection. Other active t reatments are palliative in intent and have limited success. In addition to tumor response and survival duration, the toxicities of therapies and the overall quality of life of patients need to be considered as important outcomes. Viral hepatitis prevention and screening of individuals at risk are strategies that are important for HCC management in communities where the disease is endemic. PMID:11819496

  10. Caring for head and neck oncology patients. Does social support lead to better quality of life?

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, C. M.; Logan-Smith, L. L.; Phillips, J.; MacPhee, M.; Attia, E. L.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether social support contributes to better quality of life and psychological state of head and neck oncology patients. DESIGN: A structured questionnaire, administered orally to patients face-to-face, with specific questions about demographic and medical information and social support and two standardized scales; a cancer-specific quality of life scale and a depression scale. SETTING: Head and Neck Oncology Clinic, an institutional referral centre providing ambulatory care at the Camp Hill Medical Centre in Halifax, NS. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-five head and neck oncology patients (33 men, 12 women) who came for follow-up appointments at the clinic. One person did not complete the interview. Fifty patients were approached, but five were not included: one died before the interview, and four agreed to participate but were prevented by transportation or timing problems. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Scores on the Functional Living Index-Cancer Scale and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale. RESULTS: Four main factors predicted quality of life: satisfaction with family physician support, severity of cancer, sex of patient, and type of cancer. Three important predictors of psychological state were loss of appetite, family physician support, and sex of patient. CONCLUSION: Social support, particularly from family physicians, contributes greatly to better quality of life and psychological state for head and neck oncology patients. PMID:8828874

  11. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in critically ill surgical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Delfino Duarte, Pericles Almeida; Fumagalli, Andreia Cristina; Wandeur, Vanessa; Becker, Delmiro

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (N-GAL) is an early biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI) due to various etiologies. On the other hand, N-GAL is also elevated in patients with acute inflammatory conditions and in several solid neoplasms. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy of N-GAL as a predictor of AKI and mortality in oncological surgical patients postoperatively in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: This was a prospective cohort observation study on adult cancer patients submitted to elective or emergency surgeries and admitted in the ICU. Urinary N-GAL was measured at the first 2 h after admission. AKI incidence and other complications were assessed, including hospital mortality. Results: A total of 22 patients were assessed (77% male, age 52.8 years, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II] 17.3) in whom the most frequent site of cancer was the gastrointestinal tract. AKI incidence was 13.6%. Urinary N-GAL was a predictor of AKI (22.0 ng/ml in patients without AKI vs. 239.1 ng/ml in patients with AKI, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the main predictors of AKI were age, APACHE II, and N-GAL. N-GAL was also higher, although not statistically significant in patients who died in the hospital. Conclusions: In oncological postoperative patients admitted to the ICU, urinary N-GAL was an independent predictor of AKI; moreover, its level was higher in the deceased patients. PMID:25983430

  12. Duodenocaval Fistula in a Patient with Inferior Vena Cava Leiomyosarcoma Treated by Surgical Resection and Caval Polytetrafluoroethylene Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Davide; Querques, Giulia; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Bonaffini, Pietro Andrea; Sironi, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) leiomyosarcoma represents an extremely rare disease that commonly involves the segment between the inflow of the renal veins and the inflow of the hepatic veins (46% of cases). We report the case of a patient affected by an IVC leiomyosarcoma, treated with surgical resection, caval reconstruction with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and right nephrectomy, followed by external beam radiotherapy. Oncological follow-up was negative for 17 years after this combined treatment, since the patient developed a duodenocaval fistula (DCF). PMID:26185702

  13. Committee opinion no. 464: patient safety in the surgical environment.

    PubMed

    2010-09-01

    Ensuring patient safety in the operating room begins before the patient enters the operative suite and includes attention to all applicable types of preventable medical errors (including, for example, medication errors), but surgical errors are unique to this environment. Steps to prevent wrong-site, wrong-person, wrong-procedure errors, or retained foreign objects have been recommended, starting with structured communication between the patient, the surgeon(s), and other members of the health care team. Prevention of surgical errors requires the attention of all personnel involved in the patient's care. PMID:20733473

  14. Toward strategies for cost containment in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, W R; Gavett, J W; Kirshner, R; Messick, W J; Ingersoll, G

    1983-01-01

    The University of Rochester, Department of Surgery, in response to an experimental community-wide limit on hospital budgets, studied high-cost general surgical patients as a potential source of leverage for containment of hospital costs. It was found that a small number of patients impact significantly on hospital costs. In 1980, 3935 patients at Strong Memorial Hospital (SMH) had at least one contact with a general surgical patient care or intensive care unit; 261 patients (6.6%) had total 1980 charges of more than $20,000 each. They contributed 32% of the total of both general surgical charges and patient days. A subset of 2021 patients was selected to represent more precisely the general surgical patient. The 85 high-cost patients (4.2%) of this subset were chosen for intensive study. These patients generated a significant and disproportionate per cent of total (2021) general surgical charges (26.8%) and hospital days (27.6%). Average total charges were more than 8 times those of the complementary general surgical subset (1936). Nineteen of the 85 patients (22.3%) died in the hospital and 42 patients (49.4%) were dead within 2 1/2 years. Forty patients (of the 85) were then further identified as "complex", based on multiple, usually unrelated, illnesses and multiple annual admissions. Tending to be elderly with poor prognoses, 60% of them had died by April 1983. The major criterion of complexity was the lack of a well-focused medical problem; the cure for one problem simply relinquished primacy to another. A parallel study of hospital ancillary procedures disclosed a similar high-cost pattern. Of approximately 4000 ancillary procedures, 100 (2.5%) had annual charges of $100,000 or over, accounting for two-thirds of total 1980 ancillary charges. Roughly 20% of a single patient's ordered procedures accounted for 80% of the patient's ancillary charges, thus allowing concentrated study of a relatively small number of charges. Means for cost containment may be applied logically to the high-cost patient and particularly toward the complex patient. The complex patient is especially suited for consideration, since it is postulated that these patients are endemic to all general hospitals and to all clinical services. Strategies to be developed should include: 1) a managerial system in which physicians have an incentive to contain costs, 2) an online data system, 3) an accurate, efficient way to identify prospective high-cost and complex patients and, 4) awareness by physicians, patients, and society that less expensive modes of diagnosis and therapy are an appropriate response to rationed health resources. PMID:6412640

  15. [The experience of the "oncologic patient": (re)conceptualizing the informative act].

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Carlos António

    2007-01-01

    The adaptation of the patient to the conditions of chronic illness makes the information given to the patient one of the most powerful strategies, capable of contributing to a change in the social representation of the patient, from that of a mere clinical case to that of a holistic being. The objective of this study was to investigate the scientific work published in periodicals indexed by the Medline and Lilacs databases between 1990 and 2006 as to the informative act and the different forms in which information is provided to oncology patients. This analysis of the literature led to the conclusion that there has been an increase in the volume of publications, underlining the role of the oncology patient as a catalyst for new strategies for psychosocial adjustment and revealing her key role through her status as a 'professional patient'. PMID:18472547

  16. Effect of Opiates, Anesthetic Techniques, and Other Perioperative Factors on Surgical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Alan David; Patel, Nayan; Bueno, Franklin Rivera; Hymel, Brad; Vadivelu, Nalini; Kodumudi, Gopal; Urman, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Opioid pharmacotherapy is often used to treat cancer pain. However, morphine and other opioid-like substance use in patients with cancer may have significant adverse consequences, including the suppression of both innate and acquired immune responses. Although studies have examined the possibility that regional anesthesia attenuates the immunosuppressive response of surgery, the effects of morphine and other opioid-related substances on tumor progression remain unknown. Methods This article presents an evidence-based review of the influence of opioids and anesthetic technique on the immune system in the context of cancer recurrence. The review focuses on the field of regional anesthesia and the setting of surgical oncologic procedures. The method for perioperative pain management and the technique of anesthesia chosen for patients in cancer surgery were explored. Results General anesthetics have been indicated to suppress both cell-mediated immunity and humoral immunity. Evidence suggests that intravenous opioids suppress the immune system. However, the mechanisms by which anesthetics and analgesics inhibit the immune system are not understood. Compared with the alternatives, regional analgesia offers reduced blood loss and superior postoperative analgesia. Because of these advantages, the use of regional analgesia has increased in oncologic surgeries. Conclusion Immune responses from all components of the immune system, including both the humoral and cell-mediated components, appear to be suppressed by anesthetics and analgesics. The clinical anesthesiologist should consider these factors in the application of technique, especially in cancer surgery. PMID:24940132

  17. Surgical management in patient with uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Somasheila I; Pappuru, Rajeev Reddy; Latha, K Madhavi; Kamat, Sripathi; Sangwan, Virender S

    2013-01-01

    Surgery in the management of uveitis can be divided based on indication: either for therapeutic or can be for diagnostic purposes or to manage complications. The commonest indications include: Visual rehabilitation: surgery for removal of cataract, band keratopathy, corneal scars, pupillary membranes, removal of dense vitreous membranes, management of complications: anti-glaucoma surgery, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and chronic hypotony and diagnostic: aqueous tap, vitreous biopsy, tissue biopsy (iris, choroid). In this review, we shall describe the surgical technique for visual rehabilitation and for management of complications. PMID:23803480

  18. Use of Psychosocial Services Increases after a Social Worker-Mediated Intervention in Gynecology Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Yuko; Shah, Nina R.; Ward, Kristy K.; McHale, Michael T.; Alvarez, Edwin A.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of psychosocial services to gynecologic oncology outpatients by a social worker increases service use. During the initial six weeks (phase I), patients were referred for psychosocial services by clinic staff. During the second six weeks (phase II), a nurse introduced available…

  19. Surgical and oncology trials for rectal cancer: who will participate? | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Patients, surgeons, and oncologists were asked whether they would be willing to enter one of five randomized controlled trials for rectal cancer. Patients’ willingness to participate was consistently low (19%-32%). Colorectal surgeons and medical and radiation oncologists also reported low levels of potential participation. The overwhelming reason for refusing to enter each trial was a dislike of the randomization process, followed by the effect of treatment on quality of life.

  20. Use of an electronic patient-reported outcome measurement system to improve distress management in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sophia K.; Rowe, Krista; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Management of patient distress is a critical task in cancer nursing and cancer practice. Here we describe two examples of how an electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) measurement system implemented into routine oncology care can practically aid clinical and research tasks related to distress management. Methods Tablet personal computers were used to routinely complete a standardized ePRO review of systems surveys at point of care during every encounter in the Duke Oncology outpatient clinics. Two cases of use implementation are explored: (1) triaging distressed patients for optimal care, and (2) psychosocial program evaluation research. Results Between 2009 and 2011, the ePRO system was used to collect information during 17,338 Duke Oncology patient encounters. The system was used to monitor patients for psychosocial distress employing an electronic clinical decision support algorithm, with 1,952 (11.3%) referrals generated for supportive services. The system was utilized to examine the efficacy of a psychosocial care intervention documenting statistically significant improvements in distress, despair, fatigue, and quality of life (QOL) in 50 breast cancer patients. Significance of results ePRO solutions can guide best practice management of cancer patient distress. Nurses play a key role in implementation and utilization. PMID:24128592

  1. Fears, Uncertainties, and Hopes: Patient-Initiated Actions and Doctors' Responses During Oncology Interviews.

    PubMed

    Beach, Wayne A; Dozier, David M

    2015-11-01

    New cancer patients frequently raise concerns about fears, uncertainties, and hopes during oncology interviews. This study sought to understand when and how patients raise their concerns, how doctors responded to these patient-initiated actions, and implications for communication satisfaction. A subsampling of video recorded and transcribed encounters was investigated involving 44 new patients and 14 oncologists. Patients completed pre/post self-report measures about fears, uncertainties, and hopes as well as postevaluations of interview satisfaction. Conversation analysis was used to initially identify pairs of patient-initiated and doctor-responsive actions. A coding scheme was subsequently developed, and two independent coding teams, comprised of two coders each, reliably identified patient-initiated and doctor-responsive social actions. Interactional findings reveal that new cancer patients initiate actions much more frequently than previous research had identified, concerns are usually raised indirectly, and with minimal emotion. Doctors tend to respond to these concerns immediately, but with even less affect, and rarely partner with patients. From pre/post results, it was determined that the higher patients' reported fears, the higher their postvisit fears and lower their satisfaction. Patients with high uncertainty were highly proactive (e.g., asked more questions), yet reported even greater uncertainties after encounters. Hopeful patients also exited interviews with high hopes. Overall, new patients were very satisfied: oncology interviews significantly decreased patients' fears and uncertainties, while increasing hopes. Discussion raises key issues for improving communication and managing quality cancer care. PMID:26134261

  2. “Il Corpo Ritrovato”: Dermocosmetological Skin Care Project for the Oncologic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, G.; Romano, M. C.; Cameli, N.; Mariano, M.; Pastore, F.; Annunziata, M. C.; Mazzella, C.; De Vita, Valerio; Mauriello, Maria Chiara; Monfrecola, G.

    2011-01-01

    Neoplastic disease and its therapeutic options have a huge impact on the patient's quality of life from both the emotional and the working point of view. The project “Il Corpo Ritrovato” aims at creating an interdisciplinary network of physicians to improve the quality of life of the oncologic patient, focusing on such important aspects as dermocosmetological skin care but also on the evaluation of new therapeutic and diagnostic algorithms in order to make further progress in the field of prevention. PMID:22084736

  3. Patients’ awareness of the surgical risks of smoking

    PubMed Central

    Bottorff, Joan L.; Seaton, Cherisse L.; Lamont, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the smoking patterns of patients receiving elective surgery and their knowledge about the benefits of smoking cessation to inform and strengthen support for patients to quit smoking in order to optimize surgical outcomes. Design Patients who had elective surgery were screened for smoking status, and eligible patients completed a telephone survey. Setting Two regional hospitals in northern British Columbia. Participants Of 1722 patients screened, 373 reported smoking before surgery. Of these, 161 (59.0% women) completed a telephone survey. Main outcome measures Patient smoking cessation, knowledge of the perioperative risks of smoking, use of resources, and health care provider advice and assistance. Results Participants included 66 men and 95 women (mean [SD] age of 51.9 [14.0] years). In total, 7.5% of these patients quit smoking in the 8 weeks before their surgeries, although an additional 38.8% reduced their smoking. Only about half of the patients surveyed were aware that continuing to smoke increased their surgical risks. Further, only half of the patients surveyed reported being advised to quit before their surgeries by a health care professional. Few were using the provincial resources available to support smoking cessation (eg, QuitNow), and 39.6% were unaware of the provincial program to cover the cost of smoking cessation aids (eg, nicotine gum or patches), yet 62.7% of respondents were thinking about quitting smoking. Conclusion Many surgical patients in northern British Columbia who smoked were unaware of the perioperative risks of smoking and the cessation support available to them. An opportunity exists for all health care professionals to encourage more patients to quit in order to optimize their surgical outcomes.

  4. Comparison of resident operative case logs during a surgical oncology rotation in the United States and an international rotation in India.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, Paul; Soliman, Mohsin; Kolkman, Marcy; Stack, Apollo; Rao, T Subramanyeshwar; Mukta, Srinivasulu; Schmid, Kendra; Thompson, Jon; Are, Chandrakanth

    2015-03-01

    This study compared the operative case log experience between rotations during General Surgery residency in the United States and an international rotation in India. A resident from the General Surgery residency program at University of Nebraska Medical Center participated in an international rotation in Surgical Oncology at Mehdi Nawaz Jung Institute of Oncology in Hyderabad, India for 3 months in 2009. The operative case log of this resident (INT) was compared to those of another resident (US) on a rotation in surgical oncology at the parent institution during the same time period. Both institutions were tertiary care centers. We noted that the INT resident performed a greater number of cases (132) when compared to the US resident (61). The INT resident also performed cases in a wider variety of disease categories such as: head and neck (26 %), gynecology (19 %), breast (14 %) and urology (4 %). In contrast, abdominal cases accounted for 68 % of the cases performed by the US resident with fewer cases in the other categories. The INT resident performed 98 % of the cases by the open approach, whereas the US resident performed only 81 % of cases by the open approach, with the remaining 19 % of cases performed by the laparoscopic approach. The results demonstrate that the INT resident performed a greater number of operative cases when compared to a resident (US) at the parent institution, and performed cases in more diverse disease categories with an emphasis on the open operative approach. PMID:25937762

  5. Obesity-related insulin resistance: implications for the surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Tewari, N; Awad, S; Macdonald, I A; Lobo, D N

    2015-11-01

    In healthy surgical patients, preoperative fasting and major surgery induce development of insulin resistance (IR). IR can be present in up to 41% of obese patients without diabetes and this can rise in the postoperative period, leading to an increased risk of postoperative complications. Inflammation is implicated in the aetiology of IR. This review examines obesity-associated IR and its implications for the surgical patient. Searches of the Medline and Science Citation Index databases were performed using various key words in combinations with the Boolean operators AND, OR and NOT. Key journals, nutrition and metabolism textbooks and the reference lists of key articles were also hand searched. Adipose tissue has been identified as an active endocrine organ and the chemokines secreted as a result of macrophage infiltration have a role in the pathogenesis of IR. Visceral adipose tissue appears to be the most metabolically active, although results across studies are not consistent. Results from animal and human studies often provide conflicting results, which has rendered the pursuit of a common mechanistic pathway challenging. Obesity-associated IR appears, in part, to be related to inflammatory changes associated with increased adiposity. Postoperatively, the surgical patient is in a proinflammatory state, so this finding has important implications for the obese surgical patient. PMID:26028059

  6. Community Oncology Medical Homes: Physician-Driven Change to Improve Patient Care and Reduce Costs.

    PubMed

    Waters, Teresa M; Webster, Jennifer A; Stevens, Laura A; Li, Tao; Kaplan, Cameron M; Graetz, Ilana; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-11-01

    Although the patient-centered medical home is a well-established model of care for primary care providers, adoption by specialty providers has been relatively limited. Recently, there has been particular interest in developing specialty medical homes in medical oncology because of practice variation, care fragmentation, and high overall costs of care. In 2012, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation awarded Innovative Oncology Business Solutions a 3-year grant for their Community Oncology Medical Home (COME HOME) program to implement specialty medical homes in seven oncology practices across the country. We report our early experience and lessons learned.Through September 30, 2014, COME HOME has touched 16,353 unique patients through triage encounters, patient education visits, or application of clinical pathways. We describe the COME HOME model and implementation timeline, profile use of key services, and report patient satisfaction. Using feedback from practice sites, we highlight patient-centered innovations and overall lessons learned.COME HOME incorporates best practices care driven by triage and clinical pathways, team-based care, active disease management, enhanced access and care, as well as financial support for the medical home infrastructure. Information technology plays a central role, supporting both delivery of care and performance monitoring. Volume of service use has grown steadily over time, leveling out in second quarter 2014. The program currently averages 1,265 triage encounters, 440 extended hours visits, and 655 patient education encounters per month.COME HOME offers a patient-centered model of care to improve quality and continuity of care. PMID:26220931

  7. Methods for the postoperative management of the thoracic oncology patients: lessons from the clinic.

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, Giovanni; Facciolo, Francesco; Pastorino, Ugo; Rocco, Gaetano

    2015-12-01

    Oncological thoracic surgery comprises challenging procedures not only from a surgical point of view but also regarding the postoperative management. The most significant procedures performed for malignancy are those requiring resection of the lung, the pleura, the esophagus, mediastinal structures, the chest wall and airways. Especially after major procedures, postoperative complications occur frequently and usually require a multidisciplinary approach involving thoracic surgeons, anesthesiologists, pulmonologist, physiotherapists and oncologists. Thus, a proper postoperative management is as important as the surgical procedure to achieve the best outcome following surgery. In this article, we provide an overview of the basic principles for management of postoperative imaging and drain system and review the main postoperative complications following thoracic surgery, focusing also on new strategies to prevent them. PMID:26536136

  8. Surgical Management of Stone Disease in Patient with Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Alonso; Granberg, Candace F.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Milliner, Dawn S.; Krambeck, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To present our experience with surgical management of nephrolithiasis in patients with primary hyperoxaluria (PH). Methods A retrospective chart review from 1994–2012 was perform to identify patients with diagnosis of PH. Results A total of 14 patients with PH were identified with median follow-up of 18.6 years (range: 0.9–51). Median age at initial symptom and subsequent diagnosis were 6.7 years (range: 1.1–35.5) and 0.42 years (range: 0–33.25), respectively. Patients underwent a total of 54 procedures at our institution including: ureteroscopy 27 (50%), percutaneous nephrolithotomy 15 (28%), shock wave lithotripsy 8 (15%), and combined procedures 4 (7%). Overall non-intraparenchymal stone free rate after first, second, and third procedure(s) were 59%, 76%, and 78%, respectively. On average 1.6 procedures (range: 1–4) were required to rid patients of symptomatic stones, which subsequently afforded them a mean of 3.62 years (range: 0.25–21.5) without the need of additional intervention. There were 6 Clavien grade ? III complications in 4 patients, including immediate postoperative ESRD in 3. Conclusions Despite optimal medical and surgical management, patients experience recurrent acute stone events requiring multiple urologic interventions. Significant complications such as ESRD can occur secondary to surgical intervention. PMID:25733260

  9. The patient-centered medical home in oncology: from concept to reality.

    PubMed

    Page, Ray D; Newcomer, Lee N; Sprandio, John D; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the cost of providing quality cancer care has been subject to an epic escalation causing concerns on the verge of a health care crisis. Innovative patient-management models in oncology based on patient-centered medical home (PCMH) principles, coupled with alternative payments to traditional fee for service (FFS), such as bundled and episodes payment are now showing evidence of effectiveness. These efforts have the potential to bend the cost curve while also improving quality of care and patient satisfaction. However, going forward with FFS alternatives, there are several performance-based payment options with an array of financial risks and rewards. Most novel payment options convey a greater financial risk and accountability on the provider. Therefore, the oncology medical home (OMH) can be a way to mitigate some financial risks by sharing savings with the payer through better global care of the patient, proactively preventing complications, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations. However, much of the medical home infrastructure that is required to reduced total costs of cancer care comes as an added expense to the provider. As best-of-practice quality standards are being elucidated and refined, we are now at a juncture where payers, providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders should work in concert to expand and implement the OMH framework into the variety of oncology practice environments to better equip them to assimilate into the new payment reform configurations of the future. PMID:25993243

  10. The role of mannose binding lectin on fever episodes in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Ferenc; Fadgyas, Balázs; Papp, Éva; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Prohászka, Zoltán; Müller, Brigitta; Kovács, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant changes in pediatric oncological therapy, mortality is still high, mainly due to infections. Complement system as an ancient immune defense against microorganisms plays a significant role in surmounting infections, therefore, deficiency of its components may have particular importance in malignancies. The present paper assesses the effect of promoter (X/Y) and exon 1 (A/0) polymorphisms of the MBL2 gene altering mannose binding lectin (MBL) serum level in pediatric oncological patients with febrile neutropenia. Furthermore, frequency distribution of MBL2 alleles in children with malignancies and age-matched controls was analysed. Fifty-four oncohematological patients and 53 children who had undergone pediatric surgery were enrolled into this retrospective study. No significant differences were found in the frequency of MBL2 alleles between the hemato-oncologic and control group. The average duration of fever episodes was significantly shorter (p = 0.035) in patients carrying genotypes (AY/AY and AY/AX) that encode normal MBL level, compared to individuals with genotypes associated with lower functional MBL level (AX/AX, AY/0, AX/0, or 0/0) (days, median (IQ range) 3.7(0-5.4) vs. 5.0(3.8-6.6), respectively). In conclusion, our data suggest that MBL2 genotypes may influence the course of febrile neutropenia in pediatric patients with malignancies, and may contribute to clarification of the importance of MBL in infections. PMID:26433879

  11. [Surgical intervention in patients with malignant glioma].

    PubMed

    Kostron, Herwig; Rössler, Karl

    2006-06-01

    Glial tumors occur at an incidence from 2 to 10/ 100.000 (Japan vs. Sweden) and building up to 50 % of all patients suffering from brain tumors. 50 % of those are again malignant gliomas Grade III and Grade IV. Despite all therapeutic approaches the median survival for glioblastomas is 15 months and for anaplastic gliomas Grade III 30 months. After diagnosis, preferably by MRI, a neurosurgical procedure is performed under microsurgical guidelines mostly by means of neuronavigation and intraoperative guidance. Depending on the preoperative diagnosis and localisation of the pathologic lesion an open craniotomy or a stereotactic biopsy is performed. This allows the histological verification and decompression and cytoreduction. A gros total safe removal preserving neurological function is the most important goal of surgery. Tumor removal in eloquent areas such as speech area is performed under local anesthesia as an awake operation. Age, Karnofsky performance status, histology as well as radical removal have a significant influence on overall survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy with Temozolemide have further improved the outcome significantly. The 2-year survival has reached 28 % in most recent studies. Further experimental therapies in controlled trials, such as intratumoral convection-enhanced instillation of immunotoxins and radiopeptids, photodynamic therapy and direct instillation of new formulations of chemotherapeutic drugs (e. g. nanoparticles) are promising new approaches. New developments in the treatment of patients harboring malignant brain tumors allow an individual neurooncological treatment concept to be established to enhance overall survival and quality of life. PMID:16944364

  12. Oral-dental concerns of the pediatric oncology patient

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, K.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main concerns of all disciplines in health care today is maintaining the patient's quality of life and comfort during cancer therapy. Oral complications resulting from radiation or chemotherapy can be expected in a large percentage of patients. Conducting a dental evaluation and performing treatment before therapy can help prevent or lessen potential complications. With preventive care and fewer infections, the patient will be able to communicate with friends and family, and optimum care and comfort can be provided.

  13. Surgical options for patellar stabilization in the skeletally immature patient.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Kenneth D; Fabricant, Peter D; Ladenhauf, Hannah N; Green, Daniel W

    2012-09-01

    Patella dislocation is a common injury in children and adolescents and occurs at a rate of 29 to 43 per 100,000 among the 10- to 17-year-olds. The variety and types of patellar instability seen in a pediatric orthopedic population may differ slightly from those seen in an adult clinic. Four main types of pediatric patellar instability exist and include: posttraumatic, syndromic, obligatory,and fixed. Over 100 surgical techniques have been proposed to treat the various types of patellar instability. This review intends to discuss the techniques and outcomes of surgical reconstructions accepted and utilized in the skeletally immature patients. PMID:23882722

  14. Surgical errors and risks – the head and neck cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Harréus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery. PMID:24403972

  15. [Restoration of speech function in oncological patients with maxillary defects].

    PubMed

    Matiakin, E G; Chuchkov, V M; Akhundov, A A; Azizian, R I; Romanov, I S; Chuchkov, M V; Agapov, V V

    2009-01-01

    Speech quality was evaluated in 188 patients with acquired maxillary defects. Prosthetic treatment of 29 patients was preceded by pharmacopsychotherapy. Sixty three patients had lessons with a logopedist and 66 practiced self-tuition based on the specially developed test. Thirty patients were examined for the quality of speech without preliminary preparation. Speech quality was assessed by auditory and spectral analysis. The main forms of impaired speech quality in the patients with maxillary defects were marked rhinophonia and impaired articulation. The proposed analytical tests were based on a combination of "difficult" vowels and consonants. The use of a removable prostheses with an obturator failed to correct the affected speech function but created prerequisites for the formation of the correct speech stereotype. Results of the study suggest the relationship between the quality of speech in subjects with maxillary defects and their intellectual faculties as well as the desire to overcome this drawback. The proposed tests are designed to activate the neuromuscular apparatus responsible for the generation of the speech. Lessons with a speech therapist give a powerful emotional incentive to the patients and promote their efforts toward restoration of speaking ability. Pharmacopsychotherapy and self-control are another efficacious tools for the improvement of speech quality in patients with maxillary defects. PMID:20037557

  16. Pain Management Issues for the Geriatric Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Jason L

    2015-09-01

    Adequate treatment of pain is of utmost importance in making uncomplicated the perioperative course for geriatric surgical patients. Effective analgesia reduces morbidity, improves patient and family satisfaction, and is a natural expectation of high-quality care. Pain treatment in older adults is more complicated than in younger counterparts, and great consideration must be given to age-related changes in physiology and pharmacokinetics. Pain treatment must be individualized based on each patient's profile. Side effects must be minimized and organ toxicity avoided. When complications occur they may be more severe, and treatment must be prompt. Alternative plans for analgesia must be readily enacted. PMID:26315638

  17. Immunotherapy of gram-negative infections in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Glauser, M P

    1989-09-01

    While it is widely recognized that gram-negative bacteria (GNB) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients whose immune defenses are compromised both by their underlying malignancy as well as by its treatment, efforts to prevent or to treat such infections by immunological means have been hampered for several reasons. First, the natural anatomical barriers are often disrupted either by the tumor itself, by the chemotherapeutic agents, or, as recognized more recently, by viral (herpetic) or fungal infections, so that entrance of the gram-negative flora into the host tissue and blood stream is greatly facilitated. Efforts to diminish the bacterial load by means of oral decontamination, be it selective or not, to prevent such ingress have brought limited success. Second, active immunization is not likely to elicit a useful response in these patients, so that mainly passive immunotherapy has been considered and studied. However, since the most immunocompromised cancer patients are very often leucopenic, the opsono-phagocytic function of passively administered antibodies is not likely to help the patients to get rid of the invading gram-negative bacteria. This latter observation has been particularly well established in the case of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in leukemic patients (Young LS, Stevens P, Ingram J. J Clin Invest 1975, 56, 850-861). PMID:2680515

  18. Longitudinal Assessments of Quality of Life in Endometrial Cancer Patients: Effect of Surgical Approach and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Tien; Menard, Chantal; Samant, Rajiv; Choan, E.; Hopkins, Laura; Faught, Wylam; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is often considered for endometrial cancer. We studied the effect of RT and surgical treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: All patients referred to the gynecologic oncology clinics with biopsy findings showing endometrial cancer were recruited. QOL assessments were performed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire-C30, version 3. Assessments were obtained at study entry and at regular 3-month intervals for a maximum of 2 years. Open-ended telephone interviews were done every 6 months. Linear mixed regression models were built using QOL domain scores as dependent variables, with the predictors of surgical treatment and adjuvant RT type. Results: A total of 40 patients were recruited; 80% of the surgeries were performed by laparotomy. Significant improvements were seen in most QOL domains with increased time from treatment. Adjuvant RT resulted in significantly more severe bowel symptoms and improvement in insomnia compared with conservative follow-up. No significant adverse effect from adjuvant RT was seen on the overall QOL. Bowel symptoms were significantly increased in patients treated with laparotomy compared with laparoscopy in the patients treated with whole pelvic RT. Qualitatively, about one-half of the patients noted improvements in their overall QOL during follow-up, with easy fatigability the most prevalent. Conclusion: No significant adverse effect was seen on patients' overall QOL with adjuvant pelvic RT after the recovery period. The acute adverse effects on patients' QOL significantly improved with an increasing interval from diagnosis.

  19. Integrative oncology for breast cancer patients: introduction of an expert-based model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant breast neoplasms are among the most frequent forms of cancer in the Western world. Conventional treatment of breast cancer may include surgery, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, radiation and/or immunotherapy, all of which are often accompanied by severe side effects. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been shown to be effective in alleviating those symptoms. Furthermore, with patient survival rates increasing, oncologists, psychologists and other therapists have to become more sensitive to the needs of cancer survivors that go beyond than the mere alleviation of symptoms. Many CAM methods are geared to treat the patient in a holistic manner and thus are also concerned with the patient’s psychological and spiritual needs. Discussion The use of certain CAM methods may become problematic when, as frequently occurs, patients use them indiscriminately and without informing their oncologists. Herbal medicines and dietary supplements, especially, may interfere with primary cancer treatments or have other detrimental effects. Thus, expertise in this highly specialized field of integrative medicine should be available to patients so that they can be advised about the benefits and negative effects of such preparations and practices. Being a beneficial combination of conventional and CAM care, integrative oncology makes possible the holistic approach to cancer care. The concept of integrative oncology for breast cancer is jointly practiced by the Department of Internal and Integrative Medicine, Kliniken Essen-Mitte, academic teaching hospital of the University of Duisburg-Essen, and the Breast Center at Kliniken Essen-Mitte in Germany. This model is introduced here; its scope is reviewed, and its possible implications for the practice of integrative medicine are discussed. Summary Evidence-based integrative care is crucial to the field of oncology in establishing state-of-the-art care for breast cancer patients. PMID:23170989

  20. [Salvage cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy failure: principles, indications, patient selection, oncological results and morbidity].

    PubMed

    Hétet, J-F; Colls, P; Pocholle, P; Chauveau, P; Barré, C; Hallouin, P

    2014-11-01

    Potentially curative salvage options for biochemical failure after primary prostatic radiotherapy include salvage radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound and cryotherapy. Salvage cryoablation for recurrent prostate cancer after irradiation failure is currently a well-established therapeutic option, since technical improvements have permitted better oncologic outcomes and lower complications rates over the years. This article reviews surgical technique, oncologic and functional outcomes, as well as morbidity and complications of salvage cryotherapy for local recurrence after external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for prostate cancer. PMID:24910288

  1. Colorectal cancer in aged patients. Toward the routine treatment through laparoscopic surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; MARCHESE, S.; FAMOSO, F.; LA CORTE, F.; MARLETTA, S.; LEANZA, G.; ZANGHÌ, G.; LEANZA, V.; INTAGLIATA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in general population. The incidence seems to be higher in older age. Surgery remains the treatment of choice and laparoscopic approach offers numerous benefits. We report our personal experience in elderly patients operated on for colorectal cancer with laparoscopic resection. Patients and methods From January 2003 to September 2013, out of 160 patients aged 65 years or older and operated with minimally invasive techniques, 30 cases affected by colorectal cancer and operated on with laparoscopic approach were analyzed in this study. Results Male/female ratio was 1.35 and mean age 72 years. Constipation, weight loss, anemia and rectal bleeding were the most commonly reported symptoms. Lesions involved descending-sigmoid colon in 53% of cases, rectum in 37% and ascending colon in 10%. Among laparoscopic colorectal operations laparoscopic left colectomy was the most frequently performed, followed by right colectomy, abdominoperineal resection and Hartmann procedure. Operative times ranged from 3 to 5 hours depending on surgical procedure performed. Mean hospital stay was 6 days (range 4–9). Conversion to open approach occurred only in a case of laparoscopic right colectomy (3%) for uncontrolled bleeding. A single case of mortality was reported. In two cases (7%) anastomotic leakage was observed, conservatively treated in one patient and requiring reoperation in the other one. Conclusions Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is feasible and effective for malignancies in elderly population offering several advantages including immunologic and oncologic ones. However an experienced surgical team is essential in reducing risks and complications. PMID:25827663

  2. Surgical treatment of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chen, S F; Kato, Y; Sinha, R; Kumar, A; Watabe, T; Imizu, S; Oda, J; Oguri, D; Sano, H; Hirose, Y

    2015-01-01

    We present our experience with elective microsurgical clipping of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) and analyze this management. A total of 150 patients with UIA were reviewed and data were collected with regard to age, sex, presence of symptoms, location and size of the aneurysms, surgical complications and postoperative 1 year outcomes. Aneurysm size was assessed either by three-dimensional CT angiography or digital subtraction angiogram. Glasgow Outcome Scale was used to assess clinical outcomes. One hundred and fifty patients with 165 aneurysms were treated in this series. The mean size of the UIA was 5.6mm. Eighty aneurysms (48.5%) were less than 5mm in size, and 73 (44.2%) were from 5 to 10mm. Ten (6.1%) of the aneurysms were large and two (1.2%) were giant. One hundred and forty-three were asymptomatic and seven were symptomatic before surgery. The outcome was good in 147 patients (98%), and only three patients (2%) had a treatment-related unfavorable outcome. Five patients experienced transient neurological deficits and one patient experienced permanent neurological deficits. Overall 98.7% of the treated aneurysms were satisfactorily obliterated. Wound complications were seen only in three patients. In conclusion, UIA pose a significant challenge for neurosurgeons, where a delicate balance between benefits and possible risks must be weighed. If the requisite expertise is available, they can be treated surgically with low morbidity and a good outcome at specialized neurovascular centers. PMID:25443084

  3. Improving Patient Safety in Clinical Oncology: Applying Lessons From Normal Accident Theory.

    PubMed

    Chera, Bhishamjit S; Mazur, Lukasz; Buchanan, Ian; Kim, Hong Jin; Rockwell, John; Milowsky, Matthew I; Marks, Lawrence B

    2015-10-01

    Concerns for patient safety persist in clinical oncology. Within several nonmedical areas (eg, aviation, nuclear power), concepts from Normal Accident Theory (NAT), a framework for analyzing failure potential within and between systems, have been successfully applied to better understand system performance and improve system safety. Clinical oncology practice is interprofessional and interdisciplinary, and our therapies often have narrow therapeutic windows. Thus, many of our processes are, in NAT terms, interactively complex and tightly coupled within and across systems and are therefore prone to unexpected behaviors that can result in substantial patient harm. To improve safety at the University of North Carolina, we have applied the concepts of NAT to our practice to better understand our systems' behavior and adopted strategies to reduce complexity and coupling. Furthermore, recognizing that we cannot eliminate all risks, we have stressed safety mindfulness among our staff to further promote safety. Many specific examples are provided herein. The lessons from NAT are translatable to clinical oncology and may help to promote safety. PMID:26182183

  4. Validity of the endotoxin assay in post surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Büller, H R; ten Cate, J W; Sturk, A; Thomas, L L

    1985-01-01

    In a prospective study 56 patients were studied after major surgery for 10 days to correlate endotoxemia with bacteremia and clinical septicemia. Endotoxemia was detected with a quantitative plasma endotoxin assay using limulus lysate and a chromogenic substrate. Clinical septicemia was defined using a set of predetermined criteria. In 29 patients both bacterial cultures and endotoxin assays were negative. One patient showed clinical signs of septicemia. In 14 patients, low grade endotoxemia (mean 47 +/- 15 pg/ml) was observed in the first three days after surgery. Only three of these patients also showed positive endotoxin tests after this period. Corresponding blood cultures were frequently negative (81%) most likely due to prior and concurrent antibiotic prophylaxis. Two endotoxin positive patients had clinical signs of septicemia. In a total of 16 patients, including two patients from the former group endotoxemia (mean 56 +/- 21 pg/ml) was noted beyond the third post-operative day. Samples for blood cultures collected simultaneously were positive for gram negative bacilli in six patients. Clinical septicemia was present in 12 of the 16 patients. The positive and negative predictive value of the endotoxin test for bacteremia and/or septicemia after the third day of surgery for all patients was found to be 75% and 98% respectively. The results of this small prospective study in surgical patients suggest that this rapid endotoxin test is a useful clinical adjunct for both the detection and exclusion of gram negative bacteremia/septicemia. PMID:4048215

  5. Assessing the spiritual needs and practices of oncology patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dedeli, Ozden; Yildiz, Emel; Yuksel, Safak

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the oncology patients' spiritual needs and activities. Besides, the study was to provide clinical evaluation of the feasibility and usefulness of the Patients Spiritual Needs Assessment Scale. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was performed by using a demographic and spiritual practices questionnaire, the Turkish version of the Patients Spiritual Needs Assessment Scale. The results of our study demonstrated that the most common spiritual needs of patients with cancer were "to address issues before death and dying" (100%), "feel a sense of peace and contentment" (94.8%), and "for companionship" (93.5%). Spiritually assessing a patient with cancer requires knowledge of how spiritual needs may manifest and how to talk with a client about his or her spiritual needs. These findings can help nurses to begin this process of providing spiritual care for patients with cancer. PMID:25658933

  6. Treatment of colorectal cancer in older patients: International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) consensus recommendations 2013.

    PubMed

    Papamichael, D; Audisio, R A; Glimelius, B; de Gramont, A; Glynne-Jones, R; Haller, D; Köhne, C-H; Rostoft, S; Lemmens, V; Mitry, E; Rutten, H; Sargent, D; Sastre, J; Seymour, M; Starling, N; Van Cutsem, E; Aapro, M

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in Europe and worldwide, with the peak incidence in patients >70 years of age. However, as the treatment algorithms for the treatment of patients with CRC become ever more complex, it is clear that a significant percentage of older CRC patients (>70 years) are being less than optimally treated. This document provides a summary of an International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) task force meeting convened in Paris in 2013 to update the existing expert recommendations for the treatment of older (geriatric) CRC patients published in 2009 and includes overviews of the recent data on epidemiology, geriatric assessment as it relates to surgery and oncology, and the ability of older CRC patients to tolerate surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, treatment of their metastatic disease including palliative chemotherapy with and without the use of the biologics, and finally the use of adjuvant and palliative radiotherapy in the treatment of older rectal cancer patients. An overview of each area was presented by one of the task force experts and comments invited from other task force members. PMID:25015334

  7. Robotic, laparoscopic and open surgery for gastric cancer compared on surgical, clinical and oncological outcomes: a multi-institutional chart review. A study protocol of the International study group on Minimally Invasive surgery for GASTRIc Cancer—IMIGASTRIC

    PubMed Central

    Desiderio, Jacopo; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Nguyen, Ninh T; Zhang, Shu; Reim, Daniel; Alimoglu, Orhan; Azagra, Juan-Santiago; Yu, Pei-Wu; Coburn, Natalie G; Qi, Feng; Jackson, Patrick G; Zang, Lu; Brower, Steven T; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Facy, Olivier; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Coratti, Andrea; Annecchiarico, Mario; Bazzocchi, Francesca; Avanzolini, Andrea; Gagniere, Johan; Pezet, Denis; Cianchi, Fabio; Badii, Benedetta; Novotny, Alexander; Eren, Tunc; Leblebici, Metin; Goergen, Martine; Zhang, Ben; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Liu, Tong; Al-Refaie, Waddah; Ma, Junjun; Takiguchi, Shuji; Lequeu, Jean-Baptiste; Trastulli, Stefano; Parisi, Amilcare

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastric cancer represents a great challenge for healthcare providers and requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach in which surgery plays a major role. Minimally invasive surgery has been progressively developed, first with the advent of laparoscopy and recently with the spread of robotic surgery, but a number of issues are currently being debated, including the limitations in performing an effective extended lymph node dissection, the real advantages of robotic systems, the role of laparoscopy for Advanced Gastric Cancer, the reproducibility of a total intracorporeal technique and the oncological results achievable during long-term follow-up. Methods and analysis A multi-institutional international database will be established to evaluate the role of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches in gastric cancer, comprising of information regarding surgical, clinical and oncological features. A chart review will be conducted to enter data of participants with gastric cancer, previously treated at the participating institutions. The database is the first of its kind, through an international electronic submission system and a HIPPA protected real time data repository from high volume gastric cancer centres. Ethics and dissemination This study is conducted in compliance with ethical principles originating from the Helsinki Declaration, within the guidelines of Good Clinical Practice and relevant laws/regulations. A multicentre study with a large number of patients will permit further investigation of the safety and efficacy as well as the long-term outcomes of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches for the management of gastric cancer. Trial registration number NCT02325453; Pre-results. PMID:26482769

  8. Generating patient-specific pulmonary vascular models for surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murff, Daniel; Co-Vu, Jennifer; O'Dell, Walter G.

    2015-03-01

    Each year in the U.S., 7.4 million surgical procedures involving the major vessels are performed. Many of our patients require multiple surgeries, and many of the procedures include "surgical exploration". Procedures of this kind come with a significant amount of risk, carrying up to a 17.4% predicted mortality rate. This is especially concerning for our target population of pediatric patients with congenital abnormalities of the heart and major pulmonary vessels. This paper offers a novel approach to surgical planning which includes studying virtual and physical models of pulmonary vasculature of an individual patient before operation obtained from conventional 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. These models would provide clinicians with a non-invasive, intricately detailed representation of patient anatomy, and could reduce the need for invasive planning procedures such as exploratory surgery. Researchers involved in the AirPROM project have already demonstrated the utility of virtual and physical models in treatment planning of the airways of the chest. Clinicians have acknowledged the potential benefit from such a technology. A method for creating patient-derived physical models is demonstrated on pulmonary vasculature extracted from a CT scan with contrast of an adult human. Using a modified version of the NIH ImageJ program, a series of image processing functions are used to extract and mathematically reconstruct the vasculature tree structures of interest. An auto-generated STL file is sent to a 3D printer to create a physical model of the major pulmonary vasculature generated from 3D CT scans of patients.

  9. Hip pain in the young, active patient: surgical strategies.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Michael R; Erickson, Jill A; McCarthy, Joseph C; Mont, Michael A; Mulkey, Patrick; Peters, Christopher L; Pivec, Robert; Austin, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Hip disorders in young patients likely exist as a spectrum of prearthritic and arthritic conditions. With the increasing recognition of these disorders, surgical options are being popularized and more patients are being treated at a younger age. Hip surgeons must develop a careful set of evidenced-based indications and follow surgical outcomes in a rigorous, scientific manner. Hip arthroscopy can be used to successfully treat some hip disorders, including labral tears, with or without femoroacetabular impingement, resulting in mechanical symptoms. Long-term outcomes after arthroscopy are determined by the condition of the cartilage at the time of surgery. Patients with preoperative radiographic evidence of moderate to severe arthritis have poor outcomes when treated with arthroscopy. Open joint preservation procedures (including periacetabular osteotomy and surgical hip dislocation with osteochondroplasty) can be done in the absence of substantial arthritis to treat hip dysplasia, femoroacetabular impingement, and related conditions. The results of these procedures are good in appropriately selected patients at short-term to midterm follow-ups. In the presence of severe arthritis, joint replacement is the treatment of choice. Total hip arthroplasty using uncemented acetabular and femoral fixation provides reliable osseointegration; however, long-term results in young patients have historically been compromised by bearing surface wear, osteolysis, and component loosening. Contemporary, highly cross-linked polyethylene and ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have durable results, low complication rates, and offer the potential of long-term survivorship in this high-demand population. In general, metal-on-metal implants have higher complication rates versus other bearing surface options and should be avoided. The best results of hip resurfacing are seen in men younger than 55 years with large femoral head sizes. Although implant survivorship is comparable to that of total hip arthroplasty, the sequelae of metal wear debris continue to cause concern. PMID:24720303

  10. Is the clinical use of cannabis by oncology patients advisable?

    PubMed

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Avisar, Adva; Batash, Ron; Schaffer, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    The use of the cannabis plant for various medical indications by cancer patients has been rising significantly in the past few years in several European countries, the US and Israel. The increase in use comes from public demand for the most part, and not due to a scientific basis. Cannabis chemistry is complex, and the isolation and extraction of the active ingredient remain difficult. The active agent in cannabis is unique among psychoactive plant materials, as it contains no nitrogen and, thus, is not an alkaloid. Alongside inconclusive evidence of increased risks of lung and head and neck cancers from prolonged smoking of the plant produce, laboratory evidence of the anti-cancer effects of plant components exists, but with no clinical research in this direction. The beneficial effects of treatment with the plant, or treatment with medicine produced from its components, are related to symptoms of the disease: pain, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight loss. The clinical evidence of the efficacy of cannabis for these indications is only partial. However, recent scientific data from studies with THC and cannabidiol combinations report the first clinical indication of cancer-related pain relief. The difficulties of performing research into products that are not medicinal, such as cannabis, have not allowed a true study of the cannabis plant extract although, from the public point of view, such studies are greatly desirable. PMID:24606496

  11. Precision oncology for patients with advanced cancer: the challenges of malignant snowflakes.

    PubMed

    Kurzrock, Razelle; Giles, Francis J

    2015-01-01

    Precision oncology implies customizing treatment to the unique molecular and biologic characteristics of each individual and their cancer. Its implementation is being facilitated by remarkable technological advances in genomic sequencing, as well as the increasing availability of targeted and immunotherapeutic drugs. Yet, next generation sequencing may be a disruptive technology in that its results suggest that classic paradigms for clinical research and practice are a poor fit with the complex reality encountered in metastatic malignancies. Indeed, it is evident that advanced tumors have heterogeneous molecular landscapes that mostly differ between patients. Traditional modes of clinical research/practice are drug centered, with a strategy of finding commonalities between patients so that they can be grouped together and treated similarly. However, if each patient with metastatic cancer has a unique molecular portfolio, a new patient-centered, N-of-one approach that utilizes individually tailored treatment is needed. PMID:26030337

  12. Medical problems of surgical patients. Hypertension and ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Prys-Roberts, C.

    1976-01-01

    Pre-existing disease in the form of hypertension or ischaemic heart disease may increase morbidity and mortality in patients presenting for anaesthesia and surgery. The interaction of these two cardiovascular conditions in relation to anaesthesia has been studied in a series of 115 patients. The results did not support the view that antihypertensive drugs and beta-receptor blocking agents should be withdrawn before anaesthesia and surgery. The main cause for concern in providing anaesthesia for these patients is that sympathetic nervous activation induced either by anaesthetic manoeuvres or by surgical stimulation may lead to reflex cardiovascular responses which, by increasing myocardial oxygen demand, lead to episodes of myocardial ischaemia. In this respect beta-receptor blocking drugs appear to have a protective effect on the ischaemic myocardium. PMID:10825

  13. Evaluation and Management of Patients With Heart Disease and Cancer: Cardio-Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Joerg; Lerman, Amir; Sandhu, Nicole P.; Villarraga, Hector R.; Mulvagh, Sharon L.; Kohli, Manish

    2014-01-01

    The care for patients with cancer has advanced greatly over the past decades. A combination of earlier cancer diagnosis and greater use of traditional and novel systemic treatments has decreased cancer-related mortality. Effective cancer therapies, however, can result in short- and long-term co-morbidities that can decrease the net clinical gain by impacting quality of life and survival. In particular, cardiovascular complications of cancer treatments can have a profound impact on the health of cancer patients and are more common among those with recognized or unrecognized underlying cardiovascular diseases. A new discipline termed “cardio-oncology” has thus evolved to address the cardiovascular needs of cancer patients and optimize their care in a multidisciplinary approach. This review provides a brief introduction and background on this emerging field and then focuses on its practical aspects including: cardiovascular risk assessment and prevention before cancer treatment, cardiovascular surveillance and therapy during cancer treatment, and cardiovascular monitoring and management after cancer therapy. The content of this review is based on a literature search of PubMed between January 1, 1960, and February 1, 2014 using the search terms cancer, cardiomyopathy, cardiotoxicity, cardio-oncology, chemotherapy, heart failure, and radiation. PMID:25192616

  14. Improving drug chart documentation in elective surgical patient admissions.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alice

    2014-01-01

    National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines state that all healthcare organisations should put policies in place for medication reconciliation on admission. At Croydon University Hospital a medication history had previously been taken in Foundation Year 1 (FY1) preoperative clinics. However, when these clinics were deemed unnecessary, this opportunity for drug chart documentation was lost, along with an awareness of this responsibility among the FY1s. As a result patients were being admitted to wards without adequate drug chart documentation which resulted in a serious untoward incident occurring. This project aimed to increase awareness among FY1s of this responsibility and as a result increase drug chart documentation in postoperative elective surgical patients. The drug charts of 40 postoperative elective surgical patients admitted to all surgical wards were reviewed over a 2 week period. 12.5% (4/32) of patients taking regular medication had these correctly prescribed, with ‘high risk medication omissions’ found in 7.5% (3/40). Documentation of an allergy status was absent in 17.5% (7/40) of patients, including 5% (2/40) of whom had a known drug allergy. To create awareness of this responsibility, first, a presentation was given to the FY1s, second, posters to prompt action were placed on the elective surgical wards, and finally, the Director of Medical Education emailed the FY1s reiterating these facts. We then reviewed the drug charts of 45 elective postoperative patients over a 2 week period following these interventions. The results showed: correct prescription of regular medications improved to 48% (16/33); ‘high risk medication omissions’ reduced to 4% (2/45); documentation of allergy status on the drug charts increased to 87% (39/45); failure to document a known drug allergy on the drug chart fell to 2% (1/45); and patients with a ‘high risk medication omission’ or an undocumented known drug allergy decreased from 12.5% (5/40) to 7 % (3/45). This study has highlighted an area in which medication reconciliation and drug chart documentation were inadequate, and posed a risk to patient safety. Interventions designed to educate the FY1s and inform them of their responsibility improved standards in regular medication prescription and allergy documentation. However, leaving the onus with the FY1s was not enough to achieve adequate drug chart documentation. Further project cycles may therefore require the implementation of a step within the patient admission protocol in the preoperative ward that requires the nursing staff to contact the team's doctor when the patient arrives in hospital to ensure satisfactory drug chart documentation. In addition, collaboration with the pharmacists could also allow a ‘best possible medication history’ to be taken on the day of admission and thus reduce risk to patient safety.

  15. Surgical management of cleft lip in pedo-patients.

    PubMed

    Taware, C P; Kulkarni, S R

    1991-01-01

    The Present article describes in short etiology of cleft lip and cleft palate. With this in-born defect, patient develops crucial problems with feeding, phonation, overall growth and development of affected and allied soft and hard tissue structures. This in turn results in deformity and asymmetry which is going to affect functional requirements as well as aesthetic outlook. Hence it really becomes mandatory to correct this defect surgically as early as possible, at stipulated timings so as to avoid present and future anticipated problems. PMID:1820390

  16. Factors influencing the diagnostic accuracy and management in acute surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Sajid, Muhammad Shafique; Hollingsworth, Thaddeus; McGlue, Mike; Miles, William FA

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy (DA) in acute surgical patients admitted to a District General Hospital. METHODS: The case notes of all acute surgical patients admitted under the surgical team for a period of two weeks were reviewed for the data pertaining to the admission diagnoses, relevant investigations and final diagnoses confirmed by either surgery or various other diagnostic modalities. The diagnostic pathway was recorded from the source of referral [general practitioner (GP), A and E, in-patient] to the correct final diagnosis by the surgical team. RESULTS: Forty-one patients (23 males) with acute surgical admissions during two weeks of study period were evaluated. The mean age of study group was 61.05 ± 23.24 years. There were 111 patient-doctor encounters. Final correct diagnosis was achieved in 85.4% patients. The DA was 46%, 44%, 50%, 33%, 61%, 61%, and 75% by GP, A and E, in-patient referral, surgical foundation year-1, surgical senior house officer (SHO), surgical registrar, and surgical consultant respectively. The percentage of clinical consensus diagnosis was 12%. Surgery was performed in 48.8% of patients. Sixty-seven percent of GP-referred patients, 31% of A and E-referred, and 25% of the in-patient referrals underwent surgery. Surgical SHO made the most contributions to the primary diagnostic pathway. CONCLUSION: Approximately 85% of acute surgical patients can be diagnosed accurately along the diagnostic pathway. Patients referred by a GP are more likely to require surgery as compared to other referral sources. Surgical consultant was more likely to make correct surgical diagnosis, however it is the surgical SHO that contributes the most correct diagnoses along the diagnostic pathway. PMID:25429324

  17. Zygomycosis originating from an odontogenic infection in a pediatric oncology patient

    PubMed Central

    Adderson, Elisabeth E.; Rowland, Christopher; McGregor, Lisa M.; Santana, Victor M.

    2011-01-01

    The Zygomyces are an increasingly frequent cause of invasive mould infection in immunocompromised patients. Here we describe the first well-documented case of Rhizopus infection of odontogenic origin, which presented as a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection in a neutropenic child. The infection resolved with limited surgical debridement and antifungal therapy. PMID:20227220

  18. Adverse surgical outcomes among patients with cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, G M; Offenbartl, S K

    1991-11-01

    To determine the factors that contributed to adverse outcomes, the records of 59 cognitively impaired patients with nonfatal complications (n = 23) or death (n = 36) on a general surgery teaching service over a 30-month period were examined retrospectively. Specific complications are reported. Patient, disease, and management factors related to mortality and morbidity are identified. Patients with cognitive impairments had a higher mortality rate (9.6 vs 6.3%) and approximately the same rate of nonfatal complications (6.1 vs 7.6%) when compared with general surgery patients as a whole. Patient characteristics including age over 70, dementia, nursing home residence, contractures, inability to communicate, need for total care, and gross malnutrition were associated with fatal outcomes. Vascular, colonic, esophageal, gastric, or duodenal conditions, emergency admission, urgent operation, and admission APACHE II scores greater than or equal to 15 were disease-related factors associated with mortality. Management risk factors were prehospital or inpatient diagnostic delays and technical or judgmental errors of surgical management. Twenty-four of 36 deaths were directly related either to a diagnostic delay (11), an operative technical error (11), or a judgmental error of postoperative airway management (2). Eighty-five per cent of diagnostic delays (11/13) and 37 per cent (11/30) of technical errors resulted in mortality. Suggestions for improving the care of these patients are discussed. PMID:1746775

  19. [Polymorphism of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance susceptibility genes in oncological patients].

    PubMed

    Ulybina, Iu M; Imianitov, E N; Vasil'ev, D A; Bershte?n, L M

    2008-01-01

    Glucose intolerance and insulin resistance belong to the group of leading risk factors for breast (BC) and endometrial cancer (EC). Differences in the intensity of association of these endocrine disturbances with BC and EC may at least partly be explained by non-identity in polygenic nature of the mentioned hormone-metabolic shifts and oncological diseases themselves as well. In this study, which included 105 healthy postmenopausal women and 301 female cancer patients (110 BC and 191 EC) without overt diabetes mellitus, we compared the frequency of the following genetic polymorphisms: insulin receptor substrate-1, IRS Gly972Arg; leptin receptor, LEPR Lys109Arg and Gln223Arg; mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2, UCP2_866G/A; and gene ND3 of mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA 10398A/G. Genotyping was performed with allele-specific real-time PCR. According to data received, certain genetic markers associated with impaired glucose tolerance and/or insulin resistance (namely, leptin receptor genotypes 223 Gln/Arg and Gln/Gln) are revealed in oncological patients more often than in females without cancer. Other markers (like genotype UCP2 866AA and polymorphism mtDNA 10398A) appeared to be relatively more frequent in EC than in BC providing one of the interpretations for the lower insulin sensitivity and higher incidence of carbohydrate metabolism disturbances in the first of these two diseases. PMID:19140314

  20. The effects of group music therapy on mood states and cohesiveness in adult oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Waldon, E G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the efficacy of a music therapy protocol on mood states and levels of group cohesiveness in adult oncology patients. Eleven oncology patients in 2 groups (ages 30 to 84 years) took part in the study over a 10-week period of time (10 participants completed the study). During that period, participants took part in 8 music therapy sessions consisting of 2 types of interventions: (a) 4 "music making" sessions (where the mechanism for change included the process of making music) and (b) 4 "music responding" sessions (where the mechanism included the process of responding to music). The two types of music therapy sessions and their effectiveness on improving mood states and group cohesiveness were examined. The Profile of Mood States-Short Form (POMS-SF) was used to assess changes in participants' mood states. A content analysis, attendance records, and a questionnaire were used to assess levels of group cohesiveness. Results showed significant improvement in mood state scores (from presession levels to postsessions levels) after involvement in all music therapy sessions. Similar significant findings were found within each of the "music making" and "music responding" conditions but no differences were found when comparisons were made between those conditions. No statistically significant effects were found with respect to group cohesiveness measures. Study implications and future research directions are discussed. PMID:11570933

  1. [COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF POSITIVE SURGICAL MARGIN RATES IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ROBOT- ASSISTED OR RETROPUBIC RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR PROSTATE CANCER].

    PubMed

    Veliev, E L; Sokolov, E A; Loran, O B

    2015-01-01

    The issue of comparative evaluation of oncological and functional outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) is widely discussed in the international literature. A key point in studying the oncological efficacy of both techniques is a comparative evaluation of positive surgical margin (PSM) rates as one of the main prognostic factors influencing the further course of prostate cancer. Available data so far are inconsistent, which prompted us to conduct our own research. A retrospective analysis was performed in two groups of patients who underwent RARP (n = 63) and RRP (n = 116) from January 2014 to April 2015. Despite a general trend towards lower PSM rates in RARP group compared to RRP group (12.7 and 21.6%, respectively, p = 0.09), no significant differences were found in the stratification of patients in both groups depending on the risk of prostate cancer progression and pathological stage. These data show the potential equality of the two methods regarding intraoperative control of resection margins. PMID:26665764

  2. Acute surgical illness in patients with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Kudsk, K A; Tranbaugh, R F; Sheldon, G F

    1981-07-01

    Acute abdominal pain frequently accompanies sickle cell crisis. The character of this pain may be difficult to discriminate from acute surgical processes such as acute cholecystitis or appendicitis. Seven patients with sickle cell disease presenting with abdominal pain underwent surgery. Review of the medical records demonstrated a characteristic pattern of presentation consistent from crisis to crisis. When patients with known sickle cell disease present with symptoms of abdominal pain, (1) the character of the symptoms, (2) precipitating events, (3) white blood cell count, (4) bilirubin, and (5) fever should be compared with those characteristics in previous crises. Deviation from previous patterns suggests an illness caused by problems other than sickel cell crisis. PMID:7258505

  3. Pediatric oncology nurses' attitudes related to discussing fertility preservation with pediatric cancer patients and their families.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Clayton, Heather; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; King, Lindsey M; Nieder, Michael; Wilson, Crystal

    2007-01-01

    This study explores nurses' attitudes toward the discussion of fertility preservation (FP) with pediatric cancer patients and their families. A cross-sectional survey was administered to attendees of a pediatric oncology conference. Of the 115 nurses who responded and comprised the study sample, most reported discussing risks of infertility or FP patients' families, that boys younger than 18 years should not be given erotic materials during semen collection, and difficulty locating FP facilities. The 3 patient factors most likely to encourage the discussion of FP are the patient being recently married or engaged, the patient asking about FP, and availability of patient education materials. While the results indicate that nurses do not regularly discuss FP with their patients, nurses perceive such discussion as being within their scope of practice. Therefore, with appropriate intervention, nurses may play a key role in facilitating discussions regarding FP with patients and families. PMID:17827491

  4. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: what every provider of gynecologic oncology care should know.

    PubMed

    Duska, Linda R; Engelhard, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2010. While initial implementation of the law began shortly thereafter, the full implementation will take place over the next few years. With respect to cancer care, the act was intended to make care more accessible, affordable, and comprehensive across different parts of the country. For our cancer patients and our practices, the ACA has implications that are both positive and negative. The Medicaid expansion and access to insurance exchanges are intended to increase the number of insured patients and thus improve access to care, but many states have decided to opt out of the Medicaid program and in these states access problems will persist. Screening programs will be put in place for insured patients but may supplant federally funded programs that are currently in place for uninsured patients and may not follow current screening guidelines. Both hospice and home health providers will be asked to provide more services with less funding, and quality measures, including readmission rates, will factor into reimbursement. Insured patients will have access to all phases of clinical trial research. There is a need for us as providers of Gynecologic Oncology care to be active in the implementation of the ACA in order to ensure that our patients and our practices can survive and benefit from the changes in health care reimbursement, with the ultimate goals of improving access to care and quality while reducing unsustainable costs. PMID:23500090

  5. Merging Children’s Oncology Group Data with an External Administrative Database Using Indirect Patient Identifiers: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yimei; Hall, Matt; Fisher, Brian T.; Seif, Alix E.; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Bagatell, Rochelle; Getz, Kelly D.; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gerbing, Robert B.; Sung, Lillian; Adamson, Peter C.; Gamis, Alan; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials data from National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative oncology group trials could be enhanced by merging with external data sources. Merging without direct patient identifiers would provide additional patient privacy protections. We sought to develop and validate a matching algorithm that uses only indirect patient identifiers. Methods We merged the data from two Phase III Children’s Oncology Group (COG) trials for de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS). We developed a stepwise matching algorithm that used indirect identifiers including treatment site, gender, birth year, birth month, enrollment year and enrollment month. Results from the stepwise algorithm were compared against the direct merge method that used date of birth, treatment site, and gender. The indirect merge algorithm was developed on AAML0531 and validated on AAML1031. Results Of 415 patients enrolled on the AAML0531 trial at PHIS centers, we successfully matched 378 (91.1%) patients using the indirect stepwise algorithm. Comparison to the direct merge result suggested that 362 (95.7%) matches identified by the indirect merge algorithm were concordant with the direct merge result. When validating the indirect stepwise algorithm using the AAML1031 trial, we successfully matched 157 out of 165 patients (95.2%) and 150 (95.5%) of the indirectly merged matches were concordant with the directly merged matches. Conclusions These data demonstrate that patients enrolled on COG clinical trials can be successfully merged with PHIS administrative data using a stepwise algorithm based on indirect patient identifiers. The merged data sets can be used as a platform for comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness studies. PMID:26606521

  6. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Jin; Fishman, Jessica; Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Vapiwala, Neha; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali; Xie, Sharon X.; Mao, Jun J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  7. Impact of metabolic syndrome in surgical patients: should we bother?

    PubMed

    Tzimas, P; Petrou, A; Laou, E; Milionis, H; Mikhailidis, D P; Papadopoulos, G

    2015-08-01

    Clinicians inevitably encounter patients who meet the diagnostic criteria for the metabolic syndrome (MetS); these criteria include central obesity, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidaemia, and hyperglycaemia. Regardless of the variations in its definition, MetS may be associated with adverse outcomes in patients undergoing both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. There is a paucity of data concerning the anaesthetic management of patients with MetS, and only a few observational (mainly retrospective) studies have investigated the association of MetS with perioperative outcomes. In this narrative review, we consider the impact of MetS on the occurrence of perioperative adverse events after cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Metabolic syndrome has been associated with higher rates of cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal perioperative events and wound infections compared with patients with a non-MetS profile. Metabolic syndrome has also been related to increased health service costs, prolonged hospital stay, and a greater need for posthospitalization care. Therefore, physicians should be able to recognize the MetS in the perioperative period in order to formulate management strategies that may modify any perianaesthetic and surgical risk. However, further research is needed in this field. PMID:26109210

  8. Psychosocial and legal aspects of oncological treatment in patients with cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ku?nierkiewicz, Maria; K?dziora, Justyna; Jaroszyk-Pawlukiewicz, Joanna; Nowak-Jaroszyk, Monika

    2013-01-01

    With society getting older and affected by many diseases, more and more people suffer from severe cognitive disorders. As practice shows, the legal situations of such people is often problematic. This is due to a number of factors, such as short time since the deterioration of patient's condition, initial symptoms ignored, social prejudice towards the idea of incapacitation or taking decisions for a patient, complicated procedures and, sometimes, insufficient knowledge of legal regulations. Cognitive disorders also occur in patients treated for cancer. To be effective, oncological treatment needs to be started as early as possible. This, however, does not meet the criteria of sudden threat to life. The present article relates to both the psychosocial and legal aspects of care of people suffering from intense disorders of memory, attention, problem solving, executive functions, and other. Surely, physicians know how to handle patients with the above dysfunctions. However, legal procedures aimed to protect patients’ rights are often unclear and time consuming. In practice, this often amounts to a dilemma whether to treat or follow the applicable law. Certainly, solutions in this regard should be clearer and better adapted to the needs arising from specific treatment needs of particular groups of patients. PMID:24936334

  9. Quality of life after different oncologic interventions in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mücke, Thomas; Koschinski, Janett; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kanatas, Anastasios; Mitchell, David A; Loeffelbein, Denys J; Deppe, Herbert; Rau, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Patient reported outcomes following head and neck cancer are of great importance, given the functional, psychological, and social impacts of the disease and its treatment. In addition, not only is the number of publications on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) increasing in a variety of specialties, but there is also a growing awareness of the potential role of HRQOL in practice. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the HRQOL of head and neck cancer patients following different oncologic interventions, using an internationally established test. In this cross-sectional study, we included three different groups of 32 patients each. Participants had histologically confirmed invasive oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in the anterior floor of the mouth. Group allocation was based on treatment modality, as follows: only surgery (group 1), operation and adjuvant radiotherapy (XRT) (group 2), and the additional presence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) (group 3). All patients were questioned about their HRQOL, using the standardized University of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire (UW-QOL). Surveys for groups 1 and 2 were conducted at least 24 months after the end of tumor-related treatment, in cases of ORN (group 3) 12 months after completion of disease-related treatment. A total of 96 patients were included into this study. The mean age was 62.79 ± 8.93 years. The patients in groups 1 and 2 revealed a reduced quality of life, of a greater magnitude after radiation therapy. Patients felt that radiotherapy was much worse than surgery; however, half of the patients stated that they would repeat radiation therapy if necessary. The subjective evaluation of the HRQOL after surgery and radiotherapy was a valuable instrument for assessing the rehabilitation of patients in the context of their function and quality of life. Radiation therapy can be considered a trigger of functional limitations and emotional distress that contributes to decreased HRQOL in patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:26421469

  10. Surgical Management in a Patient With Complex Uveitic Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhu; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Uveitic glaucoma (UG) is secondary glaucoma, present as a clinical challenge in both diagnosis and management. We report a case of complex UG, which initially presented as pupillary block and rupture of the anterior lens capsule. We performed cataract extraction with preservation of posterior capsule. Then, the case turned to aphakic malignant glaucoma. We performed anterior vitrectomy with posterior capsule resection in this case. After the second operation, the patient had a satisfactory recovery. Specifically, ultrasonographic biomicroscopy was useful during the diagnosis process and follow-up period in this case. UG presenting as pupillary block, rupture of the anterior lens capsule, and aqueous misdirection seldom presents in clinical practice. Earlier and more active surgical intervention may be necessary for effective preservation of visual function in complex cases of UG. PMID:26252285

  11. Effects of Video Games on the Adverse Corollaries of Chemotherapy in Pediatric Oncology Patients: A Single-Case Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolko, David J.; Rickard-Figueroa, Jorge L.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed effects of video games on adverse corollaries of chemotherapy in three pediatric oncology patients. Results indicated that access to video games resulted in reduction in the number of anticipatory symptoms experienced and observed, as well as a diminution in the aversiveness of chemotherapy side effects. (Author/NRB)

  12. Patient-oriented Functional Results of Total Femoral Endoprosthetic Reconstruction Following Oncologic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kevin B.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Chandrasekar, Coonoor R.; Biau, David; Babinet, Antoine; Deheshi, Benjamin; Bell, Robert S.; Grimer, Robert J.; Wunder, Jay S.; Ferguson, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Functional outcomes following oncologic total femoral endoprosthetic reconstruction (TFR) are lacking. We compared patient-oriented functional results of TFRs to proximal femur and distal femur reconstructions (PFR and DFR). We also compared function and complications with regard to knee and hip componentry. Methods 54 TFR patients were identified from 3 institutional prospective databases. 41 had fixed- and 13 had rotating-hinge knees, 37 hemiarthroplasty and 17 total hip arthroplasty componentry. Toronto Extremity Salvage Scores (TESS) for n=27 were compared between groups and to cohorts of PFR (n=31) and DFR (n=85) patients using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results Follow-up averaged 4 years. Mechanical complications included 5 hip dislocations and 1 femoral malrotation. Four dislocations were in fixed-hinge implants, all in those lacking abductor reattachment. TESS averaged 69.3±17.8, statistically decreased from DFR (p=0.002) and PFR patients (p=0.036). No significant differences were detected between patients in the fixed-hinge (n=18) and rotating-hinge (n=9) groups (p = 0.944), or total hip (n=8) and hemiarthroplasty (n=19) groups (p=0.633). Conclusions TFR is reserved for extreme cases of limb salvage, portending a poor prognosis overall. Function reflects additive impairments from PFR and DFR. TFR outcomes differ little with rotating- or fixed-hinge, total hip or hemiarthroplasty implants. PMID:21695701

  13. Transcatheter repair of aortic leaflet perforation in a patient with prior surgical bicuspid aortic valve repair.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wayland; Smith, Thomas; Rogers, Jason H

    2015-11-15

    A 47-year-old male underwent surgery for functional bicuspid aortic valve severe regurgitation with a fused right and left coronary cusp. The patient presents nine years after surgical bicuspid aortic valve repair with symptomatic severe aortic regurgitation, diagnosed by TEE and MRI, caused primarily from a perforation located at the base of the surgically fused coronary cusps. The patient had a minimally dilated aortic root that did not yet necessitate surgical intervention. We present a novel percutaneous bicuspid aortic valve perforation repair that potentially decreases the number of surgical operations the patient must undergo during his lifetime. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25914034

  14. Surgical complications associated with primary closure in patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    García-Morales, Esther; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Cecilia-Matilla, Almudena; García-Álvarez, Yolanda; Beneit-Montesinos, Juan Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of complications associated with primary closure in surgical procedures performed for diabetic foot osteomyelitis compared to those healed by secondary intention. In addition, further evaluation of the surgical digital debridement for osteomyelitis with primary closure as an alternative to patients with digital amputation was also examined in our study. Methods Comparative study that included 46 patients with diabetic foot ulcerations. Surgical debridement of the infected bone was performed on all patients. Depending on the surgical technique used, primary surgical closure was performed on 34 patients (73.9%, Group 1) while the rest of the 12 patients were allowed to heal by secondary intention (26.1%, Group 2). During surgical intervention, bone samples were collected for both microbiological and histopathological analyses. Post-surgical complications were recorded in both groups during the recovery period. Results The average healing time was 9.9±SD 8.4 weeks in Group 1 and 19.1±SD 16.9 weeks in Group 2 (p=0.008). The percentage of complications was 61.8% in Group 1 and 58.3% in Group 2 (p=0.834). In all patients with digital ulcerations that were necessary for an amputation, a primary surgical closure was performed with successful outcomes. Discussion Primary surgical closure was not associated with a greater number of complications. Patients who received primary surgical closure had faster healing rates and experienced a lower percentage of exudation (p=0.05), edema (p<0.001) and reinfection, factors that determine the delay in wound healing and affect the prognosis of the surgical outcome. Further research with a greater number of patients is required to better define the cases for which primary surgical closure may be indicated at different levels of the diabetic foot. PMID:23050062

  15. Rapid Reduction of Central Line Infections in Hospitalized Pediatric Oncology Patients Through Simple Quality Improvement Methods

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung W.; Chang, Lawrence; Hanauer, David A.; Shaffer-Hartman, Jackie; Teitelbaum, Daniel; Lewis, Ian; Blackwood, Alex; Akcasu, Nur; Steel, Janell; Christensen, Joy; Niedner, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) patients are at significant risk for developing central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLA-BSIs) due to their prolonged dependence on such catheters. Effective strategies to eliminate these preventable infections are urgently needed. In this study, we investigated the implementation of bundled central line maintenance practices and their effect on hospital-acquired CLA-BSIs. Materials and Methods CLA-BSI rates were analyzed within a single-institution’s PHO unit between January 2005 and June 2011. In May 2008, a multidisciplinary quality improvement team developed techniques to improve the PHO unit’s safety culture and implemented the use of catheter maintenance practices tailored to PHO patients. Data analysis was performed using time-series methods to evaluate the pre- and post-intervention effect of the practice changes. Results The pre-intervention CLA-BSI incidence was 2.92 per 1000-patient days (PD) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most prevalent pathogen (29%). In the post-intervention period, the CLA-BSI rate decreased substantially (45%) to 1.61 per 1000-PD (p<0.004). Early on, blood and marrow transplant (BMT) patients had a three-fold higher CLA-BSI rate compared to non-BMT patients (p<0.033). With additional infection control countermeasures added to the bundled practices, BMT patients experienced a larger CLA-BSI rate reduction such that BMT and non-BMT CLA-BSI rates were not significantly different post-intervention. Conclusions By adopting and effectively implementing uniform maintenance catheter care practices, learning multidisciplinary teamwork, and promoting a culture of patient safety, the CLA-BSI incidence in our study population was significantly reduced and maintained. PMID:22522576

  16. The influence of race on the attitudes of radiation oncology patients towards clinical trial enrollment. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    In this study of radiation oncology patients, whites and non-whites had similar rates of enrollment in clinical trials and expressed similar levels of interest in clinical trials. However, significant differences in attitudes towards clinical trials between whites and nonwhites were found. These differences reflect findings in other studies that there is a lack of trust of the medical establishment by nonwhite patients and this lack of trust affects enrollment.

  17. Practical tips for surgical research: how to optimize patient recruitment. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Surgeons are often patients’ initial point of contact about surgical studies. Surgeons conducting clinical research need to consider the issues involved in patient recruitment and plan strategies to minimize and avoid recruitment difficulties. In this article, strategies are suggested to avoid common pitfalls in recruitment to surgical trials.

  18. Surgical innovation-enhanced quality and the processes that assure patient/provider safety: A surgical conundrum.

    PubMed

    Bruny, Jennifer; Ziegler, Moritz

    2015-12-01

    Innovation is a crucial part of surgical history that has led to enhancements in the quality of surgical care. This comprises both changes which are incremental and those which are frankly disruptive in nature. There are situations where innovation is absolutely required in order to achieve quality improvement or process improvement. Alternatively, there are innovations that do not necessarily arise from some need, but simply are a new idea that might be better. All change must assure a significant commitment to patient safety and beneficence. Innovation would ideally enhance patient care quality and disease outcomes, as well stimulate and facilitate further innovation. The tensions between innovative advancement and patient safety, risk and reward, and demonstrated effectiveness versus speculative added value have created a contemporary "surgical conundrum" that must be resolved by a delicate balance assuring optimal patient/provider outcomes. This article will explore this delicate balance and the rules that govern it. Recommendations are made to facilitate surgical innovation through clinical research. In addition, we propose options that investigators and institutions may use to address competing priorities. PMID:26653169

  19. Palliative care: From oncology to all nursing arenas - Good practice or scaring the patients?

    PubMed

    Kydd, Angela

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to encourage critical discussion of an individual's understanding of palliative care and compare this with a health care professional's understanding of palliative care. In doing this, the paper serves to illustrate the importance of words attached to services - so with palliative care - are we providing good care, or scaring the patients? The paper touches on the historical origins of palliative care as an adjunct of oncology, to a specialism in its own right and now as an integral part of all care - in a 'generalist palliative care nurse'. However, it is unlikely that patients and their families are aware of such developments and will see palliative care services as immediate end of life care. It is argued that whatever your thoughts on the use of the term 'palliative care', it is important to understand what has resonance for patients. You may not agree with this paper, and I do not expect all of you to agree, but I hope it has made you think. For those who strongly disagree, take heart from a quote by Frank A. Clark (1860-1936) 'We find comfort among those who agree with us - growth among those who don't'. PMID:26106012

  20. Age- Related Toxicity in Patients with Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Altaf, Sadaf; Enders, Felicity; Lyden, Elizabeth; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Rodeberg, David; Arndt, Carola

    2014-01-01

    On the Fourth Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma study, older children experienced excessive neurotoxicity whereas younger children had increased myelosuppression. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the same pattern of toxicity was seen on the successor study when use of growth factor was required and dosing of chemotherapy was different by performing a retrospective cohort analysis on patients treated on Children’s Oncology Group protocol D9803. Toxicity data were analyzed by stratifying children into four age groups. The frequency of grade 3/4 neurotoxicity, myelosuppression, infection and mucositis was predicted for each age group. The cumulative doses of vincristine and cyclophosphamide administered were measured as percent of protocol- prescribed dose. Adolescents (age 15+) were more likely to experience neurotoxicity compared to younger patients (OR 3.6, P< 0.0001). There was no difference in myelosuppression, infection or mucositis. The mean percent protocol-prescribed doses administered for vincristine and cyclophosphamide did not differ much by age group. Adolescents experienced more neurotoxicity with vincristine compared to younger patients. No differences in other toxicities were observed between age groups. Since adolescents received at least 85% of protocol prescribed doses of vincristine, it is difficult to attribute the poorer survival in this age group to inadequate protocol delivered therapy. PMID:24936741

  1. Prognostic Inflammation Score in Surgical Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several inflammatory markers have been investigated as prognostic parameters in a variety of cancer population with mostly favorable results. This study aimed to verify the significance of common inflammatory markers as prognostic variables and assess whether a selective combination of them as prognostic inflammation score (PIS) could further improve their prognostic values in surgical patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). A total of 265 patients who had undergone curative resection of CRC were reviewed retrospectively. Preoperative levels of inflammatory markers such as serum C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell count (WBC), and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) were assessed by uni- and multivariate survival analysis with disease-free (DFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). PIS was constructed with a selective combination of inflammatory markers which were independently significant. On univariate analysis, CRP, ESR, and NLR were significantly associated with DFS and DSS. On multivariate analysis, CRP and NLR were independently significant prognostic variables for DSS and DFS respectively (P=0.013, P=0.021). When PIS was constructed with combination of CRP and NLR, it was independently and significantly associated with both DFS and DSS (P=0.006, P=0.010). Furthermore, PIS was superior to CRP for DSS (HR=15.679 vs. HR=5.183), and NLR for DFS in terms of prognosticating power (HR=4.894 vs. HR=2.687). When PIS is constructed with combination of CRP and NLR, it is a potentially significant prognostic variable associated with poor survival regardless pathologic prognostic variables in patients with CRC after curative resection. PMID:26713054

  2. Barriers to recruitment for surgical trials in head and neck oncology: A survey of trial investigators. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Three head and neck cancers trials in the United Kingdom were examined to identify barriers to recruitment at the planned rate. The primary barriers were patient preference for one study arm and aversion to randomization. The complexity of patient information, which often was not appropriate to socioeconomic status and English proficiency of the targeted patients, also served as a barrier.

  3. A Comparative Study of Conservative versus Surgical Treatment Protocols for 77 Patients with Idiopathic Granulomatous Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Yabano?lu, Hakan; Çolako?lu, Tamer; Belli, Sedat; Aytac, Huseyin Ozgur; Bolat, Filiz Aka; Pourbagher, Ay?in; Tezcaner, Tugan; Yildirim, Sedat; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and demographic data of patients with idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM) and to compare the results of conservative versus surgical treatment protocols. The demographic data, clinical findings, microbiological and pathologic features, scanning and treatment methods, recurrence, and recovery rates of 77 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the type of treatment received. Core biopsies were used to diagnose 37 patients: 26 using incisional biopsies and 14 using excisional biopsies. Of the patient population with IGM, 31 were treated with surgical excision, one with a simple mastectomy, and one with a subcutaneous mastectomy combined with a breast implant, whereas 44 were treated with steroids. The recovery rates of the 44 patients who were treated conservatively were 6 (1-15) months while for the 33 patients who were treated surgically, it was 1 (1-5) month (p = 0.001). Nine patients from the conservative treatment group experienced a recurrence while there were no recurrences in the surgically treated group (p = 0.009). Among all patients, the recurrence rate was 11.7% (9/77) while the average follow-up period was 16.57 ± 18.57 months. As a comparative study between conservative treatment protocols and surgical ones for patients with idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM), this study is the largest to date. A wide surgical excision is the preferred approach for treating patients with IGM because of the low recurrence rate. PMID:25858348

  4. Characteristics of surgical patients receiving inappropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Stephen W.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Guidry, Christopher A.; Hranjec, Tjasa; Metzger, Rosemarie; Swenson, Brian R.; Sawyer, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Inappropriate antibiotics have been observed to result in an increased duration of antibiotic treatment and hospital length of stay, development of multidrug-resistant organisms, and mortality rate compared with appropriate antibiotic treatment. Few studies have evaluated independent risk factors associated with inappropriateness. The purpose of this study was to identify independent predictors of inappropriate, empiric antimicrobial therapy for the treatment of severe sepsis. METHODS This was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of all surgical/trauma patients admitted to a tertiary care center from 1996 to 2007 and treated for sepsis. “Appropriate” empiric antibiotic treatment was determined by sensitivity testing. Demographics and comorbidities, infection sites, infection organisms, and outcomes between strata were compared. Differences in outcome were estimated using relative risk and 95% confidence intervals for correlated data. RESULTS A total of 2,855 patients (7,158 infections) were identified. Independent predictors of inappropriate, empiric antimicrobial therapy for the treatment of severe sepsis included site of infection and organism type. Severity of illness, age, medical conditions, and community versus health care–associated infections were not associated with inappropriate therapy. Although inappropriate empiric therapy was associated with a longer length of stay and duration of antimicrobial use, it did not result in higher mortality. CONCLUSION Our study observed that inappropriate empiric antibiotic selection is related to site of infection and pathogen. Other clinical variables do not appear to predict inappropriateness of antibiotic treatment. Efforts should be focused on early broad-spectrum therapy and more rapid microbiologic methods. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Therapeutic/care management study, level II. PMID:25051386

  5. Music reduces stress and anxiety of patients in the surgical holding area.

    PubMed

    Winter, M J; Paskin, S; Baker, T

    1994-12-01

    Many patients in the Surgical Holding Area become stressed and anxious. In a hospital setting music reduces patients' anxiety. This study determined that music can reduce the anxiety and stress of patients in the Surgical Holding Area. In this study, one group of subjects listed to music while a second group did not. Subjects who listened to music while in the Surgical Holding Area had significantly less stress and anxiety than did those who did not listen to music. Both groups spent similar lengths of time in the Surgical Holding Area. The results strongly suggest that if music were available to all patients in the Surgical Holding Area, most would select this option, and they would experience less anxiety. PMID:7707258

  6. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. I. The case of T1N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cellai, Enrico; Frata, Paolo; Magrini, Stefano M. . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; De Stefani, Agostina; Buglione, Michela; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T1 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 831 T1 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia-Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Actuarial cumulative local control probability (LC), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates have been calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups with both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage have been evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late damage incidence and second tumor cumulative probability (STP) have been also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-, 5-, and 10-year OS was equal to 86%, 77%, and 57%, respectively. Corresponding values for LC were 86%, 84%, and 83% and for DSS 96%, 95%, and 93%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Eighty-seven percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were: male gender, earlier treatment period, larger tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and the use of Cobalt 60. At multivariate analysis, only gender, tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and beam type retained statistical significance. Higher total doses and larger field sizes are significantly related (logistic regression) with a higher late damage incidence. Scatterplot analysis of various combinations of field dimensions and total dose showed that field dimensions >35 and <49 cm{sup 2}, together with doses of >65 Gy, offer the best local control results together with an acceptably low late damage incidence. Twenty-year STP was equal to 23%, with second tumor deaths being more frequent than larynx cancer deaths (67 of 831 vs. 46/831). Conclusion: The results of this study support the opinion, suggested by some international guidelines, that radiotherapy is standard treatment for T1 glottic cancer. Better results are obtained in patients with less extended disease and with 4-6 MV photon beams. The use of doses in excess of 65 Gy and of field sizes of 36-49 cm{sup 2} is probably the best technical choice available. Late damage is infrequent, but careful follow-up is warranted to detect early not only relapses (because conservative salvage surgery is feasible), but also second malignant tumors, which constitute the main cause of death in these patients and are potentially curable.

  7. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. II. The case of T2N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Frata, Paolo; Cellai, Enrico; Magrini, Stefano M. . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; Tonoli, Sandro; Buglione, Michela; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second-tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T2 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 256 T2 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Cumulative probability of local control (LC), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups by both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage were evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late-damage incidence and second-tumor cumulative probability (STP) were also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year OS rates were, respectively, 73%, 59%, and 37%. Corresponding values for cumulative LC probability were 73%, 73%, and 70% and for DSS, 89%, 86%, and 85%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Seventy-three percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were larger tumor extent and impaired cord mobility. At multivariate analysis, the same factors retained statistical significance. Twenty-year STP was 23%, with second-tumor deaths less frequent than larynx cancer deaths (20 of 256 vs. 30 of 256). Incidence of late damage was higher in the first decade of accrual (22%) than in the last decade (10%, p = 0.03); the same was true for severe late damage (9% vs. 1.8%). Conclusion: Present-day radical radiotherapy can be considered a standard treatment for T2 glottic cancer. Better results are obtained in patients with less extended disease. Late damage is relatively infrequent, but a careful follow-up is warranted for early detection not only of relapses (because salvage surgery is feasible) but also of second malignant tumors, which constitute a relevant but not the leading cause of death in these patients and are potentially curable.

  8. Reproductive health in the adolescent and young adult cancer patient: an innovative training program for oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Hutchins, Nicole M; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2013-03-01

    In 2008, approximately 69,200 adolescents and young adults (AYAs) were diagnosed with cancer, second only to heart disease for males in this age group. Despite recent guidelines from professional organizations and clinical research that AYA oncology patients want information about reproductive health topics and physician support for nurses to address these issues with patients, existing research finds few oncology nurses discuss this topic with patients due to barriers such as lack of training. This article describes an innovative eLearning training program, entitled Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare. The threefold purpose of this article is to: (1) highlight major reproductive health concerns relevant to cancer patients, (2) describe the current status of reproductive health and oncology communication and the target audience for the training, and (3) present a systematic approach to curriculum development, including the content analysis and design stages as well as the utilization of feedback from a panel of experts. The resulting 10-week curriculum contains a broad-based approach to reproductive health communication aimed at creating individual- and practice-level change. PMID:23225072

  9. Patient-reported outcomes for US oncology labeling: review and discussion of score interpretation and analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Shields, Alan; Coon, Cheryl; Hao, Yanni; Krohe, Meaghan; Yaworsky, Andrew; Mazar, Iyar; Foley, Catherine; Globe, Denise

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes ways to approach the conceptual and practical challenges associated with interpreting the clinical meaning of scores produced by patient reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires, particularly when used to inform efficacy decisions for regulatory approval for oncology products. Score interpretation estimates are not inherent to PRO questionnaires per se, instead, vary dependent upon sample and study design characteristics. Scores from PRO measures can be interpreted at the individual and group level, and each carries its own set of statistics for evaluating differences. Oncology researchers have a variety of methods and data analytic strategies available to support their score interpretation needs, which should be considered in the context of their a priori knowledge of the target patient population, the hypothesized effects of treatment, the study design and assessment schedule, and the inferences and decisions to be made from the PRO data. PMID:26594897

  10. Surgical Approaches to the Oral Cavity Primary and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Jatin P.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: A variety of surgical approaches used to treat primary oral cavity tumors are described to delineate the technique and rationale behind each treatment choice. Methods and Materials: Size, location, proximity to bone, lymph node status, histology, and prior treatment considerations are employed to determine the most appropriate surgical approach for primary oral cavity tumors. Results: Oncologic outcomes and physical function show the best results from surgical treatment of many primary oral cavity, but necessitates careful selection of surgical approach. Conclusion: Each surgical approach must be selected based upon relevant tumor, patient and physician factors.

  11. Surgical care burden in orbito-temporal neurofibromatosis: Multiple procedures and surgical care duration analysis in 47 consecutive adult patients.

    PubMed

    Pessis, Rachel; Lantieri, Laurent; Britto, Jonathan A; Leguerinel, Caroline; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Hivelin, Mikaël

    2015-10-01

    Patients with orbito-temporal neurofibromatosis (OTNF) bear a heavy burden of surgical care. We studied 47 consecutive patients with OTNF from the French Neurofibromatosis 1 Referral Center cohort (n > 900), over a 15-year period to determine the clinical features most likely to predict repeat surgery and longer duration of surgical care. Forty-seven patients (5.2% of the NF1 patients' cohort) underwent 79 procedures with a 4.8 years average follow-up. Soft-tissue surgery had a high revision rate (19/45 patients), skeletal surgery did not (2/13 patients). Transosseous wire canthopexy and facial aesthetic unit remodeling were associated with stable outcome. Ptosis repair carried an unfavorable outcome, particularly in the presence of sphenoid dysplasia. Stable skeletal remodeling was achieved with polyethylene implants and/or cementoplasty. Multiple procedures were undertaken in 70% of patients and were predicted by the NF volume, canthopexy, skeletal dysplasia, or a Jackson's classification 2 and/or 3; but not by declining visual acuity. A classification based upon predictive risk of repeated procedures is proposed: Group 1: Isolated soft tissue infiltration not requiring levator palpebrae or canthal surgery; Group 2: Soft tissue involvement requiring ptosis repair or canthopexy, or NF great axis over 4.5 cm; Group 3: Presence of sphenoid dysplasia with pulsatile proptosis, regardless of visual acuity. PMID:26210305

  12. Psychosocial status of patients randomly assigned to medical or surgical therapy for chronic stable angina.

    PubMed

    Brown, J S; Rawlinson, M E

    1979-09-01

    Aspects of social and psychologic functioning are compared for 51 patients randomly assigned to surgical or medical management of chronic stable angina. No differences were found between the two groups in work status, social activity, adequacy of family functioning, perceived health, life satisfaction, memory span, extent of anxiety, hypochondriasis and hysteria. However, surgically treated patients were significantly less depressed and more likely to report improvement in health and family functioning after the initiation of treatment. It is concluded that the psychologic and social outcomes appear slightly more favorable in patients treated surgically than in those treated medically. PMID:314234

  13. Use of Transversus Abdominis Plane (TAP) Blocks for Pain Management in Elderly Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Gay; Ritchey, William

    2015-11-01

    Elderly patients who require surgical interventions often have multiple comorbidities that complicate their intraoperative and postoperative care. Surgical team members should consider all potential problems that elderly patients may experience and base perioperative care on their assessment. This article discusses the use of the transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block in elderly patients undergoing surgical procedures to relieve pain and reduce the use of narcotics or sedatives during the immediate and extended postoperative recovery period. By reducing postoperative pain and the use of sedatives and narcotics, the TAP block improves pain management and helps reduce the incidence of postoperative delirium, pneumonia, urinary retention, and falls. PMID:26514706

  14. Analysis of non-clonal chromosome abnormalities observed in hematologic malignancies among Southwest Oncology Group patients

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, T.S.; Dobin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    From 1987-1994, the Southwest Oncology Group Cytogenetics Committee reviewed 1571 studies in 590 adult patient cases with ALL, AML, CML or CLL. These were analyzed for the presence of clinically important non-clonal abnormalities (NCA). Abnormalities were defined as non-clonal if one metaphase had a structural abnormality or an extra chromosome. Chromosome loss was not analyzed due to the possibility of random loss. In 72 cases (12%) comprising 136 studies, at least one NCA was observed. In 21 of these cases (29%), NCAs consisted of obvious clonal evolution or instability, and thus were not included in the analysis. At least one structural NCA was observed in which the abnormality differed from the mainline in 36 (50%) patients. Seventeen of the 36 cases had a normal mode. Nineteen of the 36 patients had an abnormal or normal/abnormal mode. At least one numerical NCA was found in 15 cases (21%). Fifteen cases (21%) contained at least one marker chromosome. Several cases involved NCA in more than one of the above divisions. NCAs could be classified into several categories: (1){open_quotes}the clone to come{close_quotes}, (2) evolving clones which then disappeared, (3) NCAs with putative clinical importance that never became clonal, (4) NCAs during remission identical to the preceding clonal abnormality, (5) NCAs which indicated clonal evolution or instability. Examples include one metaphase with t(9;22) or del(20q) or inv(16) or +8 which either preceded or followed clonal findings of the same aberration. Such findings should be communicated to the clinician.

  15. Surgical technique for treatment of concomitant grade II MCL lesion in patients with ACL rupture.

    PubMed

    Blanke, Fabian; Vonwehren, Lutz; Pagenstert, Geert; Valderrabano, Victor; Majewski, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Combined lesions of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) are frequent in athletes. While surgical treatment of ACL injury is mandatory treatment regime of concomitant grade II MCL lesions remains unclear with tendency to surgical intervention. Standardized surgical technique is lacking. Present study wants to introduce surgical technique for treatment of concomitant grade II MCL lesion and report short term outcome results. 5 Patients with acute ACL rupture and grade II MCL-lesion were included. All patients received surgical treatment of concomitant MCL lesion by distinct surgical technique and ACL reconstruction. We evaluated valgus instability, anterior instability and range of motion (ROM) according to international knee documentation commitee (IKDC) and Lysholm?Score both preoperative and after 6, 16 weeks and 9 months postoperative. All Patients showed excellent clinical results at final follow-up. Valgus and anterior stability could be restored in all patients. 1 patient (20%) lost 15° in flexion of ROM at final follow up. However in all 5 patients (100%) the findings were graded as normal or nearly nor-mal according to IKDC knee examination form. Lysholm-Score averaged 94,6. Therefore presented surgical technique improved both, valgus and anterior stability, and led to excellent short term results at final follow up. PMID:26435239

  16. Can you ask? We just did! Assessing sexual function and concerns in patients presenting for initial gynecologic oncology consultation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Vanessa; Abramsohn, Emily; Makelarski, Jennifer; Barber, Rachel; Wroblewski, Kristen; Tenney, Meaghan; Lee, Nita Karnik; Yamada, S. Diane; Lindau, Stacy Tessler

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe patterns of response to, and assess sexual function and activity elicited by, a self-administered assessment incorporated into a new patient intake form for gynecologic oncology consultation. Methods A cross-sectional study of patients presenting to a single urban academic medical center between January 2010 and September 2012. New patients completed a self-administered intake form, including six brief sexual activity and function items. These items, along with abstracted medical record data, were descriptively analyzed. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between sexual activity and function and disease status, adjusting for age. Results Median age was 50 years (range 18–91, N = 499); more than half had a final diagnosis of cancer. Most patients completed all sex-related items on the intake form; 98% answered at least one. Among patients who were sexually active in the prior 12 months (57% with cancer, 64% with benign disease), 52% indicated on the intake form having, during that period, a sexual problem lasting several months or more. Of these, 15% had physician documentation of the sexual problem. Eighteen women were referred for care. Providers reported no patient complaints about the inclusion of sexual items on the intake form. Conclusions Nearly all new patients presenting for gynecologic oncology consultation answered self-administered items to assess sexual activity and function. Further study is needed to determine the role of pretreatment identification of sexual function concerns in improving sexual outcomes associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25582823

  17. The 2014 Society of Surgical Oncology Susan G. Komen for the Cure Symposium: triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lisa A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Morrow, Monica; Carey, Lisa A; King, Tari A

    2015-03-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an operational term that refers to a heterogeneous collection of breast cancers lacking expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and HER2. These tumors account for 12-17 % of all breast cancers, preferentially affect young women, are more frequent in women of African and Hispanic descent, and are enriched in the population of patients diagnosed with "interval cancers." TNBCs account for the majority of breast cancers arising in BRCA1 germline mutation carriers (approximately 80%), and approximately 11-16% of all TNBCs harbor BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutations. Well-known risk factors for ER-positive cancers, such as reproductive history and hormonal factors, do not appear to have the same correlations for TNBC, and histologic risk factors for TNBC have not been identified. Patients with TNBC have a higher risk of both local and distant recurrence, but this is not mitigated by bigger surgery, and standard criteria should be used to select the approach to local therapy in these patients. Although platinum drugs have shown promise in the treatment of TNBC, standard chemotherapy remains the standard of care outside of a clinical trial. PMID:25527230

  18. Descriptive summary of patients seen at the surgical companies during Operation Iraqi Freedom-1.

    PubMed

    Walker, G Jay; Zouris, James; Galarneau, Michael F; Dye, Judy

    2007-01-01

    The Navy-Marine Corps Combat Trauma Registry is a data repository summarizing information from data sets describing injuries sustained and treatments administered to casualties from the point of injury to rehabilitation. Among the medical facilities contributing data to the Combat Trauma Registry during Operation Iraqi Freedom were the Marine Corps forward surgical companies. The surgical companies offer resuscitative surgery, medical treatment, and temporary holding facilities, in addition to preparing patients for evacuation. This article reviews the types of patients admitted and treatments provided at the surgical companies during the major combat period of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The surgical companies saw an average of 15 to 17 patients per day during this period. Less than 20% of the U.S. casualties seen were wounded in action. In contrast, >75% of the enemy prisoner of war presentations were for battle injuries. Less than 15% of the patients were held at the facilities for >24 hours. PMID:17274256

  19. Perioperative nurses' knowledge of indicators for pressure ulcer development in the surgical patient population.

    PubMed

    Lupear, Susan Krauser; Overstreet, Maria; Krau, Stephen D

    2015-06-01

    Despite focused attention to improve the quality and safety of patient care, and the financial impact pressure ulcers (PUs) can have on a health care provider or institution, evidence supports that PUs continue to occur in other patient populations during admission to the hospital. An example of a patient population in which evidence indicates that the development of PUs occurs, is patients who have a surgical procedure. The article discusses a project designed to identify potential knowledge deficits among perioperative nurses of indicators for PU development in the surgical patient population. PMID:25999080

  20. Measured dose rate constant from oncology patients administered 18F for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Brian; Holahan, Brian; Aime, Jean; Humm, John; St Germain, Jean; Dauer, Lawrence T.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Patient exposure rate measurements verify published patient dose rate data and characterize dose rates near 2-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) patients. A specific dose rate constant based on patient exposure rate measurements is a convenient quantity that can be applied to the desired distance, injection activity, and time postinjection to obtain an accurate calculation of cumulative external radiation dose. This study reports exposure rates measured at various locations near positron emission tomography (PET) {sup 18}F-FDG patients prior to PET scanning. These measurements are normalized for the amount of administered activity, measurement distance, and time postinjection and are compared with other published data. Methods: Exposure rates were measured using a calibrated ionization chamber at various body locations from 152 adult oncology patients postvoid after a mean uptake time of 76 min following injection with a mean activity of 490 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Data were obtained at nine measurement locations for each patient: three near the head, four near the chest, and two near the feet. Results: On contact with, 30 cm superior to and 30 cm lateral to the head, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.482 (0.511), 0.135 (0.155), and 0.193 (0.223) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. On contact with, 30 cm anterior to, 30 cm lateral to and 1 m anterior to the chest, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.623 (0.709), 0.254 (0.283), 0.190 (0.218), and 0.067 (0.081) {mu}Sv/MBq h respectively. 30 cm inferior and 30 cm lateral to the feet, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.024 (0.022) and 0.039 (0.044) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. Conclusions: The measurements for this study support the use of 0.092 {mu}Sv m{sup 2}/MBq h as a reasonable representation of the dose rate anterior from the chest of patients immediately following injection. This value can then be reliably scaled to the desired time and distance for planning and staff dose evaluation purposes. At distances closer than 1 m, a distance-specific dose rate constant of 0.367 {mu}Sv/MBq h at 30 cm is recommended for accurate calculations. An accurate patient-specific dose rate constant that accounts for patient-specific variables (e.g., distribution and attenuation) will allow an accurate evaluation of the dose rate from a patient injected with an isotope rather than simply utilizing a physical constant.

  1. Surgical strategy for intracranial dermoid and epidermoid tumors: An experience with 33 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jose Carlos; Aversa, Antônio; Pereira, Celestino; Nogueira, Jânio; Gonçalves, Mariangela; Lopes, Hélio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this paper is to report on our surgical strategy and technique and to identify the best management for intracranial dermoids and epidermoids tumors (IDETs). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 33 consecutive patients (14 males and 19 females; mean age at surgery, 37.9 years) with pathologically confirmed IDETs who underwent surgical resection, with mean follow-up of 7.2 years. Results: Gross total tumor removal was achieved in 24 cases (72.7%) with zero surgical mortality and a recurrence rate of 9%. Conclusions: The surgical strategies used in this group of patients enabled total removal of most tumors without surgical mortality and with low morbidity and recurrence rates, proving to be safe and effective. PMID:25558422

  2. WSES guidelines for management of Clostridium difficile infection in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Malangoni, Mark A; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Griffiths, Ewen A; Di Bella, Stefano; McFarland, Lynne V; Eltringham, Ian; Shelat, Vishal G; Velmahos, George C; Kelly, Ciarán P; Khanna, Sahil; Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Alrahmani, Layan; Ansaloni, Luca; Augustin, Goran; Bala, Miklosh; Barbut, Frédéric; Ben-Ishay, Offir; Bhangu, Aneel; Biffl, Walter L; Brecher, Stephen M; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Caínzos, Miguel A; Canterbury, Laura A; Catena, Fausto; Chan, Shirley; Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R; Clanton, Jesse; Coccolini, Federico; Cocuz, Maria Elena; Coimbra, Raul; Cook, Charles H; Cui, Yunfeng; Czepiel, Jacek; Das, Koray; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Di Saverio, Salomone; Dumitru, Irina Magdalena; Eckert, Catherine; Eckmann, Christian; Eiland, Edward H; Enani, Mushira Abdulaziz; Faro, Mario; Ferrada, Paula; Forrester, Joseph Derek; Fraga, Gustavo P; Frossard, Jean Louis; Galeiras, Rita; Ghnnam, Wagih; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Gorrepati, Venkata; Ahmed, Mohamed Hassan; Herzog, Torsten; Humphrey, Felicia; Kim, Jae Il; Isik, Arda; Ivatury, Rao; Lee, Yeong Yeh; Juang, Paul; Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Kim, Peter K; Kluger, Yoram; Ko, Wen Chien; LaBarbera, Francis D; Lee, Jae Gil; Leppaniemi, Ari; Lohsiriwat, Varut; Marwah, Sanjay; Mazuski, John E; Metan, Gokhan; Moore, Ernest E; Moore, Frederick Alan; Nord, Carl Erik; Ordoñez, Carlos A; Júnior, Gerson Alves Pereira; Petrosillo, Nicola; Portela, Francisco; Puri, Basant K; Ray, Arnab; Raza, Mansoor; Rems, Miran; Sakakushev, Boris E; Sganga, Gabriele; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Stewart, David B; Tattevin, Pierre; Timsit, Jean Francois; To, Kathleen B; Tranà, Cristian; Uhl, Waldemar; Urbánek, Libor; van Goor, Harry; Vassallo, Angela; Zahar, Jean Ralph; Caproli, Emanuele; Viale, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades there have been dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), with increases in incidence and severity of disease in many countries worldwide. The incidence of CDI has also increased in surgical patients. Optimization of management of C difficile, has therefore become increasingly urgent. An international multidisciplinary panel of experts prepared evidenced-based World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines for management of CDI in surgical patients. PMID:26300956

  3. Ertapenem Prophylaxis Associated With an Increased Risk of Clostridium difficile Infection Among Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwon; Prasad, Priya; Lin, Matthew; Garritson, Susan; Nichols, Amy; Liu, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    A case-control study was conducted to determine risk factors for hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection among patients admitted to 2 surgical units. Ertapenem prophylaxis was significantly associated with C. difficile infection risk (odds ratio, 3.13 [95% CI, 1.13-8.68], P=.028) and may offer an antimicrobial stewardship target among surgical patients. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;36(11):1351-1354. PMID:26278576

  4. Surgical management of the patient with invasive carcinoma discovered at reduction mammoplasty.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Raymond; Niedbala, Angela R

    2003-11-01

    The diagnosis of invasive carcinoma presents a surgical dilemma when discovered incidentally at breast reduction mammoplasty. Subsequent surgical and therapeutic management for such cases have not been established. Although management and treatment may vary according to patient preference, a review of the literature of the past four decades yielded scant discussion of the topic. We describe two cases of occult breast carcinomas that were not evident on preoperative breast screening, but were discovered on the pathology exam of reduction mammoplasty specimen. The purpose of our publication is to recommend a surgical approach for the patient in such a situation. PMID:14627265

  5. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Charles B. Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  6. Medical Oncology Service

    Cancer.gov

    Training The Medical Oncology Fellowship Program provides both clinical and research training opportunities for each fellow during this 3-year program. All fellows spend their first year in a clinical setting, caring for patients. In the second and third

  7. Medical Oncology Service

    Cancer.gov

    The Medical Oncology Service of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI), is a part of the National Institutes of Health, the world's largest medical research institution, operated by the U.S. federal government. Patients who

  8. Comparative Oncology Program

    Cancer.gov

    SYNOPSIS OF THE NCI COMPARATIVE ONCOLOGY TRIAL CONSORTIUM A central mission of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI) is the development and delivery of novel cancer treatment strategies for cancer patients. A significant hu

  9. SU-F-18C-06: Prospective Patient Evaluation of Iterative Reconstruction in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R; Vance, S; Cattaneo, R; Schultz, L; Elshaikh, M; Chetty, I; Glide-Hurst, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work incorporates iterative reconstruction (IR) into a dose reduction study to characterize image quality metrics, delineation, and dosimetric assessment, with the goal of reducing imaging dose in Radiation Oncology. Methods: Three-dimensional noise power spectrum (NPS) analysis characterized noise magnitude/texture (120 kVp, 50–200 mAs, IR levels 1–6 yielding noise reduction of 0.89–0.55 compared to filtered backprojection (FBP)). Task-specific Modulation Transfer Functions (MTFtask) were characterized across varied subject contrasts. A prospective dose reduction study (500 to 150 mAs) was conducted for 12 patients (43 inter-fraction CTs) for high-dose rate brachytherapy. Three physicians performed qualitative image assessment between full-dose FBP (FD-FBP, 500 mAs), low-dose FBP (LD-FBP, 150–250 mAs), and low-dose IRL5-6 (LD-IR) scans for image noise, cuff/bladder interface detectability, spatial resolution, texture, and segmentation confidence. Comparisons between LD-FBP and LD-IR were conducted for the following metrics: delineation (bladder and rectum evaluated via overlap indices (OI) and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC)), noise, boundary changes, dose calculation, and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Results: NPS showed ?50% reduction in noise magnitude and ?0.1 1/mm spatial frequency shift with IRL6. The largest MTFtask decrease between FBP and IR was 0.08 A.U. Qualitative patient image evaluation revealed LD-IR was equivalent or slightly worse than FD-FBP, and superior to LD-FBP for all metrics except low contrast interface and texture. The largest CT number discrepancy from FBP occurred at a bone/tissue interface using IRL6 (?1.2 ± 4.9 HU (range: ?17.6 – 12.5 HU)). No significant contour differences (OIs and DSCs = 0.85 – 0.95) and dose calculation discrepancy (<0.02%) were observed. DRRs preserved anatomical detail and demonstrated <2% difference in intensity between LD-FBP and LD-IRL6. Conclusion: While phantom analysis showed slight noise texture differences with IR, patient results revealed that image quality, contouring ability, and dosimetric parameters were not adversely affected, thus support integrating IR into treatment planning. Research supported in part by a grant from Philips HealthCare.

  10. Functional evaluation of patients with surgically treated terrible triad of the elbow

    PubMed Central

    Brigato, Rafael Mulatti; Mouraria, Guilherme Grisi; Kikuta, Fernando Kenji; Coelho, Sérgio de Paula; Cruz, Márcio Alves; Zoppi, Américo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the functional outcome of patients with surgically treated terrible triad of the elbow. METHODS: A retrospective evaluation was performed using the MEPS score (Mayo Elbow Performance Score) of patients diagnosed with terrible triad of the elbow who underwent surgical treatment. RESULTS: 14 patients (nine men and five women) and 15 elbows (one bilateral case) were evaluated. A MEPS average score of 78 points and 86% good and excellent results was obtained. As complications, we had one case of infection and three of neuropraxia of the ulnar nerve. CONCLUSION: The patients had stable elbow with good function, however with reduced range of motion. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:26207090

  11. Differences in Mortality for Surgical Cancer Patients by Insurance and Hospital Safety Net Status

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Cathy J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests hospitals serving low-income patients have poorer outcomes. However, safety net hospitals (SNHs) offering access to care regardless of insurance coverage may provide better care than low-income patients would otherwise receive. This study considers the association between insurance and mortality among surgical cancer patients and the role of SNHs. We estimate models of 1- and 5-year mortality on insurance, SNH status, patient characteristics, and hospital surgical volume for colorectal and breast cancer patients. Interaction terms between insurance and SNH status estimate how mortality differs by insurance source at SNHs. Medicaid and uninsurance are associated with significantly higher mortality for colorectal cancer patients. There is a statistically significant improvement in mortality for Medicaid colorectal cancer patients treated in SNHs relative to non-safety net hospitals, and a marginally significant improvement for uninsured breast cancer patients treated in SNHs. The results suggest a survival benefit for low-income patients treated in SNHs. PMID:22951313

  12. 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Pediatric Oncology and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cost, Carrye; Brock, Evangeline; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Siegel, Jane D.; Ardura, Monica I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pediatric oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients are at high risk for influenza infection and its associated complications. Little is known about infection with novel 2009 influenza A (H1N1) in this population. Procedure Prospective laboratory surveillance identified all children with positive influenza test results from 4/27/09-12/5/09. 2009 H1N1 infection was confirmed by PCR subtyping; cases in which subtyping was not performed were considered probable. Medical records of all pediatric oncology and HSCT cases were reviewed. Results Thirty children with cancer or HSCT had laboratory-confirmed influenza A. Patients with ALL (18), CNS tumors (4), CML (1), Ewing sarcoma (1), Hodgkin lymphoma (1), LCH (1), severe aplastic anemia (1), and HSCT (3), had confirmed (5) and probable (25) H1N1 by rapid (22; 73%), DFA (4; 13%), or RVP (4; 13%) assays. Most frequent presenting signs and symptoms were fever (93%; median 38.6°C), cough (97%), and rhinorrhea (83%). Ten patients required hospitalization for a median of 5 days, most commonly for fever and neutropenia (8). Imaging demonstrated lower respiratory tract involvement in 3 patients. There were no concomitant bacteremias; one patient had rhinovirus co-infection. Three patients required ICU care; 1 developed ARDS, multi-organ failure, and died after 5 days. Chemotherapy was delayed in 5 patients. Oseltamivir was administered to 28 patients; 1 patient developed an oseltamivir-resistant strain and was treated with zanamivir. Conclusions 2009 influenza A H1N1 infection in children with cancer and HSCT is mild in most patients, but can lead to serious complications. PMID:20973099

  13. Surgical management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Atul F; McGraw, Michael H; Israelite, Craig L

    2015-11-18

    Sickle cell disease is a known risk factor for osteonecrosis of the hip. Necrosis within the femoral head may cause severe pain, functional limitations, and compromise quality of life in this patient population. Early stages of avascular necrosis of the hip may be managed surgically with core decompression with or without autologous bone grafting. Total hip arthroplasty is the mainstay of treatment of advanced stages of the disease in patients who have intractable pain and are medically fit to undergo the procedure. The management of hip pathology in sickle cell disease presents numerous medical and surgical challenges, and the careful perioperative management of patients is mandatory. Although there is an increased risk of medical and surgical complications in patients with sickle cell disease, total hip arthroplasty can provide substantial relief of pain and improvement of function in the appropriately selected patient. PMID:26601059

  14. Surgical management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F; McGraw, Michael H; Israelite, Craig L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a known risk factor for osteonecrosis of the hip. Necrosis within the femoral head may cause severe pain, functional limitations, and compromise quality of life in this patient population. Early stages of avascular necrosis of the hip may be managed surgically with core decompression with or without autologous bone grafting. Total hip arthroplasty is the mainstay of treatment of advanced stages of the disease in patients who have intractable pain and are medically fit to undergo the procedure. The management of hip pathology in sickle cell disease presents numerous medical and surgical challenges, and the careful perioperative management of patients is mandatory. Although there is an increased risk of medical and surgical complications in patients with sickle cell disease, total hip arthroplasty can provide substantial relief of pain and improvement of function in the appropriately selected patient. PMID:26601059

  15. Applicability of the Clavien-Dindo classification to emergency surgical procedures: a retrospective cohort study on 444 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing emergency surgery have a high risk for surgical complications and death. The Clavien-Dindo classification has been developed and validated in elective general surgical patients, but has not been validated in emergency surgical patients. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications in emergency surgical patients and to study preoperative factors for risk stratification that should be included into a database of surgical complications. Methods A cohort of 444 consecutive patients having emergency general surgery during a three-month period was retrospectively analyzed. Surgical complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Preoperative risk factors for complications were studied using logistic regression analysis. Results Preoperatively 37 (8.3%) patients had organ dysfunctions. Emergency surgical patients required a new definition for Grade IV complications (organ dysfunctions). Only new onset organ dysfunctions or complications that significantly contributed to worsening of pre-operative organ dysfunctions were classified as grade IV complications. Postoperative complications developed in 115 (25.9%) patients, and 14 (3.2%) patients developed grade IV complication. Charlson comorbidity index, preoperative organ dysfunction and the type of surgery predicted postoperative complications. Conclusions The Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications can be used in emergency surgical patients but preoperative organ dysfunctions should be taken into account when defining postoperative grade IV complications. For risk stratification patients’ comorbidities, preoperative organ dysfunctions and the type of surgery should be taken into consideration. PMID:25075222

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Broad-Panel PCR Assays for the Detection of Gastrointestinal Pathogens in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhengming; Zhu, Haiqing; Rodriguez, Alicia; Mhaissen, Mohammad; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Adderson, Elisabeth; Hayden, Randall T

    2015-11-01

    Broadly multiplexed molecular amplification assays offer an unprecedented ability to diagnose gastrointestinal infection in immunocompromised patients. However, little data are available to compare the performance of such systems in this population. A total of 436 stool samples were collected from 199 predominantly immunocompromised pediatric oncology patients. Remnant samples were tested in parallel with the use of the premarket (investigational use only) versions of two broadly multiplexed PCR assays (BioFire and Luminex), and the results of samples corresponding to the first episode per patient were compared with those from laboratory-developed molecular assays, culture, and antigen detection. Overall performance of the multiplexed systems was comparable, with BioFire and Luminex detecting 94 and 99 positives (P = 0.34), respectively. Stratifying by analyte, BioFire assay detected 51 samples positive for Clostridium difficile, whereas Luminex assay detected 60 (P = 0.01). Biofire and Luminex detected 28 and 38 norovirus-positive samples (P = 0.002), respectively. Astrovirus- and adenovirus-positive samples were detected in higher numbers by in-house PCR than by BioFire; the same was observed for adenovirus with Luminex. Differences observed with other analytes were minimal, did not reach statistical significance, or lacked the numbers needed to detect a difference between systems. Broadly multiplexed PCR offers an effective means of detecting a variety of gastrointestinal pathogens in pediatric oncology patients, with assay performance comparable among the tests examined. PMID:26321042

  17. The utility of surgical lung biopsy in cancer patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This retrospective study evaluated the utility and safety of surgical lung biopsy (SLB) in cancer patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods All cases of critically ill patients with cancer and diagnosed with ARDS who underwent SLB in a tertiary care hospital from January 2002 to July 2009 were reviewed. Clinical data including patient baseline characteristics, surgical complications, pathological findings, treatment alterations, and survival outcomes were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Results A total of 16 critically ill patients with cancer diagnosed with ARDS who underwent SLB were enrolled. The meantime from ARDS onset to SLB was 3.0?±?1.5 days. All SLB specimens offered a pathological diagnosis, and specific diagnoses were made in 9 of 16 patients. Biopsy findings resulted in a change in therapy in 11 of 16 patients. Overall, the SLB surgical complication rate was 19% (3/16). SLB did not directly cause the observed operative mortality. The ICU mortality rate was 38% (6/16). Patients who switched therapies after SLB had a trend toward decreased mortality than patients without a change in therapy (27% versus 60%; P?=?0.299). Conclusions In selected critically ill cancer patients with ARDS, SLB had a high diagnostic yield rate and an acceptable surgical complication rate. PMID:23680446

  18. Successful Outcome of Refractory Chronic Constipation by Surgical Treatment: A Series of 34 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lokesh, HM; Ghoshal, Uday C

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic constipation is commonly managed medically, and surgical options have been advocated in patients with refractory symptoms. We aimed to study the role of surgical procedures in patients with constipation, refractory to medical therapy. Methods Data on 34 surgically managed patients with refractory chronic constipation during a 6-year period (March 2003 to May 2009) were retrospectively analyzed. Results All the 34 patients (24 males and 10 females, median age of 45 years [range, 18-77 years]) had symptoms for a long period (median 96 months [range, 12-360 months]) without response to medical treatment including biofeedback. Preopertive investigations included barium enema, colonoscopy, colonic transit study, defecography and anorectal manometry as indicated. Eight patients (23.5%) had slow transit constipation, 4 (11.8%) had Hirschsprung's disease and 22 (64.7%) had rectal prolapse. Total colectomy and ileo-rectal anastomosis, anterior resection, Delorme's procedure, resection rectopexy and Duhamel's operation were the surgical procedures performed. Though 7 (20.6%) patients had post operative complications, there was no mortality. One patient whose symptoms recurred following anterior resection was successfully treated by total colectomy and ileo-rectal anastomosis. Median spontaneous bowel movements increased following surgical treatment compared to that while on medical treatment (1 per week [range, 0 to 3 per week] vs. 14 per week [range, 7-28 per week], P < 0.00001). Patients remained well during 3-60 months follow-up (n = 27). Conclusions Spontaneous bowel movements significantly increased following surgical operation for refractory chronic constipation, nature of which is dependent on underlying etiology and the expertise available. Careful preoperative work-up and selection of patients are critical for obtaining good functional results. PMID:23350051

  19. Patient views on financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Mark W.; Gross, Allan E.; McKneally, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, revelations of inappropriate financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers have challenged the presumption that surgeons can collaborate with surgical device manufacturers without damaging public trust in the surgical profession. We explored postoperative Canadian patients’ knowledge and opinions about financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers. Methods This complex issue was explored using qualitative methods. We conducted semistructured face-to-face interviews with postoperative patients in follow-up arthroplasty clinics at an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed. Patient-derived concepts and themes were uncovered. Results We interviewed 33 patients. Five major themes emerged: 1) many patients are unaware of the existence of financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers; 2) patients approve of financial relationships that support innovation and research but are opposed to relationships that involve financial incentives that benefit only the surgeon and the manufacturer; 3) patients do not support disclosure of financial relationships during the consent process as it may shift focus away from the more important risks; 4) patients support oversight at the professional level but reject the idea of government involvement in oversight; and 5) patients entrust their surgeons to make appropriate patient-centred choices. Conclusion This qualitative study deepens our understanding of financial relationships between surgeons and industry. Patients support relationships with industry that provide potential benefit to current or future patients. They trust our ability to self-regulate. Disclosure combined with appropriate oversight will strengthen public trust in professional collaboration with industry. PMID:26384147

  20. Reducing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections ?on Inpatient Oncology Units Using Peer Review.

    PubMed

    Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich; Malast, Tracey; Festus, Onyekachi; Riskie, Vickie

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a peer-to-peer program and the outcomes of interventions to reduce the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections in patients in bone marrow transplantation, medical, and surgical oncology units. The article reviews the process and describes tools used to achieve success in a Magnet®-designated academic medical center. PMID:26583628

  1. Experiences of patients with cancer and their nurses on the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in oncology units

    PubMed Central

    Rassouli, Maryam; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ghahramanian, Akram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Nikanfar, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although nurses acknowledge that spiritual care is part of their role, in reality, it is performed to a lesser extent. The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses’ and patients’ experiences about the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in the oncology units of Tabriz. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in the oncology units of hospitals in Tabriz. Data were collected through purposive sampling by conducting unstructured interviews with 10 patients and 7 nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: Three categories emerged from the study: (1) “perceived barriers for providing spiritual care” including “lack of preparation for spiritual care,” “time and space constraints,” “unprofessional view,” and “lack of support”; (2) “communication: A way for Strengthening spirituality despite the limitations” including “manifestation of spirituality in the appearances and communicative behaviors of nurses” and “communication: Transmission of spiritual energy”; and (3) “religion-related spiritual experiences” including “life events as divine will and divine exam,” “death as reincarnation,” “trust in God,” “prayer/recourse to Holy Imams,” and “acceptance of divine providence.” Although nurses had little skills in assessing and responding to the patients’ spiritual needs and did not have the organizational and clergymen's support in dealing with the spiritual distress of patients, they were the source of energy, joy, hope, and power for patients by showing empathy and compassion. The patients and nurses were using religious beliefs mentioned in Islam to strengthen the patients’ spiritual dimension. Conclusions: According to the results, integration of spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing is recommended. Patients and nurses can benefit from organizational and clergymen's support to cope with spiritual distress. Researchers should provide a framework for the development of effective spiritual interventions that are sensitive to cultural differences. PMID:25709687

  2. Development of an Integrated Subspecialist Multidisciplinary Neuro-oncology Service

    PubMed Central

    Price, Stephen J; Guilfoyle, Mathew; J Jefferies, Sarah; Harris, Fiona; Oberg, Ingela; G Burnet, Neil; Santarius, Thomas; Watts, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the poor outcome for patients with malignant brain tumours led to therapeutic nihilism. In turn, this resulted in lack of interest in neurosurgical oncology subspecialisation, and less than ideal patient pathways. One problem of concern was the low rate of tumour resection. Between 1997 and 2006, 685 treated glioblastomas were identified. In the first four years only 40% of patients underwent tumour resection, rising to 55% in the last four years. Before revision of the pathway, the median length of hospital stay was 8 days, and 35% of patients received the results of their histology outside of a clinic setting. A pathway of care was established, in which all patients were discussed pre-operatively in an MDT meeting and then directed into a new surgical neuro-oncology clinic providing first point of contact. This limited the number of surgeons operating on adult glioma patients and aided recruitment into research studies. Now, three consultant neurosurgeons run this service, easily fulfilling IOG requirement to spend >50% of programmed activities in neuro-oncology. Nursing support has been critical to provide an integrated service. This model has allowed increased recruitment to clinical trials. The introduction of this service led to an increase in patients discussed pre-operatively in an MDT (66% rising to 87%; P=0.027), an increase in the rate of surgical resection (from 40% to 80%) and more patients being admitted electively (from 25% to 80%; P<0.001). There was a reduction in the median length of stay (8 days reduced to 4.5 days; P<0.001). For the cohort of GBM patients that went on to have chemoradiotherapy we improved median survival to 18 months, with 35% of patients alive at two years, comparable to international outcomes. Implementing a specialist neurosurgical oncology service begins with understanding the patient care pathway. Our patients have benefitted from the culture of subspecialisation and the excellent inter-disciplinary working relationships that have been developed.

  3. VAC therapy for wound management in patients with contraindications to surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Negosanti, Luca; Sgarzani, Rossella; Nejad, Parissa; Pinto, Valentina; Tavaniello, Beatrice; Palo, Stefano; Oranges, Carlo Maria; Fabbri, Erich; Michelina, Veronica Vietti; Zannetti, Guido; Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Cipriani, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of complex wounds often requires multiple surgical debridement and eventually reconstruction with skin grafts or flaps, under local or general anesthesia. When the patient's general conditions contraindicate surgical procedures, topical negative pressure with vacuum assisted closure (VAC)) device can achieve wound healing with reduction of healing time and simpler management. We treated with VAC device four patients with complex wounds and important contraindications to surgery. In all the patients, we used VAC device with common protocol of topical negative pressure. The healing was obtained in a period variable between 18 and 40 days; the results were satisfactory in three cases, one patient developed an aesthetically unpleasant scar. We present our experience to propose VAC when surgical procedures are contraindicated. PMID:22913447

  4. One more brick in the wall of protective ventilation in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Roberto Rabello

    2015-01-01

    On June 14, 2015, Ladha and colleagues published an article in the BMJ entitled “Intraoperative protective mechanical ventilation and risk of postoperative respiratory complications: hospital based registry study”, which investigated the effects of intraoperative protective ventilation on major postoperative respiratory complications. This study used data of over 69,265 patients in order to investigate patients over the age of 18 who underwent a non-cardiac surgical procedure between January 2007 and August 2014 and required general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. The investigators found that intraoperative protective ventilation was associated with a decreased risk of postoperative respiratory complications. This study raises important questions about the ventilatory management of surgical patients.

  5. Unusual case of a surgically treated ACL tear in a 4-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Astur, Diego Costa; Castro, Saulo; Bernardes, Adilio; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury in children is an increasingly common disease. We report a rare case of surgical treatment of a 4-year-old patient who presented with an anterior cruciate ligament tear after a high-energy trauma followed by chronic spontaneous subluxation during knee flexion and extension. An extra-articular ligamental reconstruction technique was performed and the child is clinically well 4?years after surgery. Historically, non-surgical treatment has been the main treatment option, however, the indication for surgical reconstruction is increasing as we better understand the histological characteristics of the immature skeleton. PMID:26346958

  6. Surgical treatment of giant cardiac aneurysm with pseudoaneurysm in a colon carcinoma patient

    PubMed Central

    Al?alaldeh, Mohammad; K?l?ç, Ismail Do?u; Emrecan, Bilgin

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm is a rare and lethal condition associated with a high risk of rapid enlargement and rupture. It develops after transmural myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac surgery, trauma, or infection. When a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm is detected, surgical repair is recommended due to the high possibility of rupture. In this report, we present surgical treatment of a giant cardiac pseudoaneurysm that occurred after MI in a colon carcinoma patient. PMID:26336500

  7. Surgical and prosthetic management of a complex edentulous patient for fabrication of complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Comut, A Alper; Somohano, Tanya

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication of well-fitting complete dentures becomes a challenge in the presence of epulis fissuratum in the maxilla or severely resorbed alveolar tissue in the mandible. This clinical report describes the surgical and prosthetic treatment of a patient who presented with both problems. The neutral zone technique was used to improve the stability of the mandibular complete denture. Both dentures were fabricated prior to surgical excision of the epulis fissuratum and inserted immediately following the surgery. PMID:25928971

  8. Oncologic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis.

  9. Outcomes of early physiotherapy in patients with cerebral aneurysms treated by surgical clipping or endovascular embolization?

    PubMed Central

    Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Bilgin, Sevil; Köse, Nezire; Oruckaptan, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Early physiotherapy was given to 124 patients with ruptured or unruptured cerebral aneurysms who were treated by surgical clipping or endovascular embolization. Patients were divided into four groups according to their Hunt and Hess grade at admission and aneurysm treatment modality: Group 1, Hunt and Hess grade ? II and surgical clipping; Group 2, Hunt and Hess grade ? II and endovascular embolization; Group 3, Hunt and Hess grade ? III and surgical clipping; Group 4, Hunt and Hess grade ? III and endovascular embolization. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Scale, functional status using the Glasgow Outcome Scale, level of the mobility using the Mobility Scale for acute stroke patients, and independence in activities of daily living using the Barthel Index. After early physiotherapy, the level of consciousness and functional status improved significantly in Groups 1, 3, and 4; mobility improved significantly in all groups; and independence in activities of daily living improved significantly in Groups 1 and 3. At discharge, Groups 1 and 2 had better functional status than Groups 3 and 4. Level of consciousness, functional status, mobility and independence in activities of daily living improved after early physiotherapy. These findings suggest that early physiotherapy improved the prognosis of patients with cerebral aneurysms who were treated by surgical clipping or endovascular embolization. Patients with a worse clinical status at presentation had a poorer functional status at discharge. The outcome of physiotherapy was not affected by whether surgical clipping or endovascular embolization was chosen for treatment of the aneurysm. PMID:25624817

  10. Outcomes of early physiotherapy in patients with cerebral aneurysms treated by surgical clipping or endovascular embolization.

    PubMed

    Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Bilgin, Sevil; Köse, Nezire; Oruckaptan, Hakan

    2012-08-25

    Early physiotherapy was given to 124 patients with ruptured or unruptured cerebral aneurysms who were treated by surgical clipping or endovascular embolization. Patients were divided into four groups according to their Hunt and Hess grade at admission and aneurysm treatment modality: Group 1, Hunt and Hess grade ? II and surgical clipping; Group 2, Hunt and Hess grade ? II and endovascular embolization; Group 3, Hunt and Hess grade ? III and surgical clipping; Group 4, Hunt and Hess grade ? III and endovascular embolization. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Scale, functional status using the Glasgow Outcome Scale, level of the mobility using the Mobility Scale for acute stroke patients, and independence in activities of daily living using the Barthel Index. After early physiotherapy, the level of consciousness and functional status improved significantly in Groups 1, 3, and 4; mobility improved significantly in all groups; and independence in activities of daily living improved significantly in Groups 1 and 3. At discharge, Groups 1 and 2 had better functional status than Groups 3 and 4. Level of consciousness, functional status, mobility and independence in activities of daily living improved after early physiotherapy. These findings suggest that early physiotherapy improved the prognosis of patients with cerebral aneurysms who were treated by surgical clipping or endovascular embolization. Patients with a worse clinical status at presentation had a poorer functional status at discharge. The outcome of physiotherapy was not affected by whether surgical clipping or endovascular embolization was chosen for treatment of the aneurysm. PMID:25624817

  11. An exact approach for relating recovering surgical patient workload to the master surgical schedule

    E-print Network

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    , increased health expenditures, and long waiting lists, a flood of changes in the healthcare system have been set into motion. Many of these changes aim to improve efficiency and are planned by considering that reflects patient demand patterns and the priorities defined by hospital management. From this strategic

  12. [Perspectives of development in anesthesiology and intensive care in oncology].

    PubMed

    Karelov, A E

    2012-01-01

    Despite of anaesthesiology and intensive care progress in oncology there are some problems that need to be solved. These include low individual significance of perioperative risk scale, the lack of approaches for postoperative correction of risk value, estimation of surgical stress value, approach to detection of pain mechanisms etc. The studies which will resolve these problems allow improving the quality of medical care for cancer patients. PMID:22774538

  13. [Patient safety in oncology surgery: experience of the São Paulo State Cancer Institute].

    PubMed

    Vendramini, Regiane Cristina Rossi; da Silva, Elaine Aparecida; Ferreira, Karine Azevedo São Leão; Possari, João Francisco; Baia, Wânia Regina Mollo

    2010-09-01

    Patient safety concerns in surgery are increasing. The frequency of surgery-related adverse events and errors is high, and most could be avoided. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) proposed the Universal Protocol (UP-JCAHO) for preventing wrong site, wrong procedure, and wrong person surgery. In Brazil, very few health-care institutions have adopted this Protocol. Thus, there is a need to improve its dissemination and assess its effectiveness. The aim of the present study was to report the experiences of the Sao Paulo State Cancer Institute (ICESP, acronym in Portuguese) in implementing the UP-JCAHO. The Protocol comprises three steps: pre-operative verification process, marking the operative site and Time out immediately before starting the procedure. The ICESP surgical center (SC) has been functioning since November 2008. The UP-JCAHO is applied to all surgeries. A total 1019 surgeries were performed up to June 2009. No errors or adverse events were registered. The implementation of the UP-JCAHO is simple. It can be a useful tool to prevent error and adverse events in SC. PMID:20964064

  14. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76). Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers. PMID:25243153

  15. Clinical-surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder in a psoriatic arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Condylotomy is a surgical procedure that has been used as an option to treat temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. This technique has the advantage of avoiding intra-capsular alterations that might be found involving other surgical procedures. Its use, even when unilateral, has positive effect on treatment of both joints. Methods In order to better evaluate the benefits of a clinical-surgical treatment for TMD, the present report describes the case of a psoriatic arthritis patient. The case was clinically characterized by dental malloclusion, and imaging exams showed joint degeneration of the right mandibular condyle. The patient was treated by condylotomy technique after a prosthetic oral rehabilitation. Results No clinical-radiological signs or symptoms of progression of articular disease were observed within a period of 16 months after surgery. Furthermore, there was functional stability of the temporomandibular joint, total absence of local pain and improvement of mouth opening. Conclusion The present study suggests that condylotomy can be considered as a valid option for the management of TMD, since it has low surgical morbidity and favorable clinical outcomes. In this case, the patient had a medical diagnosis of systemic disease presenting general pain and pain at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in addition of causal agent of TMD (dental malloclusion). The difficulty of finding a single etiology (malocclusion vs. systemic disease) did not exclude the indication of a clinical-surgical treatment to re-establish the balance of TMJ. PMID:23556553

  16. High-frequency ultrasound in carpal tunnel syndrome: assessment of patient eligibility for surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Urbanik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy and a frequent cause of sick leaves because of work-related hand overload. That is why an early diagnosis and adequate treatment (conservative or surgical) are essential for optimal patient management. Aim The aim of the study is to assess the usefulness of high-frequency ultrasound in CTS for the assessment of patient eligibility for surgical treatment. Material and methods The study involved 62 patients (50 women and 12 men, aged 28–70, mean age 55.2) with scheduled surgeries of CTS on the basis of clinical symptoms, physical examination performed by a neurosurgeon and a positive result of EMG testing. The ultrasound examinations of the wrist were performed in all these patients. On the basis of the collected data, the author has performed multiple analyses to confirm the usefulness of ultrasound imaging in assessing patient eligibility for surgical treatment of CTS. Results US examinations showed evidence of median nerve compression at the level of the carpal tunnel in all of the examined patients. This was further confirmed during surgical procedures. The mean value of the cross-sectional area at the proximal part of the pisiform bone was 17.45 mm2 (min. 12 mm2, max. 31 mm2). Nerve hypoechogenicity proximal to the nerve compression site was visible in all 62 patients (100%). Increased nerve vascularity on the transverse section was present in 50 patients (80.65%). Conclusions Ultrasonography with the use of high-frequency transducers is a valuable diagnostic tool both for assessing patient eligibility for surgical treatment of CTS, and in postoperative assessment of the treatment efficacy. PMID:26673415

  17. [Low-flow xenon anesthesia in surgical patients with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Rashchupkin, A B; Burov, N E

    2011-01-01

    A comparative study of central hemodynamics in 60 patients with essential hypertension during low flow anesthesia with xenon and nitrous oxide is carried out. The main group consisted of 30 patients, 22 male and 8 female, in the median age of 45.9 +/- 23 years. 22 patients out of those had 2nd stage essential hypertension, while the other 8 had 3rd stage. The control group consisted of 30 patients, 20 male and 10 female, in the median age of 45.1 + 1.3 years. 4 patients had 3rd stage essential hypertension, 26 patients had 2nd stage. The both groups were clinically comparable by the character and severity of the main disease, the carried out surgery (open cholecystectomy) and the qualification of surgeons. Results of the research showed, that low flow monoanesthesia with xenon abruptly eradicated the unfavourable consequences of induction of anesthesia (3-5 mg/kg of sodium thiopental or 2-2.5 mg/kg of propofol) and had a positive effect on the parameters of central hemodynamics of patients with essential hypertension. Xenon anesthesia, compared to nitrous oxide, rapidly stabilized the parameters of blood pressure and heart rate and can be recommended as a method of choice in patients with essential hypertension and compromised myocarium. Nitrous oxide with bolus of regular fentanyl doses doesn't reliable anesthesiological protection during open cholecystectomy and shows signs of toxicity. PMID:21692217

  18. [Psychology of patient management: evaluation and quality assurance of psychosocial management in pediatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Kusch, M; Labouvie, H; Jäger, R S; Bode, U

    1997-02-01

    Since the introduction of health-care reform in Germany, quality assurance of inpatient care is required. In paediatric oncology this also includes quality assurance measures of psycho-social care. Care Psychology deals with the development, testing and continual improvement of high-quality psycho-social care. Based on clinical experience, scientific knowledge and ascertained requirements a handbook and manual of service delivery of psycho-social care is formulated and tested in everyday practice. Service performance analyses are carried out, and verified improvements are re-tested in practice. This, as well as additional attempts, should lead to total quality management (TQM) of psycho-social care in paediatric oncology according to the criteria of the European Foundation of Quality Management (EFQM). PMID:9156631

  19. [Current Surgical Treatment for Patients with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, from the Viewpoint of Emergent Operation].

    PubMed

    Ide, Yujiro; Sakamoto, Kisaburo

    2015-07-01

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is one of the most challenging congenital heart defects which require surgical interventions during neonatal period. Since the 1st successful surgical repair was reported by Norwood et al. more than 30 years ago, some modifications in surgical maneuver [e. g. introduction of right ventricule (RV)-pulmonary artery (PA) shunt] and improvement of perioperative management have brought better outcome for this patient cohort. Recent years our institute have changed the treatment strategy from primary Norwood operation during neonatal period to bilateral PA banding and subsequent Norwood operation during early infantile (we call it as "rapid 2 stage Norwood operation"). Indeed, the introduction of this new strategy has lead to earlier hemodynamic stabilization after Norwood operation. Although these operations are performed electively for most of HLHS patients, emergent operations are necessary if they have restrictive inter-atrial communication with sever pulmonary congestion, or if their patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) s tend to close in spite of prostagrandine infusion, or if pulmonary over circulation develops so rapidly. Recently more than half of HLHS patients are diagonosed in fetal. The advances in fetal diagnosis allow us to find the patients earlier and to assess the severity of the disease. Most of HLHS patients who required emergent operation just after their birth are diagnosed in fetal. However, their surgical outcome is unsatisfactory so far. Treatment for these HLHS patients has become the next challenge. PMID:26197906

  20. Outcome and Complications in Surgical Treatment of Lumbar Stenosis or Spondylolisthesis in Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Young; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Suh, Bo-Kyung; Yang, Myung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Development of anesthesiology and improvement of surgical instruments enabled aggressive surgical treatment even in elderly patients, who require more active physical activities than they were in the past. However, there are controversies about the clinical outcome of spinal surgery in elderly patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis. The purpose of this study is to review the clinical outcome of spinal surgery in elderly patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis. MEDLINE search on English-language articles was performed. There were 39685 articles from 1967 to 2013 regarding spinal disease, among which 70 dealt with geriatric lumbar surgery. Eighteen out of 70 articles dealt with geriatric lumbar surgery under the diagnosis of spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis. One was non-randomized prospective, and other seventeen reports were retrospective. One non-randomized prospective and twelve out of seventeen retrospective studies showed that old ages did not affect the clinical outcomes. One non-randomized prospective and ten of seventeen retrospective studies elucidated postoperative complications: some reports showed that postoperative complications increased in elderly patients, whereas the other reports showed that they did not increase. Nevertheless, most complications were minor. There were two retrospective studies regarding the mortality. Mortality which was unrelated to surgical procedure increased, but surgical procedure-related mortality did not increase. Surgery as a treatment option in the elderly patients with the spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis may be reasonable. However, there is insufficient evidence to make strong recommendations regarding spinal surgery for geriatric patients with spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis. PMID:26256960

  1. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  2. [Results of surgical treatment in 558 patients with carcinoma of the rectum (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Köle, W; Ertl, M

    1980-05-15

    Reviewing 558 patients with carcinoma of the rectum the symptomatology and diagnosis, the different surgical methods and especially the indication for amputation and resection are discussed. Although only 5.5% of 344 (61.6) patients, who had a radical surgical treatment (mortality rate 6.9%), were classified as Dukes A cases, 118 (34.3%) were cured for at least 5 years. The importance of early diagnosis and radical surgery strictly according to the principles of either amputation or resection are stressed. Local techniques in suitable cases are described also. PMID:7434790

  3. Pretreatment factors significantly influence quality of life in cancer patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Movsas, Benjamin . E-mail: bmovsas1@hfhs.org; Scott, Charles; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah

    2006-07-01

    Purpose The purpose of this analysis was to assess the impact of pretreatment factors on quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients. Methods and Materials Pretreatment QOL (via Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy [FACT], version 2) was obtained in 1,428 patients in several prospective Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials including nonmetastatic head-and-neck (n = 1139), esophageal (n = 174), lung (n = 51), rectal (n = 47), and prostate (n = 17) cancer patients. Clinically meaningful differences between groups were defined as a difference of 1 standard error of measurement (SEM). Results The mean FACT score for all patients was 86 (20.7-112) with SEM of 5.3. Statistically significant differences in QOL were observed based on age, race, Karnofsky Performance Status, marital status, education level, income level, and employment status, but not by gender or primary site. Using the SEM, there were clinically meaningful differences between patients {<=}50 years vs. {>=}65 years. Hispanics had worse QOL than whites. FACT increased linearly with higher Karnofsky Performance Status and income levels. Married patients (or live-in relationships) had a better QOL than single, divorced, or widowed patients. College graduates had better QOL than those with less education. Conclusion Most pretreatment factors meaningfully influenced baseline QOL. The potentially devastating impact of a cancer diagnosis, particularly in young and minority patients, must be addressed.

  4. Improving surgical patient flow in a congested recovery area

    E-print Network

    Schwartz, Trevor A

    2012-01-01

    The recent movement in healthcare reform requires hospitals to care for more patients while simultaneously reducing costs. Medical institutions can no longer afford to simply add beds and hire staff to increase capacity. ...

  5. Psychological modulation in patients surgically intervened for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lara, F J Pérez; Carranque, G; Oehling, H; Hernández, J M; Oliva, H

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been related with certain psychological dimensions. The influence of mood, emotional intelligence, and perceived quality of life on clinical symptoms and outcome of antireflux surgery was evaluated in GERD patients with and without hiatal hernia. The study included 61 patients who were diagnosed with GERD between 2003 and 2008: 16 of them without hiatal hernia (group A) and 45 of them with hiatal hernia (group B). All of these patients had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Patients were clinically examined and evaluated with the following instruments: Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, and Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)-24. Proportions were compared by using the chi-squared test; averages were compared by using the Student's t-test (with Bonferroni's correction). In general, our patients intervened for GERD showed results lower than normal or close to the lower limit of normal in the administered tests. Patients in the group without hernia were younger (P < 0.001) and with lower American Society of Anaesthesiologists risk. They showed higher scores in the SF-36 dimensions: Physical Functioning, Physical Role and Emotional Role, and lower scores in the Social Role (P < 0.001). They showed lower scores in the Emotional dimension of Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (P = 0.0068) and worse results in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression subscales of Anxiety (P < 0.001) and Depression (not significant). Men in the group without hernia showed higher scores than men in the group with hernia in the TMMS subscales corresponding to Emotional Clarity and Emotional Repair (P < 0.001). Women in the group with hernia showed higher scores than women in the group without hernia regarding Emotional Clarity (P = 0.0012). GERD patients showed poor results in all the tests, and patients without hiatal hernia compared with patients with hernia showed higher levels of anxiety, which interfered with their social life. Moreover, they showed lower tolerance to stress and higher frustration, fear, and worry. On the basis of such unfavorable phychoemotional results observed with GERD patients (especially those without hernia) in the different tests, we propose that improving our knowledge of the psychological profile of GERD patients - particularly those without hiatal hernia - could help in designing individualized medical and psychological therapies and increase success rates. PMID:23121479

  6. Multimodal approach to blood conservation in the surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Nwosu, A D

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic blood remains a scarce and expensive resource, even as the risks of disease transmission and other complications associated with blood transfusion are well known. Blood conservation, however, is a quality-of-care concept that transcends these and other known and unknown complications of transfusion, to involve a gamut of strategies meant to prevent exposure of patients to allogeneic blood. In urging a halt to incessant allogeneic blood transfusion, we report three cases to highlight the benefits of multimodal multidisciplinary collaboration in blood conservation. The three patients were chosen on account of either religious objection to any blood transfusion or the likelihood of exposure to several units of allogeneic blood. The blood conservation plan proposed for each patient was discussed with the respective surgeon and patient. Multimodal multidisciplinary approach to blood conservation utilising combination of strategies best suited for each individual patient will remarkably reduce the exposure of patients to allogeneic blood thereby ensuring better use of the scarce resource, and and preventing potential clinical complications and spiritual trespass of Jehovah's Witnesses. PMID:25772930

  7. Surgical treatment of labyrinthine fistula in patients with cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Y; Kurita, T; Matsuda, Y; Ito, S; Nakashima, T

    2009-01-01

    Labyrinthine fistula is one of the most common complications of chronic otitis media associated with cholesteatoma. The optimal management of labyrinthine fistula, however, remains controversial. Between 1995 and 2005, labyrinthine fistulae were detected in 31 (6 per cent) patients in our institution. The canal wall down technique was used in 27 (87 per cent) patients. The cholesteatoma matrix was completely removed in the first stage in all patients. Bone dust and/or temporalis fascia was inserted to seal the fistula in 29 (94 per cent) patients. A post-operative hearing test was undertaken in 27 patients; seven (26 per cent) patients showed improved hearing, 17 (63 per cent) showed no change and three (11 per cent) showed a deterioration. The study findings indicate that there are various treatment strategies available for cholesteatoma, and that the treatment choice should be based on such criteria as auditory and vestibular function, the surgeon's ability and experience, and the location and size of the fistula. PMID:19460207

  8. Use of Disinfection Cap to Reduce Central-Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection and Blood Culture Contamination Among Hematology-Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Mini; Blair, Rachel; Bell, Natalie; Son, Crystal; Huang, Yao-Ting; Dowling, Mary; Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Eagan, Janet; Sepkowitz, Kent

    2015-12-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study, we examined the impact of routine use of a passive disinfection cap for catheter hub decontamination in hematology-oncology patients. SETTING A tertiary care cancer center in New York City METHODS In this multiphase prospective study, we used 2 preintervention phases (P1 and P2) to establish surveillance and baseline rates followed by sequential introduction of disinfection caps on high-risk units (HRUs: hematologic malignancy wards, hematopoietic stem cell transplant units and intensive care units) (P3) and general oncology units (P4). Unit-specific and hospital-wide hospital-acquired central-line-associated bloodstream infection (HA-CLABSI) rates and blood culture contamination (BCC) with coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS) were measured. RESULTS Implementation of a passive disinfection cap resulted in a 34% decrease in hospital-wide HA-CLABSI rates (combined P1 and P2 baseline rate of 2.66-1.75 per 1,000 catheter days at the end of the study period). This reduction occurred only among high-risk patients and not among general oncology patients. In addition, the use of the passive disinfection cap resulted in decreases of 63% (HRUs) and 51% (general oncology units) in blood culture contamination, with an estimated reduction of 242 BCCs with CONS. The reductions in HA-CLABSI and BCC correspond to an estimated annual savings of $3.2 million in direct medical costs. CONCLUSION Routine use of disinfection caps is associated with decreased HA-CLABSI rates among high-risk hematology oncology patients and a reduction in blood culture contamination among all oncology patients. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;36(12):1401-1408. PMID:26394849

  9. Investigational tests and treatments performed in terminal stage cancer patients in two weeks before death: Turkish oncology group (TOG) study.

    PubMed

    Türker, ?brahim; Kömürcü, ?eref; Ar?can, Ali; Doruk, Hatice; Özy?lkan, Özgür; Co?kun, Hasan ?enol; Colak, Dil?en; Üçgül Çavu?o?lu, Emel; Ata, Alper; Sezer, Ahmet; Ye?il Ç?nk?r, Havva; ?enler, Filiz Cay; Arpac?, Fikret

    2014-12-01

    Although more palliative care is necessary for terminally ill cancer patients, excess investigational tests, invasive procedures, and treatments are given instead. Between November 2009 and December 2013, six hundred and twenty-four patients with end-stage cancer who were died at inpatient setting evaluated retrospectively. Patients' characteristics, sites of tumor and metastasis, tests and invasive procedures, treatments performed in the last 2 weeks before death were collected from the hospital files and analyzed. Median age of 624 patients was 58 (range 16-96) years. More than half of the patients (370, 59.3%) were men. The most frequent cancer sites were gastrointestinal (GI) system (32.2%), lung (24.0%), and breast (11.1%). Frequent metastatic sites were liver (34.8%), bone (31.5%), lung (23.3%), and/or brain (16.9%). Causes of death were respiratory failure, infections, and/or liver failure in 49.9, 23.9, and 19.4% of patients, respectively. Radiological tests performed in the last 2 weeks before death were ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scan in 25.6, 16.3, 11.4, and 3.8% of patients, respectively. Treatments received were intravenous (i.v) serum infusion, blood transfusion, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), human albumin infusion in 55.9, 44.1, 34.9, and 9.5% of patients, respectively. Invasive procedures such as invasive pain relief, terminal sedation, and chemotherapy performed in 12.6, 4.4, and 10.0% of patients, respectively. Central venous catheter application, paracentesis, thoracentesis, and GI endoscopy were applied in 41.7, 9.8, 5.6, and 3.4% of the patients, respectively. Radiological tests, invasive procedures, TPN, and human albumin transfusion were used excessively in terminal stage cancer patients in our medical oncology inpatient clinics. Invasive pain relief and terminal sedation were still underused in our cancer clinics. There is an urgent need in developing national palliative care program to improve the understanding of end-of-life care in our medical oncology clinics. PMID:25412940

  10. Hospital Teaching Intensity, Patient Race, and Surgical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Silber, Jeffrey H.; Rosenbaum, Paul R.; Romano, Patrick S.; Rosen, Amy K.; Wang, Yanli; Teng, Yun; Halenar, Michael J.; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Volpp, Kevin G.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To determine if the lower mortality often observed in teaching-intensive hospitals is due to lower complication rates or lower death rates after complications (failure-to-rescue), and whether the benefits at these hospitals accrue equally to white and black patients, since blacks receive a disproportionate share of their care at teaching-intensive hospitals. Design A retrospective study of patient outcomes and teaching intensity using logistic regression models, with and without adjusting for hospital fixed and random effects. Main Outcome Measures 30-day mortality, in-hospital complications and failure-to-rescue (“FTR”, the probability of death following complications). Setting 3,270 acute care hospitals in the United States. Patients Medicare claims on general, orthopedic and vascular surgery admissions in the U.S. for 2000 – 2005 (N = 4,658,954 unique patients). Results Combining all surgeries, compared to non-teaching hospitals, patients at very major teaching hospitals demonstrated a 15% lower odds of death (P<0.0001), no difference in complications, and a 15% lower odds of death after complications (FTR) (P<0.0001). These relative benefits associated with higher RB ratio were not experienced by black patients, for whom the odds of mortality and FTR are similar at teaching and non-teaching hospitals, a pattern that is significantly different from that of white patients (P<0.0001). Conclusions Survival after surgery is higher at hospitals with higher teaching intensity. Improved survival is due to lower mortality after complications (better FTR), and generally not due to fewer complications. However, this better survival and FTR at teaching intensive hospitals is seen for whites, not for blacks. PMID:19221321

  11. Triaging early-stage lung cancer patients into non-surgical pathways: who, when, and what?

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2015-01-01

    More lung cancer patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage due to improved diagnostic imaging techniques, a trend that is expected to accelerate with the dissemination of lung cancer screening. Surgical resection has always been considered the standard treatment for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, non-surgical treatment options for patients with early-stage NSCLC have evolved significantly over the past decade with many new and exciting alternative treatments now available. These alternative treatments include radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), percutaneous cryoablation therapy (PCT), photodynamic therapy (PDT) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), including stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy. We describe the established alternatives to surgical resection, their advantages and disadvantages, potential complications and efficacy. We then describe the optimal treatment approach for patients with early-stage NSCLC based on tumor operability, size and location. Finally, we discuss future directions and whether any alternative therapies will challenge surgical resection as the treatment of choice for patients with operable early-stage lung cancer. PMID:26380185

  12. Patient-specific mathematical neuro-oncology: using a simple proliferation and invasion tumor model to inform clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Pamela R; Juliano, Joseph; Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; Rockne, Russell C; Swanson, Kristin R

    2015-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor associated with a poor median survival of 15-18 months, yet there is wide heterogeneity across and within patients. This heterogeneity has been the source of significant clinical challenges facing patients with GBM and has hampered the drive toward more precision or personalized medicine approaches to treating these challenging tumors. Over the last two decades, the field of Mathematical Neuro-oncology has grown out of desire to use (often patient-specific) mathematical modeling to better treat GBMs. Here, we will focus on a series of clinically relevant results using patient-specific mathematical modeling. The core model at the center of these results incorporates two hallmark features of GBM, proliferation [Formula: see text] and invasion (D), as key parameters. Based on routinely obtained magnetic resonance images, each patient's tumor can be characterized using these two parameters. The Proliferation-Invasion (PI) model uses [Formula: see text] and D to create patient-specific growth predictions. The PI model, its predictions, and parameters have been used in a number of ways to derive biological insight. Beyond predicting growth, the PI model has been utilized to identify patients who benefit from different surgery strategies, to prognosticate response to radiation therapy, to develop a treatment response metric, and to connect clinical imaging features and genetic information. Demonstration of the PI model's clinical relevance supports the growing role for it and other mathematical models in routine clinical practice. PMID:25795318

  13. Bridging Protocol for Surgical Patients: One Clinic's Experience Facilitating a Safe Anticoagulation Intervention.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Lorena; Grabowski, Dean; Siragusa, Lanette; Young, R Shawn

    2015-12-01

    Surgical candidates often present with complex medical histories that necessitate an individualized approach to care to minimize surgical and anesthetic risk. Patients on warfarin require exceptionally careful clinical assessment, consideration, and consistency to reduce the risk of perioperative thromboembolism and bleeding complications. In response to this need, Victoria General Hospital in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada developed a bridging protocol based on evidence-based guidelines and a checklist tool to incorporate and communicate the necessary tasks among the interprofessional team. The purpose of this initiative was to create a patient-focused process to assist those at risk for a thromboembolic event to navigate through a clear, consistent, and collaborative surgical experience whenever cessation and resumption of warfarin administration was required. PMID:26596383

  14. Strengthening surgical handover: Developing and evaluating the effectiveness of a handover tool to improve patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Din, Nizar; Ghaderi, Shahrzad; O'Connell, Rachel; Johnson, Tayo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The European Working Time Directive and economic challenges have led to a paradigm of shift-work becoming common, and yet the continuation of high-quality patient care remains paramount. Effective and safe transfer of clinical information is critical as emphasised by the Royal College of Surgeons document ‘Safe handover: Guidance from the Working Time Directive working party (March 2007)’. The aim of this project was to design and implement a handover proforma in order to deliver a more efficient and safer system for patient care over the weekend. The surgical weekend handover proforma was designed following consultation with nursing and medical colleagues. It included a traffic light scoring system to alert the on-call team of the urgency of clinical review. An educational session was delivered to junior doctors on the surgical rotation to ensure accurate completion of the proforma. All trainee surgical doctors from Foundation Year 1 to Specialist Registrars were asked to complete a pre- and post-intervention questionnaire. Improvement was noted in all categories measured. 85% of the firms were using the new surgical weekend handover sheet. 78% of junior doctors were confident in understanding the patient's condition and executing the clinical jobs faster, with ward rounds lasting less than 3 hours. On average, 20% of patients were discharged per weekend during the trial period. Robust patient handover is vital to maintain patient safety and avoid adverse events. Our findings support the use of a surgical proforma to provide a consistent and structured approach to inpatient handover during the weekend.

  15. The Digital Patient Push Using Location to Streamline the Surgical Journey S. Mukherjee1

    E-print Network

    Peng, Xiaohong

    was designed to avoid medical errors and improve hospital efficiency by automating surgical patient management) and enhance hospital resource utilisation. The paper also describes how the information is secured during the dissemination and manipulation processes in the distributed and wireless environments. The system design has

  16. Triple pathological findings in a surgically amenable patient with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy?

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fumin; Jewells, Valerie; Trembath, Dimitri G.; Hadar, Eldad; Shin, Hae Won

    2015-01-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is a well-recognized cause of intractable epilepsy; however, coexistence with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is less common. Middle fossa epidermoid cysts are rare and may involve the temporal lobe. Most epidermoids are clinically silent, slow-growing, and seldom associated with overt symptomatology, including seizures. We describe a patient with multiple comorbidities including left MTS and a large epidermoid cyst involving the left quadrigeminal plate cistern compressing upon the cerebellar vermis and tail of the left hippocampus, resulting in refractory left temporal lobe epilepsy. The patient underwent left anterior temporal lobectomy. The surgical pathology demonstrated a third pathological finding of left temporal FCD type Ia. The patient has been seizure-free since the surgery. This case provides additional information with regard to the understanding of epileptogenicity and surgical planning in patients with MTS and epidermoid cysts. PMID:26288757

  17. Immediate nipple-areola-sparing mastectomy reconstruction: An update on oncological and reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Filassi, José Roberto; Gemperli, Rolf

    2014-08-10

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is a safe technique in patients who are candidates for conservation breast surgery. However, there is worry concerning its oncological safety and surgical outcome in terms of postoperative complications. The authors reviewed the literature to evaluate the oncological safety, patient selection, surgical techniques, and also to identify the factors influencing postoperative outcome and complication rates. Patient selection and safety related to NSM are based on oncological and anatomical parameters. Among the main criteria, the oncological aspects include the clinical stage of breast cancer, tumor characteristics and location including small, peripherally located tumors, without multicentricity, or for prophylactic mastectomy. Surgical success depends on coordinated planning with the oncological surgeon and careful preoperative and intraoperative management. In general, the NSM reconstruction is related to autologous and alloplastic techniques and sometimes include contra-lateral breast surgery. Choice of reconstructive technique following NSM requires accurate consideration of various patient related factors, including: breast volume, degree of ptosis, areola size, clinical factors, and surgeon's experience. In addition, tumor related factors include dimension, location and proximity to the nipple-areola complex. Regardless of the fact that there is no unanimity concerning the appropriate technique, the criteria are determined by the surgeon's experience and the anatomical aspects of the breast. The positive aspects of the technique utilized should include low interference with the oncological treatment, reproducibility, and long-term results. Selected patients can have safe outcomes and therefore this may be a feasible option for early breast cancer management. However, available data demonstrates that NSM can be safely performed for breast cancer treatment in selected cases. Additional studies and longer follow-up are necessary to define consistent selection criteria for NSM. PMID:25114861

  18. Immediate nipple-areola-sparing mastectomy reconstruction: An update on oncological and reconstruction techniques

    PubMed Central

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Filassi, José Roberto; Gemperli, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is a safe technique in patients who are candidates for conservation breast surgery. However, there is worry concerning its oncological safety and surgical outcome in terms of postoperative complications. The authors reviewed the literature to evaluate the oncological safety, patient selection, surgical techniques, and also to identify the factors influencing postoperative outcome and complication rates. Patient selection and safety related to NSM are based on oncological and anatomical parameters. Among the main criteria, the oncological aspects include the clinical stage of breast cancer, tumor characteristics and location including small, peripherally located tumors, without multicentricity, or for prophylactic mastectomy. Surgical success depends on coordinated planning with the oncological surgeon and careful preoperative and intraoperative management. In general, the NSM reconstruction is related to autologous and alloplastic techniques and sometimes include contra-lateral breast surgery. Choice of reconstructive technique following NSM requires accurate consideration of various patient related factors, including: breast volume, degree of ptosis, areola size, clinical factors, and surgeon’s experience. In addition, tumor related factors include dimension, location and proximity to the nipple-areola complex. Regardless of the fact that there is no unanimity concerning the appropriate technique, the criteria are determined by the surgeon’s experience and the anatomical aspects of the breast. The positive aspects of the technique utilized should include low interference with the oncological treatment, reproducibility, and long-term results. Selected patients can have safe outcomes and therefore this may be a feasible option for early breast cancer management. However, available data demonstrates that NSM can be safely performed for breast cancer treatment in selected cases. Additional studies and longer follow-up are necessary to define consistent selection criteria for NSM. PMID:25114861

  19. Advancing medical-surgical nursing practice: improving management of the changing patient condition.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Heidi; Plylar, Peggy; Krugman, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Higher patient acuities and more novice nurses on medical-surgical units have Educators focused on achieving positive outcomes with changes in patient condition. An educational program was developed to enhance nurses' knowledge, skill, and confidence in assessing hemodynamics, recognizing early signs of instability, and administering vasoactive medications. The program was successful with significant knowledge improvement as well as an increased use of the Medical Emergency Team while maintaining a low number of code calls. PMID:25407973

  20. Lived experiences and challenges of older surgical patients during hospitalization for cancer: An ethnographic fieldwork

    PubMed Central

    Høybye, Mette Terp

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the lived experiences of older surgical patients’ (aged 74 years and older) experienced challenges during a brief admission to hospital. Age, gender, polypharmacy, and the severity of illness are also factors known to affect the hospitalization process. For an ethnographic study using participant observation and interviews, surgical cancer patients (n = 9, aged 74 years and older) were recruited during admission to a Danish teaching hospital. Using ethnographic strategies of participant observation and interviews, each patient was followed through the course of 1 day during their stay at the hospital. Interviews were carried out with all patients during this time. Three areas of concern were identified as prominent in the patients’ experiences and challenges during their short hospital stay: teeth and oral cavity, eating in a hospital setting, and medication during hospitalization. Short-term hospitalization requires focused collaboration between staff and patient concerning individual challenges from their teeth and oral cavity as support of nutritional needs during surgical treatment for cancer. PMID:24559546

  1. The optimal organization of gynecologic oncology services: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fung-Kee-Fung, M.; Kennedy, E.B.; Biagi, J.; Colgan, T.; D’Souza, D.; Elit, L.M.; Hunter, A.; Irish, J.; McLeod, R.; Rosen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background A system-level organizational guideline for gynecologic oncology was identified by a provincial cancer agency as a key priority based on input from stakeholders, data showing more limited availability of multidisciplinary or specialist care in lower-volume than in higher-volume hospitals in the relevant jurisdiction, and variable rates of staging for ovarian and endometrial cancer patients. Methods A systematic review assessed the relationship of the organization of gynecologic oncology services with patient survival and surgical outcomes. The electronic databases medline and embase (ovid: 1996 through 9 January 2015) were searched using terms related to gynecologic malignancies combined with organization of services, patterns of care, and various facility and physician characteristics. Outcomes of interest included overall or disease-specific survival, short-term survival, adequate staging, and degree of cytoreduction or optimal cytoreduction (or both) for ovarian cancer patients by hospital or physician type, and rate of discrepancy in initial diagnoses and intraoperative consultation between non-specialist pathologists and gyne-oncology–specialist pathologists. Results One systematic review and sixteen additional primary studies met the inclusion criteria. The evidence base as a whole was judged to be of lower quality; however, a trend toward improved outcomes with centralization of gynecologic oncology was found, particularly with respect to the gynecologic oncology care of patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Conclusions Improvements in outcomes with centralization of gynecologic oncology services can be attributed to a number of factors, including access to specialist care and multidisciplinary team management. Findings of this systematic review should be used with caution because of the limitations of the evidence base; however, an expert consensus process made it possible to create recommendations for implementation. PMID:26300679

  2. Pain Intensity and Patients’ Acceptance of Surgical Complication Risks With Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Christopher M.; Harris, Mitchel B.; Warholic, Natalie; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Carreras, Edward; White, Andrew; Schmitz, Miguel; Wood, Kirkham B.; Losina, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study with prospective recruitment Objective To determine the relationship of pain intensity (back and leg) on patients’ acceptance of surgical complication risks when deciding whether or not to undergo lumbar spinal fusion. Background To formulate informed decisions regarding lumbar fusion surgery, preoperative discussions should include a review of the risk of complications balanced with the likelihood of symptom relief. Pain intensity has the potential to influence a patient’s decision to consent to lumbar fusion. We hypothesized that pain intensity is associated with a patient’s acceptance of surgical complication risks. Methods Patients being seen for the first time by a spine surgeon for treatment of a non-traumatic or non-neoplastic spinal disorder completed a structured questionnaire. It posed 24 scenarios, each presenting a combination of risks of 3 complications (nerve damage, wound infection, nonunion) and probabilities of symptom relief. For each scenario, the patient indicated whether he/she would/would not consent to a fusion for low back pain (LBP). The sum of the scenarios in which the patient responded that he or she would elect surgery was calculated to represent acceptance of surgical complication risks. A variety of other data were also recorded, including age, gender, education level, race, history of non-spinal surgery, duration of pain, and history of spinal injections. Data were analyzed using bivariate analyses and multivariate regression analyses. Results The mean number of scenarios accepted by 118 enrolled subjects was 10.2 (median 8, standard deviation 8.5, range 0 to 24, or 42.5% of scenarios). In general, subjects were more likely to accept scenarios with lower risks and higher efficacy. Spearman’s rank correlation estimates demonstrated a moderate association between the LBP intensity and acceptance of surgical complication risks (r=0.37, p=0.0001) while leg pain intensity had a weak but positive correlation (r=0.19, p=0.04). In bivariate analyses history of prior spinal injections was strongly associated with patients’ acceptance of surgical complication risks and willingness to proceed with surgery (54.5% of scenarios accepted for those who had injections versus 27.6% for those with no prior spinal injections, p=0.0001). White patients were more willing to accept surgery (45.9% of scenarios) than non-whites (28.4%, p=0.03). With the available numbers, age, gender, history of previous non-spinal surgery, education, and the duration of pain demonstrated no clear association with acceptance of surgical complication risks. While education overall was not influential, more educated men had greater risk tolerance than less educated men while more educated women had less risk tolerance than less educated women (p=.023). In multivariate analysis, LBP intensity remained a highly statistically significant correlate (p=0.001) of the proportion of scenarios accepted, as did a history of prior spinal injections (p=0.001) and white race (0.03). Conclusions The current investigation indicates that the intensity of LBP is the most influential factor affecting a patient’s decision to accept risk of complication and symptom persistence when considering lumbar fusion. This relationship has not been previously shown for any surgical procedure. These data could potentially change the manner in which patients are counseled to make informed choices about spinal surgery. With growing interest in adverse events and complications, these data could be important in establishing guidelines for patient-directed surgical decision-making. PMID:23124256

  3. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  4. Pretreatment Quality of Life Predicts for Locoregional Control in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Pajak, Thomas F.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Konski, Andre A.; Coyne, James C.; Gwede, Clement K.; Garden, Adam S.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Jones, Christopher; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prospectively collected health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data from patients enrolled in two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group randomized Phase III head and neck cancer trials (90-03 and 91-11) to assess their value as an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control (LRC) and/or overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: HRQOL questionnaires, using a validated instrument, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H and N), version 2, were completed by patients before the start of treatment. OS and LRC were the outcome measures analyzed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Baseline FACT-H and N data were available for 1,093 patients and missing for 417 patients. No significant difference in outcome was found between the patients with and without baseline FACT-H and N data (p = 0.58). The median follow-up time was 27.2 months for all patients and 49 months for surviving patients. Multivariate analyses were performed for both OS and LRC. Beyond tumor and nodal stage, Karnofsky performance status, primary site, cigarette use, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and altered fractionation schedules, the FACT-H and N score was independently predictive of LRC (but not OS), with p = 0.0038. The functional well-being component of the FACT-H and N predicted most significantly for LRC (p = 0.0004). Conclusions: This study represents, to our knowledge, the largest analysis of HRQOL as a prognostic factor in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. The results of this study have demonstrated the importance of baseline HRQOL as a significant and independent predictor of LRC in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  5. Optimizing Patient Preparation and Surgical Experience Using eHealth Technology.

    PubMed

    Waller, Amy; Forshaw, Kristy; Carey, Mariko; Robinson, Sancha; Kerridge, Ross; Proietto, Anthony; Sanson-Fisher, Rob

    2015-01-01

    With population growth and aging, it is expected that the demand for surgical services will increase. However, increased complexity of procedures, time pressures on staff, and the demand for a patient-centered approach continue to challenge a system characterized by finite health care resources. Suboptimal care is reported in each phase of surgical care, from the time of consent to discharge and long-term follow-up. Novel strategies are thus needed to address these challenges to produce effective and sustainable improvements in surgical care across the care pathway. The eHealth programs represent a potential strategy for improving the quality of care delivered across various phases of care, thereby improving patient outcomes. This discussion paper describes (1) the key functions of eHealth programs including information gathering, transfer, and exchange; (2) examples of eHealth programs in overcoming challenges to optimal surgical care across the care pathway; and (3) the potential challenges and future directions for implementing eHealth programs in this setting. The eHealth programs are a promising alternative for collecting patient-reported outcome data, providing access to credible health information and strategies to enable patients to take an active role in their own health care, and promote efficient communication between patients and health care providers. However, additional rigorous intervention studies examining the needs of potential role of eHealth programs in augmenting patients' preparation and recovery from surgery, and subsequent impact on patient outcomes and processes of care are needed to advance the field. Furthermore, evidence for the benefits of eHealth programs in supporting carers and strategies to maximize engagement from end users are needed. PMID:26330206

  6. Impact of surgical delay on outcomes in elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Marc; Guang, Tan Yu; Yang, Tan Kok

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine predisposing factors leading to surgical delay in elderly patients with acute abdominal conditions and its impact on surgical outcomes. METHODS: A retrospective review of a total of 144 patients aged 60 years and older who had undergone emergency abdominal surgery between 2010 and 2013 at a regional general hospital was analysed. The operations analysed were limited to perforated or gangrenous viscus and strangulated hernia. Patient demographic features, time taken to obtain a computed tomography scan, time taken to surgery and the impact on postoperative morbidity and mortality were analysed. RESULTS: The mean age was 70.5 ± 9.1 years and median time taken to surgery was 9 h. The overall mortality and complication rates (Clavien Dindo 3 and above) were 9% and 13.1% respectively. Diabetes mellitus was a significant predisposing factor which had an impact on surgical delays. Delays in surgery more than 24 h led to higher complication rates at 38.9% (P = 0.003), with multivariate analysis confirming it as an independent factor. Delays in obtaining a computed tomography (CT) scan was also shown to result in higher complication rates (Clavien Dindo 3 and above). CONCLUSION: Delays in performing emergency surgery in elderly lead to higher complication rates. Obtaining CT scans early also may facilitate prompt diagnosis of certain abdominal emergencies where presentation is more equivocal and this may lead to improved surgical outcomes. PMID:26425270

  7. Results of Surgical Treatment on Benign Anal Diseases in Korean HIV-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Perianal diseases are the most common reasons for surgery in HIV-positive patients. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of these surgical procedures in Korean patients, focusing on wound healing and postoperative complications. Retrospective analysis was performed on 72 HIV-positive patients who underwent surgery by a single surgeon for benign anal disease between 1998 and 2011. Of these, 68.1% (49/72) of patients received surgery for condyloma acuminata, 19.4% (14/72) for anal fistulas, 6.9% (5/72) for hemorrhoids, and 5.6% (4/72) for perianal abscesses. Patients with condyloma acuminata received surgical excision with electrical coagulation, and all wounds healed completely within 3 months, though 16.3% (8/49) of these patients experienced recurrence. Twelve of the 49 patients (24.5%) who were treated for condyloma acuminata underwent simultaneous operations for concomitant anal fistulas (n = 6), hemorrhoids (n = 4), and perianal abscesses (n = 2). Overall, 3 postoperative complications developed following a total of 94 procedures, and there was no significant increase in complication rate for patients with a low CD4+ T-cell count ( < 200/µL) compared to those with a higher count. The results demonstrate favorable results following perianal surgery in HIV-positive Korean patients. PMID:25246745

  8. Surgical Management of Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Marfan Syndrome during Infancy and Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung Re; Kim, Woong-Han; Choi, Eun Seok; Cho, Sungkyu; Jang, Woo Sung; Kim, Yong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitral regurgitation is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity in pediatric patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this study was to contribute to determining the appropriate surgical strategy for these patients. Methods From January 1992 to May 2013, six patients with Marfan syndrome underwent surgery for mitral regurgitation in infancy or early childhood. Results The median age at the time of surgery was 47 months (range, 3 to 140 months) and the median follow-up period was 3.6 years (range, 1.3 to 15.5 years). Mitral valve repair was performed in two patients and four patients underwent mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. There was one reoperation requiring valve replacement for aggravated mitral regurgitation two months after repair. The four patients who underwent mitral valve replacement did not experience any complications related to the prosthetic valve. One late death occurred due to progressive emphysema and tricuspid regurgitation. Conclusion Although repair can be an option for some patients, it may not be durable in infantile-onset Marfan syndrome patients who require surgical management during infancy or childhood. Mitral valve replacement is a feasible treatment option for these patients. PMID:25705592

  9. Chronobiology, cognitive function and depressive symptoms in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Melissa Voigt

    2014-09-01

    Biological rhythms are essential for the regulation of many life processes. Disturbances of the circadian rhythm are known to affect human health, performance and well-being and the negative consequences are numerous and widespread. Cognitive dysfunction, fatigue, pain, sleep disturbances and mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression, are common problems arising around the time of surgery or in the course of a cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatment period. The importance of investigating prevention or treatment possibilities in these populations is significant due to the extent of the problems and the derived consequences on morbidity and mortality. Genetic predisposition to these problems is also an issue in focus. In this thesis we initially investigated whether the specific clock gene genotype PER(5/5) was associated with the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction one week after non-cardiac surgery. We did not find any association, although this could have been due to the size of the study. Yet, if PER3(5/5) is associated with a higher incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction, the risk seems to be only modestly increased and by less than 10%. Melatonin is a hormone with well-known chronobiotic and hypnotic effects. In addition, exogenous melatonin is also known to have anxiolytic, analgesic, antidepressant and positive cognitive effects. Based on the lack of studies investigating these effects of melatonin, we conducted the MELODY trial in which we investigated the effect of 6 mg oral melatonin on depressive symptoms, anxiety, sleep, cognitive function and fatigue in patients with breast cancer in a three month time period after surgery. Melatonin had an effect on reducing the risk of developing depressive symptoms and also increased sleep efficiency perioperatively and total sleep time postoperatively. No effect was found on anxiety, sleep quality, sleepiness, general well-being or pain, however melatonin seemed to positively influence the ability to complete trial participation compared to placebo. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction was not a problem in this limited population. With regard to safety in our study, melatonin treatment for three months did not cause any serious adverse effects. Finally, we systematically reviewed the literature on the prophylactic or therapeutic effect of melatonin for depression or depressive symptoms in adult patients and assessed the safety of melatonin in these studies. The quantity, size and quality of trials investigating this question were not high and there was no clear evidence of an effect, although some studies were positive. In conclusion, further research is warranted with regard to the prophylactic effect and treatment effect of melatonin in depression, depressive symptoms, cognitive disturbances and symptom clusters of cancer patients in general. In addition, more hypothesis-generating studies with regard to the genetic heritability of POCD are needed. PMID:25186550

  10. Indication for surgical treatment in patients with adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis - a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Moramarco, Marc

    2013-01-01

    A recent literature search of the pertinent publications in the field revealed that there is poor evidence that would support surgical intervention in patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS). With complications estimated to exceed 50% over a lifetime, surgical intervention is unwarranted in the 'Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis' AIS population. In the relatively benign population of patients with AIS, according to the findings in literature, we may conclude that the long-term outcome of surgery for AIS creates a more negative end result over the course of a lifetime than the natural history of the condition itself.As a result, surgeons electing to recommend surgery are strongly advised to openly discuss and inform patients of the long-term probability of potential complications occurring after spinal fusion surgery, and document their explanations accordingly. PMID:23705983

  11. Overall survival and disease-free survival in breast cancer patients treated at the Oncology Centre in Bydgoszcz – analysis of more than six years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Wi?niewska, Magdalena; Wi?niewski, Micha?; Biedka, Marta; G?owacka, Iwona; Kozak, Dominika; Laskowski, Ryszard; Zegarski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study Malignant breast tumours are the largest oncological problem in the developed world. In the recent years the number of new diagnoses has exceeded 16,500 per year. Published data regarding far-distant results of breast cancer treatment that take under consideration the provincial division of the country may not be representative of the therapeutic effects achieved in specific oncological centres. The goal of this article is to analyse far-distant therapeutic results in breast cancer patients treated at the Oncology Centre in Bydgoszcz in 2006. They were compared with data available for Kujawsko-Pomorskie Voivodeship and with all-Poland results. Material and methods A cohort of 667 breast cancer patients at Bydgoszcz Oncology Centre between Jan 1 and Dec 31, 2006 was studied. The majority of the studied group were patients in stage I (26.2%) and II (48.3%) according to the TNM staging system, 17.5% were in stage III, and 6.4% in stage IV. The 5-year survival and 5-year disease-free survival rates were calculated. Median observation time was 79 months. Results A total of 148 patients (22.2%) suffered a relapse. There were 168 (25.2%) deaths caused by primary disease. The 5-year survival probability was 0.761 ±0.017 and the five-year disease-free survival probability was 0.807 ±0.016. Median survival time was 76.4 months, and median disease-free survival was 19.4 months. Conclusions The five-year survival probability for breast cancer patients undergoing treatment at Bydgoszcz Oncology Centre was higher than all-Poland median five-year survival probability. The observation needs to be continued and should include the assessment of treatment in subsequent time periods. PMID:26557776

  12. Efficacies of surgical treatments based on Harris hip score in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengwei; Yang, Fengjian; Lin, Weilong; Fan, Yongqian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacies of four surgical treatments, i.e., total hip arthroplasty (THA), internal fixation (IF), hemiarthroplasty (HA), and artificial femoral head replacement (artificial FHR), by performing a network meta-analysis based on Harris hip score (HHS) in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture. Methods: In strict accordance with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, randomized controlled trails (RCTs) were screened and selected from a larger group of studies that were retrieved through a comprehensive search of scientific literature databases, further complimented by manual search. The resultant high-quality data from final selected studies were analyzed using Stata 12.0 software. Results: A total of 3680 studies were initially retrieved from database search, and 15 RCTs were eventually incorporated into this meta-analysis, containing 1781 elderly patients who had undergone various surgical treatments for femoral neck fracture (THA group = 604; HA group = 604; IF group = 495; artificial FHR group = 78). Our major result revealed a statistically significant difference in HHS of femoral neck fracture when HA and IF groups were compared with THA. No differences were detected in the HHS of femoral neck fracture undergoing artificial FHR and THA. The surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) value of HHS, in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture after surgery, revealed that IF has the highest value. Conclusions: The current network meta-analysis results suggest that IF is the superlative surgical procedure for femoral neck fracture patients, and IF significantly improves the HHS in femoral neck fracture patients. PMID:26221216

  13. Retracted: Factors affecting hospital readmission rates for breast cancer patients in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michael A; Meyricke, Ramona; O'Neill, Terry; Roberts, Steven

    2007-01-17

    By this notice, the Editor and the Publisher of the Journal of Surgical Oncology retract from publication the following article: "Factors Affecting Hospital Readmission Rates for Breast Cancer Patients in Western Australia," Michael A. Martin, Ramona Meyricke, Terry O'Neill, and Steven Roberts, Journal of Surgical Oncology, Published online January 17, 2007, DOI: 10.1002/jso.20742. The article has been formally deemed a duplicate submission. The Editor and the Publisher of the Journal of Surgical Oncology regret the occurrence of this unfortunate incident. PMID:17230541

  14. Thinking in three's: changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-12-14

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won't ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to bring these team members together and influence the emergence of a safer OR. PMID:23239908

  15. Thinking in three's: Changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-01-01

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won’t ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to bring these team members together and influence the emergence of a safer OR. PMID:23239908

  16. Impact of medical therapy on patients with Crohn’s disease requiring surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Fu, YT Nancy; Hong, Thomas; Round, Andrew; Bressler, Brian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of medical therapy on Crohn’s disease patients undergoing their first surgical resection. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated all patients with Crohn’s disease undergoing their first surgical resection between years 1995 to 2000 and 2005 to 2010 at a tertiary academic hospital (St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada). Patients were identified from hospital administrative database using the International Classification of Diseases 9 codes. Patients’ hospital and available outpatient clinic records were independently reviewed and pertinent data were extracted. We explored relationships among time from disease diagnosis to surgery, patient phenotypes, medication usage, length of small bowel resected, surgical complications, and duration of hospital stay. RESULTS: Total of 199 patients were included; 85 from years 1995 to 2000 (cohort A) and 114 from years 2005 to 2010 (cohort B). Compared to cohort A, cohort B had more patients on immunomodulators (cohort A vs cohort B: 21.4% vs 56.1%, P < 0.0001) and less patients on 5-aminosalysilic acid (53.6% vs 29.8%, P = 0.001). There was a shift from inflammatory to stricturing and penetrating phenotypes (B1/B2/B3 38.8% vs 12.3%, 31.8% vs 45.6%, 29.4% vs 42.1%, P < 0.0001). Both groups had similar median time to surgery. Within cohort B, 38 patients (33.3%) received anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agent. No patient in cohort A was exposed to anti-TNF agent. Compared to patients not on anti-TNF agent, ones exposed were younger at diagnosis (anti-TNF vs without anti-TNF: A1/A2/A3 39.5% vs 11.8%, 50% vs 73.7%, 10.5% vs 14.5%, P = 0.003) and had longer median time to surgery (90 mo vs 48 mo, P = 0.02). Combination therapy further extended median time to surgery. Using time-dependent multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, patients who were treated with anti-TNF agents had a significantly higher risk to surgery (adjusted hazard ratio 3.57, 95%CI: 1.98-6.44, P < 0.0001) compared to those without while controlling for gender, disease phenotype, smoking status, and immunomodulator use. CONCLUSION: Significant changes in patient phenotypes and medication exposures were observed between the two surgical cohorts separated by a decade. PMID:25206286

  17. Patient Perspectives on Post-Discharge Surgical Site Infections: Towards a Patient-Centered Mobile Health Solution

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Patrick C.; Hartzler, Andrea; Han, Sarah M.; Armstrong, Cheryl A. L.; Stewart, Mark R.; Lordon, Ross J.; Lober, William B.; Evans, Heather L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-discharge surgical site infections (SSI) are a major source of morbidity, expense and anxiety for patients. However, patient perceptions about barriers experienced while seeking care for post-discharge SSI have not been assessed in depth. We explored patient experience of SSI and openness to a mobile health (mHealth) wound monitoring “app” as a novel solution to address this problem. Methods Mixed method design with semi-structured interviews and surveys. Participants were patients who had post-discharge surgical wound complications after undergoing operations with high risk of SSI, including open colorectal or ventral hernia repair surgery. The study was conducted at two affiliated teaching hospitals, including an academic medical center and a level 1 trauma center. Results From interviews with 13 patients, we identified 3 major challenges that impact patients' ability to manage post-discharge surgical wound complications, including required knowledge for wound monitoring from discharge teaching, self-efficacy for wound monitoring at home, and accessible communication with their providers about wound concerns. Patients found an mHealth wound monitoring application highly acceptable and articulated its potential to provide more frequent, thorough, and convenient follow-up that could reduce post-discharge anxiety compared to the current practice. Major concerns with mHealth wound monitoring were lack of timely response from providers and inaccessibility due to either lack of an appropriate device or usability challenges. Conclusions Our findings reveal gaps and frustrations with post-discharge care after surgery which could negatively impact clinical outcomes and quality of life. To address these issues, we are developing mPOWEr, a patient-centered mHealth wound monitoring application for patients and providers to collaboratively bridge the care transition between hospital and home. PMID:25436912

  18. Prosthodontic and surgical management of a completely edentulous patient with a severe class III skeletal maxillomandibular relationship: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ashy, Linah M; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2013-08-01

    This article describes a multidisciplinary approach combining surgical and prosthodontic treatment of a completely edentulous patient who presented with a severe skeletal class III relationship and was diagnosed as American College of Prosthodontists Prosthodontic Diagnostic Index (ACP PDI) class IV. The use of a complete denture serving as diagnostic tool, surgical guide, and definitive restoration is presented. Computer-aided surgical simulation was used to achieve an accurate diagnostic and surgical plan. Maxillary Lefort class I and mandibular sagittal split osteotomy surgical treatment was performed to correct arch discrepancy. The surgical procedure demonstrated a clinically acceptable maxillomandibular relationship and stability. The patient was satisfied with the esthetics and demonstrated improved oral function following prosthesis insertion. PMID:23551986

  19. Surgical Therapy of Cervical Spine Fracture in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Ce; Zhou, Xuhui; Zhou, Shengyuan; Jia, Lianshun

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to explore surgical treatments and assess the effects based on the features of cervical spine fracture in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to summarize the experiences in perioperative management. Retrospective analysis was performed in 25 AS patients with cervical spine fracture treated in our hospital from January 2011 to December 2013. The patients were divided according to fracture segments, including 4 cases at C4 to C5, 8 cases at C5 to C6, and 13 cases at C6 to C7. Among them, 12 belonged to I type, 5 to II type, and 8 to III type based on the improved classification method for AS cervical spine fracture. The Subaxial Cervical Spine Injury Classification score for these patients was 7.2?±?1.3, and the assessment of their neurological function states showed 6 patients (24%) were in American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) A grade, 1 (4%) in ASIA B grade, 3 (12%) in ASIA C grade, 12 (48%) in ASIA D grade, and 3 (12%) in ASIA E grade. Surgical methods contained simple anterior approach alone, posterior approach alone, and combined posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior approach. The average duration of patients' hospital stay was 38.6?±?37.6, and the first surgical methods were as follows: anterior approach alone on 6 cases, posterior surgery alone on 9 cases, and combined posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior approach on 10 patients. The median segments of fixation and fusion were 4.1?±?1.4 sections. Thirteen patients developed complications. During 2 to 36 months of postoperative follow-up, 1 patient died of respiratory failure caused by pulmonary infections 2 months after leaving hospital. At the end of the follow-up, bone graft fusion was achieved in the rest of patients, and obvious looseness or migration of internal fixation was not observed. In addition, the preoperative neurological injury in 12 patients (54.5%) was also alleviated in different levels. AS cervical spine fracture, an unstable fracture, should be treated with operation, and satisfactory effects will be achieved after the individualized surgical treatment according to the improved classification method for AS cervical spine fracture. PMID:26554765

  20. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  1. Surgical Audit of Patients with Ileal Perforations Requiring Ileostomy in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Hemkant; Pandey, Siddharth; Sheoran, Kapil Dev; Marwah, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Ileal perforation peritonitis is a frequently encountered surgical emergency in the developing countries. The choice of a procedure for source control depends on the patient condition as well as the surgeon preference. Material and Methods. This was a prospective observational study including 41 patients presenting with perforation peritonitis due to ileal perforation and managed with ileostomy. Demographic profile and operative findings in terms of number of perforations, site, and size of perforation along with histopathological findings of all the cases were recorded. Results. The majority of patients were male. Pain abdomen and fever were the most common presenting complaints. Body mass index of the patients was in the range of 15.4–25.3 while comorbidities were present in 43% cases. Mean duration of preoperative resuscitation was 14.73 + 13.77 hours. Operative findings showed that 78% patients had a single perforation; most perforations were 0.6–1?cm in size and within 15?cm proximal to ileocecal junction. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was seen in 29.2% patients. On histopathological examination, nonspecific perforations followed by typhoid and tubercular perforations respectively were the most common. Conclusion. Patients with ileal perforations are routinely seen in surgical emergencies and their demography, clinical profile, and intraoperative findings may guide the choice of procedure to be performed. PMID:26247059

  2. Oral Health Status of Chinese Paediatric and Adolescent Oncology Patients with Chemotherapy in Hong Kong: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kung, A.Y.H; Zhang, S; Zheng, L.W; Wong, G.H.M; Chu, C.H

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the oral health status of Chinese children and adolescents undergoing chemotherapy in Hong Kong. Method: All Chinese children and adolescent oncology patients aged 18 or below attending the Children's Centre for Cancer and Blood Disease at a hospital for chemotherapy were invited and parental consent was sought before they were accepted into the study. The study comprised of 1) a parental questionnaire, 2) the collection of medical history and 3) a clinical examination for tooth decay (caries) and mucosal status. Results: A total of 69 patients were invited, and they all participated in this study. Their mean age was 9.2±5.0 and 44 (64%) were males. Twenty-six patients (38%) had no caries experience (DMFT and/or dmft = 0). Higher caries experience was detected in participants that were not born in Hong Kong, had completed active chemotherapy, participated in school dental care service and whose parents had low educational levels. There were 41 patients with active chemotherapy, 24 of whom were diagnosed with acute leukaemia, 5 with haematological malignancies other than leukaemia and 11 with solid tumours. Antimetabolites, cytotoxic antibiotics, alkylating agents and plant alkaloids were administered in 49%, 32%, 24% and 22% of them, respectively. Twenty-six (63%) patients showed no mucosal complications. The most common oral complication was oral mucositis (24%) followed by petechiae (10%). Conclusion: About two-thirds of paediatric and adolescent cancer patients had caries experience, which was more common among those who had completed chemotherapy. Oral mucositis followed by petechiae were the two most common complications of receiving chemotherapy. PMID:25674168

  3. Surgical treatment of hepatic cystic echinococcosis in patients co-infected with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Ran, B; Shao, Y; Guo, Y; Yimiti, Y; Aji, T; Jia, J; Shayiding, P; Jiang, T; Cheng, L; Li, J; McManus, D P; Zhang, W; Wen, H

    2016-01-01

    Co-infections of cystic echinococcosis (CE) and HIV/AIDS is rare. We report four CE cases that were HIV positive. Three out of the four patients underwent a surgical operation to remove the hydatid cysts in their livers. The operation confirmed that in two of the cases their cysts had ruptured. These patients were given 3 months of albendazole after the operation. Follow-up showed they were remarkably improved in term of their health, although they were still HIV antibody positive 6 months after surgical treatment. Interestingly, the treatment remarkably increased their CD4+ cell population. We showed that surgery is suitable for treating hepatic cystic echinococcosis with HIV/AIDS co-infection. PMID:25779910

  4. Prevention of wrong-site and wrong-patient surgical errors.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Surgical errors recorded between 2002 and 2008 in a US medical liability insurance database have been analysed. Twenty-five wrong-patient procedures were recorded, resulting in 5 serious adverse events: three unnecessary prostatectomies were performed after prostate biopsy samples were mislabelled; vitrectomy was performed on the wrong patient in an ophthalmology department after confusion between two patients with identical names; and a child scheduled for adenoidectomy received a tympanic drain. There were also 107 wrong-site procedures, with one death resulting from implantation of a pleural drain on the wrong side. Another 38 patients experienced significant harm: 5 patients had surgery on the wrong vertebrae; 4 had chest tubes placed on the wrong side; 4 underwent vascular surgery at the wrong site; and 4 underwent resection of the wrong segment of the intestine. In addition, there were: 4 organ resection errors; 6 wrong-site or wrong-sided limb surgeries; 2 wrong-sided ovariectomies; 2 wrong-sided eye operations; 2 wrong-sided craniotomies; 2 wrong-sided ureteric procedures; 1 wrong-sided maxillofacial operation; and 2 radiation therapy field errors. Most errors were due to poor communication, incorrect diagnosis, or failure to implement a final set of preoperative checks. Other studies conducted in the United Kingdom and the United States have provided similar results, while data are lacking in France. The World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist is an effective way of preventing such errors but its adoption by healthcare professionals is variable. In practice, surgical errors involving the wrong patient or wrong body site are preventable. Final pre-operative checks must be applied methodically and systematically.This includes asking the patient to confirm his/her identity and the intended site of the operation. Healthcare staff must be aware of these measures. PMID:23367678

  5. Contractile function of the myocardium with prolonged hypokinesia in patients with surgical tuberculosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakutayeva, V. P.; Matiks, N. I.

    1978-01-01

    The changes in the myocardial contractile function with hypokinesia in surgical tuberculosis patients are discussed. The phase nature of the changes is noted, specifically the changes in the various systoles, diastole, and other parts of the cardiac cycle. The data compare these changes during confinement in bed with no motor activity to and with a return to motor activity after leaving the in-bed regimen.

  6. Surgical Decision Making for the Elderly Patients in Severe Head Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Jun; Yoon, Seok-Man; Oh, Jae-Sang; Bae, Hack-Gun; Doh, Jae-Won

    2014-01-01

    Objective Age is a strong predictor of mortality in traumatic brain injuries. A surgical decision making is difficult especially for the elderly patients with severe head injuries. We studied so-called 'withholding a life-saving surgery' over a two year period at a university hospital. Methods We collected data from 227 elderly patients. In 35 patients with Glasgow Coma Score 3-8, 28 patients had lesions that required operation. A life-saving surgery was withheld in 15 patients either by doctors and/or the families (Group A). Surgery was performed in 13 patients (Group B). We retrospectively examined the medical records and radiological findings of these 28 patients. We calculated the predicted probability of 6 month mortality (IPM) and 6 month unfavorable outcome (IPU) to compare the result of decision by the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) calculator. Results Types of the mass lesion did not affect on the surgical decision making. None of the motor score 1 underwent surgery, while all patients with reactive pupils underwent surgery. Causes of injury or episodes of hypoxia/hypotension might have affected on the decision making, however, their role was not distinct. All patients in the group A died. In the group B, the outcome was unfavorable in 11 of 13 patients. Patients with high IPM or IPU were more common in group A than group B. Wrong decisions brought futile cares. Conclusion Ethical training and developing decision-making skills are necessary including shared decision making. PMID:25024822

  7. The location of surgical care for rural patients with rectal cancer: patterns of treatment and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Nostedt, Michelle C.; McKay, Andrew M.; Hochman, David J.; Wirtzfeld, Debrah A.; Yaffe, Clifford S.; Yip, Benson; Silverman, Richard; Park, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Background Where cancer patients receive surgical care has implications on policy and planning and on patients’ satisfaction and outcomes. We conducted a population-based analysis of where rectal cancer patients undergo surgery and a qualitative analysis of rectal cancer patients’ perspectives on location of surgical care. Methods We reviewed Manitoba Cancer Registry data on patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosed between 2004 and 2006. We interviewed rural patients with rectal cancer regarding their preferences and the factors they considered when deciding on treatment location. Interview data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results From 2004 to 2006, 2086 patients received diagnoses of CRC in Manitoba (colon: 1578, rectal: 508). Among rural patients (n = 907), those with rectal cancer were more likely to undergo surgery at an urban centre than those with colon cancer (46.5% v. 28.8%, p < 0.001). Twenty rural patients with rectal cancer participated in interviews. We identified 3 major themes from the interview data: the decision-maker, treatment factors and personal factors. Participants described varying input into referral decisions, and often they did not perceive a choice regarding treatment location. Treatment factors, including surgeon factors and hospital factors, were important when considering treatment location. Personal factors, including travel, support, accommodation, finances and employment, also affected participants’ treatment experiences. Conclusion A substantial proportion of rural patients with rectal cancer undergo surgery at urban centres. The reasons are complex and only partly related to patient choice. Further studies are required to better understand cancer system access in geographically dispersed populations and to support cancer patients through the decision-making and treatment processes. PMID:25421082

  8. A Comparison of Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia With Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Management After Major Gynecologic Oncologic Surgeries: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Farnaz; Rasooli, Sousan; Baybordi, Ali; Golzari, Samad E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain after major open gynecologic surgeries requires appropriate pain management. Objectives: This study aimed at comparing perioperative patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) and patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) after gynecologic oncology surgeries. Patients and Methods: In this clinical trial study, 90 patients with American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) class I or II scheduled for gynecologic oncologic surgeries were randomly allocated to two groups (45 patients each group) to receive: patient-controlled epidural analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl (PCEA group), or patient controlled intravenous analgesia (IV PCA group) with fentanyl, pethidine and ondansetron. Postoperative pain was assessed over 48 hours using the visual analog scale (VAS). The frequency of rescue analgesia was recorded. Occurrence of any concomitant events such as nausea, vomiting, ileus, purities, sedation and respiratory complications were recorded postoperatively. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in demographic data including; age, weight, ASA physical status, duration of surgery, intraoperative bleeding, and the amount of blood transfusion (P > 0.05), between the two studied groups. Severity of postoperative pain was not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05); however, after first patient mobilization, pain was significantly lower in the epidural group than the IV group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the incidence of complications such as nausea, vomiting, purities or ileus (P > 0.05). Nevertheless, the incidence and severity of sedation was significantly higher in the IV group (P < 0.001). Respiratory depression was higher in the IV group than the epidural group; this difference, however, was not significant (P = 0.11). In the epidural group, only 10 patients (22.2%) had mild and transient lower extremities parenthesis. Conclusions: Both intravenous and epidural analgesic techniques with combination of analgesics provide proper postoperative pain control after major gynecologic cancer surgeries without any significant complications. Regarding lower sedative and respiratory depressant effects of epidural analgesia, it seems that this method is a safer technique for postoperative pain relief in these patients. PMID:26587406

  9. Surgical smoke.

    PubMed

    Fan, Joe King-Man; Chan, Fion Siu-Yin; Chu, Kent-Man

    2009-10-01

    Surgical smoke is the gaseous by-product formed during surgical procedures. Most surgeons, operating theatre staff and administrators are unaware of its potential health risks. Surgical smoke is produced by various surgical instruments including those used in electrocautery, lasers, ultrasonic scalpels, high speed drills, burrs and saws. The potential risks include carbon monoxide toxicity to the patient undergoing a laparoscopic operation, pulmonary fibrosis induced by non-viable particles, and transmission of infectious diseases like human papilloma virus. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity are other concerns. Minimisation of the production of surgical smoke and modification of any evacuation systems are possible solutions. In general, a surgical mask can provide more than 90% protection to exposure to surgical smoke; however, in most circumstances it cannot provide air-tight protection to the user. An at least N95 grade or equivalent respirator offers the best protection against surgical smoke, but whether such protection is necessary is currently unknown. PMID:19892630

  10. Daily baseline skin care in the prevention, treatment, and supportive care of skin toxicity in oncology patients: recommendations from a multinational expert panel

    PubMed Central

    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Humbert, Phillipe; Krutman, Jean; Luger, Thomas; Triller, Raoul; Rougier, André; Seite, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Skin reactions due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy are a significant problem for an important number of cancer patients. While effective for treating cancer, they disturb cutaneous barrier function, causing a reaction soon after initiation of treatment that impacts patient quality of life. Managing these symptoms with cosmetics and nonpharmaceutical skin care products for camouflage or personal hygiene may be important for increasing patient self-esteem. However, inappropriate product choice or use could worsen side effects. Although recommendations exist for the pharmaceutical treatment of skin reactions, there are no recommendations for the choice or use of dermatologic skin care products for oncology patients. The present guidelines were developed by a board of European experts in dermatology and oncology to provide cancer care professionals with guidance for the appropriate use of non-pharmaceutical, dermocosmetic skin care management of cutaneous toxicities associated with radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, including epidermal growth factor inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. The experts hope that these recommendations will improve the management of cutaneous side effects and hence quality of life for oncology patients. PMID:24353440

  11. Conflicting Priorities in Social Legislation and Medicine: Gynaeco-oncology Patients and their Right to Participate in Society

    PubMed Central

    Simoes, E.; Graf, J.; Wallwiener, D.; Brucker, S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the declining mortality rates, malignant diseases have gained a chronic character for many gynaeco-oncology patients. The patients can expect to participate in social life and to an increasing extent in professional life for longer lengths of time. Promotion of rehabilitation and participation is an issue of the German 9th Social Security Code that explicitly places a focus on women. This is mainly of relevance for tumour patients with regard to assessment of the degree of severe disability, to compensate for disease-induced impairments and the possibilities for improving the participation of the afflicted subjects, especially by means of protective rights in professional life. Indeed, tumour patients do sometimes find themselves confronted with conflicting priorities between the entitlements guaranteed by social legislation and the compensation conferred by the health-care services, which can then be avoided when the facts are sufficiently known. For this purpose, the physician must be fully aware of the legal situation. The present article provides an overview of the procedures and reference points for appraisals. Patients need partners among their responsible physicians to help in the assertion of their claims. From the physician?s side it is necessary to classify the reported complaints within the ever increasing knowledge about the direct side effects and the long-term side effects of cancer therapies. Against the background of an often life-long mental stress and the uncertain risk of recurrence, it should also be considered whether the concept of healing probation is in support of the targets of long-term disease management and social reintegration, also in the interest of society in general. PMID:26556909

  12. Modeling Plus MRI Data Characterize Brain Tumors in Patients | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    Patients diagnosed with glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer, routinely undergo MRI scanning prior to receiving treatment. Now, an international team of investigators has developed a mathematical modeling technique that can translate the data from pretreatment MRI scans into patient-specific rates of tumor growth and metastasis that may find use in tailoring therapy to meet the needs of each patient.

  13. What Does a Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Reveal About Patient Safety Culture of Surgical Units Compared With That of Other Units?

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Qin; Cai, Miao; Tao, Hong-bing; Cheng, Zhao-hui; Chen, Jing; Hu, Yin-huan; Li, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to examine the strengths and weaknesses of surgical units as compared with other units, and to provide an opportunity to improve patient safety culture in surgical settings by suggesting targeted actions using Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) investigation. A Hospital Survey on Patient Safety questionnaire was conducted to physicians and nurses in a tertiary hospital in Shandong China. 12 patient safety culture dimensions and 2 outcome variables were measured. A total of 23.5% of respondents came from surgical units, and 76.5% worked in other units. The “overall perceptions of safety” (48.1% vs 40.4%, P?surgical units were higher than those of other units. However, the communication openness (38.7% vs 42.5%, P?surgical units was lower than in other units. Medical workers in surgical units reported more events than those in other units, and more respondents in the surgical units assess “patient safety grade” to be good/excellent. Three dimensions were considered as strengths, whereas 5 other dimensions were considered to be weaknesses in surgical units. Six dimensions have potential to aid in improving events reporting and patient safety grade. Appropriate working times will also contribute to ensuring patient safety. Medical staff with longer years of experience reported more events. Surgical units outperform the nonsurgical ones in overall perception of safety and the number of events reported but underperform in the openness of communication. Four strategies, namely deepening the understanding about patient safety of supervisors, narrowing the communication gap within and across clinical units, recruiting more workers, and employing the event reporting system and building a nonpunitive culture, are recommended to improve patient safety in surgical units in the context of 1 hospital. PMID:26166083

  14. What Does a Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Reveal About Patient Safety Culture of Surgical Units Compared With That of Other Units?

    PubMed

    Shu, Qin; Cai, Miao; Tao, Hong-Bing; Cheng, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Jing; Hu, Yin-Huan; Li, Gang

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the strengths and weaknesses of surgical units as compared with other units, and to provide an opportunity to improve patient safety culture in surgical settings by suggesting targeted actions using Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) investigation.A Hospital Survey on Patient Safety questionnaire was conducted to physicians and nurses in a tertiary hospital in Shandong China. 12 patient safety culture dimensions and 2 outcome variables were measured.A total of 23.5% of respondents came from surgical units, and 76.5% worked in other units. The "overall perceptions of safety" (48.1% vs 40.4%, P?surgical units were higher than those of other units. However, the communication openness (38.7% vs 42.5%, P?surgical units was lower than in other units. Medical workers in surgical units reported more events than those in other units, and more respondents in the surgical units assess "patient safety grade" to be good/excellent. Three dimensions were considered as strengths, whereas 5 other dimensions were considered to be weaknesses in surgical units. Six dimensions have potential to aid in improving events reporting and patient safety grade. Appropriate working times will also contribute to ensuring patient safety. Medical staff with longer years of experience reported more events.Surgical units outperform the nonsurgical ones in overall perception of safety and the number of events reported but underperform in the openness of communication. Four strategies, namely deepening the understanding about patient safety of supervisors, narrowing the communication gap within and across clinical units, recruiting more workers, and employing the event reporting system and building a nonpunitive culture, are recommended to improve patient safety in surgical units in the context of 1 hospital. PMID:26166083

  15. Surgical management of pleomorphic adenoma of parotid gland in elderly patients: role of morphological features.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Germano; Testa, Domenico; Montagnani, Stefania; Tafuri, Domenico; Salzano, Francesco Antonio; Rocca, Aldo; Amato, Bruno; Salzano, Giovanni; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni; Piombino, Pasquale; Motta, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    The neoplasms of the salivary glands account for 2% of head and neck tumors and the most common form is the Pleomorphic adenoma (PA). Parotid gland is affected from 80% to 90% of cases. In elderly these tumors occur mostly in females. These benign tumors are composed of epithelial and myoepithelial cells that are arranged with various morphological patterns and subtypes. The classification of these tumors is also based on the amount and nature of the stroma. In literature there is an almost complete consensus that, in the major salivary glands, PAs are enclosed by a layer of fibrous tissue often called "capsule" but there is disagreement about the form, extension and thickness of this layer. The treatment is surgical and there are two main different surgical approaches: an enucleation (local dissection) or so-called subtotal superficial parotidectomy and lateral or superficial total parotidectomy. Histopathological characteristics of PAs especially of capsular alterations such as thin capsule areas, capsule-free regions, capsule penetration, satellite nodules and pseudopodia in the different subtypes are important for the choice of surgical treatment and the first explanation for tumor recurrence. In our study we describe a morphological features of 84 cases of pleomorphic adenoma of parotid gland from elderly patients treated by a surgical "enucleation like" method called nucleoresection. PMID:25159550

  16. Iron chelation with deferasirox for the treatment of secondary hemosiderosis in pediatric oncology patients: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Ktena, Yiouli P; Athanasiadou, Anastasia; Lambrou, George; Adamaki, Maria; Moschovi, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric oncology patients are often iron overloaded, due to the multiple blood transfusions necessary during the course of chemotherapy. Our aim is to report the efficacy and safety of deferasirox, an oral iron chelator, in this patient group. Deferasirox was administered to 13 children with malignancies in remission and iron overload. Ferritin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, transaminases, and bilirubin were recorded at 4- to 8-week intervals, and hepatic and cardiac iron overload were assessed with magnetic resonance imaging before initiation of treatment. Deferasirox was administered for an average of 6 months (SD=4.5; range, 0.3 to 18.2). Two children presented with skin rash, 1 with gastrointestinal disturbances, and 1 with fully reversible acute renal failure. The mean monthly rate of change in ferritin levels was -10.8 ?g/L before initiation of treatment (95% confidence interval [CI], -19.8 to -1.8; P=0.02) and -93.6 ?g/L during deferasirox treatment (95% CI, -118.1 to -69.1; P<0.001). The difference in the monthly rate of change in ferritin levels before and after treatment initiation was -82.8 ?g/L (95% CI, -111.6 to -53.9; P<0.001). Deferasirox was effective in reducing the iron burden. The adverse effects were easily monitored and managed. Further studies are warranted to investigate the effect of deferasirox on mortality and morbidity in this population. PMID:23669734

  17. Length of hospital stay in surgical service patients with nosocomial Hemophilus influenzae infections.

    PubMed Central

    Flournoy, D. J.; Hall, L.; Klein, G.; Slater, L. N.

    1989-01-01

    The length of hospitalization was characterized for 24 surgical service patients with nosocomial respiratory tract infections associated with Hemophilus influenzae. The mean number of days were: admission to surgery 8.22; surgery to culture of the nosocomial pathogen 7.00; admission to culture 16.71; admission to discharge 38.75; surgery to discharge 25.48; and culture to discharge 21.42. The length of hospital stay was prolonged for those patients with nosocomial respiratory tract infections related to H influenzae. PMID:2786083

  18. Patient safety in dermatologic surgery: Part I. Safety related to surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Timothy J; Lolis, Margarita; Goldberg, David J; MacFarlane, Deborah F

    2015-07-01

    Surgical procedures involve unique elements related to patient safety. One must be aware of potential complications and safety issues within the practice of dermatologic surgery. Developing a high level of competence in skin surgery will address some safety issues, while implementing protocols and redundancies provides systems-based correction for other safety issues. We provide an in-depth review of patient safety in dermatologic surgery. In particular, we highlight the most common safety issues and methods for reducing error. PMID:26089045

  19. Minimizing Penile Implant Infection: A Literature Review of Patient and Surgical Factors.

    PubMed

    Holland, Bradley; Kohler, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) is an effective treatment for erectile dysfunction in patients' refractory to oral or injectable treatment. While the rate of infection has decreased over the past decade, it is still the most feared complication of IPP placement. Here, we assemble possible patient and surgical factors attributing to the risk of infection. Studies have been gathered addressing each of these factors, and an Oxford Level of Evidence is assigned to each recommendation based on strength of the study. The goal of this review is to inform surgeons of possible risks in order to further reduce the risk of infection and thus increase success of IPP placement. PMID:26480830

  20. Surgical Techniques for Personalized Oncoplastic Surgery in Breast Cancer Patients with Small- to Moderate-Sized Breasts (Part 1): Volume Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Dug; Lee, Jeong Woo; Cho, Young Kyoo; Kim, Wan Wook; Hwang, Seung Ook; Jung, Jin Hyang

    2012-01-01

    Despite the popularity of breast-conserving surgery (BCS), which constitutes 50-60% of all breast cancer surgeries, discussions regarding cosmetic results after BCS are not specifically conducted. The simple conservation of breast tissue is no longer adequate to qualify for BCS completion. The incorporation of oncological and plastic surgery techniques allows for the complete resection of local disease while achieving superior cosmetic outcome. Oncoplastic BCS can be performed in one of the following two ways: 1) volume displacement techniques and 2) volume replacement techniques. This study reports volume displacement surgical techniques, which allow the use of remaining breast tissue after BCS by glandular reshaping or reduction techniques for better cosmetic results. Thorough understanding of these procedures and careful consideration of the patient's breast size, tumor location, excised volume, and volume of the remaining breast tissue during the surgery in choosing appropriate patient and surgical techniques will result in good cosmetic results. Surgery of the contralateral breast may be requested to improve symmetry and may take the form of a reduction mammoplasty or mastopexy. The timing of such surgery and the merits of synchronous versus delayed approaches should be discussed in full with the patients. Because Korean women have relatively small breast sizes compared to Western women, it is not very easy to apply the oncoplastic volume displacement technique to cover defects. However, we have performed various types of oncoplastic volume displacement techniques on Korean women, and based on our experience, we report a number of oncoplastic volume displacement techniques that are applicable to Korean women with small- to moderate-sized breasts. PMID:22493622

  1. Interprofessional patient-centred practice in oncology teams: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Karine; Dubois, Sylvie; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2015-03-01

    Studies on interprofessional practice usually report professionals' viewpoints and document organizational, procedural and relational factors influencing that practice. Considering the importance of interprofessional patient-centred (IPPC) practice, it seems necessary to describe it in detail in an actual context of care, from the perspective of patients, their families and health-care professionals. The goal of this study was to describe IPPC practice throughout the continuum of cancer care. A qualitative multiple case study was completed with two interprofessional teams from a Canadian teaching hospital. Interviews were conducted with patients, their families and professionals, and observation was carried out. Three themes were illustrated by current team practice: welcoming the person as a unique individual, but still requiring the patient to comply; the paradoxical coexistence of patient-centred discourse and professional-centred practice; and triggering team collaboration with the culmination of the patient's situation. Several influential factors were described, including the way the team works; the physical environment; professionals' and patients'/family members' stance on the collaboration; professionals' stance on patients and their families; and patients' stance on professionals. Finally, themes describing the desired IPPC practice reflect the wish of most participants to be more involved. They were: providing support in line with the patient's experience and involvement; respecting patients by not imposing professionals' values and goals; and consistency and regularity in the collaboration of all members. PMID:25070427

  2. The Effect of Race on Outcomes of Surgical or Non-surgical Treatment of Patients in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J.; Lurie, Jon D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Bono, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review of the data collected prospectively through the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT). Objective Determine the effect that race or ethnicity had on outcomes following spine surgery in the three arms of SPORT. Summary of Background Data There is a dearth of research regarding the effect of race or ethnicity on outcome following treatment for spinal disorders. Methods All participants from the three arms of the SPORT were evaluated in an as-treated analysis with patients categorized as white, black, or other. Baseline and operative characteristics of the groups were compared using the chi-square test and ANOVA. Differences in the changes between baseline and 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year time-points in the operative and non-operative treatments were evaluated with a mixed effects longitudinal regression model and differences between racial groups were compared with a multiple degrees of freedom Wald test. Results Included were 2,427 patients (85% white, 8% black, 7% other). Surgery was performed on 67% of white patients, 54% of blacks, and 68% of others. Whites and others were significantly more likely to undergo surgery than blacks (67% and 68% vs 54%, p=0.003). Complications and the risk of additional surgeries were not significantly different between racial groups. Regardless of race, all patients improved more with surgical management than with nonoperative treatment for all outcome measures at all time-points. The average 4-year area- under-the-curve results revealed surgical and non-operative treatment resulted in statistically significant improvement in whites relative to blacks for BP (p<0.001), SF (p<0.001), and ODI (p<0.001). No significant differences were appreciated in treatment effect for primary outcome measures or self-rated progress across racial groups. Conclusion These results illustrate important differences between racial groups in terms of response to spine care. While there were quantitative differences between groups, these findings are not necessarily indications of healthcare disparities. PMID:22842539

  3. Long-term Surgical Outcomes of Epiretinal Membrane in Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Noriko; Murakami, Yusuke; Nakatake, Shunji; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Enaida, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2015-01-01

    Macular complications such as an epiretinal membrane (ERM), a cystoid macular edema and a macular hole lead to unexpected central vision impairment especially for patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). To evaluate the long-term surgical outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for ERM in patients with RP, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of a consecutive series of 10 RP patients who underwent PPV for ERM at Kyushu University Hospital. Visual acuity (VA) testing, a fundus examination, and an optical coherence tomography (OCT) analysis were conducted. The standard PPV using three sclerotomies was performed for ERM. PPV was performed in 12 eyes of 10 patients. One eye was excluded from the outcome assessment due to short period observation (18 months). There was no significantly deleterious change from the baseline to final VA between the operation eyes and the fellow eyes (P?=?0.19). Moreover, morphological improvement was obtained in 9 of 11 eyes based on OCT. Our present data suggest that PPV may be tolerable in the management for ERM in RP patients over the long-term. Furthermore, the appearance of the ellipsoid zone was an important factor in the prediction of visual outcome and determination of surgical indication. PMID:26268934

  4. Care interaction adding challenges to old patients’ well-being during surgical hospital treatment

    PubMed Central

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2015-01-01

    Today, hospitals offer surgical treatment within a short hospital admission. This brief interaction may challenge the well-being of old patients. The aim of this study was to explore how the well-being of old hospitalized patients was affected by the interaction with staff during a fast-track surgical treatment and hospital admission for colon cancer. We used an ethnographic methodology with field observations and unstructured interviews focusing on one patient at a time (n=9) during a full day; the hours ranging from 7:45 a.m. to 8 p.m. Participants were between 74 and 85 years of age and of both sexes. The study was reported to the Danish Data Protection Agency with reference number (2007-58-0010). The encounter between old patients and the staff was a main theme in our findings elucidating a number of care challenges. The identified care challenges illustrated “well-being as a matter of different perspectives,” “vulnerability in contrast to well-being,” and “staff mix influencing the care encounter.” The experience of well-being in old cancer patients during hospital admission was absent or challenged when staff did not acknowledge their individual vulnerability and needs. PMID:26499314

  5. Surgical Treatment of Calcaneal Avulsion Fracture in Elderly Patients Using Cannulated Cancellous Screws and Titanium Wire.

    PubMed

    Miyamura, Satoshi; Ota, Haruka; Okamoto, Michio; Namba, Jiro; Yamamoto, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the calcaneus are relatively uncommon and are seen most frequently in elderly or osteoporotic patients. A surgical method that avoids displacement of the avulsed fragment after fixation has not been developed. We report the cases of 3 patients (a 73-year-old male, an 85-year-old male, and an 81-year-old female) treated by open reduction and internal fixation using titanium wire and cannulated cancellous screws. The posterior approach was used by way of a vertical midline incision. The fracture was fixed with 2 screws, and then a titanium wire was passed through the holes of the cannulated screws. A small incision on the lateral side of planter was added for the exit and return of the wire. The wire knot was bent inside the proximal Achilles tendon bursa in 2 patients and was directed to the plantar side in 1 to avoid irritation. Bony union was achieved without repeat displacement of the fragment in all 3 patients. Normal ankle function was restored, and the patients recovered the activities of daily living almost to the original level. Although an additional plantar incision is required, this surgical technique provides strong internal fixation. PMID:26440932

  6. Relationship between physical activity and function in elderly patients discharged after surgical treatment for gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to observe changes in physical activity (PA) from before surgery to after discharge among elderly patients with gastrointestinal cancer and to examine the relationships between PA, function, and physique after discharge in these patients. [Subjects and Methods] The study participants were 18 elderly patients who underwent surgical treatment for gastrointestinal cancer [10 males and 8 females, aged 71.4 ± 4.2?years (mean ± SD)]. We evaluated patients’ PA, function, and physique before surgery and after discharge. Calorie consumption as calculated using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short version was measured for PA. Isometric knee extension force (IKEF), the timed up and go test (TUGT), and the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) were measured for function. The body mass index (BMI) was calculated for physique. [Results] Significant declines in PA and BMI were observed after discharge among the study participants. In addition, a significant correlation between PA and IKEF was observed in the discharge phase. [Conclusion] These results suggest that PA after discharge is significantly less than that before surgery and related to the functioning of the lower extremities in the same period in elderly patients who undergo surgical treatment for gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:26504327

  7. Patients' Perspectives of Care and Surgical Outcomes in Michigan: An Analysis Using the CAHPS Hospital Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sheetz, Kyle H.; Waits, Seth A.; Girotti, Micah E.; Campbell, Darrell A.; Englesbe, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between postoperative morbidity and mortality and patients' perspectives of care. Summary Background Data Priorities in healthcare quality research are shifting to place greater emphasis on patient-centered outcomes. Whether patients' perspectives of care correlate with surgical outcomes remains unclear. Methods Using data from the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative clinical registry (2008–2012), we identified 41,833 patients undergoing major elective general or vascular surgery. Our exposure variables were the HCAHPS Total and Base Scores derived from the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Patient Experience of Care Domain. Using multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression models, we adjusted hospitals' rates of morbidity and mortality for patient comorbidities and case mix. We stratified reporting of outcomes by quintiles of hospitals' Total and Base Scores. Results Risk-adjusted morbidity (13.6% to 28.6%) varied widely across hospitals. There were no significant differences in risk-adjusted morbidity rates between hospitals with the lowest versus highest HCAHPS Total Score (24.5% vs. 20.2%, p=0.312). The HCAHPS Base Score, which quantifies sustained achievement or improvement in patients' perspectives of care, was not associated with a reduction in postoperative morbidity over the study period despite an overall decrease of 2.5% for all centers. We observed a similar relationship between HCAHPS Total and Base Scores and postoperative mortality. Conclusions and Relevance Patients' perspectives of care do not correlate with the incidence of morbidity and mortality following major surgery. Improving patients' perspectives and objective outcomes may require separate initiatives for surgeons in Michigan. PMID:24646549

  8. Patient and carer unmet needs: a survey of the British association of head and neck oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; Clifford, N; Lowe, D

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this survey was to ask members of the British Association of Head and Neck Oncology Nurses (BAHNON) about the identification of patients and carers unmet needs in the routine out-patient review clinic and the support services available during consultation. A national postal survey was sent out to the 210 current members of BAHNON in November 2009. Reminders were sent to non-responders in February 2010. The response rate was 61% (129/210). The vast majority (80%) were Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS). The questionnaire data support the strong belief in attempts to identify unmet needs with over three-quarters feeling strongly about themselves being personally involved in attempting to identify unmet needs. Most of the responders used counselling and communication methods to elicit unmet concerns rather than specific tools such as questionnaires. The vast majority clearly felt that identifying unmet needs in clinic improves patients' perception of outcome post-treatment. Support services' readily' available at the time of consultation were as follows: H&N CNS (99%), Speech and Language (86%), Oncologist (84%), Dietician/Nutritionist (84%), Dentist (44%), Oral Rehabilitation consultant (27%), Dental Hygienist (26%), Physiotherapist (21%), Chaplain (20%), Emotional Support therapist (15%), Psychologist (15%), Occupational therapist (13%), Social worker (8%), other (11%). Although responders felt it very important to identify unmet needs in follow-up clinics, there is reliance on one to one discussion with the patient and carer. Hence in a busy clinic, needs might be easily missed and further research is required into ways to facilitate their identification. PMID:20674109

  9. Rotational assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with reconstructive gastrointestinal surgical anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Zouhairi, Majed El; Watson, James B; Desai, Svetang V; Swartz, David K; Castillo-Roth, Alejandra; Haque, Mahfuzul; Jowell, Paul S; Branch, Malcolm S; Burbridge, Rebecca A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the success rates of performing therapy utilizing a rotational assisted enteroscopy device in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in surgically altered anatomy patients. METHODS: Between June 1, 2009 and November 8, 2012, we performed 42 ERCPs with the use of rotational enteroscopy for patients with altered anatomy (39 with gastric bypass Roux-en-Y, 2 with Billroth II gastrectomy, and 1 with hepaticojejunostomy associated with liver transplant). The indications for ERCP were: choledocholithiasis: 13 of 42 (30.9%), biliary obstruction suggested on imaging: 20 of 42 (47.6%), suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: 4 of 42 (9.5%), abnormal liver enzymes: 1 of 42 (2.4%), ascending cholangitis: 2 of 42 (4.8%), and bile leak: 2 of 42 (4.8%). All procedures were completed with the Olympus SIF-Q180 enteroscope and the Endo-Ease Discovery SB overtube produced by Spirus Medical. RESULTS: Successful visualization of the major ampulla was accomplished in 32 of 42 procedures (76.2%). Cannulation of the bile duct was successful in 26 of 32 procedures reaching the major ampulla (81.3%). Successful therapeutic intervention was completed in 24 of 26 procedures in which the bile duct was cannulated (92.3%). The overall intention to treat success rate was 64.3%. In terms of cannulation success, the intention to treat success rate was 61.5%. Ten out of forty two patients (23.8%) required admission to the hospital after procedure for abdominal pain and nausea, and 3 of those 10 patients (7.1%) had a diagnosis of post-ERCP pancreatitis. The average hospital stay was 3 d. CONCLUSION: It is reasonable to consider an attempt at rotational assisted ERCP prior to a surgical intervention to alleviate biliary complications in patients with altered surgical anatomy. PMID:25789100

  10. Variation in use of non-surgical treatments among osteoarthritis patients in orthopaedic practice in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2015-01-01

    Objectives National and international evidence-based guidelines for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with non-surgical treatments, followed by surgical intervention if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatments, but there are indications that these are not optimally used. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which all recommended non-surgical treatments were used by patients with hip or knee OA who receive(d) a total hip or knee replacement, as reported by patients and orthopaedic surgeons. Setting We performed two cross-sectional internet-based surveys among patients and orthopaedic surgeons throughout the Netherlands. Participants 195 OA patients either have undergone total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty no longer than 12?months ago or being on the waiting list for surgery with a confirmed date within 3?months and 482 orthopaedic surgeons were invited to participate. Primary and secondary outcome measures The use of recommended non-surgical treatments including education about OA/treatment options, lifestyle advice, dietary therapy, physical therapy, acetaminophen, NSAIDs and glucocorticoid injections. Results 174 OA patients (93%) and 172 orthopaedic surgeons (36%) completed the surveys. Most recommended non-surgical treatments were given to the majority of patients (eg, 80% education about OA, 73% physical therapy, 72% acetaminophen, 80% NSAIDs). However, only 6% of patients and 10% of orthopaedic surgeons reported using a combination of all recommended treatments. Dietary therapy was used least frequently. Only 11% of overweight and 30% of obese participants reported having received dietary therapy and 28% of orthopaedic surgeons reported to prescribe dietary therapy to overweight patients. Conclusions While most recommended non-surgical treatments were used frequently as single therapy, the combination is used in only a small percentage of OA patients. Especially, use of dietary therapy may be improved to help patients manage their symptoms, and potentially delay the need for joint arthroplasty. PMID:26353874

  11. [The use of allografts in the surgical treatment of patients with infected vascular prostheses].

    PubMed

    Locati, P M; Gallo, E; Costantini, E; Campanati, B; Socrate, A M; Lanza, G; Morlacchi, E; Costantini, S

    1998-01-01

    The article is devoted to analysis of surgical treatment of patients with such a dangerous complication as infection of the vascular prosthesis. The authors have performed 25 operations for substituting the infected prostheses for allografts. In 18 patients the infected prostheses were located in the aorto-iliac segment, in 5 patients in the femoro-popliteal segment, 1 patient had it in the aorta, and 1 in the subclavian segment. The prostheses were removed and a simultaneous revascularization was made. The authors make a conclusion that it is very expedient to use alloprostheses as a protective measure against persistent or recidivating infections. The allografts have both early and long-term resistance to infection. PMID:9751993

  12. A systematic review of the impact of routine collection of patient reported outcome measures on patients, providers and health organisations in an oncologic setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite growing interest and urges by leading experts for the routine collection of patient reported outcome (PRO) measures in all general care patients, and in particular cancer patients, there has not been an updated comprehensive review of the evidence regarding the impact of adopting such a strategy on patients, service providers and organisations in an oncologic setting. Methods Based on a critical analysis of the three most recent systematic reviews, the current systematic review developed a six-method strategy in searching and reviewing the most relevant quantitative studies between January 2000 and October 2011 using a set of pre-determined inclusion criteria and theory-based outcome indicators. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to rate the quality and importance of the identified publications, and the synthesis of the evidence was conducted. Results The 27 identified studies showed strong evidence that the well-implemented PROs improved patient-provider communication and patient satisfaction. There was also growing evidence that it improved the monitoring of treatment response and the detection of unrecognised problems. However, there was a weak or non-existent evidence-base regarding the impact on changes to patient management and improved health outcomes, changes to patient health behaviour, the effectiveness of quality improvement of organisations, and on transparency, accountability, public reporting activities, and performance of the health care system. Conclusions Despite the existence of significant gaps in the evidence-base, there is growing evidence in support of routine PRO collection in enabling better and patient-centred care in cancer settings. PMID:23758898

  13. Category-Specific Naming and Recognition Deficits in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Drane, Daniel L.; Ojemann, George A.; Aylward, Elizabeth; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Johnson, L. Clark; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Miller, John W.; Tranel, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Objective Based upon Damasio's “Convergence Zone” model of semantic memory, we predicted that epilepsy surgical patients with anterior temporal lobe (TL) seizure onset would exhibit a pattern of category-specific naming and recognition deficits not observed in patients with seizures arising elsewhere. Methods We assessed epilepsy patients with unilateral seizure onset of anterior TL or other origin (n = 22), pre- or postoperatively, using a set of category-specific items and a conventional measure of visual naming (Boston Naming Test: BNT). Results Category-specific naming deficits were exhibited by patients with dominant anterior TL seizure onset/resection for famous faces and animals, while category-specific recognition deficits for these same categories were exhibited by patients with nondominant anterior TL onset/resection. Patients with other seizure onset did not exhibit category-specific deficits. Naming and recognition deficits were frequently not detected by the BNT, which samples only a limited range of stimuli. Interpretation Consistent with the “convergence zone” framework, results suggest that the nondominant anterior TL plays a major role in binding sensory information into conceptual percepts for certain stimuli, while dominant TL regions function to provide a link to verbal labels for these percepts. Although observed category-specific deficits were striking, they were often missed by the BNT, suggesting that they are more prevalent than recognized in both pre- and postsurgical epilepsy patients. Systematic investigation of these deficits could lead to more refined models of semantic memory, aid in the localization of seizures, and contribute to modifications in surgical technique and patient selection in epilepsy surgery to improve neurocognitive outcome. PMID:18206185

  14. Relationship between delay of surgical diagnosis and severity of disease in patients with symptomatic deep infiltrating endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Sachiko; Canis, Michel; Pouly, Jean-Luc; Rabischong, Benoit; Botchorishvili, Revaz; Mage, Gérard

    2006-11-01

    We investigated relationships between delay of surgical diagnosis and severity of disease in 95 patients with symptomatic deep infiltrating endometriosis. The delay before surgical diagnosis of deep infiltrating endometriosis was significantly longer for patients with advanced stage IV (revised American Society for Reproductive Medicine [ASRM] score >70) disease than for those with stage I, II, III, or IV (revised ASRM score

  15. Patient-Specific Surgical Planning, Where Do We Stand? The Example of the Fontan Procedure.

    PubMed

    de Zélicourt, Diane A; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2016-01-01

    The Fontan surgery for single ventricle heart defects is a typical example of a clinical intervention in which patient-specific computational modeling can improve patient outcome: with the functional heterogeneity of the presenting patients, which precludes generic solutions, and the clear influence of the surgically-created Fontan connection on hemodynamics, it is acknowledged that individualized computational optimization of the post-operative hemodynamics can be of clinical value. A large body of literature has thus emerged seeking to provide clinically relevant answers and innovative solutions, with an increasing emphasis on patient-specific approaches. In this review we discuss the benefits and challenges of patient-specific simulations for the Fontan surgery, reviewing state of the art solutions and avenues for future development. We first discuss the clinical impact of patient-specific simulations, notably how they have contributed to our understanding of the link between Fontan hemodynamics and patient outcome. This is followed by a survey of methodologies for capturing patient-specific hemodynamics, with an emphasis on the challenges of defining patient-specific boundary conditions and their extension for prediction of post-operative outcome. We conclude with insights into potential future directions, noting that one of the most pressing issues might be the validation of the predictive capabilities of the developed framework. PMID:26183962

  16. Vienna international summer school on experimental and clinical oncology for medical students: an Austrian cancer education project.

    PubMed

    Fromm-Haidenberger, Sabine; Pohl, Gudrun; Widder, Joachim; Kren, Gerhard; Fitzal, Florian; Bartsch, Rupert; de Vries, Jakob; Zielinski, Christoph; Pötter, Richard

    2010-03-01

    The "International Summer School on Experimental and Clinical Oncology for Medical Students" is organised at the Medical University of Vienna to teach a multidisciplinary approach to oncology to medical students in the final phase of their studies. The program includes biology, diagnosis, clinical and psycho-oncology. Lectures are given by medical, radiation and surgical oncologists. Teaching includes case reports, poster presentations and role-play. As part of the organising committee, Austrian students organise a social program. Since 1999, six courses have been held (147 students from 19 countries). Students recorded high satisfaction with organisation, scientific content and topic range. Case presentations, poster presentations and role-play were very useful. Early criticism that the program was too intense (long lectures and little interaction) has been answered. The summer school has a high degree of acceptance and is a very useful tool to teach medical students about oncology and approaching a cancer patient. PMID:20082180

  17. Investigation of realistic PET simulations incorporating tumor patient's specificity using anthropomorphic models: Creation of an oncology database

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Efthimiou, Nikos; Nikiforidis, George C.; Kagadis, George C.; Loudos, George; Le Maitre, Amandine; Hatt, Mathieu; Tixier, Florent; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The GATE Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is used for the implementation of realistic PET simulations incorporating tumor heterogeneous activity distributions. The reconstructed patient images include noise from the acquisition process, imaging system's performance restrictions and have limited spatial resolution. For those reasons, the measured intensity cannot be simply introduced in GATE simulations, to reproduce clinical data. Investigation of the heterogeneity distribution within tumors applying partial volume correction (PVC) algorithms was assessed. The purpose of the present study was to create a simulated oncology database based on clinical data with realistic intratumor uptake heterogeneity properties.Methods: PET/CT data of seven oncology patients were used in order to create a realistic tumor database investigating the heterogeneity activity distribution of the simulated tumors. The anthropomorphic models (NURBS based cardiac torso and Zubal phantoms) were adapted to the CT data of each patient, and the activity distribution was extracted from the respective PET data. The patient-specific models were simulated with the Monte Carlo Geant4 application for tomography emission (GATE) in three different levels for each case: (a) using homogeneous activity within the tumor, (b) using heterogeneous activity distribution in every voxel within the tumor as it was extracted from the PET image, and (c) using heterogeneous activity distribution corresponding to the clinical image following PVC. The three different types of simulated data in each case were reconstructed with two iterations and filtered with a 3D Gaussian postfilter, in order to simulate the intratumor heterogeneous uptake. Heterogeneity in all generated images was quantified using textural feature derived parameters in 3D according to the ground truth of the simulation, and compared to clinical measurements. Finally, profiles were plotted in central slices of the tumors, across lines with heterogeneous activity distribution for visual assessment.Results: The accuracy of the simulated database was assessed against the original clinical images. The PVC simulated images matched the clinical ones best. Local, regional, and global features extracted from the PVC simulated images were closest to the clinical measurements, with the exception of the size zone variability and the mean intensity values, where heterogeneous tumors showed better reproducibility. The profiles on PVC simulated tumors after postfiltering seemed to represent the more realistic heterogeneous regions with respect to the clinical reference.Conclusions: In this study, the authors investigated the input activity map heterogeneity in the GATE simulations of tumors with heterogeneous activity distribution. The most realistic heterogeneous tumors were obtained by inserting PVC activity distributions from the clinical image into the activity map of the simulation. Partial volume effect (PVE) can play a crucial role in the quantification of heterogeneity within tumors and have an important impact on applications such as patient follow-up during treatment and assessment of tumor response to therapy. The development of such a database incorporating patient anatomical and functional variability can be used to evaluate new image processing or analysis algorithms, while providing control of the ground truth, which is not available when dealing with clinical datasets. The database includes all images used and generated in this study, as well as the sinograms and the attenuation phantoms for further investigation. It is freely available to the interested reader of the journal at http://www.med.upatras.gr/oncobase/.

  18. Recruiting minority cancer patients into cancer clinical trials: a pilot project involving the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and the National Medical Association. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This paper may be useful for researchers interested in enhancing their interactions with community physicians and increasing the number of minority patients referred to clinical trials. It describes a study conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) in collaboration with the National Medical Association (NMA) to better understand barriers and solutions to African-American (AA) accrual and to test several recommended low-cost strategies.

  19. Oncologic Impact of Fewer Than 12 Lymph Nodes in Patients Who Underwent Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Followed by Total Mesorectal Excision for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Ram; Han, Yoon Dae; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A minimum of 12 harvested lymph nodes (hLNs) are recommended in colorectal cancer. However, a paucity of hLNs is frequently presented after preoperative chemoradiation (pCRT) in rectal cancer and the significance of this is still uncertain. The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of hLNs on long-term oncologic outcomes. A total of 302 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent pCRT and curative resection between 1989 and 2009 were reviewed. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to the number of hLNs: <12 versus ?12 LN. The 2 groups were compared with respect to 5-year disease-free and overall survival. The optimal number or ratio of hLNs was investigated in subgroup analysis according to LN status. The median follow-up was 57 months. Patient characteristics other than age did not differ between the 2 groups. The group with <12 LNs had more favorable ypTNM and ypN stage than those with ?12 LNs. However, the long-term oncologic outcomes were not significantly different between the 2 groups. In subgroup analysis of ypN(?), the group with <5 hLNs had the most favorable oncologic outcomes. In ypN(+) cases, a higher LN ratio tended to be associated with poorer 5-year overall survival. The paucity of hLNs in locally advanced rectal cancer after chemoradiation did not imply poor oncologic outcomes in this study. In addition, <5 hLNs in ypN(?) patients could reflect a good tumor response rather than suboptimal radicality. PMID:26181550

  20. Patient-specific system for prognosis of surgical treatment outcomes of human cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kalinin, Aleksey A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Kossovich, Elena L.; Kossovich, Leonid Y.; Menishova, Liyana R.; Polienko, Asel V.

    2015-03-01

    Object of study: Improvement of life quality of patients with high stroke risk ia the main goal for development of system for patient-specific modeling of cardiovascular system. This work is dedicated at increase of safety outcomes for surgical treatment of brain blood supply alterations. The objects of study are common carotid artery, internal and external carotid arteries and bulb. Methods: We estimated mechanical properties of carotid arteries tissues and patching materials utilized at angioplasty. We studied angioarchitecture features of arteries. We developed and clinically adapted computer biomechanical models, which are characterized by geometrical, physical and mechanical similarity with carotid artery in norm and with pathology (atherosclerosis, pathological tortuosity, and their combination). Results: Collaboration of practicing cardiovascular surgeons and specialists in the area of Mathematics and Mechanics allowed to successfully conduct finite-element modeling of surgical treatment taking into account various features of operation techniques and patching materials for a specific patient. Numerical experiment allowed to reveal factors leading to brain blood supply decrease and atherosclerosis development. Modeling of carotid artery reconstruction surgery for a specific patient on the basis of the constructed biomechanical model demonstrated the possibility of its application in clinical practice at approximation of numerical experiment to the real conditions.

  1. THE SURGICAL TREATMENT METHOD FOR AN ADULT POSTTRAUMATIC THORACOLUMBAR KYPHOSIS PATIENT WITH OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA

    PubMed Central

    WAKAO, NORIMITSU; TAKEUCHI, MIKINOBU; KAMIYA, MITSUHIRO; HIRASAWA, ATSUHIKO; KAWANAMI, KATSUHISA; SATO, KEIJI; TAKAYASU, MASAKAZU

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inheritable bone disorder characterized by osseous fragility and ligamentous laxity. It is sometimes difficult to obtain bone union in patients with OI. The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of posttraumatic kyphosis due to a L1 burst fracture in a patient with OI, and to discuss how to treat it to achieve an adequate correction and circumferential fusion. The patient was a 29-year-old man with OI (Sillence type-IA) who had sustained an L1 fracture when he dived head first into a river. After 3 months of conservative therapy with a body cast, he showed disability at work because of his persistent low back pain and fatigue in his whole back. He showed no neurological disorder. Diagnostic imaging revealed localized kyphotic deformity at L1. Therefore, lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis worsened. Anterior release and fusion, and posterior fusion were conducted. Three months after surgical treatment, circumferential fusion was obtained. His low back pain and fatigue in the whole back disappeared, and he could resume work without any difficulty. From the bone union standpoint, the surgical strategy for spinal correction in OI patients is still controversial because of the intractableness of bone union and fragility of the bone itself. The authors achieved circumferential union using anterior fusion and posterior fusion, in which wide bone bed is available owing to spared posterior elements of the spinal column. PMID:25741043

  2. [Hybrid surgical intervention in a patient with an aortic arch aneurysm and coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Charchan, E R; Abugov, S A; Puretsky, M V; Kim, S Yu; Skvortsov, A A; Khachatryan, Z R

    2015-01-01

    Presented herein is a clinical case report regarding the use of hybrid technology in surgical treatment of a patient with an aneurysm of the distal portion of the aortic arch and coronary artery disease. The patient underwent a hybrid operation, i.e. debranching of the aortic arch branches, exoprosthetic repair of the ascending aorta, autovenous prosthetic coronary bypass grafting of the branch of the blunt edge of the anterior interventricular artery, stenting of the ascending portion, arch and descending portion of the aorta (stent graft "Medtronic Valiant"). In doing so, we used a non-standard approach to connecting the artificial circulation unit and to choosing the place for establishing proximal anastomoses of autovenous coronary bypass grafts. The early postoperative period was complicated by the development of respiratory insufficiency requiring continuation artificial pulmonary ventilation. The duration of the hospital stay of the patient amounted to 15 days. The check-up multispiral computed tomography showed normal functioning of the reconstruction zones, the stent graft is expanded, with no leak observed. The conclusion was made that hybrid interventions may be considered as an alternative to the classical surgical treatment associated in patients of older age group with a severe course of the postoperative period and high lethality. PMID:26035581

  3. [In-patient department technologies in the surgical treatment of outpatients in the conditions of military hospital].

    PubMed

    Andriienko, M M

    2009-01-01

    The study is devoted to a scientific substantiation, development, introduction and management of the system of in-patient department equivalent technologies in surgical treatment of outpatients in the condition of military hospital. The author has shown necessity of wide introduction into practice surgery at pre-hospital stages of military treatment-and-prophylactic service using in-patient equivalent technologies (a day hospital, a hospital in-home, a one-day surgical department) is proved. Components of medical, economic and social efficiency of introduction of a qualitatively new system of surgical treatment provided in outpatient condition of military hospital are presented in the hospital. PMID:20455460

  4. Exploring Predictors of Complication in Older Surgical Patients: A Deficit Accumulation Index and the Braden Scale

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rachel-Rose; Lagoo-Deenadayalan, Sandhya A.; Heflin, Mitchell T.; Sloane, Richard; Eisen, Irvin; Thacker, Julie M.; Whitson, Heather E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether readily collected perioperative information might identify older surgical patients at higher risk for complication. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study SETTING Medical chart review at a single academic institution PARTICIPANTS 102 patients aged 65 years and older who underwent abdominal surgery between January 2007 and December 2009. MEASUREMENTS Primary predictor variables were the first postoperative Braden Scale score (within 24 hours of surgery) and a Deficit Accumulation Index (DAI) constructed based on 39 available preoperative variables. The primary outcome was presence or absence of complication within 30 days of surgery date. RESULTS Of 102 patients, 64 experienced at least one complication with wound infection being the most common complication. In models adjusted for age, race, sex, and open vs. laparoscopic surgery, lower Braden Scale scores were predictive of 30-day postoperative complication (OR 1.30 [CI 95%, 1.06, 1.60]), longer length of stay (â = 1.44 (0.25) days; pvalue = ? 0.0001) and discharge to institution rather than home (OR 1.23 [CI 95%, 1.02, 1.48]). The cut-off value for the Braden Score with the highest predictive value for complication was ? 18 (OR 3.63 [CI 95%, 1.43, 9.19]; c statistic of 0.744). The DAI and several traditional surgical risk factors were not significantly associated with 30-day postoperative complications in this cohort. CONCLUSION This is the first study to identify the perioperative score on the Braden Scale, a widely used risk-stratifier for pressure ulcers, as an independent predictor of other adverse outcomes in geriatric surgical patients. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding as well as investigate other utilizations for this tool, which correlates well to phenotypic models of frailty. PMID:22906222

  5. Detection of Small Pulmonary Nodules with Ultrashort Echo Time Sequences in Oncology Patients by Using a PET/MR System.

    PubMed

    Burris, Nicholas S; Johnson, Kevin M; Larson, Peder E Z; Hope, Michael D; Nagle, Scott K; Behr, Spencer C; Hope, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the utility of a free-breathing ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence for the evaluation of small pulmonary nodules in oncology patients by using a hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system and to compare the nodule detection rate between UTE and a conventional three-dimensional gradient-recalled-echo (GRE) technique. Materials and Methods In this HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved prospective study, 82 pulmonary nodules were identified in eight patients with extrathoracic malignancies. Patients underwent free-breathing UTE and dual-echo three-dimensional GRE imaging of the lungs in a hybrid PET/MR imaging unit immediately after clinical PET/computed tomography (CT). CT was considered the reference standard for nodule detection. Two reviewers identified nodules and obtained measurements on MR images. The McNemar test was used to evaluate differences in nodule detection rate between MR techniques, and interrater agreement was assessed by using Bland-Altman plots. Results Mean nodule diameter ± standard deviation was 6.2 mm ± 2.7 (range, 3-17 mm). The detection rate was higher for UTE imaging than for dual-echo GRE imaging for nodules of at least 4 mm (82% vs 34%, respectively; P < .001), with the largest difference in detection noted in the 4-8-mm nodule group (79% vs 21%, P < .001). UTE imaging displayed a higher detection rate than dual-echo GRE imaging for nodules without fluorodeoxyglucose avidity (68% vs 22%, respectively; P < .001). Interrater reliability of nodule detection with MR imaging was high (? = 0.90 for UTE imaging and ? = 0.92 for dual-echo GRE imaging). Conclusion A free-breathing UTE sequence has high sensitivity for the detection of small pulmonary nodules (4-8 mm) and outperformed a three-dimensional dual-echo GRE technique for the detection of small, non-fluorodeoxyglucose-avid nodules. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26133050

  6. Systematic review of surgical treatment techniques for adult and pediatric patients with pectus excavatum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This compares outcome measures of current pectus excavatum (PEx) treatments, namely the Nuss and Ravitch procedures, in pediatric and adult patients. Original investigations that stratified PEx patients based on current treatment and age (pediatric?=?0–21; adult 17–99) were considered for inclusion. Outcome measures were: operation duration, analgesia duration, blood loss, length of stay (LOS), outcome ratings, complications, and percentage requiring reoperations. Adult implant patients (18.8%) had higher reoperation rates than adult Nuss or Ravitch patients (5.3% and 3.3% respectively). Adult Nuss patients had longer LOS (7.3 days), more strut/bar displacement (6.1%), and more epidural analgesia (3 days) than adult Ravitch patients (2.9 days, 0%, 0 days). Excluding pectus bar and strut displacements, pediatric and adult Nuss patients tended to have higher complication rates (pediatric - 38%; adult - 21%) compared to pediatric and adult Ravitch patients (12.5%; 8%). Pediatric Ravitch patients clearly had more strut displacements than adult Ravitch patients (0% and 6.4% respectively). These results suggest significantly better results in common PEx surgical repair techniques (i.e. Nuss and Ravitch) than uncommon techniques (i.e. Implants and Robicsek). The results suggest slightly better outcomes in pediatric Nuss procedure patients as compared with all other groups. We recommend that symptomatic pediatric patients with uncomplicated PEx receive the Nuss procedure. We suggest that adult patients receive the Nuss or Ravitch procedure, even though the long-term complication rates of the adult Nuss procedure require more investigation. PMID:24506826

  7. The Impact of Workers' Compensation on Outcomes of Surgical and Nonoperative Therapy for Patients with a Lumbar Disc Herniation SPORT

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Steven J.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Blood, Emily A.; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Pransky, Glenn S.; Weinstein, James N.

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Prospective randomized and observational cohorts. Objective To compare outcomes of patients with and without workers' compensation who had surgical and nonoperative treatment for a lumbar intervertebral disc herniation (IDH). Summary of Background Data Few studies have examined the association between worker's compensation and outcomes of surgical and nonoperative treatment. Methods Patients with at least 6 weeks of sciatica and a lumbar IDH were enrolled in either a randomized trial or observational cohort at 13 US spine centers. Patients were categorized as workers' compensation or nonworkers' compensation based on baseline disability compensation and work status. Treatment was usual nonoperative care or surgical discectomy. Outcomes included pain, functional impairment, satisfaction and work/disability status at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results Combining randomized and observational cohorts, 113 patients with workers' compensation and 811 patients without were followed for 2 years. There were significant improvements in pain, function, and satisfaction with both surgical and nonoperative treatment in both groups. In the nonworkers' compensation group, there was a clinically and statistically significant advantage for surgery at 3 months that remained significant at 2 years. However, in the workers' compensation group, the benefit of surgery diminished with time; at 2 years no significant advantage was seen for surgery in any outcome (treatment difference for SF-36 bodily pain [?5.9; 95% CI: ?16.7–4.9] and physical function [5.0; 95% CI: ?4.9–15]). Surgical treatment was not associated with better work or disability outcomes in either group. Conclusion Patients with a lumbar IDH improved substantially with both surgical and nonoperative treatment. However, there was no added benefit associated with surgical treatment for patients with workers' compensation at 2 years while those in the nonworkers' compensation group had significantly greater improvement with surgical treatment. PMID:20023603

  8. Digital multimedia books produced using iBooks Author for pre-operative surgical patient information.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Matthew; Wilkinson, Caroline; Golash, Aprajay

    2014-10-01

    Presenting patients with medical information and ensuring informed consent can be difficult due to patients with varying levels of literacy, physical and mental disabilities and spoken languages. Patients obtaining information from external sources, such as the internet, can also be problematic as the information can be irrelevant, inaccurate or misleading. A patient satisfaction study was performed in order to assess the effectiveness of using ebooks in order to communicate pre and post surgical information to neurosurgical patients. 3 digital books were produced using iBooks Author (a free desktop publishing program designed by Apple) including ACDF (anterior cervical discectomy and fusion), lumbar laminectomy and lumbar discectomy. Each book contained written information organised into sections and chapters along with an array of multimedia elements including 3D animations, interactive diagrams, 3D models of anatomy and patient experience videos. 32 volunteer patients were then presented with the digital books via an iPad during their preoperative assessment and then asked to complete a questionnaire. The results demonstrated a demand for this type of digital presentation of medical information and also showed patients no longer felt the need to seek further information from external sources. PMID:25390936

  9. Impact of perioperative probiotic treatment for surgical site infections in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    AISU, NAOYA; TANIMURA, SHU; YAMASHITA, YUICHI; YAMASHITA, KANEFUMI; MAKI, KENJI; YOSHIDA, YOICHIRO; SASAKI, TAKAMITSU; TAKENO, SHINSUKE; HOSHINO, SEIICHIRO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the effect of the perioperative administration of probiotics in patients undergoing colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery. The study focused on a total of 156 consecutive surgeries carried out from among all the elective CRC surgeries performed between April 2009 and March 2013. The patients involved in surgeries undertaken between April 2009 and October 2011 were placed in the non-probiotic group (group A, 81 patients) and those involved in surgeries between November 2011 and March 2013 were placed in the probiotic group (group B, 75 patients). Postoperative infectious complications were recorded, and the immune responses and fecal microbiota were determined. A breakdown of infectious complications showed that 21 (13.5%) patients experienced superficial incisional surgical site infections (SSIs), of which 16 patients were from group A (19.8%), and five patients from group B (6.7%) (P=0.016). The ImmuKnow® adenosine triphosphate values peaked on the first postoperative day (POD) in both groups. In group A, the ImmuKnow value of the first POD was increased significantly compared with the preoperative value (P=0.022). In group B, the value of the first POD did not increase compared with the preoperative value (P=0.28). In conclusion, probiotic treatment can reduce superficial incisional SSIs in patients undergoing CRC surgery. Perioperative probiotic treatment can enhance immune responses and improve the intestinal microbial environment. PMID:26622423

  10. Impact of intraoperative parathyroid hormone levels on surgical results in patients with renal hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Weber, Theresia; Zeier, Martin; Hinz, Ulf; Schilling, Tobias; Büchler, Markus W

    2005-09-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of intraoperative parathyroid hormone (PTH) measurement on surgical results in patients with renal hyperparathyroidism (HPT). From December 1999 to February 2004, a series of 95 consecutive patients underwent total parathyroidectomy and intraoperative PTH measurement for renal HPT. Intraoperative PTH was measured before and 15 minutes after parathyroidectomy with the Immulite DPC assay for intact PTH. The median PTH levels before surgery were 133.0 pmol/L, which declined to 5.9 pmol/L at the end of the operation. At follow-up, 91 of 95 (96%) patients presented with normal calcium levels. Persistent renal HPT was seen in three patients, and recurrent HPT was diagnosed in another. In 99% of the patients the intraoperative PTH levels declined more than 50% and in 73% the PTH decay was more than 90%. In 64% of the patients PTH levels dropped into the normal range (< 7.6 pmol/L). Altogether, 97% of the patients with an intraoperative PTH decrease of more than 90% presented with normal PTH levels postoperatively (p = 0.0237), as did all of the patients whose intraoperative PTH dropped into the normal range (p = 0.0432). Intraoperative PTH measurement with a decrease in intraoperative PTH of at least 90% is highly predictive of successful parathyroidectomy and normalization of postoperative calcium and PTH levels. PMID:16132402

  11. Qualitative approach to patient-reported outcomes in oncology: protocol of a French study

    PubMed Central

    Orri, Massimiliano; Sibeoni, Jordan; Labey, Mathilde; Bousquet, Guilhem; Verneuil, Laurence; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The past decade has been characterised by movement from a doctor-centred to a patient-centred approach to treatment outcomes, in which doctors try to see the illness through their patients’ eyes. Patients, family members and doctors are the three participants in cancer care, but their perspectives about what have been helpful during cancer treatment have never simultaneously and explicitly compared in the same qualitative study. The aim of this study project is to explore patients’ perspectives about the care they receive, as well as families’ and doctors’ perspectives about what have been helpful for the patient. These three points of view will be compared and contrasted in order to analyse the convergences and divergences in these perspectives. Methods and analysis This is a national multicentre qualitative study. Participants will be constituted by three different subsamples: (1) patients with cancer (skin, breast, urological and lung cancers), (2) their relatives, and (3) their referring physicians. Recruitment will follow the purposive sample technique, and the final sample size will be determined by data saturation. Data will be collected through open-ended semistructured interviews and independently analysed with NVivo V.10 software by three researchers according to the principles of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Ethics and dissemination The research protocol received approval from the University Paris Descartes review board (IRB number: 20140600001072), and participants will provide written consent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to focus on the simultaneous exploration of the separate points of view of patients, families and doctors about the care received during the cancer care journey. We expect that our findings will help to improve communication and relationships between doctors, patients and families. Comparison of these three points of view will provide information about the convergences and divergences of these perspectives and how to address the needs of all three groups. PMID:26163035

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predictors of Surgical Outcome in Patients with Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Jon D.; Moses, Rachel A.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Carragee, Eugene J.; Carrino, John A.; Kaiser, Jay A.; Herzog, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective cohort design Objective To determine if baseline MRI findings including central/foraminal stenosis, Modic change, disc morphology, facet arthropathy, disc degeneration, nerve root impingement, and thecal sac compression are associated with differential surgical treatment effect. Summary of Background Data Intervertebral Disc Herniation (IDH)remains the most common source of lumbar radiculopathy treated either with discectomy or non-operative intervention. Although MRI remains the reliable gold standard for diagnosis, uncertainty surrounds the relationship between MRI findings and treatment outcomes. Methods Three-hundred-and-seven “complete” images from patients enrolled in a previous trial were de-identified and evaluated by one of 4 independent readers. Findings were compared to outcome measures including the Oswestry Disability Index. Differences in surgery and non-operative treatment outcomes were evaluated between image characteristic subgroups and TE determined by the difference in ODI scores. Results The cohort was comprised of 40% females with an average age of 41.5 (±11.6), 61% of which underwent discectomy for IDH. Patients undergoing surgery with Modic type I endplate changes had worse outcomes (?26.4 versus ?39.7 for none and ?39.2 for type 2, p=0.002) and smaller treatment effect (?3.5 versus ?19.3 for none and ?15.7 for type 2, p=0.003). Those with compression >=1/3 showed the greatest improvement within the surgical group (?41.9 for >=1/3 versus ?31.6 for none and ?38.1 for <1/3,p=0.007), and the highest TE (?23 compared to ?11.7 for none and ?15.2 for <1/3, p=0.015). Furthermore, patients with minimal nerve root impingement demonstrated worse surgical outcomes(?26.5 versus ?41.1 for “displaced” and ?38.9 for “compressed”, p=0.016). Conclusion Among patients with IDH, those with thecal sac compression >=1/3 had greater surgical treatment effect than those with small disc herniations and Modic type I changes. Additionally, patients with nerve root “compression” and “displacement” benefit more from surgery than those with minimal nerve-root impingement. PMID:23429684

  13. New Applications of Radioguided Surgery in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Lima, Eduardo Nóbrega Pereira; Pinto, Paula Nicole Vieira; Martins, Eduardo Bruno Lobato; Chojniak, Rubens

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report oncological cases (excluding those related to breast cancer) for which radioguided surgery has been used in combination with the Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique. INTRODUCTION: Radioguided surgery enables a surgeon to identify lesions or tissues that have been preoperatively marked with radioactive substances. The Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique has been widely used to identify the sentinel lymph node and occult lesions in patients with breast cancer. However, few studies have reported the use of this technique for non-breast cancer pathologies. METHODOLOGY: In all cases, injection of Technecium-99m sulfur colloid was performed, directly inside or near by the suspicious lesion, guided by ultrasound or computed tomography, up to 36 hours prior to the surgical procedure. Intraoperative lesion detection was carried out using a gamma-probe. RESULTS: We report five oncology cases in which preoperative markings of the lesions were carried out using the Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique. The patients presented with the following: recurrence of renal cell carcinoma, cervical recurrence of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid, recurrence of retroperitoneal sarcoma, lesions of the popliteal fossa, and recurrence of rhabdomyosarcoma of a thigh. In each case, the lesions that were marked preoperatively were ultimately successfully excised. CONCLUSIONS: Radioguided surgery has proven to be a safe and effective alternative for the management of oncology patients. The Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique can be useful in selected cases where suspect lesions may be difficult to identify intraoperatively, due to their dimensions or anatomical location. The procedure allows for more conservative excisions and reduces the surgery-related morbidity. PMID:19488604

  14. Transition of care in pediatric surgical patients with complex gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Muise, Eleanor D; Cowles, Robert A

    2015-04-01

    Pediatric surgeons provide care for infants and children with a wide variety of conditions throughout the body. Many of these conditions are congenital or occur very early in life, and for this reason, providing continuity of care for these patients into adulthood is an emerging challenge. In the gastrointestinal tract, congenital and acquired conditions are now associated with excellent long-term prognosis; however, little guidance on long-term care exists. The aim of this article is to discuss aspects that are important to transitioning care of pediatric surgical patients with complex gastrointestinal disorders from pediatric to adult practitioners. Transitional care of patients with short bowel syndrome, Hirschsprung Disease, and anorectal malformations will be the focus of this discussion, but the concepts introduced here may translate to other diagnoses as well. PMID:25770365

  15. Management of patients with psoriasis treated with biological drugs needing a surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Fabiano, Antonella; De Simone, Clara; Gisondi, Paolo; Piaserico, Stefano; Lasagni, Claudia; Pellacani, Giovanni; Conti, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) is a cytokine that plays a critical role in inflammatory and immune processes and in the control of infections and sepsis. Data on the perioperative management of patients treated with biologic drugs are limited and mainly in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This retrospective study assesses variations in the incidence of side effects between psoriatic patients who temporarily discontinue or continue biological therapy before surgical treatment. Despite the immunosuppressive risk, our results suggest that postoperative complications are not influenced by the suspension of biologic therapies. As TNF-? plays a role in promoting collagen synthesis and wound healing, we suggest that anti-TNFs should be discontinued before major surgery, whereas for minor surgery, the lower rates of infections favor anti-TNF-? continuation, particularly since suspending anti-TNF therapy is known to induce psoriasis relapse. PMID:25381969

  16. Prognostic Factors of Cholangiocarcinoma After Surgical Resection: A Retrospective Study of 293 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhi-yuan; Guo, Xiao-chuan; Su, Dan; Wang, Li-jie; Zhang, Ting-ting; Bai, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma is one of the most common malignancies in China. Surgical resection is the only treatment option; however, diagnosis at advanced stage precludes surgery. Comprehensive knowledge of prognostic markers is missing. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine clinicopathological indexes that would be indicative of prognosis in post-operative cases of cholangiocarcinoma. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis of 293 cases of cholangiocarcinoma patients attending the 301 Military Hospital in Beijing, China between January 2004 and December 2010 were included in the study. The patients had follow-up history until August 2012. Cox proportional hazards model analysis was performed to identify indexes of prognosis. All indicators were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results The median follow-up time was 55.90 months, with recurrence and metastasis in 162 cases (55.3%) and death in 223 cases (76.1%). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year survival rates were 71.7%, 38.2%, and 10.6%, respectively. The independent risk factors of overall survival were degree of tumor differentiation, TNM stage, surgical margin, intraoperative blood transfusion, tumor location, alkaline phosphatase levels in blood, and relapse. Conclusions Good prognosis in cholangiocarcinoma patients is indicated by highly differentiated tumor, early stages of TNM staging, no resection margin invaded, no intraoperative blood transfusion, intrahepatic tumor, normal alkaline phosphatase levels, and no relapse. PMID:26269932

  17. The importance of cleanrooms for the treatment of haemato-oncological patients

    PubMed Central

    Matoušková, Ivanka

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of cleanrooms in health care centres is to prevent hospital infections or leakage of a highly infectious agent (the source of haemorrhagic fevers, SARS, etc.) into the ambient environment and subsequently possibly threatening other individuals. Patients with haematological malignancies or after autologous or allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) rank among immunosuppressed individuals. Prolonged and deep neutropenia is considered a key risk factor of the occurrence of an exogenous infection. One of the possibilities of preventing an exogenous infection in these patients is to place them in a “cleanroom” for the crucial period of time. Cleanrooms are intensive care units with reverse isolation. The final part of the general article below provides an overview of the technology and types of cleanrooms for immunosuppressed patients in compliance with the current recommendations and technical standards. PMID:23788892

  18. A decision support system for quality of life in head and neck oncology patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The assessment of Quality of Life (QoL) is a Medical goal; it is used in clinical research, medical practice, health-related economic studies and in planning health management measures and strategies. The objective of this project is to develop an informational platform to achieve a patient self-assessment with standardized QoL measuring instruments, through friendly software, easy for the user to adapt, which should aid the study of QoL, by promoting the creation of databases and accelerating its statistical treatment and yet generating subsequent useful results in graphical format for the physician analyzes in an appointment immediately after the answers collection. Methods First, a software platform was designed and developed in an action-research process with patients, physicians and nurses. The computerized patient self-assessment with standardized QoL measuring instruments was compared with traditional one, to verify if its use did not influence the patient's answers. For that, the Wilcoxon and t-Student tests were applied. After, we adopted and adapted the mathematic Rash model to make possible the use of QoL measure in the routine appointments. Results The results show that the computerized patient self-assessment does not influence the patient's answers and can be used as a suitable tool in the routine appointment, because indicates problems which are more difficult to identify in a traditional appointment, improving thus the physician's decisions. Conclusions The possibility of representing graphically useful results that physician needs to analyze in the appointment, immediately after the answer collection, in an useful time, makes this QoL assessment platform a diagnosis instrument ready to be used routinely in clinical practice. PMID:22340746

  19. Intensive medical student involvement in short-term surgical trips provides safe and effective patient care: a case review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The hierarchical nature of medical education has been thought necessary for the safe care of patients. In this setting, medical students in particular have limited opportunities for experiential learning. We report on a student-faculty collaboration that has successfully operated an annual, short-term surgical intervention in Haiti for the last three years. Medical students were responsible for logistics and were overseen by faculty members for patient care. Substantial planning with local partners ensured that trip activities supplemented existing surgical services. A case review was performed hypothesizing that such trips could provide effective surgical care while also providing a suitable educational experience. Findings Over three week-long trips, 64 cases were performed without any reported complications, and no immediate perioperative morbidity or mortality. A plurality of cases were complex urological procedures that required surgical skills that were locally unavailable (43%). Surgical productivity was twice that of comparable peer institutions in the region. Student roles in patient care were greatly expanded in comparison to those at U.S. academic medical centers and appropriate supervision was maintained. Discussion This demonstration project suggests that a properly designed surgical trip model can effectively balance the surgical needs of the community with an opportunity to expose young trainees to a clinical and cross-cultural experience rarely provided at this early stage of medical education. Few formalized programs currently exist although the experience above suggests the rewarding potential for broad-based adoption. PMID:21884604

  20. Optimising the Pre-Operative Investigative Work Up for Elective Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hack-Adams, Nadine; king, natalie; Ahuja, Manisha; M Higgs, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Effective pre-operative assessment of patients awaiting elective surgery should entail appropriate use of scarce NHS resources, as well as underpin patient safety. The pre-operative admissions service in district general hospitals is often junior doctor led, with a new cohort of clinicians taking over its running every four months. Lack of familiarity on the part of these clinicians with the investigative work up required for certain surgical procedures often results in over investigation of patients in the pre-admission setting, wasting time and NHS resources. A retrospective audit of 53 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy over a representative two month period demonstrated that 33% of patients received unnecessary pre-admission blood tests, including clotting screen and ‘group and save’. Design and implementation of a “Pre-Admission Handbook”, for use by junior doctors and nurse practitioners in the pre-operative setting, reduced the rate of over investigation to 12% in a subsequent, prospective audit cycle of 50 patients, and has improved patient care by standardising the pre-admissions process for elective surgery at Gloucester Royal Hospital.

  1. Inpatient surgical treatment patterns for patients with uterine fibroids in the United States, 1998-2002.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Edmund R.; Spalding, James; DuChane, Janeen; Horowitz, Ira R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the impact of patient and organizational characteristics on surgical treatment patterns for patients with uterine fibroids. METHODS: Unadjusted means and percentages were calculated from a population-based inpatient sample (HCUPNIS). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the prevalence odds ratios for the association of uterine fibroid treatments and covariates of interest. RESULTS: More than 1.2 million patients with a primary diagnosis of uterine fibroids were treated from 1998 to 2002. Of these, 84.4% received a hysterectomy and 12.3% received a myomectomy. Total abdominal hysterectomy was the most common procedure. The number of supracervical hysterectomies increased 18.1% over the five-year period. Black women and Asians/Pacific Islanders were more likely than white women to receive a myomectomy. All types of hysterectomies were more common in Medicaid patients compared with private/HMO patients. With the exception of patients in ZIP codes with a median income of <$25,000 per year, an inverse relationship was identified between income and hysterectomy rates. CONCLUSIONS: The management of uterine fibroids appears to differ across a variety of socioeconomic factors and institutional characteristics. This study suggests that additional research should be conducted to assess the impact of nonclinical factors on treatment decisions for patients with uterine fibroids. PMID:16353655

  2. Intrahepatic biliary cystic neoplasms: Surgical results of 9 patients and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Emre, Ali; Serin, Kür?at Rahmi; Özden, ?lgin; Tekant, Yaman; Bilge, Orhan; Alper, Ayd?n; Güllüo?lu, Mine; Güven, Koray

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the eligible management of the cystic neplasms of the liver. METHODS: The charts of 9 patients who underwent surgery for intrahepatic biliary cystic liver neoplasms between 2003 and 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. Informed consent was obtained from the patients and approval was obtained from the designated review board of the institution. RESULTS: All patients were female with a median (range) age of 49 (27-60 years). The most frequent symptom was abdominal pain in 6 of the patients. Four patients had undergone previous laparotomy (with other diagnoses) which resulted in incomplete surgery or recurrences. Liver resection (n = 6) or enucleation (n = 3) was performed. The final diagnosis was intrahepatic biliary cystadenoma in 8 patients and cystadenocarcinoma in 1 patient. All symptoms resolved after surgery. There has been no recurrence during a median (range) 31 (7-72) mo of follow up. CONCLUSION: In spite of the improvement in imaging modalities and increasing recognition of biliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma, accurate preoperative diagnosis may be difficult. Complete surgical removal (liver resection or enucleation) of these lesions yields satisfying long-term results. PMID:21253396

  3. [The use of negative pressure wound therapy in patients with infectious surgical complications of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Zavatski?, V V; Novitski?, A S

    2014-01-01

    In the Russian Federation diabetes affects about 11 million people. The frequency of amputation in patients with diabetes in Russia varies from 0.76 to 18.2 per 1.000 patients. From 48.9% to 60% are large amputation in which postoperative mortality reaches 50% and more. Up to half of all patients with diabetes have the defeat of major vessels of lower extremities with the formation of ischemic and neuroischemic forms of the diabetic foot syndrome. These patients are the most difficult and to save limbs need for revascularization. However, the existing algorithms of treatment of such patients do not take into account possible combination of such important pathogenetic factors, as ischemia, the prevalence of purulent-necrotic lesion of the tissues of the foot and the severity of clinical course of surgical infection. Also still not finally defined the sequence of execution of revascularization and rehabilitation of necrotic tissue, there are no indications for the use of new effective methods of treatment and rehabilitation of wounds in patients with diabetic foot. From the above, pathogenetic factors, the authors have developed a personalized Protocol of treatment of patients with ischemic and neuroischemic forms of the diabetic foot, the indications and conditions for holding therapy negative pressure. Efficiency of the proposed Protocol is accompanied by clinical examples. PMID:25484158

  4. Surgical Site Infection Caused by Aeromonas hydrophila in a Patient with Underlying Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Frincy Khandelwal; Ahmed, Nishat Hussain; Grover, Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonas skin and soft tissue infections in cancer patients can lead to serious life threatening conditions such as cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis and myonecrosis. We report here a case of surgical site infection, post radical mastectomy, in a 58-year-old female with carcinoma breast. Cultures of exudates from the wound grew Aeromonas hydrophila on repeated occasions. Recovery was uneventful following targeted antimicrobial therapy and regular dressing of the wound. Early suspicion, diagnosis, and treatment with potent antibiotics are needed to prevent any further complications resulting from infection by this emerging pathogen. PMID:25737989

  5. Early outcome and predictors of early outcome in patients treated surgically for central cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Kong, Christopher; Schroeder, Gregory D; Hjelm, Nikolaus; Sayadipour, Amir; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Anderson, D Greg

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The purpose of this study was to characterize changes in American Spinal Injury Association motor score (AMS) in the 1st week after traumatic central cord syndrome (CCS) to identify predictors of improved early outcome in patients treated with early versus delayed surgical intervention. METHODS All patients presenting to a regional spinal cord injury center between January 2004 and June 2009 were queried for those with a diagnosis of CCS. Patients treated conservatively were excluded. A prospectively maintained spinal cord injury database was used to track AMS throughout each patient's hospitalization. Hospital records provided information regarding demographics, presenting neurological examination, imaging findings, comorbidities, timing and nature of surgical procedures, and length of stay (LOS) in the hospital and intensive care unit (ICU). Patients were separated into those who underwent early surgery, within 1 day of presentation (early group), and those who underwent surgery on a delayed basis (delayed group). Differences between groups were analyzed using the Student t-test and chi-square test. Predictors of outcome were identified using correlation analysis and multiple linear regression. RESULTS Of 426 patients in the database, 80 (18.8%) were diagnosed as having CCS, and 68 of them ultimately underwent surgical decompression. Nineteen (28%) of 68 patients underwent surgery within 1 day of presentation (early group) while the remaining 49 patients (72%) underwent surgery on a delayed basis (delayed group). The mean age in the early group was significantly younger than that of the delayed group (52 vs 59 years, p = 0.049). Other characteristics were similar between groups including sex, proportion of patients with cord edema on MRI (44% early vs 55% delayed, p = 0.47), and proportion of patients with cervical fracture (26% early vs 28% delayed, p = 0.98). Patients in the early group presented with an AMS of 62.5 versus 70.0 for the delayed group (p = 0.36). No difference in the change in AMS was seen at 7 days between the early group (-2.9 points) and the delayed group (-4.2 points) (p = 0.34). Additionally, the number of patients who had early improvement was similar between the early and delayed groups (50% vs 48%, respectively, p = 0.94). Neither time in the ICU (3.4 vs 3.4 days, p = 0.84) nor the overall LOS (10.5 vs 12.5 days, p = 0.59) was different in the early versus delayed groups, respectively. Correlation analysis and multiple linear regression demonstrated early surgery was not associated with change in AMS or AMS at Day 7. Age was identified as the only significant predictor of change in AMS and had a negative effect (coefficient = -0.34, p = 0.025). CONCLUSIONS Early treatment of patients with CCS remains controversial. Although some long-term neurological recovery is expected in patients with a CCS, surgeons and patients should not expect early neurological improvement with or without early operative intervention. PMID:26161520

  6. Predictors of early treatment discontinuation in patients enrolled on Phase I oncology trials

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Mrinal M.; Pamer, Erika G.; Pettiford, Jasmine; Carvajal, Richard D.; Ivy, S. Percy; Iasonos, Alexia; Spriggs, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Patients who do not complete one cycle of therapy on Phase I trials for reasons other than dose limiting toxicity (DLT) are considered inevaluable for toxicity and must be replaced. Methods Individual records from patients enrolled to NCI-sponsored Phase I trials activated between 2000 and 2010 were used. Early discontinuation was defined as the failure to begin cycle 2 for reasons other than a DLT during cycle 1. A multinomial logistic regression with a 3-level nominal outcome (early discontinuation, DLT during cycle 1, and continuation to cycle 2) was used with continuation to cycle 2 serving as the reference category. The final model was used to create two risk scores. An independent external cohort was used to validate these models. Results Data from 3079 patients on 127 Phase I trials were analyzed. ECOG performance status (1, ? 2, two-sided P = .0315 and P = .0007), creatinine clearance (<60 ml/min, P = .0455), alkaline phosphatase (>2.5xULN, P = .0026), AST (>ULN, P = .0076), hemoglobin (<10 g/dL, P < .0001), albumin (< 3.5 g/dL, P < .0001), and platelets (<400x109/L, P = .0732) were predictors of early discontinuation. The c-index of the final model was 0.63. Conclusion Knowledge of risk factors for early treatment discontinuation in conjunction with clinical judgment can help guide Phase I patient selection. PMID:25682870

  7. Violent Behavior in Cancer Patients--A Rarely Addressed Phenomenon in Oncological Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grube, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dealing with violent cancer patients can be particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to collect data on the frequency, quality, and underlying variables affecting violent behavior as well as to examine the role played by this behavior in the premature interruption of treatment. A total of 388 cancer inpatients were examined by…

  8. Surgical technique in cadaveric donors for partial hand allotransplant in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, M; Butrón, P; Santander-Flores, S; Ricaño-Enciso, D; Negrete-Najar, J P; Pérez-Monzó, M F; González-Chávez, A; González-Chávez, M; de Rienzo-Madero, B; Hamdan-Pérez, N

    2010-01-01

    For patients with severe hand deformities due to rheumatoid arthritis, we propose an allotransplantation of an osteomyotendinose structure (OMTS), preserving the recipient's skin and sensory nerves. Our objective was to develop the surgical technique in a 10 cadavers, five as donors and five as recipients. The donor's hand was 10% to 15% smaller than the recipient's. Dissections were performed by two surgical teams under magnification. In the donor, the OMTS was procured at the distal third of the forearm, maintaining the integrity of the arterial system, with its concomitant veins and motor branches of the median and ulnar nerves, leaving the skin envelope. In the recipient, the OMTS was removed, taking care to preserve the cutaneous cover with the digital arteries in continuity with the superficial palmar arch and radial and ulnar arteries. Also, the digital nerves were maintained in the skin flap, in continuity with the median and ulnar nerves. Their motor branches were divided after emergence from the main nerves. The superficial dorsal veins and radial nerve were kept adhered to the cutaneous cover. Then, the donor OMTS was placed within the recipient cutaneous flap; all the anatomic structures were repaired. The average surgical time was 780 minutes. Methylene blue was present in the digital arteries. There were no difficulties in the anatomic repair. The surgical technique is quite laborious, especially the dissection of the recipient interdigital spaces. Due to the requirement for arterial system integrity, the cutaneous flap must be viable. Also, the allotransplanted OMTS has all necessary conditions to obtain good tissue perfusion for subsequent function. Procurement without skin permits a greater opportunity to find donors, and greater social and personal acceptance by the recipient. PMID:20692487

  9. SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS: THE NEED FOR CAREFUL PATIENT SELECTION

    PubMed Central

    Kokong, DD; Adoga, AA; Bakari, A; Okundia, PO; Onakoya, PA; Nwaorgu, OGB

    2015-01-01

    Background Vocal cord paralysis is one of the challenging laryngeal clinical entities confronting the Laryngologist and indeed, the Phono-surgeon. The ability to maintain an effective balance between voice and airway function to ensure good quality of life requires expertise. This study is therefore designed to highlight our experience on surgical management of vocal cord paralysis. Method Clinical notes of all patients that met the inclusion criteria for this study on vocal cord paralysis over a ten-year period were analysed. Data was generated from patients’ case files retrieved using standard codes according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Results From the 7,941 new ENT cases seen, 26 patients had vocal cord paralysis (VCP) giving a prevalence of 0.3%. The male to female ratio was 1: 4.2 with a mean age of 45.7years ± 6.3. Their ages ranged from 21–80 years. Thyroidectomy was the main causal factor in 46.2% while idiopathic causes was documented in 23.1%. Twenty-three patients (88.5%) had unilateral VCP from which 21(91.3%) were abductor paralysis. The ratio of Left: Right VCP was 3:1. All the 3 bilateral cases were abductor paralysis. Neurotropic agents only, were effective in cases of unilateral VCP. However, in those with bilateral paralysis, two had tracheostomy only, while the third had a laryngo-fissure, arytenoidoplasty and endo-laryngeal stenting in addition. All were successfully decannulated with good voice quality. Conclusion With these observations, we suggest the choice of appropriate surgical technique, timing and careful patient selection in order to preserve voice, curtail operative sequelae and achieve good quality of life (QoL) which is the overall management strategy, be borne in mind.

  10. Evaluation of prognostic value of selected biochemical markers in surgically treated patients with acute mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    Jab?o?ski, S?awomir; Brocki, Marian; Krzysztof, Kujawski; Wawrzycki, Marcin; Santorek-Strumi??o, Edyta; ?obos, Marek; Kozakiewicz, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Monitoring of biochemical markers of inflammation in acute mediastinitis (AM) can be useful in the modification of treatment. This study was a retrospective evaluation of selected biochemical parameters with negative impact on the prognosis in surgically treated patients. Material/Methods There were 44 consecutive patients treated surgically due to AM of differentiated etiology. Selected biochemical markers (WBC, RBC, HGB, HCT, PLT, CRP, PCT, ionogram, protein and albumins) were assessed before surgery and on the 3rd day after surgery. ANOVA was applied to find factors influencing observations. Numerical data [laboratory parameters] were compared by means of medians. Results The overall hospital mortality rate was 31.82%. In the group of dead patients, there were observed statistically significant lower mean preoperative values of RBC [p=0.0090], HGB [p=0.0286], HCT [p=0.0354], protein [p= 0.0037], albumins [p=0.0003] and sodium [p<0.0001] and elevated values of CRP [P=0.0107] and PCT p<0.0001]. High level of inflammatory markers on day 3 after surgery was found to increase the risk of death – for WBC (by 67%), for CRP (by 88%) and for PCT (by 100%). Conclusions Poor prognosis was more frequent in patients with preoperative high levels of CRP, PCT, anemia, hypoproteinemia and hyponatremia. The risk of death increases significantly if in the immediate postoperative period no distinct decrease in WBC count and of the CRP and PCT level is observed. In such a situation the patients should be qualified earlier for broadened diagnostic workup and for reoperation. PMID:22534711

  11. Study of multiparameter respiratory pattern complexity in surgical critically ill patients during weaning trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Separation from mechanical ventilation is a difficult task, whereas conventional predictive indices have not been proven accurate enough, so far. A few studies have explored changes of breathing pattern variability for weaning outcome prediction, with conflicting results. In this study, we tried to assess respiratory complexity during weaning trials, using different non-linear methods derived from theory of complex systems, in a cohort of surgical critically ill patients. Results Thirty two patients were enrolled in the study. There were 22 who passed and 10 who failed a weaning trial. Tidal volume and mean inspiratory flow were analyzed for 10 minutes during two phases: 1. pressure support (PS) ventilation (15-20 cm H2O) and 2. weaning trials with PS: 5 cm H2O. Sample entropy (SampEn), detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) exponent, fractal dimension (FD) and largest lyapunov exponents (LLE) of the two respiratory parameters were computed in all patients and during the two phases of PS. Weaning failure patients exhibited significantly decreased respiratory pattern complexity, reflected in reduced sample entropy and lyapunov exponents and increased DFA exponents of respiratory flow time series, compared to weaning success subjects (p < 0.001). In addition, their changes were opposite between the two phases of the weaning trials. A new model including rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI), its product with airway occlusion pressure at 0.1 sec (P0.1), SampEn and LLE predicted better weaning outcome compared with RSBI, P0.1 and RSBI* P0.1 (conventional model, R2 = 0.874 vs 0.643, p < 0.001). Areas under the curve were 0.916 vs 0.831, respectively (p < 0.05). Conclusions We suggest that complexity analysis of respiratory signals can assess inherent breathing pattern dynamics and has increased prognostic impact upon weaning outcome in surgical patients. PMID:21255420

  12. Social Media and Oncology: The Past, Present, and Future of Electronic Communication Between Physician and Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mark A; Dicker, Adam P

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between patient and physician is in flux with the advent of electronic media that are advancing and enhancing communication. We perform a retrospective, current, and forward-looking examination of the technologies by which information is exchanged within the healthcare community. The evolution from e-mail and listservs to blogs and the modern social networks is described, with emphasis on the advantages and pitfalls of each medium, especially in regard to maintaining the standards of privacy and professionalism to which doctors are held accountable. We support the use of contemporary platforms like Twitter and Facebook for physicians to establish themselves as trustworthy online sources of medical knowledge, and anticipate ongoing collaboration between researchers, patients, and their advocates in trial design and accrual. PMID:26433557

  13. Toxocarosis and putative DRESS syndrome in an oncological patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wutte, Nora; Palfner, Michael; Auer, Herbert; Ruckenbauer, Gerald; Valentin, Thomas; Seeber, Katharina; Aberer, Werner; Krause, Robert; Hoenigl, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Toxocarosis is a parasitic infection caused by Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati. Their definite hosts are the domestic dog and cat, where their adult forms live within the lumen of the small intestine. In humans, infective larvae hatch after ingestion of eggs, but the juvenile stages fail to develop into mature adult worms. Instead, they migrate through the body with the potential to affect virtually every body site. DRESS syndrome (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is a serious cutaneous drug reaction, which also involves other organ systems. We report on a 45-year-old man who was admitted with fever up to 40?°C, skin rash and pruritus not responding to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Laboratory results showed a slightly elevated white blood cell count, with 62?% eosinophils. History revealed contact to roaming cats. Travel history was unremarkable. Extensive diagnostic workup was performed, and the patient was finally diagnosed with DRESS syndrome, responded to systemic corticosteroid therapy and was discharged. Serology for Toxocara came back positive a few days later. Stool was again sent for microscopy and was found positive for Giardia lamblia, which was treated with a 5-day course of metronidazole. The patient had again developed rash and eosinophilia (62?%). Total immunoglobulin (Ig)E was 1,689 U/l (normal limit: patient had no further complaints. Although generalized exanthema due to Toxocara has not yet been described in literature, toxocarosis is known to cause a wide spectrum of cutaneous manifestations. Whether our patient had both, a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms and a parasitic infection, or whether a hypersensitivity reaction to Toxocara antigen was mimicking a DRESS syndrome remains unclear. PMID:24249317

  14. Systems oncology: towards patient-specific treatment regimes informed by multiscale mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Powathil, Gibin G; Swat, Maciej; Chaplain, Mark A J

    2015-02-01

    The multiscale complexity of cancer as a disease necessitates a corresponding multiscale modelling approach to produce truly predictive mathematical models capable of improving existing treatment protocols. To capture all the dynamics of solid tumour growth and its progression, mathematical modellers need to couple biological processes occurring at various spatial and temporal scales (from genes to tissues). Because effectiveness of cancer therapy is considerably affected by intracellular and extracellular heterogeneities as well as by the dynamical changes in the tissue microenvironment, any model attempt to optimise existing protocols must consider these factors ultimately leading to improved multimodal treatment regimes. By improving existing and building new mathematical models of cancer, modellers can play important role in preventing the use of potentially sub-optimal treatment combinations. In this paper, we analyse a multiscale computational mathematical model for cancer growth and spread, incorporating the multiple effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the patient survival probability and implement the model using two different cell based modelling techniques. We show that the insights provided by such multiscale modelling approaches can ultimately help in designing optimal patient-specific multi-modality treatment protocols that may increase patients quality of life. PMID:24607841

  15. Geographic and socioeconomic determinants of participation by elderly patients in surgical oncology trials | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Stewart JH, Russell GB, Howard-McNatt MM, Petro RM, Levine EA, Bell RA. Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC; Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC; Wake Forest School of Medicine, Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Winston-Salem, NC.. 2012 ASCO Annual Meeting, J Clin Oncol 30, 2012 (suppl abstr 6127). 2012 Jun 01. 2012 Jun 05. Chicago, IL.

  16. Overexpression of Cystatin SN positively affects survival of patients with surgically resected esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cystatin SN is a secreted protein and a cysteine proteinase inhibitor. It has been considered to be a tumor marker for gastrointestinal tract cancer in several functional researches. However, the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of Cystatin SN expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not been elucidated. Methods In our study, the expression of Cystatin SN was detected in 209 surgically resected ESCC tissues and 170 peritumoral normal esophageal mucosae by immunohistochemistry. The prognostic significance of Cystatin SN expression was analysed with Kaplan-Meier plots and the Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results The results showed that the immunostaining of Cystatin SN in ESCC tissues was less intense than that in the normal control tissue (P?patients with low tumoral Cystatin SN expression, ESCC patients with tumors high-expression Cystatin SN exhibited increased disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) (P?patients by survival (DFS and OS) in the stage II subgroup (P?patients whose tumors express high levels of Cystatin SN have favourable survival compared with those patients with low Cystatin SN expression. Tumoral Cystatin SN expression may be an independent predictor of survival for patients with resectable ESCCs. PMID:23711283

  17. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by Patients Admitted to a Surgical Unit in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Muhammad; Bruce, Julie; Jehan, Shah; McAdam, Timothy K; Bruce, Duff M

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Within the UK there are 50,000 practitioners of complementary medicine. Five million people have consulted such practitioners in one year. The aim of this study was to explore the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients attending general, vascular and cardiothoracic units at a regional Scottish centre. PATIENTS AND METHODS A questionnaire was administered to 450 patients attending the units over an 8-week period. The questionnaire consisted of demographic sections, a listing of 48 herbal preparations and alternative therapies, reasons for use and opinions on efficacy. RESULTS A total of 430 patients completed questionnaires (95%); age and sex were equally distributed over the sample. Of respondents, 68% (291 patients) had ever used CAM; 46% had used CAM in the preceding year. Half had used herbal preparations only, 13% non-herbal treatments and 35% both types of therapy. Only 10% were using CAM for the condition that led to their hospital admission. Two-thirds failed to inform their family physician about their use of CAM. CONCLUSIONS Despite concerns regarding the efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of complementary medicine, use amongst surgical patients is common. PMID:18701007

  18. Modifiable Prognostic Factors of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Non-Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jen-Hao; Hung, Chao-Hung; Wang, Jing-Houng; Chen, Chien-Hung; Kee, Kwong-Ming; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Yen, Yi-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Chen, Yen-Yang; Hsu, Hsuan-Chi; Lu, Sheng-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background & aims Current hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) staging systems only use baseline characteristics to predict outcome. We aimed to explore modifiable factors of the prognosis in HCC cases had undergone non-surgical treatment. Methods All HCC cases in Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial hospital in southern Taiwan from 2002 to 2012 must met all below criteria: (1) met international diagnostic guidelines, (2) underwent the initial treatments in our hospital (3) treated by non-surgical treatment modalities and (4) survived more than two years, with follow-up time longer than five years. Results A total 698 patients were enrolled: 451 (24.6%, group A) survivied between 2 to 5 years, and 247 (13.5%, group B) had survived > 5 years. Aside from liver function reserve and BCLC stages, four interventional factors: initial treatment modality, outcomes of 1st or 2nd treatment, and anti-viral therapy to chronic viral hepatitis were associated with prognosis. After propensity score matching, multiple logistic regression of 223 well-matched pairs showed that recurrence within one year after 1st treatment (OR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.35–3.48), incomplete 2nd treatment (2.01, 1.27–3.17) and absence of anti-viral agents (1.68, 1.09–2.59) were independent poor prognostic factors. Conclusion Complete treatment and anti-viral agents to chronic hepatitis were both independent modifiable prognostic factors of HCC patients had undergone non-surgical treatment. Based on these findings, timely treatment to achieve maximal locoregional control and anti-viral treatment should be provided as possible. PMID:26661388

  19. The impact of resident involvement on surgical outcomes among patients undergoing hepatic and pancreatic resections

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Aslam; Spolverato, Gaya; Kim, Yuhree; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Hirose, Kenzo; Weiss, Matthew; Makary, Martin A.; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Resident participation during hepatic and pancreatic resections varies. The impact of resident participation on surgical outcomes in hepatic and pancreatic operations is poorly defined. Methods We identified 25,511 patients undergoing a hepatic or pancreatic resection between 2006 and 2012 using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Multivariate regression models were constructed to determine any association between resident participation and surgical outcomes. Results Pancreatic resections (n = 16,045; 62.9%) were more common than liver resections (n = 9,466; 37%). Residents participated in the majority of cases (n = 21,857; 86%), with most involvement at the senior level (postgraduate year ? 3, n = 21,147; 97%). Resident participation resulted in slightly longer mean operative times (hepatic, 9 minutes; pancreatic, 22 minutes; both P < .01). Need for perioperative transfusion, hospital duration of stay, and reoperation rates were unaffected by resident participation (all P > .05). Resident participation resulted in a higher risk of overall morbidity (odds ratio [OR], 1.14; 95% CI, 1.05–1.24; P = .001), but not major morbidity (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.93–1.20; P = .40) after liver and pancreas resection. Resident participation resulted in lower odds of 30-day mortality after liver and pancreas resections (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.60–0.94; P = .01). Conclusion Although resident participation resulted in slightly longer operative times and a modest increase in overall complications after liver and pancreatic resection, other metrics such as duration of stay, major morbidity, and mortality were unaffected. These data have important implications for educating patients regarding resident participation in these complex cases. PMID:26003913

  20. Patient-specific characteristics determine success of surgical atrial fibrillation ablation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kimberly N; Russo, Mark J; Williams, Mathew R; Abbasi, Adeel; Sorabella, Robert; Martens, Timothy P; Smith, Craig R; Oz, Mehmet C; Argenziano, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Surgical atrial fibrillation ablation (SAFA) has not achieved the efficacy of Cox's original maze procedure, although technical improvements continue to be made. It is possible that biologic factors determine SAFA success. Therefore we examined how patient-specific characteristics affected SAFA success in 353 atrial fibrillation (AF) patients who underwent SAFA at a single institution. Among these, 257 (72.8%) had continuous AF and 96 (27.2%) had intermittent AF. For 297 patients (84.1%) postoperative follow-up was > 3 months. We compared SAFA success in patients whose procedure involved only pulmonary vein isolation with those whose procedure involved extensive lesion sets. Multivariate analysis included AF duration, left atrial size, preoperative atrial flutter, concomitant procedures, lesion sets, and energy source. Early SAFA success was classified as freedom from AF between postoperative months 3 and 6, and intermediate success between postoperative months 6 and 12. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves and stratum-specific likelihood ratios (SSLR) were generated to compare intermediate failure by left atrial size (LAS) thresholds. SAFA was more successful in the intermittent than the continuous AF group (n = 66, 86% vs n = 165, 71%; P = .014). When pulmonary vein isolation was compared only to more extensive lesion sets, there was no difference in success in the intermittent (34, 91% vs 32, 81%; P = .24) or continuous groups (67, 73% vs. 98, 69%; P = .603). Success for intermittent AF patients was not correlated with variables considered; in continuous AF patients, predictors included presence of concomitant mitral valve repair/replacement (P = .075), decreasing LAS (P = .025) and absence of preoperative atrial flutter (P = .001). In the continuous AF group, ROC curves and corresponding areas under the curve (AUC) were 0.60 (0.50-0.71) for failure at 6 months to 1 year. SSLR analysis generated 2 strata for LAS: < 8 cm with SSLR = 0.87 (0.74-1.0) and < or = 8 cm SSLR = 2.98 (1.07-8.3). In patients with intermittent AF, SAFA achieved acceptable results regardless of tested preoperative and intraoperative variables. In continuous AF, patient-specific characteristics affected success more than intraoperative variables. Failure was more than 3-fold greater in continuous AF patients with an LAS < or = 8 cm. In both patient types, more extensive lesion sets were not shown to improve outcomes. Future improvements in SAFA may depend on pharmacologic and/or surgical substrate modification. PMID:18187380

  1. Predictive / Reactive Planning and Scheduling of a Surgical Suite with Emergency Patient Arrival.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Mehdi; Soudi, Asie

    2016-01-01

    This paper surveys the problem of predictive / reactive scheduling of an integrated operating theatre with two types of demand for surgery: 1) elective or known demand; 2) emergency or uncertain demand. The stochastic arrival of emergency patients with uncertain surgery time enforces the scheduler to react to disruption and modify scheduling plan of elective patients. We focus on this predictive / reactive scheduling problem which has not been investigated in such way before. As in hospitals, at the time of occurrence a disruption in a surgical suite, the scheduler has not enough time to make the best decision; we propose a new approach based on two-stage stochastic programming model with recourse which determines the best recourse strategy in advance of any disruption occurrence. Using the proposed approach, the primary schedule is generated in such a way that it can absorb disruption with minimum effect on planned elective surgeries. For the first time in operating theatre planning, two new significant sets of performance measures comprising "robustness" and "stability" measures are considered in generation of primary schedule which will be shown to be of great importance in efficiency of surgical suite planning. Computational experiments performed on sets of generated problem based on the data obtained from a non-profit hospital. In order to demonstrate efficiency of the proposed method, computational results of the proposed approach are compared with classic approach. PMID:26547850

  2. Bezoar in a Pediatric Oncology Patient Treated with Coca-Cola

    PubMed Central

    Naramore, Sara; Virojanapa, Amy; Bell, Moshe; Jhaveri, Punit N.

    2015-01-01

    A bezoar is a mass of indigestible material. Bezoars can present with a gradual onset of non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. However, bezoars can result in more serious conditions such as intestinal bleeding or obstruction. Without quick recognition, particularly in susceptible individuals, the diagnosis and treatment can be delayed. Currently resolution is achieved with enzymatic dissolution, endoscopic fragmentation or surgery. We describe, to our knowledge, the first pediatric patient with lymphoma to have had a bezoar treated with Coca-Cola. PMID:26269699

  3. PIK3CA mutation analysis in Chinese patients with surgically resected cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Libing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Jiajia; Shen, Xuxia; Yang, Wentao; Yang, Gong; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathological and prognostic relevance of PIK3CA mutations in Chinese patients with surgically resected cervical cancer. PIK3CA mutations were screened in 771 cervical cancer specimens using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. In total, 13.6% (105 of 771) of patients harbored non-synonymous PIK3CA mutations. Patients harboring PIK3CA mutations were older than patients with wild-type PIK3CA (mean age: 50.7 years vs. 47.0 years, P?patients than in premenopausal patients (19.6% vs. 10.2%, P?patients and 80.9% for PIK3CA wild-type patients (P?=?0.03). PIK3CA mutation was confirmed as an independent predictor for better treatment outcome in the multivariate analyses (HR?=?0.54, 95% CI: 0.29–0.99, P?=?0.048). PIK3CA mutations were significantly associated with less distant metastases (mutant-type: 8/105, wild-type: 98/666, p?=?0.048). Thus, patients with mutant PIK3CA had distinct characteristics in age, menopausal status, and histological subtype and have better treatment outcome and less distant metastasis after surgery-based multimodal therapy. PMID:26358014

  4. Art Therapy with an Oncology Care Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nainis, Nancy A.

    2005-01-01

    Oncology nurses are particularly vulnerable to "burnout" syndrome due to the intensity of their work and the ongoing losses they experience while providing oncology care to their patients. High levels of stress in the workplace left untended lead to high job turnover, poor productivity, and diminished quality of care for patients. Attention to…

  5. Percutaneous Antegrade Varicocele Embolization Via the Testicular Vein in a Patient with Recurrent Varicocele After Surgical Repair.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Carlos J; El-Hilal, Alexander H; Darcy, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    This is a case report of an adolescent male who underwent surgical ligation for a left-sided varicocele that recurred 2 years later. Standard retrograde embolization via the left renal vein was not possible, because there was no connection from the renal vein to the gonadal vein following surgical ligation. The patient was treated via antegrade access of the spermatic vein at the inguinal level with subsequent coil embolization. PMID:25192950

  6. An Examination of the Effects of Pre-Surgical Education on Patient Expectations in Total Knee Arthroplasties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montez-Ray, Natasha Dawn

    2011-01-01

    As patients prepare for total-knee arthroplasty surgery, they have numerous expectations related to their long-term recovery and function. This research discerned whether the use of a pre-surgical patient education class with an additional long-term expectation module addressing recovery during the first 12 months after surgery was more effective…

  7. Prevalence and Predictors of Adverse Events in Older Surgical Patients: Impact of the Present on Admission Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hongsoo; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Kovner, Christine; Zhao, Zhonglin; Boockvar, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To examine the effects of the present on admission (POA) indicator on the prevalence of and factors associated with postsurgical adverse events in older patients. Design and Methods: This is a secondary data analysis of 82,898 surgical patients aged 65 years or older in 252 acute care hospitals in California in 2004. Four…

  8. A Non-inferiority Pilot Study Comparing the Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Generic Wide-spectrum Antibiotic Use in Septic Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Araya, I; Fasce, G; Núñez, E; Opazo, J L; Saez, E; Hurtado, V; Contreras, S; Quiñones, L A

    2015-12-01

    The present study is a non-inferiority study based on a descriptive and comparative case series for comparison of generic vs. original intravenous antimicrobials in septic oncology patients at an oncology private ICU. 1906 cancer patients admitted to Arturo Lopez Perez Foundation, Chile, were included in this study. After recruitment, a first retrospective group of 206 septic cancer patients recorded from 1(st) January, 2008 until July 14(th), 2010, treated with original antibiotics (cefoperazone-sulbactam, imipenem-cilastatin, piperacillin-tazobactam) were included for analyses and a second prospective group of 143 septic cancer patients recorded from July 15(th), 2010 until January 02, 2013, treated with the same but generic antibiotics were also included for comparisons. The trial protocol was developed in accordance with Helsinki and Good Clinical Practices recommendations. The results of this study showed no significant differences between the 2 groups in days of treatment, rate of success and lab test determinations (white cell count, PCR and procalcitonin), with lower, but not significant, total bed days and CPU bed days for generic antibiotics. Therefore, we conclude that the safety and efficacy of the generic antibiotics cefactam(®), imipen(®) and Piperazam(®) are not inferior to original antibiotics for the treatment of severe sepsis in hospitalised patients at the Arturo Lopez Perez Foundation. PMID:25811220

  9. Clinical Significance of Preoperative Thrombin Time in Patients with Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma following Surgical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wen-Shen; Lin, Jian-Hua; Huang, Hao; Kang, Ting; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background Noninvasive tools for the prognosis of ESCC are urgently needed. To this end, serum coagulation tests have been researched in some cancers, but the prognostic value of the TT in ESCC has not been described. Methods The levels of pre-treatment serum coagulation markers (including the PT, APTT, PTA, INR, fibrinogen level, TT and PLT) were retrospectively analyzed in 204 patients with ESCC who underwent surgical resection at our department and in 200 healthy controls, and the two groups were compared. The prognostic significance of the coagulation tests was then determined with univariate and multivariate cox hazard analyses in patients with ESCC. Results Compared with those in normal controls, the PT, APTT, and fibrinogen levels were significantly increased, whereas the TT values significantly decreased in the 204 ESCC patients. The TT directly correlated with the 5-year survival rate, not only in the entire ESCC cohort (p = 0.023) but also in the subgroups stratified according to the T and N classifications and metastasis. Conversely, the other tests were not independent prognostic factors for ESCC. Of the clotting markers, the TT inversely correlated with the fibrinogen level (p = 0.005). Conclusions The 5-year survival was shorter in ESCC patients exhibiting decreased pre-treatment TT values. Thus, the serum TT may be a clinical prognostic factor for ESCC patients. PMID:26469700

  10. The Relationship between Proliferative Scars and Endothelial Function in Surgically Revascularized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ziyrek, Murat; ?ahin, Sinan; Acar, Zeydin; ?en, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proliferative scars are benign fibrotic proliferations which demonstrate abnormal wound healing in response to skin injuries. As postulated in the “response to injury hypothesis”, atherosclerosis is also triggered by an endothelial injury. Keloid and atherosclerotic processes have many pathophysiological and cytological features in common. Aims: In this study, we investigated the relationship between proliferative scars and endothelial function in surgically revascularized patients. We aimed to test the hypothesis that atherosclerosis is a wound healing abnormality. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Consecutive patients who were admitted to the cardiology outpatient clinic with a history of coronary artery bypass grafting operation were evaluated. Thirty-three patients with proliferative scars at the median sternotomy site formed the keloid group, and 36 age- and sex-matched patients with no proliferative scar at the median sternotomy site formed the control group. Endothelial function was evaluated by flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery via ultrasonograhic examination. Results: There is no signicant difference according to the demographic data, biochemical parameters, clinical parameters and number of grafts between keloid and control groups. Endothelial-dependent vasodila-tory response was lower in the keloid group than the control group (9.30±3.5 and 18.68±8.2, respectively; p=0.001). Conclusion: This study showed that endothalial dysfunction, which is strongly correlated with atherosclerosis, was more prominent in patients with proliferative scars. As proliferative scars and atherosclerosis have many features in common, we might conclude that atherosclerosis is a wound healing abnormality.

  11. Surgical management of high-grade glioma: a standard of care.

    PubMed

    Watts, Colin

    2012-11-01

    Neurosurgical oncology for intrinsic glioma is evolving rapidly. It must be patient-centered, consultant-led and research-orientated. The value of specialist neurosurgical engagement is becoming more widely recognized. Detailed evaluation tailored to each patient is essential before the surgical admission, in conjunction with clinical oncology input. Medical optimization, collation of magnetic resonance datasets for preoperative planning and providing an informed explanation of the proposed management and its alternatives are all part of the neurosurgeon's remit. Meticulous microsurgical technique during surgery utilizing modern neuronavigation and physiological monitoring are integral components of the specialist armamentarium. A clear understanding of the rationale for surgical intervention, including its place alongside radiotherapy and chemotherapy, informs surgical decision-making. Recognition and understanding of these issues are driving the evolution of neurosurgical management of high-grade glioma. New challenges are emerging and need to be critically evaluated in robustly designed clinical trials. PMID:25057866

  12. Clinical and surgical outcomes after lumbar laminectomy: An analysis of 500 patients

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Abt, Nicholas B.; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to determine the clinical and surgical outcomes following lumbar laminectomy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of neurosurgical patients who underwent first-time, bilateral, 1-3 level laminectomies for degenerative lumbar disease. Patients with discectomy, complete facetectomy, and fusion were excluded. Results: Five hundred patients were followed for an average of 46.79 months. Following lumbar laminectomy, patients experienced statistically significant improvement in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, weakness, and sensory deficits. The rate of intraoperative durotomy was 10.00%; however, 1.60% experienced a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak. The risk of experiencing at least one postoperative complication with a lumbar laminectomy was 5.60%. Seventy-two patients (14.40%) required reoperations for progression of degenerative disease over a mean of 3.40 years. The most common symptoms prior to reoperation included back pain (54.17%), radiculopathy (47.22%), weakness (18.06%), sensory deficit (15.28%), and neurogenic claudication (19.44%). The relative risk of reoperation for patients with postoperative back pain was 6.14 times higher than those without postoperative back pain (P < 0.001). Of the 72 patients undergoing reoperations, 55.56% underwent decompression alone, while 44.44% underwent decompression and posterolateral fusions. When considering all-time reoperations, the lifetime risk of requiring a fusion after a lumbar laminectomy based on this study (average follow-up of 46.79 months) was 8.0%. Conclusion: Patients experienced statistically significant improvements in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, motor weakness, and sensory deficit following lumbar laminectomy. Incidental durotomy rate was 10.00%. Following a first-time laminectomy, the reoperation rate was 14.4% over a mean of 3.40 years. PMID:26005583

  13. The Impact of Different Surgical Modalities for Hysterectomy on Satisfaction and Patient Reported Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing debate regarding the cost-benefit of different surgical modalities for hysterectomy. Studies have relied primarily on evaluation of clinical outcomes and medical expenses. Thus, a paucity of information on patient-reported outcomes including satisfaction, recovery, and recommendations exists. Objective The objective of this study was to identify differences in patient satisfaction and recommendations by approach to a hysterectomy. Methods We recruited a large, geographically diverse group of women who were members of an online hysterectomy support community. US women who had undergone a benign hysterectomy formed this retrospective study cohort. Self-reported characteristics and experiences were compared by surgical modality using chi-square tests. Outcomes over time were assessed with the Jonkheere-Terpstra trend test. Logistic regression identified independent predictors of patient satisfaction and recommendations. Results There were 6262 women who met the study criteria; 41.74% (2614/6262) underwent an abdominal hysterectomy, 10.64% (666/6262) were vaginal, 27.42% (1717/6262) laparoscopic, 18.94% (1186/6262) robotic, and 1.26% (79/6262) single-incision laparoscopic. Most women were at least college educated (56.37%, 3530/6262), and identified as white, non-Hispanic (83.17%, 5208/6262). Abdominal hysterectomy rates decreased from 68.2% (152/223) to 24.4% (75/307), and minimally invasive surgeries increased from 31.8% (71/223) to 75.6% (232/307) between 2001 or prior years and 2013 (P<.001 all trends). Trends in overall patient satisfaction and recommendations showed significant improvement over time (P<.001).There were differences across the surgical modalities in all patient-reported experiences (ie, satisfaction, time to walking, driving and working, and whether patients would recommend or use the same technique again; P<.001). Significantly better outcomes were evident among women who had vaginal, laparoscopic, and robotic procedures than among those who had an abdominal procedure. However, robotic surgery was the only approach that was an independent predictor of better patient experience; these patients were more satisfied overall (odds ratio [OR] 1.31, 95% CI 1.13-1.51) and on six other satisfaction measures, and more likely to recommend (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.39-1.94) and choose the same modality again (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.67-2.57). Abdominal hysterectomy patients were more dissatisfied with outcomes after surgery and less likely to recommend (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.31-0.40) or choose the same technique again (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.25-0.33). Quicker return to normal activities and surgery after 2007 also were independently associated with better overall satisfaction, willingness to recommend, and to choose the same surgery again. Conclusions Consistent with other US data, laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomy rates increased over time, with a concomitant decline in abdominal hysterectomy. While inherent shortcomings of this retrospective Web-based study exist, findings show that patient experience was better for each of the major minimally invasive approaches than for abdominal hysterectomy. However, robotic-assisted hysterectomy was the only modality that independently predicted greater satisfaction and willingness to recommend and have the same procedure again. PMID:25048103

  14. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Meena S.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Giuliano, Armando E.; Harris, Jay R.; Khan, Seema A.; Horton, Janet; Klimberg, Suzanne; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Freedman, Gary; Houssami, Nehmat; Johnson, Peggy L.; Morrow, Monica

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs.

  15. Prospectively validated predictions of shock and organ failure in individual septic surgical patients: the Systemic Mediator Associated Response Test

    PubMed Central

    Slotman, Gus J

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Clinically useful predictions of end-organ function and failure in severe sepsis may be possible through analyzing the interactions among demographics, physiologic parameters, standard laboratory tests, and circulating markers of inflammation. The present study evaluated the ability of such a methodology, the Systemic Mediator Associated Response Test (SMART), to predict the clinical course of septic surgery patients from a database of medical and surgical patients with severe sepsis and/or septic shock. Patients and methods: Three hundred and three patients entered into the placebo arm of a multi-institutional sepsis study were randomly assigned to a model-building cohort (n = 200; 119 surgical) or to a predictive cohort (n = 103; 55 surgical). Using baseline and baseline plus serial measurements of physiologic data, standard laboratory tests, and plasma levels of IL-6, IL-8, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF), multivariate models were developed that predicted the presence or absence of pulmonary edema on chest radiography, and respiratory, renal, coagulation, hepatobiliary, or central nervous system dysfunction and shock in individual patients. Twenty-eight-day survival was predicted also in baseline plus serial data models. These models were validated prospectively by inserting baseline raw data from the 55 surgical patients in the predictive cohort into the models built on the comprehensive training cohort, and calculating the area under the curve (AUC) of predicted versus observed receiver operator characteristic (ROC) plots. Results: SMART predictions of physiologic, respiratory, metabolic, hepatic, renal, and hematologic function indicators were validated prospectively, frequently at clinically useful levels of accuracy. ROC AUC values above 0.700 were achieved in 30 out of 49 (61%) of SMART baseline models in predicting shock and organ failure up to 7 days in advance, and in 30 out of 54 (56%) of baseline plus serial data models. Conclusion: SMART multivariate models accurately predict pathophysiology, shock, and organ failure in individual septic surgical patients. These prognostications may facilitate early treatment of end-organ dysfunction in surgical sepsis. PMID:11056759

  16. [Factitious diseases in oncology].

    PubMed

    Reich, Michel; Clermont, Amélie; Amela, Éric; Kotecki, Nuria

    2015-12-01

    Factitious diseases and pathomimias and particularly Munchausen's syndrome, due to their rarity, are poorly diagnosed by medical teams working in oncology. Consequences can be serious and result in unadapted surgery or non justified implementation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens. These patients simulate diseases in order to attract medical attention. They might become belligerent and are likely to promptly discharge themselves from hospital if they do not get the desired attention or are unmasked. With two following case reports and literature review, we would like to alert clinicians about difficulties encountered in diagnosis and management of factitious disorders. When faced with this diagnosis, the patient will tend to deny reality and break contact with the medical team who exposed him. Medical peregrinating behavior surrounded by conflicts with medical team, past psychiatric illness, history of working in the medical and paramedical field and social isolation can guide the diagnosis. Somaticians and especially surgeons working in the oncologic field must remain vigilant about this diagnosis and collaborate with either the psycho-oncologic team or the consultation-liaison psychiatric team. Some recommendations for medical professionals how to cope with these patients will be suggested. PMID:26597474

  17. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients: Surgical Clips as Surrogate for Breast Excision Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Ruiter, Peter de; Remeijer, Peter; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Rasch, Coen

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the use of surgical clips as a surrogate for localization of the excision cavity and to quantify the stability of the clips' positions during the course of external beam radiotherapy for breast cancer patients, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one breast cancer patients with surgical clips placed in the breast excision cavity were treated in a supine position with 28 daily fractions. CBCT scans were regularly acquired for a setup correction protocol. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were registered to the planning CT scans, using gray-value registration of the excision cavity region and chamfer matching of the clips. Subsequently, residual setup errors (systematic [{Sigma}] and random [{sigma}]) of the excision cavity were estimated relative to the clips' registration. Finally, the stability of the clips' positions were quantified as the movement of each separate clip according to the center of gravity of the excision cavity. Results: When clips were used for online setup corrections, the residual errors of the excision cavity were {Sigma}{sub left-right} = 1.2, {sigma}{sub left-right} = 1.0; {Sigma}{sub cranial-caudal} = 1.3, {sigma}{sub cranial-caudal} = 1.2; and {Sigma}{sub anterior-posterior} = 0.7, {sigma}{sub anterior-posterior} = 0.9 mm. Furthermore, the average distance (over all patients) between the clips and centers of gravity of the excision cavities was 18.8 mm (on the planning CT) and was reduced to 17.4 mm (measured on the last CBCT scan). Conclusion: Clips move in the direction of the center of gravity of the excision cavity, on average, 1.4 mm. The clips are good surrogates for locating the excision cavity and providing small residual errors.

  18. The use of the essential oil lavandin to reduce preoperative anxiety in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Braden, Rebecca; Reichow, Susan; Halm, Margo A

    2009-12-01

    Preoperative anxiety is prevalent in surgical patients who may require anxiety medications, thus impacting preoperative teaching and patient satisfaction. No studies were found in a comprehensive search on the effect of essential oils on anxiety in the preoperative setting. The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate whether the essential oil lavandin is more effective than standard care in reducing preoperative anxiety. A convenience sample of 150 adult patients were randomly assigned to either control (standard care), experimental (standard care plus essential oil lavandin), or sham (standard care plus jojoba oil) groups. Visual analog scales were used to assess anxiety on admission and OR transfer. Controlling for baseline anxiety and pain, the lavandin group had significantly lower anxiety on OR transfer, suggesting that lavandin is a simple, low-risk, cost-effective intervention with the potential to improve preoperative outcomes and increase patient satisfaction. Future studies should test the effects of lavandin in the postoperative phase and in specific populations with documented high anxiety. PMID:19962101

  19. Incidental retroperitoneal paraganglioma in patient candidate to radical prostatectomy: Concurrent surgical treatments by robotic approach

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Matteo; Sangalli, Mattia; Zanoni, Matteo; Ghezzi, Massimo; Fabbri, Fabio; Sozzi, Francesco; Rigatti, Patrizio; Cestari, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old male with biopsy-proven prostate cancer and candidate for radical prostatectomy. The patient’s medical history includes hypertension and atrial fibrillation in prophylactic treatment; however, he was suffering from recurrent paroxysmal episodes of supraventricular tachycardia. Abdominal magnetic resonance performed for prostate cancer staging detected a non-lymphatic inter-cavo-aortic mass of 42 × 37 × 43 cm. Results of biochemical screening confirmed the clinical diagnosis of symptomatic paraganglioma. The patient was subjected in a single robotic session for concurrent excision of the inter-aortocaval mass and radical prostatectomy with bilateral pelvic lymph-node dissection. During the procedure, there were no anesthesiological or surgical complications. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. Six months after surgery, his prostate-specific antigen level was undetectable and the abdominal magnetic resonance imaging was negative for local recurrence or metastasis of paraganglioma. No more episodes of tachycardia were reported or antihypertensive therapy was necessary. PMID:26279735

  20. [Oncological care according Alfred Schütz].

    PubMed

    Popim, Regina Célia; Boemer, Magali Roseira

    2005-01-01

    The study was realized among oncological nurses in their daily work routine and aimed to understand these professionals' subjective action, starting from their relation with patients, adopting a phenomenological reference framework based on the ideas of Alfred Schütz. The question: what does working in oncological care mean to you? Please describe, was used to collect statements, which were analyzed and clarified the typical action of a nurse caregiver in this daily routine. The study revealed that oncological care implies dealing with humans in a fragile situation; requires a relationship of affectivity; is care delivery that entails the genesis of professional burnout. Care delivery in oncology is highly complex, requiring a professional competence that goes beyond the technical-scientific sphere. Nursing professionals need to seek strategies which enable them to face the fatigue they are submitted to in their work. PMID:16308624

  1. Overview of resistant gram-positive pathogens in the surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Rapp, R P

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococci and enterococci are the most common pathogens in surgical-site and bloodstream infections. The emergence of drug resistance among these gram-positive bacteria thus poses a substantial threat to patients with surgical infections. Resistance to methicillin/oxacillin is frequently observed in Staphylococcus aureus isolates and is often accompanied by multidrug resistance. Vancomycin is usually the treatment of choice for infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), so the recent appearance of S. aureus isolated with intermediate sensitivity to vancomycin is cause for concern. Vancomycin resistance has already appeared in most species of enterococci. Infections caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are associated with increased mortality compared to infections caused by vancomycin-sensitive isolates. Measures for preventing vancomycin resistance include reducing the use of vancomycin and other agents that appear to be associated with VRE, including third-generation cephalosporins and anti-anaerobic drugs. Third-generation cephalosporins have also been implicated in the increased prevalence of MRSA infections. Prudent use of existing antibiotics is an essential strategy for combating the rising tide of drug-resistant gram-positive pathogens. PMID:12594908

  2. Surgical Outcomes of Canalicular Trephination Combined with Endoscopic Dacryocystorhinostomy in Patients with Distal or Common Canalicular Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yoon Jin; Choi, Hye Sun; Jang, Jae Woo; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the surgical outcomes of canalicular trephination combined with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) in patients with a distal or common canalicular obstruction. It also identified the factors affecting surgical success rates associated with this technique. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 57 patients (59 eyes) in whom a canalicular obstruction was encountered during endoscopic DCR. All patients were treated with endoscopic DCR, followed by canalicular trephination and silicone tube placement. The surgical outcome was categorized as a functional success according to the patient's subjective assessment of symptoms, including epiphora, and as an anatomical success according to a postoperative nasolacrimal duct irrigation test. Surgical success rates were compared based on age, sex, location of the obstruction, number of silicone tubes, and experience of the surgeon. Results Functional success was achieved in 55 of 59 eyes (93%) at one month, 50 eyes (84%) at three months, and 46 eyes (78%) at six months. Anatomical success was achieved in 58 of 59 eyes (98%) at one month, 52 eyes (88%) at three months, and 50 eyes (84%) at six months. There was a statistically significant difference in surgical outcome according to the experience of the surgeon. The anatomical success rate at the six-month follow-up exam was 95.4% in the >5 years of experience group, and 53.3% in the <5 years of experience group (p = 0.008, Pearson chi-square test). Conclusions The success rate of canalicular trephination combined with endoscopic DCR in patients with a distal or common canalicular obstruction decreased gradually during the six-month follow-up period. In particular, patients undergoing procedures with experienced surgeons tended to show excellent surgical outcomes at the six-month follow-up exam.

  3. A systematic review of reasons for nonentry of eligible patients into surgical randomized controlled trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This review article included studies that reported reasons for nonentry of eligible patients into surgical randomized controlled trials. The most frequently reported patient-related reasons for not enrolling were preference for one form of treatment, dislike of the idea of randomization, and the potential for increased demands. Additional reasons cited by patients, but not clinicians, included a distrust of clinicians, refusal of a placebo, discomfort with “being a guinea pig,” and inability to make a treatment decision.

  4. [Surgical managment of colorectal liver metastasis].

    PubMed

    Prot, Thomas; Halkic, Nermin; Demartines, Nicolas

    2007-06-27

    Surgery offer the only curative treatment for colorectal hepatic metastasis. Nowadays, five-year survival increases up to 58% in selected cases, due to the improvement and combination of chemotherapy, surgery and ablative treatment like embolisation, radio-frequency or cryoablation. Surgery should be integrated in a multi disciplinary approach and initial work-up must take in account patient general conditions, tumor location, and possible extra hepatic extension. Thus, a surgical resection may be performed immediately or after preparation with chemotherapy or selective portal embolization. Management of liver metastasis should be carried out in oncological hepato-biliary centre. PMID:17708232

  5. Late diagnosis and surgical treatment of patients diagnosed with unilateral congenital cataract at Fundación Visión, in Asuncion, Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Zegarra, Manuel; Burga, Gisella Harumi; Lansingh, Van; Samudio, Margarita; Duarte, Edgar; Ferreira, Rocio; Dorantes, Yesenia; Ginés, Juan Carlos; Zepeda, Luz

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Providing data on the late diagnosis and surgical treatment of patients who underwent surgery for total unilateral congenital cataract. Methods: Systematic retrospective review of the medical record of all patients between 0 and 16 years old with total unilateral congenital cataract who underwent surgery at Fundación Vision between January 2010 and July 2012. Results: Medical records of 37 patients (51 % females) were studied, age was 7.4 (± 4.9) years (average ± SD) and 62% lived on Departamento Central (the most populated region from Paraguay). A total of 97.3% patients underwent late surgical treatment and 86.5% received a late diagnosis. The average time elapsed between the diagnosis and the surgical treatment was one month, and 62.2% of the patients underwent surgery within six months from the diagnosis. Conclusion: This study evidences that most of the patients in our series had a late treatment as a result of a late diagnosis. Based on these results we recommend establishing strategies to improve the early detection and surgical treatment of the newborns. PMID:25494375

  6. Intraocular surgery in a large diabetes patient population: risk factors and surgical results.

    PubMed

    Ostri, Christoffer

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in developed countries. Accordingly, the prevention and treatment of vision-threatening diabetic eye complications is assuming greater importance. The overall aim of this thesis is to analyse risk factors for intraocular surgery in a large diabetes population and to report surgical results. The specific objectives are to (1) estimate the incidence of diabetic vitrectomy and analyse risk factors (Study I), (2) report long-term results, prognostic factors and incidence of cataract surgery after diabetic vitrectomy (Study II), (3) report results and prognostic factors after cataract surgery in diabetes patients (Study III) and (4) analyse risk factors for diabetic papillopathy with emphasis on metabolic control variability (Study IV). All studies are based on a close-to-complete national surgery register and a large, closely followed diabetic retinopathy screening population. Study I (cohort study, 3980 type 1 diabetes patients) illustrates that diabetic vitrectomy is rarely required in a diabetes patient population with varying degrees of diabetic retinopathy. The risk of reaching diabetic vitrectomy increases fourfold with poor metabolic control, defined as glycosylated haemoglobin A1c > 75 mmol/mol (~9%), which points to good metabolic control as an important preventive measure. Study II (cohort study, 167 diabetes patients) shows that most diabetic vitrectomy patients stand to gain visual acuity ?0.3 after surgery. Visual acuity is stable after 1 year, and the stability is maintained through 10 years of follow-up. The use of silicone oil for endotamponade is a consistent long-term predictor of low vision after surgery. The risk of requiring cataract surgery after diabetic vitrectomy is substantial, and the risk increases if silicone oil is used. Study III (cohort study, 285 diabetes patients) shows, on the other hand, that diabetes patients can expect a significant improvement in visual acuity after cataract surgery, regardless of the degree of diabetic retinopathy. Poor preoperative visual acuity, a high degree of diabetic retinopathy and advanced age are predictors of a poor visual acuity after surgery. The risk of diabetic macular oedema after surgery is 4%. Finally, Study IV (case-control study, 2066 type 1 diabetes patients) demonstrates that diabetic papillopathy shares characteristics with diabetic retinopathy. The risk of experiencing diabetic papillopathy increases markedly with a drastic, recent reduction in glycosylated haemoglobin A1c and a small optic disc. This lends support to the theory that diabetic eye complications may occur in anatomically predisposed patients in response to metabolic control variability. Overall, results after intraocular surgery in diabetes patients are favourable. Surgery, however, is associated with costs to society, patient discomfort and risk of complications. This thesis provides an analysis of risk factors for intraocular surgery and identifies prognostic factors for visual acuity after surgery, which can be used for preventive purposes, surgical decision-making and patient counselling. PMID:24809766

  7. Comparative Oncology Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium (COTC) is an active network of twenty academic comparative oncology centers, centrally managed by the NIH-NCI-Center for Cancer Research's Comparative Oncology Program, that functions to design and execute clinic

  8. [The geriatric patient in surgical gynecology. Results of the treatment of geriatric patients--a postoperative quality control].

    PubMed

    Rummler, S; Radmann, D

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents results of a retrospective study covering 506 older women (age range: 60 years and older), who were treated by major gynecologic operations in a twenty-years-period between 1962 and 1981 at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the District Hospital of Stralsund. The total number of patients operated on during these twenty years was 6,246, the frequency of the operated older women 10.11 per cent. In two control periods (1967-1971 and 1977-1981) there was a slight increased of these patients in the last period from 8.22 per cent to 13.29 per cent. Comparing postoperative outcome and complication rate of the geriatric patients group there is no statistically significant difference to another group of patients (age range: 30-40 years) undergoing gynecologic surgery in 1981. Indications for gynecologic surgery showed age-dependent differences in the two groups. Our conclusions are that retrospective studies concerning clinical assuring of professional quality of medical care are not sufficient enough. As a result of this study we present our concept for medical data processing (documentation) regarding quality-assessment of gynecologic surgical care. PMID:3788338

  9. Sympathetic autonomic dysfunction and impaired cardiovascular performance in higher risk surgical patients: implications for perioperative sympatholysis

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, John; Nelson, Alexander; Otto, James M; Stephens, Robert C M; Martin, Daniel S; Sneyd, J Robert; Struthers, Richard; Minto, Gary; Ackland, Gareth L

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent perioperative trials have highlighted the urgent need for a better understanding of why sympatholytic drugs intended to reduce myocardial injury are paradoxically associated with harm (stroke, myocardial infarction). We hypothesised that following a standardised autonomic challenge, a subset of patients may demonstrate excessive sympathetic activation which is associated with exercise-induced ischaemia and impaired cardiac output. Methods Heart rate rise during unloaded pedalling (zero workload) prior to the onset of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) was measured in 2 observation cohorts of elective surgical patients. The primary outcome was exercise-evoked, ECG-defined ischaemia (>1?mm depression; lead II) associated with an exaggerated increase in heart rate (EHRR ?12?bpm based on prognostic data for all-cause cardiac death in preceding epidemiological studies). Secondary outcomes included cardiopulmonary performance (oxygen pulse (surrogate for left ventricular stroke volume), peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak), anaerobic threshold (AT)) and perioperative heart rate. Results EHRR was present in 40.4–42.7% in both centres (n=232, n=586 patients). Patients with EHRR had higher heart rates perioperatively (p<0.05). Significant ST segment depression during CPET was more common in EHRR patients (relative risk 1.7 (95% CI 1.3 to 2.1); p<0.001). EHRR was associated with 11% (95%CI 7% to 15%) lower predicted oxygen pulse (p<0.0001), consistent with impaired left ventricular function. Conclusions EHRR is common and associated with ECG-defined ischaemia and impaired cardiac performance. Perioperative sympatholysis may further detrimentally affect cardiac output in patients with this phenotype. PMID:26512327

  10. Systematic Review of Quality of Life and Patient Reported Outcomes in Patients with Oncologic Related Lower Extremity Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Cemal, Yeliz; Jewell, Sarah; Albornoz, Claudia R.; Pusic, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Lower limb lymphedema (LLL) is a common complication of cancer treatment. The disease is chronic and progressive with no cure. Although a common and significant source of morbidity, the impact of this condition on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has only recently been addressed. In effort to identify valid treatment strategies for LLL, we performed a systematic review, identifying studies describing HRQOL outcomes in patients with LLL secondary to cancer. Methods and Results Seven medical databases were searched to identify reports using validated Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) instruments on patients with cancer-related LLL. Studies were classified by levels of evidence set by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and evaluated using the Efficace criteria. 25 studies were identified, 6 met inclusion criteria. Levels of evidence included: no level I studies, level II (n=3), level III (n=1), and level 4 (n=2). 50% of studies were compliant with the Efficace criteria. 5 PRO HRQOL instruments were used, but only 1 was specific to cancer-related lymphedema. Treatment strategies assessed included complete decongestive physiotherapy (CDP), exercise, and compression bandaging. CDP yielded significant enhancements in HRQOL. Conclusions There is a deficit in high quality studies for HRQOL in patients with LLL secondary to cancer. Furthermore, of the studies present, most did not conform to guidelines set for assessment of HRQOL, nor did they use lymphedema condition specific PRO instruments. New measures specific to assessing LLL are necessary to gain more accurate evaluation of how this debilitating disorder affects HRQOL. PMID:23531180

  11. Peri-operative management of the surgical patient with diabetes 2015: Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Barker, P; Creasey, P E; Dhatariya, K; Levy, N; Lipp, A; Nathanson, M H; Penfold, N; Watson, B; Woodcock, T

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes affects 10-15% of the surgical population and patients with diabetes undergoing surgery have greater complication rates, mortality rates and length of hospital stay. Modern management of the surgical patient with diabetes focuses on: thorough pre-operative assessment and optimisation of their diabetes (as defined by a HbA1c < 69 mmol.mol(-1) ); deciding if the patient can be managed by simple manipulation of pre-existing treatment during a short starvation period (maximum of one missed meal) rather than use of a variable-rate intravenous insulin infusion; and safe use of the latter when it is the only option, for example in emergency patients, patients expected not to return to a normal diet immediately postoperatively, and patients with poorly controlled diabetes. In addition, it is imperative that communication amongst healthcare professionals and between them and the patient is accurate and well informed at all times. Most patients with diabetes have many years of experience of managing their own care. The purpose of this guideline is to provide detailed guidance on the peri-operative management of the surgical patient with diabetes that is specific to anaesthetists and to ensure that all current national guidance is concordant. PMID:26417892

  12. Dietary inflammatory index as a potential determinant of a length of hospitalization among surgical patients treated for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galas, A; Kulig, P; Kulig, J

    2014-01-01

    Background/objectives: Inflammation is a central process responsible for health outcomes among surgical patients. Immunonutrition has been investigated as a promising modifying factor; however, inflammatory properties of habitual diet have not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to describe inflammatory properties of diet measured by the dietary inflammatory index (DII) among surgical patients treated for colorectal cancer and to link inflammatory properties of habitual diet with a duration of hospitalization. Subjects/methods: A follow-up study among colorectal cancer patients treated surgically was performed in Krakow, Poland. In total, 689 patients were recruited for the study. Habitual diet was assessed using a standardized semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Overall, 23 dietary items (including macro-and micronutrients) were used to calculate individuals' DII. Gender, age, marital status, body mass index, smoking status, lifetime physical activity, taking vitamin supplements, number of chronic diseases, cancer site, Duke's staging and surgery type were considered as potential covariates. Results: Participants were aged 58 years, with the average hospitalization time of 11 days. Higher DII (meaning diet with higher anti-inflammatory properties) was negatively associated with the duration of hospitalization (univariable linear regression: b=?0.59; P=0.005). Multivariable logistic regression has shown the decrease of the risk of longer stays (>7 days) among patients with the DII >?4.25, but only among younger (?60 years) patients, irrespective of Duke's staging. Conclusions: The DII might be used as a potential predictor of longer hospitalization among colorectal cancer patients treated surgically. The study provides evidence for the role of dietary-related low-grade inflammation among surgical patients. PMID:25005677

  13. Changes of Esophagogastric Junctional Adenocarcinoma and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Among Surgical Patients During 1988–2012

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Yang, Kun; Zhang, Weihan; Chen, Xiaolong; Chen, Xinzu; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhixin; Chen, Jiaping; Zhao, Yongfan; Zhou, Zongguang; Chen, Longqi; Hu, Jiankun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the changes of esophagogastric junctional adenocarcinoma (EGJA) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) among surgical patients from 1988 to 2012 in a Chinese high-volume hospital. Background: The incidence of EGJA in Western countries has rapidly increased in recent decades. However, recent data from China remain sparse. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on the basis of 5053 patients who underwent surgery for gastric and distal esophageal adenocarcinoma. Total of 1723 patients with EGJA who underwent surgery were included. Changes of the prevalence of GERD and the clinicopathological features and surgical treatment of EGJA were longitudinally analyzed by a 5-year interval. Results: The proportion of EGJA was increased from 22.3% in period 1 (1988–1992) to 35.7% in period 5 (2008–2012) (P?patients with EGJA in period 5 than in period 1 (42.0% vs 19.6%) (P?patients with EGJA. PMID:25647058

  14. [Evaluation of the use of hyaluronic acid in iatrogenic scars after phonosurgery (excluding surgical oncology) and ligamento-epithelial abnormalities of the vocal cords].

    PubMed

    Perouse, R; Coulombeau, B

    2013-01-01

    Between January of 2007 and December of 2011, six patients underwent revision microphonosurgery because of scarring complicating the initial surgery. The technique consisted of detaching the scarred area, the insertion of fibrils of hyaluronic acid (Merogel), a microsuture and possibly intra-cordal fat injection. A pre-and post-operative phoniatric protocol assessed the results which appear encouraging. PMID:24494334

  15. Treatment of Elderly Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of an International Expert Panel Meeting of the Italian Association of Thoracic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gridelli, Cesare; Balducci, Lodovico; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Di Maio, Massimo; Felip, Enriqueta; Langer, Corey; Lilenbaum, Rogerio C; Perrone, Francesco; Senan, Suresh; de Marinis, Filippo

    2015-09-01

    Most patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are elderly, and age has important implications for their management and treatment. In May 2014, the Italian Association of Thoracic Oncology organized an International Experts Panel Meeting with the intent to review the available evidence regarding the treatment of elderly patients with NSCLC and to discuss the implications for clinical practice and future research in this field; this article summarizes the panelists' conclusions. All patients aged more than 70 years should receive an assessment of physiologic age, including mortality and toxicity prediction. Age itself does not contraindicate adjuvant chemotherapy after resection. Elderly patients with locally advanced NSCLC should be considered for combined chemo-radiotherapy. In the advanced setting, the combination of carboplatin/paclitaxel results in prolonged survival compared with single-agent gemcitabine or vinorelbine, albeit with increased toxicity. In fit selected patients, other carboplatin-based or cisplatin-based regimens are feasible, but randomized trials specifically showing survival prolongation in elderly patients are lacking. The survival benefit for bevacizumab added to chemotherapy seems limited to patients aged less than 75 years. In unfit elderly patients, single agents are recommended. Regardless of age, patients with advanced nonsquamous NSCLC, and those who have never smoked independently of their histologic subtype, should be tested for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement. In patients with NSCLC harboring EGFR mutation or ALK rearrangement, targeted drugs are feasible and well tolerated. PMID:25862554

  16. The Practical Application of Clinical Prediction Rules: A Commentary Using Case Examples in Surgical Patients with Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Le, David; Côté, Pierre; Fehlings, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Commentary. Objective?This commentary aims to discuss the practical applications of a clinical prediction rule (CPR) developed to predict functional status in patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of degenerative cervical myelopathy. Methods?Clinical cases from the AOSpine CSM-North America study were used to illustrate the application of a prediction rule in a surgical setting and to highlight how this CPR can be used to ultimately enhance patient care. Results?A CPR combines signs and symptoms, patient characteristics, and other predictive factors to estimate disease probability, treatment prognosis, or risk of complications. These tools can influence allocation of health care resources, inform clinical decision making, and guide the design of future research studies. In a surgical setting, CPRs can be used to (1) manage patients' expectations of outcome and, in turn, improve overall satisfaction; (2) facilitate shared decision making between patient and physician; (3) identify strategies to optimize surgical results; and (4) reduce heterogeneity of care and align surgeons' perceptions of outcome with objective evidence. Conclusions?Valid and clinically-relevant CPRs have tremendous value in a surgical setting. PMID:26682095

  17. The Impact of Body Mass Index on the Surgical Outcomes of Patients With Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai-Ning; Chen, Xin-Zu; Zhang, Wei-Han; Yang, Kun; Chen, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the impact of body mass index (BMI) on the short-term and long-term results of a large cohort of gastric cancer (GC) patients undergoing gastrectomy. Recently, the “obesity paradox” has been proposed, referring to the paradoxically “better” outcomes of overweight and obese patients compared with nonoverweight patients. The associations between BMI and surgical outcomes among patients with GC remain controversial. A single-institution cohort of 1249 GC patients undergoing gastrectomy between 2000 and 2010 were categorized to low-BMI (<18.49?kg/m2), normal-BMI (18.50–24.99?kg/m2), and high-BMI (?25.00?kg/m2) groups. The postoperative complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo system, and their severity was assessed by using the Comprehensive Complication Index (CCI). The impact of BMI on the postoperative complications and overall survival was analyzed. There were 908, 158, and 182 patients in the normal-BMI, low-BMI, and high-BMI groups, respectively. The overall morbidity in the high-BMI group (24.7%) was higher than that in either the low-BMI or the normal-BMI group (20.9% and 15.5%, respectively; P?=?0.006), but the mean CCI in the low-BMI group was significantly higher (8.32?±?19.97) than the mean CCI in the normal-BMI and high-BMI groups (3.76?±?11.98 and 5.58?±?13.07, respectively; P?patients exhibited paradoxically “superior” survival outcomes compared with the normal-BMI patients. These findings confirm the “obesity paradox” in GC patients undergoing gastrectomy. PMID:26496304

  18. Midregional Proadrenomedullin Improves Risk Stratification beyond Surgical Risk Scores in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Philipp; Huber, Andreas; Müller, Beat; Maisano, Francesco; Taramasso, Maurizio; Moarof, Igal; Obeid, Slayman; Stähli, Barbara E.; Cahenzly, Martin; Binder, Ronald K.; Liebetrau, Christoph; Möllmann, Helge; Kim, Won-Keun; Hamm, Christian; Lüscher, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional surgical risk scores lack accuracy in risk stratification of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Elevated levels of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) levels are associated with adverse outcome not only in patients with manifest chronic disease states, but also in the general population. Objectives We investigated the predictive value of MR-proADM for mortality in an unselected contemporary TAVR population. Methods We prospectively included 153 patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR from September 2013 to August 2014. This population was compared to an external validation cohort of 205 patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR. The primary endpoint was all cause mortality. Results During a median follow-up of 258 days, 17 out of 153 patients who underwent TAVR died (11%). Patients with MR-proADM levels above the 75th percentile (? 1.3 nmol/l) had higher mortality (31% vs. 4%, HR 8.9, 95% CI 3.0–26.0, P < 0.01), whereas patients with EuroSCORE II scores above the 75th percentile (> 6.8) only showed a trend towards higher mortality (18% vs. 9%, HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.8–5.6, P = 0.13). The Harrell’s C-statistic was 0.58 (95% CI 0.45–0.82) for the EuroSCORE II, and consideration of baseline MR-proADM levels significantly improved discrimination (AUC = 0.84, 95% CI 0.71–0.92, P = 0.01). In bivariate analysis adjusted for EuroSCORE II, MR-proADM levels ?1.3 nmol/l persisted as an independent predictor of mortality (HR 9.9, 95% CI (3.1–31.3), P <0.01) and improved the model’s net reclassification index (0.89, 95% CI (0.28–1.59). These results were confirmed in the independent validation cohort. Conclusions Our study identified MR-proADM as a novel predictor of mortality in patients undergoing TAVR. In the future, MR-proADM should be added to the commonly used EuroSCORE II for better risk stratification of patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis. PMID:26630012

  19. Enhanced Protein-Energy Provision via the Enteral Route Feeding (PEPuP) protocol in critically ill surgical patients: a multicentre prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Declercq, B; Deane, A M; Wang, M; Chapman, M J; Heyland, D K

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal levels of feeding in critically ill patients are associated with poor clinical outcomes. The Enhanced Protein-Energy Provision via the Enteral Route Feeding (PEPuP) protocol was developed to improve nutritional delivery in the critically ill and has been studied in several hospitals. However, the experience with this protocol in surgical patients is limited to date. The objective of this analysis was to describe the experience with this protocol in surgical patients. We analysed observational patient data obtained from the 2013 International Nutrition Survey. We compared nutritional practices and outcomes of patients admitted for surgical and medical reasons to ICUs in sites that implemented the PEPuP protocol. We used surgical ICU patients in non-PEPuP sites as a concurrent control group. In sites that implemented the PEPuP protocol, surgical patients received a smaller proportion of prescribed calories (43% versus 61%, P=0.004) and protein (38% versus 57%, P=0.002) compared to medical patients. When compared to the cohort of surgical patients from control sites, the surgical patients from PEPuP sites received similar amounts of calories and protein. Although surgical PEPuP patients were more likely to receive trophic and volume-based feeds compared to surgical patients in control sites, other aspects of the PEPuP protocol were not adequately implemented. We conclude that nutritional delivery to surgical patients remains inadequate and the PEPuP protocol seems ineffective in improving nutritional intake in this population. Further research to determine methods of optimising PEPuP protocol implementation and adherence in surgery patients is needed. PMID:26673594

  20. [ABDOMINAL TRANSDIAPHRAGMATIC EXTRAPERICARDIAL SURGICAL ACCESS TO SUPRADIAPHRAGMATIC PART OF VENA CAVA INFERIOR IN PATIENTS OPERATED FOR RENAL-CELL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Shchukin, D V; Lesovoy, V N; Garagatiy, I A; Polyakov, N N; Khareba, G G

    2015-04-01

    Safety and possibility to perform abdominal surgical accesses to supradiaphragmatic part of vena cava inferior (VCI) in patients, operated on for renal-cell cancer, were estimated. In 12 patients the results of application of several surgical access variants to supradiaphragmatic part of VCI were estimated. Most simple and safe way to isolate supradiaphragmatic VCI and cavaatrial junction is to perform a T-like diaphragmotomy. Intraoperative complications rate have constituted 36.4%. The blood loss volume due to VCI injury (in 3 cases) while performing transdiaphragmatic surgical access to supradiaphragmatic part of VCI, have constituted 112.5 ml at average. Injuries of pleura, pericardium, main truncus of diaphragmatic nerve did not occur. PMID:26263648

  1. [Radiological trap and oncological precautions in a patient who has undergone a permanent withdrawal of PIP breast implants].

    PubMed

    Koutsomanis, A; Bruant-Rodier, C; Roedlich, M-N; Bretz-Grenier, M-F; Perrot, P; Bodin, F

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a 57-year-old patient who presented radiological images similar to ruptured breast implants one year after the supposed withdrawal of the latter. This woman had benefited for the first time from cosmetic PIP breast implants in 2000. Early in 2014, she requested the removal of the implants without renewal because she was feeling pain and functional discomfort. A few months after the operation, she consulted for breast swelling in the upper pole of the breast. Radiological assessment showed liquid formations compatible with the presence of implants. At our request, the rereading of the MRI by the radiologist definitively concluded on a bilateral seroma within the persistent fibrous capsule. In the absence of symptoms, clinical monitoring had been decided. But at the recrudescence of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases associated with breast implants, a cytological sampling was intended. In case of cytological abnormality or recurrence of the seroma, a surgical procedure should be performed. In conclusion, the removal of a breast implant without capsulectomy may result in the formation of a seroma whose images resemble those of an implant. It is always worthwhile to provide precise clinical data to the radiologist in order to help him to make informed interpretations. Every serous effusion in a breast lodge having contained a silicone implant must evoke the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. PMID:26232069

  2. The Impact of Diabetes on the Outcomes of Surgical and Nonsurgical Treatment of Patients in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Mitchell K.; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Blood, Emily A.; Zhao, Wenyan; Albert, Todd J.; Vacarro, Alexander; Oleson, Christina V.; Morgan, Tamara S.; Weinstein, James N.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A secondary analysis comparing diabetic patients with nondiabetic patients enrolled in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT). Objective To compare surgical outcomes and complications between diabetic and nondiabetic spine patients. Summary of Background Data Patients with diabetes are predisposed to comorbidities that may confound the diagnosis and treatment of patients with spinal disorders. Methods Baseline characteristics and outcomes of 199 patients with diabetes were compared with those of the nondiabetic population in a total of 2405 patients enrolled in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial for the diagnoses of intervertebral disc herniation (IDH), spinal stenosis (SpS), and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Primary outcome measures include the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) Health Status questionnaire and the Oswestry Disability Index. Results Patients with diabetes were significantly older and had a higher body mass index than nondiabetic patients. Comorbidities, including hypertension, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and joint disease, were significantly more frequent in diabetic patients than in nondiabetic patients. Patients with diabetes and IDH did not make significant gains in pain and function with surgical intervention relative to diabetic patients who underwent nonoperative treatment. Diabetic patients with SpS and DS experienced significantly greater improvements in pain and function with surgical intervention when compared with nonoperative treatment. Among those who had surgery, nondiabetic patients with SpS achieved marginally significantly greater gains in function than their diabetic counterparts (SF-36 physical function, P = 0.062). Among patients who had surgery for DS, diabetic patients did not have as much improvement in pain or function as did the nondiabetic population (SF-36 bodily pain, P = 0.003; physical function, P = 0.002). Postoperative complications were more prevalent in patients with diabetes than in nondiabetic patients with SpS (P = 0.002). There was an increase in postoperative (P = 0.028) and intraoperative (P = 0.029) blood replacement in DS patients with diabetes. Conclusion Diabetic patients with SpS and DS benefited from surgery, though older SpS patients with diabetes have more postoperative complications. IDH patients with diabetes did not benefit from surgical intervention. PMID:21270715

  3. Effect of early surgery in high surgical risk geriatric patients with femoral neck fracture and taking antiplatelet agents

    PubMed Central

    Sa-ngasoongsong, Paphon; Kulachote, Noratep; Sirisreetreerux, Norachart; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Laohajaroensombat, Sukij; Pinsiranon, Nithiwut; Woratanarat, Patarawan; Kawinwonggowit, Viroj; Suphachatwong, Chanyut; Wajanavisit, Wiwat

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of early surgical intervention on the high surgical risk elderly patients who sustained femoral neck fracture (FNF) and taking concomitant antiplatelet agents. METHODS: Between 2010 and 2012, a prospective study was conducted on 49 geriatric patients, who took antiplatelet agents, sustained FNF and underwent surgery within 72 h [early surgery (ES) group], and these were compared with a retrospective consecutive case series of patients with similar characteristics (45 cases) who had delayed surgery (DS group) after 72 h during an earlier 3-year period. Postoperative outcomes were followed for one year and compared. RESULTS: There were non-significant differences in perioperative blood loss, blood transfusion, intensive care unit requirement and postoperative mortality (P > 0.05 all). There were 2 patients (4%) in the DS group who died after surgery (P = 0.23). However, the ES group showed a significantly better postoperative outcome in terms of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and functional outcome (P < 0.05 all). CONCLUSION: Early hip surgery in geriatric hip fracture patients with ongoing antiplatelet treatment was not associated with a significant increase of perioperative blood loss and postoperative mortality. Moreover, ES resulted in a better postoperative surgical outcome. In early hip surgery protocol, the antiplatelet agents are discontinued and the patient is operated on within 72 h after admission, which is safe and effective for the medically fit patients. PMID:26716093

  4. Lung Injury Prediction Score Is Useful in Predicting Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Mortality in Surgical Critical Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Zachary M.; Gassner, Marika Y.; Coughlin, Megan A.; Mahan, Meredith; Watras, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Background. Lung injury prediction score (LIPS) is valuable for early recognition of ventilated patients at high risk for developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This study analyzes the value of LIPS in predicting ARDS and mortality among ventilated surgical patients. Methods. IRB approved, prospective observational study including all ventilated patients admitted to the surgical intensive care unit at a single tertiary center over 6 months. ARDS was defined using the Berlin criteria. LIPS were calculated for all patients and analyzed. Logistic regression models evaluated the ability of LIPS to predict development of ARDS and mortality. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve demonstrated the optimal LIPS value to statistically predict development of ARDS. Results. 268 ventilated patients were observed; 141 developed ARDS and 127 did not. The average LIPS for patients who developed ARDS was 8.8 ± 2.8 versus 5.4 ± 2.8 for those who did not (p < 0.001). An ROC area under the curve of 0.79 demonstrates LIPS is statistically powerful for predicting ARDS development. Furthermore, for every 1-unit increase in LIPS, the odds of developing ARDS increase by 1.50 (p < 0.001) and odds of ICU mortality increase by 1.22 (p < 0.001). Conclusion. LIPS is reliable for predicting development of ARDS and predicting mortality in critically ill surgical patients. PMID:26301105

  5. Surgical Treatment for Occlusion of Graft Arteriovenous Fistula in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Tae Ook; Chang, Sung-Wook; Ryu, Kyoung Min; Ryu, Jae Wook

    2015-01-01

    Background Maintenance of adequate vascular access for hemodialysis is important in patients with end-stage renal disease. Once arteriovenous fistula (AVF) occlusion occurs, the patient should be treated with rescue therapy. This study was performed to evaluate the results of a rescue therapy for AVF occlusion. Methods From January 2008 to December 2012, 47 patients who underwent surgical rescue therapy for AVF occlusion after graft AVF formation, were enrolled in this study. The patients were divided into two groups, namely the graft repair group (group A, n=19) and the thrombectomy group (group B, n=28). Postoperative results of both groups were analyzed retrospectively. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the clinical characteristics between the two groups. In terms of the duration of AVF patency after the first rescue therapy, group A showed a longer AVF patency duration than group B (24.5±21.9 months versus 17.7±13.6 months), but there was no statistically significant difference (p=0.310). In terms of the annual frequency of AVF occlusion after the rescue therapy of group A was lower than that of group B (0.59 versus 0.71), but there was no statistically significant difference (p=0.540). The AVF patency rates at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years after the first rescue therapy in group A were 52.6%, 31.5%, 21.0%, and 15.7%, respectively, and those in group B, they were 32.1%, 25.0%, 17.8%, and 7.14%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference (p=0.402). Conclusion Graft repair revealed comparable results. Although there was no statistically significant difference, the patent duration and annual frequency of AVF occlusion of group A were better than those of group B. Therefore, graft repair is considered as a safe and useful procedure for maintaining graft AVF. PMID:25705597

  6. Should we follow the 9th ACCP guidelines for VTE prevention in surgical patients?

    PubMed

    Arcelus, Juan I; Villar, Jesus M; Muñoz, Nuria

    2012-10-01

    The 9th edition of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines on antithrombotic therapy and prevention, includes relevant changes compared to previous versions. In the 9th ACCP, leadership of most chapters was given to methodologists who were familiar with the GRADE methodology. All topic panelists underwent a selection process paying particular attention to their financial and intellectual conflicts of interests. In the 9th ACCP guidelines, evidence has been explicitly presented in many evidence profiles and summary of evidence tables. In order to get a more balanced trade-off between desirable and undesirable effects of the alternative prevention and therapeutic interventions, there has been an increased emphasis on clinically relevant events, as opposed to previous surrogate asymptomatic outcomes. In addition, there has been a systematic review and survey on patient values and preferences for thrombotic and bleeding outcomes. As a result of the above changes, the strength of most recommendations has been downgraded compared to previous editions. The main changes regarding prevention on nonorthopedic surgical patients include the adoption of two risk assessment models. The only recommendation that has been upgraded is to extend prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) for four weeks after abdominal or pelvic cancer surgery. A controversial modification in orthopedic patients is recommendation in favor of the use of aspirin after hip or knee arthroplasty. New oral anticoagulants are recommended, but LMWH are suggested as the preferred option. Extending pharmacological prophylaxis for up to 35days rather than 10-14days is now suggested for patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery. PMID:23026658

  7. Surgical Treatment of Giant Liver Hemangioma Larger Than 10?cm: A Single Center's Experience With 86 Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Huang, Zhi-Yong; Ke, Chang-Shu; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Bi-Xiang; Chen, Yi-Fa; Zhang, Wan-Guang; Zhu, Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2015-08-01

    The ideal surgical treatment of giant liver hemangioma is still controversial. This study aims to compare the outcomes of enucleation with those of resection for liver hemangioma larger than 10?cm in different locations of the liver and establish the preoperative predictors of increased intraoperative blood loss.Eighty-six patients underwent enucleation or liver resection for liver hemangioma larger than 10?cm was retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographic, tumor characteristics, surgical indications, the outcomes of both surgical treatment, and the clinicopathological parameters influencing intraoperative blood loss were analyzed.Forty-six patients received enucleation and 40 patients received liver resection. Mean tumor size was 14.1?cm with a range of 10-35?cm. Blood loss, blood product usage, operative time, hepatic vascular occlusion time and frequency, complications and postsurgical hospital stay were similar between liver resections and enucleation for right-liver and left-liver hemangiomas. There was no surgery-related mortality in either group. Bleeding was more related to adjacency of major vascular structures than the size of hemangioma. Adjacency to major vascular structures and right or bilateral liver hemangiomas were independently associated with blood loss >550?mL (P?=?0.000 and 0.042, respectively).Both enucleation and liver resection are safe and effective surgical treatments for liver hemangiomas larger than 10?cm. The risk of intraoperative blood loss is related to adjacency to major vascular structures and the location of hemangioma. PMID:26313792

  8. Preventing transmission of infectious agents in the pediatric in-patients hematology-oncology setting: what is the role for non-pharmacological prophylaxis?

    PubMed Central

    Caselli, Désirée; Cesaro, Simone; Livadiotti, Susanna; Ziino, Ottavio; Paolicchi, Olivia; Zanazzo, Giulio; Milano, Giuseppe M.; Licciardello, Maria; Barone, Angelica; Cellini, Monica; Raffaella, De Santis; Giacchino, Mareva; Rossi, Mario Renato; Aricò, Maurizio; Castagnola, Elio

    2011-01-01

    The most intensive chemotherapy regimens were used in the past for leukemia patients who were the main focus of trials on infections; today there are increasing numbers of children with solid cancer and considerable risk of infection who do receive intensive standard-dose chemotherapy. Despite a continuous will to protect the immune-compromised child from infections, evidence-based indications for intervention by non-pharmacological tools is still lacking in the pediatric hematology-oncology literature. Guidelines on standard precautions as well as precautions to avoid transmission of specific infectious agents are available. As a result of a consensus discussion, the Italian Association for Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (AIEOP) Cooperative Group centers agree that for children treated with chemotherapy both of these approaches should be implemented and vigorously enforced, while additional policies, including strict environmental isolation, should be restricted to patients with selected clinical conditions or complications. We present here a study by the working group on infectious diseases of AIEOP. PMID:21647282

  9. Transapical Implantation of a 2nd-Generation JenaValve Device in Patient with Extremely High Surgical Risk

    PubMed Central

    Mieres, Juan; Menéndez, Marcelo; Fernández-Pereira, Carlos; Rubio, Miguel; Rodríguez, Alfredo E.

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) is performed in patients who are poor surgical candidates. Many patients have inadequate femoral access, and alternative access sites have been used such as the transapical approach discussed in this paper. We present an elderly and fragile patient not suitable for surgery for unacceptable high risk, including poor ventricular function, previous myocardial infarction with percutaneous coronary intervention, pericardial effusion, and previous cardiac surgery with replacement of mechanical mitral valve. Transapical aortic valve replacement with a second-generation self-expanding JenaValve is performed. The JenaValve is a second-generation transapical TAVR valve consisting of a porcine root valve mounted on a low-profile nitinol stent. The valve is fully retrievable and repositionable. We discuss transapical access, implantation technique, and feasibility of valve implantation in this extremely high surgical risk patient. PMID:26346128

  10. Soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh: surgical margin influences local recurrence but not survival in 152 patients.

    PubMed

    Vraa, S; Keller, J; Nielsen, O S; Jurik, A G; Jensen, O M

    2001-02-01

    Between 1979 and 1998, 152 patients with a soft-tissue sarcoma arising in the thigh were surgically treated in the Sarcoma Center in Aarhus, Denmark. We studied clinicopathologic factors prognostic for local recurrence and survival. 27 patients (18%) had a low-grade tumor, 26 (17%) an intermediate-grade and 99 (65%) a high-grade tumor. 27 patients (18%) were amputated and 125 (82%) had a local resection. 21 (14%) underwent a marginal resection, 82 (54%) a wide resection and 49 (32%) a compartmental resection. 32 patients were also given radiotherapy, 11 of these had a marginal resection. The 5-year local recurrence-free rate was 91%. Multivariate analysis selected marginal resection and histological high grade as unfavorable prognostic factors for local recurrence. The 5-year survival rate was 68%. High age and histological high grade were unfavorable prognostic factors for survival in a multivariate analysis. Surgical margin influenced local recurrence, but not the overall survival. PMID:11327418

  11. New surgical treatment options in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Werner T. W.; Nelius, Thomas; Aronoff, David R.; Mittemeyer, Bernhard T.

    2003-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in males older than 50 years of age. 75-80% of this population is considered to have some degree of BPH causing clinical symptoms and requiring urological treatment. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) is currently the standard surgical treatment modality for BPH. In an attempt to minimize the need for hospitalization and the associated perioperative and postoperative morbidity, alternatives have been sought. Various types of Laser techniques such as interstitial Laser cogaulation and side-firing technology have been proposed. Numerous studies have shown that Laser procedures safely and effectively reduce the volume of the prostate. Intra- and postoperative bleeding are nearly unknown complications for Laser procedures, whereas this is the most relevant complication for the TUR-P. Due to significant tissue edema after Laser treatment, patients commonly show delayed time to void adequately, and therefore, catheter drainage is often necessary for 3 to 21 days. Retrograde ejaculation is reported to occur less (0 - 10%) compared to TUR-P (> 60%). Urinary tract infections are very common after interstitial laser coagulation. Although not many long-term clinical data are available, various studies have shown that BPH patients improve in symptom score, flow rate and post-void residual up to 3 years after Laser treatment. This paper presents a concise review of efficacy, advantages and disadvantages of the most frequently used Laser techniques as well as the long-term clinical data compared to TUR-P.

  12. Impact of portable air filtration units on exposure of haematology-oncology patients to airborne Aspergillus fumigatus spores under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Engelhart, S; Hanfland, J; Glasmacher, A; Krizek, L; Schmidt-Wolf, I G H; Exner, M

    2003-08-01

    We undertook a one-year study to investigate the impact of the NSA model 7100A/B portable air filtration unit on exposure of haematology-oncology patients to airborne Aspergillus fumigatus spores under field conditions. Weekly measurements for airborne A. fumigatus were conducted in indoor and outdoor air, and surveillance for invasive aspergillosis was based on a combination of ward liaison, targeted chart review and consultation with the medical staff. The mean indoor A. fumigatus counts (8.1 cfu/m3; range, <0.8 to 42 cfu/m3) reflected the fungal load of outdoor air (9.4 cfu/m3; range, <0.8 to 50 cfu/m3), and were reduced by only about one third in rooms with portable air filtration units (5.3 cfu/m3; range, <0.8 to 41 cfu/m3). During the study period, a total of five cases (incidence density, 0.8 per 1000 patient-days) of invasive aspergillosis (one proven case, four suspected cases; case fatality rate 40%) were recorded. None of these five patients was allocated to a room with portable air filtration unit, however, the difference between incidence densities in rooms with and without portable air filtration units was non-significant (Fisher's exact test, P=0.33). Due to the noise level and thermal discomfort, patient compliance with the air filtration units was poor. We conclude that under field conditions this air filtration unit cannot be recommended for prevention of invasive aspergillosis in neutropenic haematology-oncology patients. PMID:12919761

  13. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    PubMed

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel. PMID:24702775

  14. Surgical approaches to treating otitis media in the only hearing ear of patients with contralateral hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jun; Chen, Wenwen; Deng, Yaxin; Cai, Xunhua; Shan, Liang; Du, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the surgical procedures used to treat the only hearing ears of two patient cohorts diagnosed with otitis media in the last twenty years. Clinical, surgical, and follow-up data of 15 patients with otitis media in the only hearing ear who underwent middle ear surgery prior to 2000 (Cohort A) and 13 patients with a similar condition (Cohort B) who underwent middle ear surgery between 2000 and 2013 were retrospectively collected, analyzed, and compared. Mean preoperative air conduction (AC) and bone conduction of the patients in Cohort B was 61 ± 18.7 and 20 ± 15.7 dBHL, respectively. Mean preoperative and postoperative air bone gap was 43.21 ± 13.2 dBHL and 12.66 ± 3.93 dBHL, respectively. The success rate of the surgical procedures in this patient cohort was 85%. Surgery of the only hearing ear in patients with otitis media is safe and effective if performed carefully. PMID:26309687

  15. Treatment results in different surgical approaches for intraspinal tumor in 51 patients

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Shaohui; Wu, Yunle; Tao, Yong; Chen, Xiaoming; Fang, Ye; Du, Li; Zhao, Jingmin; Zeng, Gaofeng

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the treatment results for the different surgical approaches for intraspinal tumor in lumbar spine. We retrospectively reviewed data for 51 patients with intraspinal tumors who were treated with surgery. We used the navigation system (group A) or traditional method (group B) to guide the surgery. Through the comparison of group A (22 patients) and group B (29 patients), we found some differences between the two groups, such as their total resection rate, the placement of pedicle screws, the mean operating time, intraoperative operation loss, JOA scores. In group A, the total resection rate was 95.45%. One hundred and ten pedicle screws were implanted, and no screw injured the nerve tissues or blood vessel; the placement of 94.55% of the pedicle screws was excellent. In group B, the total resection rate was 86.28%. A total of 134 pedicle screws were implanted, including five screws that injured nerve tissues or blood vessels; the placement of 87.31% of the pedicle screws was excellent. The postoperative symptoms were significantly improved in the two groups, and there were no deaths. The operation times were significantly lower in group A than in group B (P < 0.05), and the intraoperative operation loss was significantly lower in group A than in group B (P < 0.01). Additionally, the postoperative improvement in percent evaluated by Japan Orthopaedic Association (JOA) back pain evaluation questionnaire was significantly higher in group A than in group B (P < 0.05). The navigation system can provide crucial help in the treatment of spinal operation as an assisted method, which has great potential to improve the accuracy and safety. PMID:26629194

  16. Less Invasive Surgical Procedures Using Narrow-Diameter Implants: A Prospective Study in 20 Consecutive Patients.

    PubMed

    Lambert, France Emmanuelle; Lecloux, Geoffrey; Grenade, Charlotte; Bouhy, Alice; Lamy, Marc; Rompen, Eric Henri

    2015-12-01

    Narrow-diameter implants (NDIs) are increasingly produced and used in implant dentistry, especially since the introduction of new, more resistant materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical performance of NDIs (3.3 mm) placed in thin alveolar crests. Twenty consecutive patients needing implant-supported fixed partial dentures and presenting an alveolar thickness ?6 mm were treated with 1 or several NDIs. The surgical protocol was chosen according to the clinical situation: (1) flapless, (2) mini-cervical flap, (3) wide flap, (4) wide flap + guided bone regeneration (GBR). Implants were immediately loaded if the primary stability was higher than 20 Ncm. Implant survival and success, prosthodontic success rates, and patient-centered outcomes were evaluated after a follow-up period of 1 year. A total of 39 implants were placed in 20 patients, 12 and 27 implants in the anterior regions and in the posterior mandible, respectively. All but 1 implant reached an insertion torque higher than 20 Ncm and were loaded within 48 hours. The implant survival and success rates both reached 94.7%. The need for GBR was avoided in 60% of the implant sites. The mean peri-implant bone remodeling after a follow-up period of 1 year was -0.35 mm at the implant level. Peri-implant bone remodeling was higher in the posterior region, when the alveolar crest was thinner than 4 mm and GBR was required in addition. In conclusion, use of NDIs to restore partial edentation in sites with limited horizontal thickness seems to be an effective treatment option that prevented GBR in the majority of the present cases. Immediate provisionalization of NDIs does not seem to impair the results. PMID:24766161

  17. Computerization of the surgical intensive care unit: improvement of patient care via education.

    PubMed

    Greenburg, A G; McClure, D K; Fink, R; Stubbs, J A; Peskin, G W

    1975-06-01

    For the past 18 months we have been evaluating and developing a computerized patient-monitoring system in our surgical intensive care unit. Despite the enormous potential for use of such systems, we have been impressed with its underutilization and its failure to yield objective improvement in patient care at our institution and many others. The output of the system was ignored because the decision maker was unable or unwilling to integrate the more sophisticated data presented to him. The computer was relegated to the position of "redundant secretary". In an attempt to reverse this situation, we have developed a multilevel, multigoal educational system employing the computer. We have implemented brief educational programs for use by all unit personnel to explain deviant monitored variables. Given a physiologic subsystem and a particular variable, personnel can: (1) inquire whether or not the variable is deviant; (2) obtain a list of probable causes for the deviation; (3) obtain an explanation of the pathophysiology of particular deviants as well as instruction on how to identify a most probable cause; and (4) inquire how to correct specific deviants. When we monitored the system utilization after implementation of the educational programs, we found all of the system had improved utilization. As a result we have a better educated staff who communicate more effectively, deal with more sophisticated information, and make better decisions with resultant improved patient care. Additionally, the staff is eager to help improve the system. We believe the full potential of such systems can be obtained only through education. PMID:1096346

  18. Vestibular Extension along with Frenectomy in Management of Localized Gingival Recession in Pediatric Patient: A New Innovative Surgical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Anuradha; Bajwa, Navroop Kaur; Kalaskar, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper reports case of pediatric localized gingival recession (LGR) in mandibular anterior region which was treated by using new innovative surgical approach, i.e. combination of frenectomy and vestibular extension. These interceptive surgeries not only gained sufficient width of attached gingival but also lower the attachment of labial frenum. How to cite this article: Jingarwar M, Pathak A, Bajwa NK, Kalaskar R. Vestibular Extension along with Frenectomy in Management of Localized Gingival Recession in Pediatric Patient: A New Innovative Surgical Approach. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):224-226. PMID:26604542

  19. Risk Models of Operative Morbidities in 16,930 Critically Ill Surgical Patients Based on a Japanese Nationwide Database

    PubMed Central

    Saze, Zenichiro; Miyata, Hiroaki; Konno, Hiroyuki; Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Anazawa, Takayuki; Tomotaki, Ai; Wakabayashi, Go; Mori, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate preoperative variables predictive of lethal morbidities in critically ill surgical patients at a national level. There is no report of risk stratification for morbidities associated with mortality in critically ill patients with acute diffuse peritonitis (ADP). We examined data from 16,930 patients operated during 2011 and 2012 in 1546 different hospitals for ADP identified in the National Clinical Database of Japan. We analyzed morbidities significantly associated with operative mortality. Based on 80% of the population, we calculated independent predictors for these morbidities. The risk factors were validated using the remaining 20%. The operative mortality was 14.1%. Morbidity of any grade occurred in 40.2% of patients. Morbidities correlated with mortality, including septic shock, progressive renal insufficiency, prolonged ventilation >48 hours, systemic sepsis, central nervous system (CNS) morbidities, acute renal failure and pneumonia, and surgical site infection (SSI), were selected for risk models. A total of 18 to 29 preoperative variables were selected per morbidity and yielded excellent C-indices for each (septic shock: 0.851; progressive renal insufficiency: 0.878; prolonged ventilation >48?h: 0.849; systemic sepsis: 0.839; CNS morbidities: 0.848; acute renal failure: 0.868; pneumonia: 0.830; and SSI: 0.688). We report the first risk stratification study on lethal morbidities in critically ill patients with ADP using a nationwide surgical database. These risk models will contribute to patient counseling and help predict which patients require more aggressive surgical and novel pharmacological interventions. PMID:26222854

  20. Use of the modified early warning score and serum lactate to prevent cardiopulmonary arrest in hematology-oncology patients: a quality improvement study.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert S; Gobel, Barbara H; Schumacher, Mark; Lee, Jungwha; Weaver, Charlotta; Weitzman, Sigmund

    2014-01-01

    This process improvement project aimed to improve the early identification of clinically deteriorating hematology-oncology patients in order to prevent the development of critical illness and to facilitate timely intensive care unit (ICU) transfers. Using failure modes and effects analysis, a protocol employing the Modified Early Warning Score and serum lactate level was implemented to identify deteriorating patients who required the attention of the rapid response team. Control charts revealed a significant decrease in codes and preventable codes, while ICU transfers remained stable. A retrospective analysis to control for age, sex, race, severity of illness, and do not resuscitate status was performed, yielding a codes odds ratio of 0.51 (95% confidence interval = 0.31-0.85) and a preventable codes odds ratio of 0.25 (95% confidence interval = 0.07-0.82). At the study team's institution, implementation of this protocol reduced codes and preventable codes without an associated increase in ICU transfers. PMID:24202295

  1. Surgical treatment for double-valve destruction after balloon aortic valvuloplasty in a patient with porcelain aorta.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Fukui, Toshihiro; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2015-08-01

    We report a rare case of surgical treatment for double-valve destruction after balloon aortic valvuloplasty in a 90-year old female with severe aortic calcification. The patient underwent aortic balloon valvuloplasty for symptomatic aortic stenosis, resulting in severe aortic regurgitation because of injury to the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve and severe mitral regurgitation because of rupture of the chordae tendineae. She became haemodynamically unstable and required treatment with mechanical ventilation and assisted circulation. Urgent surgical treatment was planned. The patient's porcelain aorta increased the difficulty of surgery, but the procedure was carefully planned, and aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair were performed successfully without major complications. The patient had a satisfactory postoperative course and was transferred to another hospital for rehabilitation on the 8th postoperative day. PMID:25187531

  2. Current oncologic applications of radiofrequency ablation therapies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhruvil R; Green, Sari; Elliot, Angelina; McGahan, John P; Khatri, Vijay P

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) uses high frequency alternating current to heat a volume of tissue around a needle electrode to induce focal coagulative necrosis with minimal injury to surrounding tissues. RFA can be performed via an open, laparoscopic, or image guided percutaneous approach and be performed under general or local anesthesia. Advances in delivery mechanisms, electrode designs, and higher power generators have increased the maximum volume that can be ablated, while maximizing oncological outcomes. In general, RFA is used to control local tumor growth, prevent recurrence, palliate symptoms, and improve survival in a subset of patients that are not candidates for surgical resection. It’s equivalence to surgical resection has yet to be proven in large randomized control trials. Currently, the use of RFA has been well described as a primary or adjuvant treatment modality of limited but unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, liver metastasis, especially colorectal cancer metastases, primary lung tumors, renal cell carcinoma, boney metastasis and osteoid osteomas. The role of RFA in the primary treatment of early stage breast cancer is still evolving. This review will discuss the general features of RFA and outline its role in commonly encountered solid tumors. PMID:23671734

  3. Carpal valgus in llamas and alpacas: Retrospective evaluation of patient characteristics, radiographic features and outcomes following surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Barbara; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F; Huber, Michael J; Parker, Jill E; Semevolos, Stacy A

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated outcomes of surgical treatment for carpal valgus in New World camelids and correlated successful outcome (absence of carpal valgus determined by a veterinarian) with patient characteristics and radiographic features. Univariable and multivariable analyses of retrospective case data in 19 camelids (33 limbs) treated for carpal valgus between 1987 and 2010 revealed that procedures incorporating a distal radial transphyseal bridge were more likely (P = 0.03) to result in success after a single surgical procedure. A greater degree of angulation (> 19°, P = 0.02) and younger age at surgery (< 4 months, P = 0.03) were associated with unsuccessful outcome. Overall, 74% of limbs straightened, 15% overcorrected, and 11% had persistent valgus following surgical intervention. To straighten, 22% of limbs required multiple procedures, not including implant removal. According to owners, valgus returned following implant removal in 4 limbs that had straightened after surgery. PMID:25477542

  4. Carpal valgus in llamas and alpacas: Retrospective evaluation of patient characteristics, radiographic features and outcomes following surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Barbara; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F.; Huber, Michael J.; Parker, Jill E.; Semevolos, Stacy A.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated outcomes of surgical treatment for carpal valgus in New World camelids and correlated successful outcome (absence of carpal valgus determined by a veterinarian) with patient characteristics and radiographic features. Univariable and multivariable analyses of retrospective case data in 19 camelids (33 limbs) treated for carpal valgus between 1987 and 2010 revealed that procedures incorporating a distal radial transphyseal bridge were more likely (P = 0.03) to result in success after a single surgical procedure. A greater degree of angulation (> 19°, P = 0.02) and younger age at surgery (< 4 months, P = 0.03) were associated with unsuccessful outcome. Overall, 74% of limbs straightened, 15% overcorrected, and 11% had persistent valgus following surgical intervention. To straighten, 22% of limbs required multiple procedures, not including implant removal. According to owners, valgus returned following implant removal in 4 limbs that had straightened after surgery. PMID:25477542

  5. Essential Oils for Complementary Treatment of Surgical Patients: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Stea, Susanna; Beraudi, Alina; De Pasquale, Dalila

    2014-01-01

    Aromatherapy is the controlled use of plant essences for therapeutic purposes. Its applications are numerous (i.e., wellbeing, labour, infections, dementia, and anxiety treatment) but often they have not been scientifically validated. The aim of the present study is to review the available literature to determine if there is evidence for effectiveness of aromatherapy in surgical patients to treat anxiety and insomnia, to control pain and nausea, and to dress wound. Efficacy studies of lavender or orange and peppermint essential oils, to treat anxiety and nausea, respectively, have shown positive results. For other aspects, such as pain control, essential oils therapy has shown uncertain results. Finally, there are encouraging data for the treatment of infections, especially for tea tree oil, although current results are still inconclusive. It should also be considered that although they are, allergic reactions and toxicity can occur after oral ingestion. Therefore, while rigorous studies are being carried out, it is important that the therapeutic use of essential oils be performed in compliance with clinical safety standards. PMID:24707312

  6. [New trends and novel possibilities in the management of oncologic patients: clinical uses of PET/MRI].

    PubMed

    Borbély, Katalin

    2015-03-01

    The most recent multimodality technique, the hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) combines two very different technologies, which is a great result of human creativity. The combined PET/MRI has significant potentials in clinical oncology providing new perspectives of functional and anatomical information. PET/MRI offers simultaneous measurements of multifunctional data such as PET mapping by different specific tracers or MRI morphologic, MR molecular (MR spectroscopy, MRS), or MR functional (fMR) information of a living system. PMID:25763908

  7. The surgical treatment of lordoscoliosis and hyperlordosis in patients with quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Karampalis, C; Tsirikos, A I

    2014-06-01

    We describe 13 patients with cerebral palsy and lordoscoliosis/hyperlordosis of the lumbar spine who underwent a posterior spinal fusion at a mean age of 14.5 years (10.8 to 17.4) to improve sitting posture and relieve pain. The mean follow-up was 3.3 years (2.2 to 6.2). The mean pre-operative lumbar lordosis was 108(°) (80 to 150(°)) and was corrected to 62(°) (43(°) to 85(°)); the mean thoracic kyphosis from 17(°) (-23(°) to 35(°)) to 47(°) (25(°) to 65(°)); the mean scoliosis from 82(°) (0(°) to 125(°)) to 22(°) (0(°) to 40(°)); the mean pelvic obliquity from 21(°) (0(°) to 38(°)) to 3(°) (0(°) to 15(°)); the mean sacral slope from 79(°) (54(°) to 90(°)) to 50(°) (31(°) to 66(°)). The mean pre-operative coronal imbalance was 5 cm (0 cm to 8.9 cm) and was corrected to 0.6 cm (0 to 3.2). The mean sagittal imbalance of -8 cm (-16 cm to 7.8 cm) was corrected to -1.6 cm (-4 cm to 2.5 cm). The mean operating time was 250 minutes (180 to 360 minutes) and intra-operative blood loss 0.8 of estimated blood volume (0.3 to 2 estimated blood volume). The mean intensive care and hospital stay were 3.5 days (2 to 8) and 14.5 days (10 to 27), respectively. Three patients lost a significant amount of blood intra-operatively and subsequently developed chest or urinary infections and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. An increased pre-operative lumbar lordosis and sacral slope were associated with increased peri-operative morbidity: scoliosis and pelvic obliquity were not. A reduced lumbar lordosis and increased thoracic kyphosis correlated with better global sagittal balance at follow-up. All patients and their parents reported excellent surgical outcomes. Lordoscoliosis and hyperlordosis are associated with significant morbidity in quadriplegic patients. They are rare deformities and their treatment is challenging. Sagittal imbalance is the major component: it can be corrected by posterior fusion of the spine with excellent functional results. PMID:24891582

  8. Advancing Precision Medicine in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    Advances in cancer genomics are leading to a new era in oncology in which a patient's cancer will be extensively characterized for mutations and other molecular abnormalities, and treatment will be based mainly on the identified molecular changes instead of the type of cancer. This approach to treatment is known as precision medicine.

  9. Risk factors for readmission in patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal carcinoma who are receiving front-line chemotherapy on a clinical trial (GOG 218): an NRG oncology/gynecologic oncology group study (ADS-1236)?

    PubMed Central

    Duska, Linda R.; Java, James J.; Cohn, David E.; Burger, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Readmission within 30 days is a measure of care quality. Ovarian cancer patients are at high risk for readmission, but specific risk factors are not defined. This study was designed to determine risk factors in patients with ovarian cancer receiving upfront surgery and chemotherapy. Methods The study population was enrolled to GOG 0218. Factors predictive of admission within 30 days of a previous admission or 40 days of cytoreductive surgery were investigated. Categorical variables were compared by Pearson chi-square test, continuous variables by Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney test. A logistic regression model was used to evaluate independent prognostic factors and to estimate covariate-adjusted odds. All tests were two-tailed, ? = 0.05. Results Of 1873 patients, 197 (10.5%) were readmitted, with 59 experiencing >1 readmission. One-hundred-forty-four (73%) readmissions were post-operative (readmission rate 7.7%). Significant risk factors include: disease stage (stage 3 vs 4, p = 0.008), suboptimal cytoreduction (36% vs 64%, p = 0.001), ascites, (p = 0.018), BMI (25.4 vs 27.6, p < 0.001), poor PS (p < 0.001), and higher baseline CA 125 (p = 0.017). Patients readmitted within 40 days of surgery had a significantly shorter interval from surgery to chemotherapy initiation (22 versus 32 days, p < 0.0001). Patients treated with bevacizumab had higher readmission rates in the case of patients with >1 readmission. On multivariate analysis, the odds of re-hospitalization increased with doubling of BMI (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.07–3.07) and PS of 2 (OR = 2.05, 95% CI 1.21–3.48). Conclusion Significant risk factors for readmission in ovarian cancer patients undergoing primary surgery and chemotherapy include stage, residual disease, ascites, high BMI and poor PS. Readmissions are most likely after the initial surgical procedure, a discrete period to target with a prospective intervention. PMID:26335594

  10. Utilisation of a thoracic oncology database to capture radiological and pathological images for evaluation of response to chemotherapy in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Carey, George B; Kazantsev, Stephanie; Surati, Mosmi; Rolle, Cleo E; Kanteti, Archana; Sadiq, Ahad; Bahroos, Neil; Raumann, Brigitte; Madduri, Ravi; Dave, Paul; Starkey, Adam; Hensing, Thomas; Husain, Aliya N; Vokes, Everett E; Vigneswaran, Wickii; Armato, Samuel G; Kindler, Hedy L; Salgia, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Objective An area of need in cancer informatics is the ability to store images in a comprehensive database as part of translational cancer research. To meet this need, we have implemented a novel tandem database infrastructure that facilitates image storage and utilisation. Background We had previously implemented the Thoracic Oncology Program Database Project (TOPDP) database for our translational cancer research needs. While useful for many research endeavours, it is unable to store images, hence our need to implement an imaging database which could communicate easily with the TOPDP database. Methods The Thoracic Oncology Research Program (TORP) imaging database was designed using the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) platform, which was developed by Vanderbilt University. To demonstrate proof of principle and evaluate utility, we performed a retrospective investigation into tumour response for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) patients treated at the University of Chicago Medical Center with either of two analogous chemotherapy regimens and consented to at least one of two UCMC IRB protocols, 9571 and 13473A. Results A cohort of 22 MPM patients was identified using clinical data in the TOPDP database. After measurements were acquired, two representative CT images and 0–35 histological images per patient were successfully stored in the TORP database, along with clinical and demographic data. Discussion We implemented the TORP imaging database to be used in conjunction with our comprehensive TOPDP database. While it requires an additional effort to use two databases, our database infrastructure facilitates more comprehensive translational research. Conclusions The investigation described herein demonstrates the successful implementation of this novel tandem imaging database infrastructure, as well as the potential utility of investigations enabled by it. The data model presented here can be utilised as the basis for further development of other larger, more streamlined databases in the future. PMID:23103606

  11. Clinical evaluation with 18 months follow-up of new PTTM enhanced dental implants in maxillo-facial post-oncological patients

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Piero; Jamshir, Sara; Brauner, Edoardo; Di Carlo, Stefano; Ceci, Antonio; Piccoli, Luca; Pompa, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of this study is to present 18 months follow-up results of porous tantalum trabecular metal-enhanced titanium dental implant (PTTM) in implant supported prosthesis in post-oncological patients. Materials and methods A total of 25 PTTM implants were placed in each jaw of 6 patients that met specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Resonance Frequency Analysis (RFA) was conducted and Implant stability was recorded in ISQ values (Osstell ISQ, Osstell AB, Goteborg, Sweden) at implant placement and after 2,4,6,12 and 18 months of functional loading. Mean bone loss was also evaluated at the same interval of time on each periapical radiographs, bone levels were calculated by measuring the distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone to implant contact. Results Cumulative implant survival rate is 100% (n=25/25) to date and mean ISQ values recorded were: 72.14±5.61 (range= 50–81) at surgery, 64.39±8.12 (range=44–74) after 2 months, 74.26±7.14 (range=44–74) after 4 months, 76.84±7.65 (range=60–83) after 6 months, 78.13±4.14 (range=64–84) after 12 months and 80.22±6.23 (range=68–89) after 18 months of functional loading. Mean crestal marginal bone loss was 0.19±0.25 mm after 2 months of functional loading on periapical radiographs, 0.22±0.4 mm at 4 months, 0.3±0.46 mm at 6 months, 0.57±0.62 at 1 year and 0.64±0.60 mm after 18 months. Conclusions The results of this study, even if limited by the number of implants placed indicate that PTTM dental implants have a clinical efficacy in prosthetic rehabilitation of post-oncological patients, due to trabecular structure of the porous Ta metal that increases bone-implant connection values. PMID:25774249

  12. Radiotherapy, Bisphosphonates and Surgical Stabilization of Complete or Impending Pathologic Fractures in Patients with Metastatic Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolanczyk, Michal J.; Fakhrian, Khashayar; Adamietz, Irenäus A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the treatment outcomes of patients with metastatic bone disease with complete or impending pathologic fractures, who were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT), bisphosphonates or both after orthopedic stabilization. Material and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the results of RT, bisphosphonates or both after orthopedic stabilization for complete or impending pathologic fractures in 72 patients with skeletal metastases. After surgery, 32 patients (44%) were treated with RT alone (group 1), 31 patients (43%) were treated with RT and bisphosphonates (group 2) and 9 (13%) patients were treated with bisphosphonates (group 3), respectively. Patients were treated with a median dose of 30Gy (30-40 Gy/2-3Gy per fraction).The local tumor progression, pain progression and need for re-operation or re-radiotherapy were assessed from patients' medical records. Median follow-up time was 9 months. Results: Median overall survival time was 14 months (95% CI: 12-17). Secondary surgical intervention at the same location was necessary in 1 patient of group 1 (2%), 2 patients of group 2(5%) and 2 patients of group 3 (15%), respectively (p=0.097). Local tumor progress was observed in 3 patients of group 1 (9%), 2 patients of group 2 (7%) and 4 patients in group 3 (44%), respectively (p=0.021). Local pain progress was observed in 19%, 16% and 67% of the same groups (p=0.011). Conclusion: Our data confirm the efficacy and necessity of postoperative RT after orthopedic stabilization for metastatic bone disease to control the local disease. Bisphosphonates do not obviate the need for RT in the management of bone metastases after surgical stabilization. The combined treatment might lead to a better local tumor and pain control. PMID:26722368

  13. Pre-surgical Alveolar Molding in A Newborn Patient with Complete Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate-A Report.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shilpi; Nandlal, B; Reddy, Sudhakar

    2014-05-01

    Clefts of the lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP) are the most common congenital malformations seen in the head and neck region. Children with CLAP face a vast variety of problems like feeding difficulties, hearing loss (ear infections), missing or malformed teeth and speech defects, along with psychosocial stigma which influences the social development and rehabilitation of such patients. Management of CLAP has been recognized as a unique challenge for parents as well as medical team. Pre-surgical alveolar molding has shown promising results in solving the problems which are associated with CLAP, to a great extent. We are reporting a case of a newborn patient with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, who had inability in suckling and nasal regurgitation of oral fluids since birth, which were aided by providing a Pre-surgical alveolar molding to facilitate feeding and also to improve future facial appearance. This article highlights the effectiveness of alveolar molding appliance which was used to direct growth of the alveolar ridges and lips in the pre surgical treatment of cleft lip and palate. As a result of this appliance, the primary surgical repair of the nose and lip which was done, healed under minimal tension, thereby reducing scar formation and improving the aesthetic results. PMID:24995251

  14. Comparative Effectiveness Research in Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Sonali; Tergas, Ana I.

    2015-01-01

    The field of gynecologic oncology is faced with a number of challenges including how to incorporate new drugs and procedures into practice, how to balance therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of treatment, how to individualize therapy to particular patients or groups of patients, and how to contain the rapidly rising costs associated with oncologic care. In this chapter we examine three common and highly debated clinical scenarios in gynecologic oncology: the initial management of ovarian cancer, the role of lymphadenectomy in the treatment of endometrial cancer, and the choice of adjuvant therapy for ovarian cancer. PMID:25677027

  15. Limb salvage in musculoskeletal oncology: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of musculoskeletal sarcomas has made vast strides in the last few decades. From an era where amputation was the only option to the current day function preserving resections and complex reconstructions has been a major advance. The objectives of extremity reconstruction after oncologic resection include providing skeletal stability where necessary, adequate wound coverage to allow early subsequent adjuvant therapy, optimising the aesthetic outcome and preservation of functional capability with early return to function. This article highlights the concepts of surgical margins in oncology, discusses the principles governing safe surgical resection in these tumors and summarises the current modalities and recent developments relevant to reconstruction after limb salvage. The rationale of choice of a particular resection modality, the unique challenges of reconstruction in skeletally immature individuals and the impact of adjuvant modalities like chemotherapy and radiotherapy on surgical outcomes are also discussed. PMID:25190911

  16. Outcomes of Primary Surgical Cytoreduction in Patients with BRCA-associated High-grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, David M.; Long, Kara C.; Tanner, Edward J.; Grisham, Rachel N.; Arnold, Angela G.; Bhatia, Jasmine; Phillips, Mary F.; Spriggs, David R.; Soslow, Robert A.; Kauff, Noah D.; Levine, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective BRCA-associated and sporadic ovarian cancers have different pathologic and clinical features. Our goal was to determine if BRCA mutation status is an independent predictor of residual tumor volume following primary surgical cytoreduction. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with FIGO stage IIIC-IV high-grade serous ovarian cancer classified for the presence or absence of germline BRCA mutations. The primary outcome was tumor-debulking status categorized as complete gross resection (0mm), optimal but visible disease (1-10mm), or suboptimal debulking (>10mm) following primary surgical cytoreduction. Overall survival by residual tumor size and BRCA status was also assessed as a secondary endpoint. Results Data from 367 patients (69 BRCA mutated, 298 BRCA wild-type) were analyzed. Rate of optimal tumor debulking (0-10mm) in BRCA wild-type and BRCA-mutated patients were 70.1% and 84.1%, respectively (P=0.02). On univariate analysis, increasing age (10-year OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.07–1.65; P=0.01) and wild-type BRCA status (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.23–0.94, P=0.03) were both significantly associated with suboptimal surgical outcome. On multivariate analysis, BRCA mutation status was no longer associated with residual tumor volume (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.31–1.29; P=0.21) while age remained a borderline significant predictor (10-year OR, 1.25; 95% CI,1.01–1.56; P=0.05). Both smaller residual tumor volume and mutant BRCA status were significantly associated with improved overall survival. Conclusion BRCA mutation status is not associated with the rate of optimal tumor debulking at primary surgery after accounting for differences in patient age. Improved survival of BRCA carriers is not the result of better surgical outcomes but instead intrinsic tumor biology. PMID:22579790

  17. Prevention and management of postoperative delirium among older patients on an orthopedic surgical unit: a best practice implementation project.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Pamela K

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is an acute state of confusion that is often seen in older patients after major orthopedic surgical procedures. It is associated with increased costs of care, morbidity, delayed functional recovery, and prolonged hospital stay. Identification of predictive risk factors, early diagnosis and treatment, and implementation of environmental controls can minimize the impact of postoperative delirium. This project measured pre- and post intervention compliance with best practice in the prevention and management of postoperative delirium. PMID:22166973

  18. Analysis of patient-specific surgical ventricular restoration: importance of an ellipsoidal left ventricular geometry for diastolic and systolic function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Wenk, Jonathan F.; Zhong, Liang; Klepach, Doron; Zhang, Zhihong; Ge, Liang; Ratcliffe, Mark B.; Zohdi, Tarek I.; Hsu, Edward; Navia, Jose L.; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2013-01-01

    Surgical ventricular restoration (SVR) is a procedure designed to treat heart failure by surgically excluding infarcted tissues from the dilated failing left ventricle. To elucidate and predict the effects of geometrical changes from SVR on cardiac function, we created patient-specific mathematical (finite-element) left ventricular models before and after surgery using untagged magnetic resonance images. Our results predict that the postsurgical improvement in systolic function was compromised by a decrease in diastolic distensibility in patients. These two conflicting effects typically manifested as a more depressed Starling relationship (stroke volume vs. end-diastolic pressure) after surgery. By simulating a restoration of the left ventricle back to its measured baseline sphericity, we show that both diastolic and systolic function improved. This result confirms that the increase in left ventricular sphericity commonly observed after SVR (endoventricular circular patch plasty) has a negative impact and contributes partly to the depressed Starling relationship. On the other hand, peak myofiber stress was reduced substantially (by 50%) after SVR, and the resultant left ventricular myofiber stress distribution became more uniform. This significant reduction in myofiber stress after SVR may help reduce adverse remodeling of the left ventricle. These results are consistent with the speculation proposed in the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure trial (20) for the neutral outcome, that “the lack of benefit seen with surgical ventricular reconstruction is that benefits anticipated from surgical reduction of left ventricular volume (reduced wall stress and improvement in systolic function) are counter-balanced by a reduction in diastolic distensibility.” PMID:23640586

  19. Microbiology of Explanted Suture Segments from Infected and Noninfected Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krepel, Candace J.; Marks, Richard M.; Rossi, Peter J.; Sanger, James; Goldblatt, Matthew; Graham, Mary Beth; Rothenburger, Stephen; Collier, John; Seabrook, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    Sutures under selective host/environmental factors can potentiate postoperative surgical site infection (SSI). The present investigation characterized microbial recovery and biofilm formation from explanted absorbable (AB) and nonabsorbable (NAB) sutures from infected and noninfected sites. AB and NAB sutures were harvested from noninfected (70.9%) and infected (29.1%) sites in 158 patients. At explantation, devices were sonicated and processed for qualitative/quantitative bacteriology; selective sutures were processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Bacteria were recovered from 85 (53.8%) explanted sites; 39 sites were noninfected, and 46 were infected. Suture recovery ranged from 11.1 to 574.6 days postinsertion. A significant difference in mean microbial recovery between noninfected (1.2 isolates) and infected (2.7 isolates) devices (P < 0.05) was noted. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), Peptostreptococcus spp., Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia spp. were recovered from infected devices, while commensal skin flora was recovered from noninfected devices. No significant difference in quantitative microbial recovery between infected monofilament and multifilament sutures was noted. Biofilm was present in 100% and 66.6% of infected and noninfected devices, respectively (P < 0.042). We conclude that both monofilament and braided sutures provide a hospitable surface for microbial adherence: (i) a significant difference in microbial recovery from infected and noninfected sutures was noted, (ii) infected sutures harbored a mixed flora, including multidrug-resistant health care-associated pathogens, and (iii) a significant difference in the presence or absence of a biofilm in infected versus noninfected explanted devices was noted. Further studies to document the benefit of focused risk reduction strategies to minimize suture contamination and biofilm formation postimplantation are warranted. PMID:23175247

  20. Isolation and characterization of ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells obtained from a surgical patient

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, JIA; SHA, HUIFAN; WANG, GUAN; BAO, GUOLIANG; LU, SHUN; LUO, QINGQUAN; TAN, QIANG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphological characteristics and pluripotent differentiation potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Bone marrow cells were isolated from a rib fragment of an adult surgical patient, hBMMSCs were isolated based on plastic adherence and expanded ex vivo and phenotyping was performed. Pluripotent differentiation assays for adipogenesis, myogenesis and osteogenesis were conducted. Hematopoietic reconstruction of sublethally irradiated nude mice was performed by infusion of hBMMSCs. The gene expression profiles of early and late hBMMSCs were examined. The rate of CD31-positive cells was 31.1% in passage (P)4 hBMMSCs and 18.6% in P10 hBMMSCs. CD105 and CD106 were expressed in 99 and 95% of P25 hBMMSCs, respectively. Lipid droplets appeared at day 18 post induction. For osteogenesis, palpable masses were grossly observed from day 35 post inoculation of hBMMSCs. Hematoxylin and eosin staining further revealed chondrocytes and bone tissues. For myogenesis, at day six post subcutaneous inoculation, hBMMSCs differentiated into myocytes and were positive for myoglobin and MyoD1. In irradiated nude mice reconstituted by hBMMSCs, the white blood cell count briefly decreased following irradiation; however, it gradually recovered. In the irradiated nude mice reconstituted with hBMMSCs, CD45- and CD34-positive cells were detected 72 h post induction. Gene microarray analysis of P7 and P57 hBMMSCs demonstrated that 20 genes were upregulated >2 fold and 40 genes were downregulated >2 fold in P57 hBMMSCs. In conclusion, the isolated HBMMSCs possessed pluripotent differentiation potential and it was feasible and safe to use hBMMSCs within 30 passages. PMID:25376882

  1. [PREDICTING FACTORS OF THE LIFE SPAN IN PATIENTS, SUFFERING METASTATIC COLORECTAL CANCER AND SYNCHRONOUS HEPATIC AFFECTION AFTER SURGICAL TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Kolesnik, O O; Burlaka, A A; Lukashenko, A V; Pryimak, V V; Zhukov, Yu O; Makhmudov, D E; Volk, M O; Shchepotin, I B

    2015-05-01

    The results of treatment of 125 patients, suffering metastatic hepatic affection in colorectal cancer (pT1--4N0--2M1--in colonic cancer and pT1--3N0--2M1--in cancer recti), to whom in 2008-2015 yrs a one-staged (Group 1) or two-staged (Group II) surgical treatment was done. In affection of 4 regional lymph nodes and more (pN2) late results were less favorable, than in pN1 or pN0, not depending from surgical approach choosed. In 48 (38.4%) patients with one syndromal hepatic metastatic focus, the indices of general three-year and five-year cumulative survival were the best, than in other groups--82 and 63% (p = 0.001) accordingly; in monolobar affection--68 and 49%, and in bilobar--23 and 0%, not depending from method of surgical treatment (p < 0.001) choosed. Predictive factors were established, which impact negatively the indices of general survival in patients, suffering metastatic hepatic affection in colorectal cancer: hepatic metastatic foci number 4 and more, bilobar hepatic metastatic affection. PMID:26419027

  2. Obstructive Gastric Pseudotumor Caused by Cytomegalovirus in an AIDS Patient: A Case Report and Review of Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Boteon, Yuri Longatto; Alves, Iuri Pedreira Filardi; da Silva, Amanda Pinter Carvalheiro; Junior, Valdir Tercioti; de Souza Coelho Neto, João; Lopes, Luiz Roberto; de Carvalho Ramos, Marcelo; Andreollo, Nelson Adami

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 27 Final Diagnosis: Obstructive gastric pseudotumor Symptoms: Dyspepsia • weight loss Medication: Ganciclovir Clinical Procedure: Infectious diseases treatments and surgical treatment Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common opportunistic pathogen in patients with HIV. It is also a major cause of gastrointestinal ulcers in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). CMV pseudotumor in the stomach is a rare cause of digestive tract obstruction. Case Report: In this study we report a male patient infected with HIV in 2002. In 2014 he evolved C3 stage AIDS with prepyloric gastric ulcer which provoked deformity and pseudotumoral aspect of the gastric outlet. Endoscopic biopsy confirmed CMV infection. He underwent Roux-en-Y gastroenteroanastomosis with good recovery. Conclusions: CMV infection should be considered as an agent in gastric lesions in HIV-infected patients. Roux-en-Y gastroenteroanastomosis is a surgical option for this group of patients, allowing improvements in quality of life and decreasing risks of perioperative complications. PMID:26277259

  3. Gender, Race, and Survival: A Study in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases Patients Utilizing the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Chao, Samuel T.; Rice, Thomas W.; Adelstein, David J.; Barnett, Gene H.; Mekhail, Tarek M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To explore whether gender and race influence survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with brain metastases, using our large single-institution brain tumor database and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) brain metastases classification. Methods and materials: A retrospective review of a single-institution brain metastasis database for the interval January 1982 to September 2004 yielded 835 NSCLC patients with brain metastases for analysis. Patient subsets based on combinations of gender, race, and RPA class were then analyzed for survival differences. Results: Median follow-up was 5.4 months (range, 0-122.9 months). There were 485 male patients (M) (58.4%) and 346 female patients (F) (41.6%). Of the 828 evaluable patients (99%), 143 (17%) were black/African American (B) and 685 (83%) were white/Caucasian (W). Median survival time (MST) from time of brain metastasis diagnosis for all patients was 5.8 months. Median survival time by gender (F vs. M) and race (W vs. B) was 6.3 months vs. 5.5 months (p = 0.013) and 6.0 months vs. 5.2 months (p = 0.08), respectively. For patients stratified by RPA class, gender, and race, MST significantly favored BFs over BMs in Class II: 11.2 months vs. 4.6 months (p = 0.021). On multivariable analysis, significant variables were gender (p = 0.041, relative risk [RR] 0.83) and RPA class (p < 0.0001, RR 0.28 for I vs. III; p < 0.0001, RR 0.51 for II vs. III) but not race. Conclusions: Gender significantly influences NSCLC brain metastasis survival. Race trended to significance in overall survival but was not significant on multivariable analysis. Multivariable analysis identified gender and RPA classification as significant variables with respect to survival.

  4. Left carinal pneumonectomy through median sternotomy: Surgical experience of two patients

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Chandrashekhara, SH; Keshri, Vikas Kumar; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial tumors infiltrating the carina is a formidable challenge to surgeons in view of difficult surgical access to the carina, especially on the left side, problems of securing the airway intra-operatively, technically challenging anastomosis due to anatomical location, and high post-operative morbidity and mortality. We present our surgical experience of two cases of left carinal pneumonectomy which was undertaken for resectable primary salivary gland type tumors of lung.

  5. Left carinal pneumonectomy through median sternotomy: Surgical experience of two patients.

    PubMed

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Chandrashekhara, S H; Keshri, Vikas Kumar; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial tumors infiltrating the carina is a formidable challenge to surgeons in view of difficult surgical access to the carina, especially on the left side, problems of securing the airway intra-operatively, technically challenging anastomosis due to anatomical location, and high post-operative morbidity and mortality. We present our surgical experience of two cases of left carinal pneumonectomy which was undertaken for resectable primary salivary gland type tumors of lung. PMID:26664175

  6. Comparative Oncology Program

    Cancer.gov

    As an extension of the efforts of the Comparative Oncology Program's in house "tool kit" the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium Pharmacodynamic (COTC PD) Core was developed. This multidisciplinary effort operates as a laboratory with "virtual walls" c

  7. Medical Oncology Service

    Cancer.gov

    Fellowships A world leader in cancer research and training, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) recruits fellows for an intensive 3-year assignment in medical oncology. Since its inception in 1955, the Medical Oncology Fellowship Program has helped train

  8. Influence of Spinal and General Anesthesia on the Metabolic, Hormonal, and Hemodynamic Response in Elective Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Snezana B.; Pavlovic, Aleksandar P.; Trpkovic, Sladjana V.; Ili?, Aleksandra N.; Sekulic, Ana D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine the significance of spinal anesthesia in the suppression of the metabolic, hormonal, and hemodynamic response to surgical stress in elective surgical patients compared to general anesthesia. Material/Methods The study was clinical, prospective, and controlled and it involved 2 groups of patients (the spinal and the general anesthesia group) who underwent the same surgery. We monitored the metabolic and hormonal response to perioperative stress based on serum cortisol level and glycemia. We also examined how the different techniques of anesthesia affect these hemodynamic parameters: systolic arterial pressure (AP), diastolic AP, heart rate (HR), and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). These parameters were measured before induction on anesthesia (T1), 30 min after the surgical incisions (T2), 1 h postoperatively (T3) and 24 h after surgery (T4). Results Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in the general anesthesia group compared to the spinal anesthesia group (p<0.01). Glycemia was significantly higher in the general anesthesia group (p<0.05). There was a statistically significant, positive correlation between serum cortisol levels and glycemia at all times observed (p<0.01). Systolic and diastolic AP did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.191, p=0.101). The HR was significantly higher in the general anesthesia group (p<0.01). SpO2 values did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.081). Conclusions Based on metabolic, hormonal, and hemodynamic responses, spinal anesthesia proved more effective than general anesthesia in suppressing stress response in elective surgical patients. PMID:25284266

  9. The Singapore Liver Cancer Recurrence (SLICER) Score for Relapse Prediction in Patients with Surgically Resected Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Soo Fan; Ng, Elizabeth Shu-Hui; Li, Huihua; Ong, Yu-Han; Choo, Su Pin; Ngeow, Joanne; Toh, Han Chong; Lim, Kiat Hon; Yap, Hao Yun; Tan, Chee Kiat; Ooi, London Lucien Peng Jin; Chung, Alexander Yaw Fui; Chow, Pierce Kah Hoe; Foo, Kian Fong; Tan, Min-Han; Cheow, Peng Chung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Surgery is the primary curative option in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current prognostic models for HCC are developed on datasets of primarily patients with advanced cancer, and may be less relevant to resectable HCC. We developed a postoperative nomogram, the Singapore Liver Cancer Recurrence (SLICER) Score, to predict outcomes of HCC patients who have undergone surgical resection. Methods Records for 544 consecutive patients undergoing first-line curative surgery for HCC in one institution from 1992–2007 were reviewed, with 405 local patients selected for analysis. Freedom from relapse (FFR) was the primary outcome measure. An outcome-blinded modeling strategy including clustering, data reduction and transformation was used. We compared the performance of SLICER in estimating FFR with other HCC prognostic models using concordance-indices and likelihood analysis. Results A nomogram predicting FFR was developed, incorporating non-neoplastic liver cirrhosis, multifocality, preoperative alpha-fetoprotein level, Child-Pugh score, vascular invasion, tumor size, surgical margin and symptoms at presentation. Our nomogram outperformed other HCC prognostic models in predicting FFR by means of log-likelihood ratio statistics with good calibration demonstrated at 3 and 5 years post-resection and a concordance index of 0.69. Using decision curve analysis, SLICER also demonstrated superior net benefit at higher threshold probabilities. Conclusion The SLICER score enables well-calibrated individualized predictions of relapse following curative HCC resection, and may represent a novel tool for biomarker research and individual counseling. PMID:25830231

  10. Surgical and Functional Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Replacement With Patient-Specific Implants Compared With “Off-the-Shelf” Implants

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Brodsky, Merrick; Garcia, Giancarlo A.; Gomoll, Andreas H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) instrumentation and implant designs have been evolving, with one of the current innovations being patient-specific implants (PSIs). Purpose To evaluate whether there is a significant difference in surgical time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative range of motion, and length of stay between PSI and conventional TKA. Study Design Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A consecutive series of 621 TKA patients, 307 with PSIs and 314 with conventional implants, was reviewed. Differences in estimated blood loss, length of stay, range of motion, and surgical time/tourniquet time between the 2 cohorts were analyzed. Results Linear regression analysis demonstrated that PSI decreased estimated blood loss by 44.72 mL (P < .01), decreased length of stay by 0.39 days (P < .01), decreased postoperative range of motion by 3.90° (P < .01), and had a negligible difference on surgical and tourniquet time. Conclusion The use of PSI is associated with decreased estimated blood loss, decreased length of stay, decreased range of motion, and no discernible difference in surgical or tourniquet time, all of which are unlikely to be clinically significant. PMID:26673037

  11. Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum and Salivary Concentrations of Visfatin in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Abolfazli, Nader; Jabali, Sahar; Saleh Saber, Fariba; Babaloo, Zohreh; Shirmohammadi, Adileh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Visfatin, mainly secreted by visceral adipose tissue, especially by macrophages, plays an important role in regulating the defense and immune functions, and functions as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and more importantly as a proinflammatory mediator. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on serum and salivary levels of visfatin in patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis. Materials and methods. Eighteen patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis were selected based on periodontal parameters of gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and radiographic parameters. Serum and salivary samples were collected at baseline and one month following non-surgical periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing ([SRP]). Visfatin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15, using paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results. Mean salivary and serum levels of visfatin significantly decreased after non-surgical periodontal treatment (P<0.05). Changes in salivary visfatin levels were more prominent. Conclusion. According to the findings of this study it seems that there is a direct relationship between periodontal tissue inflammation and disease activity with salivary and serum visfatin levels. PMID:25973148

  12. Positron emission tomography in oncology.

    PubMed

    Lobrano, Mary Beth; Singha, Puneet

    2003-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scans use positrons, positively charged particles, to detect metabolic and chemical changes in the body. Although the clinical applications of this technology still are evolving, PET scans are being used to detect cancer and evaluate neurologic disorders, heart muscle function, and response to treatment. In oncology, PET scans may be used to determine biopsy location, stage disease, diagnose cancer recurrence, and discern malignant from benign conditions. PET scans also have led to the incidental diagnosis of cancer. This article reviews patient preparation and PET scan procedures and includes a patient information sheet on PET scanning. Oncology nurses need to be well informed about new technologies used in cancer care, such as PET scans, to better educate and prepare patients to undergo these tests. PMID:12929270

  13. Timing of Salvage Hormonal Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients With Unfavorable Prognosis Treated With Radiotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31

    SciTech Connect

    Souhami, Luis; Bae, Kyounghwa; Pilepich, Miljenko; Sandler, Howard

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31 was a randomized trial comparing radiotherapy (RT) alone vs. RT plus adjuvant androgen suppression for life in unfavorable-prognosis carcinoma of the prostate. We examined the impact of early initiation of salvage hormonal therapy (HT) in relapsing patients randomized to RT alone arm. Methods and Materials: Patients were divided into two groups: early salvage HT and late salvage HT. The early salvage group was defined as receiving HT with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of less than 10 ng/mL, and the late salvage HT group had a PSA level of 10 ng/mL or greater. The outcomes were overall survival (OS), cause-specific mortality (CSM), and local failure (LF). The Kaplan-Meier estimation and log-rank test were used for OS, and the cumulative incidence estimation and Gray's test were used for CSM and LF. Proportional hazards regression models were used to compare the outcomes adjusted for other covariates. Results: The median follow-up times of surviving patients in the early and late salvage HT groups were about 11 and 13 years, respectively. The late salvage HT group had significantly more post-prostatectomy patients and patients with high Gleason scores. After adjustment for all covariates, OS was significantly longer in the early salvage HT group (hazard ratio, 1.5; p = 0.01). However, there were no statistically significant differences in LF or CSM between the groups. Conclusions: The early introduction of salvage HT resulted in improved OS but not improved CSM and LF. A randomized trial to define the optimal salvage hormonal timing is warranted in this group of patients with PSA recurrence after RT.

  14. [Quality control in the implementation of new surgical procedures: Da Vinci robot-assisted systems].

    PubMed

    Niegisch, G; Rabenalt, R; Albers, P

    2011-10-01

    Robot assistance in the surgical treatment of urological malignancies is gaining increasing importance. As is the case in already established surgical procedures, the quality of robot-assisted surgery needs to be controlled and evaluated by appropriate measures. Baseline-parameters of treated patients should be documented precisely. General and operation type-specific parameters should be evaluated in short- as well as in mid-term follow-up. Appropriate and validated instruments should be used. Only by using these measures will it be possible to compare robot-assisted procedures of different institutions and historical data of conventional surgery with regard to oncological and functional efficacy. PMID:21800194

  15. Surgical Repair of Late Complications in Patients Having Undergone Primary Hypospadias Repair during Childhood: A New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Barbagli, Guido; Sansalone, Salvatore; Djinovic, Rados; Lazzeri, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Background. The repair of complications in patients who had undergone hypospadias repair is still an open problem. Patients and Methods. We conducted a retrospective study of patients treated for late complications after hypospadias repair. Study inclusion criteria were patients presenting urethral, corpora cavernosa deformity, and/or penile defects due to previous hypospadias repair. Exclusion criteria were precancerous or malignant lesions and incomplete data on personal medical charts. Preoperative evaluation included clinical history, physical examination, urine culture, residual urine measurement, uroflowmetry, urethrography, urethral sonography, and urethroscopy. The patients were classified into four different groups. Success was defined as a normal functional urethra, with apical meatus, no residual penile curvature or esthetic deformity of the genitalia. Results. A total of 1,176 patients were entered in our survey. Out of the 1,176 patients, 301 patients (25.5%) underwent urethroplasty (group 1), 60 (5.2%) corporoplasty (group 2), 166 (14.1%) urethroplasty and corporoplasty (group 3), and 649 (55.2%) complex genitalia resurfacing (group 4). Mean followup was 60.4 months. Out of the 1,176 cases, 1,036 (88.1%) were considered successful and 140 (11.9%) failures. Conclusion. The majority of patients (55.2%) with failed hypospadias repair require surgical reconstruction to fully resurfacing the glans and penile shaft. PMID:22567003

  16. Surgical Repair of Late Complications in Patients Having Undergone Primary Hypospadias Repair during Childhood: A New Perspective.

    PubMed

    Barbagli, Guido; Sansalone, Salvatore; Djinovic, Rados; Lazzeri, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Background. The repair of complications in patients who had undergone hypospadias repair is still an open problem. Patients and Methods. We conducted a retrospective study of patients treated for late complications after hypospadias repair. Study inclusion criteria were patients presenting urethral, corpora cavernosa deformity, and/or penile defects due to previous hypospadias repair. Exclusion criteria were precancerous or malignant lesions and incomplete data on personal medical charts. Preoperative evaluation included clinical history, physical examination, urine culture, residual urine measurement, uroflowmetry, urethrography, urethral sonography, and urethroscopy. The patients were classified into four different groups. Success was defined as a normal functional urethra, with apical meatus, no residual penile curvature or esthetic deformity of the genitalia. Results. A total of 1,176 patients were entered in our survey. Out of the 1,176 patients, 301 patients (25.5%) underwent urethroplasty (group 1), 60 (5.2%) corporoplasty (group 2), 166 (14.1%) urethroplasty and corporoplasty (group 3), and 649 (55.2%) complex genitalia resurfacing (group 4). Mean followup was 60.4 months. Out of the 1,176 cases, 1,036 (88.1%) were considered successful and 140 (11.9%) failures. Conclusion. The majority of patients (55.2%) with failed hypospadias repair require surgical reconstruction to fully resurfacing the glans and penile shaft. PMID:22567003

  17. Health-related quality of life in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after treatment: short-term effects after brace or surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Juttmann, Rikard E.; de Kleuver, Marinus; van Biezen, Frans C.; de Koning, Harry J.

    2006-01-01

    For treatment of teenagers with progressive adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in an early stage, two options are generally considered: treatment with a brace or observation followed by surgery if necessary. Many doctors and patients prefer conservative treatment (i.e. brace treatment) to surgical treatment, because surgery of the spine is generally considered a drastic intervention. Because potential differences in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after treatment between braced and surgically treated patients are not well explored, this study aimed to determine whether short-term differences exist in HRQoL between adolescents treated with a brace or treated surgically. A cross-sectional analysis of HRQoL was made of 109 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who, after completing treatment, filled out the Dutch SRS-22 Patient Questionnaire. All patients had been treated either with a brace or surgery, or with a brace followed by surgery. Patients treated surgically had significantly higher mean scores in the satisfaction with management domain than those treated with a brace. No other consistent differences in HRQoL were found between patients treated with a brace and patients treated surgically. Gender, curve type and curve size had no relevant effect on HRQoL. We conclude that short-term differences in HRQoL after treatment in adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis are negligible and cannot support preference of one treatment above the other. PMID:16609857

  18. Surgical Treatment and Prognosis of Angiosarcoma of the Scalp: A Retrospective Analysis of 14 Patients in a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Ho; Ahn, Kyung Chan; Chang, Hak; Minn, Kyung Won; Jin, Ung Sik; Kim, Byung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We describe specific surgical methods for angiosarcoma regarding extent of resection and reconstructive options and assess their effect on patients' prognosis. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively examined 14 patients undergoing treatment for angiosarcoma of the scalp at our institute between January 2000 and June 2015. Surgical treatment comprised wide excision of the tumor and reconstruction using a free flap with skin graft. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to assess the survival parameters. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the association between risk factors and outcome parameters. Results. Mean patient age at diagnosis was 69 years, and the mean follow-up period was 17 months. The overall 5- and 2-year survival rates were 15% and 75%, respectively, whereas the 5- and 2-year disease-free survival rates were 7.7% and 38.7%, respectively. The mean survival duration was 32 months. Metastatic tumor dissemination to the lung or brain was closely associated with the major cause of death. Only a deep excision margin was significantly related to the recurrence rate. Conclusions. Cases of angiosarcoma had a poor prognosis despite the aggressive treatments. Sufficient resection margins are essential for controlling local recurrence. The effect of multidisciplinary approaches needs to be explored. PMID:26713314

  19. Surgical completeness of total thyroidectomy using harmonic scalpel: comparison with conventional total thyroidectomy in papillary thyroid carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Ju; Kim, Kyu Hyung; Koh, Yoon Woo; Chung, Woong Youn; Park, Cheong Soo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the surgical completeness and outcome of total thyroidectomy in two patient groups: One treated by harmonic scalpel (HS) and one by conventional total thyroidectomy (CT). Methods Between March 2006 and December 2007, 104 patients had total thyroidectomy by HS and 108 patients underwent CT. We analyzed clinicopathological characteristics and stimulated serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin (Tg), and anti-Tg antibodies at the time of ablation for both groups. Results Compared with the CT group, the HS group had shorter operating time and hospital stays and reduced postoperative drainage. At postsurgical ablation, mean serum TSH was 80.47 ± 21.77 mU/L in the HS group and 69.74 ± 21.17 mU/L in the CT group, with significant between-group differences (P < 0.001). Mean serum Tg levels after TSH stimulation were 1.57 ± 3.17 and 3.95 ± 10.14 ng/mL in the HS and CT groups, respectively, with significant between-group differences (P = 0.028). Conclusion Total thyroidectomy with an HS is a relatively safe and effective technique for use in patients with PTC. The HS provides surgical completeness and has a beneficial effect on successful ablation. PMID:23166885

  20. Evidence of Associations between Cytokine Genes and Subjective Reports of Sleep Disturbance in Oncology Patients and Their Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Miaskowski, Christine; Cooper, Bruce A.; Dhruva, Anand; Dunn, Laura B.; Langford, Dale J.; Cataldo, Janine K.; Baggott, Christina R.; Merriman, John D.; Dodd, Marylin; Lee, Kathryn; West, Claudia; Paul, Steven M.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify distinct latent classes of individuals based on subjective reports of sleep disturbance; to examine differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics between the latent classes; and to evaluate for variations in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes between the latent classes. Among 167 oncology outpatients with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer and 85 of their FCs, growth mixture modeling (GMM) was used to identify latent classes of individuals based on General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS) obtained prior to, during, and for four months following completion of radiation therapy. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes in candidate cytokine genes were interrogated for differences between the two latent classes. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the effect of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics on GSDS group membership. Two latent classes were identified: lower sleep disturbance (88.5%) and higher sleep disturbance (11.5%). Participants who were younger and had a lower Karnofsky Performance status score were more likely to be in the higher sleep disturbance class. Variation in two cytokine genes (i.e., IL6, NFKB) predicted latent class membership. Evidence was found for latent classes with distinct sleep disturbance trajectories. Unique genetic markers in cytokine genes may partially explain the interindividual heterogeneity characterizing these trajectories. PMID:22844404

  1. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  2. Does Hormone Therapy Reduce Disease Recurrence in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy? An Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06

    SciTech Connect

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Bae, Kwounghwa; Michalski, Jeff; Sandler, Howard; Shipley, William; Lin, Alex; Cox, James

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect on freedom from biochemical failure (bNED) or disease-free survival (DFS) by adding hormone therapy (HT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (HDRT). Methods and Materials: We used 883 analyzable prostate cancer patients who enrolled on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-06, a Phase I/II dose escalation trial, and whose mean planning target volume dose exceeded 73.8 Gy (mean, 78.5 Gy; maximum, 84.3 Gy). We defined biochemical failure according to the Phoenix definition. Results: A total of 259 men started HT 2 to 3 months before HDRT, but not longer than 6 months, and 66 men with high-risk prostate cancer received HT for a longer duration. At 5 years, the biochemical failure rates after HDRT alone were 12%, 18%, and 29% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis adjusted for covariates revealed that pretreatment PSA level was a significant factor, whereas risk group, Gleason score, T-stage, and age were not. When the patients were stratified by risk groups, the Cox proportion hazards regression model (after adjusting for pretreatment PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and T stage) did not reveal a significant effect on bNED or DFS by adding HT to HDRT Conclusion: The addition of HT did not significantly improve bNED survival or DFS in all prostate cancer patients receiving HDRT, but did approach significance in high-risk patient subgroup. The result of this study is hypothesis generating and requires testing in a prospective randomized trial.

  3. Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Dilling, Thomas J.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Garden, Adam S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Kian Ang, K.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

  4. Interviewing patients using interpreters in an oncology setting: initial evaluation of a communication skills module | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    The authors developed a communication skills training module for health professionals who work with professional translators in interviewing patients. The module combines didactic presentation of information and group role-play exercises in which trained medical interpreters help trainees communicate with bilingual patients. The module stresses communication strategies, including optimal seating arrangements that strengthen the clinician-patient relationship and de-emphasize interpreter-patient and interpreter-clinician interactions.

  5. Recruiting terminally ill patients into non-therapeutic oncology studies: views of health professionals. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Several themes emerged when interviews were conducted with clinician-researchers regarding their attitudes and concerns when recruiting terminally ill cancer patients into non-therapeutic research. The prominent themes were ethical considerations, patient-centered issues, and health professional issues. Promoting communication and autonomy and fostering familial support are important elements for overcoming patient-centered issues. Facilitating the doctor-patient relationship, using teamwork, and implementing educational programs were seen as key factors for dealing with health professional issues.

  6. Effects of an intervention aimed at improving nurse-patient communication in an oncology outpatient clinic. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This study evaluated a 2-day communication skills training program in nursing care through surveys with nurses and patients before and after the training. The training had no effect on patient perception of nurse empathy and attentiveness, patients’ moods, or cancer-related self-efficacy. The training also did not significantly affect nurses on measures related to communication and work-related stress.

  7. Surgical resection and liposomal amphotericin B to treat cavitary pulmonary zygomycosis in a patient with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hua-Ping, Zhu; Jian, Liang; Jing-Bin, Huang; Jie, Gao; Guo-Xin, Mo; Yan-Hong, Jia; Li-Xin, Xie

    2011-11-01

    We describe a 24-year-old man with type 1 diabetes mellitus and a cavitary lesion in the right upper lobe, caused by a zygomycete. Surgical resection plus liposomal amphotericin B therapy was successful. We discuss predisposing condition, clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment of pulmonary zygomycosis. PMID:21605482

  8. A Phase 2 Trial of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy After Surgery in Patients With High-Risk Endometrial Cancer: A Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hanbyoul; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Seok Mo; Cho, Chi-Heum; Kim, Byoung Gie; Ryu, Hee-Sug; Kang, Soon Beom; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: A phase 2 study was completed by the Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel in patients with high-risk endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Pathologic requirements included endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma stages III and IV. Radiation therapy consisted of a total dose of 4500 to 5040 cGy in 5 fractions per week for 6 weeks. Paclitaxel 60 mg/m{sup 2} was administered once weekly for 5 weeks during radiation therapy. Results: Fifty-seven patients were enrolled between January 2006 and March 2008. The median follow-up time was 60.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 51.0-58.2). All grade 3/4 toxicities were hematologic and usually self-limited. There was no life-threatening toxicity. The cumulative incidence of intrapelvic recurrence sites was 1.9% (1/52), and the cumulative incidence of extrapelvic recurrence sites was 34.6% (18/52). The estimated 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 63.5% (95% CI, 50.4-76.5) and 82.7% (95% CI, 72.4-92.9), respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel is well tolerated and seems to be effective for high-risk endometrioid endometrial cancers. This approach appears reasonable to be tested for efficacy in a prospective, randomized controlled study.

  9. Predominant Leg Pain Is Associated With Better Surgical Outcomes in Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Spinal Stenosis: Results from the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Adam; Blood, Emily; Lurie, Jon; Abdu, William; Sengupta, Dilip; Frymoyer, John W.; Weinstein, James

    2010-01-01

    Study Design As-treated analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT). Objective To compare baseline characteristics and surgical and nonoperative outcomes in degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) and spinal stenosis (SpS) patients stratified by predominant pain location (i.e. leg vs. back). Summary of Background Data Evidence suggests that degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) and spinal stenosis (SpS) patients with predominant leg pain may have better surgical outcomes than patients with predominant low back pain (LBP). Methods The DS cohort included 591 patients (62% underwent surgery), and the SpS cohort included 615 patients (62% underwent surgery). Patients were classified as leg pain predominant, LBP predominant or having equal pain according to baseline pain scores. Baseline characteristics were compared between the three predominant pain location groups within each diagnostic category, and changes in surgical and nonoperative outcome scores were compared through two years. Longitudinal regression models including baseline covariates were used to control for confounders. Results Among DS patients at baseline, 34% had predominant leg pain, 26% had predominant LBP, and 40% had equal pain. Similarly, 32% of SpS patients had predominant leg pain, 26% had predominant LBP, and 42% had equal pain. DS and SpS patients with predominant leg pain had baseline scores indicative of less severe symptoms. Leg pain predominant DS and SpS patients treated surgically improved significantly more than LBP predominant patients on all primary outcome measures at one and two years. Surgical outcomes for the equal pain groups were intermediate to those of the predominant leg pain and LBP groups. The differences in nonoperative outcomes were less consistent. Conclusions Predominant leg pain patients improved significantly more with surgery than predominant LBP patients. However, predominant LBP patients still improved significantly more with surgery than with nonoperative treatment. PMID:21124260

  10. [Intraoperative ultrasound duplex scanning in the diagnosis and assessment of results of surgical treatment of patients with celiac compression syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ignashov, A M; Den, Bo; Perle?, V E; Gichkin, A Iu; Ustiuzhaninov, A S; Kachalov, D V; Tabakova, T M

    2012-01-01

    The authors have performed an analysis of main indicators of celiac duplex scanning in 180 patients with celiac compression syndrome before operation, during decompression and at the postoperative period. All the patients underwent surgical celiac trunk decompression. The indicators of the intraoperative celiac duplex scanning (stenosis degree, linear peak systolic circulation rate) of the celiac trunk shower hemodynamic reliable stenosis and were sufficiently different from preoperative findings. The stenosis degree and linear peak systolic circulation rate were less during intraoperative examination than before the operation. Intraoperative, duplex canning allowed compressive stenosis of the seliac trunk to be differentatied in some patients from intravasal one (atherosclerosis and arteritis), and its adequate decompression to be performed. When performing the celiac trunk decompression it is thought to be necessary to fulfill its intraoperative ultrasound duplex scanning before and after elimination of the compression. PMID:23488263

  11. 76 FR 65885 - Medicare Program; Changes to the Ambulatory Surgical Centers Patient Rights Conditions for Coverage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ...the patient's surrogate with verbal and written notice of the patient's...of a patient's written or verbal grievance to the ASC. The following...to, mistreatment, neglect, verbal, mental, sexual, or physical abuse, must be fully...

  12. Clinical and Imaging Predictors of Surgical Outcome in Multilevel Cervical Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament: An Analysis of 184 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Peng; Yuan, Wen; Wu, Huiqiao; Yang, Lili; Tian, Ye; Liang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical and imaging predictors of surgical outcomes in patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). Materials and Methods From May 2010 to April 2012, a total of 200 consecutive patients with cervical OPLL were recruited for this study. Of them, 184 patients (130 men and 54 women) who could be tracked for more than 24 months after surgery were finally included for analysis. Their demographic, clinical and radiological data were collected preoperatively. The recovery ratio in terms of JOA score was used to assess the outcome of the patients preoperatively and at 2 years postoperatively. A JOA recovery rate less than 50% was considered a poor outcome. Results Compared with good outcome group, an older mean age at operation, a longer mean duration of symptoms, a lower mean pre-operativer JOA score, and a higher proportion of diabetics were observed in poor outcome group. Patients in poor outcome group were more likely to present kyphotic cervical alignment, smaller mean transverse area of the spinal cord, and intramedullary signal abnormalities. The result of multivariate stepwise logistic regression showed that a longer duration of symptoms and the presence of T1 hypo-intensity intramedullary changes on MRI were significant risk factors of lower JOA recovery ratios. Conclusion A longer duration of symptom, T1 hypointensity on MRI and a history of minor trauma were highly predictive of a poor outcome for patients undergoing surgical treatment of OPLL. Age at operation, the history of diabetes, the preoperative JOA score, the transverse area of the spinal cord and T2 hyper-intensity on MRI were also associated with the prognosis of OPLL. PMID:26327216

  13. Endometrial fluid associated with Essure implants placed before in vitro fertilization: Considerations for patient counseling and surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, David J; Jones, Christopher A; Wood, Samuel H

    2015-01-01

    Essure (Bayer) received approval from the U.S. Food and Drugs Administration as a permanent non-hormonal contraceptive implant in November 2002. While the use of Essure in the management of hydrosalpinx prior to in vitro fertilization (IVF) remains off-label, it has been used specifically for this purpose since at least 2007. Although most published reports on Essure placement before IVF have been reassuring, clinical experience remains limited, and no randomized studies have demonstrated the safety or efficacy of Essure in this context. In fact, no published guidelines deal with patient selection or counseling regarding the Essure procedure specifically in the context of IVF. Although Essure is an irreversible birth control option, some patients request the surgical removal of the implants for various reasons. While these patients could eventually undergo hysterectomy, at present no standardized technique exists for simple Essure removal with conservation of the uterus. This article emphasizes new aspects of the Essure procedure, as we describe the first known association between the placement of Essure implants and the subsequent development of fluid within the uterine cavity, which resolved after the surgical removal of both devices. PMID:26473113

  14. Surgical nurses' attitudes towards caring for patients dying of cancer - a pilot study of an educational intervention on existential issues.

    PubMed

    Udo, C; Melin-Johansson, C; Henoch, I; Axelsson, B; Danielson, E

    2014-07-01

    This is a randomised controlled pilot study using a mixed methods design. The overall aim was to test an educational intervention on existential issues and to describe surgical nurses' perceived attitudes towards caring for patients dying of cancer. Specific aims were to examine whether the educational intervention consisting of lectures and reflective discussions, affects nurses' perceived confidence in communication and to explore nurses' experiences and reflections on existential issues after participating in the intervention. Forty-two nurses from three surgical wards at one hospital were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Nurses in both groups completed a questionnaire at equivalent time intervals: at baseline before the educational intervention, directly after the intervention, and 3 and 6 months later. Eleven face-to-face interviews were conducted with nurses directly after the intervention and 6 months later. Significant short-term and long-term changes were reported. Main results concerned the significant long-term effects regarding nurses' increased confidence and decreased powerlessness in communication, and their increased feelings of value when caring for a dying patient. In addition, nurses described enhanced awareness and increased reflection. Results indicate that an understanding of the patient's situation, derived from enhanced awareness and increased reflection, precedes changes in attitudes towards communication. PMID:24471991

  15. Endometrial fluid associated with Essure implants placed before in vitro fertilization: Considerations for patient counseling and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Sills, E Scott; Walsh, David J; Jones, Christopher A; Wood, Samuel H

    2015-09-01

    Essure (Bayer) received approval from the U.S. Food and Drugs Administration as a permanent non-hormonal contraceptive implant in November 2002. While the use of Essure in the management of hydrosalpinx prior to in vitro fertilization (IVF) remains off-label, it has been used specifically for this purpose since at least 2007. Although most published reports on Essure placement before IVF have been reassuring, clinical experience remains limited, and no randomized studies have demonstrated the safety or efficacy of Essure in this context. In fact, no published guidelines deal with patient selection or counseling regarding the Essure procedure specifically in the context of IVF. Although Essure is an irreversible birth control option, some patients request the surgical removal of the implants for various reasons. While these patients could eventually undergo hysterectomy, at present no standardized technique exists for simple Essure removal with conservation of the uterus. This article emphasizes new aspects of the Essure procedure, as we describe the first known association between the placement of Essure implants and the subsequent development of fluid within the uterine cavity, which resolved after the surgical removal of both devices. PMID:26473113

  16. Use of Cystatin C and Serum Creatinine for the Diagnosis of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Patients Undergoing Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography at an Oncology Centre

    PubMed Central

    Fortalesa Melo, Joao Italo; Chojniak, Rubens; Costa Silva, Debora Helena; Oliveira Junior, Jose Carlos; Vieira Bitencourt, Almir Galvão; Holanda Silva, Diego; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Silva, Hernandes Cerqueira Souza; Dias, Denis Guilherme Teixeira; Rodrigues, Winglison Carli; Brancucci, Ellen Luzia; Cruz, Barbara Martins Soares; Schiavon, Beatriz Nunes; Argenton, Juliana Luz Passos; Camporini, Margareth Arrivabene; Zocchio, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to assess renal function using as laboratory measurements serum creatinine and cystatin C concentrations before and after administration of low-osmolarity (nonionic) iodinated contrast medium in patients with cancer undergoing computed tomography (CT). Methods This prospective study included 400 oncologic outpatients. Serum creatinine and cystatin C concentrations were measured before and 72 h after contrast administration. Glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) were estimated using serum creatinine–based [Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Cockroft-Gault and cystatin C based (Larsson) equations. Exploratory data analysis was performed. The nonparametric Wilcoxon test was used to compare pre and post contrast of test results and estimated clearance. The confidence interval used in the analysis was 95%. Results Compared with the pre-contrast values, the mean serum creatinine concentration was significantly higher and average GFRs estimated using MDRD and Cockcroft-Gault equations were significantly lower after the administration of contrast (p <0.001). It was also observed a significant increase after contrast in the concentration of Cystatin C (p = 0.015). In addition, a decrease in GFR estimated using the average Larsson (p = 0.021) was observed between time points. However, none of the patients presented clinically significant nephropathy. Conclusions Assessment using serum creatinine and cystatin C concentrations showed changes in renal function among patients with cancer undergoing contrast-enhanced CT examination in this study. No significant renal damage related to the use of low-osmolarity iodinated contrast medium of the type and dosage employed in this study was observed. This contrast medium is thus safe for use in patients with cancer. PMID:25961558

  17. [Postpyloric feeding tubes for surgical intensive care patients. Pilot series to evaluate two methods for bedside placement].

    PubMed

    Schröder, S; van Hülst, S; Claussen, M; Petersen, K; Pich, B; Bein, B; von Spiegel, T

    2011-03-01

    Bedside placement of postpyloric feeding tubes in surgical intensive care patients: a pilot series to evaluate two methods. Early enteral feeding is thought to be a key factor in maintaining the integrity of the gastrointestinal tract mucosal barrier associated with less bacterial translocation and decreased stimulation of the systemic inflammatory response and subsequent improved outcome in intensive care patients. Thus enteral feeding by nasogastric tubes is the preferred route of nutritional support for most surgical intensive care patients. However, intensive care patients with delayed gastric emptying and poor intestinal motility may not tolerate gastric feeding and may therefore benefit from postpyloric feeding. Postpyloric feeding tube placement may be achieved by endoscopic procedures or different bedside techniques with variable success. In the present study two feeding tubes for bedside postpyloric placement without endoscopic assistance were compared. The time to successful positioning was compared for jejunal feeding tubes from the companies Cook (Tiger 2™) and PortaMedical (Corflo-Tube®). The description for the Tiger 2™ states that because of its design slight residual peristalsis can cause it to migrate from the stomach to the jejunum. The Corflo-Tube® is also positioned at the bedside with the help of a detector and a monitor which maps the movements of the magnetic tip of the mandrin as it is pushed forward. Patients receiving early enteral nutrition through a gastric tube and exhibiting enhanced reflux, in spite of the head of the bed being raised and the administration of prokinetics randomly received either a Tiger 2™ or a Corflo-Tube®. The study included 41 patients from an intensive care ward for surgical patients and 13 out of 20 Tiger 2™-Tubes (65%) and 16 out of 21 Corflo-Tubes® (76%) were successfully positioned (p>0.05). The median time to successful positioning with the Corflo-Tubes® was 0.83 h (range 0.06-2.5 h), which was significantly shorter than the 24 h (range 2-72 h) found with the Tiger 2™ (p<0.001). There was no significant difference between the groups with respect to the period between the insertion of the tubes and the attainment of complete enteral nutrition, corresponding to the calculated individual calorie requirements. These tubes offer a good alternative to more demanding procedures as they are easy to handle and rapidly available. They confer clinical and cost advantages in terms of the early establishment of enteral feeding, no routine X-ray confirmation in the case of the Corflo-Tube® and avoidance of endoscopic guidance for tube placement or parenteral nutrition. In addition they are always justified in the event of a lack of endoscopic positioning. PMID:21057767

  18. Patient Education Self-Management During Surgical Recovery: Combining Mobile (iPad) and a Content Management System

    PubMed Central

    Moradkhani, Anilga; Douglas, Kristin S. Vickers; Prinsen, Sharon K.; Fischer, Erin N.; Schroeder, Darrell R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this investigation was to assess whether a new electronic health (e-health) platform, combining mobile computing and a content management system, could effectively deliver modular and “just-in-time” education to older patients following cardiac surgery. Subjects and Methods: Patients were provided with iPad® (Apple®, Cupertino, CA) tablets that delivered educational modules as part of a daily “to do” list in a plan of care. The tablet communicated wirelessly to a dashboard where data were aggregated and displayed for providers. Results: A surgical population of 149 patients with a mean age of 68 years utilized 5,267 of 6,295 (84%) of education modules delivered over a 5.3-day hospitalization. Increased age was not associated with decreased use. Conclusions: We demonstrate that age, hospitalization, and major surgery are not significant barriers to effective patient education if content is highly consumable and relevant to patients' daily care experience. We also show that mobile technology, even if unfamiliar to many older patients, makes this possible. The combination of mobile computing with a content management system allows for dynamic, modular, personalized, and “just-in-time” education in a highly consumable format. This approach presents a means by which patients may become informed participants in new healthcare models. PMID:24443928

  19. Physician recruitment of patients to non-therapeutic oncology clinical trials: ethics revisited. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    The risks associated with non-treatment trials, such as tissue collection, require a special effort to ensure that patients are aware of the research goals of the trials and understand that the aim of these trials is not to treat diseases. Physicians can avoid the appearance of conflict of interest and any perception that patients are being coerced by limiting their discussion to informing patients about the availability of trials and referring them to members of the research team for additional information.

  20. Abortion - surgical

    MedlinePLUS

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  1. RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE #12;A Career in Radiation Oncology YOUR CHOICE SAVE LIVES Take the first step towards a career in Radiation Oncology Visit www.acareerinradiationoncology.com.au 2 What is Radiation Oncology? Radiation Oncology is made up of three unique medical specialties

  2. Persistence of Candida albicans candidemia in non-neutropenic surgical patients: management of a representative patient in the absence of second-line treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pacini, D; Cerana, M; Beltrame, A; Di Biagio, A; De Maria, A

    2007-06-01

    Primary treatment failure and mortality in non-neutropenic patients with candidemia is high according to clinical trial experience. Current guidelines are mainly useful only for first line treatment strategies.We describe treatment failure and persistent protracted Candida albicans candidemia without clinically evident ocular involvement nor catheter recolonization in a malnourished non-neutropenic surgical patient with peritonitis. Primary antifungal treatment failure with fluconazole and secondary treatment failure with caspofungin occurred in the absence of evident Candida seeding the eye, valvular endocardium, or the intravascular catheter. Switch to liposomal amphotericin B was followed by clinical and microbiological cure. In patients with multiple risk factors for the acquisition of candidemia and life-threatening clinical conditions, the possibility of primary/secondary failure of new potent antifungal regimens may be initially neglected. Additional multicenter controlled clinical data are needed to guide the timing and choice of secondary antifungal treatment regimens in non-neutropenic candidemia patients. PMID:17594931

  3. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. Materials and Methods: One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. Results: A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Conclusions: Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26421133

  4. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Brawley, Otis W.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Thomas, Charles R.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  5. The use of proton pump inhibitors in an Italian hospital: focus on oncologic and critical non-ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Meli, Maria; Raffa, Maria Pia; Malta, Renato; Morreale, Ilaria; Aprea, Luigi; D'Alessandro, Natale

    2015-12-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most misused drugs both at the community and hospital level. Recently, possible risks have been underscored, suggesting the importance of limiting PPI use to proven indications. Objective To survey the appropriateness of PPI use in a University hospital in Italy. Setting Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Policlinico 'P. Giaccone', in Palermo, Italy. Method A one day-observational study, reviewing patients' medical records to identify treatments with PPIs and the indications for their use. After discharge, a subgroup of the cohort was followed up to assess the continuation of therapy at home. Appropriateness was evaluated according to the indications stated in the official product information sheet and supported by the AIFA notes. Main outcome measure Prevalence and appropriateness of PPI use in the hospital and after discharge. Results In the index day 62.9 % of 343 evaluable patients received a PPI. In only 29.1 % of these, the treatment could be considered appropriate. The most frequent reasons for inappropriate treatment were stress ulcer prophylaxis in low risk patients and unwarranted gastro-protection in drug treated patients. 30.9 % of patients received PPIs for uncertain indications: of these, 25.7 % were "critical" patients admitted in non-ICU wards. Furthermore, as much as 88.2 % of anticancer drug treated patients received PPIs as gastroprotective agents. At discharge 48.6 % of patients received a prescription to continue PPI therapy at home and 75.9 % of the 83 followed up patients were found to be still taking these drugs after on average 3 months from discharge. Conclusion This study confirms a high proportion of inappropriate PPI therapy into the hospital that translates in a prolonged unnecessary administration in the community setting. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of PPI therapy in subgroups of patients at moderate risk for gastric complications to optimize current guidelines. PMID:26319396

  6. 18F-FDG PET-CT after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients to Optimize Surgical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Anderegg, Maarten C. J.; de Groof, Elisabeth J.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; Bennink, Roel J.; Lagarde, Sjoerd M.; Klinkenbijl, Jean H. G.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prognosis of esophageal cancer patients can be significantly improved by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT). Given the aggressive nature of esophageal tumors, it is conceivable that in a significant portion of patients treated with nCRT, dissemination already becomes manifest during the period of nCRT. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the value and diagnostic accuracy of PET-CT after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy to identify patients with metastases preoperatively in order to prevent non-curative surgery. Methods From January 2011 until February 2013 esophageal cancer patients deemed eligible for a curative approach with nCRT and surgical resection underwent a PET-CT after completion of nCRT. If abnormalities on PET-CT were suspected metastases, histological proof was acquired. A clinical decision model was designed to assess the cost-effectiveness of this diagnostic strategy. Results 156 patients underwent a PET-CT after nCRT. In 31 patients (19.9%) PET-CT showed abnormalities suspicious for dissemination, resulting in 17 cases of proven metastases (10.9%). Of the patients without proven metastases 133 patients were operated. In 6 of these 133 cases distant metastases were detected intraoperatively, corresponding to 4.5% false-negative results. The standard introduction of a post-neoadjuvant therapy PET-CT led to a reduction of overall health care costs per patient compared to a scenario without restaging with PET-CT ($34,088 vs. $36,490). Conclusion In 10.9% of esophageal cancer patients distant metastases were detected by standard PET-CT after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. To avoid non-curative resections we advocate post-neoadjuvant therapy PET-CT as a cost-effective step in the standard work-up of candidates for surgery. PMID:26529313

  7. Improving the Definition of Tumor Bed Boost With the Use of Surgical Clips and Image Registration in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Castro Pena, Pablo; Hijal, Tarek; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Laki, Fatima; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of a boost technique. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients underwent tumorectomy with placement of two or more clips in the surgical cavity before breast remodeling. Preoperative and postoperative computed tomography scans, with match-point registration, were performed on all patients. The relationship between the location of the gross tumor volume (GTV), defined on the preoperative scan, and clip clinical target volume (CTV) (clips with a 5-mm margin on the postoperative scan) was then studied, by use of commercial volume analysis software. Results: Of the patients, 4 had two clips, 2 had three clips, 8 had four clips, and 8 had five clips. The median GTV was 1.06 mL (range, 0.2-5.3 mL); clip CTV ranged from 2.4 to 21.5 mL. Volumetric analysis showed that in 7 cases (32%), there was no intersection between the GTV and the clip CTV, with the following distribution: 4 patients with two clips, 1 patient with three clips, 1 patient with four clips, and 1 patient with five clips. The common contoured volume was defined as the percent ratio between the intersection of the GTV and clip CTV and the GTV. It was found to be significantly increased if three or more clips were used vs. only two clips (common contoured volume, 35.45% vs. 0.73%; p = 0.028). Finally, the GTV and clip CTV volume relationship can be presented as follows: 12.5% to 33% overlap in 8 patients (36.4%), 50% to 75% in 5 patients (22.7%), and greater than 90% in 2 patients (9%). Conclusions: The use of three or more clips during tumorectomy increases the accuracy of tumor bed delineation.

  8. Do severe obese patients with stress urinary incontinence benefit from transobturator tape procedure? 3-year surgical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yonguc, Tarik; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Bozkurt, Ibrahim Halil; Degirmenci, Tansu; Gunlusoy, Bulent; Sen, Volkan; Yarimoglu, Serkan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate the impact of severe obesity on surgical outcomes of the transobturator tape (TOT) procedure in patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods: In total, 32 women with severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] >35 kg/m2) were included in the study. All patients were preoperatively evaluated with history, pelvic examination, ultrasonography, and cough stress test. All patients completed the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short form (ICIQ-SF) preoperatively and at the postoperative follow-up. Cure of incontinence was defined as being completely dry after surgery. Cure was assessed subjectively and objectively. Subjective improvement defined as an International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short form (ICIQ-SF) score ?12 and satisfaction with surgery. Failure was defined as having no change or worsening of urinary incontinence after surgery. Postoperative patient satisfaction was assessed using a visual analog scale. Results: The mean follow-up time and mean BMI were 40.9 ± 20.9 months and 38 ± 3 kg/m2, respectively. According to preoperative ICIQ-SF questionnaire scores, 20 patients (62.5%) had severe and 12 patients (37.5 %) had very severe urinary incontinence symptoms. No patient had slight or moderate symptoms. None of the patients experienced worsening symptoms after surgery. Objective cure, subjective cure, subjective improvement and patient satisfaction rates were 81.2%, 46.8%, 37.5%, and 84.3% respectively. Our overall complication rate was 9.3%. None of the patients experienced intraoperative complications. Conclusion: In experienced hands, TOT is an effective and safe procedure to treat SUI, with minimal complications in severe obese women. PMID:26609331

  9. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Paulus, Rebecca; Ettinger, David S.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.; Choy, Hak

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538/Cancer and Leukemia Group B 30610).

  10. Efficiency and safety of surgical intervention to patients with Non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Chao; Liang, Shuo; Lu, Hai-Wen; Fei, Ke; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2015-01-01

    No quantitative systematic review was found to report the efficiency and safety of surgical resection in the management of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of operative intervention to patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. PubMed, the Cochrane library and Web of Science databases were searched up to July 8th, 2015. The pooled mortality from 34 studies recruiting 4788 patients was 1.5% (95% CI, 0.9–2.5%). The pooled morbidity from 33 studies consisting of 4583 patients was 16.7% (95% CI, 14.8–18.6%). The pooled proportion of patients from 35 studies, consisting of 4614 patients who were free of symptoms was 66.5% (95% CI, 61.3–71.7%) after surgery. The summary proportion of patients from 35 articles including 4279 participants who were improved was 27.5% (95% CI, 22.5–32.5%), and 9.1% (95% CI, 7.3–11.5%) showed no clinical improvement. In conclusion, our analysis indicated that lung resection in the management of non-CF bronchiectasis is associated with significant improvements in symptoms, low risk of mortality and acceptable morbidity. PMID:26627202

  11. Surgical management of intradural spinal cord tumors in children and young adults: A single-center experience with 50 patients

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Neriman; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Wrede, Karsten Henning; Sariaslan, Zeynep; Stein, Klaus Peter; Dammann, Philipp; Ringelstein, Adrian; Sure, Ulrich; Sandalcioglu, Erol Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intradural spinal cord tumors (IDSCTs) in children and young adults are rare diseases. This present study is aimed to demonstrate our experience with a large series of children and young adults with IDSCT. Methods: A total of 50 patients aged <20 years with IDSCT treated in our department between 1990 and 2010 were included in the study. Clinical, histological, and radiological findings, treatment strategies, and clinical outcome were retrospectively assessed. Depending on the relation to the spinal cord, IDSCT were dichotomized into intramedullary SCT (IMSCT) and extramedullary SCT (EMSCT). The functional outcome was evaluated with the Frankel score assessing the longest available follow-up period. Results: Mean age was 10.3 years (range 6 months–19 years). IDSCT surgery was performed in 44 patients (88%). A common first symptom in patients with EMSCT was neck and back pain (41%), whereas monoparesis of arms (43%) were often seen in patients with IMSCT. The main duration of the symptoms was longer in patients with IMSCT. The postoperative functional outcome was generally comparable to the preoperative functional condition, while better for EMSCT (P < 0.01). The functional outcome at last follow-up correlated significantly with the preoperative Frankel score (P < 0.002). Conclusion: Due to the mostly mild impact of the surgery on the functional outcome, the surgical treatment of IDSCT in children and young patients can be uniquely advocated. PMID:26713174

  12. Diurnal salivary cortisol measurement in the neurosurgical-surgical intensive care unit in critically ill acute trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Bartanusz, Viktor; Corneille, Michael G; Sordo, Salvador; Gildea, Marianne; Michalek, Joel E; Nair, Prakash V; Stewart, Ronald M; Jezova, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Acute trauma patients represent a specific subgroup of the critically ill population due to sudden and dramatic changes in homeostasis and consequently extreme demands on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Salivary cortisol is an accepted surrogate for serum free cortisol in the assessment of HPA axis function. The purpose of this study was (1) to establish the feasibility of salivary cortisol measurement in acute trauma patients in the neurosurgical-surgical intensive care unit (NSICU), and (2) to determine the diurnal pattern of salivary cortisol in the acute phase after injury. Saliva from 50 acute trauma patients was prospectively collected twice a day at 6AM and 4PM during the first week after injury in the NSICU. Mean PM cortisol concentrations were significantly higher in subjects versus controls (p<0.001). Subjects failed to develop the expected PM versus AM decrease in cortisol concentration seen in controls (p=0.005). Salivary cortisol did not vary significantly with baseline Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Injury Severity Score, sex, injury type, ethnicity, or age. When comparing mean AM and PM salivary cortisol by GCS severity category (GCS ?8 and GCS >8) the AM salivary cortisol was significantly higher in patients with GCS ?8 (p=0.002). The results show a loss of diurnal cortisol variation in acute trauma patient in the NSICU during the first week of hospitalization. Patients with severe brain injury had higher morning cortisol levels than those with mild/moderate brain injury. PMID:25065844

  13. Efficiency and safety of surgical intervention to patients with Non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Chao; Liang, Shuo; Lu, Hai-Wen; Fei, Ke; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2015-01-01

    No quantitative systematic review was found to report the efficiency and safety of surgical resection in the management of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of operative intervention to patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. PubMed, the Cochrane library and Web of Science databases were searched up to July 8th, 2015. The pooled mortality from 34 studies recruiting 4788 patients was 1.5% (95% CI, 0.9-2.5%). The pooled morbidity from 33 studies consisting of 4583 patients was 16.7% (95% CI, 14.8-18.6%). The pooled proportion of patients from 35 studies, consisting of 4614 patients who were free of symptoms was 66.5% (95% CI, 61.3-71.7%) after surgery. The summary proportion of patients from 35 articles including 4279 participants who were improved was 27.5% (95% CI, 22.5-32.5%), and 9.1% (95% CI, 7.3-11.5%) showed no clinical improvement. In conclusion, our analysis indicated that lung resection in the management of non-CF bronchiectasis is associated with significant improvements in symptoms, low risk of mortality and acceptable morbidity. PMID:26627202

  14. Ki-67 Is an Independent Predictor of Metastasis and Cause-Specific Mortality for Prostate Cancer Patients Treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoven, Bret; Yan, Yan; Ritter, Mark; Khor, Li-Yan; Hammond, Elizabeth; Jones, Christopher; Amin, Mahul; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Zeitzer, Kenneth; Pollack, Alan

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: The association of Ki-67 staining index (Ki67-SI) with overall survival (OS), disease-specific mortality (DSM), distant metastasis (DM), and biochemical failure (BF) was examined in men with favorable- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer receiving radiation therapy (RT) alone or with short-term androgen deprivation (ADT) in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08. Methods and Materials: 468 patients (23.6%) on RTOG 94-08 had sufficient tissue for Ki67-SI analysis. The median follow-up time was 7.9 years. Ki67-SI was determined by immunohistochemistry and quantified manually and by image analysis. Correlative analysis versus clinical outcome was performed using the third quartile (?Q3) cutpoint. A proportional hazards multivariable analysis (MVA) dichotomized covariates in accordance with trial stratification and randomization criteria. Results: In MVAs adjusted for all treatment covariates, high Ki67-SI (?Q3) was correlated with increased DSM (hazard ratio [HR] 2.48, P=.03), DM (HR 3.5, P=.002), and BF (HR 3.55, P<.0001). MVA revealed similar Ki67-associated hazard ratios in each separate treatment arm for DSM, DM, and BF; these reached significance only for DM in the RT-alone arm and for BF in both arms. Ki67-SI was not a significant predictor of intraprostatic recurrence assessed by repeated biopsy 2 years after treatment. Patients with a high or low Ki67-SI seemed to experience a similar relative benefit from the addition of ADT to radiation. Conclusions: High Ki67-SI independently predicts for increased DSM, DM, and protocol BF in primarily intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with RT with or without ADT on RTOG 94-08 but does not predict for local recurrence or for increased relative benefit from ADT. This and prior studies lend support for the use of Ki67-SI as a stratification factor in future trials.

  15. Patient Perspectives on Participation in the ENABLE II Randomized Controlled Trial of a Concurrent Oncology Palliative Care Intervention: Benefits and Burdens

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Cristine; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Li, Zhongze; Hegel, Mark; Ahles, Tim A.; Bakitas, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background ENABLE (Educate, Nurture, Advise Before Life Ends) II was one of the first randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of a concurrent oncology palliative care intervention on quality of life, mood, and symptom control for advanced cancer patients and their caregivers. However, little is known about how participants experience early palliative care and the benefits and burdens of participating in a palliative care clinical trial. Aim To gain a deeper understanding of participants’ perspectives about the intervention and palliative care trial participation. Design A qualitative descriptive study using thematic analysis to determine benefits and burdens of a new palliative care intervention and trial participation. Setting/Participants Of the 72 participants who were alive when the study commenced, 53 agreed to complete an in-depth, semi-structured interview regarding the ENABLE II intervention and clinical trial participation. Results Participants’ perceptions of intervention benefits were represented by four themes: enhanced problem-solving skills, better coping, feeling empowered, and feeling supported or reassured. Three themes related to trial participation: helping future patients and contributing to science, gaining insight through completion of questionnaires, and trial/intervention aspects to improve. Conclusions The benefits of the intervention and the positive aspects of trial participation outweighed trial “burdens”. This study raises additional important questions relevant to future trial design and intervention development: when should a palliative care intervention be initiated and what aspects of self-care and healthy living should be offered in addition to palliative content for advanced cancer patients when they are feeling well? PMID:22573470

  16. The surgical treatment of bile reflux gastritis: a study of 59 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, E D; Hersh, T

    1980-01-01

    Fifty-nine patients underwent duodenogastric diversion for bile reflux gastritis. Sixty per cent of 37 patients who underwent measurement of solid food gastric emptying had delayed gastric emptying. Patients were also assessed in terms of the degree of gastritis present endoscopically. Fifty-six patients were available for follow-up of from six months up to six years. The results demonstrated the following: Patients with delayed gastric emptying and reflux gastritis fared poorly after duodenogastric diversion; the greater the severity of gastritis visible by endoscopy, the better the results of diversion. Only 47% of patients achieved a satisfactory result of duodenogastric diversion. PMID:7406572

  17. Reflections: Surgical Education-the Times they are a-Changin': Lessons Learned from the 3rd MAYMET-ESO Joint Meeting.

    PubMed

    Tarkowski, Radoslaw; Vetto, John T

    2015-09-01

    Technical skills are not sufficient for successful surgical care. Non-technical skills such as team work, decision-making in cancer treatment, communication with the patient, ethical challenges, situation awareness, and communication in the operating room are mandatory for favorable outcomes. Although formally taught in other high-demand disciplines, such skills were traditionally rarely discussed in surgical oncology. The 3rd MAYMET-ESO Joint Meeting "Professionalism for Breast Surgeons" held in Istanbul, Turkey, 5 October 2013 was dedicated to the development of non-technical skills in the everyday activity of breast surgeons. We briefly discuss information from this very interesting and inspiring educational event and how it relates to more recent changes in surgical oncology education. PMID:25903052

  18. Overall Quality of Life Assessment in the Patients Undergoing External Beam Radiation in Outpatient Radiation Oncology Department

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Rashmi; Tse, Richard; Karreman, Erwin; Dubey, Arbind; Tai, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The impact of treatment on cancer patients’ quality of life (QoL) has been the focus of a variety of longitudinal studies in English literature for past decade. The measurement of patient-reported outcomes which includes health-related quality of life is a new important initiative which has emerged and grown over the past three decades. Following the development of reliable and valid self-reported questionnaires, health-related quality of life has been assessed in tens of thousands of patients and a wide variety of cancers. With growing information, feedback and experience, the quality of the health-related QOL studies has improved a lot. We expect in near future more methodologically robust studies will be done in a scientific way to answer unanswered questions. Methods: As part of a Dean's summer project, a survey was undertaken to facilitate a more complete description of the quality of life experience in patients with histological diagnosis of cancer undergoing external beam radiation as an outpatient at Allan Blair Cancer Center, Regina, Canada. The questionnaires had two major components: depression and global QOL. The depression was measured by the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale which is a short self-administered survey to quantify the depression status of a patient. Results: Overall, only the equation associated with the outcome of QoL - Physical well-being was significant. That data indicated that only the variable of age was a significant predictor. A positive relationship was present indicating higher levels of depression when patients received chemotherapy or narcotics. Breast cancer patients were less depressed than lung cancer patients. Conclusion: Cancer and its related treatment is an important health issue influencing QoL. The study has revealed that the use of chemotherapy and narcotics has a significant impact on the quality of life (QoL). PMID:26261696

  19. 78 FR 25304 - Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ...USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On-Site Leased...USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), including on- site leased...USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), including on-site...

  20. Gradual sucrose gastric loading test: A method for the prediction of nonsuccess gastric enteral feeding in critically ill surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Chittawatanarat, Kaweesak; Sathornviriyapong, Suun; Polbhakdee, Yaowalak

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intolerance of gastric enteral feeding (GEN) commonly occurs in surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU). A liquid containing sugar could prolong gastric emptying time. This study was to propose a method for prediction of nonsuccess GEN using gastric volume after loading (GVAL) following gradual sucrose gastric loading. Materials and Methods: Mechanical ventilator supported and hemodynamically stable patients in SICU were enrolled. About 180-240 min before the GEN starting, a sucrose solution (12.5%; 450 mosmole/kg, 800 mL) was administered via gastric feeding tube over 30 min with 45° head upright position. GVAL was measured at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after loading. GEN success status using clinical criteria was assessed at 72 h after the starting GEN protocol. The receiving operating characteristic (ROC) and c statistic were used for discrimination at each time point of GVAL. Results: A total of 32 patients were enrolled and completed the protocol. 14 patients (43.7%) were nonsuccessful GEN. The nonsuccess group was found to have significantly more GVAL than the other group at all-time points during the test (P < 0.05). The most discriminating point of GVAL for the prediction of nonsuccess was 150 mL at 120 min after loading with a sensitivity of 92.3%, specificity of 88.9%, positive predictive value of 85.7%, negative predictive value of 94.1%, and ROC area 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.91–1.00). Conclusion: A high GVAL following sucrose gastric loading test might be a method to predict nonsuccess GEN in critically ill surgical patients. PMID:25722551

  1. Nuclear medicine in oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1996-12-31

    Radioactivity was discovered in the late 1890s, and as early as 1903, Alexander Graham Bell advocated that radioactivity be used to treat tumors. In 1913, the first paper describing therapeutic uses of radium was published; in 1936, {sup 24}Na was administered as a therapy to a leukemia patient. Three years later, uptake of {sup 89}Sr was noted in bone metastases. During the 1940s, there was increasing use of iodine therapy for thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Diagnostic {open_quotes}imaging{close_quotes} with radioisotopes was increasingly employed in the 1930s and 40s using probes and grew in importance and utility with the development of scintillation detectors with photorecording systems. Although coincidence counting to detect positron emissions was developed in 1953, the first medical center cyclotron was not installed until 1961. The 1960s saw the development of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, emission reconstruction tomography [giving rise to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)], and {sup 64}Ga tumor imaging. Nuclear medicine was recognized as a medical specialty in 1971. Radiolabeled antibodies targeting human tumors in animals was reported in 1973; antibody tumor imaging in humans was reported in 1978. Technology has continued to advance, including the development of SPECT cameras with coincidence detection able to perform FDG/PET imaging. With this overview as as backdrop, this paper focuses on the role of nuclear medicine in oncology from three perspectives: nonspecific tumor imaging agents, specific tumor imaging agents, and radioisotopes for tumor therapy. In summary, while tumor diagnosis and treatment were among the first uses explored for radioactivity, these areas have yet to reach their full potential. Development of new radioisotopes and new radiopharmaceuticals, coupled with improvements in technology, make nuclear oncology an area of growth for nuclear medicine.

  2. Bedside Percutaneous Tracheostomy versus Open Surgical Tracheostomy in Non-ICU Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koyfman, Leonid; Frenkel, Amit; Semyonov, Michael; Peiser, Jochanan G.; Hayun-Maman, Hagit; Boyko, Matthew; Gruenbaum, Shaun E.; Zlotnik, Alexander; Klein, Moti

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous bedside tracheostomy (PBT) is a one of the common and safe procedures in intensive care units through the world. In the present paper we published our clinical experience with a performance of PBTs in the regular ward by intensive care physicians' team. We found it safe and similar outcome in comparison to open surgical tracheostomy method in operation room by ENT team. The performance of PBT in the regular ward showed potential economic advantages in saving medical staff and operating room resources. PMID:24523960

  3. Limited dissection and early primary closure of the tracheostomy stoma in head and neck oncology operations: a retrospective study of 158 cases.

    PubMed

    Hammarfjord, O; Ekanayake, K; Norton, J; Stassen, L F A

    2015-03-01

    Tracheostomy is an efficient and widely used method to secure a patent airway in patients undergoing major oral and maxillofacial oncology operations. The inferiorly based Björk flap technique, through a limited incision, followed by early primary skin closure, has been the preferred method in our unit. Patients who underwent tracheostomy for major oral and maxillofacial oncology operations during the period June 2005 to December 2012 were reviewed. Age, gender, preoperative diagnosis, duration the tracheostomy tube was in situ, tracheostomy-associated complications, and long-term sequelae were evaluated. A total 158 tracheostomies were performed using the same surgical approach in patients aged 18-84 years (median 59, mean 58.2, standard deviation 14.24 years). The time the tracheostomy tube was in situ ranged from 3 to 40 days (median 7, mean 9.0, standard deviation 6.52 days). The complication rate was 5.06% (8/158 patients). A major concern highlighted in previous publications is the risk of surgical emphysema with early closure. In this study, no patients developed surgical emphysema, tracheal fistula, clinical tracheal stenosis, or cosmetically unacceptable scarring of the neck. No patient died of a tracheostomy-related cause. In summary, the Björk flap with early primary closure of the skin by simple sutures provides a safe and easily managed approach, causing minimal postoperative morbidity. PMID:25532621

  4. Study on serum proteomic features in patients with and without recurrence or metastasis after surgical resection of esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G B; Gao, C F; Wang, X L; Zhao, G; Li, D H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify specific bio-markers for recurrence or metastasis of esophageal carcinoma in serum of patients subjected to esophagectomy. Surface-enhanced laser desorp-tion/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) combined with IMAC-Cu(2+) ProteinChip array were performed for the serum protein profiling in patients after surgical resection of esophageal carcinoma. Two groups of patients were analyzed: 38 patients without recurrence or metastasis (Group 1) and 22 patients with recurrence or metastasis after resection (Group 2). The Biomarker Wizard and Bio-marker Patterns software were used to identify proteins differentially expressed between the 2 groups. There were 33 differentially expressed serum proteins detected by comparison between the groups. The clas-sification tree model composed of 3 differentially expressed proteins with different m/z (9368.63, 5342.59, and 5254.43 Da) was established. Under the learning mode, the sensitivity and specificity of this model for diagnosis of esophageal carcinoma recurrence or metastasis were both 100% (22/22 and 38/38, respectively). Under the testing mode, the sensitivity and specificity were 90.9% (20/22) and 94.7% (36/38), re-spectively. The recurrence or metastasis of esophageal carcinoma after esophagectomy can be rapidly and accurately detected using the combi-nation of SELDI-TOF-MS with IMAC-Cu(2+) ProteinChip array, which, therefore, has a potential for clinical application. PMID:24535882

  5. Streptococcus bovis infectious endocarditis and occult gastrointestinal neoplasia: experience with 25 consecutive patients treated surgically.

    PubMed

    Alozie, Anthony; Köller, Kerstin; Pose, Lumi; Raftis, Maximilian; Steinhoff, Gustav; Westphal, Bernd; Lamprecht, Georg; Podbielski, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of gastrointestinal neoplasia in patients with Streptococcus bovis infectious endocarditis we performed a retrospective cohort analysis of all episodes of S. bovis infectious endocarditis treated at our institution between January 2000 through December 2014. Twenty-five patients were identified for this purpose. 12/25 patients received colonoscopy and 1/25 of the patients was assessed with CT colonography. Of the 13 who underwent colonic assessment, 11 were diagnosed with colonic neoplasms at different stages of development. In the absence of any strong contraindication, gastroenteroscopic evaluation in all patients diagnosed with S. bovis infectious endocarditis should be pursued. PMID:26473016

  6. Surgical treatments for patients with terminal heart failure: mechanical support compared with transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Michel; Perrault, Louis P

    2014-12-01

    Heart transplantation remains the gold standard treatment for patients with terminal end-stage heart failure. Although results reported have been excellent, older recipients and donors associated with significant comorbidities are now the rule rather than the exception. Moreover, heart failure has become a significant public health problem with a growing population of patients in countries unable to answer the demand for transplantation. An emerging answer to this dilemma comes from results reported with the use of continuous flow pumps where patient survival approaches 80% one and 2 years after implantation in selected patients. Is it time to triage patients to continuous flow pumps? Should we recommend continuous flow pump implantations in patients with various comorbidities, and offer transplantation to a selected group of patients who will reach the long-term benefit of the procedure? PMID:25284807

  7. Limb Salvage Surgery for Musculoskeletal Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wan Ismail, Wan Faisham Nu’man Bin

    2015-01-01

    The management of musculoskeletal tumours has progressed tremendously over the past few decades. Limb salvage surgery has become a standard practise without compromising the oncological outcome. Patients generally will benefit with superior function and a better quality of life compared with definitive amputation. The multidisciplinary approach and advancement of surgeries are important to achieve patient survival and optimum function. PMID:26715902

  8. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of hemorrhagic cystitis – a complication of bone marrow transplantation in pediatric oncology patients

    PubMed Central

    Biel, Anna; Soko?owska-D?bek, D?brówka; Olchowy, Cyprian; ?asecki, Mateusz

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of hemorrhagic cystitis following bone marrow transplantation in children. Material and methods The study involved an analysis of clinical material and the results of imaging tests performed in 334 patients who underwent hematopoietic cell transplantation. Ultrasonographic findings in 42 patients with hemorrhagic cystitis were analyzed in detail. The ultrasound images served to assess the severity of hemorrhagic cystitis and the results were compared with the clinical assessment of the disease on the Droller scale, as well as the laboratory and endoscopic tests. Results In the studied group of patients hemorrhagic cystitis following allogeneic transplantation was diagnosed in 12.5% cases. 73.8% patients received transplants from unrelated donors, 26.2% – from compatible siblings. The study revealed a higher incidence of hemorrhagic cystitis in children above 10 years of age. Grade 3 according to the Droller was diagnosed in 42.9%, grade 2 – in 30.9%, grade 4 – in 14.3%, and grade 1 – in 11.9% patients. The number of ultrasound examinations depended on the clinical symptoms, severity, duration and co-occurrence of other complications following the transplantation and was within the 1–15 range (average: 4.6). Grades 3 and 4 were related to the poor clinical condition of the patients and to their longer hospitalization. During this period there was an increased risk of renal malfunction and acute renal failure, post-inflammatory narrowing of the ureters, hydronephrosis, and in grade 4 the fibrosis of the bladder with reduced bladder capacity. Analyses demonstrated a significant correlation between the ultrasound image of the bladder wall and the clinical severity. Conclusions Ultrasound with Doppler options remains the primary diagnostic tool in the evaluation of hemorrhagic cystitis, and is useful in terms of its diagnosis, determination of the severity, and monitoring of the treatment.

  9. American Society for Radiation Oncology

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources and Links Journals Practice Management Practice Accreditation Radiation Oncology Coding Reimbursement PQRS EHR Incentives Program National Radiation Oncology Registry Advocacy What's Happening in Washington? What's ...

  10. Patient-Reported Outcome Coordinator Did Not Improve Quality of Life Assessment Response Rates: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donna; Gerbing, Robert; Alonzo, Todd; Aplenc, Richard; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Schulte, Fiona; Cullen, Patricia; Sung, Lillian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Health related quality of life (HRQL) assessments during therapy for pediatric cancer provide valuable information to better understand the patient experience. Our objective was to determine the impact of a patient-reported outcome (PRO) coordinator on HRQL questionnaire completion rates during a pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) trial. Methods AAML1031 is a multicenter Children’s Oncology Group therapeutic trial for de novo AML with a secondary aim to assess HRQL of children and adolescents treated with chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Parents/guardians are the primary respondents and four questionnaires are administered at eight time points. The questionnaires are the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales, PedsQL 3.0 Acute Cancer Module, PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale, and the Pediatric Inventory for Parents. To improve response rates, a central PRO coordinator was instituted and reminded sites about upcoming and delinquent questionnaires. The proportion of HRQL questionnaires completed were compared prior to, and following institution of the PRO coordinator. This analysis evaluated the first five assessment time points. Results There were231 families who consented to participate in the HRQL aim. Overall response rates for all questionnaires were 73–83%. At time point 1, within 14 days of chemotherapy initiation, post-PRO coordinator completion rates were significantly higher for three of four questionnaires. However, the effect was not sustained and at time point 4, one month following last chemotherapy or HSCT, completion rates were significantly lower post-PRO coordinator for all four questionnaires. Conclusion Addition of a central PRO coordinator did not result in sustained improvement in HRQL questionnaire completion rates. Efforts to improve response rates must consider other strategies. PMID:25915772

  11. Impact of obesity on functional and oncological outcomes in radical perineal prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Altay, Bulent; Erkurt, Bulent; Guzelburc, Vahit; Kiremit, Murat Can; Boz, Mustafa Yucel; Albayrak, Selami

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated the impact of obesity on perioperative morbidity, functional, and oncological outcomes after radical perineal prostatectomy (RPP). Methods: A total of 298 consecutive patients underwent RPP at our institution. Patients were categorized into 3 groups based on their body mass index (BMI): Normal weight <25 kg/m2 (Group 1), overweight 25 to <30 kg/m2 (Group 2), and obese ?30 kg/m2 (Group 3). We compared the groups with respect to perioperative data, postoperative oncologic, and functional outcomes. Evaluation of urinary continence and erectile function was performed using a patient-reported questionnaire and the International Index of Erectile Function-5 questionnaire, respectively, administered preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Limitations included short follow-up time, retrospective design and lack of a morbidly obese group. Results: No significant differences were found among the 3 groups with regard to operative time, estimated blood loss, length of hospital stay, catheter removal time, positive surgical margin, and complication rates. At 12 months, 94.7%, 95% and 95% of normal, overweight and obese patients, respectively, were continent (free of pad use) (p = 0.81). At 12 months, 30.6%, 29.8% and 30.4% of patients had spontaneous erections and were able to penetrate and complete intercourse in Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3, respectively (p = 0.63). Conclusions: In this cohort of patients, no clinically relevant risks were associated with increasing BMI. PMID:26600881

  12. Transcatheter versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Diabetes and Severe Aortic Stenosis at High Risk for Surgery: An Analysis of the PARTNER Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Pibarot, Philippe; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Suri, Rakesh; McAndrew, Thomas C.; Maniar, Hersh S.; Zajarias, Alan; Kodali, Susheel; Kirtane, Ajay J.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Svensson, Lars G.; Waksman, Ron; Smith, Craig R.; Leon, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a less invasive approach to aortic valve replacement (AVR) improves clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Background Diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality after surgical AVR for AS. Methods Among treated patients with severe symptomatic AS at high-risk for surgery in the PARTNER trial, we examined outcomes stratified by diabetes status of patients randomly assigned to transcatheter or surgical AVR. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 1 year. Results Among 657 patients enrolled in PARTNER who underwent treatment, there were 275 patients with diabetes (145 transcatheter, 130 surgical). There was a significant interaction between diabetes and treatment group for 1-year all-cause mortality (p=0.048). Among diabetic patients, all-cause mortality at 1 year was 18.0% in the transcatheter group and 27.4% in the surgical group (HR 0.60; 95% CI, 0.36–0.99; p=0.04). Results were consistent among patients treated via transfemoral or transapical routes. In contrast, among non-diabetic patients, there was no significant difference in all-cause mortality at 1 year (p=0.48). Among diabetic patients, the 1-year rates of stroke were similar between treatment groups (3.5% transcatheter vs. 3.5% surgery, p=0.88), but the rates of renal failure requiring dialysis >30 days were lower in the transcatheter group (0% vs. 6.1%, p=0.003). Conclusions Among patients with diabetes and severe symptomatic AS at high-risk for surgery, this post-hoc stratified analysis of the PARTNER trial suggests there is a survival benefit, no increase in stroke, and less renal failure from treatment with transcatheter compared to surgical AVR. PMID:24291272

  13. Improving Cultural Competency and Disease Awareness among Oncology Nurses Caring for Adult T-Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortese-Peske, Marisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Foreign-born residents face significant challenges accessing and receiving quality healthcare in the U.S. These obstacles include a lack of information on how to access care, fear, as well as communication and cultural barriers (Portes, Fernandez-Kelly & Light, 2012). Increasing healthcare providers' knowledge regarding a patient's…

  14. Clinical ineffectiveness of IL-2 and/or IFN alpha administration after autologous PBSC transplantation in pediatric oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Vlk, V; Eckschlager, T; Kavan, P; Kabícková, E; Koutecký, J; Sobota, V; Bubenik, J; Pospísilová, D

    2000-01-01

    Clinical impact of s.c. administration of IL-2 and/or IFN alpha was studied in 23 pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (IFN alpha group) and sarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, peripheral neuroepitelioma, neuroblastoma, and embryonic carcinoma (IL-2 + IFN alpha group) after autologous PBSC transplantation. Expression of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25, CD38, CD56, CD71, CD122, and HLA-DR antigens, serum level of the soluble IL-2R alpha, and NK activity against K562 cell line were evaluated in 11 patients representative for both types of immunotherapy. T and, more markedly, NK cell proliferation, induction of activation markers on the surface of T and NK subsets, and elevation of sIL-2R alpha concentrations were seen in the IL-2 + IFN alpha subgroup. In the IFN alpha subgroup, the total number of lymphocytes and expression of activation markers remained unchanged, but the number of CD8+ T cells increased at the expense of CD4+ T and NK cells during the therapy. Cytotoxic activity against K562 cells was not influenced by the immunotherapy in either subgroup. No significant clinical benefit of the immunotherapy was seen in these patients compared to 27 control patients with relevant diagnoses who did not receive immunotherapy. PMID:10689713

  15. Comparison of anal cancer outcomes in public and private hospital patients treated at a single radiation oncology center

    PubMed Central

    Bitterman, Danielle S.; Grew, David; Gu, Ping; Cohen, Richard F.; Sanfilippo, Nicholas J.; Leichman, Cynthia G.; Leichman, Lawrence P.; Moore, Harvey G.; Gold, Heather T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare clinical and treatment characteristics and outcomes in locally advanced anal cancer, a potentially curable disease, in patients referred from a public or private hospital. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 112 anal cancer patients from a public and a private hospital who received definitive chemoradiotherapy at the same cancer center between 2004 and 2013. Tumor stage, radiotherapy delay, radiotherapy duration, and unplanned treatment breaks ?10 days were compared using t-test and ?2 test. Overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and colostomy free survival (CFS) were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard models for OS and DFS were developed. Results The follow-up was 14.9 months (range, 0.7-94.8 months). Public hospital patients presented with significantly higher clinical T stage (P<0.05) and clinical stage group (P<0.05), had significantly longer radiotherapy delays (P<0.05) and radiotherapy duration (P<0.05), and had more frequent radiation therapy (RT) breaks ?10 days (P<0.05). Three-year OS showed a marked trend in favor of private hospital patients for 3-year OS (72.8% vs. 48.9%; P=0.171), 3-year DFS (66.3% vs. 42.7%, P=0.352), and 3-year CFS (86.4% vs. 68.9%, P=0.299). Referral hospital was not predictive of OS or DFS on multivariate analysis. Conclusions Public hospital patients presented at later stage and experienced more delays in initiating and completing radiotherapy, which may contribute to the trend in poorer DFS and OS. These findings emphasize the need for identifying clinical and treatment factors that contribute to decreased survival in low socioeconomic status (SES) populations. PMID:26487947

  16. Effects of anaesthesia on some aspects of mental functioning of surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Flatt, J R; Birrell, P C; Hobbes, A

    1984-11-01

    Plastic surgery patients undergoing either local (LA) or general (GA) anaesthesia of at least forty-five minutes' duration and a non-patient control group were used to examine the extent and duration of deterioration in mental functioning following GA and the factors influencing such deterioration. Mental functioning was assessed by a battery of six tests administered one week before anaesthesia, four days after anaesthesia and six weeks after anaesthesia. Mental performance of GA patients but not of LA patients was significantly impaired on the fourth postoperative day. Six weeks after anaesthesia GA patients were still performing significantly below controls. There was marked variation in the pattern of recovery, some GA patients failing to regain their pre-operative level of performance after six weeks. Severity of deterioration following general anaesthesia was significantly correlated with habitual caffeine consumption. PMID:6517289

  17. Surgical Management of the Forefoot in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis - A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Nash, W.J.; Al-Nammari, S.; Khan, W.S.; Pengas, I.P.

    2015-01-01

    Foot and ankle pathologies cause a significant disease burden on rheumatoid patients. Forefoot pathologies causes pain, callosities and possibly ulceration, and can cause problems with footwear. Forefoot correction in rheumatoid patients has historically comprised of excision of diseased joints. While satisfaction was high with this procedure, complications, changing expectations and improvement in medical therapy have raised expectation of patients, physicians and surgeons alike. This review assesses the role of joint preserving osteotomies and arthrodesis, as well as associated complications. It also describes the role of the multidisciplinary team in the management of these patients. PMID:25861409

  18. An overview of triple negative breast cancer for surgical oncologists.