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Sample records for surgical oncology patients

  1. Perioperative Laboratory Abnormalities in Gynecologic Oncology Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Tatnai L.; Junn, Justin; Kolenic, Giselle E.; Christen, Catherine; Johnston, Carolyn M.; Reynolds, R. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Laboratory blood testing incurs financial costs and the blood draws can increase discomfort, yet minimal data exists regarding routine testing in gynecologic oncology surgical patients. Additionally, an increasing number of gynecologic oncology surgeries are performed via a laparoscopic approach. Thus, further investigation into perioperative laboratory testing for gynecologic oncology patients is warranted. An increasing number of gynecologic oncology surgeries are performed via a laparoscopic approach. Thus, further investigation into perioperative laboratory testing for gynecologic oncology patients is warranted. Objective: The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the frequency and etiology of perioperative laboratory test abnormalities in patients undergoing laparoscopic and laparotomy surgery in a gynecologic oncology service, and (2) to establish an evidence-based algorithm to reduce unnecessary laboratory testing. Materials and Methods: A single-institution retrospective study was completed, investigating laparoscopic and laparotomic surgeries over 4 years. Information on preoperative and postoperative laboratory data, surgical parameters, perioperative interventions, and patient demographics was collected. Quality-assurance data were reviewed. Data were tabulated and analyzed using Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS) version 22. A Student's t-test was used to test for group differences for continuous variables with equal variance, the Mann-Whitney–U test for continuous variables when unequal variance was detected, and Pearson's χ2 was used to investigate categorical variables of interest. p-Values <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Logistic regression was performed to investigate the relationships among multiple predictors and each identified outcome. Results: The study included 481 subjects (168 laparoscopies, 313 laparotomies). Patients undergoing laparoscopy were, on average, younger (53.5 versus 57.4), with lower body mass indexes (29.7 versus 33.0) and lower rates of diabetes (10.7% versus 19.5%), compared to patients undergoing laparotomy. Overall, >98% of patients underwent at least one preoperative and postoperative laboratory test, totaling 8060 preoperative and 5784 postoperative results. The laparoscopy group was significantly less likely to have postoperative metabolic abnormalities or to undergo perioperative blood transfusion. Patients taking an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin-II–receptor blocker, or diuretic were significantly more likely to have elevated creatinine preoperatively (odds ratio [OR]: 5.0; p < 0.001) and postoperatively (OR: 7.1; p < 0.001), and this remained true for each group when divided by surgical approach. Perioperative complications meeting institutional quality assurance criteria occurred in 1.7% of laparoscopy patients compared to 11.8% of laparotomy patients (p < 0.001); perioperative laboratory testing was not a factor in the diagnosis of these complications. Conclusions: Clinically significant laboratory abnormalities are uncommon and are less likely to be found on routine perioperative testing in gynecologic oncology patients undergoing laparoscopy, compared to patients undergoing laparotomy. This suggests a role for limiting perioperative laboratory blood testing. (J GYNECOL SURG 32:111) PMID:27041975

  2. Rehabilitation of oncology patients with hard palate defects. Part 1: The surgical planning phase.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rahat; Altaie, Asmaa; Nattress, Brian

    2015-05-01

    This article is the first in a series of three papers that will discuss the conventional non-implant retained prosthodontic rehabilitation of oncology patients with surgically acquired hard palate defects. In this first paper, the dental challenges posed by the oncology patients will briefly be discussed. The interface between the specialist restorative dentist and the maxillofacial surgeon when planning the conventional dental rehabilitation of an oncology patient with a hard palate defect will be discussed in detail. Clinical Relevance: To highlight the importance of the restorative dentistry/surgical interface when planning a treatment for a patient requiring a maxillectomy and conventional obturation. PMID:26062257

  3. Current Management of Surgical Oncologic Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Bosscher, Marianne R. F.; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.; Hoekstra, Harald J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC). In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed. Method A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days. Results In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%. Conclusion In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy. PMID:25933135

  4. Pediatric surgical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 17 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Ethical Considerations in Pediatric Tumor Management; The Essentials of Radiotherapy for Solid Tumors in Pediatric Patients; Markers in Childhood Solid Tumors; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Neophroblastoma; and The Management of Pulmonary Metastatic Lesions in Pediatric Solid Tumors.

  5. The Prevalence of HIV in Cancer Patients at the Surgical Oncology Unit of Donka University Hospital of Conakry (Guinea)

    PubMed Central

    Traore, Bangaly; Bah, Thierno Souleymane; Traore, Fode Amara; Sow, Mamadou Saliou; Diane, Solomana; Keita, Mamady; Cisse, Mohamed; Koulibaly, Moussa; Camara, Naby Daouda

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To determine the prevalence of HIV infection among patients seen at the surgical oncology unit of Donka (Conakry, Guinea). Method. We conducted a retrospective and descriptive study of HIV infection in cancer patients from May 2007 to December 2012. Social characteristics (age, gender, marital status, and education) and immune status (HIV type, CD4 count) were reviewed. Results. Out of 2598 cancer patients, 54 (2.1%) tested positive for HIV. There were 11 (20.4%) defining AIDS and 43 (79.6%) nondefining AIDS cancers. The most frequent cancers were breast (14) (26.0%), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (6) (11.1%), liver (6) (11.1%), eye and annexes (6) (11.1%), and cervical cancer (5) (9.3%). These patients were female in 34 (63.0%) and had a median age of 39 years and body mass index was 20,3 Kg/m2. They were unschooled in 40 (74.1%) and married in 35 (64.8%). CD4 count showed a median of 317 cells/mL. Antiretroviral treatment was performed in 40 (74.1%). Conclusion. HIV prevalence is higher in patients in our unit of surgical oncology. Breast cancer was the most common in this association. A national survey of a large sample is needed to determine the true prevalence and impact of HIV on cancer prognosis. PMID:26770197

  6. Prediction tools in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Isariyawongse, Brandon K; Kattan, Michael W

    2012-07-01

    Artificial neural networks, prediction tables, and clinical nomograms allow physicians to transmit an immense amount of prognostic information in a format that exhibits comprehensibility and brevity. Current models demonstrate the feasibility to accurately predict many oncologic outcomes, including pathologic stage, recurrence-free survival, and response to adjuvant therapy. Although emphasis should be placed on the independent validation of existing prediction tools, there is a paucity of models in the literature that focus on quality of life outcomes. The unification of tools that predict oncologic and quality of life outcomes into a comparative effectiveness table will furnish patients with cancer with the information they need to make a highly informed and individualized treatment decision. PMID:22583992

  7. [The evolution of surgical and functional operability in thoracic oncology].

    PubMed

    Parshin, V D; Belov, Iu V; Komarov, R N; Bazarov, D V; Parshin, V V; Babaev, M A; Podaliak, D G

    2012-01-01

    The authors own the experience of 4157 operations on the reason of malignant lung tumors, of them 429 (10.3%) operations were combined. The extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is considered to be reasonable by extended thoracic resections. Surgical lung volume reduction by emphysema shows good functional results, which allows to use its principles in oncologic patients with low functional repiratory reserves. The overall multidisciplinary approach in thoracic oncology allows better treatment results and gives hope to the earlier inoperable patients. PMID:22968497

  8. [Chromolymphography in the oncological surgical clinic].

    PubMed

    Remizov, A L; Bokham, Ia V; Vasil'ev, B V; Stukov, A N; Tobilevich, V P

    1978-05-01

    A new Soviet preparation for colour lymphography--chromolymphotrast--is presented in this paper. Radiopaque lymphography with the use of chromolymphotrast was carried out upon more than 50 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix and of the body of the womb. Besides, there is information concerning a successful use of the chromolymphotrast in cases of cancer of the vulva, mammary gland and rectum. Colour lymphography with the use of chromolymphotrast contributes to a more complete removal of lymphatic collectors. After a preliminary lymphography surgical interventions have acquired a radical character in 93.6% of operations on lymphatic nodes, thus adding to a decrease of the incidence rate of regional recurrences. The national medical industry has proceeded to the production of the preparation, which builds up the conditions for a broad use of colour radiopaque lymphography in oncology. PMID:664167

  9. Surgical Technique Refinements in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jeffrey C.; Shah, Jatin P.

    2010-01-01

    The head and neck region poses a challenging arena for oncologic surgery. Diseases and their treatment can affect a myriad of functions, including sight, hearing, taste, smell, breathing, speaking, swallowing, facial expression and appearance. This review discusses several areas where refinements in surgical techniques have led to improved patient outcomes. This includes surgical incisions, neck lymphadenectomy, transoral laser microsurgery, minimally invasive thyroid surgery, and the use of vascularized free flaps for oromandibular reconstruction. PMID:20512941

  10. Intraoperative OCT in Surgical Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Fredrick A.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    The global incidence of cancer is rising, putting an increasingly heavy burden upon health care. The need to effectively detect and treat cancer is one of the most significant problems faced in health care today. Effective cancer treatment typically depends upon early detection and, for most solid tumors, successful removal of the cancerous tumor tissue via surgical procedures. Difficulties arise when attempting to differentiate between normal and tumor tissue during surgery. Unaided visual examination of the tissue provides only superficial, low-resolution information and often with little visual contrast. Many imaging modalities widely used for cancer screening and diagnostics are of limited use in the operating room due to low spatial resolution. OCT provides cellular resolution allowing for more precise localization of the tumor tissue. It is also relatively inexpensive and highly portable, making it well suited for intraoperative applications.

  11. The future of trials in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Naredi, Peter; La Quaglia, Michael P

    2015-07-01

    Patients with cancer generally have better outcomes when treated as part of a clinical trial compared with patients not enrolled in a clinical trial. Unfortunately, surgical participation in, and leadership of such studies, is limited. This lack of clinical investigation is adversely affecting progress in cancer surgery research and, ultimately, hinders the treatment of patients. Some of the reasons for poor surgical participation in clinical research include: limitations on funding provision; inadequate training of junior surgeons in clinical trials methodology; and inadequate support of surgical faculty members as clinical investigators. Despite these shortcomings, numerous successful surgical studies have helped to change concepts, and improve patient care in certain clinical areas. Finally, a number of possible solutions are proposed, which might improve surgical involvement in clinical trials and result in more, and better-designed and executed clinical trials in this important area of research. PMID:25869462

  12. A phase II trial of a surgical protocol to decrease the incidence of wound complications in obese gynecologic oncology patients

    PubMed Central

    Novetsky, Akiva P.; Zighelboim, Israel; Guntupalli, Saketh R.; Ioffe, Yevgeniya J.M.; Kizer, Nora T.; Hagemann, Andrea R.; Powell, Matthew A.; Thaker, Premal H.; Mutch, David G.; Massad, L. Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Obese women have a high incidence of wound separation after gynecologic surgery. We explored the effect of a prospective care pathway on the incidence of wound complications. Methods Women with a body mass index (BMI)≥30kg/m2 undergoing a gynecologic procedure by a gynecologic oncologist via a vertical abdominal incision were eligible. The surgical protocol required: skin and subcutaneous tissues to be incised using a scalpel or cutting electrocautery, fascial closure using #1 polydioxanone suture, placement of a 7mm Jackson-Pratt drain below Camper’s fascia, closure of Camper’s fascia with 3-0 plain catgut suture and skin closure with staples. Wound complication was defined as the presence of either a wound infection or any separation. Demographic and perioperative data were analyzed using contingency tables. Univariable and multivariable regression models were used to identify predictors of wound complications. Patients were compared using a multivariable model to a historical group of obese patients to assess the efficacy of the care pathway. Results 105 women were enrolled with a median BMI of 38.1. Overall, 39 (37%) had a wound complication. Women with a BMI of 30–39.9 kg/m2 had a significantly lower risk of wound complication as compared to those with a BMI >40 kg/m2 (23% vs 59%, p<0.001). After controlling for factors associated with wound complications the prospective care pathway was associated with a significantly decreased wound complication rate in women with BMI<40kg/m2 (OR 0.40, 95% C.I.: 0.18–0.89). Conclusion This surgical protocol lead to a decreased rate of wound complications among women with BMI 30–39.9 kg/m2. PMID:24952366

  13. Making cancer visible - Dyes in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Yap, Kiryu K; Neuhaus, Susan J

    2016-03-01

    Dyes share an intricate relationship with oncology. Dyes can cause cancer as chemical carcinogens, but can also be harnessed against cancer when used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Histopathology, imaging, and newer molecular diagnostics all rely on dyes, and their use in sentinel lymph node biopsies and intra-operative imaging has helped drive a paradigm shift in cancer surgery towards minimally-invasive and organ sparing approaches with enhanced resection accuracy. As therapeutic agents, the cytotoxicity of specific dyes can be employed in direct chemo-ablation or in photodynamic therapy. The same agent can have dual functionalities in cancer detection and treatment, in a novel field known as theranostics. This is facilitated by newer generation dyes conjugated with tumour-targeting probes such as antibodies, and these bio-conjugate agents can also incorporate nanotechnology or radio-isotopes. Further advances will be closely aligned with our increasing understanding of molecular oncology, and will form a new generation of cancer detection and treatment agents that promote precision medicine for cancer. Dyes and their roles have evolved and been reinvented, but they remain relevant as ever. This review explores the fascinating history of dyes, and their place in the state-of-the-art of oncology. PMID:26979638

  14. What can we learn from oncology surgical trials?

    PubMed

    Evrard, Serge; McKelvie-Sebileau, Pippa; van de Velde, Cornelis; Nordlinger, Bernard; Poston, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Conducting high-quality prospective clinical trials in surgical oncology remains a challenge, and many seemingly well-designed trials lack this high quality because of inadequate recruitment accrual, lack of clinician interest, or evolution of treatment strategy during the many years over which such trials are conducted. In this Perspectives we examine some of the failures in published surgical oncology trials and discuss why they failed, and we make a critical assessment of the established prospective trial methodology in oncological practice (that is, phase 0, I, II, III and IV trials, and large prospective comparative audits) and how these methods might be used more effectively in future evaluation of cancer-surgery practice. PMID:26483296

  15. The use of videotaped lectures in surgical oncology fellowship education.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, M A; Busch, E; Douglass, H O; Petrelli, N J

    1994-01-01

    A video library of surgical oncology topics was initiated in 1991 as an educational forum for fellows in a surgical oncology training program. First-year and second-year fellows presented formal medical lectures on specific surgical oncology topics that were based on a comprehensive literature review. An abstract of the discussion, a list of references, and a copy of the presented slides were submitted at the time of presentation of each lecture. The lectures were videotaped in front of an audience made up of faculty and fellows of the Department of Surgical Oncology, The videotapes were subsequently edited to incorporate the presented slides, and these versions were shown separately to allow critique of presentation style and content by the faculty and the fellows within the Department. Nineteen videotaped presentations from academic years 1991-1992 and 1992-1993 were evaluated. These videotaped lectures are an informational resource, and, of equal importance, they provide an assessible record for self-analysis of lecturing technique and effectiveness. PMID:7522507

  16. [Rethinking clinical research in surgical oncology. From comic opera to quality control].

    PubMed

    Evrard, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The evidence base for the effectiveness of surgical interventions is relatively poor and data from large, randomized prospective studies are rare with often a poor quality. Many efforts have been made to increase the number of high quality randomized trials in surgery and theoretical proposals have been put forward to improve the situation, but practical implementation of these proposals is seriously lacking. The consequences of this policy are not trivial; with very few patients included in surgical oncology trials, this represents wasted opportunity for advances in cancer treatment. In this review, we cover the difficulties inherent to clinical research in surgical oncology, such as quality control, equipoise, accrual, and funding and promote alternative designs to the randomized controlled trial. Although the classic randomized controlled trial has a valid but limited place in surgical oncology, other prospective designs need to be promoted as a new deal. This new deal not only implicates surgeons but also journal editors, tender jury, as well as regulatory bodies to cover legal gaps currently surrounding surgical innovation. PMID:26610367

  17. Clinical Outcome Analysis in 'High-Risk' Versus 'Low-Risk' Patients Eligible For National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 Trial: Five-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh R. Christensen, Michael E.; Hodge, C. Wesley; Adkison, Jarrod B.; Das, Rupak K.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To report the local control and overall survival outcomes after lumpectomy followed by accelerated partial breast irradiation in high-risk patients as defined by the current inclusion criteria for the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 Intergroup trial. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 273 women with early-stage breast cancer were treated using either multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (n = 247) or MammoSite (n = 26). Patients received 32-34 Gy in 8-10 twice-daily fractions using high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy. All patients met the initial inclusion criteria for the Intergroup trial and were separated into two groups: high-risk patients (representing the cohort that remained eligible for the Intergroup trial) who satisfied one or more of the 'high-risk' criteria (age <50 years, estrogen receptor negative, and/or positive lymph nodes; n = 90), and low-risk patients who comprised the remainder of the cohort (n = 183). The outcomes of the two cohorts were analyzed and compared. Results: The median follow-up of the entire cohort was 48.5 months. No significant difference was found in outcomes at 5 years between the low- and high-risk groups, with a local control rate of 97.8% vs. 93.6%, crude local recurrence rate of 2.2% (n = 4) vs. 4.4% (n = 4), and overall survival rate of 92.1% vs. 89.5%, respectively. Conclusion: At 5 years, no statistically significant difference was found in outcomes for patients deemed to be at greater risk in the current National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 Intergroup trial. These clinical data support the inclusion of this 'high-risk' population in this important ongoing study.

  18. The impact of sarcopenia on survival and complications in surgical oncology: A review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Savita; Nau, Peter N; Mezhir, James J

    2015-10-01

    Sarcopenia is the subclinical loss of skeletal muscle and strength and has been extensively studied in both the cancer and surgical literature. Specifically, sarcopenia has gained significant recognition as an important prognostic factor for both complications and survival in cancer patients. Herein, we review the current literature to date highlighting the specific impact of sarcopenia in patients undergoing oncologic procedures. PMID:26310812

  19. Robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology: evolution of a new surgical paradigm.

    PubMed

    Boggess, John F

    2007-01-01

    Robotic surgical platforms were first developed with telesurgery in mind. Conceptualized by NASA and the military to provide surgical expertise to remote locations, some telesurgical success has been documented, but progress has been held back by communication bandwidth limitations. Telepresence surgery, where the surgeon is in proximity to the patient but is provided with an ergonomic console equipped with three-dimensional vision and autonomous control of wristed laparoscopic surgical instruments and energy sources, has shown efficacy first in cardiac and then urologic cancer surgery. Interest is currently focused on the application of this technology in the field of gynecology, with techniques being described to perform simple hysterectomy, myomectomy, tubal anastomosis, and pelvic reconstruction procedures. This article will review the application of robotic- and computer-assisted surgery in the specialty of gynecologic oncology. PMID:25484936

  20. Training in surgical oncology - the role of VR simulation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T M; Aggarwal, R; Rajaretnam, N; Grantcharov, T P; Darzi, A

    2011-09-01

    There have been dramatic changes in surgical training over the past two decades which have resulted in a number of concerns for the development of future surgeons. Changes in the structure of cancer services, working hour restrictions and a commitment to patient safety has led to a reduction in training opportunities that are available to the surgeon in training. Simulation and in particular virtual reality (VR) simulation has been heralded as an effective adjunct to surgical training. Advances in VR simulation has allowed trainees to practice realistic full length procedures in a safe and controlled environment, where mistakes are permitted and can be used as learning points. There is considerable evidence to demonstrate that the VR simulation can be used to enhance technical skills and improve operating room performance. Future work should focus on the cost effectiveness and predictive validity of VR simulation, which in turn would increase the uptake of simulation and enhance surgical training. PMID:21605972

  1. Surgical care quality and oncologic outcome after D2 gastrectomy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mrena, Johanna; Mattila, Anne; Böhm, Jan; Jantunen, Ismo; Kellokumpu, Ilmo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine the quality of surgical care and long-term oncologic outcome after D2 gastrectomy for gastric cancer. METHODS: From 1999 to 2008, a total of 109 consecutive patients underwent D2 gastrectomy without routine pancreaticosplenectomy in a multimodal setting at our institution. Oncologic outcomes together with clinical and histopathologic data were analyzed in relation to the type of surgery performed. Staging was carried out according to the Union for International Cancer Control criteria of 2002. Patients were followed-up for five years at the outpatient clinic. The primary measure of outcome was long-term survival with the quality of surgery as a secondary outcome measure. Clinical data were retrospectively collected from the patient records, and causes of death were obtained from national registries. RESULTS: A total of 109 patients (58 men) with a mean age of 67.4 ± 11.2 years underwent total gastrectomy or gastric resection with D2 lymph node dissection. The tumor stage distribution was as follows: stage I, (27/109) 24.8%; stage II, (31/109) 28.4%; stage III, (41/109) 37.6%; and stage IV, (10/109) 9.2%. Forty patients (36.7%) received chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. The five-year overall survival rate for all 109 patients was 45.0%, and was 47.1% for the 104 patients treated with curative R0 resection. The five-year disease-specific survival rates were 53.0% and 55.8%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, body mass index and tumor stage were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (both P < 0.01), whereas body mass index, tumor stage, tumor site, Lauren classification, and lymph node invasion were prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival (all P < 0.05). Postoperative 30-d mortality was 1.8% and 30-d, surgical (including three anastomotic leaks, two of which were treated conservatively), and general morbidities were 26.6%, 12.8%, and 14.7%, respectively. CONCLUSION: D2 dissection is a safe surgical option for gastric cancer, providing quality surgical care and long-term oncologic outcomes that are in line with current Western standards. PMID:26715812

  2. Non-surgical oncology Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 19

    PubMed Central

    Arends, J.; Zuercher, G.; Dossett, A.; Fietkau, R.; Hug, M.; Schmid, I.; Shang, E.; Zander, A.

    2009-01-01

    Reduced nutritional state is associated with unfavourable outcomes and a lower quality of life in patients with malignancies. Patients with active tumour disease frequently have insufficient food intake. The resting energy expenditure in cancer patients can be increased, decreased, or remain unchanged compared to predicted values. Tumours may result in varying degrees of systemic pro-inflammatory processes with secondary effects on all significant metabolic pathways. Therapeutic objectives are to stabilise nutritional state with oral/enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition (PN) and thus to prevent or reduce progressive weight loss. The maintenance or improvement of quality of life, and the increase in the effectiveness and a reduction in the side-effects of antitumor therapy are further objectives. Indications for PN in tumour patients are essentially identical to those in patients with benign illnesses, with preference given to oral or enteral nutrition when feasible. A combined nutritional concept is preferred if oral or enteral nutrition are possible but not sufficient. There are generally no accepted standards for ideal energy and nutrient intakes in oncological patients, particularly when exclusive artificial nutrition is administered. The use of PN as a general accompaniment to radiotherapy or chemotherapy is not indicated, but PN is indicated in chronic severe radiogenic enteritis or after allogenic transplantation with pronounced mucositis or GvH-related gastrointestinal damage for prolonged periods, with particular attention to increased risk of bleeding and infection. No PN is necessary in the terminal phase. PMID:20049066

  3. [Geriatric intervention in oncology for elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Saint-Jean, O; LeGuen, J

    2015-10-01

    Half of all cancers occur in patients older than 70 years. National cancer plans in France promote the emergence of geriatric oncology, whose aim is that every elder cancer patient receives a pertinent treatment, according to his frailty. Geriatric intervention has been evaluated in various conditions or patients since 30 years. Meta-analysis has shown the benefits on autonomy and mortality. But benefits are related to the organization of geriatric care, especially when integrated care is provided. Literature on geriatric oncology is relatively poor. But it is certain that a geriatric comprehensive assessment provided a lot of important information for the care of cancer patients, leading to a modification of cancer treatment in many cases. Randomized trials will soon begin to evaluate the benefits of geriatric integrated care for elder cancer patients, in terms of mortality and quality of life. Actually, in oncogeriatic coordination units, pilot organizations are developed for the satisfaction of patients and professionals. PMID:26344438

  4. Comparison of surgical, functional, and oncological outcomes of open and robot-assisted partial nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Boylu, Ugur; Basatac, Cem; Yildirim, Umit; Onol, Fikret F.; Gumus, Eyup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to compare the surgical, oncological, and functional outcomes of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN) with open partial nephrectomy (OPN) in the management of small renal masses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 2009 and 2013, a total of 46 RAPN patients and 20 OPN patients was included in this study. Patients’ demographics, mean operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), warm ischemia time (WIT), length of hospital stay, pre- and post-operative renal functions, complications and oncological outcomes were recorded, prospectively. RESULTS: Mean tumor size was 4.04 cm in OPN group and 3.56 cm in RAPN group (P = 0.27). Mean R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score was 6.35 in OPN group and 5.35 in RAPN group (P = 0.02). The mean operative time was 152 min in OPN group and 225 min in RAPN group (P = 0.006). The mean EBL in OPN and RAPN groups were 417 ml and 268 ml, respectively (P = 0.001). WIT in OPN group was significantly shorter than RAPN group (18.02 min vs. 23.33 min, P = 0.003). The mean drain removal time and the length of hospital stay were longer in OPN group. There were no significant differences in terms of renal functional outcomes and postoperative complications between groups. CONCLUSION: Minimally invasive surgical management of renal masses with RAPN offers better outcomes in terms of EBL and length of stay. However, the mean operative time and WIT were significantly shorter in OPN group. RAPN is a safe and effective minimally invasive alternative to OPN in terms of oncological and functional outcomes. PMID:25598603

  5. Plastic Surgery for the Oncological Patient

    PubMed Central

    Daigeler, Adrien; Harati, Kamran; Kapalschinski, Nicolai; Goertz, Ole; Hirsch, Tobias; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Kolbenschlag, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The therapy of oncological patients has seen tremendous progress in the last decades. For most entities, it has been possible to improve the survival as well as the quality of life of the affected patients. To supply optimal cancer care, a multidisciplinary approach is vital. Together with oncologists, radiotherapists and other physicians, plastic surgeons can contribute to providing such care in all stages of treatment. From biopsies to the resection of advanced tumors, the coverage of the resulting defects and even palliative care, plastic surgery techniques can help to improve survival and quality of life as well as mitigate negative effects of radiation or the problems arising from exulcerating tumors in a palliative setting. This article aims to present the mentioned possibilities by illustrating selected cases and reviewing the literature. Especially in oncological patients, restoring their quality of life with the highest patient safety possible is of utmost importance. PMID:25593966

  6. Oncological and Functional Outcome after Surgical Treatment of Early Glottic Carcinoma without Anterior Commissure Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Jovica; Jotic, Ana; Djukic, Vojko; Pavlovic, Bojan; Trivic, Aleksandar; Krejovic-Trivic, Sanja; Milovanovic, Andjela; Milovanovic, Aleksandar; Artiko, Vera; Banko, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Glottic carcinoma can be successfully diagnosed in its early stages and treated with high percentage of success. Organ preservation and optimal functional outcomes could be achieved with wide array of surgical techniques for early glottic cancer, including endoscopic approaches or open laryngeal preserving procedures, making surgery the preferred method of treatment of early glottic carcinoma in the last few years. Material and Methods. Prospective study was done on 59 patients treated for Tis and T1a glottic carcinoma over a one-year time period in a tertiary medical center. Patients were treated with endoscopic laser cordectomy (types II–IV cordectomies according to European Laryngological Society classification of endoscopic cordectomies) and open cordectomy through laryngofissure. Follow-up period was 60 months. Clinical and oncological results were followed postoperatively. Voice quality after the treatment was assessed using multidimensional voice analysis 12 months after the treatment. Results. There were no significant differences between oncological and functional results among two groups of patients, though complications were more frequent in patients treated with open cordectomy. Conclusion. Endoscopic laser surgery should be the first treatment of choice in treatment of early glottic carcinomas, though open approach through laryngofissure should be available for selected cases where anatomical factors present limiting adequate tumor removal. PMID:24991554

  7. Improving patient safety in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Hendee, William R.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-15

    Beginning in the 1990s, and emphasized in 2000 with the release of an Institute of Medicine report, healthcare providers and institutions have dedicated time and resources to reducing errors that impact the safety and well-being of patients. But in January 2010 the first of a series of articles appeared in the New York Times that described errors in radiation oncology that grievously impacted patients. In response, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American Society of Radiation Oncology sponsored a working meeting entitled ''Safety in Radiation Therapy: A Call to Action''. The meeting attracted 400 attendees, including medical physicists, radiation oncologists, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, hospital administrators, regulators, and representatives of equipment manufacturers. The meeting was cohosted by 14 organizations in the United States and Canada. The meeting yielded 20 recommendations that provide a pathway to reducing errors and improving patient safety in radiation therapy facilities everywhere.

  8. EDUCATIONAL SECTION: risk analysis in surgical oncology-part I: concepts and tools.

    PubMed

    Rew, D A

    2000-09-01

    All clinical procedures invoke risk. Many interventions in cancer management carry a particularly high element of risk, expressed through morbidity and premature death. Formal risk analysis is a discipline which is fundamental to engineering, to finance, to the airline industry and many other sectors of public life. Clinical risk analysis involves risk prediction, risk management and risk avoidance. Risk analysis is rarely invoked or taught in the clinical sciences, and management appraisals on individual patients almost never include a formal estimate of risk. Clinical decisions tend to be guided by qualitative judgements, and by the personality interactions of patients and clinicians. A formal evaluation of risk on a case by case and procedural basis might reduce morbidity and cost in surgical oncology practice. This article introduces the concepts, the spectrum and history of risk analysis and the tools for risk prediction. PMID:11034813

  9. Nuclear oncology: From genotype to patient care

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Nuclear medicine is the medical specialty best suited to translate the exploding body of knowledge obtained from research in genetics and molecular biology into the care of patients. This fourth annual nuclear oncology conference will address how this can be done and how positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) can be used in the care of patients with cancer or with increased genetic risk of developing cancer. The course will include illustrative patient studies showing how PET and SPECT can help in diagnosis, staging and treatment planning and monitoring of patients with cancer.

  10. Influenza vaccination in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Baluch, Aliyah; Pasikhova, Yanina

    2013-12-01

    It is well established that the immunological response to the seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine is attenuated in cancer patients. Furthermore, rates of seroprotection and seroconversion vary by malignancy type and are higher in patients with solid tumors, as compared either with those with hematologic malignancies or with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell recipients. In 2009, a novel influenza strain prompted development of new vaccines and evaluation of alternative dosing strategies in an attempt to increase the rates of seroconversion in immunocompromised patients, further complicating this issue. Recent literature has demonstrated that the use of myeloablative chemotherapy regimens and biologics is correlated with decreased immunogenicity and response to influenza vaccines. Much debate still exists as to the optimal timing of influenza vaccination. Delaying vaccination from 1 week following standard chemotherapy up to 6 months following rituximab is increasingly supported by studies in this heterogeneous population. PMID:24258350

  11. Minimally invasive surgery for endometrial cancer: Does operative start time impact surgical and oncologic outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Slaughter, Katrina N.; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Nick, Alpa M.; Fleming, Nicole D.; dos Reis, Ricardo; Munsell, Mark F.; Westin, Shannon N.; Soliman, Pamela T.; Ramirez, Pedro T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Recent literature in ovarian cancer suggests differences in surgical outcomes depending on operative start time. We sought to examine the effects of operative start time on surgical outcomes for patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery for endometrial cancer. Methods A retrospective review was conducted of patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery for endometrial cancer at a single institution between 2000 and 2011. Surgical and oncologic outcomes were compared between patients with an operative start time before noon and those with a surgical start time after noon. Results A total of 380 patients were included in the study (245 with start times before noon and 135 with start times after noon). There was no difference in age (p=0.57), number of prior surgeries (p=0.28), medical comorbidities (p=0.19), or surgical complexity of the case (p=0.43). Patients with surgery starting before noon had lower median BMI than those beginning after noon, 31.2 vs. 35.3 respectively (p=0.01). No significant differences were observed for intraoperative complications (4.4% of patients after noon vs. 3.7% of patients before noon, p=0.79), estimated blood loss (median 100 cc vs. 100 cc, p=0.75), blood transfusion rates (7.4% vs. 8.2%, p=0.85), conversion to laparotomy (12.6% vs. 7.4%, p=0.10). There was no difference in operative times between the two groups (198 minutes vs. 216.5 minutes, p=0.10). There was no association between operative start time and postoperative non-infectious complications (11.9% vs. 11.0%, p=0.87), or postoperative infections (17.8% vs. 12.3%, p=0.78). Length of hospital stay was longer for surgeries starting after noon (median 2 days vs. 1 day, p=0.005). No differences were observed in rates of cancer recurrence (12.6% vs. 8.8%, p=0.39), recurrence-free survival (p=0.97), or overall survival (p=0.94). Conclusion Our results indicate equivalent surgical outcomes and no increased risk of postoperative complications regardless of operative start time in minimally invasive endometrial cancer staging, despite longer length of hospital stay for surgeries beginning after noon. PMID:24945591

  12. [Oncology].

    PubMed

    Aapro, Matti S

    2009-02-01

    The American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) determined that there were twelve major advances in medical oncology last year. Endocrine-responsive breast cancer benefits from tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor taken for more than five years. Zoledronic acid, a bisphosphonate, reduces the risk of breast cancer recurrence in premenopausal women undergoing hormonal-suppression therapy. Bevacizumab was for use in combination with paclitaxel in patients with metastatic breast cancer Cetuximab added to chemotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer patients increased survival by up to 21%. Adjuvant gemcitabine doubled disease-free survival in pancreas cancer. Adjuvant pegylated interferon cuts the risk of recurrent melanoma by 18%. Bendamustine abolishes signs of activity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 30% of patients. The HPV vaccine--now approved for prevention of cervical cancer--might have a role in preventing oral cancers and a review of 45 studies showed that oral contraceptives reduce the risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:19271650

  13. Incorporating fertility preservation into the care of young oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Redig, Amanda J; Brannigan, Robert; Stryker, Steven J; Woodruff, Teresa K; Jeruss, Jacqueline S

    2011-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors continues to increase, oncologists are faced with the challenge of providing cancer therapy to patients who may 1 day want to have children. Yet, gonadotoxic cancer treatments can compromise future fertility, either temporarily or permanently. There are established means of preserving fertility before cancer treatment; specifically, sperm cryopreservation for men and in vitro fertilization and embryo cryopreservation for women. Several innovative techniques are being actively investigated, including oocyte and ovarian follicle cryopreservation, ovarian tissue transplantation, and in vitro follicle maturation, which may expand the number of fertility preservation choices for young cancer patients. Fertility preservation may also require some modification of cancer therapy; thus, patients' wishes regarding future fertility and available fertility preservation alternatives should be discussed before initiation of therapy. This commentary provides an overview of the range of fertility preservation options currently available and under development, using case-based discussions to illustrate ways in which fertility preservation can be incorporated into oncology care. Cases involving breast cancer, testicular cancer, and rectal cancer are described to illustrate fertility issues experienced by male and female patients, as well as to provide examples of strategies for modifying surgical, medical, and radiation therapy to spare fertility. Current guidelines in oncology and reproductive medicine are also reviewed to underscore the importance of communicating fertility preservation options to young patients with cancer. PMID:21235031

  14. Optimising surgical management of elderly cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Hodigere Sripathy Jois; Pope, Daniel; Gennari, Roberto; Audisio, Riccardo A

    2005-01-01

    Background Elderly population is on rise. It is an ethical dilemma how aggressive one should be when it comes to treat cancer in elderly. Presumed fear of increased postoperative morbidity and mortality has resulted in delivery of sub-optimal cancer surgery. Methods In this review article we visit physiology of the aged, tools available to assess surgical risks in oncogeriatric patients, and current practice in the management of common cancers encountered in surgical oncology, with the view of increasing awareness on optimising surgical management of senior patients with cancer. A pubmed search for cancer, surgery, elderly, was carried out. Results Cancer is on rise with increasing age predominantly affecting breast, gastrointestinal tract and lung. Increasingly more surgeons are offering surgery to elderly cancer patient but selection bias is prevalent. Available data reflect short and long-term outcome of cancer surgery in elderly is not greatly different to that of younger patient. Declining physiological reserve along with inability to respond adequately to physiological stress are salient age related changes. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is not tested in surgical patient. There is need for a tool to define individualised operative risk. Preoperative assessment of cancer in elderly is designed to offer this information based on functional status of an individual utilising currently available tools of risk assessment. Conclusion All elderly cancer patients should be offered optimal treatment depending on their functional status not on chronological age. Oncogeriatric patient would benefit from dedicated multidisciplinary approach. Recruitment of elderly cancer patients to more clinical trials is needed to enhance our knowledge and to offer optimum treatment to this unique subgroup. PMID:15788092

  15. Rehabilitation of Oncology Patients with Hard Palate Defects Part 2: Principles of Obturator Design.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rahat; Altaie, Asmaa; Nattress, Brian

    2015-06-01

    The first part of this series on the conventional rehabilitation of oncology patients with hard palate defects discussed the dental challenges posed by oncology patients and the surgical/restorative planning interface for conventional dental rehabilitation. This article will describe Aramany's classification of hard palate defects, Brown's classification of palatal defects and focus on the basic principles of obturator design which need to be appreciated when prosthetically rehabilitating a patient with a hard palate defect. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A good understanding of basic removable prosthodontic theory relating to denture design, dental materials science and head and neck anatomy is a prerequisite when designing an obturator for a patient. PMID:26964444

  16. Incorporating Fertility Preservation into the Care of Young Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Redig, Amanda J.; Brannigan, Robert; Stryker, Steven J.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Jeruss, Jacqueline S.

    2010-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors continues to increase, oncologists are faced with the challenge of providing cancer therapy to patients who may one day want to have children. Yet gonadotoxic cancer treatments can compromise future fertility, either temporarily or permanently. There are established means of preserving fertility prior to cancer treatment, specifically, sperm cryopreservation for men and in vitro fertilization and embryo cryopreservation for women. Several innovative techniques are being actively investigated, including oocyte and ovarian follicle cryopreservation, ovarian tissue transplantation, and in vitro follicle maturation, which may expand the number of fertility preservation choices for young cancer patients. Fertility preservation may also require some modification of cancer therapy, and thus patients’ wishes regarding future fertility and the available fertility preservation alternatives should be discussed prior to the initiation of therapy. This commentary provides an overview of the range of fertility preservation options currently available and under development, and utilizes case-based discussions to illustrate ways in which fertility preservation can be incorporated into oncology care. Cases involving breast cancer, testicular cancer, and rectal cancer are described to illustrate fertility issues experienced by male and female patients, as well as to provide examples of strategies for modifying surgical, medical, and radiation therapy in order to spare fertility. Current guidelines in oncology and reproductive medicine are also reviewed to underscore the importance of communicating fertility preservation options to young patients with cancer. PMID:21235031

  17. [The problems of informing oncological patients].

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, H

    1979-01-01

    The "phase-model" of Kübler-Ross represents useful auxiliary means, which however prove correct only in a portion of the cases. The information of the diagnosis of a malign disease constitutes one of the most difficult medical problems and requires certain basic conditions. As a rule it cannot be delegated but must be solved within the realm of oncology. In the future it will be necessary to inform the patients concerning their malign disease very much more than is is presently done. PMID:299230

  18. Protecting Pediatric Oncology Patients From Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Kersun, Leslie S.; Reilly, Anne F.; Coffin, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is a common respiratory pathogen. Its severity can be unpredictable, but people with chronic illness are at increased risk of severe infection, complications, and death from influenza. This review examines evidence to support various strategies to protect pediatric oncology patients from influenza-related morbidity. Influenza vaccination should be considered standard. Additional evidence-supported measures include antiviral treatment, antiviral prophylaxis, cohorting of patients, and hospital infection control measures. Data from other high-risk populations support the vaccination of family members, double-dose or high-dose vaccination, and the use of barrier methods. These measures have the potential to optimize patient outcomes because there will be fewer treatment interruptions for acute illness. These strategies can also protect patients from prolonged hospitalizations and morbidity related to influenza. PMID:23370325

  19. Free microvascular tissue transfer for the reconstruction of midfacial defects in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Archontaki, Maria; Stavrianos, Spyros D; Rapidis, Alexander D

    2010-09-01

    This study reviews our experience with free microvascular tissue transfer for the repair of midfacial defects in surgical oncology. From 2000 to 2008, eight patients with maxillectomy defects were immediately reconstructed using free flaps. Their clinical charts were retrospectively reviewed to record demographic data, ablative and reconstructive procedures, complications and outcome. Free tissue transfer was successful in all patients, giving an overall success rate of 100%. The mean follow-up time was 4 to 101 months (mr: 43.8). Three patients died from the disease giving a patient mortality of 30%, while five patients are alive, free of disease and back to their normal daily activities. The restoration of function and improvement of patients' quality of life was a common feature in all our reconstructions. The development of free tissue transfer has made surgical treatment of oncological patients with maxillectomy defects previously considered inoperable possible, improving at the same time their quality of life. PMID:20173711

  20. [Role of the surgical pathologist for tissue management in oncology].

    PubMed

    Long, Élodie; Ilie, Marius; Hofman, Véronique; Lassalle, Sandra; Butori, Catherine; Alsubaie, Saad; Hofman, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Currently, the increasing number of ancillary methods to be performed from tumoral tissues in a pathology laboratory determines the necessity to have an optimal strategy for tissue management. The size of tissue samples dedicated for a pathological examination becomes smaller and smaller, as the diagnosis can be made with non or less invasive methods. However, the samples should also allow to provide the prognosis as well as to realise biological molecular testing in order to found a genomic alteration. Thus, it is critical to think about how to share and to pool the different expertises and abilities in a pathology laboratory in order to optimize the achievement of the different ancillary methods. Thus, following the morphological study made in hematoxylin-eosin staining, it is necessary to preempt the number of immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization studies, which will be potentially done from the tissue samples. Moreover, since the genomic alteration detection in tumours is mainly performed from DNA extracted from tissues, it is necessary to take in account some numerous parameters, in particular the nature and the time of fixation, the percentage of tumour cells, the presence of necrotic area, the percentage of inflammatory cells and the sample size. The strategy for an optimal tissue management in an oncology-pathology laboratory is critical and takes part of the different steps allowing to get an accreditation according the ISO15189 norm. PMID:23985751

  1. Nutritional assessment of surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, C S; Stegman, M R

    1988-10-01

    In order to test the sensitivity and specificity of the East Orange Nutritional Screening Form (EONSF), nutritional assessments were performed on a random sample of 10% of general medical/surgical admissions at a large midwestern veteran's administration hospital. Patients were followed until discharge to determine if they met the standard criteria of additional nutritional support. The tool correctly identified patients at nutritional risk (sensitivity) 95% of the time and patients not at nutritional risk (specificity) 89% of the time. It proved to be an effective, low-cost tool for identifying patients at risk and for planning appropriate nutritional strategies. PMID:3146037

  2. Molecules, cancer, and the surgeon. A review of molecular biology and its implications for surgical oncology.

    PubMed Central

    Arbeit, J M

    1990-01-01

    Interactions between molecules control intra- and intercellular physiology. Cancer is emerging as a disease in which individual molecules are either overproduced, mutated, expressed at inappropriate stages of development, or lost due to inheritance or aberrant mitotic division. The major players in this contest of cellular control are growth factors, growth factor receptors (GFRs), signal transducers, and dominant or suppressor/recessive oncogenes. The tumors most frequently removed by surgeons have been reported to have changes in one or another of these types of molecules. The concept of multistage carcinogenesis, whereby malignancy arises after a sequence of changes that are cumulative, and passed from progenitor to daughter cells, is also being defined as a sequence of molecular, genetic, and chromosomal alterations. Molecular antineoplastic therapy is in early stages of development at the laboratory bench. The future may see patients screened for cancer susceptibility, evaluated for adjuvant therapy, and chosen for particular treatment based on molecular analysis. The types of cancer operations and the scope of surgical resection may change as molecular techniques enhance oncologic treatment. PMID:2194440

  3. Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommended Care Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care This is a composite measure based on individual ... Age Group Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care by Age Group uzrc-9bvr Download these data » ...

  4. [Frequency, cause, and awareness of pulmonary embolism in oncologic patients].

    PubMed

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Neumann, Johanna; Taute, Bettina-Maria; Surov, Alexey

    2016-05-01

    The frequency of pulmonary embolism (PE) in oncologic patients ranges from 1.1 % to 7.3 % depending on whether not only symptomatic findings but also incidental and initially overseen events are considered. The frequency of PE is tumor-specific. Most frequently PE occurs in patients with malignancy of the ovary (25 %), pancreas, brain, uterus, and multiple myeloma. Most rarely is PE found in patients with malignancy of the testis.The tumor-specific frequency shows that the association of malignancy and PE is not equally true for alle malignancies. A number of arguments that support the above association are also valid in non-oncologic patients.The awareness of the diagnosing radiologist and the thrombus mass decide whether or not an unexpected PE is detected. An increased awareness is suggested in patients with malignancies with high PE frequency and in patients with advanced oncologic disease. PMID:27176066

  5. Exploratory survey of patients' needs and perceptions of psychosocial oncology.

    PubMed

    Preyde, Michele; Macdonald, Janice; Seegmiller, Merle

    2014-03-01

    Cancer is a major disease that affects a significant proportion of the population worldwide. With a decrease in mortality due to advancements in oncology treatment, there is an expanding role for psychosocial oncology. A satellite clinic for medical treatment (only chemotherapy) of cancer is available at the Guelph General Hospital (GGH). Patients accessing the chemotherapy clinic at GGH have minimal access to psychosocial or supportive care and it is not known if the existing services are addressing the psychosocial symptoms of cancer patients. Participants were asked to complete an anonymous survey which included self-report measures of depression, symptom severity, quality of life, and social support while receiving treatment at this facility. There was a great deal of variability in the patients' emotional symptoms at this satellite clinic, though many patients reported emotional difficulties. Greater social work presence may lead to better identification of patients who would benefit from psychosocial oncology services. PMID:24193219

  6. Monitoring the plastic surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Reines, H D

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring has now developed to the extent that it is widely accepted if used properly and that it benefits patients at great risk. We must accept the place that monitoring now occupies, as aptly put by the late Myron Laver, "What we once considered appropriate for the academic environment has now become mundane and almost a mandatory maneuver if we are to navigate the ill through their complex physiological and biochemical perturbations. We are no longer limited to the recording of heart sounds and electrical activity." We now have the capabilities of monitoring physiologic parameters that can affect the course of the surgical patient. When applied with logic based on physical and historic information, invasive and noninvasive hemodynamic-pulmonary monitoring can be extremely helpful to the practicing plastic surgeon. PMID:3884228

  7. The impact of physician posture during oncology patient encounters.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arjun; Harris, Samar; Naina, Harris V

    2015-06-01

    Non-verbal communication is an important component of the physician-patient interaction. Oncology patients face specific emotional and psychological issues requiring additional physician emotional support. Multiple studies in oncology patients have revealed that patients perceive physicians seated during the medical interview to be more compassionate, caring, and likely to spend more time with the patients. These are all associated with improved patient outcomes. Barriers to sitting may be due to those imposed by time, space, and reduced perceived benefit of sitting by the physician. Although a sitting posture alone is unlikely to compensate for poor communication skills, assessing patient preference to physician posture, and following their preference, can be a simple way of improving communication, and thus patient outcomes, especially in oncology patients. The widespread introduction of the electronic medical record (EMR) system over the last decade has added a "third wheel" to the original dyadic physician-patient relationship. Physician posture and eye gaze towards to the EMR and its components has a deleterious effect on communication. Appropriate training and sensitization in this regard should be provided for physicians. PMID:25757904

  8. [Surgical treatment of neoplasms in geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Piccolomini, A; Brandi, C; Vuolo, G; Verre, L; Roviello, F; Di Cosmo, L; Carli, A

    1994-04-01

    The Authors report their experience in the surgical management of cancer in the aged (over 65 year old patients), during the period 1988-1992 at the Istituto Policattedra di Scienze Chirurgiche, University of Siena. They consider colon and rectum, breast, stomach, pancreas and biliary tract neoplasms in relation to site, staging, emergency or delayed surgical treatment, and early postoperative results. Finally, they outline the frequently encountered problems in treating old patients and the most appropriate surgical approach. PMID:8086303

  9. Possibly Impossible Patients: Management of Difficult Behavior in Oncology Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Peteet, John R.; Meyer, Fremonta L.; Miovic, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Angry, threatening, or otherwise disruptive behavior by patients can interfere with necessary oncologic treatment, sometimes to the point of rendering continued care impossible. We offer oncology clinicians guidance in dealing with difficult outpatients by discussing the differential diagnosis and multidisciplinary management of treatment-disrupting behavior in the ambulatory oncology setting. We review the existing literature on dealing with difficult patients and present clinical experience at a comprehensive cancer center where a formalized, institutional process for responding to disruptive outpatients has been developed. A structured, multidisciplinary approach to deal with difficult behavior in oncology outpatients can improve care and staff morale. Staff using this approach can identify causes of treatment-disrupting behavior, develop and implement appropriate behavior plans, facilitate communication, address mental health issues, and ensure that decisions to terminate a relationship with a patient are ethical, clinically justified, and supported by due process. In the future, clinical recommendations and institutional guidelines for dealing with difficult patients should be evaluated with more structured, quantitative research. PMID:22043189

  10. [Diagnosis and therapy of cognitive deficits in oncology patients].

    PubMed

    Defrancesco, M; Sperner-Unterweger, B

    2015-03-01

    Improvements in the diagnostics and therapy of almost all types of cancer have extended the survival rates and average life expectancies of oncology patients. As a result the assessment of cognitive deficits is becoming much more important not only in cancer diagnostics but also in the disease-free period following treatment. Various cognitive deficits can occur in patients with intracranial as well as extracranial malignancies. These deficits can be caused by tumor or treatment-related factors. Previous studies have shown that cognitive deficits may negatively influence the quality of life, therapy adherence, prognosis and mortality of patients. Currently, standardized specially designed cognitive tests for oncology patients are lacking; nevertheless, neurocognitive assessment should become an integral element in the diagnostic procedure as well as in the therapeutic process of these patients. An increasing number of studies are currently evaluating pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies to treat or prevent cognitive deficits; however, recommendations for daily clinical use are still lacking. PMID:25676924

  11. Surgical treatment of breast lesions at a Day Centre: Experience of the European Institute of Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ballardini, Bettina; Cavalli, Marta; Manfredi, Giovanni Francesco; Sangalli, Claudia; Galimberti, Viviana; Intra, Mattia; Rossi, Elisabetta Maria Cristina; Seco, Javiera; Campanelli, Giampiero; Veronesi, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest malignancy in women worldwide. The reduced aggressiveness of breast cancer surgery has made it possible treat patients in the day surgery setting. The European Institute of Oncology, Milan, opened its new Day Center in May 2010. From May 2010 to December 2014, 17,087 patients with breast conditions were treated by the Institute's Division of Senology, 4132 (24.2%) of these in the day surgery setting, including malignant and benign conditions; 204 (4.9%) were not discharged on the day of surgery, being converted to inpatients; five (0.1%) patients returned to hospital for persistent hematoma. Our experience of performing breast cancer surgery in the day surgery setting is in line that of the literature. It is safe, but requires a well-organized unit and multidisciplinary medical team to function smoothly, with much attention paid to patient comfort and education, so as to ensure maximum patient acceptance and satisfaction. PMID:27123957

  12. [Laparoscopic jejunostomy in malnourished surgical patients: indications and technique].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, A E; Beuran, M; Veste, V; Grecu, Irina; Vasilescu, Cleopatra; Grinţescu, Ioana

    2003-01-01

    Laparoscopic jejunostomy (LJ) represents a new way of enteral nutrition (EN) for surgical malnourished patients. LJ is an alternative form of therapy, with restricted indications to the few cases when classical way for EN (nosogastroenteral tube feeding, PEG/PEJ, surgical gastrostomy), are contraindicated or can not be used, and the patient is unable to eat. This technique is also preferred to the open surgical jejunostomy. The paper describes our LJ technique, indications and contraindications. We used JL in two surgical severely malnourished patients, within 11 and 14 days, before the elective, open, curative operations. In this period the patients where exclusively nourished with special feeding solutions through the LJ catheter. The main pathologic lesions were: extrinsec antral obstruction from a perforated transverse colon carcinoma in the omental pouch, in the first case, and proximal inflammatory stenosis of efferent loop, after gastric resection with Billroth II anastomosis for duodenal ulcer, in the second case. LJ gives the opportunity for the exploration of the whole abdominal cavity, and for the direct imaging of the pathological lesions. With EN being delivered before the open, elective operations, we get an amelioration of serum albumin values, and we have no morbidity related to the LJ or open, curative operation. EN was administrated after open surgery in the same way, and in the first case, during chemotherapy. LJ is an efficient, miniinvasive way for EN, in selected surgical severe malnourished patients with proximal digestive obstructions, especially oncologic ones, the aim being an amelioration of the nutritional status and a reduction of postoperative morbidity. A continuous study on a larger number of cases is imperative necessary. PMID:14997843

  13. Quality of Pharmaceutical Care in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Monica; Ramrattan, Maya A.; Boeker, Eveline B.; Kuks, Paul F. M.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Lie-A-Huen, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical patients are at risk for preventable adverse drug events (ADEs) during hospitalization. Usually, preventable ADEs are measured as an outcome parameter of quality of pharmaceutical care. However, process measures such as QIs are more efficient to assess the quality of care and provide more information about potential quality improvements. Objective To assess the quality of pharmaceutical care of medication-related processes in surgical wards with quality indicators, in order to detect targets for quality improvements. Methods For this observational cohort study, quality indicators were composed, validated, tested, and applied on a surgical cohort. Three surgical wards of an academic hospital in the Netherlands (Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam) participated. Consecutive elective surgical patients with a hospital stay longer than 48 hours were included from April until June 2009. To assess the quality of pharmaceutical care, the set of quality indicators was applied to 252 medical records of surgical patients. Results Thirty-four quality indicators were composed and tested on acceptability and content- and face-validity. The selected 28 candidate quality indicators were tested for feasibility and sensitivity to change. This resulted in a final set of 27 quality indicators, of which inter-rater agreements were calculated (kappa 0.92 for eligibility, 0.74 for pass-rate). The quality of pharmaceutical care was assessed in 252 surgical patients. Nearly half of the surgical patients passed the quality indicators for pharmaceutical care (overall pass rate 49.8%). Improvements should be predominantly targeted to medication care related processes in surgical patients with gastro-intestinal problems (domain pass rate 29.4%). Conclusions This quality indicator set can be used to measure quality of pharmaceutical care and detect targets for quality improvements. With these results medication safety in surgical patients can be enhanced. PMID:25006676

  14. Suicide ideation among oncologic patients in a Spanish ward.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Frutos, D; Baca-Garcia, E; Mahillo-Fernandez, I; Garcia-Foncillas, J; Lopez-Castroman, J

    2016-04-01

    Oncologic patients are exposed to a higher risk of suicidal behaviors than the general population. In this study, we aim to examine the severity of suicidal ideation in a sample of oncologic patients considering different psychological and clinical features. We interviewed 202 inpatients receiving curative or palliative treatment in a medical oncology ward of a Spanish hospital during the period 2012-2014. A complete assessment of psychosocial factors, cancer diagnoses (lung, colon rectum, and genitourinary system), and suicidal behaviors were made during admission, including validated questionnaires about depression, anxiety, personality, quality of life, body image, life threatening events, hopelessness, and suicidal ideation. The characteristics of inpatients with high and low suicidal ideation were retrospectively compared. A logistic regression model was constructed to examine the relationship between the significant factors retained after the univariate analyses. One of every four patients (n = 51; 25.24%) presented high scores of suicidal ideation. Logistic regression analyses retained depression (OR = 3.55; 95% CI = 1.25-11.68; p = .016), hopelessness (OR = 8.78; 95% CI = 3.44-25.88; p ≤ .001), personality (OR = .44; 95% CI = .2-.96; p = .038), and advanced age (OR = 2.60; 95% CI = 1.18-5.98; p = .016) as the main risk factors for high suicidal ideation. Suicidal ideation was frequent among oncologic patients. These patients should receive closer monitoring, especially, when old, retired, or severely depressed. PMID:26109239

  15. Body Image and the Female Adolescent Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Burg, Alison Joy

    2016-01-01

    Female adolescent oncology patients undergo many physical changes throughout treatment that have challenging psychological, emotional, and social implications. Body image for this population is a subject that tends to be overlooked in the midst of the cancer experience. This article will examine the complex concept of body image and discuss why female adolescent patients are at such high risk for negative body image. Assessment and care strategies are needed to foster a positive body image, resiliency, and overall well-being. Although survivorship studies may offer insightful information about the effects of the cancer journey on long-term body image, focus should be on prevention and holistic care as part of the treatment itself. The health care team, especially nursing professionals, should acknowledge, recognize, and address this vital issue as a critical part of oncology care. PMID:25643971

  16. [Complementary medicine use in oncology patients].

    PubMed

    Inglin, S; Amsler, S; Arigoni, F; Burton-Jeangros, C; Pargoux-Vallade, C; Sappino, A-P

    2008-05-21

    Through an anonymized questionnaire we assessed the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in a series of cancer patients treated at the Geneva University Hospitals. 152 among the 300 sollicitated patients responded and 39 (26.5%) recognized to use CAM, particularly young, and moderate to highly educated patients. Patients justify their use of CAM to maximize caring ressources, to achieve physical or psychic relief. Most of them recognize to share these therapeutic options with their doctor. Satisfaction with traditional medicine as well as ignorance of CAM are the main arguments provided by non users. The specificity of our hospital context in which results were collected and the lack of a common and popular definition of CAM remain the main limitations of our enquiry. PMID:18616209

  17. Osteointegration in oncologic patients: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Fabrizio; Bucalo, Concetta; Saggese, Vito; Monai, Dario; Porcaro, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective the present case report aims at illustrating how implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in patients with oral cancer resection aids to improve their quality of life. Material and methods a patient with verrucous squamous cell carcinoma of the mandible was treated with surgery and rehabilitation with three interforaminal dental implants and Toronto bridge. Three years after treatment, because of cancer recurrence, a segment of jaw and one of the three mandibular implants were removed. The histological examination showed healthy bone contact to implant surface, despite proximity to the neoplastic area. Results the case shows the maintainance of the osseointegration implants despite the cancer recurrence in the same area. Conclusions endosseous implants represent a useful and valid tool for the prosthetic rehabilitation of cancer patients. Long-term effects of implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in patients with cancer still need to be verified. It would be interesting to confirm the data obtained by numerical studies of representative samples. PMID:23285321

  18. Training and certification of the surgical oncologist.

    PubMed

    Berman, Russell S; Weigel, Ronald J

    2014-12-01

    Surgical Oncology has evolved as a distinct subspecialty of General Surgery with a well-defined curriculum focused on surgical care of the cancer patient, specific areas of clinical and basic science research focus and specialty journals dedicated to the discipline. The Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO), originally formed as the James Ewing Society, has provided leadership in developing training programs in Surgical Oncology and for three decades has been involved in the approval and oversight of Surgical Oncology training programs. Over this time, Surgical Oncology Fellowship training has expanded and in 2013 there were 103 applicants for 56 fellowship positions in 21 programs. The basic tenants of Surgical Oncology training has remained devoted to the core principles of multidisciplinary care, surgical management of cancer patients and a focus on education in research, clinical trials, community outreach, patient advocacy and leadership in oncology. With the maturation of Surgical Oncology as a separate specialty, Surgical Oncology training programs are now accredited by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and graduates of the programs will soon be offered subspecialty certification in Complex General Surgical Oncology (CGSO) by the American Board of Surgery, which has created a component Surgical Oncology Board (SOB). Similar expansion has occurred in other specialty areas including an expansion of Breast Fellowships, which are still being approved by the SSO. In the 2013 SSO Breast Oncology Match, there were 67 applicants for 54 positions in 39 Breast Fellowship programs. Continued advances in cancer biology and technology will challenge us to evolve training programs in Surgical Oncology to produce surgeons capable of advancing the multidisciplinary care of cancer patients. PMID:25841526

  19. Platelet transfusion goals in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Josephson, Cassandra D

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances in platelet component preparation and transfusion support over the years, platelet products remain a limited resource due to their short (5 day) shelf life, and therefore their optimal use in the non-bleeding thrombocytopenic patient continue to draw much attention. There have been a number of national and international guidelines for platelet transfusion therapy in patients with hematologic diseases, some within the last 1-2 years that have incorporated key randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which address issues, such as the optimal platelet dose, the most appropriate threshold for prophylactic platelet transfusions, and whether prophylactic platelet transfusions are superior to therapeutic-only platelet transfusion practices for the prevention life-threatening bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. This review highlights key RCTs and recent systematic reviews focused on optimal platelet transfusion therapy in adult and pediatric patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia secondary to chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), discuss how recent innovations in platelet component processing may affect transfusion efficiency, and introduce renewed concepts on adjuvant therapies to prevent bleeding in the hypoproliferative thrombocytopenic patient. PMID:26637759

  20. Radiographic Characteristics of Adrenal Masses in Oncologic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Ky; Hong, A Ram; Roh, Eun; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jung Hee; Shin, Chan Soo; Kim, Seong Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to assess the usefulness of pre-contrast Hounsfield unit (HU) and mass size on computed tomography to differentiate adrenal mass found incidentally in oncologic patients. Methods From 2000 to 2012, 131 oncologic patients with adrenal incidentaloma were reviewed retrospectively. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were applied to determine the optimal cut-off value of the mean HU and size for detecting adrenal metastasis. Results The median age was 18 years, and 80 patients were male. The initial mass size was 18 mm, and 71 (54.2%) of these were on the left side. A bilateral adrenal mass was found in 11 patients (8.4%). Biochemically functional masses were observed in 9.2% of patients. Thirty-six out of 119 patients with nonfunctional masses underwent adrenalectomy, which revealed metastasis in 13. The primary cancers were lung cancer (n=4), renal cell carcinoma (n=2), lymphoma (n=2), hepatocellular carcinoma (n=2), breast cancer (n=1), and others (n=2). The area under the curve for the size and HU for clinically suspicious metastasis were 0.839 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.761 to 0.900; P<0.001) and 0.959 (95% CI, 0.898 to 0.988; P<0.001), respectively. The cut-off value to distinguish between metastasis and benign masses were 22 mm for size and 20 for HU. Conclusion ROC curve results suggest that pre-contrast HU >20 can be used as a diagnostic reference to suggest metastasis in oncologic patients with adrenal masses. PMID:26676336

  1. Clinical Pharmacology in the Adolescent Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    Veal, Gareth J.; Hartford, Christine M.; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented that adolescents and young adults (AYAs) experience a significant cancer burden as well as significant cancer mortality compared with other age groups. The reasons for the disparate outcomes of AYAs and other age groups are not completely understood and are likely to be multifactorial, including a range of sociodemographic issues unique to these individuals as well as differences between adolescents, younger pediatric patients, and adults in the pharmacology of anticancer agents. Because adolescence is a period of transition from childhood to early adulthood, numerous physical, physiologic, cognitive, and behavioral changes occur during this time. In this review, we provide an overview of the unique developmental physiology of the adolescent and explain how these factors and the behavioral characteristics of adolescents may affect the pharmacology of anticancer agents in this patient population. Finally, we describe examples of studies that have assessed the relation between drug disposition and age, focusing on the AYA age group. PMID:20439647

  2. Robotic surgery in urological oncology: patient care or market share?

    PubMed

    Kaye, Deborah R; Mullins, Jeffrey K; Carter, H Ballentine; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2015-01-01

    Surgical robotic use has grown exponentially in spite of limited or uncertain benefits and large costs. In certain situations, adoption of robotic technology provides value to patients and society. In other cases, however, the robot provides little or no increase in surgical quality, with increased expense, and, therefore, does not add value to health care. The surgical robot is expensive to purchase, maintain and operate, and can contribute to increased consumerism in relation to surgical procedures, and increased reliance on the technology, thus driving future increases in health-care expenditure. Given the current need for budget constraints, the cost-effectiveness of specific procedures must be evaluated. The surgical robot should be used when cost-effective, but traditional open and laparoscopic techniques also need to be continually fostered. PMID:25535000

  3. Interventional Radiology and the Care of the Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Siobhan B.; O'Connor, Owen J.; Ryan, Max F.; Maher, Michael M.

    2011-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is occupying an increasingly prominent role in the care of patients with cancer, with involvement from initial diagnosis, right through to minimally invasive treatment of the malignancy and its complications. Adequate diagnostic samples can be obtained under image guidance by percutaneous biopsy and needle aspiration in an accurate and minimally invasive manner. IR techniques may be used to place central venous access devices with well-established safety and efficacy. Therapeutic applications of IR in the oncology patient include local tumour treatments such as transarterial chemo-embolisation and radiofrequency ablation, as well as management of complications of malignancy such as pain, organ obstruction, and venous thrombosis. PMID:22091374

  4. The Rehabilitation of Oncological Patients Presenting Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MICU, ELENA CLAUDIA; IRSAY, LASZLO

    2014-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP 2011) defines neuropathic pain as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the somatosensory portion of the nervous system”. The central neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the central somatosensory central nervous system”, whereas the peripheral neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the peripheral somatosensory nervous system” [1]. The peripheral neuropathy describes any affection of the peripheral nervous system. The etiology is vast, there being a number of over 100 possible causes, which causes the global morbidity rate to reach approximately 2.4%. The chronic nature of the pain superposes the everyday routine and leads to the high intake of medication for pain alleviation. The number of cases of neuroplasia has always increased today. This disturbing diagnosis which can potentiate the signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy as well as reduce and limit the treatment options associated with neuropathies. The treatment presupposes a multidisciplinary approach, while the solution to prevent complications involves the control of risk factors and pathophysiological treatment. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CPIN) is a significant disabling symptom that is tightly connected to the administration of neurotoxic cytostatic agents used for the treatment of neoplasia. CPIN compromises the quality of life and produces pain or discomfort [2]. I have sought to produce a presentation of the medicated and physical-kinetic treatment options that have proved their effectiveness during clinical studies or random trials and can be applied to cancer patients presenting with symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy, namely with neuropathic pain, and support it with arguments. PMID:26528000

  5. [A psychological perspective on the problems faced by the oncology patients and their care teams].

    PubMed

    Kalvodová, L; Vorlícek, J; Adam, Z; Svacina, P

    2010-06-01

    Survey of the history and study of the psychical expressions of the oncology patients, the rules of communication ofoncologist and his patient. Personality of oncology patient and a Model of Kübler-Ross, then a decalogue of speaking about the oncology diagnosis. Clinical psychologict as an integral part of the medical team, which brings a supportive care for the oncology patients, then the psychopatological behaviour appears iside a medical team. In the end there are the authentic patients stories with the psychologist commentary. PMID:20681469

  6. Ethics and genomic medicine, how to navigate decisions in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Devon, Karen M; Lerner-Ellis, Jordan P; Ganai, Sabha; Angelos, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic information to make medical decisions and tailor treatments to individuals will likely provide major benefits and become an important part of health care. Surgical oncologists must ethically apply scientific genetic information in a complex and evolving environment to the benefit of their patients. In this review we address ethical issues associated with: indications for genetic testing, informed consent for testing and therapy, confidentiality, targeted therapy, prophylactic surgery, and genetic testing in children. PMID:25183289

  7. The role of the physiotherapy in the plastic surgery patients after oncological breast surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sandrin, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is the disease which causes the greatest concern among women worldwide, with an estimated 1,152,161 new cases each year. The improvement of surgical techniques, neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment enhance the survival time and recovery of these patients. As surgery is the first choice for the treatment of breast neoplasms reconstructive surgery has become an important procedure helping to reconstruct the mutilation after radical or conservative breast surgery. The objective of this article is to review the scientific literature and examine the available data regarding the role of physiotherapy in patients who undergo plastic reconstruction after oncological breast surgery, including suggestions on how physiotherapy could be applied in that population. Materials and methods Our review was obtained by searching the PubMed (National Library of Medicine, USA) and LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences) databases. Terms applied concerned physiotherapy and breast reconstructive surgery. The time of limit for our search was from 1995 until the present date. Results Fourteen articles were included in our review that matched our search criteria. Conclusions Physiotherapy is a field that still needs evidence based on daily routine and studies in the oncological physiotherapy field. Evaluation should be standardized and rehabilitation techniques used are empirical and should be researched in patients who undergo plastic reconstruction after breast surgery. The lack of post-surgery exercise protocols makes it difficult to analyse the patient’s evolution and makes it a challenge to investigate the true role of physiotherapy in this population. PMID:25083493

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use by Malaysian oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Maryam; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Abdul Shatar, Aishah Knight; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Seang, Tan Boon; Farooqui, Muhammad Aslam

    2012-05-01

    The current study sought to evaluate Malaysian oncology patients' decision making about the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for the management of their care. Patients were interviewed across three major Malaysian ethnic groups, Malay, Chinese and Indian. Thematic content analysis identified four central themes: Conceptualizing CAM, the decision making process; rationale given for selecting or rejecting CAM and barriers to CAM use. Participants generally used the term 'traditional medicine', referred to locally as 'ubat kampung', meaning medicine derived from 'local traditions'. Mixed reactions were shown concerning the effectiveness of CAM to cure cancer and the slow progression of CAM results and treatment costs were cited as major barriers to CAM use. Concerns regarding safety and efficacy of CAM in ameliorating cancer as well as potential interactions with conventional therapies highlighted the importance of patients' knowledge about cancer treatments. PMID:22500849

  9. Implanted Cardiac Defibrillator Care in Radiation Oncology Patient Population

    SciTech Connect

    Gelblum, Daphna Y. Amols, Howard

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To review the experience of a large cancer center with radiotherapy (RT) patients bearing implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) to propose some preliminary care guidelines as we learn more about the devices and their interaction with the therapeutic radiation environment. Methods and Materials: We collected data on patients with implanted ICDs treated with RT during a 2.5-year period at any of the five Memorial Sloan-Kettering clinical campuses. Information regarding the model, location, and dose detected from the device, as well as the treatment fields, fraction size, and treatment energy was collected. During this time, a new management policy for these patients had been implemented requiring treatment with low-energy beams (6 MV) and close surveillance of the patients in partnership with their electrophysiologist, as they received RT. Results: During the study period, 33 patients were treated with an ICD in place. One patient experienced a default of the device to its initial factory setting that was detected by the patient hearing an auditory signal from the device. This patient had initially been treated with a 15-MV beam. After this episode, his treatment was replanned to be completed with 6-MV photons, and he experienced no further events. Conclusion: Patients with ICDs and other implanted computer-controlled devices will be encountered more frequently in the RT department, and proper management is important. We present a policy for the safe treatment of these patients in the radiation oncology environment.

  10. Human Rhinovirus C Infections in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Loria, Carolina; Domm, Jennifer A.; Halasa, Natasha B.; Heitman, Elizabeth; Miller, E. Kathryn; Xu, Meng; Saville, Benjamin R.; Frangoul, Haydar; Williams, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with cancer and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients are at high risk for common viral infections. We sought to define the viral etiology of acute respiratory infections (ARI) and identify risk factors. Methods Nasal wash samples were collected from pediatric hematology-oncology patients and HSCT recipients with ARI during the 20032005 winter seasons. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to detect influenza A (Flu A), influenza B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenzaviruses (PIV) 13, human metapneumovirus (MPV), and human rhinoviruses (HRV). HRV specimens were sequenced and genotyped. Results Seventy-eight samples from 62 children were included. Viruses were detected in 31 of 78 samples (40%). HRV were detected most frequently, in 16 (52%) including 5 HRV type C (HRVC); followed by 7 (22%) RSV, 5 (16%) Flu A, 4 (13%) MPV and 2 (6%) PIV2. There was a trend toward higher risk of viral infection for children in daycare. Only 8% of the study children had received infuenza vaccine. Conclusions HRV, including the recently discovered HRVC, are an important cause of infection in pediatric oncology and HSCT patients. Molecular testing is superior to conventional methods and should be standard of care, since HRV are not detected by conventional methods. PMID:25377237

  11. Surgery for Li Fraumeni Syndrome: Pushing the Limits of Surgical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Langan, Russell C.; Lagisetty, Kiran H.; Atay, Scott; Pandalai, Prakash; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Avital, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Li Fraumeni syndrome is an autosomal dominant cancer syndrome due to a germline mutation in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. It results in multiple primary neoplasms in children and adults. A common question when faced with a Li Fraumeni patient who develops multiple primary cancers and/or recurrences is what is the proper treatment? Data suggests that ionizing radiation exposure increases the incidence of second malignancies in the Li Fraumeni population. Therefore, how much surgery can a cancer patient tolerate and still derive benefit from it? Methods We describe a representative case of a 54 year old female with Li Fraumeni syndrome with an enlarging adrenocortical hepatic metastasis, a new primary ampullary cancer, and an extensive surgical history. Results We performed a simultaneous pancreaticoduodenectomy and repeat partial hepatectomy. Conclusions We propose that surgery is under utilized in metastatic solid organ familial cancers in general, and argue that an aggressive surgical approach should be considered in a multidisciplinary fashion for patients with Li Fraumeni syndrome and recurrent tumors. However, because of the rarity of this familial cancer there is a paucity of evidence to support this approach therefore a review of the literature is presented. PMID:23563208

  12. Demystifying CINV control in the complex aging patient: assessing the complexities of the aging oncology patient.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Oncology nurses play a vital role in the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Serotonin-receptor antagonists, neurokinin 1 antagonists, and steroids can control nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy, improving patients' abilities to tolerate and complete the full course of cancer treatment. Safe and effective management of CINV in older patients involves special considerations, including comorbidities, potential for drug-drug interactions and toxicities, physiologic changes related to aging, and concomitant use of complementary and alternative therapies. In this session, a multidisciplinary group of oncology specialists discussed the nursing considerations related to conventional and complementary management of CINV in this patient population. PMID:15478565

  13. [Patients' Rights Act - Relevance for surgical disciplines].

    PubMed

    Haier, J

    2014-01-01

    The new Patients' Rights Act does not reflect rights of patients as professional obligations of physicians for the first time. It adopted common longtime jurisdiction, but in some respects it is going beyond. This law clearly extends the documentation requirements of physicians, especially concerning the extent of documentation. In surgical fields the requirements for enlightening physicians were more strongly worded than in previous jurisdiction. In medical facilities it is now mandatory to establish an internal quality management system. PMID:24390850

  14. Prevention of VTE in Nonorthopedic Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, David A.; Wren, Sherry M.; Karanicolas, Paul J.; Arcelus, Juan I.; Heit, John A.; Samama, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: VTE is a common cause of preventable death in surgical patients. Methods: We developed recommendations for thromboprophylaxis in nonorthopedic surgical patients by using systematic methods as described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines. Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: We describe several alternatives for stratifying the risk of VTE in general and abdominal-pelvic surgical patients. When the risk for VTE is very low (< 0.5%), we recommend that no specific pharmacologic (Grade 1B) or mechanical (Grade 2C) prophylaxis be used other than early ambulation. For patients at low risk for VTE (∼1.5%), we suggest mechanical prophylaxis, preferably with intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC), over no prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at moderate risk for VTE (∼3%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we suggest low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (Grade 2B), low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 2B), or mechanical prophylaxis with IPC (Grade 2C) over no prophylaxis. For patients at high risk for VTE (∼6%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we recommend pharmacologic prophylaxis with LMWH (Grade 1B) or low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 1B) over no prophylaxis. In these patients, we suggest adding mechanical prophylaxis with elastic stockings or IPC to pharmacologic prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at high risk for VTE undergoing abdominal or pelvic surgery for cancer, we recommend extended-duration, postoperative, pharmacologic prophylaxis (4 weeks) with LMWH over limited-duration prophylaxis (Grade 1B). For patients at moderate to high risk for VTE who are at high risk for major bleeding complications or those in whom the consequences of bleeding are believed to be particularly severe, we suggest use of mechanical prophylaxis, preferably with IPC, over no prophylaxis until the risk of bleeding diminishes and pharmacologic prophylaxis may be initiated (Grade 2C). For patients in all risk groups, we suggest that an inferior vena cava filter not be used for primary VTE prevention (Grade 2C) and that surveillance with venous compression ultrasonography should not be performed (Grade 2C). We developed similar recommendations for other nonorthopedic surgical populations. Conclusions: Optimal thromboprophylaxis in nonorthopedic surgical patients will consider the risks of VTE and bleeding complications as well as the values and preferences of individual patients. PMID:22315263

  15. [Plastic surgical reconstruction of extensive thoracic wall defects after oncologic resection].

    PubMed

    Riedel, K; Kremer, T; Hoffmann, H; Pfannschmidt, J; Reimer, P; Dienemann, H; Germann, G; Sauerbier, M

    2008-02-01

    In defect reconstruction following radical oncologic resection of malignant chest wall tumors, adequate soft-tissue reconstruction must be achieved along with function, stability, integrity, and aesthetics of the chest wall. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the oncoplastic concept following radical resection of malignant chest wall infiltration with an interdisciplinary approach. Between 1999 and 2005, 36 consecutive patients (nine males, 27 females, mean age 55 years, range 20-78) were treated with resection for malignant tumors of the chest wall. Indications were locally recurrent breast carcinoma (patient n=22), thymoma (n=1), and desmoid tumor (n=1). Primary lesions of the chest wall were spinalioma (n=1), sarcoma (n=7), and non-small-cell lung cancer (n=2). There were distant metastases of colon and cervical cancer in one patient each. Soft-tissue reconstruction was carried out using primary closure (n=1), external oblique flap (n=1), pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (n=3), latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap (n=18), vertical or transversal rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap (n=9), free tensor fascia lata- flap (n=6), trapezius flap (n=1), serratus flap (n=1), and one filet flap. In 15 reconstructive procedures microvascular techniques were used. An average of 3.4 ribs were resected. Stability of the chest wall was obtained with synthetic meshes. The latissimus dorsi flap is considered the flap of choice in chest wall reconstruction. However, alternatives such as pectoralis major flap, VRAM/TRAM flap, free TFL flap, and serratus flap must also be considered. Low mortality and morbidity rates allow tumor resection and chest wall reconstruction even in a palliative setting. PMID:17786394

  16. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article. PMID:23538250

  17. [COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF SURGICAL APPROACHES TO TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH SKIN MELANOMA].

    PubMed

    Anisimov, V V; Semiletova, Yu V; Gafton, G I; Lemekhov, V G; Myasnyankin, M Yu; Gafton, I G

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been rapid growth in the incidence of melanoma. Due to the large number of patients with various pigmented lesions, suspicious for melanoma, requiring differential diagnosis there is an actual problem of excisional biopsy in this group of patients. This review extensively covered approaches to radical surgical treatment of patients with skin melanoma. There are described in detail results of the studies of foreign experts regarding the influence of excisional and incisional biopsy on overall and disease-free survival rates of patients. On a large representative material (1126 patients) there are widely reflected the results of our studies to assess the effect of different surgical approaches to treatment of patients with skin melanoma. At present the authors can not recommend to perform excisional biopsy of patients with primary skin melanoma in oncological practice. Obviously for a final resolution of this problem it is necessary to conduct a multicenter randomized trial. PMID:26242150

  18. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc.), to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc.), and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.). These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS) has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person's job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information. PMID:19052391

  19. Indications for postoperative radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer after surgery with positive surgical margins

    PubMed Central

    Kamecki, Krzysztof; Makarewicz, Roman; Siekiera, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent cancer among men in Poland. The main methods of radical treatment are radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy. In patients who have been correctly qualified for surgery, a positive surgical margin is always an unexpected and undesirable factor. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the incidence of positive margins in more than 100 consecutive patients with prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy. Material and methods The study included 114 patients aged 44–78 years (mean 61.5 years) who underwent surgery for prostate cancer in stage cT1-3N0/M0 (according to the TNM staging system) in the years 2010-2011 in the Clinical Department of Oncological Urology in the Center of Oncology in Bydgoszcz. Results The presence of positive surgical margins was found in 45 (39.47%) patients, and in 20 (17.54%) margins were assessed as close (1–2 mm). Among the patients with positive surgical margins about 22% had biochemical recurrence. Among patients with negative surgical margins 13% of pT2c and 12.5% of pT3a had biochemical recurrence. Patients with positive surgical margins, along with patients diagnosed with tumor extending beyond the prostate (pT3a) or invading seminal vesicles (pT3b), are at an increased risk of recurrence and progression, reaching up to 30–50% over 10 years. The risk is 2–4 times higher than in patients without positive operating margins. PMID:24592127

  20. [Anesthesiological management of the high-risk surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, G; Avalle, M

    1980-03-01

    Evaluation of the anaesthesiological risk in surgical patients is described and an account is given of results obtained with an association of ketamin and NLA II in 57 high-risk patients subjected to general surgical management. PMID:7443059

  1. The Process of Oncology Nurse Practitioner Patient Navigation: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Frances

    2016-04-01

    Oncology nurse practitioner (ONP) patient navigators may improve clinical outcomes. However, no standard measures of the process of oncology patient navigation or of related clinical outcomes exist, and research in this area is limited. The exploratory pilot study detailed in this article used grounded theory and interviews with three ONPs to define the processes employed by ONP patient navigators in caring for patients with cancer.
. PMID:26991716

  2. Understanding the Differences Between Oncology Patients and Oncology Health Professionals Concerning Spirituality/Religiosity: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Camargos, Mayara Goulart de; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated whether spirituality/religiosity (S/R) plays an important role in the lives of cancer patients and in the work of health professionals who provide care for these patients. The correlations between spiritual quality of life (QOL) and the other QOL domain scores of patients and health professionals were also assessed. Moreover, QOL domain scores were compared between patients and health professionals. In this cross-sectional study, 1050 participants (525 oncology patients and 525 health professionals) were interviewed. Quality of life was assessed with the World Health Organization quality of life spiritual, religious, and personal beliefs (WHOQOL-SRPB). To compare the groups with respect to the instruments' domains, a quantile regression and an analysis of covariance model were used. The WHOQOL-Bref and WHOQOL-SRPB domains were correlated by performing Pearson and partial correlation tests. It was demonstrated that 94.1% of patients considered it important that health professionals addressed their spiritual beliefs, and 99.2% of patients relied on S/R to face cancer. Approximately, 99.6% of the patients reported that S/R support is necessary during cancer treatment; 98.3% of health professionals agreed that spiritual and religious support was necessary for oncology patients. Positive correlations between spiritual QOL and the other QOL domains were observed. When compared among themselves, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of spiritual QOL. In conclusion, S/R was an important construct in the minds of cancer patients and health professionals. Both groups often use S/R resources in their daily lives, which seems to positively affect their perceptions of QOL. Further studies are needed to determine how health professionals effectively address S/R during oncology practice. PMID:26632743

  3. Positive patient experiences in an Australian integrative oncology centre

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of cancer patients’ utilising complementary and integrative therapies (CIT) within integrative oncology centres across Western Australia. Methods Across four locations 135 patients accessed CIT services whilst undergoing outpatient medical treatment for cancer. Of the 135 patients, 66 (61 ± 12 y; female n = 45; male n = 21) agreed to complete a personal accounts questionnaire consisting of open-ended questions designed to explore patients’ perceptions of CIT. All results were transcribed into nVivo (v9) and using thematic analysis, key themes were identified. Results Of the 66 participants, 100% indicated they would “recommend complementary therapies to other patients” and 92% stated “CIT would play a significant role in their future lifestyle”. A mean score of 8 ± 1 indicated an improvement in participants’ perception of wellbeing following a CIT session. Three central themes were identified: empowerment, support and relaxation. Fourteen sub-themes were identified, with all themes clustered into a framework of multifaceted views held by cancer patients in relation to wellbeing, role of significant others and control. Conclusions Exploration of patients’ experiences reveals uniformly positive results. One of the key merits of the environment created within the centres is patients are able to work through their cancer journey with an increased sense of empowerment, without placing them in opposition to conventional medical treatment. In order to effectively target integrative support services it is crucial to explore the experiences of patients in their own words and use those forms of expression to drive service delivery. PMID:24886476

  4. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the following topics: rationale for performing GA; findings from a GA performed in geriatric oncology patients; ability of GA to predict oncology treatment–related complications; association between GA findings and overall survival (OS); impact of GA findings on oncology treatment decisions; composition of a GA, including domains and tools; and methods for implementing GA in clinical care. Results GA can be valuable in oncology practice for following reasons: detection of impairment not identified in routine history or physical examination, ability to predict severe treatment-related toxicity, ability to predict OS in a variety of tumors and treatment settings, and ability to influence treatment choice and intensity. The panel recommended that the following domains be evaluated in a GA: functional status, comorbidity, cognition, mental health status, fatigue, social status and support, nutrition, and presence of geriatric syndromes. Although several combinations of tools and various models are available for implementation of GA in oncology practice, the expert panel could not endorse one over another. Conclusion There is mounting data regarding the utility of GA in oncology practice; however, additional research is needed to continue to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:25071125

  5. Surgical jejunostomy in aspiration risk patients.

    PubMed Central

    Weltz, C R; Morris, J B; Mullen, J L

    1992-01-01

    One hundred patients underwent laparotomy for independent jejunal feeding tube placement. Neurologic disease was present in 50%, and obtundation (28) and oropharyngeal dysmotility (25) were the most common indications for enteral feeding. The post-pyloric route was chosen because of aspiration risk in almost all (94%) patients. Postoperative (30-day) mortality rate was 21%, because of cardiopulmonary failure in most (18). One death resulted directly from aspiration of tube feeds. Two surgical complications required reoperation: one wound dehiscence and one small bowel obstruction. Four wound infections occurred. Two patients underwent reoperation after tube removal, and four tubes required fluoroscopically guided reinsertion for peritubular drainage (2), removal (1), and occlusion (1). Aspiration pneumonia was present in 18 patients preoperatively and in eight postoperatively. None of the patients with feeding-related preoperative aspiration pneumonia (13) had a recurrence while fed by jejunostomy. Three patients developed postoperative aspiration pneumonia before initiation of jejunostomy feedings. Jejunostomy may be performed with low morbidity rate and substantial reduction of feeding-related aspiration pneumonia, and is the feeding route of choice in aspiration risk patients. PMID:1546899

  6. Surgical trials in oncology. the importance of quality control in the TME trial.

    PubMed

    Klein Kranenbarg, E; van de Velde, C J H

    2002-05-01

    Results from randomised trials provide the best scientific evidence of efficacy or inefficacy of the therapy. The evaluation of surgical procedures involves problems in addition to those associated with medical experimentation. Surgery, unlike a pill, is not a standardised, reproducible entity, but a unique product whose details are defined by, for example, the skill of the surgeon. Quality assurance is important for treatment and also for data handling. The different treatments (surgery, pathology, radiotherapy, etc.) should be familiar to all participating physicians prior to the start of the trial. Instructions can be given by means of a well-written protocol, videotapes, workshops and instructors at the dissection table. The data collection and data check should be done by data managers and co-ordinators for the separate disciplines. Errors and missing data should be completed and feedback to the physician is essential. Close contact between an active co-ordinating data centre, including co-ordinators for the separate disciplines, and all participating physicians is essential to conduct a quality controlled multicentre, multidisciplinary trial. Continuous enthusiasm can be maintained by the organisation of regular workshops, distribution of newsletters and trial up-dates at scientific meetings. The efforts from all of the involved co-ordinators, data managers, instructors and physicians have resulted in a very successful trial with rapid accrual, good quality treatments and procedures, good quality data, and a high participation rate among hospitals and patients. Quality control is expensive and labour-intensive, but it is worthwhile. PMID:11978518

  7. Safety of pull-type and introducer percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes in oncology patients: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) allows long-term tube feeding. Safety of pull-type and introducer PEG placement in oncology patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies is unknown. Methods Retrospective analysis of 299 patients undergoing PEG tube placement between January 2006 and December 2008 revealed 57 oncology patients. All patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancy were treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. In case of high-grade stenosis introducer Freka® Pexact PEG tube was placed (n = 24) and in all other patients (n = 33) conventional pull-type PEG tube. Short-term complications and mortality rates were compared. Results Patients' characteristics and clinical status were comparable in both groups. Short-term complications were encountered in 11/24 (48%) introducer PEG patients as compared to only 4/33 (12%) pull-type PEG patients (P < 0.05). Accidental removal of the introducer PEG tube occurred in 4/24 (17%) with need for surgical intervention in 1 vs. 0/33 (0%, P < 0.05). Wound infection occurred in 3/24 (12%) leading to septic shock and admission to intensive care unit (ICU) in 1 vs. 3/33 (9%, NS). Finally, 3/24 gastrointestinal perforations (12%) resulted from a difficult placement procedure vs. 1/33 (3%), leading to urgent surgical intervention and admission to ICU. Two introducer PEG patients died at ICU, resulting in an overall mortality rate of 8% vs. 0% (P = 0.091). Conclusion The introducer Freka® Pexact PEG procedure for long-term tube feeding may lead to significantly higher complication and mortality rates in patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. It is suggested to use the conventional pull-type PEG tube placement in this group of patients, if possible. PMID:21410958

  8. Hypnosis with medical/surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, D

    1983-12-01

    The role of hypnosis as a tool in the treatment of problems commonly encountered among medical and surgical patients is examined. Hypnosis is defined as a change in state of mind far more akin to intense concentration than sleep. Diagnostic implications of differences in hypnotic responsivity are explored, and scales suitable for use in the clinic are examined. Uses of hypnosis in treating anxiety, pain, childbirth, psychosomatic symptoms, seizure disorders, neuromuscular dysfunction, and habits are described and evaluated. The phenomenon of hypnosis is presented as a means of exploring the mind-body relationship in a controlled fashion, providing information of diagnostic importance while at the same time allowing hypnotizable patients to intensify their concentration and interpersonal receptivity in the service of a therapeutic goal. PMID:6662357

  9. Surgical Guides (Patient-Specific Instruments) for Pediatric Tibial Bone Sarcoma Resection and Allograft Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bellanova, Laura; Paul, Laurent; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2013-01-01

    To achieve local control of malignant pediatric bone tumors and to provide satisfactory oncological results, adequate resection margins are mandatory. The local recurrence rate is directly related to inappropriate excision margins. The present study describes a method for decreasing the resection margin width and ensuring that the margins are adequate. This method was developed in the tibia, which is a common site for the most frequent primary bone sarcomas in children. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomography (CT) were used for preoperative planning to define the cutting planes for the tumors: each tumor was segmented on MRI, and the volume of the tumor was coregistered with CT. After preoperative planning, a surgical guide (patient-specific instrument) that was fitted to a unique position on the tibia was manufactured by rapid prototyping. A second instrument was manufactured to adjust the bone allograft to fit the resection gap accurately. Pathologic evaluation of the resected specimens showed tumor-free resection margins in all four cases. The technologies described in this paper may improve the surgical accuracy and patient safety in surgical oncology. In addition, these techniques may decrease operating time and allow for reconstruction with a well-matched allograft to obtain stable osteosynthesis. PMID:23533326

  10. Intramedullary hemangioblastomas: surgical results in 16 patients.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Ghizoni, Enrico; dos Santos, Marcos Juliano; Valadares, Marcelo Gomes C; da Silva, Felipe Soares; Tedeschi, Helder

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Hemangioblastomas are rare, benign, highly vascularized tumors that can be found throughout the neuraxis but are mainly located in the cerebellum and in the spinal cord. Spinal hemangioblastomas can present with motor and sensory deficits, whose severity varies according to the size and location of the tumor. Resection is the best treatment option to avoid neurological deterioration. The authors report surgical results in the treatment of intramedullary hemangioblastomas and discuss the technical nuances important to achieving total resection without adding new deficits. METHODS A consecutive series of patients with intramedullary hemangioblastomas operated on between 2000 and 2014 by the senior author (H.T.) is presented. The functional scale proposed by McCormick was used to evaluate the patients' neurological status before and after surgery. RESULTS Sixteen patients were included in the study and underwent 17 surgeries. Follow-up was at least 6 months. Age at presentation varied from 13 to 58 years (mean 33.8 years). Ten patients (62.5%) were males and 6 patients (37.5%) were females. Seven (43.75%) of the 16 patients had associated von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, with hemangioblastomas also presenting in other locations. Three patients had multiple tumors in the same segment in the spinal cord, and 10 patients (62.5%) presented with cysts. According to the site of presentation, 11 tumors (68.75%) were localized at the cervical region (including the cervicomedullary junction) and 5 tumors (31.25%) at the thoracic level. Total resection was achieved in all cases, evidenced by postoperative MRI. Four patients had some functional worsening immediately after surgery. After 6 months, 1 patient had functional worsening compared with preoperative status, and 2 patients had clinical improvement. The majority of the patients remained clinically stable postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS Adequate knowledge of anatomy and the correct use of microsurgical techniques allowed total resection of these tumors, with minimal morbidity and maximum functional recovery. Outcome seems to be directly related to the neurological status before surgery. PMID:26235016

  11. Germline pharmacogenomics in oncology: decoding the patient for targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Peter H; Ratain, Mark J

    2012-04-01

    Pharmacogenomics is the study of genetic factors determining drug response or toxicity. The use of pharmacogenomics is especially desirable in oncology because the therapeutic index of oncology drugs is often narrow, the need for favorable drug response is often acute, and the consequences of drug toxicity can be life-threatening. In this review, we examine the state of pharmacogenomics in oncology, focusing only on germline pharmacogenomic variants. We consider several critical points when assessing the quality of pharmacogenomic findings and their relevance to clinical use, and discuss potential confounding factors limiting interpretation and implementation. Several of the most extensively studied drug-gene pairs (irinotecan and UGT1A1; tamoxifen and CYP2D6; 5-fluorouracil and DPYD) are inspected in depth as illustrations of both the state of advancement-and the current limitations of-present knowledge. We argue that there will likely soon be a critical mass of important germline pharmacogenomic biomarkers in oncology which deserve clinical implementation to provide optimal, personalized oncologic care. We conclude with a vision of how routine clinical testing of such germline markers could one day change the paradigm for cancer care. PMID:22321460

  12. A comparison of complementary and alternative medicine use by gynecology and gynecologic oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Von Gruenigen, V E; White, L J; Kirven, M S; Showalter, A L; Hopkins, M P; Jenison, E L

    2001-01-01

    Our objective was to describe and compare the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in gynecology and gynecological oncology patients. Five hundred and twenty-nine gynecology and gynecological oncology patients completed a questionnaire regarding CAM use. Overall, 56.3% of gynecology and gynecological oncology patients reported current use of CAM. Therapies used included nutritional supplements (20%), prayer as medical therapy (17%), exercise as medical therapy (12%), megavitamins (10%), and green tea (10%). While 69.5% believed CAM to be beneficial, only 31.6% discussed these therapies with their physician. The women spent a mean of $656.22 on CAM (range $0-$7,000), with 31.7% receiving some insurance reimbursement. Gynecologic oncology patients (n = 161) used CAM significantly more than gynecology patients (n = 368) (66% vs. 52%, 95% CI = 0.046-0.230, P = 0.004). Gynecological oncology patients also spent more for CAM, with a mean expenditure of $711 versus $622 by gynecology patients. Within the gynecological oncology patient group, there were 69 patients currently receiving modern medical treatments for cancer; among these patients, 58% reported using CAM; of these, 39.3% communicated their use of CAM to their physician. Patients in this group spent an average of $1,178 on CAM during their illness, with only 6.3% receiving insurance reimbursement. Benefits from CAM were perceived by 54.5% in this group. We concluded that cancer patients have a higher usage rate and expenditure for CAM, particularly while they are receiving medical therapy, and are more likely to discuss the use of alternative therapies with their physicians. CAM was perceived as helpful by patients despite the lack of scientific data about its effect. PMID:11437926

  13. Healing the mind/body split: bringing the patient back into oncology.

    PubMed

    Greer, Steven

    2003-03-01

    The effect on oncology of the doctrine of Cartesian dualism is examined. It is argued that (1) this doctrine continues to exert a baneful (though unacknowledged) influence on the practice of oncology, (2) Descartes's doctrine of a mind/body split is mistaken, and (3) mind and body (brain) are inextricably interwoven. A biopsychosocial model of disease is advocated. The role of psychooncology in healing the mind/body split by focusing research attention on the patient is outlined. PMID:12941164

  14. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Survivorship in Radiation Oncology: Overcoming the Cons

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Arthur K.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Movsas, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have become a key component of clinical oncology trials, many challenges exist regarding their optimal application. The goal of this article is to methodically review these barriers and suggest strategies to overcome them. This review will primarily focus on radiation oncology examples, will address issues regarding the “why, how, and what” of PROs, and will provide strategies for difficult problems such as methods for reducing missing data. This review will also address cancer survivorship because it closely relates to PROs. Methods Key articles focusing on PROs, quality of life, and survivorship issues in oncology trials are highlighted, with an emphasis on radiation oncology clinical trials. Publications and Web sites of various governmental and regulatory agencies are also reviewed. Results The study of PROs in clinical oncology trials has become well established. There are guidelines provided by organizations such as the US Food and Drug Administration that clearly indicate the importance of and methodology for studying PROs. Clinical trials in oncology have repeatedly demonstrated the value of studying PROs and suggested ways to overcome some of the key challenges. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) has led some of these efforts, and their contributions are highlighted. The current state of cancer survivorship guidelines is also discussed. Conclusion The study of PROs presents significant benefits in understanding and treating toxicities and enhancing quality of life; however, challenges remain. Strategies are presented to overcome these hurdles, which will ultimately improve cancer survivorship. PMID:25113760

  15. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  16. The Use of Art in the Medical Decision-Making Process of Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of written informed consent in the 1970s created expectations of shared decision making between doctors and patients that has led to decisional conflict for some patients. This study utilized a collaborative, intrinsic case study approach to the decision-making process of oncology patients who participated in an open art therapy…

  17. The Use of Art in the Medical Decision-Making Process of Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of written informed consent in the 1970s created expectations of shared decision making between doctors and patients that has led to decisional conflict for some patients. This study utilized a collaborative, intrinsic case study approach to the decision-making process of oncology patients who participated in an open art therapy

  18. Fertility Protection in Female Oncology Patients: How Should Patients Be Counseled?

    PubMed Central

    Findeklee, S.; Lotz, L.; Heusinger, K.; Hoffmann, I.; Dittrich, R.; Beckmann, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Protecting the fertility of patients with oncologic disease is becoming more and more important, as fulfilling the wish to have children is increasingly occurring at a later stage in life and long-term survival rates after cancer are continuing to improve. A number of fertility-preserving options exist. In addition to techniques which have been around for some time such as medical ovarian suppression, ovarian transposition, and organ-preserving surgery, there are other, more recent, innovative methods which have developed over the last few years such as cryopreservation of oocytes or ovarian tissue transplantation after completing cancer therapy. As every procedure has its specific advantages and disadvantages, informed patient consent is essential. The physicianʼs aim must be to select the optimal procedure for each patient. The extent of patientsʼ information about the options to preserve fertility in women with oncologic disease remains limited. One of the main reasons for this is that clinicians are not sure how to inform patients about existing procedures and methods. The aim of this review article is to provide help in clinical practice. PMID:26726265

  19. [Organizational and methodological issues in the development of palliative care for oncological patients].

    PubMed

    Solov'ev, V I

    2004-01-01

    The share of patients, who apply to oncology facilities with advanced pathologies, shapes up a new situation for oncologists: the sphere of palliative care of both managerial and methodological types must be promoted. Thus, 451299 patients with malignant neoplasms, including those with wide-spread forms (i.e. stages III-IV: 59.1%), were registered in Russia in 2001. One hundred and thirty structural subunits of palliative care were set up in Russia's regions for today; another 58 are being established: however, none of them could be referred to as a perfect one because the role and functions have not yet been defined for palliative care, while all subject-related publications are isolated and scanty. The functioning of hospices and palliative-care subunits is not as a rule coordinated with the oncology service or with oncology experts. This problem should be resolved through setting up the palliative-care regional systems with the role and functions of palliative care being specified for them on the basis of the existing oncology institutes, hospitals and other patient-care facilities. This would maintain the continuity of medical care rendered to oncology patients at all disease stages. PMID:15098388

  20. Oncology nurses' communication challenges with patients and families: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Smita C; Manna, Ruth; Coyle, Nessa; Shen, Megan Johnson; Pehrson, Cassandra; Zaider, Talia; Hammonds, Stacey; Krueger, Carol A; Parker, Patricia A; Bylund, Carma L

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of effective communication in an oncology setting are multifold and include the overall well-being of patients and health professionals, adherence to treatment regimens, psychological functioning, and improvements in quality of life. Nevertheless, there are substantial barriers and communication challenges reported by oncology nurses. This study was conducted to present a summary of communication challenges faced by oncology nurses. From November 2012 to March 2014, 121 inpatient nurses working in the oncology setting participated in an online pre-training qualitative survey that asked nurses to describe common communication challenges in communicating empathy and discussing death, dying, and end-of-life (EOL) goals of care. The results revealed six themes that describe the challenges in communicating empathically: dialectic tensions, burden of carrying bad news, lack of skills for providing empathy, perceived institutional barriers, challenging situations, and perceived dissimilarities between the nurse and the patient. The results for challenges in discussing death, dying and EOL goals of care revealed five themes: dialectic tensions, discussing specific topics related to EOL, lack of skills for providing empathy, patient/family characteristics, and perceived institutional barriers. This study emphasizes the need for institutions to provide communication skills training to their oncology nurses for navigating through challenging patient interactions. PMID:26278636

  1. Servier's pipeline in oncology: moving from research to patients.

    PubMed

    Therasse, Patrick; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Patrick Therasse and Jean-Pierre Abastado speak to Roshaine Gunawardana, Managing Commissioning Editor: Patrick Therasse is an MD, PhD who has focused his career on drug development in oncology. He is currently the Head of Oncology Development for Servier. Before working for Servier, he worked 8 years for GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines as Vice President, Head of Global Clinical Development for immunotherapeutics. He started his career at the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) as a research fellow and then served as Director of the EORTC Research Center for 11 years. He has worked in all fields of oncology with a long track record of publications mainly in the field of breast cancer and methodological research. He is most well known for developing new Response Criteria In Solid Tumours (RECIST), the reference for response assessment in cancer clinical trials since 2000. His areas of expertise encompass Phase I-III drug development with small molecules or active/passive immunotherapy and translational research. Jean-Pierre Abastado is an immuno-oncologist in charge of the R&D in Oncology at Servier, where he is Director of the Therapeutic Innovation Pole in Oncology. He conducted his professional career between various academic and industrial institutions. He was trained at Ecole Polytechnique (Paris), prepared his PhD on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) at the Pasteur Institute, and made a postdoctoral training at NIH (Bethesda, MD, USA). He studied T-cell activation in the Immunology department of the Pasteur Institute and at the CNRS. He was Vice President, Chief Scientific Officer of IDM-Pharma, a company specialized in cell therapy against cancer. Before joining Servier, he headed the Laboratory of Tumour Immunology within the Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN) where his team studied the tumor immune microenvironment. He has served on the Editorial board of several journals and in the Scientific Advisory Board of several biotech companies. He has authored more than 120 peer-reviewed publications. PMID:26764971

  2. Group Therapy with Patients in the Waiting Room of an Oncology Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnowitz, Edward; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a therapy group for cancer patients, conducted by cotherapists in an oncology waiting room. Group members provided mutual support and shared concerns and coping methods. Medical staff members became more involved and were more able to address the affective needs of the patients and their families. (JAC)

  3. Caring for head and neck oncology patients. Does social support lead to better quality of life?

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, C. M.; Logan-Smith, L. L.; Phillips, J.; MacPhee, M.; Attia, E. L.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether social support contributes to better quality of life and psychological state of head and neck oncology patients. DESIGN: A structured questionnaire, administered orally to patients face-to-face, with specific questions about demographic and medical information and social support and two standardized scales; a cancer-specific quality of life scale and a depression scale. SETTING: Head and Neck Oncology Clinic, an institutional referral centre providing ambulatory care at the Camp Hill Medical Centre in Halifax, NS. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-five head and neck oncology patients (33 men, 12 women) who came for follow-up appointments at the clinic. One person did not complete the interview. Fifty patients were approached, but five were not included: one died before the interview, and four agreed to participate but were prevented by transportation or timing problems. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Scores on the Functional Living Index-Cancer Scale and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale. RESULTS: Four main factors predicted quality of life: satisfaction with family physician support, severity of cancer, sex of patient, and type of cancer. Three important predictors of psychological state were loss of appetite, family physician support, and sex of patient. CONCLUSION: Social support, particularly from family physicians, contributes greatly to better quality of life and psychological state for head and neck oncology patients. PMID:8828874

  4. Severe Skin Toxicity in Pediatric Oncology Patients Treated with Voriconazole and Concomitant Methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    van Eijkelenburg, Natasha K. A.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.

    2013-01-01

    We report the occurrence of skin toxicities in pediatric oncology patients on concomitant treatment with voriconazole and methotrexate (MTX). Of 23 patients who received this combination, 11 patients suffered from cheilitis and/or photosensitivity. In contrast, only in 1 of 9 patients who received voriconazole without MTX was photosensitivity observed. A mechanism of action was not able to be identified. We describe two cases with severe skin toxicities. Caution is warranted when using voriconazole and concomitant MTX. PMID:23571545

  5. Patients' Perspectives of Surgical Safety: Do They Feel Safe?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Jennifer L.; Tillman, Matthew M.; Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Song, Juhee; Papaconstantinou, Harry T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased focus on reducing patient harm has led to surgical safety initiatives, including time-out, surgical safety checklists, and debriefings. The perception of the lay public of the surgical safety process is largely unknown. Methods A 20-question survey focused on perceptions of surgical safety practice was distributed to a random sample of patients following elective operations requiring hospitalization. Responses were measured by a 7-point Likert scale. Qualitative feedback was obtained through nonphysician-moderated sessions. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Results Surveys were distributed to 345 patients of whom 102 (29.5%) responded. Overall, patients felt safe as evidenced by scores for the questions “I felt safe the day of my surgery” (6.53 ± 0.72) and “Mistakes rarely happen during surgery” (5.39 ± 1.51). Patients undergoing their first surgery and patients with higher income levels were associated with a significant decrease in specific safety perceptions. Qualitative feedback sessions identified the physician-patient relationship as the most important factor positively influencing patient safety perceptions. Conclusion Current surgical safety practice is perceived positively by our patients; however, patients still identify physician-patient interactions, relationships, and trust as the most positive factors influencing their perception of the safety environment. PMID:26130976

  6. [The experience of the "oncologic patient": (re)conceptualizing the informative act].

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Carlos António

    2007-01-01

    The adaptation of the patient to the conditions of chronic illness makes the information given to the patient one of the most powerful strategies, capable of contributing to a change in the social representation of the patient, from that of a mere clinical case to that of a holistic being. The objective of this study was to investigate the scientific work published in periodicals indexed by the Medline and Lilacs databases between 1990 and 2006 as to the informative act and the different forms in which information is provided to oncology patients. This analysis of the literature led to the conclusion that there has been an increase in the volume of publications, underlining the role of the oncology patient as a catalyst for new strategies for psychosocial adjustment and revealing her key role through her status as a 'professional patient'. PMID:18472547

  7. [The fate of patients with intermittent claudication--comparison of surgical and non-surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Zempo, N; Yoshimura, K; Akimoto, F; Nakamura, T; Ohara, M; Wakamatsu, T; Esato, K

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the operative indication for patients with intermittent claudication because of arteriosclerosis obliterans, and to compare the late result of the surgical treatment group (130 cases, 175 limbs) with that of the non-surgical treatment group (27 cases, 31 limbs). There were 3 operative deaths and 21 late deaths in the surgical group, and 11 late deaths in the non-surgical group. The number one cause of death was heart failure, including ischemic heart disease, in both groups. The 5-year cumulative patency rate was 92.5% in the aorto-iliac, 70.6% in the femoro-distal and 82.0% in the aorto-femoro-distal arterial reconstructions. Long term symptom free rates of the surgical group and the non-surgical group, except fatal cases, were 87.2% and 25.0% in the aorto-iliac, 57.7% and 25.0% in the femoro-distal, 86.7% and 0% in the aorto-femoro-distal arterial regions, respectively. Late result of intermittent claudication in the surgical group was better than that in the non-surgical group. We conclude that intermittent claudication should be considered to be the indication for surgery, except for the cases with high risk diseases or malignant diseases. PMID:1944136

  8. Surgical centre delights patients and staff.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    Excellent teamworking and a spirit of co-operation have characterised the design, construction and, over the past year, operation of a new pound 25 million PFI-funded Surgical Centre at Kingston Hospital, Surrey, to be run under a 30-year concession by special purpose vehicle and Costain / John Laing consortium Prime Care Solutions (Kingston Ltd). Health Estate Journal reports. PMID:18988613

  9. Use of Psychosocial Services Increases after a Social Worker-Mediated Intervention in Gynecology Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Yuko; Shah, Nina R.; Ward, Kristy K.; McHale, Michael T.; Alvarez, Edwin A.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of psychosocial services to gynecologic oncology outpatients by a social worker increases service use. During the initial six weeks (phase I), patients were referred for psychosocial services by clinic staff. During the second six weeks (phase II), a nurse introduced available…

  10. Providing care for critically ill surgical patients: challenges and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Kaplan, Lewis; Gracias, Vicente H; Beilman, Gregory J; Toevs, Christine; Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Providing optimal care for critically ill and injured surgical patients will become more challenging with staff shortages for surgeons and intensivists. This white paper addresses the historical issues behind the present situation, the need for all intensivists to engage in dedicated critical care per the intensivist model, and the recognition that intensivists from all specialties can provide optimal care for the critically ill surgical patient, particularly with continuing involvement by the surgeon of record. The new acute care surgery training paradigm (including trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery) has been developed to increase interest in trauma and surgical critical care, but the number of interested trainees remains too few. Recommendations are made for broadening the multidisciplinary training and practice opportunities in surgical critical care for intensivists from all base specialties and for maintaining the intensivist model within acute care surgery practice. Support from academic and administrative leadership, as well as national organizations, will be needed. PMID:23754675

  11. From Patient-Specific Mathematical Neuro-Oncology to Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, A. L.; Rockne, R. C.; Boone, A. D.; Neal, M. L.; Hawkins-Daarud, A.; Corwin, D. M.; Bridge, C. A.; Guyman, L. A.; Trister, A. D.; Mrugala, M. M.; Rockhill, J. K.; Swanson, K. R.

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are notoriously aggressive, malignant brain tumors that have variable response to treatment. These patients often have poor prognosis, informed primarily by histopathology. Mathematical neuro-oncology (MNO) is a young and burgeoning field that leverages mathematical models to predict and quantify response to therapies. These mathematical models can form the basis of modern “precision medicine” approaches to tailor therapy in a patient-specific manner. Patient-specific models (PSMs) can be used to overcome imaging limitations, improve prognostic predictions, stratify patients, and assess treatment response in silico. The information gleaned from such models can aid in the construction and efficacy of clinical trials and treatment protocols, accelerating the pace of clinical research in the war on cancer. This review focuses on the growing translation of PSM to clinical neuro-oncology. It will also provide a forward-looking view on a new era of patient-specific MNO. PMID:23565501

  12. A Review of the Prevalence and Impact of Multiple Symptoms in Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Eun Esther; Dodd, Marylin J.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Jahan, Thierry; Miaskowski, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Findings from several studies suggest that oncology patients undergoing active treatment experience multiple symptoms and that these symptoms can have a negative effect on patient outcomes. However, no systematic review has summarized the findings from studies that assessed multiple symptoms in these patients. Therefore, the purposes of this review were to: 1) compare and contrast the characteristics of the three most commonly used instruments to measure multiple symptoms; 2) summarize the prevalence rates for multiple symptoms in studies of oncology patients receiving active treatment; 3) describe the relationships among selected demographic, disease, and treatment characteristics and multiple symptoms; and 4) describe the relationships between the occurrence of multiple symptoms and patient outcomes (i.e., functional status, quality of life). Only 18 studies were found that met the inclusion criteria for this review. The majority of the studies were cross-sectional with sample sizes that ranged from 26 to 527. Approximately 40% of patients experienced more than one symptom. However, little is known about the relationships between demographic and clinical characteristics and the occurrence of multiple symptoms. Findings from this review suggest that the occurrence of multiple symptoms is associated with decreased functional status and quality of life. However, given the large number of oncology patients who undergo active treatment each year, additional research is warranted on the prevalence and impact of multiple symptoms. Only when this descriptive research is completed with homogenous samples of patients in terms of cancer diagnoses and treatments can intervention studies for multiple symptoms be developed and tested. PMID:19019626

  13. Evaluation of the effect of care given by nursing students on oncology patients' satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Can, Gulbeyaz; Akin, Semiha; Aydiner, Adnan; Ozdilli, Kursat; Durna, Zehra

    2008-09-01

    Patients' satisfaction with the care given by nursing students will have a say in the development of practical nursing student education and in improving the quality of clinical training. The purpose of this study was to test whether the Turkish version of "The Oncology Patients' Perceptions of the Quality of Nursing Care Scale-Short Form (OPPQNCS-SF)" is appropriate for oncology patients done by studying the tool's validity and reliability and to evaluate the effect of care given by nursing students on oncology patients' satisfaction with the care they receive. The Turkish version of OPPQNCS-SF's item-score correlation coefficients were rs=0.38-0.85 (p<0.05). The Cronbach values were 0.91 for the total scale, 0.66-0.87 for the subscales. The results show that the scale is a valid and reliable tool for Turkish patients. The mean scores for every subscale and item were high. The patients were most pleased about the respect they were shown, with the answered to their questions, with the sincere interest shown and with the knowledge of nurses about their condition. The patients' high level of satisfaction with the care nursing students gave is important to ensure that nurses, who will have primary responsibility for patient care in the future, receive a good clinical and theoretical education. PMID:18653383

  14. Endoscopic laser therapy of erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of patients in oncological hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Oleg N.; Kuvshinov, Yu. P.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kartasheva, E. O.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Ponomarev, Igor V.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The results of laser therapy present in 374 patients with erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of respiratory organs and of gastro-intestinal tract after oncological operations. Two types of laser namely endoscopic laser on the basis of He-Ne and Cu laser were used as sources of radiation. It was shown high therapeutic effectiveness of laser therapy. This method may be recommended for the above-mentioned category of the patients.

  15. Fears, Uncertainties, and Hopes: Patient-Initiated Actions and Doctors' Responses During Oncology Interviews.

    PubMed

    Beach, Wayne A; Dozier, David M

    2015-01-01

    New cancer patients frequently raise concerns about fears, uncertainties, and hopes during oncology interviews. This study sought to understand when and how patients raise their concerns, how doctors responded to these patient-initiated actions, and implications for communication satisfaction. A subsampling of video recorded and transcribed encounters was investigated involving 44 new patients and 14 oncologists. Patients completed pre/post self-report measures about fears, uncertainties, and hopes as well as postevaluations of interview satisfaction. Conversation analysis was used to initially identify pairs of patient-initiated and doctor-responsive actions. A coding scheme was subsequently developed, and two independent coding teams, comprised of two coders each, reliably identified patient-initiated and doctor-responsive social actions. Interactional findings reveal that new cancer patients initiate actions much more frequently than previous research had identified, concerns are usually raised indirectly, and with minimal emotion. Doctors tend to respond to these concerns immediately, but with even less affect, and rarely partner with patients. From pre/post results, it was determined that the higher patients' reported fears, the higher their postvisit fears and lower their satisfaction. Patients with high uncertainty were highly proactive (e.g., asked more questions), yet reported even greater uncertainties after encounters. Hopeful patients also exited interviews with high hopes. Overall, new patients were very satisfied: oncology interviews significantly decreased patients' fears and uncertainties, while increasing hopes. Discussion raises key issues for improving communication and managing quality cancer care. PMID:26134261

  16. What Determines the Surgical Patient Experience? Exploring the Patient, Clinical Staff, and Administration Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mazurenko, Olena; Zemke, Dina; Lefforge, Noelle; Shoemaker, Stowe; Menachemi, Nir

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals are increasingly concerned with enhancing surgical patient experience given that Medicare reimbursements are now tied in part to patient satisfaction. Surgical patients' experience may be influenced by several factors (e.g., integration of care, technical aspects of care), which are ranked differently in importance by clinicians and patients. Strategies designed to improve patient experience can be informed by our research, which examines the determinants of the surgical patient experience from the perspective of multiple healthcare team members. We conducted 12 focus groups with surgical patients, family members, physicians, nurses, and hospital administrators at one acute care, for-profit hospital in a western state and analyzed the content for determinants of the overall surgical patient experience. Specifically, we analyzed the content of the conversations to determine how frequently participants discussed the determinants of the surgical patient experience and how positive, negative, or neutral the comments were. The study's findings suggest that surgical patients and members of the healthcare team have similar views regarding the most important factors in the patient experience-namely, interdisciplinary relationships, technical infrastructure, and staffing. The study results will be used to improve care in this facility and can inform the development of initiatives aimed at improving the surgical patient experience elsewhere. Our study could serve as a model for how other facilities can analyze the surgical patient experience from the perspectives of different stakeholders and improve their performance on the basis of data directly relevant to their organization. PMID:26554144

  17. Patient relevant endpoints in oncology: current issues in the context of early benefit assessment in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The German AMNOG healthcare reform includes a mandatory early-benefit-assessment (EBA) at launch. As per German social code, EBA is based on registration trials and includes evaluation of the patient-relevant effect of the new medicines compared to an appropriate comparator as defined by the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA). Current EBA decisions released have unveiled issues regarding the acceptance of some patient-relevant endpoints as G-BA and IQWiG are grading the endpoints, focusing on overall survival as the preferred endpoint in oncology. A taskforce of experienced German outcomes research, medical, health-technology assessment and biostatistics researchers in industry was appointed. After agreement on core assumptions, a draft position was prepared. Input on iterative versions was solicited from a panel of reviewers from industry and external stakeholders. Distinctive features of registration trials in oncology need to be considered when these studies form basis for EBA, especially in cancer-indications with long post-progression survival; and with several consecutive therapeutic options available post-progression. Ethical committees, caregivers and patients often demand cross-over-designs diluting the treatment-effect on overall survival. Regulatory authorities require evaluation of morbidity-related study endpoints including survival of patients without their disease getting worse (i.e., progression-free survival). Also, progression requires treatment-changes, another strong indicator for its relevance to patients. Based on specific guidelines and clinical trial programs that were developed to be consistent with regulatory guidance, endpoints in oncology are thoroughly evaluated in terms of their patient-relevance. This extensive knowledge and experience should be fully acknowledged during EBA when assessing the patient-relevant benefit of innovative medicines in oncology. JEL codes D61; H51; I18. PMID:24460706

  18. Community Oncology Medical Homes: Physician-Driven Change to Improve Patient Care and Reduce Costs.

    PubMed

    Waters, Teresa M; Webster, Jennifer A; Stevens, Laura A; Li, Tao; Kaplan, Cameron M; Graetz, Ilana; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-11-01

    Although the patient-centered medical home is a well-established model of care for primary care providers, adoption by specialty providers has been relatively limited. Recently, there has been particular interest in developing specialty medical homes in medical oncology because of practice variation, care fragmentation, and high overall costs of care. In 2012, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation awarded Innovative Oncology Business Solutions a 3-year grant for their Community Oncology Medical Home (COME HOME) program to implement specialty medical homes in seven oncology practices across the country. We report our early experience and lessons learned.Through September 30, 2014, COME HOME has touched 16,353 unique patients through triage encounters, patient education visits, or application of clinical pathways. We describe the COME HOME model and implementation timeline, profile use of key services, and report patient satisfaction. Using feedback from practice sites, we highlight patient-centered innovations and overall lessons learned.COME HOME incorporates best practices care driven by triage and clinical pathways, team-based care, active disease management, enhanced access and care, as well as financial support for the medical home infrastructure. Information technology plays a central role, supporting both delivery of care and performance monitoring. Volume of service use has grown steadily over time, leveling out in second quarter 2014. The program currently averages 1,265 triage encounters, 440 extended hours visits, and 655 patient education encounters per month.COME HOME offers a patient-centered model of care to improve quality and continuity of care. PMID:26220931

  19. Toward strategies for cost containment in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, W R; Gavett, J W; Kirshner, R; Messick, W J; Ingersoll, G

    1983-01-01

    The University of Rochester, Department of Surgery, in response to an experimental community-wide limit on hospital budgets, studied high-cost general surgical patients as a potential source of leverage for containment of hospital costs. It was found that a small number of patients impact significantly on hospital costs. In 1980, 3935 patients at Strong Memorial Hospital (SMH) had at least one contact with a general surgical patient care or intensive care unit; 261 patients (6.6%) had total 1980 charges of more than $20,000 each. They contributed 32% of the total of both general surgical charges and patient days. A subset of 2021 patients was selected to represent more precisely the general surgical patient. The 85 high-cost patients (4.2%) of this subset were chosen for intensive study. These patients generated a significant and disproportionate per cent of total (2021) general surgical charges (26.8%) and hospital days (27.6%). Average total charges were more than 8 times those of the complementary general surgical subset (1936). Nineteen of the 85 patients (22.3%) died in the hospital and 42 patients (49.4%) were dead within 2 1/2 years. Forty patients (of the 85) were then further identified as "complex", based on multiple, usually unrelated, illnesses and multiple annual admissions. Tending to be elderly with poor prognoses, 60% of them had died by April 1983. The major criterion of complexity was the lack of a well-focused medical problem; the cure for one problem simply relinquished primacy to another. A parallel study of hospital ancillary procedures disclosed a similar high-cost pattern. Of approximately 4000 ancillary procedures, 100 (2.5%) had annual charges of $100,000 or over, accounting for two-thirds of total 1980 ancillary charges. Roughly 20% of a single patient's ordered procedures accounted for 80% of the patient's ancillary charges, thus allowing concentrated study of a relatively small number of charges. Means for cost containment may be applied logically to the high-cost patient and particularly toward the complex patient. The complex patient is especially suited for consideration, since it is postulated that these patients are endemic to all general hospitals and to all clinical services. Strategies to be developed should include: 1) a managerial system in which physicians have an incentive to contain costs, 2) an online data system, 3) an accurate, efficient way to identify prospective high-cost and complex patients and, 4) awareness by physicians, patients, and society that less expensive modes of diagnosis and therapy are an appropriate response to rationed health resources. PMID:6412640

  20. Toward strategies for cost containment in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Drucker, W R; Gavett, J W; Kirshner, R; Messick, W J; Ingersoll, G

    1983-09-01

    The University of Rochester, Department of Surgery, in response to an experimental community-wide limit on hospital budgets, studied high-cost general surgical patients as a potential source of leverage for containment of hospital costs. It was found that a small number of patients impact significantly on hospital costs. In 1980, 3935 patients at Strong Memorial Hospital (SMH) had at least one contact with a general surgical patient care or intensive care unit; 261 patients (6.6%) had total 1980 charges of more than $20,000 each. They contributed 32% of the total of both general surgical charges and patient days. A subset of 2021 patients was selected to represent more precisely the general surgical patient. The 85 high-cost patients (4.2%) of this subset were chosen for intensive study. These patients generated a significant and disproportionate per cent of total (2021) general surgical charges (26.8%) and hospital days (27.6%). Average total charges were more than 8 times those of the complementary general surgical subset (1936). Nineteen of the 85 patients (22.3%) died in the hospital and 42 patients (49.4%) were dead within 2 1/2 years. Forty patients (of the 85) were then further identified as "complex", based on multiple, usually unrelated, illnesses and multiple annual admissions. Tending to be elderly with poor prognoses, 60% of them had died by April 1983. The major criterion of complexity was the lack of a well-focused medical problem; the cure for one problem simply relinquished primacy to another. A parallel study of hospital ancillary procedures disclosed a similar high-cost pattern. Of approximately 4000 ancillary procedures, 100 (2.5%) had annual charges of $100,000 or over, accounting for two-thirds of total 1980 ancillary charges. Roughly 20% of a single patient's ordered procedures accounted for 80% of the patient's ancillary charges, thus allowing concentrated study of a relatively small number of charges. Means for cost containment may be applied logically to the high-cost patient and particularly toward the complex patient. The complex patient is especially suited for consideration, since it is postulated that these patients are endemic to all general hospitals and to all clinical services. Strategies to be developed should include: 1) a managerial system in which physicians have an incentive to contain costs, 2) an online data system, 3) an accurate, efficient way to identify prospective high-cost and complex patients and, 4) awareness by physicians, patients, and society that less expensive modes of diagnosis and therapy are an appropriate response to rationed health resources. PMID:6412640

  1. Provision of palliative care and pain management services for oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Paolo; Voltz, Raymond; Rubio, Carmen; Mayeur, Didier; Kopf, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Early initiation of palliative care to address pain and other symptoms offers the potential to improve quality of life for patients with cancer. The approaches to implementing and delivering palliative care and pain management services vary depending on patient needs, available resources, provider training, and clinical setting. This article describes the experiences in developing programs in which the need for early palliative care or pain management services for patients with cancer was recognized. In each case, collaborative efforts, careful planning, administrative support, and ample time were needed to implement such services. To tailor services based on the available resources, different approaches were taken, including structuring of services within oncology units; creation of an integrated partnership between oncology and palliative care departments; establishment of a multidisciplinary comprehensive service; and incorporation of nurse-based pain services to address acute, chronic, and cancer pain. These examples offer insights into how to optimize delivery of services in a variety of settings with varying resources. PMID:23520182

  2. Patient-centered care in cancer treatment programs: the future of integrative oncology through psychoeducation.

    PubMed

    Garchinski, Christina M; DiBiase, Ann-Marie; Wong, Raimond K; Sagar, Stephen M

    2014-12-01

    The reciprocal relationship between the mind and body has been a neglected process for improving the psychosocial care of cancer patients. Emotions form an important link between the mind and body. They play a fundamental role in the cognitive functions of decision-making and symptom control. Recognizing this relationship is important for integrative oncology. We define psychoeducation as the teaching of self-evaluation and self-regulation of the mind-body process. A gap exists between research evidence and implementation into clinical practice. The patients' search for self-empowerment through the pursuit of complementary therapies may be a surrogate for inadequate psychoeducation. Integrative oncology programs should implement psychoeducation that helps patients to improve both emotional and cognitive intelligence, enabling them to better negotiate cancer treatment systems. PMID:25531048

  3. Frequency of and predictors for withholding patient safety concerns among oncology staff: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Schwappach, D L B; Gehring, K

    2015-05-01

    Speaking up about patient safety is vital to avoid errors reaching the patient and to improve a culture of safety. This study investigated the prevalence of non-speaking up despite concerns for safety and aimed to identify predictors for withholding voice among healthcare professionals (HCPs) in oncology. A self-administered questionnaire assessed safety concerns, speaking up beliefs and behaviours among nurses and doctors from nine oncology departments. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify predictors for withholding safety concerns. A total of 1013 HCPs returned the completed survey (response rate 65%). Safety concerns were common among responders. Fifty-four per cent reported to recognise their colleagues making potentially harmful errors at least sometimes. A majority of responders reported at least some episodes of withholding concerns about patient safety. Thirty-seven per cent said they remained silent at least once when they had information that might have helped prevent an incident. Respondents believed that a high level of interpersonal, communication and coping skills are necessary to speak up about patient safety issues at their workplace. Higher levels of perceived advocacy for patient safety and psychological safety significantly decreased the frequency of withholding voice. Remaining silent about safety concerns is a common phenomenon in oncology. Improved strategies are needed to support staff in effective communication and make cancer care safer. PMID:25287114

  4. Elderly Diabetic Patient with Surgical Site Mucormycosis Extending to Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Atul K; Vora, Himanshu J; Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Bhavin

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is rare in clinical practice. Most infections are acquired by inhalation; other portals of entry are traumatic implantation and ingestion in immunocompromised host. Mucormycosis is life threatening infection in immunocompromised host with variable moratlity ranging from 15-81% depending upon site of infection. General treatment principles include early diagnosis, correction of underlying immunosuppression and metabolic disturbances, adequate surgical debridement along with amphotericin therapy. We describe surgical site mucormycosis extended to involve large bowel in elderly diabetic patient. PMID:20606975

  5. Elderly diabetic patient with surgical site mucormycosis extending to bowel.

    PubMed

    Patel, Atul K; Vora, Himanshu J; Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Bhavin

    2010-05-01

    Mucormycosis is rare in clinical practice. Most infections are acquired by inhalation; other portals of entry are traumatic implantation and ingestion in immunocompromised host. Mucormycosis is life threatening infection in immunocompromised host with variable moratlity ranging from 15-81% depending upon site of infection. General treatment principles include early diagnosis, correction of underlying immunosuppression and metabolic disturbances, adequate surgical debridement along with amphotericin therapy. We describe surgical site mucormycosis extended to involve large bowel in elderly diabetic patient. PMID:20606975

  6. Oral-dental concerns of the pediatric oncology patient

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, K.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main concerns of all disciplines in health care today is maintaining the patient's quality of life and comfort during cancer therapy. Oral complications resulting from radiation or chemotherapy can be expected in a large percentage of patients. Conducting a dental evaluation and performing treatment before therapy can help prevent or lessen potential complications. With preventive care and fewer infections, the patient will be able to communicate with friends and family, and optimum care and comfort can be provided.

  7. The patient-centered medical home in oncology: from concept to reality.

    PubMed

    Page, Ray D; Newcomer, Lee N; Sprandio, John D; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the cost of providing quality cancer care has been subject to an epic escalation causing concerns on the verge of a health care crisis. Innovative patient-management models in oncology based on patient-centered medical home (PCMH) principles, coupled with alternative payments to traditional fee for service (FFS), such as bundled and episodes payment are now showing evidence of effectiveness. These efforts have the potential to bend the cost curve while also improving quality of care and patient satisfaction. However, going forward with FFS alternatives, there are several performance-based payment options with an array of financial risks and rewards. Most novel payment options convey a greater financial risk and accountability on the provider. Therefore, the oncology medical home (OMH) can be a way to mitigate some financial risks by sharing savings with the payer through better global care of the patient, proactively preventing complications, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations. However, much of the medical home infrastructure that is required to reduced total costs of cancer care comes as an added expense to the provider. As best-of-practice quality standards are being elucidated and refined, we are now at a juncture where payers, providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders should work in concert to expand and implement the OMH framework into the variety of oncology practice environments to better equip them to assimilate into the new payment reform configurations of the future. PMID:25993243

  8. Quality of life of patients surgically treated for ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hammed Sikiru; Adebola, Rafel Adetokunbo; Arotiba, Juwon Tunde; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Uchenna Kelvin; Amole, Taiwo Gboluwaga; Adeoye, Joshua Biodun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The surgical management of ameloblastoma can have a profound functional and psychological effect on a patient's quality of life (QoL). The aim of this study was to compare the pre- and post-operative QoL outcomes of patients requiring surgical treatment for ameloblastoma. Patients and Methods: A total number of 30 patients were identified as fulfilling the criteria for this study. They included 18 males and 12 females, aged between 14 and 47 years with a mean of 27.3 years (standard deviation 10.2). Each patient completed a modified version of the University of Washington QoL questionnaire version 4, a day to surgery and postoperatively on the 7th day, 3 months, and 6 months. Results: Following surgical treatment of patients for ameloblastoma, the QoL decreased immediately after surgery. It then gradually improved over time and exceeded the preoperative value at 6 months postoperatively. When analyzed with respect to location, posteriorly placed tumors had the best postoperative QoL outcome. Patients expressed concern more about their appearance preoperatively while postoperative concerns were mostly focused on their ability to chew. Conclusion: Significant improvement occurred in QoL scores following surgical management of ameloblastoma. The small sample size utilized in this study limits a definitive conclusion. A larger multicenter study is therefore recommended.

  9. Risk of Infectious Complications in Hemato-Oncological Patients Treated with Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Reinwald, Mark; Boch, Tobias; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Buchheidt, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hemato-oncological diseases. Although disease-related immunosuppression represents one factor, aggressive treatment regimens, such as chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or antibody treatment, account for a large proportion of infectious side effects. With the advent of targeted therapies affecting specific kinases in malignant diseases, the outcome of patients has further improved. Nonetheless, dependent on the specific pathway targeted or off-target activity of the kinase inhibitor, therapy-associated infectious complications may occur. We review the most common and approved kinase inhibitors targeting a variety of hemato-oncological malignancies for their immunosuppressive potential and evaluate their risk of infectious side effects based on preclinical evidence and clinical data in order to raise awareness of the potential risks involved. PMID:27127405

  10. Antibacterial honey (Medihoney®) for wound care of immunocompromised pediatric oncology patients

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arne; Sofka, Kai; Wieszniewsky, Gertrud; Blaser, Gisela

    2006-01-01

    The physiologic process of wound healing is impaired and prolonged in paediatic patients receiving chemotherapy. Due to profound immunosuppression, wound infection can easily spread and act as the source of sepsis. Referring to in vitro studies, which confirmed the antibacterial potency of special honey preparations against typical isolates of nosocomially acquired wound infections (including MRSA and VRE) and considering the encouraging reports from other groups, Medihoney™ has now been used in wound care at the Department of Pediatric Oncology, Children's Hospital, University of Bonn for three years. Supplemented with exemplary clinical data from pediatric oncology patients, this presentation reviews the scientific background and our promising experience with Medihoney™ in wound care issues at our institution. PMID:20204081

  11. Transesophageal Echocardiography for the Noncardiac Surgical Patient

    PubMed Central

    Rebel, Annette; Klimkina, Oksana; Hassan, Zaki-Udin

    2012-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been established as a very valuable asset for patient monitoring during cardiac surgery. The value of perioperative TEE for patients undergoing noncardiac surgery is less clear. This article reviews the technical aspects of TEE and comments on the potential benefit of using TEE as a monitoring modality apart from cardiac surgery. Based on patient's comorbidities and/or injury pattern, TEE is a fast and minimally invasive approach to obtain important hemodynamic information, especially useful in a hemodynamically unstable patient. However, certain requirements for the use of the technique are necessary, most important the development of sufficient echocardiographic skills by the anesthesiologists. Indications, skill requirements, and possible complications of the technique are reviewed. PMID:23102000

  12. Transfusion Considerations in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Bercovitz, Rachel S; Josephson, Cassandra D

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric patients with malignancies or benign hematologic diseases are a heterogeneous group with complicated underlying pathophysiologies leading to their requirements for transfusion therapy. Common practice among pediatric hematologists, oncologists, and transplant physicians is to transfuse stable patients red cells to maintain a hemoglobin greater than 7 or 8 g/dL and transfuse platelets to maintain a count greater than 10,000 or 20,000 platelets/μL. This review compiles data from myriad studies performed in pediatric patients to give readers the knowledge needed to make an informed choice when considering different management strategies for the transfusion of red blood cells, platelets, plasma, and granulocytes. PMID:27113005

  13. Surgical treatment and the patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tabachnik, N F

    1981-06-01

    It has long been recognized that the patient with chronic lung disease, malnutrition, vitamin K deficiency or electrolyte and blood gas disturbances presents a special problem for the surgeon. Patients with cystic fibrosis have all of these abnormalities. Until recently, the patient with cystic fibrosis was exclusively the domain of the pediatrician. Today, with the increasing number of patients over the age of 20 years, internists and surgeons have an increasingly important role in the care of these patients. In addition, since women with cystic fibrosis are capable of bearing children, the need for genetic, obstetric and gynecologic counseling is becoming more apparent. Although the patient with cystic fibrosis is generally at a much greater risk for the complications of surgical treatment than the normal patient, experience in the management of these patients has greatly improved the outlook. However, in most instances, surgical management of the patient with cystic fibrosis represents palliation, since these patients usually die of the medical complications of their disease. Further controlled studies are needed to fully evaluate the role of surgical treatment in the sequelas of cystic fibrosis. PMID:7017979

  14. Association Between Time (Initiation and Length) and Oncological Outcomes for the Patients with Colon Cancer Treated with Adjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, In Seob; Yoo, Jong Han; Seo, Sang Hyuk; An, Min Sung; Kim, Kwang Hee; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Chang Soo; Hwang, Jin Won; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kang, Mi Seon; Oh, Min Kyung; Hong, Kwan Hee

    2015-12-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is benefit for high-risk stage II and stage III colon cancer after curative resection. But, the optimal time between surgical and initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy remains unclear. Moreover, no study of efficacy with different lengths of adjuvant chemotherapy has appeared. This study was aimed to identify association between time (initiation and length) and oncological outcomes of adjuvant chemotherapy on the stages II and III colon cancer patients. A total of 406 high-risk stages II and III colon cancer patients were retrospectively enrolled in prospectively collected data. They were categorized into three groups representing chemotherapy initiation time: less than 4 weeks (group 1), 4 to 6 weeks (group 2), and more than 6 weeks (group 3). They were categorized into two groups representing chemotherapy length time : less than 200 days (group 1a) and more than 200 days (group 2a). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 74.97 % in group 1, 76.94 % in group 2, and 63.97 % in group 3 (p > 0.05). The 5-year DFS rates were 75.49 % in the group that received adjuvant chemotherapy within 6 weeks and 63.97 % in the group that received adjuvant chemotherapy >6 weeks (p = 0.0539). The 5-year DFS rates were 77.21 % in group 1a and 81.82 % in group 2a (p > 0.05). Adjuvant chemotherapy should be safely offered within 6 weeks after surgical excision in patients with colon cancer after considering the patient's general physical condition and hematological factors, even if the chemotherapy length is prolonged. PMID:27011547

  15. Stepwise surgical approach to equinocavovarus in patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Won, Sung Hun; Kwon, Soon Sun; Chung, Chin Youb; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, In Hyeok; Jung, Ki Jin; Moon, Sang Young; Chung, Myung Ki; Park, Moon Seok

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the radiologic results of a stepwise surgical approach to equinocavovarus in 24 patients with cerebral palsy and determined the extent to which each procedure affected radiographic parameters using a linear mixed model. The anteroposterior talus-first metatarsal and anteroposterior talonavicular coverage angles were improved. The calcaneal pitch angle, tibiocalcaneal angle, lateral talus-first metatarsal angle, and naviculocuboid overlap were also improved. The Dwyer sliding osteotomy affected the tibiocalcaneal angle, whereas first metatarsal dorsal wedge osteotomy improved the calcaneal pitch angle and lateral first metatarsal angle. The stepwise surgical approach is effective for correction of equinocavovarus in cerebral palsy patients. PMID:26529433

  16. Caring for Surgical Patients With Piercings.

    PubMed

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-06-01

    Body piercing, a type of body modification that is practiced in many cultures, creates an unnatural tract through tissue that is then held open by artificial means. Today, professional body piercing is often performed in piercing establishments that are subject to dissimilar forms of regulation. The most frequently reported medical complication of body piercing and similar body modifications, such as dermal implantation, is infection. Patients with piercings who undergo surgery may have additional risks for infection, electrical burns, trauma, or airway obstruction. The published research literature on piercing prevalence, complications, regulations, education, and nursing care is outdated. The purpose of this article is to educate nurses on topics related to nursing care for patients with piercings and similar body modifications, including the history, prevalence, motivations for, and perceptions of body piercings as well as possible complications, devices used, locations, healing times, regulations, patient education, and other health concerns. PMID:27234793

  17. 2014 President's plenary international psycho-oncology society: moving toward cancer care for the whole patient.

    PubMed

    Bultz, Barry D; Travado, Luzia; Jacobsen, Paul B; Turner, Jane; Borras, Josep M; Ullrich, Andreas W H

    2015-12-01

    The International Psycho-oncology Society (IPOS) has just celebrated its 30th anniversary. The growth of psychosocial oncology has been exponential, and this relatively new field is becoming a core service that focuses on prevention, reducing the burden of cancer, and enhancing the quality of life from time of diagnosis, through treatment, survivorship, and palliative care. Looking back over the past 30 years, we see that cancer care globally has evolved to a new and higher standard. Today, 'cancer care for the whole patient' is being accomplished with an evidence-based model that addresses psychosocial needs and integrates psycho-oncology into the treatment and care of patients. The President's Plenary Session in Lisbon, Portugal, highlighted the IPOS Mission of promoting global excellence in psychosocial care of people affected by cancer through our research, public policy, advocacy, and education. The internationally endorsed IPOS Standard of Quality Cancer Care, for example, clearly states the necessity of integrating the psychosocial domain into routine care, and that distress should be measured as the sixth vital sign after temperature, blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate, and pain. The plenary paper also discussed the global progress being made in Europe, North America, and Australia in providing quality cancer care for the whole patient. Collaborative partnerships between IPOS and organizations such as the European Partnership Action Against Cancer and the World Health Organization are essential in building capacity for the delivery of high-quality psycho-oncology services in the future. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25963279

  18. An Occupational Analysis of Counselors Working with Oncology Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nicholas A.

    1989-01-01

    Empirically examined counselors' (n=2) work behaviors with cancer patients and families in hospital setting. Results indicated most of work behaviors performed by the counselors were specialized to a hospital setting, and within this domain, most common work behavior observed was in clinical supervision of volunteers, the second-most in the…

  19. FASTING ABBREVIATION AMONG PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO ONCOLOGIC SURGERY: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    PINTO, Andressa dos Santos; GRIGOLETTI, Shana Souza; MARCADENTI, Aline

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The abbreviation of perioperative fasting among candidates to elective surgery have been associated with shorter hospital stay and decreased postoperative complications. Objective To conduct a systematic review from randomized controlled trials to detect whether the abbreviation of fasting is beneficial to patients undergoing cancer surgery compared to traditional fasting protocols. Method A literature search was performed in electronic databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), SciELO, EMBASE and Cochrane, without time restriction. Were used the descriptors: "preoperative fasting", "cancer", "diet restriction" and "perioperative period". Randomized trials were included in adults of both sexes, with diagnosis of cancer. Exclusion criteria were: use of parenteral nutrition and publications in duplicate. All analyzes, selections and data extraction were done blinded manner by independent evaluators. Results Four studies were included, with a total of 150 patients, 128 with colorectal cancer and 22 gastric cancer. The articles were published from 2006 to 2013. The main outcome measures were heterogeneous, which impaired the unification of the results by means of meta-analysis. Compared to traditional protocols, patients undergoing fasting abbreviation with the administration of fluids containing carbohydrates had improvements in glycemic parameters (fasting glucose and insulin resistance), inflammatory markers (interleukin 6 and 10) and indicators of malnutrition (grip strength hand and CRP/albumin ratio), and shorter hospital stay. The methodological quality of the reviewed articles, however, suggests that the results should be interpreted with caution. Conclusions The abbreviation of perioperative fasting in patients with neoplasm appears to be beneficial. PMID:25861075

  20. Assessment of Ondansetron-Associated Hypokalemia in Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fiedrich, Elsa; Sabhaney, Vikram; Lui, Justin; Pinsk, Maury

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Ondansetron is a 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3, serotonin) receptor antagonist used as antiemetic prophylaxis preceding chemotherapy administration. Hypokalemia is a rare complication of ondansetron, which may be underreported due to confounding emesis and chemotherapy-induced tubulopathy. We performed a prospective cohort study to determine if ondansetron caused significant hypokalemia independently as a result of renal potassium wasting. Methods. Twelve patients were recruited, with ten completing the study. Blood and urine samples were collected before and after ondansetron administration in patients admitted for intravenous (IV) hydration and chemotherapy. Dietary histories and IV records were analyzed to calculate sodium and potassium balances. Results. We observed an expected drop in urine osmolality, an increase in urine sodium, but no statistically significant change in sodium or potassium balance before and after ondansetron. Conclusion. Ondansetron does not cause significant potassium wasting in appropriately hydrated and nutritionally replete patients. Careful monitoring of serum potassium is recommended in patients with chronic nutritional or volume status deficiencies receiving this medication. PMID:23050164

  1. [Salvage cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy failure: principles, indications, patient selection, oncological results and morbidity].

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Hétet JF; Colls P; Pocholle P; Chauveau P; Barré C; Hallouin P

    2014-11-01

    Potentially curative salvage options for biochemical failure after primary prostatic radiotherapy include salvage radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound and cryotherapy. Salvage cryoablation for recurrent prostate cancer after irradiation failure is currently a well-established therapeutic option, since technical improvements have permitted better oncologic outcomes and lower complications rates over the years. This article reviews surgical technique, oncologic and functional outcomes, as well as morbidity and complications of salvage cryotherapy for local recurrence after external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

  2. Aspirin increases the risk of venous thromboembolism in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Barmparas, Galinos; Jain, Monica; Mehrzadi, Devorah; Melo, Nicolas; Chung, Rex; Bloom, Matthew; Ley, Eric J; Margulies, Daniel R

    2014-10-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) for patients taking an antiplatelet agent is largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the association between antiplatelet agent use before admission with the risk of in-hospital VTE in surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients. A retrospective review of all patients admitted to the surgical ICU at a Level I trauma center over 30 months was performed. Patients who underwent diagnostic imaging for VTE were selected. Patients were divided based on whether or not antiplatelet agents were used before admission (APTA vs NAPTA). The primary outcome was VTE occurrence. A forward logistic regression model was used to identify factors independently associated with the primary outcome. During the study period, 461 (24%) patients met inclusion criteria: 70 (15%) APTA and 391 (85%) NAPTA. After adjusting for confounding factors, APTA patients were at a significantly higher risk for developing VTE (59 vs 40%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 3.0; adjusted P = 0.04). Whether or not antiplatelet agents were resumed during the hospital stay and the day on which they were resumed did not affect VTE risk. In conclusion, surgical ICU patients receiving antiplatelet agents before admission are at a significantly higher risk for development of VTE. PMID:25264630

  3. Epidemiology and characteristics of febrile neutropenia in oncology patients from Spanish tertiary care hospitals: PINNACLE study

    PubMed Central

    DE CASTRO CARPEÑO, JAVIER; GASCÓN-VILAPLANA, PERE; TEJERINA, ANA MARIA CASAS-FERNÁNDEZ-DE; ANTÓN-TORRES, ANTONIO; LÓPEZ-LÓPEZ, RAFAEL; BARNADAS-MOLINS, AGUSTÍ; CRUZ-HERNÁNDEZ, JUAN JESÚS; MASSUTI-SUREDA, BARTOMEU; CAMPS-HERRERO, CARLOS; ARANDA-AGUILAR, ENRIQUE; LASERNA, FRANCISCO JOSÉ REBOLLO

    2015-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is one of the most common adverse events associated with myelosuppressive chemotherapy for cancer treatment. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of hospitalization due to FN in Spanish tertiary care hospitals (PINNACLE study). This epidemiological, retrospective, multicenter, nationwide study involved 119 patients from oncology units of 10 Spanish tertiary care hospitals who were admitted for FN. The primary endpoint was to assess the epidemiology and characteristics of FN. The incidence of admissions due to FN in oncology patients was 2.0% (interquartile range [IQR], 1.6–3.0). In terms of fever and absolute neutrophil count (ANC), 37.0% of the patients had a temperature of ≥38.2°C and an ANC of ≤500/m3. The number of patients who received prophylactic treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was significantly higher in the palliative group (32.6%) compared with that in the non-palliative group (13.5%). The hospital length of stay was significantly shorter in patients who received prophylactic G-CSF compared with those who did not (5.0 days; IQR, 4.0–9.0 vs. 7.0 days; IQR, 5.0–11.0, respectively). The hospital length of stay was also significantly shorter in patients receiving palliative treatment (5.0 days; IQR, 3.0–7.0) compared with those receiving non-palliative therapy (7.0 days; IQR, 5.0–12.0). In conclusion, the incidence of admissions due to FN in oncology patients was 2.0% and the duration of hospital stay was 7.0 days. Prophylactic G-CSF treatment was found to be associated with better outcomes and shorter hospital stays. Therefore, the use of this treatment becomes relevant for achieving better clinical outcomes and reducing hospitalization cost in the management of FN. PMID:26137294

  4. Oocyte Cryostorage to Preserve Fertility in Oncological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Revelli, Alberto; Molinari, Emanuela; Salvagno, Francesca; Delle Piane, Luisa; Dolfin, Elisabetta; Ochetti, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to the progress in oncostatic treatments, young women affected by cancer have a fairly good chance of surviving the disease and leading a normal post-cancer life. Quite often, however, polychemiotherapy and/or radiotherapy can induce ovarian damage and significantly reduce the content of follicles and oocytes inside the ovary, thus predisposing the patient to menstrual disorders, infertility, and precocious menopause. Several techniques have been proposed to preserve fertility in these patients; among them oocyte collection and cryopreservation prior to the oncostatic treatment has been widely applied in the last decade. The proper indications, the permitting conditions, the available hormonal stimulation protocols, as well as the effectiveness and limits of this option will be discussed herein, with a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the two techniques commonly used to cryostore oocytes, the slow-freezing technique and the vitrification technique. PMID:22291711

  5. Guiding Oncology Patients Through the Maze of Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Giuse, Nunzia Bettinsoli; Kusnoor, Sheila V; Koonce, Taneya Y; Naylor, Helen M; Chen, Sheau-Chiann; Blasingame, Mallory N; Anderson, Ingrid A; Micheel, Christine M; Levy, Mia A; Ye, Fei; Lovly, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    As the role of genomics in health care grows, patients increasingly require adequate genetic literacy to fully engage in their care. This study investigated a model for delivering consumer-friendly genetic information to improve understanding of precision medicine using health literacy and learning style principles. My Cancer Genome (MCG), a freely available cancer decision support tool, was used as a testbed. MCG content on a melanoma tumor mutation, BRAF V600E, was translated to a 6th-grade reading level, incorporating multiple learning modalities. A total of 90 patients and caregivers were recruited from a melanoma clinic at an academic medical center and randomized to 3 groups. Group A (control) received an exact copy of text from MCG. Group B was given the same content with hyperlinks to videos explaining key genetic concepts, identified and labeled by the team as knowledge pearls. Group C received the translated content with the knowledge pearls embedded. Changes in knowledge were measured through pre and post questionnaires. Group C showed the greatest improvement in knowledge. The study results demonstrate that providing information based on health literacy and learning style principles can improve patients' understanding of genetic concepts, thus increasing their likelihood of taking an active role in any decision making concerning their health. PMID:27043753

  6. Improving Patient Safety in Clinical Oncology: Applying Lessons From Normal Accident Theory.

    PubMed

    Chera, Bhishamjit S; Mazur, Lukasz; Buchanan, Ian; Kim, Hong Jin; Rockwell, John; Milowsky, Matthew I; Marks, Lawrence B

    2015-10-01

    Concerns for patient safety persist in clinical oncology. Within several nonmedical areas (eg, aviation, nuclear power), concepts from Normal Accident Theory (NAT), a framework for analyzing failure potential within and between systems, have been successfully applied to better understand system performance and improve system safety. Clinical oncology practice is interprofessional and interdisciplinary, and our therapies often have narrow therapeutic windows. Thus, many of our processes are, in NAT terms, interactively complex and tightly coupled within and across systems and are therefore prone to unexpected behaviors that can result in substantial patient harm. To improve safety at the University of North Carolina, we have applied the concepts of NAT to our practice to better understand our systems' behavior and adopted strategies to reduce complexity and coupling. Furthermore, recognizing that we cannot eliminate all risks, we have stressed safety mindfulness among our staff to further promote safety. Many specific examples are provided herein. The lessons from NAT are translatable to clinical oncology and may help to promote safety. PMID:26182183

  7. Health care-associated infections in hematology-oncology patients with neutropenia: a method of surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Karim Yaqub; Pierrotti, Ligia Camera; Freire, Maristela Pinheiro; Gutierrez, Patricia Pinheiro; Duarte, Laiane do Prado Gil; Bellesso, Marcelo; Pereira, Juliana; de Alencar Fischer Chamone, Dalton; Abdala, Edson

    2013-11-01

    We present a prospective method of surveillance of health care-associated infection in hematology-oncology inpatients with neutropenia. Incidence rates were calculated on the basis of the number of hospitalized patients, the duration of hospital stay (in days), the number of days of neutropenia, and (in cases of central line-associated blood stream infection) the number of central line-days. We detected 11.4 and 66.4 episodes of febrile neutropenia per 1,000 hospital-days and per 1,000 days of neutropenia, respectively. The incidence of central line-associated blood stream infection was 2.6 per 1,000 central line-days. Gram-negative bacteria were the most prevalent pathogens. Efforts should be made to monitor infection rates on hematology-oncology wards. PMID:23769835

  8. Use of psychosocial services increases after a social worker-mediated intervention in gynecology oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Yuko; Shah, Nina R; Ward, Kristy K; McHale, Michael T; Alvarez, Edwin A; Saenz, Cheryl C; Plaxe, Steven C

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of psychosocial services to gynecologic oncology outpatients by a social worker increases service use. During the initial six weeks (phase I), patients were referred for psychosocial services by clinic staff. During the second six weeks (phase II), a nurse introduced available services to each patient with a brochure. During the final 12 weeks (phase III), a social worker introduced services to each patient. The authors then compared psychosocial service referral rates. The sample included 196 patients. During phase III, the probability of a patient-initiated referral increased 3.4-fold (95 percent confidence interval [CI] [1.1, 10.4], p = .04) compared with baseline; the probability of any referral rose 2.7-fold (95 percent CI [1.1, 6.3], p = .03). The mean time to referral decreased from 79.4 days at baseline to 3.9 days during phase III (p < .001). The phase III intervention was accomplished only in 34 patients (39 percent) because of scheduling conflicts. Of these, eight requested referral, resulting in a 24 percent patient-initiated referral rate after meeting with a social worker. The introduction of psychosocial services by a social worker to gynecologic oncology outpatients increases referral rates and expedites evaluation. PMID:23865288

  9. Surgical Management of Stone Disease in Patient with Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Alonso; Granberg, Candace F.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Milliner, Dawn S.; Krambeck, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To present our experience with surgical management of nephrolithiasis in patients with primary hyperoxaluria (PH). Methods A retrospective chart review from 1994–2012 was perform to identify patients with diagnosis of PH. Results A total of 14 patients with PH were identified with median follow-up of 18.6 years (range: 0.9–51). Median age at initial symptom and subsequent diagnosis were 6.7 years (range: 1.1–35.5) and 0.42 years (range: 0–33.25), respectively. Patients underwent a total of 54 procedures at our institution including: ureteroscopy 27 (50%), percutaneous nephrolithotomy 15 (28%), shock wave lithotripsy 8 (15%), and combined procedures 4 (7%). Overall non-intraparenchymal stone free rate after first, second, and third procedure(s) were 59%, 76%, and 78%, respectively. On average 1.6 procedures (range: 1–4) were required to rid patients of symptomatic stones, which subsequently afforded them a mean of 3.62 years (range: 0.25–21.5) without the need of additional intervention. There were 6 Clavien grade ≥ III complications in 4 patients, including immediate postoperative ESRD in 3. Conclusions Despite optimal medical and surgical management, patients experience recurrent acute stone events requiring multiple urologic interventions. Significant complications such as ESRD can occur secondary to surgical intervention. PMID:25733260

  10. Robotic, laparoscopic and open surgery for gastric cancer compared on surgical, clinical and oncological outcomes: a multi-institutional chart review. A study protocol of the International study group on Minimally Invasive surgery for GASTRIc Cancer—IMIGASTRIC

    PubMed Central

    Desiderio, Jacopo; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Nguyen, Ninh T; Zhang, Shu; Reim, Daniel; Alimoglu, Orhan; Azagra, Juan-Santiago; Yu, Pei-Wu; Coburn, Natalie G; Qi, Feng; Jackson, Patrick G; Zang, Lu; Brower, Steven T; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Facy, Olivier; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Coratti, Andrea; Annecchiarico, Mario; Bazzocchi, Francesca; Avanzolini, Andrea; Gagniere, Johan; Pezet, Denis; Cianchi, Fabio; Badii, Benedetta; Novotny, Alexander; Eren, Tunc; Leblebici, Metin; Goergen, Martine; Zhang, Ben; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Liu, Tong; Al-Refaie, Waddah; Ma, Junjun; Takiguchi, Shuji; Lequeu, Jean-Baptiste; Trastulli, Stefano; Parisi, Amilcare

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastric cancer represents a great challenge for healthcare providers and requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach in which surgery plays a major role. Minimally invasive surgery has been progressively developed, first with the advent of laparoscopy and recently with the spread of robotic surgery, but a number of issues are currently being debated, including the limitations in performing an effective extended lymph node dissection, the real advantages of robotic systems, the role of laparoscopy for Advanced Gastric Cancer, the reproducibility of a total intracorporeal technique and the oncological results achievable during long-term follow-up. Methods and analysis A multi-institutional international database will be established to evaluate the role of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches in gastric cancer, comprising of information regarding surgical, clinical and oncological features. A chart review will be conducted to enter data of participants with gastric cancer, previously treated at the participating institutions. The database is the first of its kind, through an international electronic submission system and a HIPPA protected real time data repository from high volume gastric cancer centres. Ethics and dissemination This study is conducted in compliance with ethical principles originating from the Helsinki Declaration, within the guidelines of Good Clinical Practice and relevant laws/regulations. A multicentre study with a large number of patients will permit further investigation of the safety and efficacy as well as the long-term outcomes of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches for the management of gastric cancer. Trial registration number NCT02325453; Pre-results. PMID:26482769

  11. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients. PMID:24050606

  12. Anesthetic Implications of Obesity in the Surgical Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dority, Jeremy; Hassan, Zaki-Udin; Chau, Destiny

    2011-01-01

    The obese patient presents many challenges to both anesthesiologist and surgeon. A good understanding of the pathophysiologic effects of obesity and its anesthetic implications in the surgical setting is critical. The anesthesiologist must recognize increased risks and comorbidities inherent to the obese patient and manage accordingly, optimizing multisystem function in the perioperative period that leads to successful outcomes. Addressed from an organ systems approach, the purpose of this review is to provide surgical specialists with an overview of the anesthetic considerations of obesity. Minimally invasive surgery for the obese patient affords improved analgesia, postoperative pulmonary function, and shorter recovery times at the expense of a more challenging intraoperative anesthetic course. The physiologic effects of laparoscopy are discussed in detail. Although laparoscopy's physiologic effects on various organ systems are well recognized, techniques provide means for compensation and reversing such effects, thereby preserving good patient outcomes. PMID:23204937

  13. [Systemic enzymotherapy as a method of prophylaxis of postradiation complications in oncological patients].

    PubMed

    Hubarieva, H O; Kindzel's'kyĭ, L P; Ponomar'ova, O V; Udatova, T V; Shpil'ova, S I; Smolanka, I I; Korovin, S I; Ivankin, V S

    2000-01-01

    Set out in the paper are results of treatment of those patients with carcinoma of the lung, uterine cervix, hysterocarcinoma, breast cancer, malignant thymomas, malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and lymphogranulematosis having been administered combined, chemoradiation or radiation treatments against the background of a complex of accompanying therapy involving systemic enzymotherapy. Polyenzymic drugs were found to be capable of improving results of treatment of acute radiation reactions and preventing postradiation fibrous changes in the lungs, skin, fatty tissue, soft tissue, liver, kidneys. Thus, systemic enzymotherapy is capable of improving the quality of life and results of treatment of oncological patients. PMID:16786662

  14. “Il Corpo Ritrovato”: Dermocosmetological Skin Care Project for the Oncologic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, G.; Romano, M. C.; Cameli, N.; Mariano, M.; Pastore, F.; Annunziata, M. C.; Mazzella, C.; De Vita, Valerio; Mauriello, Maria Chiara; Monfrecola, G.

    2011-01-01

    Neoplastic disease and its therapeutic options have a huge impact on the patient's quality of life from both the emotional and the working point of view. The project “Il Corpo Ritrovato” aims at creating an interdisciplinary network of physicians to improve the quality of life of the oncologic patient, focusing on such important aspects as dermocosmetological skin care but also on the evaluation of new therapeutic and diagnostic algorithms in order to make further progress in the field of prevention. PMID:22084736

  15. Treatment of colorectal cancer in older patients: International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) consensus recommendations 2013.

    PubMed

    Papamichael, D; Audisio, R A; Glimelius, B; de Gramont, A; Glynne-Jones, R; Haller, D; Köhne, C-H; Rostoft, S; Lemmens, V; Mitry, E; Rutten, H; Sargent, D; Sastre, J; Seymour, M; Starling, N; Van Cutsem, E; Aapro, M

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in Europe and worldwide, with the peak incidence in patients >70 years of age. However, as the treatment algorithms for the treatment of patients with CRC become ever more complex, it is clear that a significant percentage of older CRC patients (>70 years) are being less than optimally treated. This document provides a summary of an International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) task force meeting convened in Paris in 2013 to update the existing expert recommendations for the treatment of older (geriatric) CRC patients published in 2009 and includes overviews of the recent data on epidemiology, geriatric assessment as it relates to surgery and oncology, and the ability of older CRC patients to tolerate surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, treatment of their metastatic disease including palliative chemotherapy with and without the use of the biologics, and finally the use of adjuvant and palliative radiotherapy in the treatment of older rectal cancer patients. An overview of each area was presented by one of the task force experts and comments invited from other task force members. PMID:25015334

  16. Hemodynamic monitoring modalities in pediatric cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Elixson, E M

    1989-06-01

    Transthoracic monitoring lines yield vital information in the care of the pediatric postoperative cardiovascular surgical patient. It is the critical care nurse, in the holistic care of the patient, who integrates this data into the daily plan of care. Invasive monitoring carries risks; therefore, guidelines for care must be followed. The care of these critically ill infants requires a multifactoral approach. Hemodynamic monitoring is one of many avenues that we follow in the intensive care unit. PMID:2684230

  17. [Surgical service for patients with purulonecrotic complications of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Malakhov, Iu S; Aver'ianov, D A; Ivanov, A V; Stepaniuk, A V; Kozovoĭ, I Ia

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with staging surgical service for patients with ulceronecrotic damages of the distal parts of lower extremities associated with diabetic foot. The authors grounded the deadlines of sanitive operations, performing after reconstructive vascular operations, on the basis of assessment of outflow tract according to Rutherford and index of TcPO2 increase. High efficiency of revascularization in order to maintenance of lower-extremity function in patients with complicated forms of diabetic foot is proved. PMID:24000608

  18. Surgical treatment of infectious spondylitis in patients undergoing hemodialysis therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lih-Huei; Fu, Tsai-Sheng; Kao, Yu-Hsein; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Niu, Chi-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2010-12-01

    Treatment of infectious spondylitis in hemodialysis patients remains a challenge because of comorbidities. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on the clinical manifestations and surgical outcomes of patients with spinal infection. Sixteen patients who underwent surgical intervention were included. There were 3 thoracic and 13 lumbar lesions. All patients presented with intractable back pain at the start of treatment. Six patients had a fever, nine had inflammation at the hemodialysis access site, and six of them had concomitant bacteremia. Ten patients had an elevated leukocyte count. Serological tests indicated an elevation of the C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate level in all patients. Five patients had a neurological compromise. Postoperative complications included two mortalities, two iliac bone graft and implant dislodgement, and one retroperitoneal wound dehiscence. The preoperative mean visual analog scale score was 7.7 (range, 6-9), which improved to 3.4 (range, 2-5) at the final follow-up for 14 surviving patients. Neurological improvement was obtained by at least one grade in four Frankel C category patients. The radiographs revealed a good bony fusion in 12 cases although with a variable bone graft subsidence. In conclusion, early diagnosis of infectious spondylitis is difficult due to latent symptoms. A spine infection should be suspected in hemodialysis patients with severe back pain, even when they are afebrile. Surgical intervention for infectious spondylitis in ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis can be performed with acceptable outcomes; however, the complication and mortality rates are relative high. PMID:20585966

  19. Assessing the spiritual needs and practices of oncology patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dedeli, Ozden; Yildiz, Emel; Yuksel, Safak

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the oncology patients' spiritual needs and activities. Besides, the study was to provide clinical evaluation of the feasibility and usefulness of the Patients Spiritual Needs Assessment Scale. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was performed by using a demographic and spiritual practices questionnaire, the Turkish version of the Patients Spiritual Needs Assessment Scale. The results of our study demonstrated that the most common spiritual needs of patients with cancer were "to address issues before death and dying" (100%), "feel a sense of peace and contentment" (94.8%), and "for companionship" (93.5%). Spiritually assessing a patient with cancer requires knowledge of how spiritual needs may manifest and how to talk with a client about his or her spiritual needs. These findings can help nurses to begin this process of providing spiritual care for patients with cancer. PMID:25658933

  20. LONG-TERM OUTCOMES IN ELDERLY SURGICAL PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Deiner, Stacie; Silverstein, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    Anesthesia has developed to the point where long term outcomes are important endpoints. Elderly patients are becoming an increasingly large part of most surgical practices, consistent with demographic shifts. Long term outcomes are particularly important for this group. In this review, we discuss functional outcomes in the elderly. We describe the areas of cognitive change and frailty, both of which are specific to the elderly. We also discuss prevention of surgical infections and emerging evidence around hemodynamic alterations in the operating room and their impact on long term outcomes. PMID:22238042

  1. Integrative oncology for breast cancer patients: introduction of an expert-based model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant breast neoplasms are among the most frequent forms of cancer in the Western world. Conventional treatment of breast cancer may include surgery, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, radiation and/or immunotherapy, all of which are often accompanied by severe side effects. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been shown to be effective in alleviating those symptoms. Furthermore, with patient survival rates increasing, oncologists, psychologists and other therapists have to become more sensitive to the needs of cancer survivors that go beyond than the mere alleviation of symptoms. Many CAM methods are geared to treat the patient in a holistic manner and thus are also concerned with the patient’s psychological and spiritual needs. Discussion The use of certain CAM methods may become problematic when, as frequently occurs, patients use them indiscriminately and without informing their oncologists. Herbal medicines and dietary supplements, especially, may interfere with primary cancer treatments or have other detrimental effects. Thus, expertise in this highly specialized field of integrative medicine should be available to patients so that they can be advised about the benefits and negative effects of such preparations and practices. Being a beneficial combination of conventional and CAM care, integrative oncology makes possible the holistic approach to cancer care. The concept of integrative oncology for breast cancer is jointly practiced by the Department of Internal and Integrative Medicine, Kliniken Essen-Mitte, academic teaching hospital of the University of Duisburg-Essen, and the Breast Center at Kliniken Essen-Mitte in Germany. This model is introduced here; its scope is reviewed, and its possible implications for the practice of integrative medicine are discussed. Summary Evidence-based integrative care is crucial to the field of oncology in establishing state-of-the-art care for breast cancer patients. PMID:23170989

  2. Surgical management of patients receiving haemodialysis for chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Yassin, S; Ezz, M

    1995-10-01

    This study was carried out on 22 patients seeking dental extractions of one molar tooth. The first group consisted of 12 patients suffering from chronic renal failure undergoing haemodialysis, while the other group consisted of 10 apparently healthy dental patients acting as a control group. The scope of this work is based on the proper handling and management of chronic renal failure patients receiving haemodialysis and undergoing an oral surgical procedure. Complete blood picture, screening of bleeding and coagulation and postextraction complications were monitored for the two groups. PMID:9497692

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine use in oncology: A questionnaire survey of patients and health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the prevalence and predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers, and to assess the knowledge of and attitudes toward CAM use in oncology among health care professionals. Methods This is a cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in a single institution in Ireland. Survey was performed in outpatient and inpatient settings involving cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers. Clinicians and allied health care professionals were asked to complete a different questionnaire. Results In 676 participants including 219 cancer patients; 301 non-cancer volunteers and 156 health care professionals, the overall prevalence of CAM use was 32.5% (29.1%, 30.9% and 39.7% respectively in the three study cohorts). Female gender (p < 0.001), younger age (p = 0.004), higher educational background (p < 0.001), higher annual household income (p = 0.001), private health insurance (p = 0.001) and non-Christian (p < 0.001) were factors associated with more likely CAM use. Multivariate analysis identified female gender (p < 0.001), non-Christian (p = 0.001) and private health insurance (p = 0.015) as independent predictors of CAM use. Most health care professionals thought they did not have adequate knowledge (58.8%) nor were up to date with the best evidence (79.2%) on CAM use in oncology. Health care professionals who used CAM were more likely to recommend it to patients (p < 0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates a similarly high prevalence of CAM use among oncology health care professionals, cancer and non cancer patients. Patients are more likely to disclose CAM usage if they are specifically asked. Health care professionals are interested to learn more about various CAM therapies and have poor evidence-based knowledge on specific oncology treatments. There is a need for further training to meet to the escalation of CAM use among patients and to raise awareness of potential benefits and risks associated with these therapies. PMID:21609461

  4. Is the clinical use of cannabis by oncology patients advisable?

    PubMed

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Avisar, Adva; Batash, Ron; Schaffer, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    The use of the cannabis plant for various medical indications by cancer patients has been rising significantly in the past few years in several European countries, the US and Israel. The increase in use comes from public demand for the most part, and not due to a scientific basis. Cannabis chemistry is complex, and the isolation and extraction of the active ingredient remain difficult. The active agent in cannabis is unique among psychoactive plant materials, as it contains no nitrogen and, thus, is not an alkaloid. Alongside inconclusive evidence of increased risks of lung and head and neck cancers from prolonged smoking of the plant produce, laboratory evidence of the anti-cancer effects of plant components exists, but with no clinical research in this direction. The beneficial effects of treatment with the plant, or treatment with medicine produced from its components, are related to symptoms of the disease: pain, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight loss. The clinical evidence of the efficacy of cannabis for these indications is only partial. However, recent scientific data from studies with THC and cannabidiol combinations report the first clinical indication of cancer-related pain relief. The difficulties of performing research into products that are not medicinal, such as cannabis, have not allowed a true study of the cannabis plant extract although, from the public point of view, such studies are greatly desirable. PMID:24606496

  5. Effectiveness of Surgical Safety Checklists in Improving Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Ragusa, Paul S; Bitterman, Adam; Auerbach, Brett; Healy, William A

    2016-03-01

    Wrong-site surgery is all too common. Despite more than a decade of campaigns by major organizations to prevent these events, there are still reports of such mistakes. This article reviews the recent literature on surgical safety checklists and other tools designed to prevent wrong-site surgery and improve patient safety in the operating room. Emphasis is placed on how well institutions comply with these guidelines, the perceptions and attitudes of those who are asked to implement them, and their effectiveness. The literature shows that the implementation of such protocols has improved patient safety. In general, these efforts are viewed favorably by operating room personnel. However, the role of these checklists and other tools in reducing wrong-sided surgeries has not been proven. The goal of the health care profession should be to continue to improve on the advances that have been made in implementing surgical checklists and preventing wrong-site surgery. Practitioners at the authors' institution are continuously searching for ways to improve on the current protocols to prevent wrong-site surgeries. The authors recently employed a protocol in which surgical instruments are kept in the back of the room, away from the patient, until completion of the surgical time-out. This practice helps to ensure that team members are not distracted or preoccupied with setting up equipment during the time-out. This approach also helps to mitigate the hierarchal style in the operating room. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(2):e307-e310.]. PMID:26942472

  6. Pulmonary embolism in surgical patients: 1959-79.

    PubMed Central

    Ruckley, C V; Thurston, C

    1982-01-01

    The Edinburgh surgical statistics (audit) have been analysed for the years 1959, 1964, 1969, 1974, and 1979 to determine the trends in pulmonary embolism in surgical patients who died. There was a total of 61,038 operations, 1528 postoperative deaths, 804 necropsies, and 158 reported pulmonary emboli. The incidence of embolism diagnosed clinically and at necropsy fell throughout the period. This fall held good after corrections for necropsy rates, prognosis, and proportions of major operations. Although the overall necropsy rate fell from 58% to 40%, in patients expected to have a good prognosis the rate rose from 68% to 75%. Necropsy-proved embolism in "good prognosis" patients fell from 0.5% to 0.15% per 100 major operations. The main reduction has taken place since most surgeons in the area adopted methods of prophylaxis against venous thrombosis, but a direct relationship is not proved by this study. PMID:6802422

  7. Surgical treatment of liver metastases in patients with neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Ahmad; Buell, Joseph F

    2013-01-01

    Liver metastases occur in 75% to 80% of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and are considered significant adverse prognostic indicators. Management of NETs liver metastases is challenging and requires aggressive therapy. Currently, there are many therapeutic options for metastatic NETs. However, there is considerable controversy regarding the optimal management. Although complete surgical resection remains the optimal therapy, a variety of other minimally invasive surgical and medical options are available, this includes thermal ablative techniques (e.g., radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryotherapy), embolization using transcatheter embolization, chemoembolization, or radioembolization, and medical therapy (e.g., chemotherapy, biotherapy with somatostatin analogues and interferon). Currently there is no evidence-based data directly comparing surgical versus alternative liver-directed treatment options. An aggressive surgical approach, coupled with additional liver-directed procedures is often recommended as it extends the overall survival. Optimal patient care should be directed by a multidisciplinary team to assure that all treatment options are explored for decision-making while treating this aggressive disease. PMID:25332951

  8. Surgical treatment of liver metastases in patients with neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Ahmad; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2013-04-01

    Liver metastases occur in 75% to 80% of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and are considered significant adverse prognostic indicators. Management of NETs liver metastases is challenging and requires aggressive therapy. Currently, there are many therapeutic options for metastatic NETs. However, there is considerable controversy regarding the optimal management. Although complete surgical resection remains the optimal therapy, a variety of other minimally invasive surgical and medical options are available, this includes thermal ablative techniques (e.g., radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryotherapy), embolization using transcatheter embolization, chemoembolization, or radioembolization, and medical therapy (e.g., chemotherapy, biotherapy with somatostatin analogues and interferon). Currently there is no evidence-based data directly comparing surgical versus alternative liver-directed treatment options. An aggressive surgical approach, coupled with additional liver-directed procedures is often recommended as it extends the overall survival. Optimal patient care should be directed by a multidisciplinary team to assure that all treatment options are explored for decision-making while treating this aggressive disease. PMID:25332951

  9. The impact of surgical outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The elderly population has increased in many countries. Indications for cancer treatment in elderly patients have expanded, because surgical techniques and medical management have improved remarkably. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) requires high-quality techniques and perioperative management methods. If it is possible for elderly patients to withstand an aggressive surgery, age should not be considered a contraindication for PD. Appropriate preoperative evaluation of elderly patients will lead to their safer management. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the safety of PD in patients older than 75 years and to show the influence of advanced age on the morbidity and mortality associated with this operation. Patients and methods Subjects were 98 patients who underwent PD during the time period from April 2005 to April 2011. During this study, 31 patients were 75 years of age or older (group A), and the other 67 patients were less than 75 years old (group B). Preoperative demographic and clinical data, surgical procedure, pathologic diagnosis, postoperative course and complication details were collected prospectively and they were analyzed in two group. Results There was no statistical difference between patient groups in terms of gender, comorbidity, preoperative drainage, diagnosis, or laboratory data. Preoperative albumin values were lower in group A (P = 0.04). The mean surgical time in group A was 408.1 73.47 min. Blood loss and blood transfusion were not significantly different between both groups. There was no statistical differences in mortality rate (P = 0.14), morbidity rate (P = 0.43), and mean length of hospital stay (P = 0.22) between both groups. Long-term survival was also no statistically significant difference between the two groups using the log-rank test (P = 0.10). Conclusion It cannot be ignored that the elderly population is getting larger. We must investigate the management of elderly patients after PD and prepare further for more experiences of PD. If appropriate surgical management is provided to elderly patients, we suggest that PD will lead to no adverse effects after surgery, and PD can be performed safely in elderly patients. We conclude that age should not be a contraindication to PD. PMID:21906398

  10. Pain Management Issues for the Geriatric Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Jason L

    2015-09-01

    Adequate treatment of pain is of utmost importance in making uncomplicated the perioperative course for geriatric surgical patients. Effective analgesia reduces morbidity, improves patient and family satisfaction, and is a natural expectation of high-quality care. Pain treatment in older adults is more complicated than in younger counterparts, and great consideration must be given to age-related changes in physiology and pharmacokinetics. Pain treatment must be individualized based on each patient's profile. Side effects must be minimized and organ toxicity avoided. When complications occur they may be more severe, and treatment must be prompt. Alternative plans for analgesia must be readily enacted. PMID:26315638

  11. Assessing Interpersonal and Communication Skills in Radiation Oncology Residents: A Pilot Standardized Patient Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Melody; Berman, Abigail T.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; LaMarra, Denise; Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita; Vapiwala, Neha

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Methods and Materials: Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of “bad news” to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Results: Overall resident performance ratings were “good” to “excellent,” with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. Conclusions: The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills.

  12. ADDUCTOR POLLICIS MUSCLE AS PREDICTOR OF MALNUTRITION IN SURGICAL PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    de MELO, Camila Yandara Sousa Vieira; da SILVA, Silvia Alves

    2014-01-01

    Background In the compromised nutritional status, there is excessive skeletal muscle loss and decreased inflammatory response, contributing to increased morbidity and mortality and length of stay. Aim To estimate the prevalence of malnutrition by measuring adductor pollicis muscle using cutoffs for surgical patients suggested in the literature. Methods Cross-sectional study with 151 patients scheduled for elective surgical procedure. Nutritional assessment was performed by classical anthropometric measurements: arm circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, arm muscle circumference, corrected arm muscle area, BMI and percentage of weight loss and the extent of the adductor pollicis muscle in both hands. Results The prevalence of malnutrition in patients was high. A significant association between nutritional diagnosis according to the measures of adductor pollicis muscle and arm circumference, BMI and triceps skinfold thickness but there was no association with arm muscular circumference, arm muscular area or percentage of weight loss. Conclusion The adductor pollicis muscle has proved to be a good method to diagnose muscle depletion and malnutrition in surgical patients. PMID:24676291

  13. Clinical Characteristics and Surgical Outcomes in Patients With Intermittent Exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Chen, Jingchang; Shen, Tao; Kang, Ying; Deng, Daming; Lin, Xiaoming; Wu, Heping; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian; Li, Jianqun; Yan, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The clinical characteristics and surgical outcomes in a large sample of patients with intermittent exotropia (IXT) as well as an analysis of risk factors associated with surgical failures are presented in this article. Data from IXT patients who received surgical management at the Eye Hospital, in the Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, of Sun Yat-Sen University, China from January 2009 to December 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Included within this analysis were data from pre- and postoperative ocular motility, primary alignment, and binocular vision. A total of 1228 patients with IXT were reviewed. Males (50.4%) and females (49.6%) were nearly equally represented in this sample. Thirty-two patients (2.6%) had a family history of strabismus. The mean age at onset was 6.77 ± 6.43 years (range 7 months –48.5 years), mean duration at presentation was 7.35 ± 6.68 years (range 6 months–47 years), and mean age at surgery was 13.7 ± 8.8 years (range 3–49 years). The mean refractive error was −0.84 ± 2.69 diopter in the right eye and −0.72 ± 2.58 diopter in the left eye. Amblyopia (4.2%), oblique muscle dysfunction (7.0%), and dissociated vertical deviation (4.7%) were also present in these patients. The most common subtype of IXT was the basic type (88.1%). Orthophoria was observed in 80.5% of patients and the ratios of surgical undercorrection and overcorrection were 14.7% and 4.8%, respectively, as determined with a mean follow-up time of 7.8 ± 3.7 months. When combining ocular alignment with binocular vision as the success criteria, the success rate decreased to 35.6%. Multivariate risk factor analysis showed that only the loss of stereoacuity (P = 0.002) was associated with a poor outcome. There were no differences in the long-term results between bilateral lateral rectus recession and unilateral lateral rectus recession with medial rectus resection. Most IXT patients displayed normal vision, with few having positive family histories, amblyopia, oblique muscle dysfunction, and dissociated vertical deviation. The most common subtype of IXT was the basic type. Long-term surgical results were less favorable when sensory status was included in the criteria for success. Patients with stereoacuity loss were at an increased risk for poor outcomes. PMID:26844467

  14. Colorectal cancer in aged patients. Toward the routine treatment through laparoscopic surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; MARCHESE, S.; FAMOSO, F.; LA CORTE, F.; MARLETTA, S.; LEANZA, G.; ZANGHÌ, G.; LEANZA, V.; INTAGLIATA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in general population. The incidence seems to be higher in older age. Surgery remains the treatment of choice and laparoscopic approach offers numerous benefits. We report our personal experience in elderly patients operated on for colorectal cancer with laparoscopic resection. Patients and methods From January 2003 to September 2013, out of 160 patients aged 65 years or older and operated with minimally invasive techniques, 30 cases affected by colorectal cancer and operated on with laparoscopic approach were analyzed in this study. Results Male/female ratio was 1.35 and mean age 72 years. Constipation, weight loss, anemia and rectal bleeding were the most commonly reported symptoms. Lesions involved descending-sigmoid colon in 53% of cases, rectum in 37% and ascending colon in 10%. Among laparoscopic colorectal operations laparoscopic left colectomy was the most frequently performed, followed by right colectomy, abdominoperineal resection and Hartmann procedure. Operative times ranged from 3 to 5 hours depending on surgical procedure performed. Mean hospital stay was 6 days (range 4–9). Conversion to open approach occurred only in a case of laparoscopic right colectomy (3%) for uncontrolled bleeding. A single case of mortality was reported. In two cases (7%) anastomotic leakage was observed, conservatively treated in one patient and requiring reoperation in the other one. Conclusions Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is feasible and effective for malignancies in elderly population offering several advantages including immunologic and oncologic ones. However an experienced surgical team is essential in reducing risks and complications. PMID:25827663

  15. Surgical treatment of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chen, S F; Kato, Y; Sinha, R; Kumar, A; Watabe, T; Imizu, S; Oda, J; Oguri, D; Sano, H; Hirose, Y

    2015-01-01

    We present our experience with elective microsurgical clipping of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) and analyze this management. A total of 150 patients with UIA were reviewed and data were collected with regard to age, sex, presence of symptoms, location and size of the aneurysms, surgical complications and postoperative 1 year outcomes. Aneurysm size was assessed either by three-dimensional CT angiography or digital subtraction angiogram. Glasgow Outcome Scale was used to assess clinical outcomes. One hundred and fifty patients with 165 aneurysms were treated in this series. The mean size of the UIA was 5.6mm. Eighty aneurysms (48.5%) were less than 5mm in size, and 73 (44.2%) were from 5 to 10mm. Ten (6.1%) of the aneurysms were large and two (1.2%) were giant. One hundred and forty-three were asymptomatic and seven were symptomatic before surgery. The outcome was good in 147 patients (98%), and only three patients (2%) had a treatment-related unfavorable outcome. Five patients experienced transient neurological deficits and one patient experienced permanent neurological deficits. Overall 98.7% of the treated aneurysms were satisfactorily obliterated. Wound complications were seen only in three patients. In conclusion, UIA pose a significant challenge for neurosurgeons, where a delicate balance between benefits and possible risks must be weighed. If the requisite expertise is available, they can be treated surgically with low morbidity and a good outcome at specialized neurovascular centers. PMID:25443084

  16. Volume optimization in surgical patients: wet or dry?

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Van der Linden P

    2007-01-01

    Perioperative fluid therapy remains the subject of active controversy. Indeed, clinical trials investigating the effects of fluid administration on outcome in surgical patients report controversial results. Critical review of these trials reveals that current standard fluid therapy is not at all evidence-based. Although it is evident that fluid overload should be avoided, replacement of fluid lost clearly improves outcome. The debate "Wet or Dry" is not a real one. Fluids should be administered in the perioperative period through a goal-directed approach taking into account patients characteristics and surgical-related events, and not through a "recipe book" approach. The type of fluid to be administered should depend on the specific space that needs to be restored (intracellular, extracellular or intravascular) and on the pharmacokinetic properties of the different solutions.

  17. Longitudinal Assessments of Quality of Life in Endometrial Cancer Patients: Effect of Surgical Approach and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Tien; Menard, Chantal; Samant, Rajiv; Choan, E.; Hopkins, Laura; Faught, Wylam; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is often considered for endometrial cancer. We studied the effect of RT and surgical treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: All patients referred to the gynecologic oncology clinics with biopsy findings showing endometrial cancer were recruited. QOL assessments were performed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire-C30, version 3. Assessments were obtained at study entry and at regular 3-month intervals for a maximum of 2 years. Open-ended telephone interviews were done every 6 months. Linear mixed regression models were built using QOL domain scores as dependent variables, with the predictors of surgical treatment and adjuvant RT type. Results: A total of 40 patients were recruited; 80% of the surgeries were performed by laparotomy. Significant improvements were seen in most QOL domains with increased time from treatment. Adjuvant RT resulted in significantly more severe bowel symptoms and improvement in insomnia compared with conservative follow-up. No significant adverse effect from adjuvant RT was seen on the overall QOL. Bowel symptoms were significantly increased in patients treated with laparotomy compared with laparoscopy in the patients treated with whole pelvic RT. Qualitatively, about one-half of the patients noted improvements in their overall QOL during follow-up, with easy fatigability the most prevalent. Conclusion: No significant adverse effect was seen on patients' overall QOL with adjuvant pelvic RT after the recovery period. The acute adverse effects on patients' QOL significantly improved with an increasing interval from diagnosis.

  18. Evaluation and Management of Patients With Heart Disease and Cancer: Cardio-Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Joerg; Lerman, Amir; Sandhu, Nicole P.; Villarraga, Hector R.; Mulvagh, Sharon L.; Kohli, Manish

    2014-01-01

    The care for patients with cancer has advanced greatly over the past decades. A combination of earlier cancer diagnosis and greater use of traditional and novel systemic treatments has decreased cancer-related mortality. Effective cancer therapies, however, can result in short- and long-term co-morbidities that can decrease the net clinical gain by impacting quality of life and survival. In particular, cardiovascular complications of cancer treatments can have a profound impact on the health of cancer patients and are more common among those with recognized or unrecognized underlying cardiovascular diseases. A new discipline termed cardio-oncology has thus evolved to address the cardiovascular needs of cancer patients and optimize their care in a multidisciplinary approach. This review provides a brief introduction and background on this emerging field and then focuses on its practical aspects including: cardiovascular risk assessment and prevention before cancer treatment, cardiovascular surveillance and therapy during cancer treatment, and cardiovascular monitoring and management after cancer therapy. The content of this review is based on a literature search of PubMed between January 1, 1960, and February 1, 2014 using the search terms cancer, cardiomyopathy, cardiotoxicity, cardio-oncology, chemotherapy, heart failure, and radiation. PMID:25192616

  19. Smart CO2 laser surgical system based on autodyne monitoring of laser-evaporated biotissues: first results in oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. K.; Varev, G. A.; Konovalov, A. N.; Kortunov, V. N.; Panchenko, V. Y.; Reshetov, I. V.; Matorin, O. V.; Maiboroda, V. F.; Ul'yanov, V. A.

    2005-08-01

    New method based on techniques of self-induced autodyne effect for diagnostics and control of laser-tissue evaporation by radiation of high-frequency pumped waveguide CO2 laser is developed. This method is used for creation of feed-back for smart CO2 laser surgical system of "Lancet" series. The results of medical testing of the smart laser surgical system are presented.

  20. Frequency of RBC Alloantibodies in Chinese Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiushi; Yang, Qiaoni; Bai, Yingzhe; Zhang, Chengxin; Diao, Yanni; Fang, Deqiang

    2012-08-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of red blood cell (RBC) alloantibodies in surgical patients. METHODS: Blood samples of 18,980 Chinese surgical patients were collected and tested between January 2009 and September 2010. For patients with RBC alloantibodies, sequences of antibodies were identified with the DiaMed Asia antibody screening system. Data regarding sex, age, transfusion history, pregnancy history, and alloantibody specificity were collected. RESULTS: 39 alloantibodies were identified from 18,980 samples, yielding a prevalence of 0.21%. The most frequently identified alloantibodies were Rhesus system antibodies (28/39, 71.8%), including anti-E (17/39; 1 anti-E accompanied by anti-Fy(b)), anti-c (5/39), anti-cE (2/39), anti-C(w) (1/39), anti-D (1/39), and anti-e (1/39). Other antibodies included anti-M (5/39), anti-Le(a) (2/39), anti-Le(b) (1/39), anti-K+S (1/39), anti-JK(a) (1/39), and anti-JS(a) (1/39). The frequency of alloantibodies was greater in females than in males (31 vs. 8). CONCLUSION: The results show a higher prevalence of RBC alloantibodies in females than in males. Anti-E was the most common alloantibody identified in this Chinese surgical population and was also more frequent in females compared to males. PMID:22969699

  1. Generating patient-specific pulmonary vascular models for surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murff, Daniel; Co-Vu, Jennifer; O'Dell, Walter G.

    2015-03-01

    Each year in the U.S., 7.4 million surgical procedures involving the major vessels are performed. Many of our patients require multiple surgeries, and many of the procedures include "surgical exploration". Procedures of this kind come with a significant amount of risk, carrying up to a 17.4% predicted mortality rate. This is especially concerning for our target population of pediatric patients with congenital abnormalities of the heart and major pulmonary vessels. This paper offers a novel approach to surgical planning which includes studying virtual and physical models of pulmonary vasculature of an individual patient before operation obtained from conventional 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. These models would provide clinicians with a non-invasive, intricately detailed representation of patient anatomy, and could reduce the need for invasive planning procedures such as exploratory surgery. Researchers involved in the AirPROM project have already demonstrated the utility of virtual and physical models in treatment planning of the airways of the chest. Clinicians have acknowledged the potential benefit from such a technology. A method for creating patient-derived physical models is demonstrated on pulmonary vasculature extracted from a CT scan with contrast of an adult human. Using a modified version of the NIH ImageJ program, a series of image processing functions are used to extract and mathematically reconstruct the vasculature tree structures of interest. An auto-generated STL file is sent to a 3D printer to create a physical model of the major pulmonary vasculature generated from 3D CT scans of patients.

  2. Clinical and Oncological Value of Preoperative BMI in Gastric Cancer Patients: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Voglino, Costantino; Di Mare, Giulio; Ferrara, Francesco; De Franco, Lorenzo; Roviello, Franco; Marrelli, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The impact of preoperative BMI on surgical outcomes and long-term survival of gastric cancer patients was investigated in various reports with contrasting results. Materials & Methods. A total of 378 patients who underwent a surgical resection for primary gastric cancer between 1994 and 2011 were retrospectively studied. Patients were stratified according to BMI into a normal group (<25, group A), an overweight group (25–30, group B), and an obesity group (≥30, group C). These 3 groups were compared according to clinical-pathological characteristics, surgical treatment, and long-term survival. Results. No significant correlations between BMI and TNM (2010), UICC stage (2010), Lauren's histological type, surgical results, lymph node dissection, and postoperative morbidity and mortality were observed. Factors related to higher BMI were male gender (P < 0.05), diabetes (P < 0.001), and serum blood proteins (P < 0.01). A trend to fewer lymph nodes retrieved during gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy in overweight patients (B and C groups) was observed, although not statistically significant. There was no difference in overall survival or disease-specific survival between the three groups. Conclusion. According to our data, BMI should not be considered a significant predictor of postoperative complications or long-term result in gastric cancer patients. PMID:25759721

  3. Managing Opioid-Tolerant Patients in the Perioperative Surgical Home.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, John T; Schwenk, Eric S; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2016-06-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is important to decrease perioperative morbidity and improve patient satisfaction. Opioids are associated with potential adverse events that may lead to significant risk. Uncontrolled pain is a risk factor in the transformation of acute pain to chronic pain. Balancing these issues can be especially challenging in opioid-tolerant patients undergoing surgery, for whom rapidly escalating opioid doses in an effort to control pain can be associated with increased complications. In the perioperative surgical home model, anesthesiologists are positioned to coordinate a comprehensive perioperative analgesic plan that begins with the preoperative assessment and continues through discharge. PMID:27208711

  4. Palliative care in pediatric hematological oncology patients: experience of a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Maria Thereza Macedo; Mota, Joaquim Antônio César; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the approach to palliative care for hematological oncology patients in the pediatric ward of a tertiary hospital. Methods This was a retrospective, descriptive study of 29 hematological oncology patients who died between 2009 and 2011. Data regarding the approach and prevalence of pain, prevalence of other symptoms, multidisciplinary team participation, communication between staff and family and limited invasive therapy were collected from the medical records. Results Twenty-seven (93.1%) patients displayed disease progression unresponsive to curative treatment. The median age at death was ten years old. Pain was the most prevalent symptom with all patients who reported pain receiving analgesic medications. The majority took weak (55.2%) and/or strong (65.5%) opioids. The patients were followed by pediatricians and a pediatric hematologist/oncologist. Participation of other professionals was also documented: 86.2% were followed by social services and 69% by psychologists, among others. There were explicit descriptions of limitation of invasive therapy in the medical records of 26 patients who died with disease progression. All these decisions were shared with the families. Conclusion Although the hospital where this study was conducted does not have a specialized team in pediatric palliative care, it meets all the requirements for developing a specific program. The importance of approaching pain and other prevalent symptoms in children with cancer involving a comprehensive multidisciplinary team is evident. Discussions were had with most of the families on limiting invasive therapy, but no record of a well-defined and coordinated treatment plan for palliative care was found. PMID:25453649

  5. Thoracic wall defects: surgical management of 205 consecutive patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pairolero, P.C.; Arnold, P.G.

    1986-07-01

    In this article, we review our experience during the past 9 years with 205 consecutive thoracic wall reconstructions. The 100 female and 105 male patients ranged in age from 12 to 85 years (mean, 53.4 years). One hundred fourteen patients had thoracic wall tumors, 56 had radiation necrosis, 56 had infected median sternotomy wounds, and 8 had costochondritis. Twenty-nine of these patients had combinations of the aforementioned conditions. One hundred seventy-eight patients underwent skeletal resection. A mean of 5.4 ribs were resected in 142 patients. Total or partial sternectomies were performed in 60. Skeletal defects were closed with prosthetic material in 66 patients and with autogenous ribs in 12. One hundred sixty-eight patients underwent 244 muscle flap procedures: 149 pectoralis major, 56 latissimus dorsi, 14 rectus abdominis, 13 serratus anterior, 8 external oblique, 2 trapezius, and 2 advancement of diaphragm. The omentum was transposed in 20 patients. The mean number of operations per patient was 1.9 (range, 1 to 8). The mean duration of hospitalization was 16.5 days. One perioperative death occurred (at 29 days). Four patients required tracheostomy. During a mean follow-up of 32.4 months, there were 49 late deaths, predominantly due to malignant disease. All 204 patients who were alive 30 days after operation had excellent surgical results at last follow-up examination or at the time of death due to causes unrelated to the reconstructive procedure.

  6. Impact of non-oncological factors on tumor recurrence after liver transplantation in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiang-Qian; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Teng, Da-Hong; Sun, Ji-San; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary neoplasm of the liver and is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Liver transplantation (LT) has become one of the best curative therapeutic options for patients with HCC, although tumor recurrence after LT is a major and unaddressed cause of mortality. Furthermore, the factors that are associated with recurrence are not fully understood, and most previous studies have focused on the biological properties of HCC, such as the number and size of the HCC nodules, the degree of differentiation, the presence of hepatic vascular invasion, elevated serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein, and the tumor stage outside of the Milan criteria. Thus, little attention has been given to factors that are not directly related to HCC (i.e., “non-oncological factors”), which have emerged as predictors of tumor recurrence. This review was performed to assess the effects of non-oncological factors on tumor recurrence after LT. The identification of these factors may provide new research directions and clinical strategies for the prophylaxis and surveillance of tumor recurrence after LT, which can help reduce recurrence and improve patient survival. PMID:26973413

  7. Readability of American Online Patient Education Materials in Urologic Oncology: a Need for Simple Communication

    PubMed Central

    Pruthi, Amanda; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Raynor, Mathew C.; Woods, Michael E.; Wallen, Eric M.; Smith, Angela B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine readability levels of reputable cancer and urologic websites addressing bladder, prostate, kidney and testicular cancers. Methods Online patient education materials (PEMs) for bladder, prostate, kidney and testicular malignancies were evaluated from the American Cancer Society, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Urology Care Foundation (AUA-UCF), Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN), Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), Kidney Cancer Association (KCA), and Testicular Cancer Resource Center (TCRC). Grade level was determined using several readability indices, and analyses were performed based on cancer type, website, and content area (general, causes, risk factors and prevention, diagnosis and staging, treatment, and post-treatment). Results Estimated grade level of online PEMs ranged from 9.2 to 14.2 with an overall mean of 11.7. Websites for kidney cancer had the least difficult readability (11.3) and prostate cancer had the most difficult readability (12.1). Among specific websites, the most difficult readability levels were noted for the AUA-UCF website for bladder and prostate cancer and the KCA and TCRC for kidney and testes cancer. Readability levels within content areas varied based on disease and website. Conclusion Online PEMs in urologic oncology are written at a level above the average American reader. Simplification of these resources are necessary to improve patient understanding of urologic malignancy. PMID:25623686

  8. Impact of non-oncological factors on tumor recurrence after liver transplantation in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiang-Qian; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Teng, Da-Hong; Sun, Ji-San; Zheng, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary neoplasm of the liver and is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Liver transplantation (LT) has become one of the best curative therapeutic options for patients with HCC, although tumor recurrence after LT is a major and unaddressed cause of mortality. Furthermore, the factors that are associated with recurrence are not fully understood, and most previous studies have focused on the biological properties of HCC, such as the number and size of the HCC nodules, the degree of differentiation, the presence of hepatic vascular invasion, elevated serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein, and the tumor stage outside of the Milan criteria. Thus, little attention has been given to factors that are not directly related to HCC (i.e., "non-oncological factors"), which have emerged as predictors of tumor recurrence. This review was performed to assess the effects of non-oncological factors on tumor recurrence after LT. The identification of these factors may provide new research directions and clinical strategies for the prophylaxis and surveillance of tumor recurrence after LT, which can help reduce recurrence and improve patient survival. PMID:26973413

  9. Hip pain in the young, active patient: surgical strategies.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Michael R; Erickson, Jill A; McCarthy, Joseph C; Mont, Michael A; Mulkey, Patrick; Peters, Christopher L; Pivec, Robert; Austin, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Hip disorders in young patients likely exist as a spectrum of prearthritic and arthritic conditions. With the increasing recognition of these disorders, surgical options are being popularized and more patients are being treated at a younger age. Hip surgeons must develop a careful set of evidenced-based indications and follow surgical outcomes in a rigorous, scientific manner. Hip arthroscopy can be used to successfully treat some hip disorders, including labral tears, with or without femoroacetabular impingement, resulting in mechanical symptoms. Long-term outcomes after arthroscopy are determined by the condition of the cartilage at the time of surgery. Patients with preoperative radiographic evidence of moderate to severe arthritis have poor outcomes when treated with arthroscopy. Open joint preservation procedures (including periacetabular osteotomy and surgical hip dislocation with osteochondroplasty) can be done in the absence of substantial arthritis to treat hip dysplasia, femoroacetabular impingement, and related conditions. The results of these procedures are good in appropriately selected patients at short-term to midterm follow-ups. In the presence of severe arthritis, joint replacement is the treatment of choice. Total hip arthroplasty using uncemented acetabular and femoral fixation provides reliable osseointegration; however, long-term results in young patients have historically been compromised by bearing surface wear, osteolysis, and component loosening. Contemporary, highly cross-linked polyethylene and ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have durable results, low complication rates, and offer the potential of long-term survivorship in this high-demand population. In general, metal-on-metal implants have higher complication rates versus other bearing surface options and should be avoided. The best results of hip resurfacing are seen in men younger than 55 years with large femoral head sizes. Although implant survivorship is comparable to that of total hip arthroplasty, the sequelae of metal wear debris continue to cause concern. PMID:24720303

  10. Physician Recruitment of Patients to Non-Therapeutic Oncology Clinical Trials: Ethics Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Black, Lee; Batist, Gerald; Avard, Denise; Rousseau, Caroline; Diaz, Zuanel; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2013-01-01

    Tailoring medical treatment to individual patients requires a strong foundation in research to provide the data necessary to understand the relationship between the disease, the patient, and the type of treatment advocated for. Non-therapeutic oncology clinical trials studying therapeutic resistance require the participation of patients, yet only a small percentage enroll. Treating physicians are often relied on to recruit patients, but they have a number of ethical obligations that might be perceived as barriers to recruiting. Concepts such as voluntariness of consent and conflicts of interest can have an impact on whether physicians will discuss clinical trials with their patients and how patients perceive the information. However, these ethical obligations should not be prohibitive to physician recruitment of patients – precautions can be taken to ensure that patients’ consent to research participation is fully voluntary and devoid of conflict, such as the use of other members of the research team than the treating physician to discuss the trial and obtain consent, and better communication between researchers, clinicians, and patients. These can ensure that research benefits are maximized for the good of patients and society. PMID:23483771

  11. Surgical options for patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Laurie M; Salpekar, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Despite ongoing investigation into pharmacologic treatments for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), outcomes for chronic administration of medications remain disappointing. In many instances LGS is treatment refractory, resulting in poor prognoses that include intellectual disability, persisting seizures, and psychiatric conditions. For patients with treatment resistance to other modalities for LGS, a further option is surgical intervention. Evaluation for surgery should involve interictal electroencephalogram (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis, and age-appropriate neuropsychological/developmental assessment. Resective surgery, where seizure foci are removed, successfully controls seizures in many cases, particularly where lesionectomy or lobar resections are appropriate. Recent studies of resective surgery on individuals with LGS show promising results, with a high percentage of patients having improved seizure control. Corpus callosotomy is a palliative surgical approach that aims at controlling potentially injurious seizures, for example, atonic or drop seizures, by preventing the bilateral spread of epileptic activity. Once associated with a high risk for morbidity and mortality, microsurgical techniques and surgery limited to the anterior region of the callosum have greatly diminished complications of corpus callosotomy surgery. Vagus nerve stimulation, another palliative procedure, offers rates of seizure improvement similar to those of corpus callosotomy, with the exception of atonic seizure for which corpus callosotomy may lead to a greater reduction. Recent advances in surgical techniques offer encouraging options for treatment of LGS. PMID:25284034

  12. Surgical Management of Rhinosinusitis in Onco-Hematological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Girolamo, Stefano; Di Mauro, Roberta; Giacomini, Piergiorgio; Cantonetti, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In onco-hematological diseases, the incidence of paranasal sinuses infection dramatically increase and requires a combination of medical and surgical therapy. Balloon dilatation surgery (DS) is a minimally invasive, tissue preserving procedure. The study evaluates the results of DS for rhinosinusitis in immunocompromised patients. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted in 110 hematologic patients with rhinosinusitis. Twenty-five patients were treated with DS technique and 85 patients with endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). We considered the type of anesthesia and the extent of intra- and postoperative bleeding. Patients underwent Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-20) to evaluate changes in subjective symptoms and global patient assessment (GPA) questionnaire to value patient satisfaction. Results Local anesthesia was employed in 8 cases of DS and in 15 of ESS. In 50 ESS patients, an anterior nasal packing was placed and in 12 cases a repacking was necessary. In the DS group, nasal packing was required in 8 cases and in 2 cases a repacking was placed (P=0.019 and P=0.422, respectively). The SNOT-20 change score showed significant improvement of health status in both groups. However the DS group showed a major improvement in 3 voices: need to blow nose, runny nose, and facial pain/pressure. The 3-month follow-up GPA questionnaire showed an higher satisfaction of DS group. Conclusion Balloon DS represents a potentially low aggressive treatment and appears to be relatively safe and effective in onco-hematologic patients. All these remarks may lead the surgeon to consider a larger number of candidates for surgical procedure. PMID:25436050

  13. Surgical patents and patients--the ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Tołłoczko, Tadeusz

    2005-01-01

    It is obvious that every inventor should be rewarded for the intellectual effort, and at the same time be encouraged to successively improve his or her discovery and to work on subsequent innovations. Patents also ensure that patent owners are officially protected against intellectual piracy, but protection of intellectual property may be difficult to accomplish. Nevertheless, it all comes down to this basic question: Does a contradiction exist between medical ethics and the "Medical and Surgical Procedure Patents" system? It may well turn out that medical-procedure patents can have a negative influence on the standard of medical care. Medical-method patents may also interfere with the physician-patient relationship. At present, physicians do not question the usefulness of patent protection for medicines, biotechnology, equipment and devices, but they strongly oppose it for surgical procedures. PMID:15727000

  14. Bacterial bloodstream infections and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in pediatric hematology/oncology patients after anticancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mulla, Naima A; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; El Shafie, Sittana; Janahi, Mohammed; Al-Nasser, Abdullah A; Chandra, Prem

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology and oncology represent a major problem worldwide, but this has not been studied in Qatar. In this study, we investigated the burden of infection and the resistance pattern in the bacterial etiology, in the only tertiary pediatric hematology and oncology center in Qatar. Methods All pediatric cancer patients (n=185) were evaluated retrospectively during the period 2004–2011; a total of 70 (38%) patients were diagnosed with bloodstream infections. Bacterial etiology was determined, along with their susceptibility patterns. Neutropenia, duration of neutropenia, fever, duration of fever, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated throughout the study. Results A total of 70 patients (38%) were diagnosed with acute leukemias, lymphomas, solid tumors, or brain tumors; those patients experienced 111 episodes of bacteremia. The most common Gram-positive (n=64 [55%]) isolates were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=26), Staphylococcus hominis (n=9), and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=7), and the common Gram-negative (n=52 [45%]) isolates were Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=14), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=10), and Escherichia coli (n=7). There was a significant association observed between fever with positive blood culture and different types of cancer (P=0.035). The majority of bacteremia (n=68 [61.3%]) occurred in nonneutropenic episodes. Elevated values of CRP (≥5 mg/L) were detected in 82 (95.3%) episodes and were negatively correlated with absolute neutrophil count (ANC) (r=−0.18; P=0.248) among all cases. However, the infection-related fatality rate was 2.2% (n=4), with three caused by Gram-negative pathogens. Multidrug resistant organisms were implicated in 33 (28.4%) cases and caused three of the mortality cases. Conclusion Multidrug resistant organisms cause mortality in pediatric cancer patients. Investigation of antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms may guide successful antimicrobial therapy and improve the surveillance and quality of pediatric malignancy care. PMID:25395866

  15. A tele-oncology model replacing face-to-face specialist cancer care: perspectives of patients in North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Sabe; Kelly, Jenny; Evans, Rebecca; Larkins, Sarah

    2014-03-18

    We explored the experiences of patients using the Townsville Tele-oncology clinic, where most patients are no longer seen face-to-face. All medical oncology patients who received services via telehealth at the Townsville Cancer Centre in 2012 were invited to participate in an interview. None refused. Thirty two patients were interviewed by telephone and three via videoconference at their local health service facility. Data analysis identified five major themes (quality of the consultation; communication and relationships; familiarity with technology and initial fears; local services and support; and lack of coordination of services between the local rural hospital and the major regional hospital) and each major theme included a number of sub-themes. Most patients interviewed (69%) had not seen their oncology specialist face-to-face, but 86% of them found the video-consultation to be of high quality and were extremely satisfied with the interaction. The acceptance of teleconsultation appeared to be linked to the patients' trust with their local health system and staff. Overall, the tele-oncology model that replaced face-to-face care in North Queensland was accepted and welcomed by patients. PMID:24643950

  16. Selected surgical managements in snoring and obstructive sleep apnea patients

    PubMed Central

    Olszewska, Ewa; Rutkowska, Justyna; Czajkowska, Aneta; Rogowski, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The diagnostic process and the surgical procedures in patients with snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are crucial. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of surgical treatment in snoring and OSAS patients. Material/Methods A precise laryngological examination and screening polysomnography (Poly-Mesam) were performed in all patients with mild, moderate and severe OSAS before and 6 months after surgery. The patients completed questionnaires concerning their complaints. We included patients qualified to septoplasty, laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP), uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) and radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy of the tongue base (RITT). Outcome evaluation of surgery was performed on the basis of data received from follow-up laryngological examinations, selected parameters obtained from the Poly-Mesam test and follow-up questionnaires. Results In most cases we observed improvement, defined as decreasing some sleep parameters, such as a respiratory disturbance index (RDI), by more than 50%, decreasing the loudness of snoring, decreasing the number of hypopneas, and obtaining better blood saturation values. After UPPP we noticed changes in retropalatal space, soft palate dimensions and uvula-posterior pharyngeal wall distance. In the postoperative period we did not observe severe complications. In some cases we found short-lived palatal deficiency after UPPP. Patients after RITT experienced discomfort and throat pain lasting from 2 to 4 days. In 2 patients we observed swelling of the tongue base, which decreased after few days. Conclusions Surgery in OSAS contributes to normalization of some sleep parameters. The majority of patients experienced improvement after surgery. PMID:22207114

  17. Pediatric oncology nurses' attitudes related to discussing fertility preservation with pediatric cancer patients and their families.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Clayton, Heather; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; King, Lindsey M; Nieder, Michael; Wilson, Crystal

    2007-01-01

    This study explores nurses' attitudes toward the discussion of fertility preservation (FP) with pediatric cancer patients and their families. A cross-sectional survey was administered to attendees of a pediatric oncology conference. Of the 115 nurses who responded and comprised the study sample, most reported discussing risks of infertility or FP patients' families, that boys younger than 18 years should not be given erotic materials during semen collection, and difficulty locating FP facilities. The 3 patient factors most likely to encourage the discussion of FP are the patient being recently married or engaged, the patient asking about FP, and availability of patient education materials. While the results indicate that nurses do not regularly discuss FP with their patients, nurses perceive such discussion as being within their scope of practice. Therefore, with appropriate intervention, nurses may play a key role in facilitating discussions regarding FP with patients and families. PMID:17827491

  18. Effects of oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Di Bisceglie, Cataldo; Bertagna, Angela; Composto, Emanuela R; Lanfranco, Fabio; Baldi, Matteo; Motta, Giovanna; Barberis, Anna M; Napolitano, Emanuela; Castellano, Elena; Manieri, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Pretherapy sperm cryopreservation in young men is currently included in good clinical practice guidelines for cancer patients. The aim of this paper is to outline the effects of different oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders, based on an 8-year experience of the Cryopreservation Centre of a large public hospital. Two hundred and sixty-one patients with testicular neoplasia and 219 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders who underwent chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and pretherapy semen cryopreservation were evaluated. Sperm and hormonal parameters (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, inhibin B levels) were assessed prior to and 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months after the end of cancer treatment. At the time of sperm collection, baseline FSH level and sperm concentration were impaired to a greater extent in patients with malignant testicular neoplasias than in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. Toxic effects on spermatogenesis were still evident at 6 and 12 months after the end of cancer therapies, while an improvement of seminal parameters was observed after 18 months. In conclusion, an overall increase in sperm concentration was recorded about 18 months after the end of cancer treatments in the majority of patients, even if it was not possible to predict the evolution of each single case ‘a priori'. For this reason, pretherapy semen cryopreservation should be considered in all young cancer patients. PMID:23542137

  19. Effects of oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Bisceglie, Cataldo; Bertagna, Angela; Composto, Emanuela R; Lanfranco, Fabio; Baldi, Matteo; Motta, Giovanna; Barberis, Anna M; Napolitano, Emanuela; Castellano, Elena; Manieri, Chiara

    2013-05-01

    Pretherapy sperm cryopreservation in young men is currently included in good clinical practice guidelines for cancer patients. The aim of this paper is to outline the effects of different oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders, based on an 8-year experience of the Cryopreservation Centre of a large public hospital. Two hundred and sixty-one patients with testicular neoplasia and 219 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders who underwent chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and pretherapy semen cryopreservation were evaluated. Sperm and hormonal parameters (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, inhibin B levels) were assessed prior to and 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months after the end of cancer treatment. At the time of sperm collection, baseline FSH level and sperm concentration were impaired to a greater extent in patients with malignant testicular neoplasias than in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. Toxic effects on spermatogenesis were still evident at 6 and 12 months after the end of cancer therapies, while an improvement of seminal parameters was observed after 18 months. In conclusion, an overall increase in sperm concentration was recorded about 18 months after the end of cancer treatments in the majority of patients, even if it was not possible to predict the evolution of each single case 'a priori'. For this reason, pretherapy semen cryopreservation should be considered in all young cancer patients. PMID:23542137

  20. Merging Children’s Oncology Group Data with an External Administrative Database Using Indirect Patient Identifiers: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yimei; Hall, Matt; Fisher, Brian T.; Seif, Alix E.; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Bagatell, Rochelle; Getz, Kelly D.; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gerbing, Robert B.; Sung, Lillian; Adamson, Peter C.; Gamis, Alan; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials data from National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative oncology group trials could be enhanced by merging with external data sources. Merging without direct patient identifiers would provide additional patient privacy protections. We sought to develop and validate a matching algorithm that uses only indirect patient identifiers. Methods We merged the data from two Phase III Children’s Oncology Group (COG) trials for de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS). We developed a stepwise matching algorithm that used indirect identifiers including treatment site, gender, birth year, birth month, enrollment year and enrollment month. Results from the stepwise algorithm were compared against the direct merge method that used date of birth, treatment site, and gender. The indirect merge algorithm was developed on AAML0531 and validated on AAML1031. Results Of 415 patients enrolled on the AAML0531 trial at PHIS centers, we successfully matched 378 (91.1%) patients using the indirect stepwise algorithm. Comparison to the direct merge result suggested that 362 (95.7%) matches identified by the indirect merge algorithm were concordant with the direct merge result. When validating the indirect stepwise algorithm using the AAML1031 trial, we successfully matched 157 out of 165 patients (95.2%) and 150 (95.5%) of the indirectly merged matches were concordant with the directly merged matches. Conclusions These data demonstrate that patients enrolled on COG clinical trials can be successfully merged with PHIS administrative data using a stepwise algorithm based on indirect patient identifiers. The merged data sets can be used as a platform for comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness studies. PMID:26606521

  1. An oncology patient's choice to forgo nonvolitional nutrition support: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Chapman, G

    1996-12-01

    A 76-year-old patient with metastatic carcinoid tumor who had difficulty tolerating an oral diet and jejunostomy feedings became dehydrated and failed to thrive. His jejunostomy feeding regimen was manipulated to improve tolerance without success. Although his medical condition was untreatable, he was not considered terminally ill, and he was determined to be a reasonable candidate for home total parenteral nutrition (HTPN). However, he thought HTPN was an "excessive measure," and despite lengthy discussions with him by members of both the Hematology/Oncology and Nutrition Support services about the potential benefits of HTPN, he refused any further interventions involving nonvolitional nutrition support (jejunostomy feedings and HTPN). He was discharged to home receiving an oral diet as tolerated in the care of his family and hospice. This case illustrates the ethical considerations surrounding a patient's decision to forgo medical care that might prolong life. PMID:9016144

  2. The Impact of Alternative Payment Models on Oncology Innovation and Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Miller, Amy M; Omenn, Gilbert S; Kean, Marcia A

    2016-05-15

    Oncology care is in a time of major transformation. Scientific discovery is driving breakthroughs in prevention, diagnostics, and treatment, resulting in tremendous gains for patients as the number of cancer survivors continues to grow on an annual basis. At the same time, there is mounting pressure across the healthcare system to contain costs while improving the quality of cancer care. In response to this pressure, private and government payers are increasingly turning to tools such as alternative payment models (APM) and clinical pathways to improve the efficiency of care, inform coverage decisions, and support shared decision-making. As APMs, clinical pathways and other tools are utilized more broadly, it will be critical that these models support the evidence-based use of innovative biomedical advances, including personalized medicine, and deliver patient-centered, high-value care. Clin Cancer Res; 22(10); 2335-41. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27087022

  3. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: what every provider of gynecologic oncology care should know.

    PubMed

    Duska, Linda R; Engelhard, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2010. While initial implementation of the law began shortly thereafter, the full implementation will take place over the next few years. With respect to cancer care, the act was intended to make care more accessible, affordable, and comprehensive across different parts of the country. For our cancer patients and our practices, the ACA has implications that are both positive and negative. The Medicaid expansion and access to insurance exchanges are intended to increase the number of insured patients and thus improve access to care, but many states have decided to opt out of the Medicaid program and in these states access problems will persist. Screening programs will be put in place for insured patients but may supplant federally funded programs that are currently in place for uninsured patients and may not follow current screening guidelines. Both hospice and home health providers will be asked to provide more services with less funding, and quality measures, including readmission rates, will factor into reimbursement. Insured patients will have access to all phases of clinical trial research. There is a need for us as providers of Gynecologic Oncology care to be active in the implementation of the ACA in order to ensure that our patients and our practices can survive and benefit from the changes in health care reimbursement, with the ultimate goals of improving access to care and quality while reducing unsustainable costs. PMID:23500090

  4. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Jin; Fishman, Jessica; Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Vapiwala, Neha; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali; Xie, Sharon X.; Mao, Jun J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  5. Neural network adapted to wound cell analysis in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Viljanto, Jouko; Koski, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of the real state of wound healing of closed surgical wounds is uncertain both clinically and from conventional laboratory tests. Therefore, a novel approach based on early analysis of exactly timed wound cells, computerized further with an artificial neural network, was developed. At the end of routine surgery performed on 481 children under 18 years of age, a specific wound drain Cellstick™ was inserted subcutaneously between the wound edges to harvest wound cells. The Cellsticks™ were removed from 1 to 50 hours, mainly at hour 3 or 24 postsurgery. Immediately, the cellular contents were washed out using a pump constructed for the purpose. After cytocentrifugation, the cells were stained and counted differentially. Based on their relative proportions at selected time intervals, an artificial self-organizing neural map was developed. This was further transformed to a unidirectional linear graph where each node represents one set of relative cell quantities. As early as 3 hours, but more precisely 24 hours after surgery, the location of the nodes on this graph showed individually the patients' initial speed of wound inflammatory cell response. Similarly, timed Cellstick™ specimens from new surgical patients could be analyzed, computerized, and compared with these node values to assess their initial speed in wound inflammatory cell response. Location of the node on the graph does not express the time lapse after surgery but the speed of wound inflammatory cell response in relation to that of other patients. PMID:21362082

  6. Surgical management of cleft lip in pedo-patients.

    PubMed

    Taware, C P; Kulkarni, S R

    1991-01-01

    The Present article describes in short etiology of cleft lip and cleft palate. With this in-born defect, patient develops crucial problems with feeding, phonation, overall growth and development of affected and allied soft and hard tissue structures. This in turn results in deformity and asymmetry which is going to affect functional requirements as well as aesthetic outlook. Hence it really becomes mandatory to correct this defect surgically as early as possible, at stipulated timings so as to avoid present and future anticipated problems. PMID:1820390

  7. Functional changes of intestinal mucosal barrier in surgically critical patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Mu-lin; He, Xian-di; Jiang, Cong-qiao; Liu, Rui-lin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The gut is capable of inducing multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). In the diagnosis and treatment of critical ill patients, doctors should pay particular attention to the protection or recovery of intestinal barrier function. However, no reliable diagnostic criteria are available clinically. This study aimed to assess the changes of intestinal mucosal barrier function in surgically critical ill patients as well as their significance. METHODS: Thirty-eight surgically critical ill patients were enrolled as a study group (APACHE II>8 scores), and 15 non-critical ill patients without intestinal dysfunction were selected as a control group (APACHE II<6). General information, symptoms, physical signs, and APACHE II scores of the patients were recorded. The patients in the study group were subdivided into an intestinal dysfunction group (n=26) and a non-intestinal dysfunction group (n=12). Three ml venous blood was collected from the control group on admission and the same volume of plasma was collected from the study group both on admission and in the period of recovery. The plasma concentrations of endotoxin, diamine oxidase (DAO), D-lactate, and intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (iFABP) were detected respectively. The data collected were analyzed by the SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. RESULTS: The levels of variables were significantly higher in the study group than in the control group (P<0.01). They were higher in the intestinal dysfunction group than in the non-intestinal dysfunction group (DAO P<0.05, endotoxin, D-lactate, iFABP P<0.01). In the non-intestinal dysfunction group compared with the control group, the level of endotoxin was not significant (P>0.05), but the levels of DAO, D-lactate and iFABP were statistically significant (P<0.05). The levels of variables in acute stage were higher than those in recovery stage (P<0.01). The death group showed higher levels of variables than the survival group (endotoxin and D-lactate P<0.01, DAO and iFABP P<0.05). CONCLUSION: The plasma concentrations of endotoxin, DAO, D-lactate, and intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (iFABP) could reflect a better function of the intestinal mucosa barrier in surgically critical ill patients. PMID:25214969

  8. Surgical strategy: matching the patient with the procedure.

    PubMed

    Hentz, Vincent R

    2002-08-01

    The general indications, timing, and choice of procedure can be determined by asking and answering the following questions appropriately: 1. Has the patient achieved neurologic, emotional, and social stability? 2. What is the patient's current level of motor and sensory resources and function? The number and strength of muscles remaining under good voluntary control are the most important variables. 3. Are the patient's expectations realistic? 4. Does the patient possess the necessary intelligence and motivation? Some procedures, such as arthrodesis of a specific joint, require little motivation to succeed; however, a complex set of muscle-tendon transfers requires a great deal of motor reeducation for the patient to achieve an optimal result. 5. Does the patient have the necessary time to invest in achieving a good result? The patient must be able to set aside the time necessary for postoperative immobilization in a cast or splint and for therapy and reeducation. 6. Are the necessary support services and personnel available and committed? 7. Have all preoperative obstacles to success been considered and has a plan developed to overcome any remaining obstacles? 8. Does the patient understand the potential complications and benefits? 9. Can the patient and professional team tolerate a complication, failure, or suboptimal result? Both the medical staff and the patient must be prepared for complications that may lead to a suboptimal outcome or frank failure. 10. Are the patient's current health and well-being ideal? 11. Is the surgical plan consistent with the patient's physical resources, goals, and expectations? 12. Does an alternate plan exist? 13. Does the surgeon understand the scope of the complications and how to salvage an acceptable result should a complication occur? PMID:12474600

  9. Distribution and determinants of patient satisfaction in oncology: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lis, Christopher G; Rodeghier, Mark; Gupta, Digant

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. It places considerable mental, physical, and emotional stress on patients and requires them to make major adjustments in many key areas of their lives. As a consequence, the demands on health care providers to satisfy the complex care needs of cancer patients increase manifold. Of late, patient satisfaction has been recognized as one of the key indicators of health care quality and is now being used by health care institutions for monitoring health care improvement programs, gaining accreditation, and marketing strategies. The patient satisfaction information is also being used to compare and benchmark hospitals, identify best-performance institutions, and discover areas in need of improvement. However, the existing literature on patient satisfaction with the quality of cancer care they receive is inconsistent and heterogeneous because of differences in study designs, questionnaires, study populations, and sample sizes. The aim of this review was therefore to systematically evaluate the available information on the distribution and determinants of patient satisfaction in oncology. PMID:19936172

  10. The meaning of DNR status: oncology nurses' experiences with patients and families.

    PubMed

    Jezewski, M A; Finnell, D S

    1998-06-01

    Patients, providers, and families are increasingly involved in end-of-life decisions (advance directives, health care proxy, do-not-resuscitate [DNR] status consents). These decisions can be complex processes whereby the participants in the process must come to terms with often painful and difficult decisions. The role perception of the nurse in end-of-life decision making is not well delineated. This chapter explores the results of a study that addresses the question, "What are the experiences of oncology nurses as they interact with patients and/or family members during the process of patients/families signing DNR consents. The grounded theory method of data collection and analysis was used to explore this question. The results of the study indicate that central to the process of consenting to DNR status is the degree of shared understanding about the meaning of DNR status among participants and the conflict that can occur when meanings are not shared. A model is presented that illustrates the connections between the meanings of DNR (patient, family, and provider) and congruence and conflict in the DNR consent process. Strategies are discussed that facilitate prevention or resolution of conflict in the DNR status decision-making process. Strategies used by the nurse to facilitate decision making by patient and families include communicating with, caring for, educating, advocating for, and collaborating with patients, families, and other providers. PMID:9615512

  11. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  12. Factors Influencing Communication Between the Patients with Cancer and their Nurses in Oncology Wards

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rassouli, Maryam; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Nikanfar, Alireza; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Ghahramanian, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: The main theme of the research emerged as “three-factor effects” that demonstrates all the factors related to the patient, nurse, and the organization and includes three categories of “Patient as the center of communication”, “Nurse as a human factor”, and “Organizational structures”. The first category consists of two sub-categories of “Imposed changes by the disease” and the “patient's particular characteristics”. The second category includes sub-categories of “sense of vulnerability” and “perception of professional self: Pre-requisite of patient-centered communication”. The third category consists of the sub-categories of “workload and time imbalance”, “lack of supervision”, and “impose duties in context of neglecting nurse and patient needs”. Characteristics of the patients, nurses, and care environment seemed to be the influential factors on the communication. Conclusions: In order to communicate with cancer patients effectively, changes in philosophy and culture of the care environment are essential. Nurses must receive proper trainings which meet their needs and which focus on holistic and patient-centered approach. PMID:24600177

  13. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection in Patients at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, A; Farhangi, H; Badiee, Z; Banihashem, A; Mosaddegh, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections in critical care unit are high, and they are serious hospital problems. Infections acquired during the hospital stay are generally called nosocomial infections, initially known as infections arising after 48 h of hospital admission. The mostfrequent nosocomial infections (urinary, respiratory, gastroenteritis and blood stream infection) were common in patients at hospital.The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection among hospitalized children at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods Data were collected from 200 patient's records presented with symptoms of nosocomial infection at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital from March 2014 to September 2014. Descriptive statistics using percentage was calculated. Results Incidence of nosocomial infections inpatients athematology-oncology ward was 31% (62/200). Of which 69.35% (43/62) blood stream infection being the most frequent; followed by 30.64% (19/62) was urinary tract infection (UTI), and the most common blood culture isolate was been Staphylococcus epidermidis 18 (41.86%), andour study showed that large numbers ofnosocomial UTIs causing by Gram‑negative bacteria. Conclusion This study showed blood stream infection and UTI are the common nosocomial infections among patients athematology-oncology ward. Early recognition of infections and short term use of invasive devices along with proper infection control procedures can significantly decrease the incidence of nosocomial infections in patients. PMID:26985350

  14. Effects of Video Games on the Adverse Corollaries of Chemotherapy in Pediatric Oncology Patients: A Single-Case Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolko, David J.; Rickard-Figueroa, Jorge L.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed effects of video games on adverse corollaries of chemotherapy in three pediatric oncology patients. Results indicated that access to video games resulted in reduction in the number of anticipatory symptoms experienced and observed, as well as a diminution in the aversiveness of chemotherapy side effects. (Author/NRB)

  15. Prosthetic rehabilitation in post-oncological patients: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Brauner, Edoardo; Cassoni, Andrea; Battisti, Andrea; Bartoli, Davina; Valentini, Valentino

    2010-01-01

    Summary Prosthetic rehabilitation in post-oncologic patients after bone reconstruction are not substantially different than those of patients affected by severe atrophia of upper or lower jaw after bone reconstruction. Aim of this paper is to evaluate the possibilities of prosthetic rehabilitation on these patients and to present our method. Prosthesis-based oral rehabilitation of such tumor cases rapresents a challenge. The report analyses two cases of patients who underwent ablative oral surgery. Both have received a fibula free vascularised flap. The first was rehabilitated with a removable prosthesis fixed on the residual teeth, while the second with an implant supported prosthesis. In case of carcinoma resection of the oral mucosa, the removable prosthesis guarantees a simplification in dental care operations. On the other hand, irradiated mucosa is frequentely unable to tolerate the friction created by the acrylic base. However, the fixed prosthesis can limit the view during follow-up controls. In our school, according to all exposed reasons, we consider the implant supported overdenture prosthesis to be the best choice for those patients. PMID:22238701

  16. Psychosocial and legal aspects of oncological treatment in patients with cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kuśnierkiewicz, Maria; Kędziora, Justyna; Jaroszyk-Pawlukiewicz, Joanna; Nowak-Jaroszyk, Monika

    2013-01-01

    With society getting older and affected by many diseases, more and more people suffer from severe cognitive disorders. As practice shows, the legal situations of such people is often problematic. This is due to a number of factors, such as short time since the deterioration of patient's condition, initial symptoms ignored, social prejudice towards the idea of incapacitation or taking decisions for a patient, complicated procedures and, sometimes, insufficient knowledge of legal regulations. Cognitive disorders also occur in patients treated for cancer. To be effective, oncological treatment needs to be started as early as possible. This, however, does not meet the criteria of sudden threat to life. The present article relates to both the psychosocial and legal aspects of care of people suffering from intense disorders of memory, attention, problem solving, executive functions, and other. Surely, physicians know how to handle patients with the above dysfunctions. However, legal procedures aimed to protect patients’ rights are often unclear and time consuming. In practice, this often amounts to a dilemma whether to treat or follow the applicable law. Certainly, solutions in this regard should be clearer and better adapted to the needs arising from specific treatment needs of particular groups of patients. PMID:24936334

  17. The outcome of surgical fixation of mid shaft clavicle fractures; looking at patient satisfaction and comparing surgical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Alshameeri, Zeiad A.; Katam, Krishnaiah; Alsamaq, Mohammed; Sonsale, Paresh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Clavicle fractures represent 2.5% of fractures in adults and almost 44% of shoulder injuries. The treatment is usually non-surgical with good results; however, significantly displaced fractures can be associated with high non-union rate and therefore many would advocate surgical fixation. This is traditionally carried out by direct approach over the clavicle but an infraclavicular approach has also been used for clavicular fixation. The aim of this study was to identify the main indications for surgical intervention at our unit and patient satisfaction following surgery. We also wanted to compare the direct and the infraclavicular surgical approaches in relation to the outcome of surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study looking at all the clavicle fractures managed surgically over 5 years at our department. Information relating to surgical indication, surgical approach, complications, outcome, patient satisfaction, and oxford shoulder score were collected. Results: A total of 35 patients were identified, the majority were males (n = 25) and most (n = 29) were working at the time of injury. The commonest indication for surgery was displacement with shortening (n = 16). The infraclavicular approach was used in the majority of patients (n = 21), the rest (n = 14) had direct incision. Evidence of radiological and union was achieved in all patients after an average of 13 (8-24) weeks. There were no major complications but minor complications were reported in 28% and 19% of cases with direct and infraclavicular approaches, respectively. Plates were removed from six symptomatic patients; infraclavicular (n = 2) and direct approach (n = 4). Four asymptomatic plates were removed on patients’ requests. All patients returned to work (after an average 2.6 months), had good oxford shoulder score between 12-20, regardless of the surgical approach used. All patients except one would recommend it to a friend. Conclusion: Our study showed excellent surgical outcome for displaced clavicle fractures supported by the high union rate, good oxford shoulder score, high return to work rate, and good patient's satisfaction. The number of minor complications and symptomatic metal work removal was less in the infraclavicular approach. PMID:23204761

  18. Global radiation oncology waybill

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garzón, Victor; Rovirosa, Ángeles; Ramos, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Radiation oncology covers many different fields of knowledge and skills. Indeed, this medical specialty links physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even rehabilitation and aesthetics. The current socio-economic situation and professional competences affect the development and future or this specialty. The aim of this article was to analyze and highlight the underlying pillars and foundations of radiation oncology, indicating the steps implicated in the future developments or competences of each. Methods This study has collected data from the literature and includes highlights from discussions carried out during the XVII Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) held in Vigo in June, 2013. Most of the aspects and domains of radiation oncology were analyzed, achieving recommendations for the many skills and knowledge related to physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even supportive care and management. Results Considering the data from the literature and the discussions of the XVII SEOR Meeting, the “waybill” for the forthcoming years has been described in this article including all the aspects related to the needs of radiation oncology. Conclusions Professional competences affect the development and future of this specialty. All the types of radio-modulation are competences of radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the pillars of Radiation Oncology are based on experience and research in every area of Radiation Oncology. PMID:24416572

  19. Patient Participation in Surgical Treatment Decision Making from the Patients' Perspective: Validation of an Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Heggland, Liv-Helen; Øgaard, Torvald; Mikkelsen, Aslaug; Hausken, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a new, brief, easy-to-administer self-reported instrument designed to assess patient participation in decision making in surgical treatment. We describe item generation, psychometric testing, and validity of the instrument. The final scale consisted of four factors: information dissemination (5 items), formulation of options (4 items), integration of information (4 items), and control (3 items). The analysis demonstrated a reasonable level of construct validity and reliability. The instrument applies to patients in surgical wards and can be used to identify the health services that are being provided and the areas that could strengthen patient participation. PMID:22830010

  20. Oncologic aspects of long-term followed incidental prostate cancer detected by cystoprostatectomy in Korean patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Chang; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Sung Han; Joung, Jae Young; Seo, Ho Kyung; Chung, Jinsoo; Park, Weon Seo; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence and clinical features of incidentally discovered prostate adenocarcinoma in patients undergoing radical cystoprostatectomy (CPT) for bladder cancer. Methods Ninety-six consecutive patients scheduled to undergo CPT were prospectively enrolled. The prostates were excised completely during CPT. The CPT specimens were examined, and the clinicopathologic characteristics of incidental prostate cancer studied. Complete transverse sections of the prostate were taken from the apex to the base at 4-mm intervals and all prostates were examined by a single pathologist. Results The mean patient age and prostate-specific antigen level were 66.1 ± 10.0 years and 2.8 ± 5.0 ng/mL, respectively. Of the 96 patients, 35 (36.5%) had prostate cancer (PCa). Of these incidental PCas, 57.1% (20.8% of all patients undergoing CPT) were clinically significant. None of the patients who were age ≤50 years had incidental PCa. However, the incidences of PCa in the 51–60 years, 61–70 years, and ≥71 years age groups were 27.8% (5/18), 48.7% (19/39), and 35.5% (15/31), respectively, and the difference according to the age subgroup was significant (P = 0.048). During the median follow-up of 49 months, 29.2% (28/96) of patients died. There were no PCa-specific deaths, and two patients (2.1%) showed biochemical recurrences. Conclusion Incidental PCas were diagnosed in ∼40% of CPT specimens, and ∼50% of incidental PCas were clinically significant. During radical CPT in patients aged ≥60 years, the possibility of the presence of PCa and the potential oncologic risk of partial prostatectomy during CPT should be remembered. PMID:26157769

  1. RECQ1 A159C Polymorphism Is Associated With Overall Survival of Patients With Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Replication Study in NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui; Moughan, Jennifer; Crane, Christopher; Hoffman, John P.; Regine, William F.; Abrams, Ross A.; Safran, Howard; Liu, Chang; Chang, Ping; Freedman, Gary M.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Guha, Chandan; Abbruzzese, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To confirm whether a previously observed association between RECQ1 A159C variant and clinical outcome of resectable pancreatic cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation is reproducible in another patient population prospectively treated with postoperative chemoradiation. Methods and Materials Patients were selected, according to tissue availability, from eligible patients with resected pancreatic cancer who were enrolled on the NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704 trial of 5-fluorouacil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation preceded and followed by 5-FU or gemcitabine. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue sections, and genotype was determined using the Taqman method. The correlation between genotype and overall survival was analyzed using a Kaplan-Meier plot, log-rank test, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results In the 154 of the study’s 451 eligible patients with evaluable tissue, genotype distribution followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (ie, 37% had genotype AA, 43% AC, and 20% CC). The RECQ1 variant AC/CC genotype carriers were associated with being node positive compared with the AA carrier (P = .03). The median survival times (95% confidence interval [CI]) for AA, AC, and CC carriers were 20.6 (16.3–26.1), 18.8 (14.2–21.6), and 14.2 (10.3–21.0) months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, patients with the AC/CC genotypes were associated with worse survival than patients with the AA genotype (hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.07–2.23, P =.022). This result seemed slightly stronger for patients on the 5-FU arm (n = 82) (HR 1.64, 95% CI 0.99–2.70, P =.055) than for patients on the gemcitabine arm (n = 72, HR 1.46, 95% CI 0.81–2.63, P =.21). Conclusions Results of this study suggest that the RECQ1 A159C genotype may be a prognostic or predictive factor for resectable pancreatic cancer patients who are treated with adjuvant 5-FU before and after 5-FU-based chemoradiation. Further study is needed in patients treated with gemcitabine to determine whether an association exists. PMID:26725729

  2. Cancer patient expectations of and communication with oncologists and oncology nurses: the experience of an integrated oncology and palliative care service.

    PubMed

    Sapir, R; Catane, R; Kaufman, B; Isacson, R; Segal, A; Wein, S; Cherny, N I

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate ambulatory cancer patients' knowledge of their diagnosis and stage, their expectations of medical and nursing staff, and issues related to communication with the professional staff. A structured interview was conducted with each of 103 consecutive cancer patients attending the Oncology Day Hospital of the Shaare Zedek Medical Center. There were 77 women and 26 men, and their median age was 56 (18-86) years. Their religious status was elicited: 48% described themselves as religious, 25% as traditional, and 27% as secular. According to their physicians, 41 were in remission, 11 had stable disease, 47 had progressive disease and in 4 the disease status was unknown. Patients tended to underestimate the status of their disease: among those with progressive disease, 36% stated that their disease was stable or in remission. Overwhelmingly, patients expected that their oncologists should be patient and skilled in diagnostic procedures (98%), tactful, considerate and therapeutically skilled (90-95%), and skilled in the management of pain and the psychosocial consequences of cancer (75-85%). When there is bad news to be transmitted, 92% of patients indicated that they would want disclosure, while 6% indicated that they would want the news withheld from them but passed on to their family members. Most patients were very satisfied with the clarity of the information they received about their disease (85%) and the sensitivity with which it was transmitted (90%). Although 88% of patients reported that they relied on their oncologist for therapeutic decision making, 45% indicated that they had sought a second opinion and 32% reported seeking the opinion of a rabbinical medical broker. Almost all, 97%, of patients indicated that they felt comfortable seeking advice from their oncologist, and the oncologist was the staff member most often sought out for both information (69%) and support (66%). The data indicate high patient expectations of nursing and medical oncology staff members' skills and behaviors. Despite expressing a high level of satisfaction, a substantial percentage of patients had an inaccurate understanding of their disease status. PMID:11094990

  3. Memantine before Mastectomy Prevents Post-Surgery Pain: A Randomized, Blinded Clinical Trial in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Véronique; Joly, Dominique; Villatte, Christine; Dubray, Claude; Durando, Xavier; Daulhac, Laurence; Coudert, Catherine; Roux, Delphine; Pereira, Bruno; Pickering, Gisèle

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain following surgical treatment for breast cancer with or without chemotherapy is a clinical burden and patients frequently report cognitive, emotional and quality of life impairment. A preclinical study recently showed that memantine administered before surgery may prevent neuropathic pain development and cognitive dysfunction. With a translational approach, a clinical trial has been carried out to evaluate whether memantine administered before and after mastectomy could prevent the development of neuropathic pain, the impairment of cognition and quality of life. Method A randomized, pilot clinical trial included 40 women undergoing mastectomy in the Oncology Department, University Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Memantine (5 to 20 mg/day; n = 20) or placebo (n = 20) was administered for four weeks starting two weeks before surgery. The primary endpoint was pain intensity measured on a (0–10) numerical rating scale at three months post-mastectomy. Results Data analyses were performed using mixed models and the tests were two-sided, with a type I error set at α = 0.05. Compared with placebo, patients receiving memantine showed at three months a significant difference in post-mastectomy pain intensity, less rescue analgesia and a better emotional state. An improvement of pain symptoms induced by cancer chemotherapy was also reported. Conclusions This study shows for the first time the beneficial effect of memantine to prevent post-mastectomy pain development and to diminish chemotherapy-induced pain symptoms. The lesser analgesic consumption and better well-being of patients for at least six months after treatment suggests that memantine could be an interesting therapeutic option to diminish the burden of breast cancer therapy. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01536314 PMID:27050431

  4. Oncologic and Functional Outcomes after Partial Nephrectomy Versus Radical Nephrectomy in T1b Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter, Matched Case-Control Study in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hoon Ah; Kim, Jin Wook; Byun, Seok Soo; Hong, Sung Hoo; Kim, Young Jun; Park, Young Hyun; Yang, Kyung Suk; Cho, Seok; Cheon, Jun; Kang, Seok Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The study was to compare the oncologic and functional outcomes of partial nephrectomy (PN) and radical nephrectomy (RN) for pathologically proven T1b renal cell carcinoma using pair-matched groups. Materials and Methods We reviewed our prospectively maintained database for RN and PN in T1b renal tumors surgically treated between 1999 and 2011 at five institutions in Korea. Of 611 patients treated with PN or RN for a solitary and NX/N0 M0 renal mass (4-7 cm), 577 (PN, 100; RN, 477) patients with pathologically confirmed pT1b remained for analysis. Study subjects were grouped by PN or RN, then matched by age, sex, comorbidities, body mass index, tumor size and depth, histologic type, and preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using propensities score. To evaluate oncologic outcomes, overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were analyzed. The functional outcomes were evaluated by postoperative eGFR. Results The median follow-up in the RN group was 48.1 and 42.6 months in the PN group. The estimated 10-year CSS rate (PN 85.7% vs. RN 84.4%, p=0.52) and 5- and estimated 10-year PFS rates (PN: 86.4% and 79.2% vs. RN: 86.0% and 66.1%, p=0.66) did not differ significantly between groups. The estimated 10-year OS rate was significantly higher in the PN group (85.7%) compared to the RN group (73.3%) (p=0.003). PN was less likely to induce new-onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage CKD compared with RN. Conclusion Our study suggests that patients treated with PN demonstrate a superior OS rate and postoperative renal function with analogous CSS and PFS rates compared with pair-matched patients treated with RN. PMID:26044158

  5. Rapid Reduction of Central Line Infections in Hospitalized Pediatric Oncology Patients Through Simple Quality Improvement Methods

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung W.; Chang, Lawrence; Hanauer, David A.; Shaffer-Hartman, Jackie; Teitelbaum, Daniel; Lewis, Ian; Blackwood, Alex; Akcasu, Nur; Steel, Janell; Christensen, Joy; Niedner, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) patients are at significant risk for developing central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLA-BSIs) due to their prolonged dependence on such catheters. Effective strategies to eliminate these preventable infections are urgently needed. In this study, we investigated the implementation of bundled central line maintenance practices and their effect on hospital-acquired CLA-BSIs. Materials and Methods CLA-BSI rates were analyzed within a single-institution’s PHO unit between January 2005 and June 2011. In May 2008, a multidisciplinary quality improvement team developed techniques to improve the PHO unit’s safety culture and implemented the use of catheter maintenance practices tailored to PHO patients. Data analysis was performed using time-series methods to evaluate the pre- and post-intervention effect of the practice changes. Results The pre-intervention CLA-BSI incidence was 2.92 per 1000-patient days (PD) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most prevalent pathogen (29%). In the post-intervention period, the CLA-BSI rate decreased substantially (45%) to 1.61 per 1000-PD (p<0.004). Early on, blood and marrow transplant (BMT) patients had a three-fold higher CLA-BSI rate compared to non-BMT patients (p<0.033). With additional infection control countermeasures added to the bundled practices, BMT patients experienced a larger CLA-BSI rate reduction such that BMT and non-BMT CLA-BSI rates were not significantly different post-intervention. Conclusions By adopting and effectively implementing uniform maintenance catheter care practices, learning multidisciplinary teamwork, and promoting a culture of patient safety, the CLA-BSI incidence in our study population was significantly reduced and maintained. PMID:22522576

  6. Surgical transposition of the ovaries: Imaging findings in 14 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kier, R.; Chambers, S.K. )

    1989-11-01

    Pelvic radiation therapy for cervical or vaginal cancer often leads to ovarian failure. To remove the ovaries from the radiation portal and preserve their function, they can be transposed to the lateral abdomen. Serial imaging studies in 14 patients who had undergone ovarian transposition (five bilateral, nine unilateral) were reviewed. Images obtained included 32 CT scans, 20 sonograms, and one MR image. Most transposed ovaries were located along the paracolic gutters near the iliac crests, creating an extrinsic mass effect on adjacent bowel. Detection of surgical clips on the ovary on CT scans allowed confident recognition of all 19 transposed ovaries. Cysts in the transposed ovaries, noted on most imaging studies, did not correlate with complications of pain or hormonal dysfunction. In one case, a large physiologic cyst in a transposed ovary distorted the cecum and was mistaken for a mucocele of the appendix. In another case, a large ovarian cyst was thought to be tumor recurrence or a lymphocele. These findings indicate that although the transposed ovaries can be recognized on CT scans by the surgical clips attached to the ovaries, the appearance of the ovary does not predict reliably the development of complications.

  7. 3D surgical planning in patients affected by lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Carrasco, J A; Acha, B; Gómez-Cia, T; Lopez-Garcia, R A; Delgado, Carlos; Serrano, C

    2015-03-01

    Lipodystrophy is a pathological condition characterized by the focal or general absence of adipose tissue. Surgeons reset the patient's surface contours using injectable materials to recreate a normal physical appearance. However, due to difficulties in preoperative planning and intraoperative assessment, about 15% of the surgical procedures involved are reinterventions to improve volume or symmetry. This increases the need for an available, efficient tool capable of providing the surgeon with a good estimation of the volumes to be injected before the intervention proper begins. This work describes a virtual reality-based application for the surgical planning of facial lipodystrophy correction (FLIC). The tool uses points selected interactively by the surgeon to compute a curve that delimits the surface area to be operated on. It then automatically computes an estimated natural reconstructed surface and the quantity of volume that needs to be implanted during the intervention. Experiments have been carried out in which the filling volumes estimated using FLIC and ZBrush software were compared with the real volumes injected by the surgeon. ICCs higher than 0.97 indicate that there were no significant differences between the respective measurements, thus validating the tool proposed in this paper. PMID:25618746

  8. Impact of metabolic syndrome in surgical patients: should we bother?

    PubMed

    Tzimas, P; Petrou, A; Laou, E; Milionis, H; Mikhailidis, D P; Papadopoulos, G

    2015-08-01

    Clinicians inevitably encounter patients who meet the diagnostic criteria for the metabolic syndrome (MetS); these criteria include central obesity, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidaemia, and hyperglycaemia. Regardless of the variations in its definition, MetS may be associated with adverse outcomes in patients undergoing both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. There is a paucity of data concerning the anaesthetic management of patients with MetS, and only a few observational (mainly retrospective) studies have investigated the association of MetS with perioperative outcomes. In this narrative review, we consider the impact of MetS on the occurrence of perioperative adverse events after cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Metabolic syndrome has been associated with higher rates of cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal perioperative events and wound infections compared with patients with a non-MetS profile. Metabolic syndrome has also been related to increased health service costs, prolonged hospital stay, and a greater need for posthospitalization care. Therefore, physicians should be able to recognize the MetS in the perioperative period in order to formulate management strategies that may modify any perianaesthetic and surgical risk. However, further research is needed in this field. PMID:26109210

  9. Prognostic factors of overall survival in renal cancer patients single oncological center study

    PubMed Central

    Sandheim, Marek; Jakubowski, Jacek; Juszczak, Kajetan; Stelmach, Andrzej Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The clinical course of renal cancer remains difficult to predict. Attempts to appoint new independent prognostic factors (IPFs) and comparisons of already identified ones among populations are inevitable to develop more effective prognostic instruments. The aim of this study was to evaluate IPFs of overall survival in a given population of patients with renal cancer. Materials and methods Retrospective analysis of 148 patients with renal cancer treated at the Oncological Institute in Cracow from 2000 to 2007 was performed. Mean followup was 51 months. Using the lograng test, a group of clinicopathological and biochemical features was analyzed in respect to their influence on overall survival. Results were presented as KaplanMeier curves. Final identification of IPFs was made by multivariate Cox regression analysis. Results Overall survival rate at 1, 2, and 5year followup was 58.8%, 38.2%, and 21.4%, respectively. The set of identified IPFs consisted of performance status, smoking history, hemoglobin concentration, anatomical staging, tumor grade, and the presence of microvascular invasion. It was confirmed that only nephrectomy increases significantly overall survival. Conclusions Apart from smoking history, the role of all other IPFs identified in our study is well documented in the literature. Smoking history seems to be a new IPF with strong negative impact on survival in patients with RCC. PMID:24707365

  10. Surgical Management in a Patient With Complex Uveitic Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhu; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Uveitic glaucoma (UG) is secondary glaucoma, present as a clinical challenge in both diagnosis and management. We report a case of complex UG, which initially presented as pupillary block and rupture of the anterior lens capsule. We performed cataract extraction with preservation of posterior capsule. Then, the case turned to aphakic malignant glaucoma. We performed anterior vitrectomy with posterior capsule resection in this case. After the second operation, the patient had a satisfactory recovery. Specifically, ultrasonographic biomicroscopy was useful during the diagnosis process and follow-up period in this case. UG presenting as pupillary block, rupture of the anterior lens capsule, and aqueous misdirection seldom presents in clinical practice. Earlier and more active surgical intervention may be necessary for effective preservation of visual function in complex cases of UG. PMID:26252285

  11. Perioperative Hemoglobin Trajectory in Adult Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Tung, Hon-Ming Andrew; Slater, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Preoperative anemia and nadir hemoglobin (Hb) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have been identified as significant risk factors for blood transfusion during cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to confirm the association between preoperative anemia, perioperative fluid management, and blood transfusion. In addition, the proportion of elective cardiac surgery patients presenting for surgery with anemia was identified to examine whether the opportunity exists for timely diagnosis and intervention. Data from referral until hospital discharge were comprehensively reviewed over a 12-month period for all nonemergency cardiac surgical patients operated on in our institution. Of the 342 patients identified, elective cases were referred a median of 35 days before preoperative clinic and operated on a median of 14 days subsequently. Subacute cases had a median of 3 days from referral to surgery. As per the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for anemia, 24.2% of elective and 29.6% of subacute patients were anemic. Blood transfusion was administered to 46.2% of patients during their admission. Transfusion was more likely in patients who were female (odds ratio [OR]: 2.45, 95%confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–4.70), had a low body mass index (BMI) (OR: .89, 95% CI: .84–.94), preoperative anemia (OR: 5.15, 95% CI: 2.59–10.24), or renal impairment (OR: 5.44, 95% CI: 2.42–12.22). Hemodilution minimization strategies reduced the Hb fall during CPB, but not transfusion rates. This study identifies a high prevalence of preoperative anemia with sufficient time for elective referrals to undergo appropriate diagnosis and interventions. It also confirms that low red cell mass (anemia and low BMI) and renal impairment are predictors of perioperative blood transfusion. Perfusion strategies to reduce hemodilution are effective at minimizing the intraoperative fall in Hb concentration but did not influence transfusion rate. PMID:26543251

  12. Escalation of Oncologic Services at the End of Life Among Patients With Gynecologic Cancer at an Urban, Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Eijean; Rogers, Anna; Ji, Lingyun; Sposto, Richard; Church, Terry; Roman, Lynda; Tripathy, Debu; Lin, Yvonne G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Use of oncology-related services is increasingly scrutinized, yet precisely which services are actually rendered to patients, particularly at the end of life, is unknown. This study characterizes the end-of-life use of medical services by patients with gynecologic cancer at a safety-net hospital. Methods: Oncologic history and metrics of medical use (eg, hospitalizations, chemotherapy infusions, procedures) for patients with gynecologic oncology who died between December 2006 and February 2012 were evaluated. Mixed-effect regression models were used to test time effects and construct usage summaries. Results: Among 116 subjects, cervical cancer accounted for the most deaths (42%). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years; 63% were Hispanic, and 65% had advanced disease. Only 34% died in hospice care. The median times from do not resuscitate/do not intubate documentation and from last therapeutic intervention to death were 9 days and 55 days, respectively. Significant time effects for all services (eg, hospitalizations, diagnostics, procedures, treatments, clinic appointments) were detected during the patient's final year (P < .001), with the most dramatic changes occurring during the last 2 months. Patients with longer duration of continuity of care used significantly fewer resources toward the end of life. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report enumerating medical services obtained by patients with gynecologic cancer in a large, public hospital during the end of life. Marked changes in interventions in the patient's final 2 months highlight the need for cost-effective, evidence-based metrics for delivering cancer care. Our data emphasize continuity of care as a significant determinant of oncologic resource use during this critical period. PMID:25604595

  13. Medical Expertise and Patient Involvement: A Multiperspective Qualitative Observation Study of the Patient’s Role in Oncological Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Peter; Wäscher, Sebastian; Vollmann, Jochen; Schildmann, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Decision making in oncology poses intricate ethical questions because treatment decisions should account not only for evidence-based standards but also for the patient’s individual values and preferences. However, there is a scarcity of empirical knowledge about patient involvement in oncological decision making. Methods. Direct, nonparticipant observation was used as a qualitative research method to gain an understanding of the interplay between medical expertise and patient participation in oncological decision making. Based on a multiperspective approach, observations were performed in three settings (tumor conference, ward round, and outpatient clinic) in the oncology department of a German university hospital. The observation transcripts were analyzed using central features of qualitative data analysis. Results. Major differences were identified regarding the decision-making processes in the three settings related to the patient’s presence or absence. When the patient was absent, his or her wishes were cited only irregularly; however, patients actively advanced their wishes when present. Preselection of treatments by physicians was observed, narrowing the scope of options that were finally discussed with the patient. Dealing with decisions about risky treatments was especially regarded as part of the physician’s professional expertise. Conclusion. The study reveals aspects of decision making for cancer patients that have been underexposed in the empirical and theoretical literature so far. Among these are the relevance of structural aspects for the decisions made and the practice of preselection of treatment options. It should be further discussed how far medical expertise reaches and whether therapeutic decisions can be made without consulting the patient. PMID:24760711

  14. Sexual Function of Endometrial Cancer Patients Enrolled on the Gynecologic Oncology Group LAP2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeanne; Huang, Helen; Chase, Dana M; Walker, Joan L.; Cella, David; Wenzel, Lari

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To present responses to sexual function items contained within the quality of life (QOL) survey of the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) LAP2 study, to investigate associations between sexual function and other factors such as relationship quality and body image), and to explore patterns of response in endometrial cancer patients. Methods Participants enrolled on the LAP2 QOL study arm completed a self-report QOL survey, which contained sexual function items, before surgery, and at 1, 3, 6-weeks and 6-months post surgery. Responses to sexual function questions were classified into three patterns—responder, intermittent responder and non-responder—based on whether the sexual function items were answered when the QOL survey was completed. Results Of 752 patients who completed the QOL survey, 225 completed the sexual function items within the QOL survey, 224 responded intermittently, and 303 did not respond at all. No significant differences of sexual function were found between the patients randomized to laparoscopy compared to laparotomy. Among those who responded completely or intermittently, sexual function scores declined after surgery and recovered to pre-surgery levels at 6 months. Sexual function was positively associated with better quality of relationship (P<0.001), body image (P<0.001), and QOL (P<0.001), and negatively associated with fear of sex (P<0.001). Conclusion Our findings suggest that younger patients, those who were married, and those who had quality relationships were more likely to answer the sexual function items and have better quality of sexual function. Factors such as age, relationship quality, body image, and pain may place women with endometrial cancer at risk for sexual difficulties in the immediate recovery period; however, sexual function improved by 6-months postoperatively in our cohort of early-stage endometrial cancer patients. PMID:23095778

  15. Outbreak of Tsukamurella spp. Bloodstream Infections among Patients of an Oncology Clinic—West Virginia, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    See, Isaac; Nguyen, Duc B.; Chatterjee, Somu; Shwe, Thein; Scott, Melissa; Ibrahim, Sherif; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; McNulty, Steven; Noble-Wang, Judith; Price, Cindy; Schramm, Kim; Bixler, Danae; Guh, Alice Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the source and identify control measures of an outbreak of Tsukamurella species bloodstream infections at an outpatient oncology facility. Design Epidemiologic investigation of the outbreak with a case control study. Methods A case was an infection in which Tsukamurella spp. was isolated from a blood or catheter tip culture during January 2011–June 2012 from a patient of the oncology clinic. Laboratory records of area hospitals and patient charts were reviewed. A case-control study was conducted among clinic patients to identify risk factors for Tsukamurella spp. bloodstream infection. Clinic staff were interviewed and infection control practices were assessed. Results Fifteen cases of Tsukamurella (T. pulmonis or T. tyrosinosolvens) bloodstream infection were identified, all in patients with underlying malignancy and indwelling central lines. Median age of case-patients was 68 years; 47% were male. The only significant risk factor for infection was receipt of saline flush from the clinic during September–October 2011 (P=0.03), when the clinic had been preparing saline flush from a common-source bag of saline. Other infection control deficiencies that were identified at the clinic included suboptimal procedures for central line access and preparation of chemotherapy. Conclusion Although multiple infection control lapses were identified, the outbreak was likely caused by improper preparation of saline flush syringes by the clinic. The outbreak demonstrates that bloodstream infections among oncology patients can result from improper infection control practices and highlights the critical need for increased attention to and oversight of infection control in outpatient oncology settings. PMID:24521597

  16. Chemotherapy-induced adverse drug reactions in oncology patients: A prospective observational survey

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Deepti; Rehan, Harmeet S.; Sharma, Vibha; Mishra, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy, a multimodal approach to oncological treatment, involves highly complex regimens and hence accounts to high susceptibility toward adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The present study aims to determine the prevalence of adverse events in patients treated with chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: Spontaneous ADR report of patients on antineoplastic drugs received in the past 2 years (January 2011-January 2013) were studied. These reports were analyzed for various carcinomas under treatment, medications used, types of ADRs, organ system involvement, severity, causality assessment, and preventability. Results: Over a period of 2 years, a total 591 cases were received with an incidence of 58.6%. The prevalence of ADRs was more in female patients (73.6%) as compared to men. ADRs mostly occurred in the age group of 41-50 years (27.4%). Patients treated for breast carcinoma (39.1%) reported the highest incidence of ADRs. Cisplatin (19.6%) was found to be the most common offending drug. The most common ADR reported was nausea and vomiting (23%). Gastroenterology (40.1%) was the most affected system. About 50.2% of the ADRs required treatment and 12.9% ADRs were considered serious. Causality assessment revealed that 80% of the ADRs were possible. About 86.97% cases were found to be mild, and 51% were not preventable. Conclusion: The success of chemotherapy comes with the word of caution regarding toxicities of antineoplastic drugs. Pharmacovigilance of these drugs needs to be explored, and use of preventative measures needs to be enhanced in order to reduce the incidence and severity of ADRs. PMID:27051157

  17. Reproductive Health in the Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Patient: An Innovative Training Program for Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Hutchins, Nicole M.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, approximately 69,200 AYAs were diagnosed with cancer, second only to heart disease for males in this age group. Despite recent guidelines from professional organizations and clinical research that AYA oncology patients want information about reproductive health topics and physician support for nurses to address these issues with patients, existing research finds few oncology nurses discuss this topic with patients due to barriers such as lack of training. This article describes an innovative eLearning training program, entitled Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare (ENRICH). The threefold purpose of this article is to: (1) highlight major reproductive health concerns relevant to cancer patients, (2) describe the current status of reproductive health and oncology communication and the target audience for the training, and (3) present a systematic approach to curriculum development, including the content analysis and design stages as well as the utilization of feedback from a panel of experts. The resulting 10-week curriculum contains a broad-based approach to reproductive health communication aimed at creating individual- and practice-level change. PMID:23225072

  18. Review of current best practice and priorities for research in radiation oncology for elderly patients with cancer: the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) task force.

    PubMed

    Kunkler, I H; Audisio, R; Belkacemi, Y; Betz, M; Gore, E; Hoffe, S; Kirova, Y; Koper, P; Lagrange, J-L; Markouizou, A; Pfeffer, R; Villa, S

    2014-11-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a key component of the management of older cancer patients. Level I evidence in older patients is limited. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) established a task force to make recommendations for curative RT in older patients and to identify future research priorities. Evidence-based guidelines are provided for breast, lung, endometrial, prostate, rectal, pancreatic, oesophageal, head and neck, central nervous system malignancies and lymphomas. Patient selection should include comorbidity and geriatric evaluation. Advances in radiation planning and delivery improve target coverage, reduce toxicity and widen eligibility for treatment. Shorter courses of hypofractionated whole breast RT are safe and effective. Conformal RT and involved-field techniques without elective nodal irradiation have improved outcomes in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without increasing toxicity. Where comorbidities preclude surgery, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an option for early-stage NSCLC and pancreatic cancer. Modern involved-field RT for lymphoma based on pre-treatment positron emission tomography data has reduced toxicity. Significant comorbidity is a relative contraindication to aggressive treatment in low-risk prostate cancer (PC). For intermediate-risk disease, 4-6 months of hormones are combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). For high-risk PC, combined modality therapy (CMT) is advised. For high-intermediate risk, endometrial cancer vaginal brachytherapy is recommended. Short-course EBRT is an alternative to CMT in older patients with rectal cancer without significant comorbidities. Endorectal RT may be an option for early disease. For primary brain tumours, shorter courses of postoperative RT following maximal debulking provide equivalent survival to longer schedules. MGMT methylation status may help select older patients for temozolomide alone. Stereotactic RT provides an alternative to whole-brain RT in patients with limited brain metastases. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy provides an excellent technique to reduce dose to the carotids in head and neck cancer and improves locoregional control in oesophageal cancer. Best practice and research priorities are summarised. PMID:24625455

  19. An mHealth system for toxicity monitoring of paediatric oncological patients using Near Field Communication technology.

    PubMed

    Duregger, Katharina; Hayn, Dieter; Morak, Jürgen; Ladenstein, Ruth; Schreier, Gunter

    2015-08-01

    Home-based monitoring might be useful to reduce the burden of long-lasting oncological treatment for children. Current telemonitoring applications focus on chronic diseases or elderly people. Based on the workflow for different stakeholders and the identification of parameters important in paediatric oncology, we developed a prototype of a smartphone-based telehealth system using Near Field Communication technology for monitoring paediatric neuroblastoma patients at home. The parameters blood pressure, heart rate, temperature, body weight, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, wellbeing, pain level, nausea level and skin alterations could be monitored using a smartphone, a designated app, point-of-care measurement devices and a smart-poster containing RFID tags. The system has been designed to increase the quality of life for paediatric cancer patients. As a future step, a clinical trial is currently being planned to evaluate the system in clinical setting. PMID:26737866

  20. Improving Care in Pediatric Neuro-oncology Patients: An Overview of the Unique Needs of Children With Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Cheryl; Petriccione, Mary; Donzelli, Maria; Pottenger, Elaine

    2016-03-01

    Brain tumors represent the most common solid tumors in childhood, accounting for almost 25% of all childhood cancer, second only to leukemia. Pediatric central nervous system tumors encompass a wide variety of diagnoses, from benign to malignant. Any brain tumor can be associated with significant morbidity, even when low grade, and mortality from pediatric central nervous system tumors is disproportionately high compared to other childhood malignancies. Management of children with central nervous system tumors requires knowledge of the unique aspects of care associated with this particular patient population, beyond general oncology care. Pediatric brain tumor patients have unique needs during treatment, as cancer survivors, and at end of life. A multidisciplinary team approach, including advanced practice nurses with a specialty in neuro-oncology, allows for better supportive care. Knowledge of the unique aspects of care for children with brain tumors, and the appropriate interventions required, allows for improved quality of life. PMID:26245798

  1. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. II. The case of T2N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Frata, Paolo; Cellai, Enrico; Magrini, Stefano M. . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; Tonoli, Sandro; Buglione, Michela; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second-tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T2 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 256 T2 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Cumulative probability of local control (LC), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups by both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage were evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late-damage incidence and second-tumor cumulative probability (STP) were also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year OS rates were, respectively, 73%, 59%, and 37%. Corresponding values for cumulative LC probability were 73%, 73%, and 70% and for DSS, 89%, 86%, and 85%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Seventy-three percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were larger tumor extent and impaired cord mobility. At multivariate analysis, the same factors retained statistical significance. Twenty-year STP was 23%, with second-tumor deaths less frequent than larynx cancer deaths (20 of 256 vs. 30 of 256). Incidence of late damage was higher in the first decade of accrual (22%) than in the last decade (10%, p = 0.03); the same was true for severe late damage (9% vs. 1.8%). Conclusion: Present-day radical radiotherapy can be considered a standard treatment for T2 glottic cancer. Better results are obtained in patients with less extended disease. Late damage is relatively infrequent, but a careful follow-up is warranted for early detection not only of relapses (because salvage surgery is feasible) but also of second malignant tumors, which constitute a relevant but not the leading cause of death in these patients and are potentially curable.

  2. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. I. The case of T1N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cellai, Enrico; Frata, Paolo; Magrini, Stefano M. . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; De Stefani, Agostina; Buglione, Michela; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T1 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 831 T1 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia-Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Actuarial cumulative local control probability (LC), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates have been calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups with both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage have been evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late damage incidence and second tumor cumulative probability (STP) have been also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-, 5-, and 10-year OS was equal to 86%, 77%, and 57%, respectively. Corresponding values for LC were 86%, 84%, and 83% and for DSS 96%, 95%, and 93%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Eighty-seven percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were: male gender, earlier treatment period, larger tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and the use of Cobalt 60. At multivariate analysis, only gender, tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and beam type retained statistical significance. Higher total doses and larger field sizes are significantly related (logistic regression) with a higher late damage incidence. Scatterplot analysis of various combinations of field dimensions and total dose showed that field dimensions >35 and <49 cm{sup 2}, together with doses of >65 Gy, offer the best local control results together with an acceptably low late damage incidence. Twenty-year STP was equal to 23%, with second tumor deaths being more frequent than larynx cancer deaths (67 of 831 vs. 46/831). Conclusion: The results of this study support the opinion, suggested by some international guidelines, that radiotherapy is standard treatment for T1 glottic cancer. Better results are obtained in patients with less extended disease and with 4-6 MV photon beams. The use of doses in excess of 65 Gy and of field sizes of 36-49 cm{sup 2} is probably the best technical choice available. Late damage is infrequent, but careful follow-up is warranted to detect early not only relapses (because conservative salvage surgery is feasible), but also second malignant tumors, which constitute the main cause of death in these patients and are potentially curable.

  3. Surgical innovation-enhanced quality and the processes that assure patient/provider safety: A surgical conundrum.

    PubMed

    Bruny, Jennifer; Ziegler, Moritz

    2015-12-01

    Innovation is a crucial part of surgical history that has led to enhancements in the quality of surgical care. This comprises both changes which are incremental and those which are frankly disruptive in nature. There are situations where innovation is absolutely required in order to achieve quality improvement or process improvement. Alternatively, there are innovations that do not necessarily arise from some need, but simply are a new idea that might be better. All change must assure a significant commitment to patient safety and beneficence. Innovation would ideally enhance patient care quality and disease outcomes, as well stimulate and facilitate further innovation. The tensions between innovative advancement and patient safety, risk and reward, and demonstrated effectiveness versus speculative added value have created a contemporary "surgical conundrum" that must be resolved by a delicate balance assuring optimal patient/provider outcomes. This article will explore this delicate balance and the rules that govern it. Recommendations are made to facilitate surgical innovation through clinical research. In addition, we propose options that investigators and institutions may use to address competing priorities. PMID:26653169

  4. Surgical complications associated with primary closure in patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    García-Morales, Esther; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Cecilia-Matilla, Almudena; García-Álvarez, Yolanda; Beneit-Montesinos, Juan Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of complications associated with primary closure in surgical procedures performed for diabetic foot osteomyelitis compared to those healed by secondary intention. In addition, further evaluation of the surgical digital debridement for osteomyelitis with primary closure as an alternative to patients with digital amputation was also examined in our study. Methods Comparative study that included 46 patients with diabetic foot ulcerations. Surgical debridement of the infected bone was performed on all patients. Depending on the surgical technique used, primary surgical closure was performed on 34 patients (73.9%, Group 1) while the rest of the 12 patients were allowed to heal by secondary intention (26.1%, Group 2). During surgical intervention, bone samples were collected for both microbiological and histopathological analyses. Post-surgical complications were recorded in both groups during the recovery period. Results The average healing time was 9.9±SD 8.4 weeks in Group 1 and 19.1±SD 16.9 weeks in Group 2 (p=0.008). The percentage of complications was 61.8% in Group 1 and 58.3% in Group 2 (p=0.834). In all patients with digital ulcerations that were necessary for an amputation, a primary surgical closure was performed with successful outcomes. Discussion Primary surgical closure was not associated with a greater number of complications. Patients who received primary surgical closure had faster healing rates and experienced a lower percentage of exudation (p=0.05), edema (p<0.001) and reinfection, factors that determine the delay in wound healing and affect the prognosis of the surgical outcome. Further research with a greater number of patients is required to better define the cases for which primary surgical closure may be indicated at different levels of the diabetic foot. PMID:23050062

  5. Analysis of non-clonal chromosome abnormalities observed in hematologic malignancies among Southwest Oncology Group patients

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, T.S.; Dobin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    From 1987-1994, the Southwest Oncology Group Cytogenetics Committee reviewed 1571 studies in 590 adult patient cases with ALL, AML, CML or CLL. These were analyzed for the presence of clinically important non-clonal abnormalities (NCA). Abnormalities were defined as non-clonal if one metaphase had a structural abnormality or an extra chromosome. Chromosome loss was not analyzed due to the possibility of random loss. In 72 cases (12%) comprising 136 studies, at least one NCA was observed. In 21 of these cases (29%), NCAs consisted of obvious clonal evolution or instability, and thus were not included in the analysis. At least one structural NCA was observed in which the abnormality differed from the mainline in 36 (50%) patients. Seventeen of the 36 cases had a normal mode. Nineteen of the 36 patients had an abnormal or normal/abnormal mode. At least one numerical NCA was found in 15 cases (21%). Fifteen cases (21%) contained at least one marker chromosome. Several cases involved NCA in more than one of the above divisions. NCAs could be classified into several categories: (1){open_quotes}the clone to come{close_quotes}, (2) evolving clones which then disappeared, (3) NCAs with putative clinical importance that never became clonal, (4) NCAs during remission identical to the preceding clonal abnormality, (5) NCAs which indicated clonal evolution or instability. Examples include one metaphase with t(9;22) or del(20q) or inv(16) or +8 which either preceded or followed clonal findings of the same aberration. Such findings should be communicated to the clinician.

  6. Evaluation of Distress and Stress in Cancer Patients in AMIR Oncology Hospital in Shiraz

    PubMed Central

    Mansourabadi, A; Moogooei, M; Nozari, S

    2014-01-01

    Background Routine screening for distress is internationally recommended as a necessary standard for good cancer care given its high prevalence and negative consequences on quality of life. This study attempts to support validation of Distress Thermometer (DT) in Shiraz, Iran and in the second step to investigate privilege/priority of DT over other referent criterion measures. Material and methods In total, 58 outpatients with cancer were recruited from AMIR Oncology hospital in Shiraz, Iran. Each participant completed the DT and a list of 34 possible cancer-related problems (the Problem List), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the 18-item Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18), and a short visual analog scale to determine the understandability of the tools. Results Characteristic analysis revealed that DT cutoff scores ≥4 and ≥5 had optimal sensitivity and specificity relative to both HADS and BSI-18 cutoff scores for general caseness and more severe psychological distress, respectively. Patients with DT scores ≥4 (cases) were more likely to be women suffering from psychological problems in the past experience stressful events in the 3 years ago and encounter more family, emotional, and physical issue related to cancer or cancer treatment (p=0.02). Conclusion Patients indicated that the DT was easier to fill out and to understand than the HADS, but not the BSI-18. The DT was identified as a simple and effective screening instrument for detecting distress in Iranian cancer patients as a first step toward more properly referring those in need to psychosocial intervention. PMID:25598953

  7. Prognostic Inflammation Score in Surgical Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several inflammatory markers have been investigated as prognostic parameters in a variety of cancer population with mostly favorable results. This study aimed to verify the significance of common inflammatory markers as prognostic variables and assess whether a selective combination of them as prognostic inflammation score (PIS) could further improve their prognostic values in surgical patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). A total of 265 patients who had undergone curative resection of CRC were reviewed retrospectively. Preoperative levels of inflammatory markers such as serum C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell count (WBC), and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) were assessed by uni- and multivariate survival analysis with disease-free (DFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). PIS was constructed with a selective combination of inflammatory markers which were independently significant. On univariate analysis, CRP, ESR, and NLR were significantly associated with DFS and DSS. On multivariate analysis, CRP and NLR were independently significant prognostic variables for DSS and DFS respectively (P=0.013, P=0.021). When PIS was constructed with combination of CRP and NLR, it was independently and significantly associated with both DFS and DSS (P=0.006, P=0.010). Furthermore, PIS was superior to CRP for DSS (HR=15.679 vs. HR=5.183), and NLR for DFS in terms of prognosticating power (HR=4.894 vs. HR=2.687). When PIS is constructed with combination of CRP and NLR, it is a potentially significant prognostic variable associated with poor survival regardless pathologic prognostic variables in patients with CRC after curative resection. PMID:26713054

  8. Neurotoxicity in Ovarian Cancer Patients on Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) Protocol 218: Characteristics Associated with Toxicity and the Effect of Substitution with Docetaxel: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Dana M.; Huang, Helen; Foss, Cassandra D.; Wenzel, Lari B.; Monk, Bradley J.; Burger, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe characteristics associated with neurotoxicity (NT) in advanced ovarian cancer patients treated on Gynecologic Oncology Group 218 and examine effect of substituting docetaxel for paclitaxel in these patients. Methods The development of NT was defined as Common Toxicity Criteria grade (G) ≥1. The association between substitution with docetaxel and NT improvement was explored with generalized estimating equations adjusting for treatment cycle and NT grading at previous cycle. Results Of 1,864 evaluable patients, 1,329 (71%) developed G≥1 NT during the study. Nearly half appeared within the first two cycles of chemotherapy, with 31% experiencing G≥2. Older patients or those with worse quality of life (QoL) scores at baseline (p<0.05) were more likely to experience NT. One-hundred-six patients received docetaxel as substitute for paclitaxel. Of them, 47 patients started with docetaxel at cycle one due to reaction to paclitaxel (n=32), fear of NT (n=4), other reasons (n=11), whereas 59 patients switched to docetaxel during cycle 2-6 due to NT (n=32), reaction to paclitaxel (n=19), and other reasons (n=8). Although the protocol instructed otherwise, the majority continued paclitaxel despite G≥2 NT symptoms. There was no evidence that substitution with docetaxel improved NT (Odds Ratio): 1.57; 95% CI 0.98-2.54; p>0.05). Of 59 patients who switched to docetaxel, only seven (12%) discontinued taxane prior to chemotherapy completion. A roughly equal chance of worsening NT was reported on paclitaxel (6%) as on docetaxel (5%). Conclusions Age and worse QoL at baseline are associated with NT. Substitution of docetaxel did not improve NT symptoms. PMID:25529832

  9. [Surgical correction of dislipodemia in patients with obesity].

    PubMed

    Fishman, M B; Mirchuk, K K; Chie, Ma; Muzhikov, S P

    2014-01-01

    The results of surgical treatment of 139 patients with metabolic syndrome, obesity and dislipodemia were analyzed. Modern bariatric operations (4 types) were performed by using laparoscopic method. There were regulated bandages of the stomach (RBS), lengthwise gastric resections (LGR), biliopancreatic and stomach bypass surgeries (BBS, SBS). Results of five-year follow-up indicated that restrictive operations on the stomach (RBS, LGR) aimed to correct overweight and dislipodemia had some limitations to application in a varying degree. The RBS operation should be appropriate to use for women of the young age group, when an initial body-weight index wasn't more than 43 kg/m2. The LGR operation was effective for men of the young age group and women in case of moderately expressed dislipodemia and in case when the initial body-weight index didn't exceed more than 45 kg/m2. Combined bariatric operations (BBS, SBS) were most likely effective on body weight and dislipodemia. PMID:25823310

  10. 77 FR 25179 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Surgical Safety Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Eileen Hogan, Center for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety, AHRQ, 540 Gaither Road... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Surgical Safety Institute AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ),...

  11. Patient perspectives: Kundalini yoga meditation techniques for psycho-oncology and as potential therapies for cancer.

    PubMed

    Shannahoff-Khalsa, David S

    2005-03-01

    The ancient system of Kundalini Yoga (KY) includes a vast array of meditation techniques. Some were discovered to be specific for treating psychiatric disorders and others are supposedly beneficial for treating cancers. To date, 2 clinical trials have been conducted for treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The first was an open uncontrolled trial and the second a single-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing a KY protocol against the Relaxation Response and Mindfulness Meditation (RRMM) techniques combined. Both trials showed efficacy on all psychological scales using the KY protocol; however, the RCT showed no efficacy on any scale with the RRMM control group. The KY protocol employed an OCD-specific meditation technique combined with other techniques that are individually specific for anxiety, low energy, fear, anger, meeting mental challenges, and turning negative thoughts into positive thoughts. In addition to OCD symptoms, other symptoms, including anxiety and depression, were also significantly reduced. Elements of the KY protocol other than the OCD-specific technique also may have applications for psycho-oncology patients and are described here. Two depression-specific KY techniques are described that also help combat mental fatigue and low energy. A 7-part protocol is described that would be used in KY practice to affect the full spectrum of emotions and distress that complicate a cancer diagnosis. In addition, there are KY techniques that practitioners have used in treating cancer. These techniques have not yet been subjected to formal clinical trials but are described here as potential adjunctive therapies. A case history demonstrating rapid onset of acute relief of intense fear in a terminal breast cancer patient using a KY technique specific for fear is presented. A second case history is reported for a surviving male diagnosed in 1988 with terminal prostate cancer who has used KY therapy long term as part of a self-directed integrative care approach. PMID:15695478

  12. Multiscale modeling and surgical planning for single ventricle heart patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison

    2011-11-01

    Single ventricle heart patients are among the most challenging for pediatric cardiologists to treat, and typically undergo a palliative course of three open-heart surgeries starting immediately after birth. We will present recent tools for modeling blood flow in single ventricle heart patients using a multiscale approach that couples a 3D Navier-Stokes domain to a 0D closed loop lumped parameter network comprised of circuit elements. This coupling allows us to capture the effect of changes in local geometry, such as shunt sizes, on global circulatory dynamics, such as cardiac output. A semi-implicit numerical method is formulated to solve the coupled system in which flow and pressure information is passed between the two domains at the inlets and outlets of the model. A finite element method with outflow stabilization is applied in the 3D Navier-Stokes domain, and the LPN system of ordinary differential equations is solved numerically using a Runge-Kutta method. These tools are coupled via automated scripts to a derivative-free optimization method. Optimization is used to systematically explore surgical designs using clinically relevant cost functions for two stages of single ventricle repair. First, we will present results from optimization of the first stage Blalock Taussig Shunt. Second, we will present results from optimization of a new Y-graft design for the third stage of single ventricle repair called the Fontan surgery. The Y-graft is shown, in simulations, to successfully improve hepatic flow distribution, a known clinical problem. Preliminary clinical experience with the Y-graft will be discussed.

  13. Medical Oncology Service

    Cancer.gov

    The Medical Oncology Service of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI), is a part of the National Institutes of Health, the world's largest medical research institution, operated by the U.S. federal government. Patients who

  14. Medical Oncology Service

    Cancer.gov

    Training The Medical Oncology Fellowship Program provides both clinical and research training opportunities for each fellow during this 3-year program. All fellows spend their first year in a clinical setting, caring for patients. In the second and third

  15. Comparative Oncology Program

    Cancer.gov

    SYNOPSIS OF THE NCI COMPARATIVE ONCOLOGY TRIAL CONSORTIUM A central mission of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI) is the development and delivery of novel cancer treatment strategies for cancer patients. A significant hu

  16. Using baldrige performance excellence program approaches in the pursuit of radiation oncology quality care, patient satisfaction, and workforce commitment.

    PubMed

    Sternick, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies. PMID:22655229

  17. Using Baldrige Performance Excellence Program Approaches in the Pursuit of Radiation Oncology Quality Care, Patient Satisfaction, and Workforce Commitment

    PubMed Central

    Sternick, Edward S.

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies. PMID:22655229

  18. The oncology palliative care clinic at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre: an early intervention model for patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Breffni; Swami, Nadia; Pope, Ashley; Rodin, Gary; Dougherty, Elizabeth; Mak, Ernie; Banerjee, Subrata; Bryson, John; Ridley, Julia; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2015-04-01

    Several recently published randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the benefits of early palliative care involvement for patients with advanced cancer. In the oncology outpatient setting, palliative care clinics are an ideal site for the provision of early, collaborative support, which can be maintained throughout the cancer trajectory. Despite this, access to ambulatory palliative care clinics is limited, even at tertiary cancer centres. Existing programs for outpatient palliative care are variable in scope and are not well described in the literature. We describe the development and expansion of an outpatient palliative care clinic at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Canada, demonstrating how the clinic functions at a local and regional level. This clinic served as the intervention for a recent large cluster-randomized trial of early palliative care. The model for this service can be adapted by other palliative care programs that aim to provide early, integrated oncology care. PMID:25281230

  19. Measured dose rate constant from oncology patients administered 18F for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Brian; Holahan, Brian; Aime, Jean; Humm, John; St Germain, Jean; Dauer, Lawrence T.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Patient exposure rate measurements verify published patient dose rate data and characterize dose rates near 2-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) patients. A specific dose rate constant based on patient exposure rate measurements is a convenient quantity that can be applied to the desired distance, injection activity, and time postinjection to obtain an accurate calculation of cumulative external radiation dose. This study reports exposure rates measured at various locations near positron emission tomography (PET) {sup 18}F-FDG patients prior to PET scanning. These measurements are normalized for the amount of administered activity, measurement distance, and time postinjection and are compared with other published data. Methods: Exposure rates were measured using a calibrated ionization chamber at various body locations from 152 adult oncology patients postvoid after a mean uptake time of 76 min following injection with a mean activity of 490 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Data were obtained at nine measurement locations for each patient: three near the head, four near the chest, and two near the feet. Results: On contact with, 30 cm superior to and 30 cm lateral to the head, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.482 (0.511), 0.135 (0.155), and 0.193 (0.223) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. On contact with, 30 cm anterior to, 30 cm lateral to and 1 m anterior to the chest, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.623 (0.709), 0.254 (0.283), 0.190 (0.218), and 0.067 (0.081) {mu}Sv/MBq h respectively. 30 cm inferior and 30 cm lateral to the feet, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.024 (0.022) and 0.039 (0.044) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. Conclusions: The measurements for this study support the use of 0.092 {mu}Sv m{sup 2}/MBq h as a reasonable representation of the dose rate anterior from the chest of patients immediately following injection. This value can then be reliably scaled to the desired time and distance for planning and staff dose evaluation purposes. At distances closer than 1 m, a distance-specific dose rate constant of 0.367 {mu}Sv/MBq h at 30 cm is recommended for accurate calculations. An accurate patient-specific dose rate constant that accounts for patient-specific variables (e.g., distribution and attenuation) will allow an accurate evaluation of the dose rate from a patient injected with an isotope rather than simply utilizing a physical constant.

  20. Oncologic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis.

  1. The Dual Rounding Model: Forging Therapeutic Alliances 
in Oncology and Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Baxley, Carey E

    2016-04-01

    Inpatients with solid tumors at Duke University Hospital in Durham, NC, are cared for in a dynamic integrated care model that incorporates medical oncology and palliative care. This has profound implications for patients, their loved ones, medical and surgical staff, and oncology nurses. As a nurse with less than three years of experience, my participation in a setting that uses the Dual Rounding Model has accelerated my professional and personal development. During a typical shift, I am an oncology nurse, a palliative care nurse, and a hospice nurse.
. PMID:26991719

  2. Comparative Study of Peroneal Tenosynovitis as the Complication of Intraarticular Calcaneal Fracture in Surgically and Non-Surgically Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bahari Kashani, Mahmoud; Kachooei, Amir Reza; Ebrahimi, Hengameh; Peivandi, Mohammad Taghi; Amelfarzad, Sara; Bekhradianpoor, Nastoor; Azami, Mehran; Fatehi, Amirreza; Bahari Kashani, Golsa

    2013-01-01

    Background Calcaneus has the most fracture prevalence among tarsal bones. About 3/4 of calcaneal fractures are intra-articular fractures with displacement. The majority of calcaneal fractures occur in 21 - 35 year old young men, and that are mostly active people, these fractures cause complete disability for 15 months. Moreover, inappropriate treatment leads to lots of social and economical damages. Objectives In this study we compared the incidence and the severity of peroneal tenosynovitis as a complication of non-operative and operative treatment of intra-articular calcaneal fractures. In this study, some other complications of this fracture were also analyzed and the prevalence of the complication was higher in non-operated patients. Patients and Methods A total of 140 patients with intra-articular calcaneal fracture were analyzed prospectively. These patients were divided into 2 groups: operated group and non-operated group. Results In non-operated group (56 patients), 22 patients were complicated by peroneal tenosynovitis. In operated group (84 patients), 8 patients had the same complication. Statistical analysis revealed that the prevalence, and the severity of this complication in the mentioned groups had a meaningful difference. The results in operated group were much better than the non-operated one. Conclusions Although some of the orthopedic surgeons are not interested to manage these fractures surgically and most of them treat these cases conservatively (casting, etc.), in most displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures, surgical treatment is the method of choice. Moreover, in non-surgical treatment the prevalence of these complications among the patients is more and as a result, inevitable social, occupational and familial damages occur. PMID:24693362

  3. Predictive Score Card in Lumbar Disc Herniation: Is It Reflective of Patient Surgical Success after Discectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C.; Montazeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Does the Finneson–Cooper score reflect the true value of predicting surgical success before discectomy? The aim of this study was to identify reliable predictors for surgical success two year after surgery for patients with LDH. Prospective analysis of 154 patients with LDH who underwent single-level lumbar discectomy was performed. Pre- and post-surgical success was assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) over a 2-year period. The Finneson-Cooper score also was used for evaluation of the clinical results. Using the ODI, surgical success was defined as a 30% (or more) improvement on the ODI score from the baseline. The ODI was considered the gold standard in this study. Finally, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power of the Finneson–Cooper score in predicting surgical success were calculated. The mean age of the patients was 49.6 (SD = 9.3) years and 47.4% were male. Significant improvement from the pre- to post-operative ODI scores was observed (P < 0.001). Post-surgical success was 76.0% (n = 117). The patients’ rating on surgical success assessments by the ODI discriminated well between sub-groups of patients who differed with respect to the Finneson–Cooper score. Regarding patients’ surgical success, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the Finneson-Cooper ratings correlated with success rate. The findings indicated that the Finneson–Cooper score was reflective of surgical success before discectomy. PMID:27100287

  4. FDG PET and Split-Bolus Multi-Detector Row CT Fusion Imaging in Oncologic Patients: Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Scialpi, Michele; Palumbo, Isabella; Gravante, Sabrina; Buresta, Tommaso; D'Andrea, Alfredo; Pierotti, Luisa; Palumbo, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Purpose To assess the incremental value of split-bolus multidetector computed tomography (CT) combined with fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) for follow-up of oncologic patients. Materials and Methods The institutional ethics committee approved the use of this protocol. Thirty-eight oncologic patients who underwent FDG PET/unenhanced multidetector CT and split-bolus multidetector CT for restaging were investigated retrospectively. The split-bolus CT protocol included imaging during the hepatic arterial and portal venous phases in one scan. Software was used for fusion of the independently acquired FDG PET and split-bolus CT data, and fused datasets were compared with FDG PET/unenhanced CT data. The standard of reference for diagnosis of lesions in all patients was a combination of histologic results (if available), clinical results (medical history, physical examination, and laboratory test results), and the results of follow-up imaging (conventional CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or ultrasonography) for at least 6 months. Descriptive statistics were used. Results Fifty-nine true-positive lesions were identified with fused FDG PET/split-bolus CT; 41 were concordant and detected with both split-bolus CT and PET/unenhanced CT, 16 with split-bolus CT only, and two with PET/unenhanced CT. Two different false-positive lesions were identified with PET/unenhanced CT and PET/split-bolus CT. Furthermore, in 20 of 38 (53%) patients, FDG PET/split-bolus CT allowed detection of important additional findings (n = 40) not detected at FDG PET/unenhanced CT. Both the tumor-related findings (n = 13, 32.5%) and the non-tumor-related findings (n = 27, 67.5%) were important to the clinical treatment of these patients. Conclusion Fused FDG PET/split-bolus multidetector CT provides additional information compared with FDG PET/unenhanced multidetector CT in oncologic patients. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26361222

  5. Meaningful patient representation informing Canada’s cancer drug funding decisions: views of patient representatives on the Pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, J.S.; Brown, M.B.; McMahon, C.; Nanson, J.; Rozmovits, L.

    2014-01-01

    In this interview with the patient representatives on the Expert Review Committee (perc) of the Pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review (pcodr), those representatives offer their views about how to be a valuable contributing member of Canada’s national cancer drug funding recommendation committee. The article seeks to inform readers, and especially clinicians, about pcodr from the perspective of the patient representatives. PMID:25302034

  6. Surgical Approaches to the Oral Cavity Primary and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Jatin P.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: A variety of surgical approaches used to treat primary oral cavity tumors are described to delineate the technique and rationale behind each treatment choice. Methods and Materials: Size, location, proximity to bone, lymph node status, histology, and prior treatment considerations are employed to determine the most appropriate surgical approach for primary oral cavity tumors. Results: Oncologic outcomes and physical function show the best results from surgical treatment of many primary oral cavity, but necessitates careful selection of surgical approach. Conclusion: Each surgical approach must be selected based upon relevant tumor, patient and physician factors.

  7. [Oncologic pain].

    PubMed

    Alves Costa, Carla; Santos, Cristina; Alves, Paula; Costa, Agostinho

    2007-01-01

    Pain can be defined by several ways, but is usually describes as an unpleasant sensorial or emotional experience related to real or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. The cancer patient may experience pain related to the cancer itself, its treatment or not related at all with the oncologic disease. It has an extreme importance to the patient, as it is interpreted as a worsening of the prognosis or near death. Therefore it is extremely important a correct approach and treatment of cancer pain. Pain can be treated by pharmacologic, non-pharmacologic means and by more invasive procedures. The options for pharmacologic treatment are various, since nonopioid, opioid analgesics and co-analgesics. The authors present a review of the pharmacological treatment of cancer pain and alert to the importance of the recognition of pain as an illness and the possibility to be relieved. PMID:18183334

  8. SU-F-18C-06: Prospective Patient Evaluation of Iterative Reconstruction in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R; Vance, S; Cattaneo, R; Schultz, L; Elshaikh, M; Chetty, I; Glide-Hurst, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work incorporates iterative reconstruction (IR) into a dose reduction study to characterize image quality metrics, delineation, and dosimetric assessment, with the goal of reducing imaging dose in Radiation Oncology. Methods: Three-dimensional noise power spectrum (NPS) analysis characterized noise magnitude/texture (120 kVp, 50–200 mAs, IR levels 1–6 yielding noise reduction of 0.89–0.55 compared to filtered backprojection (FBP)). Task-specific Modulation Transfer Functions (MTFtask) were characterized across varied subject contrasts. A prospective dose reduction study (500 to 150 mAs) was conducted for 12 patients (43 inter-fraction CTs) for high-dose rate brachytherapy. Three physicians performed qualitative image assessment between full-dose FBP (FD-FBP, 500 mAs), low-dose FBP (LD-FBP, 150–250 mAs), and low-dose IRL5-6 (LD-IR) scans for image noise, cuff/bladder interface detectability, spatial resolution, texture, and segmentation confidence. Comparisons between LD-FBP and LD-IR were conducted for the following metrics: delineation (bladder and rectum evaluated via overlap indices (OI) and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC)), noise, boundary changes, dose calculation, and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Results: NPS showed ∼50% reduction in noise magnitude and ∼0.1 1/mm spatial frequency shift with IRL6. The largest MTFtask decrease between FBP and IR was 0.08 A.U. Qualitative patient image evaluation revealed LD-IR was equivalent or slightly worse than FD-FBP, and superior to LD-FBP for all metrics except low contrast interface and texture. The largest CT number discrepancy from FBP occurred at a bone/tissue interface using IRL6 (−1.2 ± 4.9 HU (range: −17.6 – 12.5 HU)). No significant contour differences (OIs and DSCs = 0.85 – 0.95) and dose calculation discrepancy (<0.02%) were observed. DRRs preserved anatomical detail and demonstrated <2% difference in intensity between LD-FBP and LD-IRL6. Conclusion: While phantom analysis showed slight noise texture differences with IR, patient results revealed that image quality, contouring ability, and dosimetric parameters were not adversely affected, thus support integrating IR into treatment planning. Research supported in part by a grant from Philips HealthCare.

  9. Patient-Specific Surgical Outcomes Assessment Using Population-Based Data Analysis for Risk Model Development

    PubMed Central

    AbuSalah, Ahmad M.; Melton, Genevieve B.; Adam, Terrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal surgical planning and decision making surrounding surgical interventions requires patient-specific risk assessment which incorporates patient pre-operative clinical assessment and clinical literature. In this paper, we utilized population-based data analysis to construct surgical outcome predictive models for spinal fusion surgery using hospital, patient and admission characteristics. We analyzed population data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) –a nationally representative database– to identify data elements affecting inpatient mortality, length of stay, and disposition status for patients receiving spinal fusion surgery in the years 2004–2008. In addition to outcomes assessment, we want to make the analytic model results available to clinicians and researchers for pre-operative surgical risk assessment, hospital resource allocation, and hypothesis generation for future research without an individual patient data management burden. Spinal fusion was the selected prototype procedure due to it being a high volume and typically inpatient procedure where patient risk factors will likely affect clinical outcomes. PMID:23304385

  10. EARLY ORAL RE-FEEDING ON ONCOLOGY PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO GASTRECTOMY FOR GASTRIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    LAFFITTE, Andressa Madalozo; POLAKOWSKI, Camila Brandão; KATO, Massakazu

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no advantage in maintaining patients on oral fasting after gastrointestinal elective resection. The early feeding up to 48 h can be beneficial, because it reduces infectious complications and hospital stay. Aim: Evaluate the evolution and tolerance of early oral diet in postoperative period after gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Methods: Anthropometric assessment was performed on the day of surgery, weight, height, body mass index and weight loss were measured. Acceptance of diet was evaluated as food intake (amount accepted) and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, abdominal distension, postoperative complications and hospital stay. Results: The sample consisted of 23 patients, 17 with partial gastrectomy and six with total gastrectomy. In the assessment of nutritional status 9% were malnourished, 54.5% normal weight, 9% overweight and 27.2% obese, but 54% had weight loss. There was good acceptance of the diet in 96,9% of the sample. Nausea and abdominal distension were present in 4,3% and 65.2% constipation. Surgical complications according to the Clavien scalle, 13% had grade V, 4.3% grade IIIA, 8.7% grade I and 73% did not have complications. The length of hospital stay was 5±2.2 days. Conclusion: Early postoperative re-feeding in total and partial gastrectomy was well tolerated by patients. PMID:26537147

  11. [Dental and oral surgical treatment of a B haemophilic patient with high inhibitor level. Case report].

    PubMed

    Vajta, László; Nagy, Ágnes; Kálovics, Judit; Szalma, József

    2015-06-01

    More than 1000 hemophilic male patients are registered in Hungary, from which only a trace number suffers from factor IX inhibitory hemophilia. For correct dental and oral surgical treatment of these patients mandatory cooperation is required among medical specialties, exerting multi-staged haemostatic principles. Authors represent in this case report the dental and oral surgical treatment of a B hemophilic patient with high inhibitor level and describe possible local haemostatic measures. PMID:26434210

  12. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Charles B. Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  13. Anesthesia and perioperative management of colorectal surgical patients – specific issues (part 2)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Santosh; Lutz, Jan M.; Panchagnula, Umakanth; Bansal, Sujesh

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal surgery carries significant morbidity and mortality, which is associated with an enormous use of healthcare resources. Patients with pre-existing morbidities, and those undergoing emergency colorectal surgery due to complications such as perforation, obstruction, or ischemia / infarction are at an increased risk for adverse outcomes. Fluid therapy in emergency colorectal surgical patients can be challenging as hypovolemic and septic shock may coexist. Abdominal sepsis is a serious complication and may be diagnosed during pre-, intra-, or postoperative periods. Early suspicion and recognition of medical and / or surgical complications are essential. The critical care management of complicated colorectal surgical patients require collaborative and multidisciplinary efforts. PMID:22869934

  14. Management of prostate cancer in older patients: updated recommendations of a working group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Droz, Jean-Pierre; Aapro, Matti; Balducci, Lodovico; Boyle, Helen; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Cathcart, Paul; Dickinson, Louise; Efstathiou, Eleni; Emberton, Mark; Fitzpatrick, John M; Heidenreich, Axel; Hughes, Simon; Joniau, Steven; Kattan, Michael; Mottet, Nicolas; Oudard, Stéphane; Payne, Heather; Saad, Fred; Sugihara, Toru

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) developed treatment guidelines for men with prostate cancer who are older than 70 years old. In 2013, a new multidisciplinary SIOG working group was formed to update these recommendations. The consensus of the task force is that older men with prostate cancer should be managed according to their individual health status, not according to age. On the basis of a validated rapid health status screening instrument and simple assessment, the task force recommends that patients are classed into three groups for treatment: healthy or fit patients who should have the same treatment options as younger patients; vulnerable patients with reversible impairment who should receive standard treatment after medical intervention; and frail patients with non-reversible impairment who should receive adapted treatment. PMID:25079103

  15. Surgical technique for treatment of concomitant grade II MCL lesion in patients with ACL rupture.

    PubMed

    Blanke, Fabian; Vonwehren, Lutz; Pagenstert, Geert; Valderrabano, Victor; Majewski, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Combined lesions of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) are frequent in athletes. While surgical treatment of ACL injury is mandatory treatment regime of concomitant grade II MCL lesions remains unclear with tendency to surgical intervention. Standardized surgical technique is lacking. Present study wants to introduce surgical technique for treatment of concomitant grade II MCL lesion and report short term outcome results. 5 Patients with acute ACL rupture and grade II MCL-lesion were included. All patients received surgical treatment of concomitant MCL lesion by distinct surgical technique and ACL reconstruction. We evaluated valgus instability, anterior instability and range of motion (ROM) according to international knee documentation commitee (IKDC) and Lysholm‑Score both preoperative and after 6, 16 weeks and 9 months postoperative. All Patients showed excellent clinical results at final follow-up. Valgus and anterior stability could be restored in all patients. 1 patient (20%) lost 15° in flexion of ROM at final follow up. However in all 5 patients (100%) the findings were graded as normal or nearly nor-mal according to IKDC knee examination form. Lysholm-Score averaged 94,6. Therefore presented surgical technique improved both, valgus and anterior stability, and led to excellent short term results at final follow up. PMID:26435239

  16. 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Pediatric Oncology and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cost, Carrye; Brock, Evangeline; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Siegel, Jane D.; Ardura, Monica I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pediatric oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients are at high risk for influenza infection and its associated complications. Little is known about infection with novel 2009 influenza A (H1N1) in this population. Procedure Prospective laboratory surveillance identified all children with positive influenza test results from 4/27/09-12/5/09. 2009 H1N1 infection was confirmed by PCR subtyping; cases in which subtyping was not performed were considered probable. Medical records of all pediatric oncology and HSCT cases were reviewed. Results Thirty children with cancer or HSCT had laboratory-confirmed influenza A. Patients with ALL (18), CNS tumors (4), CML (1), Ewing sarcoma (1), Hodgkin lymphoma (1), LCH (1), severe aplastic anemia (1), and HSCT (3), had confirmed (5) and probable (25) H1N1 by rapid (22; 73%), DFA (4; 13%), or RVP (4; 13%) assays. Most frequent presenting signs and symptoms were fever (93%; median 38.6C), cough (97%), and rhinorrhea (83%). Ten patients required hospitalization for a median of 5 days, most commonly for fever and neutropenia (8). Imaging demonstrated lower respiratory tract involvement in 3 patients. There were no concomitant bacteremias; one patient had rhinovirus co-infection. Three patients required ICU care; 1 developed ARDS, multi-organ failure, and died after 5 days. Chemotherapy was delayed in 5 patients. Oseltamivir was administered to 28 patients; 1 patient developed an oseltamivir-resistant strain and was treated with zanamivir. Conclusions 2009 influenza A H1N1 infection in children with cancer and HSCT is mild in most patients, but can lead to serious complications. PMID:20973099

  17. Frailty and cognitive impairment: Unique challenges in the older emergency surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Moug, S J; Stechman, M; McCarthy, K; Pearce, L; Myint, P K; Hewitt, J

    2016-03-01

    Introduction Older patients (>65 years of age) admitted as general surgical emergencies increasingly require improved recognition of their specific needs relative to younger patients. Two such needs are frailty and cognitive impairment. These are evolving research areas that the emergency surgeon increasingly requires knowledge of to improve short- and long-term patient outcomes. Methods This paper reviews the evidence for frailty and cognitive impairment in the acute surgical setting by defining frailty and cognitive impairment, introducing methods of diagnosis, discussing the influence on prognosis and proposing strategies to improve older patient outcomes. Results Frailty is present in 25% of the older surgical population. Using frailty-scoring tools, frailty was associated with a significantly longer hospital stay and higher mortality at 30 and 90 days after admission to an acute surgical unit. Cognitive impairment is present in a high number of older acute surgical patients (approximately 70%), whilst acute onset cognitive impairment, termed delirium, is documented in 18%. However, patients with delirium had significantly longer hospital stays and higher in-hospital mortality than those with cognitive impairment. Conclusions Improved knowledge of frailty and delirium by the emergency surgeon allows the specialised needs of older surgical patients to be taken into account. Early recognition, and consideration of minimally invasive surgery or radiological intervention alongside potentially transferable successful elective interventions such as comprehensive geriatric assessment, may help to improve short- and long-term patient outcomes in this vulnerable population. PMID:26890834

  18. Differential effect of zoledronic acid on normal trabecular and cortical bone density in oncologic patients with bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocchi, Carlo C.; Dell'Aia, Paola; Errante, Yuri; Occhicone, Filomena; Longo, Daniela; Virz, Vladimir; Tonini, Giuseppe; Napoli, Nicola; Santini, Daniele; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate bone density changes at the level of normal bone and bone metastases after zoledronic acid (ZA) treatment in oncologic patients. Materials and methods We retrospectively evaluated 72 consecutive adult patients with histologically confirmed solid tumors with at least 1 newly diagnosed bone metastatic lesion. Bone metastases were diagnosed by bone scans and confirmed with computed tomography (CT). Patients received intravenous ZA, 4mg, by 15-min infusion every 28 day through a peripheral or a central venous access and were monitored for at least 3 months and a maximum of 24 months. Bone density was determined at the level of bone metastases and at the level of normal trabecular and cortical bone using a ROI-based approach. Results A significant increase was demonstrated at the level of normal trabecular bone of the calvarium and the femoral neck. No significant increase of density was observed at the level of the normal cortical bone. Bone metastases showed a significant increase in CT density as compared to baseline up to 24 months after zoledronic acid. Conclusion We have found that long term treatment with ZA increases trabecular bone density in oncologic patients whereas normal cortical bone changes are not detectable. PMID:26909251

  19. Effect of oncological treatment on serum adipocytokine levels in patients with stage II–III breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    COSKUN, TEOMAN; KOSOVA, FUNDA; ARI, ZEKI; SAKARYA, ASLAN; KAYA, YAVUZ

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived hormones (adipocytokines), such as adiponectin, leptin, resistin and visfatin, and the pancreatic hormone insulin, have been suggested to play a role in carcinogenesis. we therefore hypothesized that the oncological treatment of breast cancer may alter the serum levels of these adipocytokines and insulin. In this study, we aimed to compare the serum levels of adipocytokines and insulin between the pre- and post-treatment period in patients with breast cancer. In this prospective study, 20 consecutive patients with stage II and III breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery or total mastectomy and/or axillary dissection. The patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, if necessary. Blood samples were obtained during the preoperative period and postoperatively after completion of the adjuvant therapy. There was no statistically significant difference between the pre- and post-treatment levels of visfatin, adiponectin and leptin. However, the serum insulin and resistin levels and insulin resistance were found to be statistically significantly increased following treatment (P<0.05). Post-treatment resistin levels were positively correlated with insulin resistance (r=0.45, P<0.05). Therefore, oncological treatment of stage II and III breast cancer did not affect visfatin, adiponectin and leptin levels, but statistically significantly increased resistin levels and insulin resistance. In addition, the post-treatment resistin levels were positively correlated with insulin resistance, suggesting that resistin may be involved in the development of insulin resistance in breast cancer patients following treatment. PMID:27123303

  20. Therapeutic scrapbooking: a technique to promote positive coping and emotional strength in parents of pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Paula G; Sebaugh, Jill Genone

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic scrapbooking is an intervention being used with parents and caregivers of children with cancer. The purpose of the group is to promote hopefulness, mobilize internal strengths, and thereby enhance the parents' and caregivers' coping abilities to benefit pediatric oncology patients. Facilitators, licensed in medical social work, provide a safe environment for participants to verbalize their stories and share their distress. Scrapbooking is a "normal" activity without the negative stigma that a "support group" may carry, minimizing the reluctance to attend this supportive group. Outcome measurements indicate this therapeutic intervention achieves positive results. PMID:21391072

  1. Red Blood Cell Antibodies in Hematology/Oncology Patients: Interpretation of Immunohematologic Tests and Clinical Significance of Detected Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Tormey, Christopher A

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a cornerstone of the management of patients with hematology/oncology disorders. However, a potentially deleterious consequence of transfusion is the development of alloantibodies against blood group antigens present on RBCs. Such alloantibodies can be an obstacle in providing compatible units for transfusion. Providers in this arena must fully understand the testing performed by blood banks, as well as the consequences of detected antibodies. This article reviews immunohematologic tests, describes how autoimmune hemolytic anemia is classified by autoantibodies; outlines RBC alloimmunization rates, and presents strategies to prevent/mitigate the impact of RBC alloimmunization. PMID:27113001

  2. Patient Care Doesn't Suffer When Surgical Residents Work More: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Care Doesn't Suffer When Surgical Residents Work More: Study Even shifts that exceeded 28 hours ... when the doctors-in-training are allowed to work longer shifts, a new study finds. In fact, ...

  3. Surgical strategy for intracranial dermoid and epidermoid tumors: An experience with 33 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jose Carlos; Aversa, Antônio; Pereira, Celestino; Nogueira, Jânio; Gonçalves, Mariangela; Lopes, Hélio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this paper is to report on our surgical strategy and technique and to identify the best management for intracranial dermoids and epidermoids tumors (IDETs). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 33 consecutive patients (14 males and 19 females; mean age at surgery, 37.9 years) with pathologically confirmed IDETs who underwent surgical resection, with mean follow-up of 7.2 years. Results: Gross total tumor removal was achieved in 24 cases (72.7%) with zero surgical mortality and a recurrence rate of 9%. Conclusions: The surgical strategies used in this group of patients enabled total removal of most tumors without surgical mortality and with low morbidity and recurrence rates, proving to be safe and effective. PMID:25558422

  4. WSES guidelines for management of Clostridium difficile infection in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Malangoni, Mark A; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Griffiths, Ewen A; Di Bella, Stefano; McFarland, Lynne V; Eltringham, Ian; Shelat, Vishal G; Velmahos, George C; Kelly, Ciarán P; Khanna, Sahil; Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Alrahmani, Layan; Ansaloni, Luca; Augustin, Goran; Bala, Miklosh; Barbut, Frédéric; Ben-Ishay, Offir; Bhangu, Aneel; Biffl, Walter L; Brecher, Stephen M; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Caínzos, Miguel A; Canterbury, Laura A; Catena, Fausto; Chan, Shirley; Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R; Clanton, Jesse; Coccolini, Federico; Cocuz, Maria Elena; Coimbra, Raul; Cook, Charles H; Cui, Yunfeng; Czepiel, Jacek; Das, Koray; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Di Saverio, Salomone; Dumitru, Irina Magdalena; Eckert, Catherine; Eckmann, Christian; Eiland, Edward H; Enani, Mushira Abdulaziz; Faro, Mario; Ferrada, Paula; Forrester, Joseph Derek; Fraga, Gustavo P; Frossard, Jean Louis; Galeiras, Rita; Ghnnam, Wagih; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Gorrepati, Venkata; Ahmed, Mohamed Hassan; Herzog, Torsten; Humphrey, Felicia; Kim, Jae Il; Isik, Arda; Ivatury, Rao; Lee, Yeong Yeh; Juang, Paul; Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Kim, Peter K; Kluger, Yoram; Ko, Wen Chien; LaBarbera, Francis D; Lee, Jae Gil; Leppaniemi, Ari; Lohsiriwat, Varut; Marwah, Sanjay; Mazuski, John E; Metan, Gokhan; Moore, Ernest E; Moore, Frederick Alan; Nord, Carl Erik; Ordoñez, Carlos A; Júnior, Gerson Alves Pereira; Petrosillo, Nicola; Portela, Francisco; Puri, Basant K; Ray, Arnab; Raza, Mansoor; Rems, Miran; Sakakushev, Boris E; Sganga, Gabriele; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Stewart, David B; Tattevin, Pierre; Timsit, Jean Francois; To, Kathleen B; Tranà, Cristian; Uhl, Waldemar; Urbánek, Libor; van Goor, Harry; Vassallo, Angela; Zahar, Jean Ralph; Caproli, Emanuele; Viale, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades there have been dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), with increases in incidence and severity of disease in many countries worldwide. The incidence of CDI has also increased in surgical patients. Optimization of management of C difficile, has therefore become increasingly urgent. An international multidisciplinary panel of experts prepared evidenced-based World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines for management of CDI in surgical patients. PMID:26300956

  5. Impact of trauma and surgical treatment on the quality of life of patients with facial fractures.

    PubMed

    Conforte, J J; Alves, C P; Sánchez, M delP R; Ponzoni, D

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the impact of oral and maxillofacial trauma and surgical treatment on the quality of life of patients. The study included 66 patients (age range 18-65 years) with facial fractures; 33 required surgical treatment and 33 required conservative (non-surgical) treatment. Quality of life was evaluated by applying the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14) immediately after diagnosis of the trauma (T1), 30 days after surgery or trauma (T2), and 90 days after surgery or trauma (T3). For the control group (conservative treatment), there was a change in quality of life at T1 and T2. A change in quality of life was found for all of the surgical patients, regardless of the type of fracture and the observation period analyzed. There was no statistical difference when T1, T2, and T3 were compared in cases of zygomatic, Le Fort I, and nasal fractures, however there was an improvement in the quality of life of patients with mandibular fractures (P=0.0102) and multiple facial fractures (P=0.0097) at T3. Facial trauma caused the greatest impact on the quality of life of surgical patients at T1. The surgical treatment significantly improved quality of life for patients with mandibular and multiple facial fractures. PMID:26723500

  6. Reducing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections 
on Inpatient Oncology Units Using Peer Review.

    PubMed

    Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich; Malast, Tracey; Festus, Onyekachi; Riskie, Vickie

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a peer-to-peer program and the outcomes of interventions to reduce the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections in patients in bone marrow transplantation, medical, and surgical oncology units. The article reviews the process and describes tools used to achieve success in a Magnet®-designated academic medical center. PMID:26583628

  7. Assessment of presurgical clefts and predicted surgical outcome in patients treated with and without nasoalveolar molding.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Marcie S; Clouston, Sean; Ahmed, Mohammad M; M Lowe, Kristen; Shetye, Pradip R; Broder, Hillary L; Warren, Stephen M; Grayson, Barry H

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining an esthetic and functional primary surgical repair in patients with complete cleft lip and palate (CLP) can be challenging because of tissue deficiencies and alveolar ridge displacement. This study aimed to describe surgeons' assessments of presurgical deformity and predicted surgical outcomes in patients with complete unilateral and bilateral CLP (UCLP and BCLP, respectively) treated with and without nasoalveolar molding (NAM). Cleft surgeon members of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association completed online surveys to evaluate 20 presurgical photograph sets (frontal and basal views) of patients with UCLP (n = 10) and BCLP (n = 10) for severity of cleft deformity, quality of predicted surgical outcome, and likelihood of early surgical revision. Five patients in each group (UCLP and BCLP) received NAM, and 5 patients did not receive NAM. Surgeons were masked to patient group. Twenty-four percent (176/731) of surgeons with valid e-mail addresses responded to the survey. For patients with UCLP, surgeons reported that, for NAM-prepared patients, 53.3% had minimum severity clefts, 58.9% were anticipated to be among their best surgical outcomes, and 82.9% were unlikely to need revision surgery. For patients with BCLP, these percentages were 29.8%, 38.6%, and 59.9%, respectively. Comparing NAM-prepared with non-NAM-prepared patients showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.001), favoring NAM-prepared patients. This study suggests that cleft surgeons assess NAM-prepared patients as more likely to have less severe clefts, to be among the best of their surgical outcomes, and to be less likely to need revision surgery when compared with patients not prepared with NAM. PMID:25534051

  8. Computed Tomography Imaging in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lisa J

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging has become the mainstay of oncology, providing accurate tumor staging and follow-up imaging to monitor treatment response. Presurgical evaluation of tumors is becoming commonplace and guides surgeons as to the extent and whether complete tumor resection is possible. CT imaging plays a crucial role in radiotherapy treatment planning. CT imaging in oncology has become ubiquitous in veterinary medicine because of increased availability of this imaging modality. This article focuses on CT cancer staging in veterinary oncology, CT imaging for surgical planning, and advances in CT simulation for radiation therapy planning. PMID:26851976

  9. Relationship between outpatients' perceptions of physicians' communication styles and patients' anxiety levels in a Japanese oncology setting.

    PubMed

    Takayama, T; Yamazaki, Y; Katsumata, N

    2001-11-01

    For life-threatening illnesses such as cancer that require a long-term treatment regimen, communication is particularly important between doctors and patients. While it is assumed that the more serious the illness, the greater the need to relieve patients' anxiety, physicians' communication styles can directly influence patients' anxiety levels. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between outpatients' perceptions of physicians' communication styles and the patients' anxiety levels in oncology settings. Patient anxiety level was measured using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory before and after the consultation. The Perceived Physician's Communication Style Scale was developed in this study. Analysis of responses to the scale resulted in four factors--"acceptive", "patient-centered", "attentive", and "facilitative"--of the physician's communication style and explained 63.7% of the variance. The inter-correlation for overall scale items was 0.95. Patient satisfaction with the medical encounter was also measured to validate the physician's communication style scale. Moderate correlation between the physician's communication style and satisfaction was observed and confirms the relationship between a favorable communication style and a patient's satisfaction. After the consultation, the patients' anxiety levels dropped 5.0 +/- 1.5 points (p<0.001), and the physician's communication style was shown in many cases to be linked to patient anxiety levels after the consultation. The effect of the physician's communication style on patients' post-consultation anxiety levels was small among the patients with an advanced disease status. Also, the findings showed that patients' post-consultation anxiety levels remained low even among those patients with unfavorable examination results if the patients evaluated their physician's communication style as high. This study suggested that the physician's communication style is important not only for moderating patients' anxiety, but could also be helpful for moderating physicians' own stress levels when communicating bad news to patients. PMID:11676404

  10. Differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics and quality of life outcomes among oncology patients with different types of pain.

    PubMed

    Posternak, Victoria; Dunn, Laura B; Dhruva, Anand; Paul, Steven M; Luce, Judith; Mastick, Judy; Levine, Jon D; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Hammer, Marylin; Wright, Fay; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study, in oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy (n = 926), were to: describe the occurrence of different types of pain (ie, no pain, only noncancer pain [NCP], only cancer pain [CP], or both CP and NCP) and evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics, and quality of life (QOL) among the 4 groups. Patients completed self-report questionnaires on demographic and symptom characteristics and QOL. Patients who had pain were asked to indicate if it was or was not related to their cancer or its treatment. Medical records were reviewed for information on cancer and its treatments. In this study, 72.5% of the patients reported pain. Of the 671 who reported pain, 21.5% reported only NCP, 37.0% only CP, and 41.5% both CP and NCP. Across the 3 pain groups, worst pain scores were in the moderate to severe range. Compared with the no pain group, patients with both CP and NCP were significantly younger, more likely to be female, have a higher level of comorbidity, and a poorer functional status. In addition, these patients reported: higher levels of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbance; lower levels of energy and attentional function; and poorer QOL. Patients with only NCP were significantly older than the other 3 groups. The most common comorbidities in the NCP group were back pain, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and depression. Unrelieved CP and NCP continue to be significant problems. Oncology outpatients need to be assessed for both CP and NCP conditions. PMID:26683234

  11. Impact of the difference in surgical site on the physique in gastrointestinal tract cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hara, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akira; Kogure, Eisuke; Ishii, Takaya

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to observe physical function, physique (only BMI), and nutrition status (evaluated by serum albumin levels) from before surgery to after discharge among perioperative patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer and to examine the effect of difference in surgical site (i.e., stomach, colon, and rectum) in these patients. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 70 patients who underwent surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer [36 males and 34 females, aged 59.3 ± 11.4 years (mean ± SD)]. The subjects were classified into three levels according to surgical site (stomach, colon, and rectum). We evaluated patients' physical function, physique, and nutrition status in the three points: before surgery, after surgery, and after discharge. The 6-minute walk distance was measured for physical function. Body mass index was measured for physique. The serum albumin level was measured for nutrition status. [Results] Significant declines in 6-minute walk distance, body mass index, and serum albumin were observed after surgery among the study subjects. In addition, a significant decline in body mass index was observed after discharge compared with before surgery. Regarding body mass index, a significant interaction between surgical site and evaluation times was observed for ANOVA. [Conclusion] These results suggest that BMI after discharge is significantly less than that before surgery and that body mass index changes from before surgery to after surgery are efficacy the difference of surgical site in patients who undergo surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer. PMID:26957730

  12. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; van den Ende, Cornelia H. M.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with (a combination of) non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands. Materials and Methods We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments. Results Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included “People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery” (facilitator for education about OA), and “Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving” (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice). For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were “Lack of knowledge about guideline” (barrier for lifestyle advice), “Agreements/ deliberations with primary care” and “Easy communication with a dietician” (facilitators for dietary therapy). Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription. Conclusions Strategies to improve non-surgical treatment use in orthopaedic practice should be targeted at changing the beliefs of orthopedic surgeons, communication with other OA care providers and involving patient’s environment in OA treatment. PMID:26799974

  13. Facial aesthetic surgical goals in patients of different cultures.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Jones, Julian M

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of facial aesthetic surgery is to improve the patient's psychological well-being. To achieve this, the surgeon must understand the patient's body image and their aesthetic and psychological expectations. These factors must be judged in the context of their cultural background. The patient's cultural values must also be understood to optimize the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:25049120

  14. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76). Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers. PMID:25243153

  15. A Comparative Study of Conservative versus Surgical Treatment Protocols for 77 Patients with Idiopathic Granulomatous Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Yabanoğlu, Hakan; Çolakoğlu, Tamer; Belli, Sedat; Aytac, Huseyin Ozgur; Bolat, Filiz Aka; Pourbagher, Ayşin; Tezcaner, Tugan; Yildirim, Sedat; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and demographic data of patients with idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM) and to compare the results of conservative versus surgical treatment protocols. The demographic data, clinical findings, microbiological and pathologic features, scanning and treatment methods, recurrence, and recovery rates of 77 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the type of treatment received. Core biopsies were used to diagnose 37 patients: 26 using incisional biopsies and 14 using excisional biopsies. Of the patient population with IGM, 31 were treated with surgical excision, one with a simple mastectomy, and one with a subcutaneous mastectomy combined with a breast implant, whereas 44 were treated with steroids. The recovery rates of the 44 patients who were treated conservatively were 6 (1-15) months while for the 33 patients who were treated surgically, it was 1 (1-5) month (p = 0.001). Nine patients from the conservative treatment group experienced a recurrence while there were no recurrences in the surgically treated group (p = 0.009). Among all patients, the recurrence rate was 11.7% (9/77) while the average follow-up period was 16.57 ± 18.57 months. As a comparative study between conservative treatment protocols and surgical ones for patients with idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM), this study is the largest to date. A wide surgical excision is the preferred approach for treating patients with IGM because of the low recurrence rate. PMID:25858348

  16. Radiotherapeutic and surgical management for newly diagnosed brain metastasis(es): An American Society for Radiation Oncology evidence-based guideline

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, May N.; Rades, Dirk; Wirth, Andrew; Lo, Simon S.; Danielson, Brita L.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Sperduto, Paul W.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Radawski, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Jian Z.; Gillin, Michael T.; Mohideen, Najeeb; Hahn, Carol A.; Chang, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To systematically review the evidence for the radiotherapeutic and surgical management of patients newly diagnosed with intraparenchymal brain metastases. Methods and Materials Key clinical questions to be addressed in this evidence-based Guideline were identified. Fully published randomized controlled trials dealing with the management of newly diagnosed intraparenchymal brain metastases were searched systematically and reviewed. The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force levels of evidence were used to classify various options of management. Results The choice of management in patients with newly diagnosed single or multiple brain metastases depends on estimated prognosis and the aims of treatment (survival, local treated lesion control, distant brain control, neurocognitive preservation). Single brain metastasis and good prognosis (expected survival 3 months or more): For a single brain metastasis larger than 3 to 4 cm and amenable to safe complete resection, whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and surgery (level 1) should be considered. Another alternative is surgery and radiosurgery/radiation boost to the resection cavity (level 3). For single metastasis less than 3 to 4 cm, radiosurgery alone or WBRT and radiosurgery or WBRT and surgery (all based on level 1 evidence) should be considered. Another alternative is surgery and radiosurgery or radiation boost to the resection cavity (level 3). For single brain metastasis (less than 3 to 4 cm) that is not resectable or incompletely resected, WBRT and radiosurgery, or radiosurgery alone should be considered (level 1). For nonresectable single brain metastasis (larger than 3 to 4 cm), WBRT should be considered (level 3). Multiple brain metastases and good prognosis (expected survival 3 months or more): For selected patients with multiple brain metastases (all less than 3 to 4 cm), radiosurgery alone, WBRT and radiosurgery, or WBRT alone should be considered, based on level 1 evidence. Safe resection of a brain metastasis or metastases causing significant mass effect and postoperative WBRT may also be considered (level 3). Patients with poor prognosis (expected survival less than 3 months): Patients with either single or multiple brain metastases with poor prognosis should be considered for palliative care with or without WBRT (level 3). It should be recognized, however, that there are limitations in the ability of physicians to accurately predict patient survival. Prognostic systems such as recursive partitioning analysis, and diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment may be helpful. Conclusions Radiotherapeutic intervention (WBRT or radiosurgery) is associated with improved brain control. In selected patients with single brain metastasis, radiosurgery or surgery has been found to improve survival and locally treated metastasis control (compared with WBRT alone). PMID:25925626

  17. Surgical management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F; McGraw, Michael H; Israelite, Craig L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a known risk factor for osteonecrosis of the hip. Necrosis within the femoral head may cause severe pain, functional limitations, and compromise quality of life in this patient population. Early stages of avascular necrosis of the hip may be managed surgically with core decompression with or without autologous bone grafting. Total hip arthroplasty is the mainstay of treatment of advanced stages of the disease in patients who have intractable pain and are medically fit to undergo the procedure. The management of hip pathology in sickle cell disease presents numerous medical and surgical challenges, and the careful perioperative management of patients is mandatory. Although there is an increased risk of medical and surgical complications in patients with sickle cell disease, total hip arthroplasty can provide substantial relief of pain and improvement of function in the appropriately selected patient. PMID:26601059

  18. Allergic reaction to a red plastic allergy alert patient identification bracelet: implications for surgical patient safety.

    PubMed

    Colbert, Serryth; Williams, John V; Mackenzie, Neil; Brennan, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of allergy to a hospital thermally-printed red plastic allergy alert bracelet in a 48 year old lady admitted to the day surgery unit. Two hours postoperatively, an intensely itchy area of erythema and oedema was seen extending from her left wrist distally to the fingers. The bracelet was removed and the rash resolved overnight without further complication. A diagnosis of contact dermatitis was made, secondary to exposure to an agent within the bracelet. We discuss the safety implications for surgical patients unable to wear an identification bracelet and the steps that may be taken to minimise the risk of harm from misidentification. We believe this to be the first documented case of an allergy to a patient identification bracelet in the medical literature. PMID:24245062

  19. Impact of the difference in surgical site on the physique in gastrointestinal tract cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akira; Kogure, Eisuke; Ishii, Takaya

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to observe physical function, physique (only BMI), and nutrition status (evaluated by serum albumin levels) from before surgery to after discharge among perioperative patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer and to examine the effect of difference in surgical site (i.e., stomach, colon, and rectum) in these patients. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 70 patients who underwent surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer [36 males and 34 females, aged 59.3 ± 11.4 years (mean ± SD)]. The subjects were classified into three levels according to surgical site (stomach, colon, and rectum). We evaluated patients’ physical function, physique, and nutrition status in the three points: before surgery, after surgery, and after discharge. The 6-minute walk distance was measured for physical function. Body mass index was measured for physique. The serum albumin level was measured for nutrition status. [Results] Significant declines in 6-minute walk distance, body mass index, and serum albumin were observed after surgery among the study subjects. In addition, a significant decline in body mass index was observed after discharge compared with before surgery. Regarding body mass index, a significant interaction between surgical site and evaluation times was observed for ANOVA. [Conclusion] These results suggest that BMI after discharge is significantly less than that before surgery and that body mass index changes from before surgery to after surgery are efficacy the difference of surgical site in patients who undergo surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer. PMID:26957730

  20. Pretreatment factors significantly influence quality of life in cancer patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Movsas, Benjamin . E-mail: bmovsas1@hfhs.org; Scott, Charles; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah

    2006-07-01

    Purpose The purpose of this analysis was to assess the impact of pretreatment factors on quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients. Methods and Materials Pretreatment QOL (via Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy [FACT], version 2) was obtained in 1,428 patients in several prospective Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials including nonmetastatic head-and-neck (n = 1139), esophageal (n = 174), lung (n = 51), rectal (n = 47), and prostate (n = 17) cancer patients. Clinically meaningful differences between groups were defined as a difference of 1 standard error of measurement (SEM). Results The mean FACT score for all patients was 86 (20.7-112) with SEM of 5.3. Statistically significant differences in QOL were observed based on age, race, Karnofsky Performance Status, marital status, education level, income level, and employment status, but not by gender or primary site. Using the SEM, there were clinically meaningful differences between patients {<=}50 years vs. {>=}65 years. Hispanics had worse QOL than whites. FACT increased linearly with higher Karnofsky Performance Status and income levels. Married patients (or live-in relationships) had a better QOL than single, divorced, or widowed patients. College graduates had better QOL than those with less education. Conclusion Most pretreatment factors meaningfully influenced baseline QOL. The potentially devastating impact of a cancer diagnosis, particularly in young and minority patients, must be addressed.

  1. Applicability of the Clavien-Dindo classification to emergency surgical procedures: a retrospective cohort study on 444 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing emergency surgery have a high risk for surgical complications and death. The Clavien-Dindo classification has been developed and validated in elective general surgical patients, but has not been validated in emergency surgical patients. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications in emergency surgical patients and to study preoperative factors for risk stratification that should be included into a database of surgical complications. Methods A cohort of 444 consecutive patients having emergency general surgery during a three-month period was retrospectively analyzed. Surgical complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Preoperative risk factors for complications were studied using logistic regression analysis. Results Preoperatively 37 (8.3%) patients had organ dysfunctions. Emergency surgical patients required a new definition for Grade IV complications (organ dysfunctions). Only new onset organ dysfunctions or complications that significantly contributed to worsening of pre-operative organ dysfunctions were classified as grade IV complications. Postoperative complications developed in 115 (25.9%) patients, and 14 (3.2%) patients developed grade IV complication. Charlson comorbidity index, preoperative organ dysfunction and the type of surgery predicted postoperative complications. Conclusions The Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications can be used in emergency surgical patients but preoperative organ dysfunctions should be taken into account when defining postoperative grade IV complications. For risk stratification patients comorbidities, preoperative organ dysfunctions and the type of surgery should be taken into consideration. PMID:25075222

  2. Unusual case of a surgically treated ACL tear in a 4-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Astur, Diego Costa; Castro, Saulo; Bernardes, Adilio; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury in children is an increasingly common disease. We report a rare case of surgical treatment of a 4-year-old patient who presented with an anterior cruciate ligament tear after a high-energy trauma followed by chronic spontaneous subluxation during knee flexion and extension. An extra-articular ligamental reconstruction technique was performed and the child is clinically well 4?years after surgery. Historically, non-surgical treatment has been the main treatment option, however, the indication for surgical reconstruction is increasing as we better understand the histological characteristics of the immature skeleton. PMID:26346958

  3. DISPARITIES IN PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGY PATIENT EDUCATION AND LINGUISTIC RESOURCES: RESULTS OF A NATIONAL SURVEY OF PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGISTS

    PubMed Central

    Slone, Jeremy S; Self, Elizabeth; Friedman, Debra; Heiman, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Background Extensive patient and family education is required at the time of a new diagnosis of pediatric cancer yet ittle data exist regarding the availability and linguistic competency of new cancer diagnosis education provided by pediatric oncology institutions. Procedure Using the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) membership list, a web-based survey was conducted among a cohort of pediatric oncologists to determine pediatric oncologists’ assessment of institutional resources for new cancer diagnosis education and the availability of linguistically appropriate education. Results Of 1,294 ASPHO members sent email survey invitations, 573 (44.3%) responded with 429 meeting eligibility criteria. Oncologists at academic institutions reported their institutions had more availability of resources for new diagnosis education compared with those from non-academic institutions (Mean 78.6 vs. 74.3; 0 [not at all] – 100 [well equipped]; p=0.05). The mean score increased with volume of new cancer diagnoses/year: small (<75) = 73.4; medium (75 – 149) = 76.7; large (≥ 150) = 84.5 (p <0.001). Oncologists at large volume institutions reported more availability of an established patient education protocol (50.8% vs. 38.1%, p <0.001) and increased use of dedicated non-physician staff (79.9% vs. 66.1%, p=0.02), but less use of websites for patient education (17.2% vs. 33.3%, p=0.001). Availability of linguistically appropriate education improved with increasing institution size: small (76.4), medium (82.3) and large (84.0) patient volume (p <0.011). Conclusion According to pediatric oncologists, a disparity in educational and linguistic resources for new pediatric cancer diagnosis education exists depending on institution type and size. PMID:24167088

  4. Impact of total activity variation in 18F-FDG injected with the overall PET image quality in oncology patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishar, H.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Salasiah, M.; Noramaliza, M. N.; Abdul Jalil, N.

    2013-05-01

    The preliminary study aims to investigate whether variation on dose activity 18F-FDG will influence the overall PET image quality in oncology patients. This is a retrospective analysis of 10 oncology patients who were injected with an average of 337.40 ± 38.43 MBq of 18F-FDG for PET/CT whole body examination. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on total activity of 18F-FDG injected: less than 333 MBq (302.96±12.65 MBq) (group 1) and more than 333 MBq (371.85±14.00 MBq) (group 2). Multiple Image Projection (MIP) PET images were scored visually by two qualified nuclear radiologists using a two-point scoring scale (poor and excellent). The agreement between radiologists was analysed using kappa measure of agreement (K). The prediction on poor-to-excellent PET image by the total activity of 18F-FDG injected was analysed using a Chi-squared test (x2). A p value of < 0.05 was considered significant. Agreement on PET image scoring was substantial, with a kappa value of 0.737. However, the prediction of the PET image quality by the total activity injected has been found to be insignificant (p > 0.05). Therefore, there is no strong evidence suggest that the dose injected will influence the PET image quality. Hence, it is recommended to use low-dosed of 18F-FDG technique as it also potentially yields a comparable PET image and reduces radiation burden to the patients.

  5. Knowledge expectations of surgical orthopaedic patients: a European survey.

    PubMed

    Valkeapää, Kirsi; Klemetti, Seija; Cabrera, Esther; Cano, Sara; Charalambous, Andreas; Copanitsanou, Panagiota; Ingadottir, Brynja; Istomina, Natalja; Johansson Stark, Åsa; Katajisto, Jouko; Lemonidou, Chryssoula; Papastavrou, Evridiki; Sigurdardottir, Arun K; Sourtzi, Panayota; Unosson, Mitra; Zabalegui, Adelaida; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2014-12-01

    Ageing population entails a growing international problem of osteoarthritis. Best practices for education of these patients are lacking. This study focused on empowering education in Northern (Finland, Iceland, Lithuania and Sweden) and Southern Europe (Cyprus, Greece and Spain). The aim was to analyse associations between expected knowledge and background factors. The data were collected from European arthroplasty patients with the Knowledge Expectations of hospital patients- scale, (KE(hp) - scale), including bio-physiological, functional, experiential, ethical, social and financial dimensions. Patients had essential bio-physiological and functional knowledge expectations. Women expected more than men, employed less than retired, unemployed or who worked at home. Generally, patients in Northern countries expected more than in Southern countries. However, highest expectations were found in Sweden and Greece, lowest in Spain and Cyprus. There are differences in knowledge expectations based on patients' backgrounds. Development of common standards in European patient education needs further research. PMID:24118436

  6. [A rare case of surgical management of a patient with thoracic aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Kospanov, N A; Mierbekov, E M; Eshmuratov, T Sh; Kodasbaev, A T; Kirgizbaev, S Zh

    2012-01-01

    Described in the article is a clinical case of successful surgical management of a male patient diagnosed with a syphilitic-origin aneurysm of the thoracic aorta isthmus, complicated by an aortopulmonary fistula. Also presented herein are the clinical pattern, findings of examination, and treatment policy. This is followed by a detailed description of both the course of the surgical intervention and outcomes obtained. PMID:22929686

  7. Evolving trends in surgically managed patients with proximal humerus fracture: are we different after ten years?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Choon Chiet; Hey, Dennis Hwee Weng; Murphy, Diarmuid

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION New knowledge, and improved surgical hardware and fixation techniques have changed surgical management. We review the evolving trends of surgically managed proximal humerus fractures. METHODS Patients who underwent surgery for proximal humerus fractures from 1 January 2001 to 31 December 2010 were identified from the hospital’s electronic diagnosis and operative coding database. Data extracted from the database included patient demographics, comorbidities, clinical and radiological findings, operative techniques, and complications. RESULTS In total, 95 patients with 97 surgically managed proximal humerus fractures were identified. The median age of the patients was 50 (range 12–85) years, and the male to female ratio was 1.2:1.0. Male patients tended to present at a younger age than female patients (peak age 30–39 years vs. 70–79 years, p < 0.001). Two-part surgical neck fracture was the most common type of fracture (n = 33, 34.0%). Plate osteosynthesis was predominantly used for two- and three-part surgical neck fractures involving the greater tuberosity (p = 0.03, p = 0.0002, respectively). Hemiarthroplasty was commonly performed for four-part fractures (p < 0.001). Wound infections, implant failure, avascular necrosis of the humeral head and nonunion were seen in 8 (8.3%) cases. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) had been in use since 2007 (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION Surgically managed proximal humerus fractures predominantly involved young men following high velocity injury and elderly women following osteoporotic fractures. Open plating was most commonly used for two- and three-part fractures, and hemiarthroplasty for four-part fractures. MIPO techniques have been practised in our institution since 2007. PMID:25631967

  8. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  9. [Bladder drainage in patients undergoing the Pereyra surgical procedure].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colorado, S; Villagrán, R; Escobar-Del Barco, L; Villalobos-Acosta, S; Kunhardt-Rasch, J; Delgado-Urdapilleta, J

    1996-07-01

    Postoperative acute urinary retention was evaluated in the patients who underwent Pereyra procedure. Comparison of suprapubic and urethral catheterization. Between January 1994 and July 1995, fifty two patients with urinary stress incontinence underwent Pereyra procedure, 31 female patient with suprapubic drainage (cistofix Ch 15) and 17 urethral catherization with a latex foley catheter. Sponatneous micturition and urinary retention was evaluated until the catheter was removed. Mean age was 43.8 years (32 a 66), the duration of suprapubic vesical drainage with suprapubic catheter were 3 days in 58.6% of the patients, and more than 3 days in 41.29%. Recatheterizacion in the patients with urethral drainage was more frequent. Urinary retention after 7 days was present in 23.99% with suprapubic vesical drainage and 28.5% with urethral catheter. Recatheterization is more frequent in patients with urethral catheter. PMID:8756195

  10. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered, embodies the highest quality in research and education, yet transforms into a sustainable and agile sub-specialty to pro-actively and effectively manage the immense and relentless financial pressures and regulatory expectations that will be faced over the next decade. PMID:27148476

  11. Nutritional support of surgical patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Wagner, I Janelle; Rombeau, John L

    2011-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in need of surgery are often malnourished, which in turn increases the risk for postoperative complications. Malnutrition in IBD patients who must undergo surgery is due to the disordered activity of the diseased intestine, decreased dietary intake, and adverse effects of potent medications. IBD operations predispose patients to both macronutrient and micronutrient deficiencies. If the gut can be used safely it is the preferential route for feeding, though preoperative and postoperative parenteral nutrition remains a viable alternative for severely malnourished patients. New nutrient therapies include immunonutrition, fish oils, and probiotics. PMID:21787968

  12. Patient views on financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Mark W.; Gross, Allan E.; McKneally, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, revelations of inappropriate financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers have challenged the presumption that surgeons can collaborate with surgical device manufacturers without damaging public trust in the surgical profession. We explored postoperative Canadian patients’ knowledge and opinions about financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers. Methods This complex issue was explored using qualitative methods. We conducted semistructured face-to-face interviews with postoperative patients in follow-up arthroplasty clinics at an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed. Patient-derived concepts and themes were uncovered. Results We interviewed 33 patients. Five major themes emerged: 1) many patients are unaware of the existence of financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers; 2) patients approve of financial relationships that support innovation and research but are opposed to relationships that involve financial incentives that benefit only the surgeon and the manufacturer; 3) patients do not support disclosure of financial relationships during the consent process as it may shift focus away from the more important risks; 4) patients support oversight at the professional level but reject the idea of government involvement in oversight; and 5) patients entrust their surgeons to make appropriate patient-centred choices. Conclusion This qualitative study deepens our understanding of financial relationships between surgeons and industry. Patients support relationships with industry that provide potential benefit to current or future patients. They trust our ability to self-regulate. Disclosure combined with appropriate oversight will strengthen public trust in professional collaboration with industry. PMID:26384147

  13. Rapid prototyping for patient-specific surgical orthopaedics guides: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Diana; Laptoiu, Dan

    2016-06-01

    There has been a lot of hype surrounding the advantages to be gained from rapid prototyping processes in a number of fields, including medicine. Our literature review aims objectively to assess how effective patient-specific surgical guides manufactured using rapid prototyping are in a number of orthopaedic surgical applications. To this end, we carried out a systematic review to identify and analyse clinical and experimental literature studies in which rapid prototyping patient-specific surgical guides are used, focusing especially on those that entail quantifiable outcomes and, at the same time, providing details on the guides' design and type of manufacturing process. Here, it should be mentioned that in this field there are not yet medium- or long-term data, and no information on revisions. In the reviewed studies, the reported positive opinions on the use of rapid prototyping patient-specific surgical guides relate to the following main advantages: reduction in operating times, low costs and improvements in the accuracy of surgical interventions thanks to guides' personalisation. However, disadvantages and sources of errors which can cause patient-specific surgical guide failures are as well discussed by authors. Stereolithography is the main rapid prototyping process employed in these applications although fused deposition modelling or selective laser sintering processes can also satisfy the requirements of these applications in terms of material properties, manufacturing accuracy and construction time. Another of our findings was that individualised drill guides for spinal surgery are currently the favourite candidates for manufacture using rapid prototyping. Other emerging applications relate to complex orthopaedic surgery of the extremities: the forearm and foot. Several procedures such as osteotomies for radius malunions or tarsal coalition could become standard, thanks to the significant assistance provided by rapid prototyping patient-specific surgical guides in planning and performing such operations. PMID:27095508

  14. Surgical mortality in patients more than 80 years of age.

    PubMed

    Khan-Kheil, A M; Khan, H N

    2016-03-01

    Introduction Patients aged >80 years account for a considerable proportion of the population admitted to hospital under general surgeons. We aimed to establish the prevalence of mortality in patients aged >80 years who underwent emergency general, vascular and urological surgery within a 13-month period at a large teaching hospital in the UK. Materials and methods A retrospective analysis was carried out of all patients aged ?80 years admitted on acute on-call emergency under general, vascular or urological surgeons. Patient demographics (including comorbidities and sex) were recorded. American Society of Anesthesiologists scores were reviewed from anaesthetic records. The outcome measure was 30-day mortality for those who had undergone emergency general, vascular or urological surgery. Results A total of 4,069 patients were admitted under general, vascular and urological surgeons during the study period. Of these patients, 521 were aged >80 years. Sixty-three patients underwent emergency surgery and 12 died <30 days after surgery (mortality = 19%). The most common procedure was laparotomy (20 cases). The most common co-morbidity was cardiac disease, which included hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, and hypercholesterolemia. A considerable proportion of patients also had malignant disease and arthritis. Conclusions The present study suggests that emergency surgery should not be denied to subjects aged >80 years based on age alone. Mortality varies according to the type of emergency procedure. Mortality was highest after laparotomy and vascular surgery whereas, for more routine procedures such as hernia repair and abscess drainage, survival was almost 100% after 30 days. PMID:26672811

  15. How nonverbal communication shapes the doctor-patient relationship: from paternalism to the ethics of care in oncology.

    PubMed

    Bommier, C; Mamzer, M F; Desmarchelier, D; Hervé, C

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this research, led in the wake of years of pressure to reject paternalism, was to study whether controlled practice of nonverbal communication by doctors inheres a continued risk of paternalistic attitudes in oncology clinic interviews (chosen to illustrate the doctor-patient relationship). This study involved qualitative descriptive research based on interview observations and questionnaires and mobilized recognized theory borrowed from sociology and anthropology. We found that the legislative framework governing the doctor-patient relationship has simply shifted the paternalism issue from verbal communication over to a new area that doctors have not yet mastered and patients have not yet understood, i.e., nonverbal communication. This study shows that all the laws framing the doctor-patient relationship can be circumvented, and that by controlling nonverbal communication, the doctor can fall back into paternalism. The rejection of paternalism therefore needs to lead to an appropriate reading of the patient's story, which in ethical terms can only happen if hospital structures are made non-paternalizing by design, if doctors learn to understand the patient's different chronemic timeframe, and if doctors committedly engage in the Hippocratic Oath codified through the ethics of care. PMID:24558741

  16. Surgical management of patients with severe head injuries.

    PubMed

    Pieper, D R; Valadka, A B; Marsh, C

    1996-05-01

    Minutes can make the difference between life and death when patients with severe head injuries require surgery. Subdural, epidural, and intracerebral hematomas and cerebral contusions and gunshot wounds are the pathologic entities encountered most frequently during emergency surgery in patients with severe head injuries. Neurosurgical team members frequently use hyperventilation, mannitol and barbiturates, and sophisticated monitoring modalities to manage patients with severe head injuries during and after surgery. Although monitoring a patient's intracranial pressure (ICP) through a ventriculostomy catheter remains the most widely used gauge of cerebral metabolism, neurosurgical teams also are using fiber-optic ICP monitoring catheters, cerebral blood flow measurement probes, microdialysis catheters, jugular venous oxygen saturation catheters, and brain oxygen content measurement electrodes. Coordinated teamwork by perioperative nurses, neurosurgeons, anesthesia care providers, and emergency department staff members helps ensure the best possible outcomes for patients who require surgery for management of severe head injuries. PMID:8712808

  17. Surgical Outcomes in Patients with High Spinal Instability Neoplasm Score Secondary to Spinal Giant Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Benjamin D.; Sankey, Eric W.; Goodwin, C. Rory; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Lo, Sheng-Fu L.; Bydon, Ali; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Witham, Timothy F.; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Objective To describe the surgical outcomes in patients with high preoperative Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) secondary to spinal giant cell tumors (GCT) and evaluate the impact of en bloc versus intralesional resection and preoperative embolization on postoperative outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 14 patients with GCTs of the spine who underwent surgical treatment prior to the use of denosumab. A univariate analysis was performed comparing the patient demographics, perioperative characteristics, and surgical outcomes between patients who underwent en bloc marginal (n = 6) compared with those who had intralesional (n = 8) resection. Results Six patients underwent en bloc resections and eight underwent intralesional resection. Preoperative embolization was performed in eight patients. All patients were alive at last follow-up, with a mean follow-up length of 43 months. Patients who underwent en bloc resection had longer average operative times (p = 0.0251), higher rates of early (p = 0.0182) and late (p = 0.0389) complications, and a higher rate of surgical revision (p = 0.0120). There was a 25% (2/8 patients) local recurrence rate for intralesional resection and a 0% (0/6 patients) local recurrence rate for en bloc resection (p = 0.0929). Conclusions Surgical excision of spinal GCTs causing significant instability, assessed by SINS, is associated with high intraoperative blood loss despite embolization and independent of resection method. En bloc resection requires a longer operative duration and is associated with a higher risk of complications when compared with intralesional resection. However, the increased morbidity associated with en bloc resection may be justified as it may minimize the risk of local recurrence. PMID:26835198

  18. Identifying Health Literacy and Health System Navigation Needs Among Rural Cancer Patients: Findings from the Rural Oncology Literacy Enhancement Study (ROLES)

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Donate, Ana P.; Halverson, Julie; Simon, Norma-Jean; Strickland, Jeanne Schaaf; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Smith, Paul D.; Linskens, Rebecca; Wang, Xinyi

    2013-01-01

    Rural residence is associated with disparities in cancer-related outcomes. Guided by the Chronic Care Model (CCM), the Rural Oncology Literacy Enhancement Study (ROLES) assessed health literacy and patient navigation needs among rural cancer patients. A mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) approach was used, including: in-depth interviews, health literacy assessments, and phone surveys with cancer patients (N=53) from 5 oncology clinics in rural Wisconsin; focus groups and selfadministered surveys with staff (N=41) in these clinics. Within four dimensions of the CCM (community resources, self-management support, delivery system design, and decision support), this study uncovered multiple unmet navigation needs, health literacy limitations, and barriers to quality cancer care. System-level implementation of patient navigation and health literacy best practices could contribute to improved cancer care and patient outcomes among rural populations. Further research identifying effective interventions that reduce cancer disparities among rural cancer patients is necessary. PMID:23813542

  19. External Dacryocystorhinostomy: Characteristics and Surgical Outcomes in Patients with and without Previous Dacryocystitis

    PubMed Central

    Rabina, Gilad; Golan, Shani; Neudorfer, Meira; Leibovitch, Igal

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare pre- and postoperative characteristics and surgical success rates of patients with and without previous episodes of dacryocystitis, who underwent external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) for nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO). Methods. The medical files of all patients who underwent external DCR between 2006 and 2011 in our institution were reviewed. The retrieved data of patients with and without previous episodes of dacryocystitis were compared. Surgical success was determined by postoperative followup of at least 6 months. Results. A total of 185 patients with NLDO underwent external DCR of whom 152 (100 females and 52 males, mean age 67 ± 15 years) met the inclusion criteria. Sixty had previous episodes of dacryocystitis and 92 did not. Left-side obstruction was more common than right-side obstruction among patients with previous episodes of dacryocystitis (48.3% versus 31.7%, resp., P = 0.031). Glaucoma patients were significantly more likely to develop dacryocystitis than patients without glaucoma (P = 0.002). The success rate of external DCR was 94.4% for patients with previous episodes of dacryocystitis and 86.7% for patients without (P = 0.337). Conclusions. The surgical outcomes of external DCR in patients with or without a previous episode of dacryocystitis were similar. Patients with glaucoma and NLDO had a significantly higher risk of developing dacryocystitis. PMID:24455195

  20. Facial Nerve Paralysis in Patients With Chronic Ear Infections: Surgical Outcomes and Radiologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Woong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical features, radiologic findings, and treatment outcomes in patients of facial nerve paralysis with chronic ear infections. And we also aimed to evaluate for radiologic sensitivities on facial canal, labyrinth and cranial fossa dehiscences in middle ear cholesteatomas. Methods A total of 13 patients were enrolled in this study. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for clinical features, radiologic findings, surgical findings, and recovery course. In addition, retrospective review of temporal bone computed tomography (CT) and operative records in 254 middle ear cholesteatoma patients were also performed. Results Of the 13 patients, eight had cholesteatomas in the middle ear, while two patients exhibited external auditory canal cholesteatomas. Chronic suppurative otitis media, petrous apex cholesteatoma and tuberculous otitis media were also observed in some patients. The prevalence of facial paralysis in middle ear cholesteatoma patients was 3.5%. The most common involved site of the facial nerve was the tympanic segment. Labyrinthine fistulas and destruction of cranial bases were more frequently observed in facial paralysis patients than nonfacial paralysis patients. The radiologic sensitivity for facial canal dehiscence was 91%. The surgical outcomes for facial paralysis were relatively satisfactory in all patients except in two patients who had petrous apex cholesteatoma and requiring conservative management. Conclusion Facial paralyses associated with chronic ear infections were observed in more advanced lesions and the surgical outcomes for facial paralysis were relatively satisfactory. Facial canal dehiscences can be anticipated preoperatively with high resolution CTs. PMID:26330915

  1. Transfusion and management of surgical patients with hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Wade G; Uffort, Ekong; Denning, David

    2015-04-01

    Clinical trials have provided guidance in developing triggers for transfusing in the hemodynamically stable patient. These studies have identified that improved outcomes can be obtained in the massively transfused patient when platelets and fresh frozen plasma are transfused with packed red blood cells. Studies that characterize the complications of transfusions, such as transfusion-related acute lung injury and poor cancer-related outcomes, are discussed. Emerging data that characterize the risk factors associated with transfusion-related acute lung injury and suggest metastasis and local recurrence occur at a higher rate in the transfused patient are discussed. Hematologic disorders commonly encountered by surgeons are discussed. PMID:25814112

  2. Clinical-surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder in a psoriatic arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Condylotomy is a surgical procedure that has been used as an option to treat temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. This technique has the advantage of avoiding intra-capsular alterations that might be found involving other surgical procedures. Its use, even when unilateral, has positive effect on treatment of both joints. Methods In order to better evaluate the benefits of a clinical-surgical treatment for TMD, the present report describes the case of a psoriatic arthritis patient. The case was clinically characterized by dental malloclusion, and imaging exams showed joint degeneration of the right mandibular condyle. The patient was treated by condylotomy technique after a prosthetic oral rehabilitation. Results No clinical-radiological signs or symptoms of progression of articular disease were observed within a period of 16 months after surgery. Furthermore, there was functional stability of the temporomandibular joint, total absence of local pain and improvement of mouth opening. Conclusion The present study suggests that condylotomy can be considered as a valid option for the management of TMD, since it has low surgical morbidity and favorable clinical outcomes. In this case, the patient had a medical diagnosis of systemic disease presenting general pain and pain at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in addition of causal agent of TMD (dental malloclusion). The difficulty of finding a single etiology (malocclusion vs. systemic disease) did not exclude the indication of a clinical-surgical treatment to re-establish the balance of TMJ. PMID:23556553

  3. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between frailty and outcome in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Oakland, K; Nadler, R; Cresswell, L; Jackson, D; Coughlin, P A

    2016-02-01

    Introduction Frailty is becoming increasingly prevalent in the elderly population although a lack of consensus regarding a clinical definition hampers comparison of clinical studies. More elderly patients are being assessed for surgical intervention but the effect of frailty on surgical related outcomes is still not clear. Methods A systematic literature search for studies prospectively reporting frailty and postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing surgical intervention was performed with data collated from a total of 12 studies. Random effects meta-analysis modelling was undertaken to estimate the association between frailty and mortality rates (in-hospital and one-year), length of hospital stay and the need for step-down care for further rehabilitation/nursing home placement. Results Frailty was associated with a higher in-hospital mortality rate (pooled odds ratio [OR]: 2.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.62-4.73), a higher one-year mortality rate (pooled OR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.49-2.66), a longer hospital stay (pooled mean difference: 1.05 days, 95% CI: 0.02-2.07 days) and a higher discharge rate to further rehabilitation/step-down care (pooled OR: 5.71, 95% CI: 3.41-9.55). Conclusions The presence of frailty in patients undergoing surgical intervention is associated with poorer outcomes with regard to mortality and return to independence. Further in-depth studies are required to identify factors that can be optimised to reduce the burden of frailty in surgical patients. PMID:26741674

  4. Muscle chemistry of critically ill surgical patients and the effects of a course of intravenous nutrition.

    PubMed

    King, R F; Collins, J P; Morgan, D B; Hill, G L

    1978-07-01

    The water, electrolyte and nitrogen contents of muscle were measured in 15 critically ill surgical patients before and after a course (approximately 2 weeks) of intravenous nutrition and in 8 normal individuals. The muscle from the surgical patients contained a significantly increased ratio of water to fat-free dry weight (P less than 0.01) due to an increase in the proportion of extracellular to intracellular water, and this was not corrected by intravenous nutrition. These changes could be due to an accumulation of extracellular fluid alone or to a loss of cell cytoplasm or a loss of whole muscle fibres. Intracellular chemistry was normal in the ill surgical patients and was not changed by intravenous nutrition. PMID:96905

  5. [Patient's point of view on surgical innovations: for less traumatic surgery and enhanced recovery].

    PubMed

    Bucher, P; Pugin, F; Ostermann, S; Morel, P

    2010-06-23

    Surgical innovations (associating LESS, NOTES, robotics, images software and Fast-track surgery) will allow a less and less invasive surgery. While these advances could be view as surgical or industrial marketing, or compared to the laparoscopic revolution, they simply answer patients' demand in a society changing its standard regarding: medical care, body image, recovery and rehabilitation. We will in this paper, according to results of a Google Survey analyzing population expectations of surgery, evaluate the interest of these surgical innovations. While, these innovations at least in part answers patients expectation, their therapeutic validity will have to be proved. It is our job, to foresee the future of surgery in accordance with health care system needs and patients expectation for adequate implementation of these innovations. PMID:20672685

  6. Review of Time to Surgical Decompression in Traumatic Spinal Cord Injured Patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, E; O'Reilly, A; Synnott, K; Morris, S; Timlin, M

    2015-10-01

    Interventions which may improve neurological outcomes, including time to surgical decompression, in traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) evoke much interest. The majority of TSCI patients in Ireland are managed acutely at the National Spinal Injuries Unit (NSIU). A retrospective review of healthcare records of TSCI patients, who had surgical management there, in 2010, 2011, 2012, was performed. From the information gathered, the duration of each stage of the patient pathway was calculated. Median duration between onset of injury and time of arrival at local hospital was 1 hour 25 minutes, between arrival at local hospital and referral to NSIU was 4 hours 17 minutes, between referral to and arrival at NSIU was 6 hours 25 minutes, between onset of injury and arrival at NSIU was 13 hours 7 minutes, between onset of injury and surgical decompression was 27 hours. A number of factors have been identified which could influence these time durations. PMID:26625648

  7. [Comparative results of surgical treatment of patients with morbid obesity].

    PubMed

    Iudin, V A; Sazhin, V P; Mel'nikov, A A; Osipov, V V; Usachev, I A; Ivanov, V V; Mel'nikova, I A

    2014-01-01

    It was performed a comparative analysis of treatment of 62 patients who were operated for morbid obesity. Patients were divided into 3 groups depending on kind of surgery: jejunal-iliac intestinal bypass, restrictive operations and combined operations. The complications in early postoperative period were diagnosed in 16.6% of patients after jejunal-iliac intestinal bypass and in 10% of patients after combined operations. Regardless of the kind of surgery there was rapid reduction of the body mass in the first year of observation with gradual increase of weight by an average of 5% in the subsequent period. The highest rate of weight loss by the second year was revealed after combined operations (up to 73.4%). Thus it was 1.1 times more than after jejunal-iliac intestinal bypass and 1.3 times more than after restrictive operations. PMID:25589182

  8. Psychological modulation in patients surgically intervened for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lara, F J Pérez; Carranque, G; Oehling, H; Hernández, J M; Oliva, H

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been related with certain psychological dimensions. The influence of mood, emotional intelligence, and perceived quality of life on clinical symptoms and outcome of antireflux surgery was evaluated in GERD patients with and without hiatal hernia. The study included 61 patients who were diagnosed with GERD between 2003 and 2008: 16 of them without hiatal hernia (group A) and 45 of them with hiatal hernia (group B). All of these patients had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Patients were clinically examined and evaluated with the following instruments: Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, and Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)-24. Proportions were compared by using the chi-squared test; averages were compared by using the Student's t-test (with Bonferroni's correction). In general, our patients intervened for GERD showed results lower than normal or close to the lower limit of normal in the administered tests. Patients in the group without hernia were younger (P < 0.001) and with lower American Society of Anaesthesiologists risk. They showed higher scores in the SF-36 dimensions: Physical Functioning, Physical Role and Emotional Role, and lower scores in the Social Role (P < 0.001). They showed lower scores in the Emotional dimension of Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (P = 0.0068) and worse results in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression subscales of Anxiety (P < 0.001) and Depression (not significant). Men in the group without hernia showed higher scores than men in the group with hernia in the TMMS subscales corresponding to Emotional Clarity and Emotional Repair (P < 0.001). Women in the group with hernia showed higher scores than women in the group without hernia regarding Emotional Clarity (P = 0.0012). GERD patients showed poor results in all the tests, and patients without hiatal hernia compared with patients with hernia showed higher levels of anxiety, which interfered with their social life. Moreover, they showed lower tolerance to stress and higher frustration, fear, and worry. On the basis of such unfavorable phychoemotional results observed with GERD patients (especially those without hernia) in the different tests, we propose that improving our knowledge of the psychological profile of GERD patients - particularly those without hiatal hernia - could help in designing individualized medical and psychological therapies and increase success rates. PMID:23121479

  9. Surgical management of isolated popliteus tendon injuries in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Joseph N; Rebolledo, Brian J; Warren, Russell F; Green, Daniel W

    2016-03-01

    Isolated popliteus avulsion injuries are a rare occurrence, especially in the skeletally immature population. Two cases of isolated popliteus tendon avulsion injuries in paediatric patients were identified and successfully managed with suture anchor reattachment of the avulsed fragment in the anatomic position. The objective of this case report is to raise awareness of orthopaedic surgeons to the rarely encountered isolated popliteus tendon injury that can occur in paediatric patients. Level of evidence Expert opinion, Level V. PMID:26856317

  10. Surgical treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in "Krokodil" drug addicted patients.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Yuri M; Hakobyan, Koryun A; Poghosyan, Anna Yu; Avetisyan, Eduard K

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective study of jaw osteonecrosis treatment in patients using the "Krokodil" drug from 2009 to 2013. On the territory of the former USSR countries there is widespread use of a self-produced drug called "Krokodil". Codeine containing analgesics ("Sedalgin", "Pentalgin" etc), red phosphorus (from match boxes) and other easily acquired chemical components are used for synthesis of this drug, which used intravenously. Jaw osteonecrosis develops as a complication in patients who use "Krokodil". The main feature of this disease is jawbone exposure in the oral cavity. Surgery is the main method for the treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in patients using "Krokodil". 40 "Krokodil" drug addict patients with jaw osteonecrosis were treated. Involvement of maxilla was found in 11 patients (27.5%), mandible in 21 (52.5%), both jaws in 8 (20%) patients. 35 Lesions were found in 29 mandibles and 21 lesions in 19 maxillas. Main factors of treatment success are: cessation of "Krokodil" use in the pre- (minimum 1 month) and postoperative period and osteonecrosis area resection of a minimum of 0.5 cm beyond the visible borders of osteonecrosis towards the healthy tissues. Surgery was not delayed until sequestrum formation. In the mandible marginal or segmental resection (with or without TMJ exarticulation) was performed. After surgery recurrence of disease was seen in 8 (23%) cases in the mandible, with no cases of recurrence in the maxilla. According to our experience in this case series, surgery is the main method for the treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in patients using "Krokodil". Cessation of drug use and jaw resection minimize the rate of recurrences in such patients. PMID:24969764

  11. High-frequency ultrasound in carpal tunnel syndrome: assessment of patient eligibility for surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Urbanik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy and a frequent cause of sick leaves because of work-related hand overload. That is why an early diagnosis and adequate treatment (conservative or surgical) are essential for optimal patient management. Aim The aim of the study is to assess the usefulness of high-frequency ultrasound in CTS for the assessment of patient eligibility for surgical treatment. Material and methods The study involved 62 patients (50 women and 12 men, aged 28–70, mean age 55.2) with scheduled surgeries of CTS on the basis of clinical symptoms, physical examination performed by a neurosurgeon and a positive result of EMG testing. The ultrasound examinations of the wrist were performed in all these patients. On the basis of the collected data, the author has performed multiple analyses to confirm the usefulness of ultrasound imaging in assessing patient eligibility for surgical treatment of CTS. Results US examinations showed evidence of median nerve compression at the level of the carpal tunnel in all of the examined patients. This was further confirmed during surgical procedures. The mean value of the cross-sectional area at the proximal part of the pisiform bone was 17.45 mm2 (min. 12 mm2, max. 31 mm2). Nerve hypoechogenicity proximal to the nerve compression site was visible in all 62 patients (100%). Increased nerve vascularity on the transverse section was present in 50 patients (80.65%). Conclusions Ultrasonography with the use of high-frequency transducers is a valuable diagnostic tool both for assessing patient eligibility for surgical treatment of CTS, and in postoperative assessment of the treatment efficacy. PMID:26673415

  12. Conservative Surgical Treatment of Infected Ulceration of the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint With Osteomyelitis in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Dalla Paola, Luca; Carone, Anna; Morisi, Claudio; Cardillo, Sara; Pattavina, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Ulceration of the plantar aspect of the first metatarsophalangeal joint is a common localization in the diabetic foot. Conservative treatment of this lesion is a challenging problem, performed through the soft tissues and osseous debridement. The present study included a cohort of 28 patients affected by diabetes mellitus and a first ray lesion penetrating the bone. After surgical debridement with removal of the infected bone, we positioned antibiotic-loaded bone cement and stabilized the treated area with an external fixator. All patients with critical limb ischemia had their vascular disease treated before the procedure. The mean follow-up was 12.2 ± 6.9 months. Four patients developed a relapse of the ulceration after the procedure. In the postoperative period, 1 patient (3.57%) developed dehiscence of the surgical site and underwent a second procedure. In the follow-up period, 2 patients (7.14%) experienced bone cement dislocation. In 1 of these patients, a new ulceration was observed dorsally to the surgical site. The approach was surgical revision with bone cement replacement and stabilization with a new external fixator. In the other patient, given the absence of ulcerations, the cement was removed, and arthrodesis with internal stabilization using 2 cannulated screws was performed. One patient (3.57%), who had developed a relapse of ulceration after recurrent critical ischemia, underwent a percutaneous revascularization procedure and transmetatarsal amputation. During the follow-up period, no ulceration recurrences, transfer ulcerations, shoe fit problems, or gait abnormalities were detected in the other 24 patients. Our study presents the results of a technique requiring a 1-stage surgical approach to a relatively common problem, which is often difficult to solve. PMID:25249400

  13. Immediate nipple-areola-sparing mastectomy reconstruction: An update on oncological and reconstruction techniques

    PubMed Central

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Filassi, José Roberto; Gemperli, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is a safe technique in patients who are candidates for conservation breast surgery. However, there is worry concerning its oncological safety and surgical outcome in terms of postoperative complications. The authors reviewed the literature to evaluate the oncological safety, patient selection, surgical techniques, and also to identify the factors influencing postoperative outcome and complication rates. Patient selection and safety related to NSM are based on oncological and anatomical parameters. Among the main criteria, the oncological aspects include the clinical stage of breast cancer, tumor characteristics and location including small, peripherally located tumors, without multicentricity, or for prophylactic mastectomy. Surgical success depends on coordinated planning with the oncological surgeon and careful preoperative and intraoperative management. In general, the NSM reconstruction is related to autologous and alloplastic techniques and sometimes include contra-lateral breast surgery. Choice of reconstructive technique following NSM requires accurate consideration of various patient related factors, including: breast volume, degree of ptosis, areola size, clinical factors, and surgeon’s experience. In addition, tumor related factors include dimension, location and proximity to the nipple-areola complex. Regardless of the fact that there is no unanimity concerning the appropriate technique, the criteria are determined by the surgeon’s experience and the anatomical aspects of the breast. The positive aspects of the technique utilized should include low interference with the oncological treatment, reproducibility, and long-term results. Selected patients can have safe outcomes and therefore this may be a feasible option for early breast cancer management. However, available data demonstrates that NSM can be safely performed for breast cancer treatment in selected cases. Additional studies and longer follow-up are necessary to define consistent selection criteria for NSM. PMID:25114861

  14. The impact of conventional or hypofractionated radiotherapy on voice quality and oncological outcome in patients with early glottic cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Nicola, L; Gravina, G L; Marampon, F; Bonfili, P; Buonopane, S; Di Staso, M; Festuccia, C; Franzese, P; Tombolini, M; Tombolini, V

    2010-11-01

    The hypothesis being tested in this study is that hypofractionated radiotherapy is well tolerated and not lower in terms of oncological outcome than conventional radiotherapy. Forty patients with histologically proven glottic cancer were included in the analysis. Twenty-two were treated by hypofractionated radiotherapy (3D-HFRT) (25 fractions of 2.4 Gy delivered daily to a total dose of 60 Gy). This group was retrospectively compared to 18 subjects who met the same inclusion criteria and who were treated with conventional radiotherapy (3D-CRT) (33 fractions of 2 Gy delivered daily to a total dose of 66 Gy). One year after RT treatment in 10 patients (5 in the arm-1 and 5 in the arm-2) mild dysphonia persisted. The other patients achieved a complete recovery of the overall quality of voice with no significant difference documented between the two groups. At 3 years the local control rate was 100% for the patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy and 96% for the patients treated with conventional regimen. The statistical analysis did not show any significant difference in local control between the two groups (p=0.45). No significant acute and late toxicity was documented in both groups. Subjects with early glottic cancer seem to experience comparable levels of morbidity irrespective whether they were treated by hypofractionated or conventional conformal therapy without any worsening of the tumor local control. Thus, we provide clinical evidence to justify trends already emerging toward hypofractionated regimens in early glottic cancer. PMID:20878134

  15. Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach for Apoplectic Pituitary Tumor: Surgical Outcomes and Complications in 45 Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Rucai; Li, Xueen; Li, Xingang

    2016-02-01

    Objective To assess the safety and effectiveness of the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach (EETA) for apoplectic pituitary adenoma. Design A retrospective study. Setting Qilu Hospital of Shandong University; Brain Science Research Institute, Shandong University. Participants Patients admitted to Qilu Hospital of Shandong University who were diagnosed with an apoplectic pituitary tumor and underwent EETA for resection of the tumor. Main Outcome Measures In total 45 patients were included in a retrospective chart review. Data regarding patient age, sex, presentation, lesion size, surgical procedure, extent of resection, clinical outcome, and surgical complications were obtained from the chart review. Results In total, 38 (92.7%) of 41 patients with loss of vision obtained visual remission postoperatively. In addition, 16 patients reported a secreting adenoma, and postsurgical hormonal levels were normal or decreased in 14 patients. All other symptoms, such as headache and alteration of mental status, recovered rapidly after surgery. Two patients (4.4%) incurred cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Six patients (13.3%) experienced transient diabetes insipidus (DI) postoperatively, but none of these patients developed permanent DI. Five patients (11.1%) developed hypopituitarism and were treated with replacement of hormonal medicine. No cases of meningitis, carotid artery injury, or death related to surgery were reported. Conclusion EETA offers a safe and effective surgical option for apoplectic pituitary tumors and is associated with low morbidity and mortality. PMID:26949589

  16. Cultural differences in spiritual care: findings of an Israeli oncologic questionnaire examining patient interest in spiritual care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As professional spiritual care (chaplaincy) is introduced to new cultures worldwide, it bears examining which elements of screening and care are universal and, for those elements showing cultural difference, to study them in each culture. No quantitative spiritual care patient study had previously been done in Israel. Our objectives were twofold: 1) to examine who wants spiritual care in Israel, including demographic and clinical variables, and to compare against other results worldwide to further develop universal screening protocols 2) to see what patients want from spiritual care specifically in the Israeli setting. Methods Self-administered patient questionnaire examining spirituality/religiosity, interest in spiritual care (subdivided by type of care), and key demographic, social, and clinical data. The study setting was an Israeli oncology center at which spiritual care had been recently introduced. Results Data from 364 oncology patient questionnaires found 41% interest in spiritual care, as compared to 35%-54% in American studies. Having previously been visited by a spiritual caregiver predicted patient interest in further spiritual care (AOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.6), suggesting that the new service is being well-received. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis identified additional predictors of openness to receiving spiritual care: self-describing as somewhat/very spiritual vs. not spiritual (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.9 and 6.3, 95% CI 1.8-8.6 and 2.6-15.1) or traditional/religious vs. secular (AOR 2.2 and 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.6 and 1.1-4.0); and receiving one visit a week or less from family and friends (AOR 5.6, 95% CI 2.1-15.1). These findings are in line with previous American studies, suggesting universality across cultures that could be utilized in screening. Differences in demographic data and medical condition were not significant predictors of patient interest, suggesting a cultural difference, where age and education were predictors in the American context. Levels of interest in explicitly religious or spiritual support such as prayer or addressing religious/spiritual questions were much lower than in other cultures. Conclusions Results illustrate the demand for and satisfaction with the new Israeli service. The cross-cultural comparison found both culture-dependent and possibly universal predictors of patient interest, and found lower interest in Israel for explicitly religious/spiritual types of support. PMID:24708816

  17. Cardiac Papillary Fibroelastoma: Single-Institution Experience with 14 Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Ramlawi, Basel; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    In general, treatment for symptomatic and asymptomatic cardiac papillary fibroelastoma is surgical resection—particularly of left-sided lesions, because of the risk of systemic embolization. However, few institutions have enough experience with these tumors to validate this approach. We present our institutional experience with papillary fibroelastoma and discuss our current approach. We searched our institution's cardiac tumor database, identified all patients diagnosed with cardiac papillary fibroelastoma from 1992 through 2014, and recorded the clinical and pathologic characteristics of each case. We found 14 patients (mean age, 60.5 ± 12.3 yr) who had 18 lesions. Eleven patients (79%) were symptomatic; however, we could not always definitively associate their symptoms with a cardiac tumor. Most lesions were solitary and ≤1.5 cm in diameter; half involved the left side of the heart. All 18 lesions were surgically excised. There were no operative or 30-day deaths, and no patient needed valve replacement postoperatively. There was one late death; at one year, another 3 patients were lost to follow-up, and the others were alive without tumor recurrence. Because of the embolic risk inherent to intracardiac masses and our relatively good postoperative outcomes, we recommend the surgical resection of all left-sided papillary fibroelastomas in surgical candidates, and we discuss with patients the advisability of resecting right-sided lesions. PMID:27127431

  18. Patient Satisfaction of Surgical Treatment of Clitoral Phimosis and Labial Adhesions Caused by Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    King, Michelle; Rieff, Mollie; Krapf, Jill; Goldstein, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis, usually affecting the anogenital skin in women. This chronic inflammation can cause scarring of genitalia including narrowing of the introitus and phimosis of the clitoris. These architectural changes can lead to recurrent tearing during intercourse (vulvar granuloma fissuratum) and decreased clitoral sensation. Surgical correction of vulvar granuloma fissuratum (VGF) and clitoral phimosis can be performed, but there is little data on the patient satisfaction and complications following these surgical procedures. Aim To evaluate patient experience and outcomes in women undergoing surgical correction of scarring caused by anogenital LS. Methods A retrospective chart review of patients at a vulvar disorders clinic was performed to identify women who had undergone surgical correction of clitoral phimosis or lysis of vulvar adhesions for VGF due to LS. Twenty‐eight women were contacted via telephone between 4 and 130 months postoperatively. An eight‐question survey was used to determine patient experience and outcomes. Main Outcome Measures All participants completed an eight‐question survey to evaluate patient satisfaction with the surgery, effects on clitoral sensation, orgasm and pain with intercourse, postoperative symptoms or complications, and the presence of recurrent vulvar scarring. Results Participants reported that they were either very satisfied (44%) or satisfied (40%) with the procedure. Of the women who experienced decreased clitoral sensation prior to surgery, 75% endorsed increased clitoral sensitivity postoperatively. Of the women who had dyspareunia prior to surgery, the majority of women reported having pain‐free sex (33%) or improved but not completely pain‐free sex (58%) after surgery. There were no complications or symptoms made worse by the surgical procedures. Conclusions This study shows high patient satisfaction and low complication risk associated with surgical correction of clitoral phimosis and lysis of vulvar adhesions for VGF caused by LS. Patients reported improvement in clitoral sensation and ability to achieve orgasm, as well as decreased dyspareunia. Surgical correction of vulvar scarring is a viable option to restore vulvar anatomy and sexual function in appropriate candidates with anogenital LS. Flynn AN, King M, Rieff M, Krapf J, and Goldstein AT. Patient satisfaction of surgical treatment of clitoral phimosis and labial adhesions caused by lichen sclerosus. Sex Med 2015;3:251–255. PMID:26797058

  19. Percutaneous dilatational versus conventional surgical tracheostomy in intensive care patients

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Tarek F.; Ahmed, Mohamed Rifaat; Saber, Aly

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tracheostomy is usually performed in patients with difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation or some catastrophic neurologic insult. Conventional tracheostomy involves dissection of the pretracheal tissues and insertion of the tracheostomy tube into the trachea under direct vision. Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is increasingly popular and has gained widespread acceptance in many intensive care unit and trauma centers. Aim: Aim of the study was to compare percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy versus conventional tracheostomy in intensive care patients. Patients and Methods: 64 critically ill patients admitted to intensive care unit subjected to tracheostomy and randomly divided into two groups; percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy and conventional tracheostomy. Results: Mean duration of the procedure was similar between the two procedures while the mean size of tracheostomy tube was smaller in percutaneous technique. In addition, the Lowest SpO2 during procedure, PaCO2 after operation and intra-operative bleeding for both groups were nearly similar without any statistically difference. Postoperative infection after 7 days seen to be statistically lowered and the length of scar tend to be smaller among PDT patients. Conclusion: PDT technique is effective and safe as CST with low incidence of post operative complication. PMID:22361497

  20. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.

  1. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  2. Surgical Management for Early-Stage Bilateral Breast Cancer Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing-yan; Quan, Chen-lian; Tan, Yu-long; Liu, Guang-yu; Shao, Zhi-min; Wu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the current surgical management strategy for bilateral breast cancer (BBC) patients and to assess the changes in this strategy in China. Methods This is a retrospective review of all patients with early-stage BBC who underwent surgical treatment at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between June 2007 and June 2014. Results A total of 15,337 patients with primary breast cancer were identified. Of these patients, 218 (1.5%) suffered from synchronous bilateral breast cancer (sBBC), and 296 (2.0%) suffered from metachronous bilateral breast cancer (mBBC). Patients with a lobular carcinoma component, those with estrogen receptor-positive cancer, and those with an accompanying sclerosing adenosis in the affected breast tended to develop BBC. The rates of bilateral mastectomy, breast conserving therapy, reconstruction, and combined surgeries were 86.2%, 6.4%, 3.7%, and 3.7%, respectively, for patients with sBBC and 81.1%, 4.4%, 3.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, for patients with mBBC. The interval between bilateral cancers, age at first diagnosis of breast cancer, histopathological type, and stage have significant impacts on the choice of surgery for patients with BBC. Conclusions Bilateral mastectomy was the dominant surgical management for patients with BBC in China, despite the increased application of breast reconstruction surgery observed in recent years. Bilateral prosthetic breast reconstruction was the ideal choice for patients with sBBC. Chinese surgeons should take responsibility for patient education and inform their patients about their surgical options. PMID:25874699

  3. [Surgical treatment policy during motor rehabilitation of patients with a single ischemic lower extremity].

    PubMed

    Zoloev, G K; Litvinovskiĭ, S V; Koval', O A

    2003-01-01

    Altogether 218 patients suffering from obliterating arterial diseases with unilateral postamputation defects (PAD) of the lower extremities and 13 patients with bilateral PAD were examined. A study was made of the data pertaining to the age, motivation for rehabilitation, occupational and social status, degree of social independence, and severity of circulatory disorders. The surgical treatment and rehabilitation policy for patients with unilateral PAD of the lower extremities was defined taking into account the social factory. PMID:12811383

  4. Pretreatment Quality of Life Predicts for Locoregional Control in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Pajak, Thomas F.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Konski, Andre A.; Coyne, James C.; Gwede, Clement K.; Garden, Adam S.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Jones, Christopher; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prospectively collected health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data from patients enrolled in two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group randomized Phase III head and neck cancer trials (90-03 and 91-11) to assess their value as an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control (LRC) and/or overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: HRQOL questionnaires, using a validated instrument, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H and N), version 2, were completed by patients before the start of treatment. OS and LRC were the outcome measures analyzed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Baseline FACT-H and N data were available for 1,093 patients and missing for 417 patients. No significant difference in outcome was found between the patients with and without baseline FACT-H and N data (p = 0.58). The median follow-up time was 27.2 months for all patients and 49 months for surviving patients. Multivariate analyses were performed for both OS and LRC. Beyond tumor and nodal stage, Karnofsky performance status, primary site, cigarette use, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and altered fractionation schedules, the FACT-H and N score was independently predictive of LRC (but not OS), with p = 0.0038. The functional well-being component of the FACT-H and N predicted most significantly for LRC (p = 0.0004). Conclusions: This study represents, to our knowledge, the largest analysis of HRQOL as a prognostic factor in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. The results of this study have demonstrated the importance of baseline HRQOL as a significant and independent predictor of LRC in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  5. Assessment of Patient Satisfaction of the Quality of Health Care Provided by Outpatient Services of an Oncology Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Anastasia; Sarafis, Pavlos; Malliarou, Maria; Tsounis, Andreas; Igoumenidis, Michael; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Niakas, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this research is to investigate the patient’s satisfaction (patient’s satisfaction) with medical services provided in Outpatients’ Departments of a Greek Anti-Cancer Hospital in morning and afternoon clinics. The assessment of patients and identification of factors that contribute to their satisfaction will highlight the organizational and operational problems of outpatient department and assist in finding solutions to upgrade the quality of services provided. Material and Methodology: For the collection of data, a questionnaire with closed answers in a five-point scale ‘Likert’ scale was used. The questions were related to demographics, social data users, and the overall service process in the outpatient Hospital. The sample consisted of 100 patients (RR: 76%) who visited the outpatient clinic in the morning or afternoon over a month long period of time. Results: The results of our research showed that cancer patients reported a high satisfaction rate with the health services provided in outpatient department of Anti-Cancer Hospital. The highest reported levels of satisfaction were related to working with medical staff because of the special relationship of trust that patients develop with their physician. Some problems were noted during the morning shift by patients. Patients reported frustration over long waiting times to get an appointment, last minute appointments, lack of flexibility when making appointments and long waiting times before being examined by a doctor. No statistically significant relationship was found between overall satisfaction with demographics’ and other factors, although the grading services seem to be affected by the health status of patients, education and sex. Conclusion: The problems that were identified leading to less patient satisfaction were the long waiting periods to get an appointment, last minute appointments, non-flexibility in making appointments and long waiting times to be examined by the doctor. Administration should increase its efforts to upgrade the quality of health care provided to oncology patients by taking all the necessary measures. PMID:25169006

  6. Surgical options for the young patient with glenohumeral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Jonathan D.; Abboud, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Young patients with glenohumeral arthritis are an ongoing treatment challenge. They typically have high demands of their shoulders, require long-term durability due to their young age, and often have altered local anatomy, through their disease process (instability arthropathy, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) or from previous surgery (capsulorraphy arthropathy, chondrolysis, etc.). Workup to evaluate underlying causes of early arthritis, and to exclude infectious causes are necessary. When nonoperative management fails, arthroscopic debridement, hemiarthroplasty (isolated, with glenoid reaming, or with biological interposition), and total shoulder arthroplasty are treatment options available to the treating surgeon. Debridement or hemiarthroplasty can provide pain relief for a subset of patients, but results have not been reproducible across the literature and have not been durable over time. Total shoulder arthroplasty provides the most reliable pain relief, but long-term glenoid loosening and wear continue to lead to high revision rates in this patient population. PMID:26980987

  7. Preoperative preparation of the surgical patient with neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Schiavi, Adam; Papangelou, Alexander; Mirski, Marek

    2009-12-01

    This article emphasizes some key points in the preoperative evaluation of patients with neurologic disease. The amount of neurologic disease in the general population is a difficult number to assess accurately. This is, in part, because of the wide-sweeping scope of neurologic disease. The International Classification of Diseases has the highest number of conditions attributable to neurologic disease. Patients with neurologic disease are commonly encountered, and their illness is often complicated by significant comorbid disease. It is important to think of the patient as a whole rather than the sum of his or her systems. While it is tempting to consider the traditional preoperative evaluation from a "cardiac clearance" point of view, we must resist this urge, and evaluate which risk factors we can modify and hopefully mitigate to optimize the perioperative period. PMID:19942180

  8. Lesson in psycho-oncology.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jimmie C

    2002-01-01

    As a new subspecialty of oncology, psycho-oncology's emergent role reflects the growing interest and concern over the past 25 years, on the part of both oncologists and the general public, in the psychological, behavioral, and social factors related to cancer prevention and treatment. Today, total care of cancer patients must include concern for psychosocial well-being and management of distress must be fully integrated with the other aspects of the patient's treatment plan. Prevention efforts are rooted in the willingness and ability of individuals to change lifestyle and risk behaviors, and this has to be elucidated by research in psycho-oncology. Further, psycho-oncology advances theory and practice related to the effects of cancer on psychological function and provides expertise in the prevention of cancer. Thus, psycho-oncology has a unique role to play in cancer treatment and prevention. PMID:19266677

  9. Surgical Management of the Patient with an Implanted Cardiac Device

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, John D.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Chen, Jonathan; Spotnitz, Henry M.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Edwards, Niloo

    1999-01-01

    Objective To identify the sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) that may alter the performance of implanted cardiac devices and develop strategies to minimize their effects on patient hemodynamic status. Summary Background Data Since the development of the sensing demand pacemaker, EMI in the clinical setting has concerned physicians treating patients with such devices. Implanted cardiovertor defibrillators (ICDs) and ventricular assist devices (VADs) can also be affected by EMI. Methods All known sources of interference to pacemakers, ICDs, and VADs were evaluated and preventative strategies were devised. Results All devices should be thoroughly evaluated before and after surgery to make sure that its function has not been permanently damaged or changed. If electrocautery is to be used, pacemakers should be placed in a triggered or asynchronous mode; ICDs should have arrhythmia detection suspended before surgery. If defibrillation is to be used, the current flow between the paddles should be kept as far away from and perpendicular to the lead system as possible. Both pacemakers and ICDs should be properly shielded if magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, or radiation therapy is to be used. The effect of EMI on VADs depends on the model. Magnetic resonance imaging adversely affects all VADs except the Abiomed VAD, and therefore its use should be avoided in this population of patients. Conclusions The patient with an implanted cardiac device can safely undergo surgery as long as certain precautions are taken. PMID:10561087

  10. Flow Simulation to Enable Patient Specific Virtual Surgical Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Kenneth; Taylor, Charles; Mueller, Jens

    2003-11-01

    The current paradigm for interventional and surgery planning for the treatment of cardiovascular disease relies exclusively on diagnostic imaging data to define the present state of the patient, empirical data to evaluate the efficacy of prior treatments for similar patients, and the judgement of the surgeon to decide on a preferred treatment. The individual variability and inherent complexity of human biological systems is such that diagnostic imaging and empirical data alone are insufficient to predict the outcome of a given treatment for an individual patient. We have proposed a new paradigm of predictive medicine in which the physician utilizes computational tools to construct and evaluate a combined anatomic/physiologic model to predict differential changes in blood flow for alternative treatment plans for an individual patient. Ideally, these systems would provide an integrated set of image segmentation, geometric solid modeling, automatic finite element mesh generation, computational mechanics and scientific visualization tools accessible through an intuitive human-computer interface. In this talk we focus on the flow simulation aspects of this project. Error estimators for transient flow analyses have been developed and implemented to focus computational resources on the areas where they may have provide the greatest improvement. We will describe these error estimators and apply them to adaptive as well as uniform refinement simulations and compare the accuracy and performance to available experimental data in porcine bypass models that have been carried out specifically for this purpose.

  11. Assessment of Serologic Immunity to Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis After Treatment of Korean Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyo Jin; Lee, Jae-Wook; Chung, Nak-Gyun; Cho, Bin; Kim, Hack-Ki

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis antibody titers after antineoplastic treatment and to suggest an appropriate vaccination approach for pediatric hemato-oncologic patients. A total of 146 children with either malignancy in remission after cessation of therapy or bone marrow failure were recruited. All children had received routine immunization including diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccination before diagnosis of cancer. The serologic immunity to diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was classified as: completely protective, partially protective, or non-protective. Non-protective serum antibody titer for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was detected in 6.2%, 11.6%, and 62.3% of patients, respectively, and partial protective serum antibody titer for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was seen in 37%, 28.1%, and 8.9% of patients. There was no significant correlation between the severity of immune defect and age, gender or underlying disease. Revaccination after antineoplastic therapy showed significantly higher levels of antibody for each vaccine antigen. Our data indicates that a large proportion of children lacked protective serum concentrations of antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. This suggests that reimmunization of these patients is necessary after completion of antineoplastic treatment. Also, prospective studies should be undertaken with the aim of devising a common strategy of revaccination. PMID:22219618

  12. Triaging early-stage lung cancer patients into non-surgical pathways: who, when, and what?

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2015-01-01

    More lung cancer patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage due to improved diagnostic imaging techniques, a trend that is expected to accelerate with the dissemination of lung cancer screening. Surgical resection has always been considered the standard treatment for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, non-surgical treatment options for patients with early-stage NSCLC have evolved significantly over the past decade with many new and exciting alternative treatments now available. These alternative treatments include radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), percutaneous cryoablation therapy (PCT), photodynamic therapy (PDT) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), including stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy. We describe the established alternatives to surgical resection, their advantages and disadvantages, potential complications and efficacy. We then describe the optimal treatment approach for patients with early-stage NSCLC based on tumor operability, size and location. Finally, we discuss future directions and whether any alternative therapies will challenge surgical resection as the treatment of choice for patients with operable early-stage lung cancer. PMID:26380185

  13. Preventing multidrug-resistant gram-negative organisms in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Rebecca J

    2012-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant gram-positive infections have consumed the attention of health care organizations as well as the media, but recently multidrug-resistant gram-negative organisms (MDR-GNOs) have become more and more prevalent. Limited treatment options are available for MDR-GNO infections; thus, prevention is key. Patients who are at high risk for developing infections must be identified, and specialized prevention interventions must be developed for their care. Surgical patients are one subset of patients at high risk for developing MDR-GNOs. Advanced practice nurses must support nurses and other health care personnel in preventing MDR-GNO infections. Education should include active surveillance, contact precautions, cohorting patients and staff members, unit closures, reinforced hand hygiene practices, and environmental cleaning tailored to the care of surgical patients in regard to their preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care. PMID:22935259

  14. Conservative and surgical semen retrieval in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Löchner-Ernst, D; Mandalka, B; Kramer, G; Stöhrer, M

    1997-07-01

    Assisted semen retrieval was applied in 219 men with spinal cord injury (212 supranuclear, seven infranuclear lesions). Vibrostimulation in supranuclear lesions was successful in 133, and in five more after physostigmine injection. Electroejaculation was successful in all seven infranuclear lesions and in four supranuclear patients failing with vibrostimulation. Eight more supranuclear patients responded to electroejaculation and physostigmine. Surgical retrieval was applied in 27 patients. Nine Wagenknecht spermatoceles showed only one success, from all 18 implanted Brindley reservoirs semen could be collected. Three patients, in whom no pregnancy could be induced after Brindley reservoir implantation, had testicular sperm aspirated. In 109 patients who wanted to have offspring, 73 pregnancies could be induced in 46 couples, leading to 54 births (four twins), 16 abortions and three pregnancies. Conservative semen retrieval was possible in 82 of these men (63 pregnancies in 37 couples) and surgical methods were used in 27 (10 pregnancies in nine couples). PMID:9232752

  15. Explaining the amount of care needed by hospitalised surgical patients: a prospective time and motion study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospitals provide care for patients with a variety of diseases, co-morbidities and complications. The actual amount of care these patients need is unclear. Given the recent developments such as ageing, multi-morbidity and budgetary restraints, a practical explanatory model would avail healthcare professionals and managers in determining the demand and costs for clinical care. Methods Six surgical wards in a Dutch university hospital participated in this prospective time and motion study. Surgeons, nurses and paramedics recorded the time spent on patient care 24/7 by means of PDAs. The investigators extracted possible determining characteristics from a previous systematic review and expert focus group. Total amount of care needed by the patients was expressed as costs involved in medical and nursing time, surgical interventions and diagnostics. Afterwards the investigators applied linear regression analysis to detect significant independent characteristics. Results 174 Surgical patients were monitored during their hospital stay. Characteristics significantly influencing the consumed amount of care were: medication during hospitalisation, complications, co-morbidity, medical specialty, age, as well as undergoing surgery and length of stay. Median costs for care were €8.446 per patient admission. Conclusions The investigators developed a model that explains the total demand and costs of care needed for surgical patients in a university hospital. The input for this instrument can be derived from readily available data in hospital databases. This makes it a relatively easy instrument to help healthcare professionals and managers appreciate the amount of care needed on (surgical) wards and may be used to appreciate trends in time. PMID:23379756

  16. Improving neuro-oncological patients care: basic and practical concepts for nurse specialist in neuro-rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuro-oncological population well expresses the complexity of neurological disability due to the multiple neurological deficits that affect these patients. Moreover, due to the therapeutical opportunities survival times for patients with brain tumor have increased and more of these patients require rehabilitation care. The figure of nurse in the interdisciplinary specialty of neurorehabilitation is not clearly defined, even if their role in this setting is recognized as being critical and is expanding. The purpose of the study is to identify the standard competencies for neurorehabilitation nurses that could be taught by means of a specialization course. Methods A literature review was conducted with preference given to works published between January 2000 and December 2008 in English. The search strategy identified 523 non-duplicated references of which 271 titles were considered relevant. After reviewing the abstracts, 147 papers were selected and made available to a group of healthcare professionals who were requested to classify them in few conceptual main areas defining the relative topics. Results The following five main areas were identified: clinical aspects of nursing; nursing techniques; nursing methodology; relational and organisational models; legal aspects of nursing. The relative topics were included within each area. As educational method a structured course based on lectures and practical sessions was designed. Also multi-choices questions were developed in order to evaluate the participants level of knowledge, while a semi-structured interview was prepared to investigate students satisfaction. Conclusions Literature shows that the development of rehabilitation depends on the improvement of scientific and practical knowledge of health care professionals. This structured training course could be incorporated into undergraduate nursing education programmes and also be inserted into continuing education programmes for graduate nurses. Developing expertise in neuro-rehabilitation for nurses, will be critical to improve overall care and care management of patients with highly complex disabilities as patients affected by brain tumors. The next step will be to start discussing, at the level of scientific societies linked to the field of neurorehabilitation and oncology, the development of a specialisation course in neurorehabilitation nursing. PMID:23031446

  17. Experiences of patients with cancer and their nurses on the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in oncology units

    PubMed Central

    Rassouli, Maryam; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ghahramanian, Akram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Nikanfar, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although nurses acknowledge that spiritual care is part of their role, in reality, it is performed to a lesser extent. The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses’ and patients’ experiences about the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in the oncology units of Tabriz. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in the oncology units of hospitals in Tabriz. Data were collected through purposive sampling by conducting unstructured interviews with 10 patients and 7 nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: Three categories emerged from the study: (1) “perceived barriers for providing spiritual care” including “lack of preparation for spiritual care,” “time and space constraints,” “unprofessional view,” and “lack of support”; (2) “communication: A way for Strengthening spirituality despite the limitations” including “manifestation of spirituality in the appearances and communicative behaviors of nurses” and “communication: Transmission of spiritual energy”; and (3) “religion-related spiritual experiences” including “life events as divine will and divine exam,” “death as reincarnation,” “trust in God,” “prayer/recourse to Holy Imams,” and “acceptance of divine providence.” Although nurses had little skills in assessing and responding to the patients’ spiritual needs and did not have the organizational and clergymen's support in dealing with the spiritual distress of patients, they were the source of energy, joy, hope, and power for patients by showing empathy and compassion. The patients and nurses were using religious beliefs mentioned in Islam to strengthen the patients’ spiritual dimension. Conclusions: According to the results, integration of spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing is recommended. Patients and nurses can benefit from organizational and clergymen's support to cope with spiritual distress. Researchers should provide a framework for the development of effective spiritual interventions that are sensitive to cultural differences. PMID:25709687

  18. Relevance of Imaging Examinations in the Surgical Planning of Patients with Bowel Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Trippia, Carlos H.; Zomer, Monica T.; Terazaki, Carlos R.T.; Martin, Rafael L.S.; Ribeiro, Reitan; Kondo, William

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a benign gynecologic disease characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. The complexity of the disease results from its multiple clinical presentations, the multifocal pattern of distribution of the lesions, the presence of extra pelvic sites of the disease (mainly affecting the urinary and the intestinal tracts), and the difficulty in the preoperative diagnosis (by means of imaging studies) and in the surgical treatment. The preoperative mapping of the lesions, either by ultrasound or by magnetic resonance imaging, allows for an adequate surgical planning and a better preoperative patient counseling, especially in those women with deep infiltrating endometriosis affecting the bowel. Also, the choice of the surgical team that is going to perform the procedure may be based on the preoperative workup. In this paper, we highlight the important findings that should be described in the imaging examination reports for the preoperative workup of patients with deep infiltrating endometriosis of the intestine. PMID:26917983

  19. [Definition and outline on geriatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Terret, C; Droz, J-P

    2009-11-01

    Geriatric oncology is the concept for management of elderly cancer patients. It is an equal approach of the health status problems and of cancer in a patient considered as a whole. Therefore it is not a subspecialty but a practice which can be translated in the elderly cancer patient's care. The treatment of cancer is based on the same principles than this of younger patients; recommendations used are those of the scientific oncological societies. Health problems of elderly patients are screened by specific tools. Patients without major health problems are managed by the oncological team in the routine; those for whom screening have demonstrated problems are first evaluated in the geriatrics setting and then oncological decisions are adapted to the patient situation. Decisions are made in specific geriatric oncology conferences. Specific clinical trials are required to build an Evidence Based Medicine background. Geriatric oncology teaching programs are warranted. PMID:20123506

  20. Clinical Characteristics, Surgical Management and Adjuvant Therapy of Patients with Uterine Carcinosarcoma: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Wallwiener, C.; Hartkopf, A.; Kommoss, S.; Joachim, C.; Wallwiener, M.; Taran, F. A.; Brucker, S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To review a single-center experience over a 27-year period of managing uterine carcinosarcoma (UCS), focusing on surgical practice, adjuvant therapy and clinical outcome. Material and Methods: This was a retrospective study of women with histologically proven UCS treated at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tübingen, Germany, between 1983 and 2010. Inpatient and outpatient records were reviewed; follow-up and survival data were ascertained. Results: The study population comprised 18 patients with UCS. Primary surgical treatment consisted of total abdominal hysterectomy in 12 patients (67 %) and laparoscopic total hysterectomy in 4 patients (22 %). Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed in 94 % of patients (17/18). Lymph nodes were evaluated in 15 patients (83 %). Positive pelvic lymph nodes were present in 2 patients (11 %). A total of 17 patients (94 %) received adjuvant therapy. Disease recurred in 7 (39 %) patients of our study group, with no recurrence noted in the 4 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgical staging. Median disease-free survival (DFS) was 48.7 months (95 % CI: 0.0–157.3) and median overall survival (OS) was 49.9 months (95 % CI: 0.0–108.2). The 5-year survival rate was 40 %. Conclusion: UCS is a rare and aggressive uterine neoplasm with high recurrence rates and metastatic potential. Surgical staging consisting of total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and systematic lymphadenectomy is the most important treatment for patients with UCS. Adjuvant radiation therapy appears to decrease pelvic recurrence, but there is a high incidence of distant recurrence, indicating the need for additional systemic treatment. PMID:26941453

  1. Comparison of Two Surgical Methods, Primary Closure and Rotational Flap, in Patients With Chronic Pilonidal Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Enshaei, A.; Motearefi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pilonidal sinus is a common infectious process which occurs in buttocks and sacral area which involves a wide range of symptoms that are different from an asymptomatic sinus abscess to acute and chronic sinus track. Basically non-surgical treatment for this disease is not recommended. In this study, we have been compared two methods of primary repair and rotation flap in terms of factors such as duration of hospitalization, recurrence, infection etc. Methods: 80 patients with chronic pilonidal sinus were randomly divided into two groups and underwent surgery. Diabetic and obese patients with underlying diseases and patients with acute pilonidal abscess or prior surgery were excluded. The patients’ hospital stay, duration of postoperative pain, itching and hematoma, were investigated. Results: In this study, patients’ sex and mean age were examined in terms of frequency of complications of hematoma, wound infection, recurrence, itching, and duration of hospitalization and the presence of seroma, there is no significant difference between the two methods of primary surgical repair and rotation flap (P>0.05) But in terms of the opening of the surgical wound, in primary surgical method, 5 patients (12.5%), wound dehiscence were reported, in rotation flap, any case of wound dehiscence were reported. There is significant difference between wound dehiscence in patients with chronic pilonidal sinus and two methods of surgery. (P=0.02). The mean duration of pain relief was 15.2±3.35 days in the primary surgical repair method and rotation flap was 7±2.3 days. According to the test there is significant difference between mean duration of pain relief and two surgical methods. (P=0.001). The mean duration of sutures was 15.3±2.3 days in the primary repair method and in rotational flap was 12±3.6 days. There is significant difference between the mean duration of sutures and two surgical methods (P=0.001) Conclusion: Considering these results, rotational flap is the preferred method due to fewer complications, lower recurrence after surgery and faster healing time of surgical wounds and as a result, the effective force’s early return to economic cycle. Finally, we can say that each surgeon according to the type and size of the sinuses and occupational status and social class, personality and individuality of the patient can select the appropriate method of surgery. PMID:25363174

  2. Charcot Neuroarthropathy in Patients With Diabetes: An Updated Systematic Review of Surgical Management.

    PubMed

    Schneekloth, Brian J; Lowery, Nicholas J; Wukich, Dane K

    2016-01-01

    Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) of the foot and ankle is a demanding clinical dilemma, and surgical management can be very complicated. Historically, the evidence guiding surgical management of CN has been small retrospective case series and expert opinions. The purpose of the present report was to provide a systematic review of studies published from 2009 to 2014 and to review the indications for surgery. A Medline search was performed, and a systematic review of studies discussing the surgical management of CN was undertaken. Thirty reports fit the inclusion criteria for our study, including 860 patients who had undergone a surgical procedure for the treatment of CN. The surgical procedures included amputation, arthrodesis, debridement of ulcers, drainage of infections, and exostectomy. The midfoot was addressed in 26.9% of cases, the hindfoot in 41.6%, and the ankle in 38.4%. Of the 30 studies, 24 were retrospective case series (level 4), 4 were controlled retrospective studies (level 3), and 2 were level II studies. The overall amputation rate was 8.9%. The quality of the published data on the surgical management of CN has improved during the past several years. Evidence concerning the timing of treatment and the use of different fixation methods remains inconclusive. PMID:26810129

  3. A comprehensive approach to the prevention of central venous catheter complications: results of 10-year prospective surveillance in pediatric hematology-oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Cavaliere, Mara; Pegoraro, Anna; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Zadra, Nicola; Tridello, Gloria

    2016-04-01

    We report our decennial experience with 1161 newly-placed long-term central venous catheters inserted in 919 hematology-oncology patients for a total of 413,901 CVC-days of observation. Most of the CVCs were partially-implanted, open-ended, Broviac-Hickman type of CVC (95 %). One thousand and twenty-four complications were recorded equal to 2.47 per 1000 CVC-days. The frequency of complications per CVC, the rate of episodes per 1000 CVC-days, and removal rate were malfunction/occlusion 42 %, 1.18/1000, and 2.3 %; mechanical (dislodgement/rupture/kinking) 18.3 %, 0.51/1000, and 77.4 %; bacteremia 14.8 %, 0.42/1000, and 18.6 %; exit-site/tunnel infection 11.5 %, 0.32/1000, and 9.7 %; thrombosis 0.86 %, 0.02/1000, and 30 %; pneumothorax 0.52 %, 0.01/1000, and 0. In multivariate analysis, the risk factors were for mechanical complications, a younger age <6.1 years at CVC insertion (HR 1.8, p = 0.0006); for bacteremia, a double lumen CVC (HR 3.1, p < 0.0001) and the surgical modality of CVC insertion (HR 1.5, p = 0.03); for exit-site/tunnel infection, a double lumen CVC (HR 2.1, p = 0.0003) and a diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma (HR 1.8, p = 0.01); for malfunction/occlusion, an age <6.1 years (HR 1.6, p = 0.0003), the diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma (HR 1.9, p < 0.0001) and double lumen CVC (HR 1.33, p = 0.023). The cumulative incidence of premature CVC removal was 29.2 % and the risk factors associated with this event were the surgical modality of CVC insertion (HR 1.4, p = 0.0153) and an age at CVC positioning less than 6.1 years (HR 1.6, p = 0.0025). We conclude that a best-practice set of rules resulted in reduced CVC complications. PMID:26961934

  4. Disparities in Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Jane C.; Stain, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical oncology is one of the most frequently studied surgical specialties with regard to disparities in quality of care. There is variation in the care received according to nonclinical factors such as age, race and ethnicity, education, income, and even geographic region. Differences exist with regard to who gets treatment, what treatment is received, and the outcomes of those treatments. Although the existence of such disparities is no longer in doubt, the etiology is still being investigated. Ongoing research and quality improvement initiatives move beyond the mere description of existing disparities in one of three ways: (1) identifying and understanding the factors that lead to disparities; (2) advancing available methods to measure and track disparities; and (3) developing an approach to improvement. In this article, we start out by offering a framework to describe potential factors that lead to disparities, using examples from surgical oncology. We then describe the approaches to measuring and tracking disparities that are being used in research and quality improvement. Finally, we attempt to illustrate how all of these factors interact and offer some potential strategies to close the gap and alleviate disparities within the discipline. PMID:18197450

  5. Neurological recovery after surgical decompression in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy - a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, W. Y.; Arvinte, D.; Wong, Y. W.; Luk, K. D.K.

    2007-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is a common clinical problem. No study has examined the pattern of neurological recovery after surgical decompression. We conducted a prospective study on the pattern of neurological recovery after surgical decompression in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Patients suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy and requiring surgical decompression from January 1995 to December 2000 were prospectively included. Upper limbs, lower limbs and sphincter functions were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. Assessment was done before the operation, at 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year and then yearly after surgery. Results were analysed with the t-test. Differences with P-values less than 0.05 were regarded as statistically significant. Fifty-five patients were included. The average follow-up period was 53 months. Thirty-nine patients (71%) had neurological improvement after the operation with a mean recovery rate of 55%. The JOA score improved after surgery, reaching statistical significance at 3 months and a plateau at 6 months. Thirty-six patients (65%) had improvement of upper limb function. Twenty-four patients (44%) had improvement of lower limb function. Eleven patients (20%) had improvement of sphincter function. The recovery rate of upper limb function was 37%, of lower limb function was 23% and of sphincter function was 17%. Surgical decompression worked well in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Seventy-one percent of patients had neurological improvement after the operation. The neurological recovery reached a plateau at 6 months after the operation. The upper limb function had the best recovery, followed by lower limb and sphincter functions. PMID:17235616

  6. Does surgical sympathectomy improve clinical outcomes in patients with refractory angina pectoris?

    PubMed

    Holland, Luke C; Navaratnarajah, Manoraj; Taggart, David P

    2016-04-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: In patients with angina pectoris refractory to medical therapy, does surgical sympathectomy improve clinical outcomes? A total of 528 papers were identified using the search protocol described, of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. There were 5 case series and 1 prospective cohort study. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. All 5 of the case series demonstrated an improvement in symptoms, exercise tolerance or quality of life in patients undergoing surgical sympathectomy. An early case series investigating an open approach had a high morbidity and mortality rate, but the 4 other series used a minimally invasive technique and had low morbidity and zero perioperative mortality rates. The cohort study compared surgical sympathectomy with transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR) and concluded TMR to be superior. However, this study looked only at unilateral sympathectomy, whereas all 5 case series focused on bilateral surgery. We conclude that the best currently available evidence does suggest that patients report an improvement in their symptoms and quality of life following surgical sympathectomy, but the low level of this evidence does not allow for a statistically proved recommendation. PMID:26787727

  7. A computerized reminder for prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, R.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the effect of a computerized reminder system on the rate of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis in surgical patients. DESIGN: A prospective trial to measure change in compliance compared to historic controls. MEASUREMENTS: LDS Hospital surgeons developed local consensus as to which procedures should have DVT prophylaxis. The historic rate of prophylaxis for the procedures was measured through a database search of patient records. A computerized reminder system was then implemented which utilized an expert knowledge base and a time drive mechanism to flag surgical cases for DVT prophylaxis. For eligible patients, a DVT reminder appeared on the operating room schedule; surgical staff used this as a guide to apply prophylaxis. During the 3 month trial the rate of DVT prophylaxis was remeasured and compared to the pre-intervention rate. RESULTS: The pre-intervention rate of DVT prophylaxis over a 3 month period was 85.2% (785 of 921 eligible cases). For the 3 months following the introduction of the computerized reminder, compliance with DVT prophylaxis increased to 99.3% (1084 of 1092 eligible cases). The difference between the historic controls and the study subjects was highly significant (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: A computerized reminder is an effective method of increasing the rate of DVT prophylaxis in surgical patients. PMID:9929284

  8. Surgonomics as a health care financing policy for hospitalized surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1989-05-01

    The Medicare system of prospective payment to hospitals based on diagnostic related groups (DRG) has been severely criticized at a number of levels. Many states are using DRG prospective "All Payor Systems" for reimbursement to hospitals with the federal DRG system as a model. In All Payor Systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; the state of New York has been All Payor since 1 January 1988. This study simulated DRG All Payor methods on a large sample (N = 17,560) of surgical patients for a two year period, using both federal and New York DRG reimbursement methods currently in effect. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had, on average, a longer length of stay in the hospital and higher total cost of hospitalization compared with patients from Blue Cross and other commercial payors. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had a greater severity of illness compared with patients from Blue Cross or other payors. All except commercial insurors (that is, Medicaid, Blue Cross and Medicare) had greater financial risk under the DRG All Payor scheme. Results from our study suggest that federal, state and private payors may not be adequately reimbursing health care providers for the care of the hospitalized surgical patient under the DRG prospective scheme of hospital payment. It appears that the financing policy for health care, especially at the federal and state level, could limit both the access and quality of care for surgical patients. PMID:2496483

  9. Establishing the surgical nurse liaison role to improve patient and family member communication.

    PubMed

    Herd, Hope A; Rieben, Melissa A

    2014-05-01

    Having clear personal communication with a surgical patient's family members decreases the anxiety and increases patient and family member satisfaction. Perioperative team members at one East Coast community hospital implemented a new approach to communication in the perioperative area to address patient satisfaction after patient survey scores declined in the areas of communication and calming fears. An additional consideration was the facility's plan to move to a new facility in which the surgical department would be split across two floors. A literature review revealed that adding a surgical nurse liaison can increase patient, family member, and staff member satisfaction. The administration approved creation of the position, with duties that included managing the waiting area, facilitating interaction between physicians and patients' family members, and assisting with family visits to the perianesthesia unit. After implementation of this position, results of surveys showed increases in patient satisfaction. One year after the position was established, staff members reported they were happy with the position as well. PMID:24766921

  10. [Intraperitoneal chemotherapy with CDDP for patients with peritoneal recurrent gastric cancer following surgical intervention].

    PubMed

    Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kainuma, Osamu; Soda, Hiroaki; Cho, Akihiro; Tonooka, Toru; Saito, Hiroshige; Yanagibashi, Hiroo; Arimitsu, Hidehito; Kobayashi, Ryousuke; Chibana, Tomofumi; Tokoro, Yukinari; Nagata, Matsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of intraperitoneal chemotherapy with cisplatin (CDDP) for peritoneal recurrent gastric cancer following surgical intervention. Twelve patients were enrolled. The combination systemic chemotherapy was S-1 or S-1 plus paclitaxel (S-1+PTX). PTX was administered intravenously at 80 mg/m² on day S-1 and 15. S-1 was administered at 80 mg/ m²/ day for 7 consecutive days, followed by 7 days of rest, and the cycle was repeated. CDDP was administered intraperitoneally at 40 mg/body on day 8. This treatment was repeated every 4 weeks until disease progression was diagnosed. The survival time(ST)and time to treatment failure(TTF)were estimated. The surgical interventions were gastrectomy in 3 patients, colostomy in 8 patients, and enterostomy in 1 patient. Overall, the median TTF and ST were 294 days and 455 days, respectively. When stratified by surgical method and combination chemotherapy, the median TTF and ST were not statistically significant. However, when stratified by performance status (PS), the median TTF was 352 days for patients with PS 0 and 218 days for those with PS 1, 2 (p=0.0029), whereas the median ST was 553 days for patients with PS 0 and 331 days for those with PS 1, 2 (p=0.0198). In conclusion, the data suggest that intraperitoneal CDDP chemotherapy with systemic chemotherapy is effective for the treatment of extensive peritoneal recurrent gastric cancer, especially in patients with good PS. PMID:25731217

  11. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance. PMID:26897865

  12. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a malnourished surgical patient: clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nolli, M; Barbieri, A; Pinna, C; Pasetto, A; Nicosia, F

    2005-11-01

    We report a clinical and neuroradiological description of a severe case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in a surgical patient. After colonic surgery for neoplasm, he was treated for a long time with high glucose concentration total parenteral nutrition. In the early post-operative period, the patient showed severe encephalopathy with ataxia, ophthalmoplegia and consciousness disorders. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the clinical suspicion of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The radiological feature showed hyperintense lesions which were symmetrically distributed along the bulbo-pontine tegmentum, the tectum of the mid-brain, the periacqueductal grey substance, the hypothalamus and the medial periventricular parts of the thalamus. This progressed to typical Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with ataxia and memory and cognitive defects. Thiamine deficiency is a re-emerging problem in non-alcoholic patients and it may develop in surgical patients with risk factors such as malnutrition, prolonged vomiting and long-term high glucose concentration parenteral nutrition. PMID:16223408

  13. Coordinating perioperative care for the 'high risk' general surgical patient using risk prediction scoring.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Shaziz; Lees, Nicholas Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying 'high risk' (> 5% mortality score) emergency general surgical patients early, allows appropriate perioperative care to be allocated by securing critical care beds and ensuring the presence of senior surgeons and senior anesthetists intraoperatively. Scoring systems can be used to predict perioperative risk and coordinate resources perioperatively. Currently it is unclear which estimate of risk correlates with current resource deployment. A retrospective study was undertaken assessing the relationship between deployment of perioperative resources: senior surgeon, senior anesthetist and critical care bed. The study concluded that almost all high risk patients with high POSSUM mortality and morbidity scores had a consultant senior surgeon present intraoperatively. Critically unwell patients with higher operative severity and perioperative morbidity scores received higher care (HDU/ICU) beds postoperatively, ensuring that they received appropriate care if their condition deteriorated. Therefore POSSUM scoring should be used perioperatively in emergency cases to coordinate appropriate perioperative care for high risk general surgical patients. PMID:26901929

  14. Triple pathological findings in a surgically amenable patient with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy☆

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fumin; Jewells, Valerie; Trembath, Dimitri G.; Hadar, Eldad; Shin, Hae Won

    2015-01-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is a well-recognized cause of intractable epilepsy; however, coexistence with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is less common. Middle fossa epidermoid cysts are rare and may involve the temporal lobe. Most epidermoids are clinically silent, slow-growing, and seldom associated with overt symptomatology, including seizures. We describe a patient with multiple comorbidities including left MTS and a large epidermoid cyst involving the left quadrigeminal plate cistern compressing upon the cerebellar vermis and tail of the left hippocampus, resulting in refractory left temporal lobe epilepsy. The patient underwent left anterior temporal lobectomy. The surgical pathology demonstrated a third pathological finding of left temporal FCD type Ia. The patient has been seizure-free since the surgery. This case provides additional information with regard to the understanding of epileptogenicity and surgical planning in patients with MTS and epidermoid cysts. PMID:26288757

  15. Quality of life in patients submitted to surgical treatment of idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, João Bernardo Sancio Rocha; Saleme, Nathália Ambrozim Santos; Batista, José Lucas; Cardoso, Igor Machado; Jacob, Charbel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To evaluate quality of life, using the SF-36, in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) who un-derwent surgery for deformity correction, comparing the results in the pre-and post-operative period. METHODS : We evaluated 29 patients, 24 female, mean age 14.5 years, all patients had measurement of Cobb angle greater than 50º, and responded to the SF-36 questionnaire preope-ratively and on average two years after surgery. RESULTS : There was improvement in all eight domains studied by the SF-36 after surgical treatment, with statistically significant improvement of the domains functional capacity physical aspects, pain and general state. Vitality and mental heal-th were those with the lowest percentage of improvement postoperatively. CONCLUSION : Surgical treatment of defor-mity in all AIS improved the functional aspects assessed by the SF-36, representing, in practice, better quality of life for these patients. Evidence Level II, Prospective Study. PMID:27057138

  16. Elective surgical patients' narratives of hospitalization: the co-construction of safety.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Carole; Saunders, Mark N K

    2013-12-01

    This research explores how elective surgical patients make sense of their hospitalization experiences. We explore sensemaking using longitudinal narrative interviews (n=72) with 38 patients undergoing elective surgical procedures between June 2010 and February 2011. We consider patients' narratives, the stories they tell of their prior expectations, and subsequent post-surgery experiences of their care in a United Kingdom (UK) hospital. An emergent pre-surgery theme is that of a paradoxical position in which they choose to make themselves vulnerable by agreeing to surgery to enhance their health, this necessitating trust of clinicians (doctors and nurses). To make sense of their situation, patients draw on technical (doctors' expert knowledge and skills), bureaucratic (National Health Service as a revered institution) and ideological (hospitals as places of safety), discourses. Post-operatively, themes of 'chaos' and 'suffering' emerge from the narratives of patients whose pre-surgery expectations (and trust) have been violated. Their stories tell of unmet expectations and of inability to make shared sense of experiences with clinicians who are responsible for their care. We add to knowledge of how patients play a critical part in the co-construction of safety by demonstrating how patient-clinician intersubjectivity contributes to the type of harm that patients describe. Our results suggest that approaches to enhancing patients' safety will be limited if they fail to reflect patients' involvement in the negotiated process of healthcare. We also provide further evidence of the contribution narrative inquiry can make to patient safety. PMID:24331879

  17. Malnutrition and Obesity in Pediatric Oncology Patients: Causes, Consequences, and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Co-Reyes, Erica; Li, Rhea; Huh, Winston; Chandra, Joya

    2012-01-01

    In children with cancer, suboptimal nutrition states are common consequences of the disease and its treatment. These nutrition states have been attributed to a number of etiologies dependent on the patient’s tumor type and treatment, and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Interventions vary from psychosocial to pharmacological and surgical management. Further research is necessary to understand the epidemiology and etiology of these nutrition states. Of great importance is the development and implementation of effective interventions to optimize nutritional status among children with cancer during and after therapy. PMID:22948929

  18. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) tumour at the surgical scar site in a patient of carcinoma breast.

    PubMed

    Abrari, Andleeb

    2011-01-01

    A patient on follow-up post surgery for carcinoma breast, presented with a nodule under the surgical scar. The sinister eventuality of recurrent carcinoma was clinically considered first. The lesion was biopsied and the histopathology was diagnostic of pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia tumour. The nodule was excised and the patient's clinical denouement has been uneventful in the 4 months which have elapsed after this event. PMID:22688488

  19. STUDY ON THE APPLICABILITY OF THE MODIFIED TOKUHASHI SCORE IN PATIENTS WITH SURGICALLY TREATED VERTEBRAL METASTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, Jeferson Luis; Freitas, Rosyane Rena de; Mello, Glauco José Pauka; Neto, Mário Armani; Freitas Filho, Geraldo de; Ferreira, Carolina Bega; Novaes, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    To present the results obtained from surgical treatment of patients with vertebral metastases, comparing them with the modified Tokuhashi score in order to validate the applicability of this score for prognostic predictions and for choosing surgical treatments. Methods: This was a retrospective study on 157 patients treated surgically for spinal metastasis in Erastus Gaertner Hospital in Curitiba. The Tokuhashi score was applied retrospectively to all the patients. The patients' actual survival time was compared with the expected survival time using the Tokuhashi score. Results: There were 82 females and 75 males. The most frequent location of the primary tumor was the breast. The thoracic region was involved in 66.2%, lumbar region in 65.6%, cervical region in 15.9% and sacral region in 12.7%. All the patients underwent surgical treatment. The most frequent indication for treatment was intractable pain (89.2%). There was partial or complete improvement in a majority of the cases (52.2%). Out of 157 cases studied, 86.6% died. The maximum survival time was 13.6 years, the minimum was 3 days and the mean was 13.2 months. The following frequencies of Tokuhashi scores were found among the operated cases: up to 8 points, 111 cases; 9-11 points, 43 cases; and 12-15 points, three cases. The mean survival time in months for all 157 patients according to the Tokuhashi score was: 0-8 points, 15.4 months; 9-11 points, 11.4 months; and 12-15 points, 12 months. Conclusion: Unlike the nonsurgical approach recommended by Tokuhashi for patients with lower scores, this group in our study was sent for surgery, with better results than those of non-operated patients reported by Tokuhashi. PMID:27027033

  20. Surgical Treatment of Multiple Hydatid Cysts in the Liver of a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hailong; Jiang, Yufeng; Liu, Guisheng; Zhang, Shijie; Peng, Xinyu

    2015-01-01

    Multiple hydatid cysts in the liver rarely occur in the pediatric population. Here, we present the case of a 16-year-old girl who presented with six hydatid cysts in the liver. The cysts were surgically removed and all found to be infertile. Interestingly, the patient had post-operative eosinophilia. From this experience, we conclude that individualized treatment is necessary for patients with multiple hydatid cysts. PMID:25561565

  1. The trans-sphenoidal resection of pituitary adenomas in elderly patients and surgical risk.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, M; Bertani, G; Carrabba, G; Rampini, P; Zavanone, M; Caroli, M; Sala, E; Ferrante, E; Gaini, S M; Spada, A; Mantovani, G; Lania, A

    2013-06-01

    In western countries, the process of "ageing of the population" is increasingly forcing clinical medicine to find answers for pathologies affecting the elder segments of our community. In this respect, pituitary adenomas often raise difficult questions on surgical indications, since little is known about postoperative morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. The transsphenoidal endonasal approach (TNS), which is considered the gold standard for surgical resection of the majority of functioning and non-functioning pituitary adenomas, is supposed to be a low morbidity and mortality procedure in adult patients. However, only a few contradicting data are available in the literature about elderly patients. In this paper we retrospectively analyze a cohort of 43 consecutive patients aged more than 65 years, operated on for pituitary adenomas at our Institution in the years 1998-2007. These patients were treated by transsphenoidal endonasal approach (TNS) for resection of non-functioning pituitary adenomas (n = 31), GH-secreting adenomas (n = 4) and ACTH-secreting adenomas (n = 8). Clinical records reported a macroadenoma with tumour-related mass symptoms in about 80 % of patients; single or multiple pituitary deficits were present in 44 % of patients. Regarding comorbidities, cardiac disease was the most frequently observed (86 %); assessment of anaesthesiological risk indicated a moderate to severe ASA score in most patients, 11 % showing a 4-5 score. On the basis of current criteria, our retrospective analysis revealed that cure was achieved in 54 % of patients. The outcome was similar to that observed in the general population of patients undergoing transphenoidal surgery in our centre, without differences in the rate of surgical and endocrinological cure, minor and major surgical complications and hospitalization duration. In particular, no significant anaesthesiological complications were observed and no patient developed either permanent diabetes insipidus or cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea. In conclusion, in specialized centres the surgical treatment of pituitary adenomas via the transsphenoidal route can be a safe and effective procedure even in elderly patients. PMID:22488370

  2. Management of chronic empyema with unexpandable lung in poor surgical risk patients using an empyema tube

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Abhishek; Jantz, Michael A; Penley, Andrea M; Mehta, Hiren J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: High preoperative risk precludes decortication and other surgical interventions in some patients with chronic empyema. We manage such patients by converting the chest tube into an “empyema tube,” cutting the tube near the skin and securing the end with a sterile clip to allow for open pleural drainage. The patient is followed serially, and the tube gradually withdrawn based on radiological resolution and amount of drainage. Methods: Between 2010 and 2014, patients with chronic empyema and unexpandable lung, deemed high-risk surgical candidates, had staged chest tube removal, and were included for the study. The volume of fluid drained, culture results, duration of drainage, functional status, and comorbidities were recorded. Measurements and Results: Eight patients qualified. All had resolution of infection. The tube was removed after an average of 73.6 ± 49.73 (95% confidence interval [CI]) days. The mean duration of antibiotic treatment was 5.37 ± 1.04 (95% CI) weeks. None required surgery or experienced complications from an empyema tube. Conclusion: A strategy of empyema tube drainage with staged removal is an option in appropriately selected patients with chronic empyema, unexpandable lung, and poor surgical candidacy.

  3. Using a screening tool to improve timely referral of patients from acute oncology-haematology to palliative care services.

    PubMed

    Begum, Akhtari

    2013-01-01

    This project was done at specialist cancer hospital in Qatar. At a haematology-oncology inpatient department most patients were not getting access to palliative care unless they were at the very end stages of life. Data collected from 2008-2011 showed significant numbers of patients were dying within one month of their transfer to palliative care. There was no standard measure to identify the prospective palliative care patients. A multidisciplinary team developed a Palliative care referral screening tool based on the National Cancer Care Network guideline. Retrospective medical record review done from January to April 2012 showed a mean of 68% of patients who scored more than five were not consulted, 32% of patients who scored more than seven were not transferred to palliative care and seven percent died without any referral. The team used various kinds of quality planning, analysis and improvement tools in the form of process mapping, value analysis, Fish Bone diagrams, stakeholders' analysis and communication, physician survey, "Pareto's principal" (80 / 20 rule, the law of vital few) and other data collection tools. The palliative care referral process was standardised by preparing and implementing an objective scoring tool based on international best practice. It changed the referral culture and helped manage the psychological barriers of patients, families and caregivers. Extensive orientation and education of all key stakeholders was implemented. Monthly auditing of patient records was carried out. The aim has been achieved, exceeded and sustained, and we reduced the percentage of patients who scored more than five without palliative consultation from a mean of 68% to 16% and those who scored more than seven without palliative care transfer from a mean of thirty two percent to three percent, after four months of the project's implementation. Standardising the referral process and creating an objective referral tool is needed to facilitate safe, collaborative, continuous and patient centered care. Timely referral of cancer patients to palliative care minimises patient and caregiver distress, ensures better quality of life, and provides an appropriate measure for end of life care. PMID:26734188

  4. Does duration of preoperative sciatica impact surgical outcomes in patients with lumbar disc herniation?

    PubMed

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Ghayem Hasankhani, Ebrahim; Kachooei, Amir Reza; Rahimi, Mohammad Dawood; Khanzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background. In lumbar disc herniation, most authors recommend nonoperative treatment for the first few weeks of presentation, but what about the upper limit of this golden period? The aim of this study is to assess the effect of preoperative sciatica duration on surgical outcome of lumbar disc herniation. Methods. We retrospectively evaluated 240 patients (124 males and 116 females) with a mean age of 36.4 ± 5.9 years (range 16 to 63) surgically treated due to primary stable L4-L5 disc herniation. The patients were placed into two groups: with more and less than 12-month duration of preoperative sciatalgia. Disability and pain were measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Wilcoxon test and Mann-Whitney U test were used for statistical analysis. Results. Total mean duration of preoperative sciatalgia and follow-up period were 13.3 months (range 2 to 65) and 33.7 ± 5.1 months (range 24 to 72), respectively. Comparison between the groups showed that duration of preoperative sciatalgia either less or more than 12 months did not affect the surgical outcomes significantly. Conclusions. More or less than 12-month duration of preoperative sciatalgia may not affect the surgical outcomes of simple lumbar disc herniation in the patients undergoing discectomy. PMID:24616807

  5. Factors predicting surgical resection in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Wu, Jin-shu; Wang, Xin-tian; Lv, Pin; Gong, Lian-sheng; Liu, Gong; Tian, Bu-ning; Li, Ya-yong; Jiang, Bo

    2014-08-01

    Here, we investigate the potential factors that affect the outcome of patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICC) and cirrhosis. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data and pathological features of 58 patients with ICC and cirrhosis who underwent liver resection between July 2000 and March 2008, and analyzed the prognostic risk factors by means of univariate and multivariate analyses. The overall morbidity and mortality were 40% and 3.3%, respectively. The overall median survival was 24 months, and the 1-, 3-, and 5-year actuarial survival rates were 53%, 18%, and 10%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that Child-Pugh classification, hypoalbuminemia, vascular invasion, lymphnodes metastasis, tumor-nodes-metastasis (TNM) staging system, positive surgical margins, and high perioperative blood transfusion volumes were all significantly associated with poor survival. Multivariate analysis confirmed that hypoalbuminemia, vascular invasion, positive surgical margins, and high perioperative blood transfusion volume were survival related, with hazard ratios (HR) of 2.58, 3.12, 3.57, and 1.98, respectively. Surgical resection is an effective treatment for patients affected by ICC and cirrhosis. Predictive factors, including hypoalbuminemia, vascular invasion, positive surgical margins, and high perioperative blood transfusion volumes are all related to poor survival. PMID:24476002

  6. Surgical errors and risks – the head and neck cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Harréus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery. PMID:24403972

  7. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable patients to play a role in their care. Critical for most patients, this also improves the physician-patient relationship, the quality of cancer care, and the well-being of patients and their families. PMID:24857081

  8. Conflicting Priorities in Social Legislation and Medicine: Gynaeco-oncology Patients and their Right to Participate in Society

    PubMed Central

    Simoes, E.; Graf, J.; Wallwiener, D.; Brucker, S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the declining mortality rates, malignant diseases have gained a chronic character for many gynaeco-oncology patients. The patients can expect to participate in social life and to an increasing extent in professional life for longer lengths of time. Promotion of rehabilitation and participation is an issue of the German 9th Social Security Code that explicitly places a focus on women. This is mainly of relevance for tumour patients with regard to assessment of the degree of severe disability, to compensate for disease-induced impairments and the possibilities for improving the participation of the afflicted subjects, especially by means of protective rights in professional life. Indeed, tumour patients do sometimes find themselves confronted with conflicting priorities between the entitlements guaranteed by social legislation and the compensation conferred by the health-care services, which can then be avoided when the facts are sufficiently known. For this purpose, the physician must be fully aware of the legal situation. The present article provides an overview of the procedures and reference points for appraisals. Patients need partners among their responsible physicians to help in the assertion of their claims. From the physicianʼs side it is necessary to classify the reported complaints within the ever increasing knowledge about the direct side effects and the long-term side effects of cancer therapies. Against the background of an often life-long mental stress and the uncertain risk of recurrence, it should also be considered whether the concept of healing probation is in support of the targets of long-term disease management and social reintegration, also in the interest of society in general. PMID:26556909

  9. Clinical effect of a positive surgical margin after hepatectomy on survival of patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chun-Nan; Hsieh, Feng-Jen; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Chen, Jen-Shi; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Jan, Yi-Yin; Chen, Miin-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Background Several unfavorable prognostic factors have been proposed for peripheral cholangiocarcinoma (PCC) in patients undergoing hepatectomy, including gross type of tumor, vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis, a high carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level, and a positive resection margin. However, the clinical effect of a positive surgical margin on the survival of patients with PCC after hepatectomy still needs to be clarified due to conflicting results. Methods A total of 224 PCC patients who underwent hepatic resection with curative intent between 1977 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. Eighty-nine patients had a positive resection margin, with 62 having a microscopically positive margin and 27 a grossly positive margin (R2). The clinicopathological features, outcomes, and recurrence pattern were compared with patients with curative hepatectomy. Results PCC patients with hepatolithiasis, periductal infiltrative or periductal infiltrative mixed with mass-forming growth, higher T stage, and more advanced stage tended to have higher positive resection margin rates after hepatectomy. PCC patients who underwent curative hepatectomy had a significantly higher survival rate than did those with a positive surgical margin. When PCC patients underwent hepatectomy with a positive resection margin, the histological grade of the tumor, nodal positivity, and chemotherapy significantly affected overall survival. Locoregional recurrence was the most common pattern of recurrence. Conclusion A positive resection margin had an unfavorable effect on overall survival in PCC patients undergoing hepatectomy. In these patients, the prognosis was determined by the biology of the tumor, including differentiation and nodal positivity, and chemotherapy increased overall survival. PMID:25552905

  10. Utilitarian prioritization of radiation oncology patients based on maximization of population tumour control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Li, W.; Jennings, L.; Kearvell, R.; Bydder, S.

    2013-06-01

    An objective method for establishing patient prioritization in the context of a radiotherapy waiting list is investigated. This is based on a utilitarian objective, being the greatest probability of local tumour control in the population of patients. A numerical simulation is developed and a clinical patient case-mix is used to determine the influence of the characteristics of the patient population on resulting optimal patient scheduling. With the utilitarian objective, large gains in tumour control probability (TCP) can be achieved for individuals or cohorts by prioritizing patients for that fraction of the patient population with relatively small sacrifices in TCP for a smaller fraction of the population. For a waiting list in steady state with five patients per day commencing treatment and leaving the list (and so with five patients per day entering the list), and a mean wait time of 35 days and a maximum of 90 days, optimized wait times ranged from a mean of one day for patients with tumour types with short effective doubling times to a mean of 66.9 days for prostate cancer patients. It is found that, when seeking the optimal daily order of patients on the waiting list in a constrained simulation, the relative rather than absolute value of TCP is the determinant of the resulting optimal waiting times. An increase in the mean waiting time mostly influences (increases) the optimal waiting times of patients with fast-growing tumours. The proportional representation of groups (separated by tumour type) in the patient population has an influence on the resulting distribution of optimal waiting times for patients in those groups, though has only a minor influence on the optimal mean waiting time for each group.

  11. The current and future role of the medical oncologist in the professional care for cancer patients: a position paper by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    PubMed

    Popescu, R A; Schäfer, R; Califano, R; Eckert, R; Coleman, R; Douillard, J-Y; Cervantes, A; Casali, P G; Sessa, C; Van Cutsem, E; de Vries, E; Pavlidis, N; Fumasoli, K; Wörmann, B; Samonigg, H; Cascinu, S; Cruz Hernández, J J; Howard, A J; Ciardiello, F; Stahel, R A; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    The number of cancer patients in Europe is rising and significant advances in basic and applied cancer research are making the provision of optimal care more challenging. The concept of cancer as a systemic, highly heterogeneous and complex disease has increased the awareness that quality cancer care should be provided by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of highly qualified healthcare professionals. Cancer patients also have the right to benefit from medical progress by receiving optimal treatment from adequately trained and highly skilled medical professionals. Built on the highest standards of professional training and continuing medical education, medical oncology is recognised as an independent medical specialty in many European countries. Medical oncology is a core member of the MDT and offers cancer patients a comprehensive and systemic approach to treatment and care, while ensuring evidence-based, safe and cost-effective use of cancer drugs and preserving the quality of life of cancer patients through the entire 'cancer journey'. Medical oncologists are also engaged in clinical and translational research to promote innovation and new therapies and they contribute to cancer diagnosis, prevention and research, making a difference for patients in a dynamic, stimulating professional environment. Medical oncologists play an important role in shaping the future of healthcare through innovation and are also actively involved at the political level to ensure a maximum contribution of the profession to Society and to tackle future challenges. This position paper summarises the multifarious and vital contributions of medical oncology and medical oncologists to today's and tomorrow's professional cancer care. PMID:24335854

  12. Daily baseline skin care in the prevention, treatment, and supportive care of skin toxicity in oncology patients: recommendations from a multinational expert panel.

    PubMed

    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Humbert, Phillipe; Krutman, Jean; Luger, Thomas; Triller, Raoul; Rougier, André; Seite, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Skin reactions due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy are a significant problem for an important number of cancer patients. While effective for treating cancer, they disturb cutaneous barrier function, causing a reaction soon after initiation of treatment that impacts patient quality of life. Managing these symptoms with cosmetics and nonpharmaceutical skin care products for camouflage or personal hygiene may be important for increasing patient self-esteem. However, inappropriate product choice or use could worsen side effects. Although recommendations exist for the pharmaceutical treatment of skin reactions, there are no recommendations for the choice or use of dermatologic skin care products for oncology patients. The present guidelines were developed by a board of European experts in dermatology and oncology to provide cancer care professionals with guidance for the appropriate use of non-pharmaceutical, dermocosmetic skin care management of cutaneous toxicities associated with radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, including epidermal growth factor inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. The experts hope that these recommendations will improve the management of cutaneous side effects and hence quality of life for oncology patients. PMID:24353440

  13. Daily baseline skin care in the prevention, treatment, and supportive care of skin toxicity in oncology patients: recommendations from a multinational expert panel

    PubMed Central

    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Humbert, Phillipe; Krutman, Jean; Luger, Thomas; Triller, Raoul; Rougier, André; Seite, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Skin reactions due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy are a significant problem for an important number of cancer patients. While effective for treating cancer, they disturb cutaneous barrier function, causing a reaction soon after initiation of treatment that impacts patient quality of life. Managing these symptoms with cosmetics and nonpharmaceutical skin care products for camouflage or personal hygiene may be important for increasing patient self-esteem. However, inappropriate product choice or use could worsen side effects. Although recommendations exist for the pharmaceutical treatment of skin reactions, there are no recommendations for the choice or use of dermatologic skin care products for oncology patients. The present guidelines were developed by a board of European experts in dermatology and oncology to provide cancer care professionals with guidance for the appropriate use of non-pharmaceutical, dermocosmetic skin care management of cutaneous toxicities associated with radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, including epidermal growth factor inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. The experts hope that these recommendations will improve the management of cutaneous side effects and hence quality of life for oncology patients. PMID:24353440

  14. [Using arts therapies in psycho-oncology: evaluation of an exploratory study implemented in an out-patient setting].

    PubMed

    Schiltz, L; Zimoch, A

    2013-01-01

    According to the state-of-the-art in health psychology and psycho-oncology, a cancerous disease, as well as the accompanying medical treatments, is a source ofintense emotional stress. As feelings of insecurity and anxiety are likely to induce negative effects on immune defences, those effects may overlap with the cancerous disease and complicate its evolution. As arts therapies tend to favour the imaginary and symbolic elaboration of the tensions of daily life, as well as the re appropriation of one's body and personal history, different artistic mediations may occupy an important function in the psychological follow-up of the patient. Following an exploratory study in a hospital, we carried out an action-research in an out-patient setting during six moths. The arts therapeutic treatment comprehended alternatively drawing and writing sessions while listening to music, opening tracks for a thorough verbal elaboration. The evaluation was based on psychometric scales (HADS and MDBF), rating scales for the pictorial and literary production and a semi-structured interview. According to the results of the quantitative analyses, based on non parametric statistical procedures for small groups and non metric data, as well as to the qualitative content analyses, arts therapies could become a valuable treating measure within a multidisciplinary bio-psycho-social approach. PMID:23808110

  15. Interprofessional patient-centred practice in oncology teams: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Karine; Dubois, Sylvie; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2015-03-01

    Studies on interprofessional practice usually report professionals' viewpoints and document organizational, procedural and relational factors influencing that practice. Considering the importance of interprofessional patient-centred (IPPC) practice, it seems necessary to describe it in detail in an actual context of care, from the perspective of patients, their families and health-care professionals. The goal of this study was to describe IPPC practice throughout the continuum of cancer care. A qualitative multiple case study was completed with two interprofessional teams from a Canadian teaching hospital. Interviews were conducted with patients, their families and professionals, and observation was carried out. Three themes were illustrated by current team practice: welcoming the person as a unique individual, but still requiring the patient to comply; the paradoxical coexistence of patient-centred discourse and professional-centred practice; and triggering team collaboration with the culmination of the patient's situation. Several influential factors were described, including the way the team works; the physical environment; professionals' and patients'/family members' stance on the collaboration; professionals' stance on patients and their families; and patients' stance on professionals. Finally, themes describing the desired IPPC practice reflect the wish of most participants to be more involved. They were: providing support in line with the patient's experience and involvement; respecting patients by not imposing professionals' values and goals; and consistency and regularity in the collaboration of all members. PMID:25070427

  16. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  17. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An

  18. Thinking in three's: Changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-01-01

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won’t ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to bring these team members together and influence the emergence of a safer OR. PMID:23239908

  19. Thinking in three's: changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-12-14

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won't ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to bring these team members together and influence the emergence of a safer OR. PMID:23239908

  20. A Comparison of Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia With Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Management After Major Gynecologic Oncologic Surgeries: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Farnaz; Rasooli, Sousan; Baybordi, Ali; Golzari, Samad E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain after major open gynecologic surgeries requires appropriate pain management. Objectives: This study aimed at comparing perioperative patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) and patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) after gynecologic oncology surgeries. Patients and Methods: In this clinical trial study, 90 patients with American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) class I or II scheduled for gynecologic oncologic surgeries were randomly allocated to two groups (45 patients each group) to receive: patient-controlled epidural analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl (PCEA group), or patient controlled intravenous analgesia (IV PCA group) with fentanyl, pethidine and ondansetron. Postoperative pain was assessed over 48 hours using the visual analog scale (VAS). The frequency of rescue analgesia was recorded. Occurrence of any concomitant events such as nausea, vomiting, ileus, purities, sedation and respiratory complications were recorded postoperatively. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in demographic data including; age, weight, ASA physical status, duration of surgery, intraoperative bleeding, and the amount of blood transfusion (P > 0.05), between the two studied groups. Severity of postoperative pain was not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05); however, after first patient mobilization, pain was significantly lower in the epidural group than the IV group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the incidence of complications such as nausea, vomiting, purities or ileus (P > 0.05). Nevertheless, the incidence and severity of sedation was significantly higher in the IV group (P < 0.001). Respiratory depression was higher in the IV group than the epidural group; this difference, however, was not significant (P = 0.11). In the epidural group, only 10 patients (22.2%) had mild and transient lower extremities parenthesis. Conclusions: Both intravenous and epidural analgesic techniques with combination of analgesics provide proper postoperative pain control after major gynecologic cancer surgeries without any significant complications. Regarding lower sedative and respiratory depressant effects of epidural analgesia, it seems that this method is a safer technique for postoperative pain relief in these patients. PMID:26587406

  1. Value of PCR in surgically treated patients with staphylococcal infective endocarditis: a 4-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zaloudíková, B; Němcová, E; Pol, J; Sorm, Z; Wurmová, S; Novotná, K; Vaněrková, M; Holá, V; Růžička, F; Dušek, L; Němec, P; Freiberger, T

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to establish a diagnostic value for broad-range polymerase chain reaction (br-PCR) and staphylococci-specific multiplex PCR (ssm-PCR) performed on surgical material from patients with staphylococcal infective endocarditis (IE). Data were analysed retrospectively from 60 patients with suspected staphylococcal IE and 59 controls who were surgically treated at three cardiosurgery centres over 4 years. Both PCR tests showed high agreement and could be aggregated. In patients with definite and rejected IE, the clinical sensitivity and specificity of PCR reached 89 and 95%, respectively. Tissue culture (TC) and PCR agreed with blood culture (BC) in 29% and 67% of IE cases. TC helped to determine aetiology in five BC negative cases while PCR aided in nine cases. Out of 52 patients with conclusive staphylococcal IE, 40 were diagnosed with S. aureus and 12 with coagulase-negative staphylococci. PCR was shown to be highly superior to TC in confirming preoperative diagnosis of IE. In addition to aid in culture negative patients, PCR helped to establish or refine aetiology in inconclusive cases. We suggest that simultaneous br-PCR and ssm-PCR performed on surgical material together with histopathology could significantly increase the performance of current Duke criteria. PMID:21964590

  2. Management of spontaneous extramedullary spinal haematomas: results in eight patients after MRI diagnosis and surgical decompression.

    PubMed Central

    Langmayr, J J; Ortler, M; Dessl, A; Twerdy, K; Aichner, F; Felber, S

    1995-01-01

    Spinal cord compression due to extradural and subdural haemorrhage is a neurosurgical emergency. Differences in clinical presentation in relation to localisation of the haematoma, value of MRI as a diagnostic tool, surgical treatment, and prognosis were investigated in a retrospective case series of eight patients with extradural (n = four) and subdural (n = four) haematomas. Results of MRI were compared with operative findings and proved to be of high sensitivity in defining the type of bleeding and delineating craniocaudal extension and ventrodorsal location. Surgical treatment by decompressive laminectomy, haematoma evacuation, and postoperative high dose corticosteroids resulted in resolution of symptoms in five patients and improvement in the clinical situation in two patients. One patient with a chronic subdural haematoma had a second operation because of arachnoidal adhesions. One patient presented with a complete cord transection syndrome due to an acute subdural haematoma and remained paraplegic. It is concluded that prompt, reliable, and non-invasive diagnosis by MRI leads to efficient surgical treatment and a favourable outcome in this rare condition. Images PMID:7561928

  3. Efficacies of surgical treatments based on Harris hip score in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengwei; Yang, Fengjian; Lin, Weilong; Fan, Yongqian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacies of four surgical treatments, i.e., total hip arthroplasty (THA), internal fixation (IF), hemiarthroplasty (HA), and artificial femoral head replacement (artificial FHR), by performing a network meta-analysis based on Harris hip score (HHS) in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture. Methods: In strict accordance with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, randomized controlled trails (RCTs) were screened and selected from a larger group of studies that were retrieved through a comprehensive search of scientific literature databases, further complimented by manual search. The resultant high-quality data from final selected studies were analyzed using Stata 12.0 software. Results: A total of 3680 studies were initially retrieved from database search, and 15 RCTs were eventually incorporated into this meta-analysis, containing 1781 elderly patients who had undergone various surgical treatments for femoral neck fracture (THA group = 604; HA group = 604; IF group = 495; artificial FHR group = 78). Our major result revealed a statistically significant difference in HHS of femoral neck fracture when HA and IF groups were compared with THA. No differences were detected in the HHS of femoral neck fracture undergoing artificial FHR and THA. The surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) value of HHS, in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture after surgery, revealed that IF has the highest value. Conclusions: The current network meta-analysis results suggest that IF is the superlative surgical procedure for femoral neck fracture patients, and IF significantly improves the HHS in femoral neck fracture patients. PMID:26221216

  4. Prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients before the start of chemotherapy: potential of the distress thermometer as an ultra-brief screening instrument

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Jorge; Campla, Cristóbal; D’Aguzan, Nicole; Barraza, Soledad; Padilla, Oslando; Sánchez, Cesar; Palma, Silvia; González, Matías

    2014-01-01

    Emotional distress (ED) is greater for oncology patients in comparison with the general population, and this has implications for the quality of life of the patient and his/her family, adherence to the treatment, and eventually, survivorship. In general, the detection of these symptoms is low, which explains the need for detection systems appropriate to the clinical reality of the oncology team. The objective of this study is to evaluate for the first time the usefulness of an ultra-brief screening instrument [distress thermometer (DT)], in a group of Chilean oncology patients. A total of 166 outpatients were evaluated at the Cancer Center of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, before starting chemotherapy. Two screening instruments were applied: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and DT. The application of HADS resulted in a prevalence of 32.7% of anxiety symptoms (HADS-A ≥ 8), 15.7% of depression symptoms (HADS-D ≥ 8), and 39.8% had a total score of HADS-T ≥ 11. The DT resulted in the prevalence of 32.5% of distress or ED (DT ≥ 5). The validity of the DT was evaluated as a screening tool in comparison with HADS, observing, in relation to the anxiety scale (HADS-A), a sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 78.4% (DT ≥ 4); depression (HADS-D), a sensitivity of 69.2% and specificity of 74.3% (DT ≥ 5); and in relation to the total scale (HADS-T), a sensitivity of 68.2% and specificity of 73.0% (DT ≥ 4). This study demonstrates the elevated prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients, before the start of chemotherapy, and confirms the potential of the DT as a brief screening instrument with easy application. The DT will allow the clinician to increase the detection threshold in the Chilean oncology population, intervene in a timely manner, and contribute to the comprehensive handling of the oncology patient without affecting the time needed for assistance. PMID:24966889

  5. Prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients before the start of chemotherapy: potential of the distress thermometer as an ultra-brief screening instrument.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Jorge; Campla, Cristóbal; D'Aguzan, Nicole; Barraza, Soledad; Padilla, Oslando; Sánchez, Cesar; Palma, Silvia; González, Matías

    2014-01-01

    Emotional distress (ED) is greater for oncology patients in comparison with the general population, and this has implications for the quality of life of the patient and his/her family, adherence to the treatment, and eventually, survivorship. In general, the detection of these symptoms is low, which explains the need for detection systems appropriate to the clinical reality of the oncology team. The objective of this study is to evaluate for the first time the usefulness of an ultra-brief screening instrument [distress thermometer (DT)], in a group of Chilean oncology patients. A total of 166 outpatients were evaluated at the Cancer Center of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, before starting chemotherapy. Two screening instruments were applied: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and DT. The application of HADS resulted in a prevalence of 32.7% of anxiety symptoms (HADS-A ≥ 8), 15.7% of depression symptoms (HADS-D ≥ 8), and 39.8% had a total score of HADS-T ≥ 11. The DT resulted in the prevalence of 32.5% of distress or ED (DT ≥ 5). The validity of the DT was evaluated as a screening tool in comparison with HADS, observing, in relation to the anxiety scale (HADS-A), a sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 78.4% (DT ≥ 4); depression (HADS-D), a sensitivity of 69.2% and specificity of 74.3% (DT ≥ 5); and in relation to the total scale (HADS-T), a sensitivity of 68.2% and specificity of 73.0% (DT ≥ 4). This study demonstrates the elevated prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients, before the start of chemotherapy, and confirms the potential of the DT as a brief screening instrument with easy application. The DT will allow the clinician to increase the detection threshold in the Chilean oncology population, intervene in a timely manner, and contribute to the comprehensive handling of the oncology patient without affecting the time needed for assistance. PMID:24966889

  6. Surgical Management of Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Marfan Syndrome during Infancy and Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung Re; Kim, Woong-Han; Choi, Eun Seok; Cho, Sungkyu; Jang, Woo Sung; Kim, Yong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitral regurgitation is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity in pediatric patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this study was to contribute to determining the appropriate surgical strategy for these patients. Methods From January 1992 to May 2013, six patients with Marfan syndrome underwent surgery for mitral regurgitation in infancy or early childhood. Results The median age at the time of surgery was 47 months (range, 3 to 140 months) and the median follow-up period was 3.6 years (range, 1.3 to 15.5 years). Mitral valve repair was performed in two patients and four patients underwent mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. There was one reoperation requiring valve replacement for aggravated mitral regurgitation two months after repair. The four patients who underwent mitral valve replacement did not experience any complications related to the prosthetic valve. One late death occurred due to progressive emphysema and tricuspid regurgitation. Conclusion Although repair can be an option for some patients, it may not be durable in infantile-onset Marfan syndrome patients who require surgical management during infancy or childhood. Mitral valve replacement is a feasible treatment option for these patients. PMID:25705592

  7. Optimizing Patient Preparation and Surgical Experience Using eHealth Technology

    PubMed Central

    Forshaw, Kristy; Carey, Mariko; Robinson, Sancha; Kerridge, Ross; Proietto, Anthony; Sanson-Fisher, Rob

    2015-01-01

    With population growth and aging, it is expected that the demand for surgical services will increase. However, increased complexity of procedures, time pressures on staff, and the demand for a patient-centered approach continue to challenge a system characterized by finite health care resources. Suboptimal care is reported in each phase of surgical care, from the time of consent to discharge and long-term follow-up. Novel strategies are thus needed to address these challenges to produce effective and sustainable improvements in surgical care across the care pathway. The eHealth programs represent a potential strategy for improving the quality of care delivered across various phases of care, thereby improving patient outcomes. This discussion paper describes (1) the key functions of eHealth programs including information gathering, transfer, and exchange; (2) examples of eHealth programs in overcoming challenges to optimal surgical care across the care pathway; and (3) the potential challenges and future directions for implementing eHealth programs in this setting. The eHealth programs are a promising alternative for collecting patient-reported outcome data, providing access to credible health information and strategies to enable patients to take an active role in their own health care, and promote efficient communication between patients and health care providers. However, additional rigorous intervention studies examining the needs of potential role of eHealth programs in augmenting patients’ preparation and recovery from surgery, and subsequent impact on patient outcomes and processes of care are needed to advance the field. Furthermore, evidence for the benefits of eHealth programs in supporting carers and strategies to maximize engagement from end users are needed. PMID:26330206

  8. Prevalence and Determinants of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shoar, Saeed; Naderan, Mohammad; Aghajani, Motahareh; Sahimi-Izadian, Elaheh; Hosseini-Araghi, Negin; Khorgami, Zhamak

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Mood disorders are prevalent in hospitalized patients. However, risk factors for early diagnosis have not been studied exclusively in surgical patients. Our study aimed to investigate the prevalence and determinants of depression and anxiety symptoms in surgical patients. Methods We included 392 surgical patients in this prospective cross-sectional study, which took place between June 2011 and June 2012. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to screen for symptoms of depression and anxiety at weekly interviews. Regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for early (the day after admission) and late (one week or more) in-hospital psychiatry symptoms. Results Depression and anxiety symptoms increased from the time of admission toward longer hospital stay. Scores obtained in the second and third weeks of admission were associated with the need for surgery while HADS in the third week was associated with lack of familial support and being under the poverty line (p < 0.050). Regression model analysis showed that early depression was associated with female gender, and early anxiety was inversely affected by female gender and protected by higher education level. A history of mood disorder was a risk factor. Later anxiety was also associated with longer hospital stay. Conclusions Depression and anxiety symptoms are a major concern in surgical patients especially in females and those with a history of mood disorders or lower educational level. Patients with a longer hospital stay, in particular, those with underlying diseases, postoperative complications, lack of familial support, and the need for reoperation were also at increased risk. PMID:27162587

  9. Non surgical predicting factors for patient satisfaction after third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer-Martí, José-Carlos; Aloy-Prósper, Amparo; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David

    2016-01-01

    Background In the third molar surgery, it is important to focus not only on surgical skills, but also on patient satisfaction. Classically studies have been focused on surgery and surgeon’s empathy, but there are non-surgical factors that may influence patient satisfaction. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study was performed on 100 patients undergoing surgical extractions of impacted mandibular third molars treated from October 2013 to July 2014 in the Oral Surgery Unit of the University of Valencia. A questionnaire (20 questions) with a 10-point Likert scale was provided. The questionnaire assessed the ease to find the center, the ease to get oriented within the center, the burocratic procedures, the time from the first visit to the date of surgical intervention, waiting time in the waiting room, the comfort at the waiting room, the administrative staff (kindness and efficiency to solve formalities), medical staff (kindness, efficiency, reliability, dedication), personal data care, clarity in the information received (about the surgery, postoperative care and resolution of the doubts), available means and state of facilities. Outcome variables were overall satisfaction, and recommendation of the center. Statistical analysis was made using the multiple linear regression analysis. Results Significant correlations were found between all variables and overall satisfaction. The multiple regression model showed that the efficiency of the surgeon and the clarity of the information were statistically significant to overall satisfaction and recommendation of the center. The kindness of the administrative staff, available means, the state of facilities and the comfort at the waiting room were statistically significant to the recommendation of the center. Conclusions Patient satisfaction directly depends on the efficiency of the surgeon and clarity of the clinical information received about the procedure. Appreciation of these predictive factors may help clinicians to provide optimal care for impacted third molar surgery patients. Key words:Patient satisfaction, third molar, questionnaire. PMID:26827054

  10. Satisfaction of early breast cancer patients with discussions during initial oncology consultations with a medical oncologist

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R. F.; Hill, C.; Burant, C. J.; Siminoff, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this report is to extend the current understanding of patient satisfaction by examining expectations of a sample of breast cancer patients and concordance with their medical oncologists about the content of consultations and the importance of consultation items. Methods Three hundred and ninety-five female early stage breast cancer patients of 56 oncologists participated. Patients and oncologists completed a matched questionnaire measuring (a) met expectations, (b) concordance over content and item importance, and (c) satisfaction. Results Overall patient satisfaction was extremely high (x = 91/100%) although expectations were not met at the stated level desired. Patients and physicians disagreed over what was conveyed and received. Higher overall satisfaction was predicted by levels of met expectations (unstandardized beta =0.69, p =0.008, SE =0.26) and concordance over (a) content (unstandardized beta =1.09, p =0.002, SE =0.34) and (b) importance (unstandardized beta =−0.78, p =0.006, SE 0.28). Conclusion Although patient expectations were not well met and physician–patient discord was high about the content of consultations and the importance of consultation items, patients reported high levels of satisfaction. Expectation fulfillment and levels of concordance predicted satisfaction. PMID:18484569

  11. The optimal organization of gynecologic oncology services: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fung-Kee-Fung, M.; Kennedy, E.B.; Biagi, J.; Colgan, T.; D’Souza, D.; Elit, L.M.; Hunter, A.; Irish, J.; McLeod, R.; Rosen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background A system-level organizational guideline for gynecologic oncology was identified by a provincial cancer agency as a key priority based on input from stakeholders, data showing more limited availability of multidisciplinary or specialist care in lower-volume than in higher-volume hospitals in the relevant jurisdiction, and variable rates of staging for ovarian and endometrial cancer patients. Methods A systematic review assessed the relationship of the organization of gynecologic oncology services with patient survival and surgical outcomes. The electronic databases medline and embase (ovid: 1996 through 9 January 2015) were searched using terms related to gynecologic malignancies combined with organization of services, patterns of care, and various facility and physician characteristics. Outcomes of interest included overall or disease-specific survival, short-term survival, adequate staging, and degree of cytoreduction or optimal cytoreduction (or both) for ovarian cancer patients by hospital or physician type, and rate of discrepancy in initial diagnoses and intraoperative consultation between non-specialist pathologists and gyne-oncology–specialist pathologists. Results One systematic review and sixteen additional primary studies met the inclusion criteria. The evidence base as a whole was judged to be of lower quality; however, a trend toward improved outcomes with centralization of gynecologic oncology was found, particularly with respect to the gynecologic oncology care of patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Conclusions Improvements in outcomes with centralization of gynecologic oncology services can be attributed to a number of factors, including access to specialist care and multidisciplinary team management. Findings of this systematic review should be used with caution because of the limitations of the evidence base; however, an expert consensus process made it possible to create recommendations for implementation. PMID:26300679

  12. Screening for Distress in Routine Oncological Care—A Survey in 520 Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Loquai, Carmen; Scheurich, Vera; Syring, Nils; Schmidtmann, Irene; Rietz, Stephan; Werner, Andreas; Grabbe, Stephan; Beutel, Manfred E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite the increasing incidence of melanoma little is known about patients' emotional distress associated with this disease. Supplemented by the problem list (PL), the distress thermometer (DT) is a recommended screening instrument to measure psychosocial distress in cancer patients. Our objective was to explore the acceptance and the feasibility of the DT and PL as a concise screening tool in an ambulatory setting for routine care and to elucidate determinants of distress in melanoma patients with regard to sociodemographic and clinical variables. Methods Consecutive melanoma outpatients were asked to complete the DT with the PL prior to their scheduled consultation. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from the patients' charts. Clinical data included melanoma stage, time since diagnosis, previous treatment, current treatment, and other cancer disease. Results Out of 734 patients recruited into the study, 520 patients (71%) completed both the DT and the PL. Forty-seven percent met the ≥5 cut-off score for distress. Younger and employed patients reported higher distress than older and retired patients. A cut-off score of ≥5 was closely associated with self-reported emotional sources of distress, with practical problems, especially at work, family problems (dealing with the partner), and physical problems like pain, appearance, getting around, and nausea. Apart from higher distress under current systemic treatment, no associations were found between distress and clinical data. Conclusion The DT together with the PL seems to be an economically reasonable screening tool to measure psychosocial distress in melanoma patients. In particular, younger melanoma patients who are currently employed are prone to experience distress at some point after diagnosis, but there appears to be almost no association between clinical data and the extent of distress. To characterize the impact of distress on disease outcome and quality of life in melanoma patients, further research is needed. PMID:23861748

  13. Surgical Outcomes of Laparoscopic Liver Resection in Elderly Patients: A Comparative Study From a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hiroki; Iwashita, Yukio; Watanabe, Kiminori; Takayama, Hiroomi; Kawasaki, Takahide; Yada, Kazuhiro; Ohta, Masayuki; Kitano, Seigo; Inomata, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    The life expectancy continues to gradually increase worldwide. Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) was recently reported to be a relatively safe procedure for treatment of liver disease because of the development of new techniques and instruments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of elderly patients who underwent LLR. Of these 61 patients who underwent LLR in our institute from January 2010 through April 2014, 21 were aged 75 years and above (group E), and 40 were aged below 75 years (group NE). Patient characteristics were retrospectively analyzed between the 2 groups. The results showed that patient characteristics were similar between the 2 groups, although the incidence of hypertension was significantly greater among patients in group E. There were no significant differences in the incidence of postoperative complications or length of hospital stay between the 2 groups. In conclusion, LLR for elderly patients was a feasible procedure compared with nonelderly patients. PMID:26121548

  14. [Remarks on the physician-patient relationship with cancer patients. Prerequisites, function, and goal of so-called Balint groups in an internal-oncological department].

    PubMed

    Meerwein, F; Kauf, S; Schneider, G

    1976-01-01

    Drawing on their experience with their own cancer patients and with the Balint Group in the Oncological Department of Zürich's University Hospital, the authors describe the special problems arising in the doctor-patient relationship in this field. They show how the diagnosis of cancer can give rise to a feeling of sudden and complete object loss in the patient, thereby confronting the doctor with his own fear of death. The mobilization of archaic defence mechanisms in both the doctor and the patients can lead to an insoluble double-blind situation unless the doctor is able to give up his defence position and thus make it possible for the patient to give up his own fear of death and to accept the nature of his illness. The authors show how the doctor can break through the isolation of the patient in whose body-ego an archaic bad inner-object has been activated by the cancer, and build up good inner objects for him again. In the last chapter Winnicott's idea the "intermediate area" is shown to shed a new light on the phenomenon of redenial or belief in immortality. PMID:961096

  15. Detection of serum cytokines before and after pharmacological and surgical treatment in patients with cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Naik, M I; Tenguria, R K; Haq, E

    2016-01-01

    Human cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by Echinococcus granulosus, is one of the most important and widespread parasitic zoonoses. One of the problems that can be encountered after treating CE patients is the risk of post-surgical relapses or treatment failure, thus a long-term clinical and serological follow-up is required to evaluate the success or failure of therapy. In the present study immunological markers have been identified to indicate the effectiveness of pharmacological and surgical treatments. The relationship between serum cytokine levels and the outcome of chemotherapy and surgery was evaluated in 50 patients with CE. Serum interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) before and after pharmacological and surgical treatment. Serum cytokine levels of IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ were elevated in a significant proportion of patients during the active stage of disease. IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ were measurable in 41 (82%), 37 (74%) and 25 (50%) patients before the treatment. Clinical and radiological assessment of patients 2 years after pharmacological treatment has shown that 48 of 50 patients responded to treatment. IL-4 and IL-10 levels were decreased significantly (P< 0.05) in these patients. Conversely, patients who did not respond showed high levels of IL-4 and IL-10 and undetectable levels of IFN-γ. Hence these results suggest that serum IL-4 and IL-10 detection may be useful in the follow-up of patients with CE. PMID:25726962

  16. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tralongo, Paolo; Ferraù, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Verderame, Francesco; Caruso, Michele; Giuffrida, Dario; Butera, Alfredo; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients’ needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients’ needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective. PMID:21941445

  17. Recruiting Terminally Ill Patients into Non-Therapeutic Oncology Studies: views of Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-therapeutic trials in which terminally ill cancer patients are asked to undergo procedures such as biopsies or venipunctures for research purposes, have become increasingly important to learn more about how cancer cells work and to realize the full potential of clinical research. Considering that implementing non-therapeutic studies is not likely to result in direct benefits for the patient, some authors are concerned that involving patients in such research may be exploitive of vulnerable patients and should not occur at all, or should be greatly restricted, while some proponents doubt whether such restrictions are appropriate. Our objective was to explore clinician-researcher attitudes and concerns when recruiting patients who are in advanced stages of cancer into non-therapeutic research. Methods We conducted a qualitative exploratory study by carrying out open-ended interviews with health professionals, including physicians, research nurses, and study coordinators. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Analysis was carried out using grounded theory. Results The analysis of the interviews unveiled three prominent themes: 1) ethical considerations; 2) patient-centered issues; 3) health professional issues. Respondents identified ethical issues surrounding autonomy, respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, discrimination, and confidentiality; bringing to light that patients contribute to science because of a sense of altruism and that they want reassurance before consenting. Several patient-centered and health professional issues are having an impact on the recruitment of patients for non-therapeutic research. Facilitators were most commonly associated with patient-centered issues enhancing communication, whereas barriers in non-therapeutic research were most often professionally based, including the doctor-patient relationship, time constraints, and a lack of education and training in research. Conclusions This paper aims to contribute to debates on the overall challenges of recruiting patients to non-therapeutic research. This exploratory study identified general awareness of key ethical issues, as well as key facilitators and barriers to the recruitment of patients to non-therapeutic studies. Due to the important role played by clinicians and clinician-researchers in the recruitment of patients, it is essential to facilitate a greater understanding of the challenges faced; to promote effective communication; and to encourage educational research training programs. PMID:23216847

  18. Oncologic Safety of Immediate Breast Reconstruction for Invasive Breast Cancer Patients: A Matched Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hoo; Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Han-Byoel; Jin, Ung Sik; Chang, Hak; Minn, Kyung Won; Noh, Dong-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) between patients undergoing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and those undergoing mastectomy alone. Methods A retrospective review of patients who underwent mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction for resectable invasive breast cancer between 2002 and 2010 at a single center was conducted. These cases were matched to patients who underwent mastectomy alone in the same time period, performed by 1:2 matching. Matching control variables included age, tumor size, axillary lymph node metastasis, and estrogen receptor status. Overall, 189 patients were identified in the IBR group, and 362 patients were matched to this group. Results In the IBR group, 75 patients (39.7%) underwent conventional total mastectomy, 78 (41.3%) underwent skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM), and 36 (19.0%) underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM). The IBR group was significantly younger than the control group (41.9 and 45.1 years, respectively) (p=0.032), in spite of matching between three age groups. The DFS rates were similar between the IBR group and mastectomy alone group, at 92.0% and 89.9%, respectively, at 5-year follow-up (log-rank test, p=0.496). The 5-year LRFS was 96.2% in the IBR group and 96.4% in the mastectomy alone group (log-rank test, p=0.704), similar to data from previous reports. Subgroup analyses for SSM or NSM patients showed no differences in LRFS and DFS between the two groups. Additionally, in stage III patients, IBR did not cause an increase in recurrence. Conclusion IBR after mastectomy, including both SSM and NSM, had no negative impact on recurrence or patient survival, even in patients with advanced disease. PMID:27064557

  19. Addressing Spirituality Within the Care of Patients at the End of Life: Perspectives of Patients With Advanced Cancer, Oncologists, and Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Andrea C.; Lauderdale, Katharine E.; Alcorn, Sara; Dillinger, Jennifer; Balboni, Michael T.; Van Wert, Michael; VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Attention to patients’ religious and spiritual needs is included in national guidelines for quality end-of-life care, but little data exist to guide spiritual care. Patients and Methods The Religion and Spirituality in Cancer Care Study is a multi-institution, quantitative-qualitative study of 75 patients with advanced cancer and 339 cancer physicians and nurses. Patients underwent semistructured interviews, and care providers completed a Web-based survey exploring their perspectives on the routine provision of spiritual care by physicians and nurses. Theme extraction was performed following triangulated procedures of interdisciplinary analysis. Multivariable ordinal logistic regression models assessed relationships between participants’ characteristics and attitudes toward spiritual care. Results The majority of patients (77.9%), physicians (71.6%), and nurses (85.1%) believed that routine spiritual care would have a positive impact on patients. Only 25% of patients had previously received spiritual care. Among patients, prior spiritual care (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 14.65; 95% CI, 1.51 to 142.23), increasing education (AOR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.49), and religious coping (AOR, 4.79; 95% CI, 1.40 to 16.42) were associated with favorable perceptions of spiritual care. Physicians held more negative perceptions of spiritual care than patients (P<.001) and nurses (P=.008). Qualitative analysis identified benefits of spiritual care, including supporting patients’ emotional well-being and strengthening patient-provider relationships. Objections to spiritual care frequently related to professional role conflicts. Participants described ideal spiritual care to be individualized, voluntary, inclusive of chaplains/clergy, and based on assessing and supporting patient spirituality. Conclusion Most patients with advanced cancer, oncologists, and oncology nurses value spiritual care. Themes described provide an empirical basis for engaging spiritual issues within clinical care. PMID:22614979

  20. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF UNSTABLE PELVIC RING FRACTURE IN SKELETALLY IMMATURE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Joao Antonio Matheus; de Souza Portes Meirelles, Ricardo; Júnior, Luiz Augusto Peçanha Tavares; Goldsztajn, Flávio; Rocha, Tito; Mendes, Pedro Henrique Barros

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To present the outcomes from definitive surgical treatment for unstable fractures of the pelvic ring in children undergoing surgical reduction and stabilization. Methods: We studied 10 patients with immature skeletons who suffered unstable fractures of the pelvic ring and were treated between March 2004 and January 2008. The study was retrospective, based on clinical and radiographic evaluations. Results: The mean age at the time of the trauma was 8.8 years (2 to 13 years). Seven patients were female and three was male. There were eight cases of trauma caused by being run over, and one case each of a motorcycle accident and falling from a height. Five patients had other associated injuries such as fractures of the clavicle, femoral diaphysis, proximal humerus, lower leg bones, olecranon and bladder injury. All the patients evaluated showed an excellent clinical outcome. The pelvic asymmetry before surgery ranged from 0.7 to 2.9 cm (mean 1.45 cm), and dropped to values between 0.2 and 0.9 cm (mean 0.39 cm) after reduction. In no case was any change observed in pelvic asymmetry measured in the immediate postoperative period and at the end of follow-up. Conclusion: Pelvic ring fractures in skeletally immature patients are rare and surgical treatment is unusual. Several authors have questioned conservative treatment because of the complications encountered. Bone remodeling does not seem enough to cause an improvement in pelvic asymmetry, and this justifies the choice of surgical treatment for reduction and correction of pelvic ring deformities. PMID:27026968

  1. Lived experiences and challenges of older surgical patients during hospitalization for cancer: An ethnographic fieldwork

    PubMed Central

    Høybye, Mette Terp

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the lived experiences of older surgical patients’ (aged 74 years and older) experienced challenges during a brief admission to hospital. Age, gender, polypharmacy, and the severity of illness are also factors known to affect the hospitalization process. For an ethnographic study using participant observation and interviews, surgical cancer patients (n = 9, aged 74 years and older) were recruited during admission to a Danish teaching hospital. Using ethnographic strategies of participant observation and interviews, each patient was followed through the course of 1 day during their stay at the hospital. Interviews were carried out with all patients during this time. Three areas of concern were identified as prominent in the patients’ experiences and challenges during their short hospital stay: teeth and oral cavity, eating in a hospital setting, and medication during hospitalization. Short-term hospitalization requires focused collaboration between staff and patient concerning individual challenges from their teeth and oral cavity as support of nutritional needs during surgical treatment for cancer. PMID:24559546

  2. Quality analysis of patient information on surgical treatment of haemorrhoids on the internet

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, ND

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Haemorrhoids are the most common benign condition seen by colorectal surgeons. At clinic appointments, advice given about lifestyle modification or surgical interventions may not be understood fully by patients. Patients may use the internet for further research into their condition. However, the quality of such information has not been investigated before. This study assessed the quality of patient information on surgical treatment of haemorrhoids on the internet. Methods Four searches were carried out using the search terms ‘surgery for haemorrhoids’ and ‘surgery for piles’ on two search engines (Google and Yahoo). The first 50 results for each search were assessed. Sites were evaluated using the DISCERN instrument. Results In total, 200 websites were assessed, of which 144 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of these, 63 (44%) were sponsored by herbal remedies for haemorrhoids. Eighty-nine (62%) mentioned conservative treatment options but eleven (8%) did not include surgery in their treatment options. Only 38 sites (27%) mentioned recurrence of haemorrhoids following surgery and 28 sites (20%) did not list any complications. Overall, 19 websites (14%) were judged as being of high quality, 66 (45%) as moderate quality and 58 (40%) as low quality. Conclusions The quality of information on the internet is highly variable and a significant proportion of websites assessed are poor. The majority of websites are sponsored by private companies selling alternative treatments for haemorrhoids. Clinicians should be prepared to advise their patients which websites can provide high-quality information on the surgical treatment of haemorrhoids. PMID:23838496

  3. Higher Plasma Pyridoxal Phosphate Is Associated with Increased Antioxidant Enzyme Activities in Critically Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chien-Hsiang; Huang, Shih-Chien; Chiang, Ting-Yu; Wong, Yueching

    2013-01-01

    Critically ill patients experience severe stress, inflammation and clinical conditions which may increase the utilization and metabolic turnover of vitamin B-6 and may further increase their oxidative stress and compromise their antioxidant capacity. This study was conducted to examine the relationship between vitamin B-6 status (plasma and erythrocyte PLP) oxidative stress, and antioxidant capacities in critically ill surgical patients. Thirty-seven patients in surgical intensive care unit of Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan, were enrolled. The levels of plasma and erythrocyte PLP, serum malondialdehyde, total antioxidant capacity, and antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e., superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase) were determined on the 1st and 7th days of admission. Plasma PLP was positively associated with the mean SOD activity level on day 1 (r = 0.42, P < 0.05), day 7 (r = 0.37, P < 0.05), and on changes (Δ (day 7 − day 1)) (r = 0.56, P < 0.01) after adjusting for age, gender, and plasma C-reactive protein concentration. Higher plasma PLP could be an important contributing factor in the elevation of antioxidant enzyme activity in critically ill surgical patients. PMID:23819116

  4. Investigation of realistic PET simulations incorporating tumor patient's specificity using anthropomorphic models: Creation of an oncology database

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Efthimiou, Nikos; Nikiforidis, George C.; Kagadis, George C.; Loudos, George; Le Maitre, Amandine; Hatt, Mathieu; Tixier, Florent; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The GATE Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is used for the implementation of realistic PET simulations incorporating tumor heterogeneous activity distributions. The reconstructed patient images include noise from the acquisition process, imaging system's performance restrictions and have limited spatial resolution. For those reasons, the measured intensity cannot be simply introduced in GATE simulations, to reproduce clinical data. Investigation of the heterogeneity distribution within tumors applying partial volume correction (PVC) algorithms was assessed. The purpose of the present study was to create a simulated oncology database based on clinical data with realistic intratumor uptake heterogeneity properties.Methods: PET/CT data of seven oncology patients were used in order to create a realistic tumor database investigating the heterogeneity activity distribution of the simulated tumors. The anthropomorphic models (NURBS based cardiac torso and Zubal phantoms) were adapted to the CT data of each patient, and the activity distribution was extracted from the respective PET data. The patient-specific models were simulated with the Monte Carlo Geant4 application for tomography emission (GATE) in three different levels for each case: (a) using homogeneous activity within the tumor, (b) using heterogeneous activity distribution in every voxel within the tumor as it was extracted from the PET image, and (c) using heterogeneous activity distribution corresponding to the clinical image following PVC. The three different types of simulated data in each case were reconstructed with two iterations and filtered with a 3D Gaussian postfilter, in order to simulate the intratumor heterogeneous uptake. Heterogeneity in all generated images was quantified using textural feature derived parameters in 3D according to the ground truth of the simulation, and compared to clinical measurements. Finally, profiles were plotted in central slices of the tumors, across lines with heterogeneous activity distribution for visual assessment.Results: The accuracy of the simulated database was assessed against the original clinical images. The PVC simulated images matched the clinical ones best. Local, regional, and global features extracted from the PVC simulated images were closest to the clinical measurements, with the exception of the size zone variability and the mean intensity values, where heterogeneous tumors showed better reproducibility. The profiles on PVC simulated tumors after postfiltering seemed to represent the more realistic heterogeneous regions with respect to the clinical reference.Conclusions: In this study, the authors investigated the input activity map heterogeneity in the GATE simulations of tumors with heterogeneous activity distribution. The most realistic heterogeneous tumors were obtained by inserting PVC activity distributions from the clinical image into the activity map of the simulation. Partial volume effect (PVE) can play a crucial role in the quantification of heterogeneity within tumors and have an important impact on applications such as patient follow-up during treatment and assessment of tumor response to therapy. The development of such a database incorporating patient anatomical and functional variability can be used to evaluate new image processing or analysis algorithms, while providing control of the ground truth, which is not available when dealing with clinical datasets. The database includes all images used and generated in this study, as well as the sinograms and the attenuation phantoms for further investigation. It is freely available to the interested reader of the journal at http://www.med.upatras.gr/oncobase/.

  5. [Doctor-patient relationship in oncology: how to prevent and solve some conflicts?].

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, Daniel; Hartmann, Olivier; Dauchy, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    The inequality between doctor(s) and patient(s) is a frequent cause of ethical and relational difficulties. To know the elements of this inequality is a requirement to improve their relationship. The major elements of this inequality: the patient experiments suffering and may die; the doctor belongs to a group, has a wide knowledge, the ability to cure, is active. Some elements diminish this inequality: patients associations; new laws (the right to be informed, to give one's informed consent, to have free access to one's medical file, to refuse the treatment, etc.); relinquishing paternalism and making shared decision; improving doctor's competence in information. Equality also means solidarity and reciprocal knowledge, respect and trust. Specific objectives have to be acknowledged: the patient's and the doctor's ones can be different. Patients and doctors should have an equal exigency of rights and duties: they cannot do or demand anything. Both of them need to be recognized as competent in their own tasks, and responsible towards each other, the other patients, themselves. They equally require to preserve one's ideals, to keep one's identity, one's sense of dignity and value. Equal freedom to think and act can be hindered by the influence of others, but also by inadequate emotions, fantasies, unconscious thoughts and memories. The psycho-oncologists and the psychoanalytic experience are therefore useful to overcome these unconscious obstacles. Medical staff should also have the experience of solving the ethical difficulties that inequality can raise. PMID:18230567

  6. A phase I study of irinotecan in pediatric patients: a pediatric oncology group study.

    PubMed

    Blaney, S; Berg, S L; Pratt, C; Weitman, S; Sullivan, J; Luchtman-Jones, L; Bernstein, M

    2001-01-01

    A Phase I trial of irinotecan was performed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), and the incidence and severity of other toxicities in children with refractory solid tumors. Thirty-five children received 146 courses of irinotecan administered as a 60-min i.v. infusion, daily for 5 days, every 21 days, after premedication with dexamethasone and ondansetron. Doses ranged from 30 mg/m2 to 65 mg/m2. An MTD was defined in heavily pretreated and less-heavily pretreated (i.e., two prior chemotherapy regimens, no prior bone marrow transplantation, and no radiation to the spine, skull, ribs, or pelvic bones) patients. Myelosuppression was the primary DLT in heavily pretreated patients, and diarrhea was the DLT in less-heavily pretreated patients. The MTD in the heavily pretreated patient group was 39 mg/m2, and the MTD in the less-heavily pretreated patients was 50 mg/m2. Non-dose-limiting diarrhea that was well controlled and of brief duration was observed in approximately 75% of patients. A partial response was observed in one patient with neuroblastoma, and in one patient with hepatocellular carcinoma. Stable disease (4-20 cycles) was observed in seven patients with a variety of malignancies including neuroblastoma, pineoblastoma, glioblastoma, brainstem glioma, osteosarcoma, hepatoblastoma, and a central nervous system rhabdoid tumor. In conclusion, the recommended Phase II dose of irinotecan administered as a 60-min i.v. infusion daily for 5 days, every 21 days, is 39 mg/m2 in heavily treated and 50 mg/m2 in less-heavily treated children with solid tumors. PMID:11205914

  7. Hearing stimulation of the pediatric patient with congenital aural atresia: surgical and audiological evaluation of 38 patients.

    PubMed

    Kuşcu, Oğuz; Günaydın, Rıza Önder; Bajin, Münir Demir; Sözen, Tevfik; Ünal, Ömer Faruk; Akyol, Umut

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to stress the importance of and discuss the timing and options for the treatment of congenital aural atresia (CAA), including non-surgical alternative treatment modalities and amplification, and to report the audiological and surgical results of a series of patients. Thirty-eight children with CAA were evaluated with regard to hearing and anatomical anomalies accompanying CAA: the state of the ossicles and the facial nerve, postoperative complications and audiological results. The ages of the patients ranged between 4 and 18 years, with a mean of 10 years. All underwent surgical treatment; 32 had unilateral atresia, while 6 had bilateral atresia. The mean follow-up duration was 7 months. The facial canal was dehiscent in 36.8% of cases. In 70.2% cases, the malleus and incus were present as an ossicular mass, fixed and attached to the atretic bone. The stapes was normal in 97.3% of the patients; in 2.7% the suprastructure was deformed. The success rate, defined as an air-bone gap of 20 dB or less, was 63.1% in this series of patients. If atresia is bilateral, very early hearing stimulation to prevent the maldevelopment of children's speech and cognitive skills is of the utmost importance. In unilateral cases, surgery may be postponed until early adulthood, when the patient is able to make his/her own decision and cooperate in the treatment and postoperative aspects. PMID:25818960

  8. Prosthodontic and surgical management of a completely edentulous patient with a severe class III skeletal maxillomandibular relationship: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ashy, Linah M; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2013-08-01

    This article describes a multidisciplinary approach combining surgical and prosthodontic treatment of a completely edentulous patient who presented with a severe skeletal class III relationship and was diagnosed as American College of Prosthodontists Prosthodontic Diagnostic Index (ACP PDI) class IV. The use of a complete denture serving as diagnostic tool, surgical guide, and definitive restoration is presented. Computer-aided surgical simulation was used to achieve an accurate diagnostic and surgical plan. Maxillary Lefort class I and mandibular sagittal split osteotomy surgical treatment was performed to correct arch discrepancy. The surgical procedure demonstrated a clinically acceptable maxillomandibular relationship and stability. The patient was satisfied with the esthetics and demonstrated improved oral function following prosthesis insertion. PMID:23551986

  9. Patient-specific model of a scoliotic torso for surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmouche, Rola; Cheriet, Farida; Labelle, Hubert; Dansereau, Jean

    2013-03-01

    A method for the construction of a patient-specific model of a scoliotic torso for surgical planning via inter-patient registration is presented. Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of a generic model are registered to surface topography (TP) and X-ray data of a test patient. A partial model is first obtained via thin-plate spline registration between TP and X-ray data of the test patient. The MRIs from the generic model are then fit into the test patient using articulated model registration between the vertebrae of the generic model's MRIs in prone position and the test patient's X-rays in standing position. A non-rigid deformation of the soft tissues is performed using a modified thin-plate spline constrained to maintain bone rigidity and to fit in the space between the vertebrae and the surface of the torso. Results show average Dice values of 0:975 +/- 0:012 between the MRIs following inter-patient registration and the surface topography of the test patient, which is comparable to the average value of 0:976 +/- 0:009 previously obtained following intra-patient registration. The results also show a significant improvement compared to rigid inter-patient registration. Future work includes validating the method on a larger cohort of patients and incorporating soft tissue stiffness constraints. The method developed can be used to obtain a geometric model of a patient including bone structures, soft tissues and the surface of the torso which can be incorporated in a surgical simulator in order to better predict the outcome of scoliosis surgery, even if MRI data cannot be acquired for the patient.

  10. Surgical outcomes of Korean ulcerative colitis patients with and without colitis-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yong Sik; Cho, Yong Beom; Park, Kyu Joo; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Yoon, Sang Nam; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Lee, Kil Yeon; Kim, Hungdai; Lee, Ryung-Ah; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinicopathologic characteristics of surgically treated ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and to compare the characteristics of UC patients with colitis-associated cancer (CAC) to those without CAC. METHODS: Clinical data on UC patients who underwent abdominal surgery from 1980 to 2013 were collected from 11 medical institutions. Data were analyzed to compare the clinical features of patients with CAC and those of patients without CAC. RESULTS: Among 415 UC patients, 383 (92.2%) underwent total proctocolectomy, and of these, 342 (89%) were subjected to ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. CAC was found in 47 patients (11.3%). Adenocarcinoma was found in 45 patients, and the others had either neuroendocrine carcinoma or lymphoma. Comparing the UC patients with and without CAC, the UC patients with CAC were characteristically older at the time of diagnosis, had longer disease duration, underwent frequent laparoscopic surgery, and were infrequently given preoperative steroid therapy (P < 0.001-0.035). During the 37 mo mean follow-up period, the 3-year overall survival rate was 82.2%. CONCLUSION: Most Korean UC patients experience early disease exacerbation or complications. Approximately 10% of UC patients had CAC, and UC patients with CAC had a later diagnosis, a longer disease duration, and less steroid treatment than UC patients without CAC. PMID:25834319

  11. Use of herbs or vitamin/mineral/nutrient supplements by pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Ayşe Bozkurt; Bör, Özcan

    2016-05-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread and increasing. We sought to study the frequency and factors affecting of its use in children with cancer. We designed a questionnaire that was administered to the parents of children between September 2013 and March 2014. A total of 74 patients were enrolled into the study. Fifty patients (67.5%) had used one or more than one type of herbs or vitamin/mineral/nutrient. The most commonly used CAM treatment was grape molasses (36.6%). The main source of information to families was the internet. No correlation found between the use of CAM and parents' education status, the level of income, socioeconomic status, chemotherapy treatment. Patients with cancer highly tended to use CAM treatment without informing healthcare professionals. The integration of complementary methods to the conventional treatments is interesting and seem to respond to the needs of patients allowing a more comprehensive approach to care. PMID:27157962

  12. Impact of erythropoietin treatment on the quality of life of oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    Pelegrí, A

    2007-10-01

    Anaemia has a high incidence in cancer patients, especially when it is a consequence of myelosuppressive treatments. The incidence and prevalence of this condition is influenced by the type and extension of the tumour, type and intensity of the myelosuppressive treatment that patients receive, and previous surgery or intercurrent infections. Clinical manifestations of anaemia, overlapped by tumour symptomatology, depend on haemoglobin (Hb) levels; these manifestations cause impairment of the functional capacity, as well as a negative impact on the quality of life (QOL) of cancer patients as a consequence. Erythropoietin treatment for anaemia has been established as optimal for correcting Hb levels. Its impact on patients' QOL has been evaluated in numerous randomised prospective studies by the use of diverse types of erythropoietin and administration modes. The three types of erythropoietin, alpha, beta and darbepoetin alpha, have shown a clear efficacy in all haematological parameters. This positive effect is related with significant improvements in the QOL of patients, especially those patients undergoing myelosuppressive treatments, and with regard to specific scales of fatigue and anaemia. PMID:17974525

  13. Neoantigen response in patients successfully treated for lymphoma. A Southwest Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    King, G W; Grozea, P C; Eyre, H J; LoBuglio, A F

    1979-06-01

    To ascertain the cellular immune function of patients successfully treated for lymphoma, we measured skin-test reactivity to a battery of recall antigens, phytohemmagglutinin (PHA), and the neoantigens keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB). Seventy-four patients with Hodgkin's disease and 31 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were studied from 3 to 186 months after cessation of therapy for lymphoma. Although reactivity to recall antigens and PHA was normal, the number of patients responding to the neoantigens was significantly (P less than 0.01) lower than normal (KLH, 35%; and DNCB, 34%). This impairment in reactivity to neoantigens could not be correlated with specific diagnosis, stage of disease, or type of treatment. Reactivity to DNCB was significantly (P less than 0.01) improved in those patients studied more than 3 years after treatment, but the number who reacted was still markedly abnormal (17 of 33). Thus, successfully treated patients with lymphoma seem to have difficulty in responding to new foreign antigens. PMID:375792

  14. [What is the benefit of oncological rehabilitation programs for cancer patients in palliative care?].

    PubMed

    Bartsch, H H

    2001-07-01

    Medical and psychosocial rehabilitation of cancer patients is deeply integrated into the German health system. In contrast to the majority of other European countries and the United States of America, rehabilitation is mainly done as inpatient care and only rarely in outpatient units. In curative treated cancer patients the main goals of rehabilitation include recovery from physical impairments, adaptation to functional disabilities and improvement of psychosocial functioning, including the ability to go back to work. In palliative cancer patients the improvement of health adjusted quality of life, the avoidance of permanent supportive care and the social integration are the major goals. Cancer rehabilitation needs an interdisciplinary strategy between medical, psychooncologic, physiotherapeutical and educational professionals. To attain a benefit for the individual cancer patient as well as for the medical system it is important to clearly define the rehabilitation needs and design a most individual rehabilitation program adjusted to the personal needs of the patient. A systematic quality management since 1995 of German rehabilitation clinics and rehabilitation programs did significantly improve this part of the professional health system. However it is necessary to add more outpatient units for cancer rehabilitation to reach more flexibility and satisfy the demand of patients for more home located support. PMID:11508115

  15. Post-operative care to promote recovery for thoracic surgical patients: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Wilfred Wai Kit

    2016-02-01

    The change in patient population leads to an inevitable transformation among the healthcare system. Over the past decades, thoracic surgical technique has been evolving from conventional open thoracotomy to minimally invasive video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Thoracic nursing team of Prince of Wales Hospital (PWH) grows together with the evolution and aims at providing holistic and quality care to patients require thoracic operation. In order to enhance patient post-operative recovery, few strategies have been implemented including early mobilization, staff training and clinical audit. On the other hand, nursing case management approach was proved to be a cost-effective method in managing patients. It is also suitable for thoracic patients, especially for those who are suffering from thoracic neoplasm. It is believed that, the introduction of nursing case management approach would provide a better holistic care to the thoracic patients. PMID:26941973

  16. Post-operative care to promote recovery for thoracic surgical patients: a nursing perspective

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The change in patient population leads to an inevitable transformation among the healthcare system. Over the past decades, thoracic surgical technique has been evolving from conventional open thoracotomy to minimally invasive video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Thoracic nursing team of Prince of Wales Hospital (PWH) grows together with the evolution and aims at providing holistic and quality care to patients require thoracic operation. In order to enhance patient post-operative recovery, few strategies have been implemented including early mobilization, staff training and clinical audit. On the other hand, nursing case management approach was proved to be a cost-effective method in managing patients. It is also suitable for thoracic patients, especially for those who are suffering from thoracic neoplasm. It is believed that, the introduction of nursing case management approach would provide a better holistic care to the thoracic patients. PMID:26941973

  17. Surgical treatment of hydatid cysts of the lung: report on 1055 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, R; Yüksel, M; Cetin, G; Süzer, K; Alp, M; Kaya, S; Unlü, M; Moldibi, B

    1989-01-01

    Of 1055 patients treated surgically for pulmonary hydatid disease, most (950) had isolated lung cysts, the other 105 having both liver and lung cysts. The chest radiograph was most valuable in diagnosis; the Casoni and Weinberg tests and blood eosinophil counts were found to be diagnostically unreliable. One thousand and seventy seven primary operations were performed. Cystotomy and capitonnage were carried out in 906 patients, 40 of whom also had decortication of the pleura. Other procedures included cystotomy with wedge resection of locally damaged lung (29 patients) and cyst removal with capitonnage by Ugon's method (33) or the Perez-Fontana procedure (8) and with costal resection for osteomyelitis in two cases. More radical surgery was carried out in 99 patients for longstanding infection or severe lung destruction. Postoperative complications occurred in 37 patients (3.5%) and the 30 day mortality rate was 1.7%. It is concluded that a lung conserving surgical operation is the treatment of choice for most patients with pulmonary hydatid disease. In patients with coexisting liver cysts the thoracic transpleural approach allowed the lung and liver cysts to be removed at the same session. Images PMID:2705149

  18. Surgical Outcome of Ahmed Valve Implantation in Mexican Patients with Neovascular Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lazcano-Gomez, Gabriel; Jimenez-Roman, Jesus; Hernandez-Garciadiego, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe clinical results of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in Mexican patients with neovascular glaucoma (NVG). Materials and methods: We reviewed records of 60 eyes of 60 patients with NVG who underwent Ahmed valve implantation, with a follow-up period of 1 year. We identified successful and failed cases and compared baseline and follow-up characteristics to identify possible differences between both groups. Results: We classified 36 eyes (60%) as successful and 24 (40%) as failed cases. We found a significant difference in success rate in patients who had a hypertensive phase at any time during the follow-up period (OR = 5.15, CI = 1.49-20.15, p = 0.004). Patients in the success group showed a statistically significant decrease in the number of glaucoma medications 1 year after surgery (p <0.0001). We found a statistically significant difference in success rate in patients who had preoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) better than logmar 0.70 (odds ratio 4.31, CI = 1.1-19.3, p = 0.03086). Conclusion: A hypertensive postoperative phase and a preoperative BCVA worse or equal to 20/100 seem to be risk factors for Ahmed valve surgical failure in patients with NVG. How to cite this article: Hernandez-Oteyza A, Lazcano-Gomez G, Jimenez-Roman J, Hernandez-Garciadiego C. Surgical Outcome of Ahmed Valve Implantation in Mexican Patients with Neovascular Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2014;8(3):86-90.

  19. Surgical Audit of Patients with Ileal Perforations Requiring Ileostomy in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Hemkant; Pandey, Siddharth; Sheoran, Kapil Dev; Marwah, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Ileal perforation peritonitis is a frequently encountered surgical emergency in the developing countries. The choice of a procedure for source control depends on the patient condition as well as the surgeon preference. Material and Methods. This was a prospective observational study including 41 patients presenting with perforation peritonitis due to ileal perforation and managed with ileostomy. Demographic profile and operative findings in terms of number of perforations, site, and size of perforation along with histopathological findings of all the cases were recorded. Results. The majority of patients were male. Pain abdomen and fever were the most common presenting complaints. Body mass index of the patients was in the range of 15.4–25.3 while comorbidities were present in 43% cases. Mean duration of preoperative resuscitation was 14.73 + 13.77 hours. Operative findings showed that 78% patients had a single perforation; most perforations were 0.6–1 cm in size and within 15 cm proximal to ileocecal junction. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was seen in 29.2% patients. On histopathological examination, nonspecific perforations followed by typhoid and tubercular perforations respectively were the most common. Conclusion. Patients with ileal perforations are routinely seen in surgical emergencies and their demography, clinical profile, and intraoperative findings may guide the choice of procedure to be performed. PMID:26247059

  20. Should Patients and Family be Involved in “Do Not Resuscitate” Decisions? Views of Oncology and Palliative Care Doctors and Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Grace M; Kwee, Ann K; Krishna, Lalit

    2012-01-01

    Background: “Do not resuscitate” (DNR) orders are put in place where cardiopulmonary resuscitation is inappropriate. However, it is unclear who should be involved in discussions and decisions around DNR orders. Aim: The aim was to determine the views of oncology and palliative care doctors and nurses on DNR orders. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted on 146 doctors and nurses in oncology and palliative care working within a tertiary specialist cancer center in Singapore. Results: Perceived care differences as a result of DNR determinations led to 50.7% of respondents reporting concerns that a DNR order would mean that the patient received a substandard level of care. On the matter of DNR discussions, majority thought that patients (78.8%) and the next of kin (78.1%) should be involved though with whom the ultimate decision lay differed. There was also a wide range of views on the most appropriate time to have a DNR discussion. Conclusions: From the viewpoint of oncology and palliative care healthcare professionals, patients should be involved at least in discussing if not in the determination of DNR orders, challenging the norm of familial determination in the Asian context. The varied responses highlight the complexity of decision making on issues relating to the end of life. Thus, it is important to take into account the innumerable bio-psychosocial, practical, and ethical factors that are involved within such deliberations. PMID:22837612

  1. Contractile function of the myocardium with prolonged hypokinesia in patients with surgical tuberculosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakutayeva, V. P.; Matiks, N. I.

    1978-01-01

    The changes in the myocardial contractile function with hypokinesia in surgical tuberculosis patients are discussed. The phase nature of the changes is noted, specifically the changes in the various systoles, diastole, and other parts of the cardiac cycle. The data compare these changes during confinement in bed with no motor activity to and with a return to motor activity after leaving the in-bed regimen.

  2. MR spectroscopy in patients after surgical clipping and endovascular embolisation of intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Tarasów, Eugeniusz; Kochanowicz, Jan; Brzozowska, Joanna; Mariak, Zenon; Walecki, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: In MR spectroscopy, we evaluated cerebral metabolic changes in patients 2–4 years after clipping or endovascular therapy of intracranial aneurysms. Material/Metodhs: A prospective study was conducted in 36 patients after SAH, treated surgically (n=23) or by endovascular embolisation (n=13). Control group consisted of 20 healthy volunteers. The clinical evaluation was based on the Glasgow Coma Scale, Hunt and Hess grade, and Glasgow Outcome Scale. MR spectroscopy was performed with 1.5T system with PRESS sequence, at echo time of 35 ms, in frontal lobes unchanged in MR examination. Ratios of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (mI) and glutamine/glutamate complex (Glx) to creatine were assessed. Results: Only a slight, statistically insignificant reduction of NAA/Cr and an insignificant increase of mI/Cr were noted; other metabolite ratios were close to the ones in the control group. Similar results were obtained in patients after surgical clipping and after endovascular therapy. Only in patients with aneurysms of anterior communicating artery complex (AcoA), the NAA/Cr ratio showed a significant reduction as compared to that of non-AcoA patients and of the control group. No significant changes of metabolite ratios were found in patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms, with regard to aneurysm lateralisation. Conclusions: Surgical clipping and endovascular embolisation of ICA, MCA and posterior circulatory aneurysms do not induce changes in metabolite concentration in frontal lobes assessed in MR spectroscopy. In patients with AcoA aneurysms, 2–4 years after obliteration, there were found persistent metabolic changes in unchanged brain tissue of the frontal lobes, corresponding to neuronal damage (dysfunction). PMID:22802800

  3. Perioperative Care Coordination Measurement: A Tool to Support Care Integration of Pediatric Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Lynne R; Ziniel, Sonja I; Antonelli, Richard C

    2016-03-01

    The relationship of care coordination activities and outcomes to resource utilization and personnel costs has been evaluated for a number of pediatric medical home practices. One of the first tools designed to evaluate the activities and outcomes for pediatric care coordination is the Care Coordination Measurement Tool (CCMT). It has become widely used as an instrument for health care providers in both primary and subspecialty care settings. This tool enables the user to stratify patients based on acuity and complexity while documenting the activities and outcomes of care coordination. We tested the feasibility of adapting the CCMT to a pediatric surgical population at Boston Children's Hospital. The tool was used to assess the preoperative care coordination activities. Care coordination activities were tracked during the interval from the date the patient was scheduled for a surgical or interventional procedure through the day of the procedure. A care coordination encounter was defined as any task, whether face to face or not, supporting the development or implementation of a plan of care. Data were collected to enable analysis of 5675 care coordination encounters supporting the care provided to 3406 individual surgical cases (patients). The outcomes of care coordination, as documented by the preoperative nursing staff, included the elaboration of the care plan through patient-focused communication among specialist, facilities, perioperative team, and primary care physicians in 80.5% of cases. The average time spent on care coordination activities increased incrementally by 30 minutes with each additional care coordination encounter for a surgical case. Surgical cases with 1 care coordination encounter took an average of 35.7 minutes of preoperative care coordination, whereas those with ≥4 care coordination encounters reported an average of 121.6 minutes. We successfully adapted and implemented the CCMT for a pediatric surgical population and measured nonface-to-face, nonbillable encounters performed by perioperative nursing staff. The care coordination activities integrated into the preoperative process include elaboration of care plans and identification and remediation of discrepancies. Capturing the activities and outcomes of care coordination for preoperative care provides a framework for quality improvement and enables documentation of the value of nonface-to-face perioperative nursing encounters that comprise care coordination. PMID:26517234

  4. Risk Assessment of BRONJ in Oncologic Patients Treated with Bisphosphonates: Follow-Up to 18 Months

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Lucia; Nori, Alessandra; Berlin, Ricarda Sara; Mazur, Marta; Orsini, Giovanna; Putignano, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Bisphosphonates related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a pathological condition characterized by bone exposure or latent infection in patients treated with the drug. The aim of the study is to monitor the BRONJ level of risk health in patients with cancer, according to a preventive clinical protocol, which is firstly aimed at reducing risk factors such as the periodontal infections. Materials and Methods. 10 patients participated in the protocol and were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 18 months of treatment with bisphosphonates, through full mouth plaque and bleeding scores (FMPS and FMBS), clinical attachment level (CAL) measurement, and the occurrence of osteonecrosis. Results. The mean plaque and bleeding were reduced and the CAL has not shown significant changes and in no cases was there manifestation of BRONJ. Conclusion. The protocol proved crucial for the maintenance of good oral health conditions by eliminating the risk of BRONJ during the observation period. PMID:25258628

  5. The importance of cleanrooms for the treatment of haemato-oncological patients

    PubMed Central

    Matoušková, Ivanka

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of cleanrooms in health care centres is to prevent hospital infections or leakage of a highly infectious agent (the source of haemorrhagic fevers, SARS, etc.) into the ambient environment and subsequently possibly threatening other individuals. Patients with haematological malignancies or after autologous or allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) rank among immunosuppressed individuals. Prolonged and deep neutropenia is considered a key risk factor of the occurrence of an exogenous infection. One of the possibilities of preventing an exogenous infection in these patients is to place them in a “cleanroom” for the crucial period of time. Cleanrooms are intensive care units with reverse isolation. The final part of the general article below provides an overview of the technology and types of cleanrooms for immunosuppressed patients in compliance with the current recommendations and technical standards. PMID:23788892

  6. Qualitative approach to patient-reported outcomes in oncology: protocol of a French study

    PubMed Central

    Orri, Massimiliano; Sibeoni, Jordan; Labey, Mathilde; Bousquet, Guilhem; Verneuil, Laurence; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The past decade has been characterised by movement from a doctor-centred to a patient-centred approach to treatment outcomes, in which doctors try to see the illness through their patients’ eyes. Patients, family members and doctors are the three participants in cancer care, but their perspectives about what have been helpful during cancer treatment have never simultaneously and explicitly compared in the same qualitative study. The aim of this study project is to explore patients’ perspectives about the care they receive, as well as families’ and doctors’ perspectives about what have been helpful for the patient. These three points of view will be compared and contrasted in order to analyse the convergences and divergences in these perspectives. Methods and analysis This is a national multicentre qualitative study. Participants will be constituted by three different subsamples: (1) patients with cancer (skin, breast, urological and lung cancers), (2) their relatives, and (3) their referring physicians. Recruitment will follow the purposive sample technique, and the final sample size will be determined by data saturation. Data will be collected through open-ended semistructured interviews and independently analysed with NVivo V.10 software by three researchers according to the principles of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Ethics and dissemination The research protocol received approval from the University Paris Descartes review board (IRB number: 20140600001072), and participants will provide written consent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to focus on the simultaneous exploration of the separate points of view of patients, families and doctors about the care received during the cancer care journey. We expect that our findings will help to improve communication and relationships between doctors, patients and families. Comparison of these three points of view will provide information about the convergences and divergences of these perspectives and how to address the needs of all three groups. PMID:26163035

  7. Patient reported outcomes in pediatric oncology practice: suggestions for future usage by parents and pediatric oncologists.

    PubMed

    Schepers, S A; Engelen, V E; Haverman, L; Caron, H N; Hoogerbrugge, P M; Kaspers, G J L; Egeler, R M; Grootenhuis, M A

    2014-09-01

    Several studies in adults have shown patient reported outcomes (PROs) to be effective in enhancing patient-physician communication and discussion of Health Related Quality of Life outcomes. Although less studied, positive results have been demonstrated in children. A PRO-intervention needs to be feasible in clinical practice to be successful. In the current study, 74 parents of children who successfully completed their cancer treatment and 21 pediatric oncologists (POs) evaluated a PRO-intervention and gave recommendations for future use in their practice. Most parents and POs suggested PROs to be an important part of standard care, starting during treatment, with an assessment frequency of every 3 months. PMID:24648289

  8. Surgical Decision Making for the Elderly Patients in Severe Head Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Jun; Yoon, Seok-Man; Oh, Jae-Sang; Bae, Hack-Gun; Doh, Jae-Won

    2014-01-01

    Objective Age is a strong predictor of mortality in traumatic brain injuries. A surgical decision making is difficult especially for the elderly patients with severe head injuries. We studied so-called 'withholding a life-saving surgery' over a two year period at a university hospital. Methods We collected data from 227 elderly patients. In 35 patients with Glasgow Coma Score 3-8, 28 patients had lesions that required operation. A life-saving surgery was withheld in 15 patients either by doctors and/or the families (Group A). Surgery was performed in 13 patients (Group B). We retrospectively examined the medical records and radiological findings of these 28 patients. We calculated the predicted probability of 6 month mortality (IPM) and 6 month unfavorable outcome (IPU) to compare the result of decision by the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) calculator. Results Types of the mass lesion did not affect on the surgical decision making. None of the motor score 1 underwent surgery, while all patients with reactive pupils underwent surgery. Causes of injury or episodes of hypoxia/hypotension might have affected on the decision making, however, their role was not distinct. All patients in the group A died. In the group B, the outcome was unfavorable in 11 of 13 patients. Patients with high IPM or IPU were more common in group A than group B. Wrong decisions brought futile cares. Conclusion Ethical training and developing decision-making skills are necessary including shared decision making. PMID:25024822

  9. A videofluoroscopic study comparing severe swallowing disorders in patients treated surgically or with radiation for oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Santini, L; Robert, D; Lagier, A; Giovanni, A; Dessi, P; Fakhry, N

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the causal mechanisms of severe swallowing disorders after the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Twenty-six patients with severe swallowing disorders at ≥12 months after treatment for oropharyngeal cancer were analyzed retrospectively using videofluoroscopy. Fourteen patients (54%) had been treated with surgery (±postoperative radiotherapy), while 12 patients (46%) had been treated with (chemo)radiotherapy. Videofluoroscopy analysis showed a localized alteration in the surgical excision area resulting in impaired tongue root retraction in the surgical group (P=0.012), while general impairment of the pharyngeal, laryngeal, and upper oesophagus sphincter was found in the non-surgical group. Aspirations in the surgical group most often occurred after swallowing, while in the non-surgical group, they occurred during and after swallowing (P=0.039). This analysis by videofluoroscopy provides important insights into the mechanisms giving rise to swallowing disorders after the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25697064

  10. Oncology Nursing Education: Nursing Students' Commitment of "Presence" with the Dying Patient and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Sandra M.; Hogan, Nancy S.

    2003-01-01

    Following a chaplain's lecture on the end of life, nursing students wrote reaction papers on appropriate ways to support dying patients and their families. Six processes emerged, including the core concept of the nurse's presence at the bedside. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  11. Attitudes of Medical Students Toward Psychiatric, Oncologic, and General Medical Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachtel, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The variables affecting ratings of the importance of biopsychosocial versus biomedical assessments are examined. It was hypothesized that students would perceive the relative importance of biomedical and biopsychosocial assessments differentially based on the diagnoses of the patients and the students' level of training. (MLW)

  12. Violent Behavior in Cancer Patients--A Rarely Addressed Phenomenon in Oncological Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grube, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dealing with violent cancer patients can be particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to collect data on the frequency, quality, and underlying variables affecting violent behavior as well as to examine the role played by this behavior in the premature interruption of treatment. A total of 388 cancer inpatients were examined by

  13. Violent Behavior in Cancer Patients--A Rarely Addressed Phenomenon in Oncological Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grube, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dealing with violent cancer patients can be particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to collect data on the frequency, quality, and underlying variables affecting violent behavior as well as to examine the role played by this behavior in the premature interruption of treatment. A total of 388 cancer inpatients were examined by…

  14. [Full attention to several key issues in surgical treatment for the elderly patients with gastrointestinal cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenggang

    2016-05-25

    With the development of population aging in our country, the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer is increasing. The risk of developing gastrointestinal cancer in elderly over 75 years was 5-6 times and the risk of death of gastrointestinal cancer was 7-8 times of the general population. As compared to non-elderly, the incidence of gastric cancer was not decreased obviously but the total incidence of colorectal cancer was increased more quickly. Therefore, screening of gastrointestinal cancer should be performed in the elderly for early discovery, diagnosis and treatment. Because of the insidious onset of the illness in elderly patients, gastrointestinal cancers are mostly diagnosed at advanced or late stage(stage III( or IIII(). Well differentiated cancer is more common, such as papillary or tubular adenocarcinoma. Lauren type, Borrmann II( or III( are more common in gastric cancer, which are relatively favorable. Compared with non-elderly patients, many elderly patients also suffer from comorbid diseases with higher operation risk and postoperative complication rates. Therefore, we must pay great attention to the perioperative management and the surgical operation for the elderly patients. In this paper, several key issues involved the development trend of incidence and mortality of gastrointestinal cancer, the clinicopathological characteristics, the comorbidity and surgical treatment in the elderly patients with gastrointestinal cancer will be elaborated, aiming at promoting further attention to the clinical therapeutic strategies, management measures and prognostic factors for the elderly patients with gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:27215510

  15. Patient-tailored conservative surgical treatment of invasive uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. A review.

    PubMed

    Menczer, J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to review currently available data regarding the results of a more conservative, patient-tailored surgical approach in selected cases of early invasive uterine squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A PubMed search of investigations in the English language published from January 2000 to September 2012 containing the terms conservative surgery, conservative treatment, trachelectomy, parametrectomy, lymphadenectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy and fertility sparing surgery in combination with SCC was made. Conization only is optimal for women with stage Ia1 disease mainly in tumors without lymph vascular space involvement (LVSI). In stage Ib1 patients interested to maintain reproductive capacity, vaginal or abdominal radical trachelectomy are the procedures of choice. Patients with small tumors (<2 cm), no deep invasion, no LVSI, and negative pelvic nodes are at very low risk of parametrial involvement and parametrectomy may be omitted in them. Such patients may benefit from less radical surgery and may be candidates for simple hysterectomy, simple trachelectomy, or conization with pelvic lymphadenectomy. Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is apparently a good predictor of node metastases and allows the performance of lymphadenectomy only in SLN positive cases. Thus lymphadenectomy may also be omitted in some patients. In young women with locally advanced tumors, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility-sparing surgery may also be a feasible treatment. A more conservative, patient-tailored surgical approach in selected cases of early SCC is possible resulting in lower morbidity and preservation of fertility without compromising the outcome. PMID:24051940

  16. Surgical Treatment of Inferior Vena Cava Tumor Thrombus in Patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyangkyoung; Moon, Ki-Myung; Cho, Yong-Pil; Song, Cheryn; Kim, Chung-Soo; Ahn, Hanjong

    2010-01-01

    Radical nephrectomy with inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombectomy remains the most effective therapeutic option in patients with renal cell carcinoma and IVC tumor thrombus. Cephalic extension of the thrombus is closely related to perioperative morbidity. We purposed to design a safe and successful surgical strategy through a review of our surgical experience and treatment results in 35 patients (male:female=28:7, mean age=56 yr [32-77]) who underwent IVC thrombectomy with radical nephrectomy between January 1997 and December 2006. The limit of tumor extension was level I in 10 patients (28.6%), level II in 17 (48.6%), and level III and IV in 4 patients each (11.4%). Liver mobilization with hepatic vascular exclusion was performed in 12 patients and cardiopulmonary bypass in 7. Thirty-two primary closures, 2 patch closures, and 1 graft interposition were performed. One patient underwent simultaneous pulmonary embolectomy because of an operative pulmonary embolism. There was no operative mortality, and the overall survival at 5-yr was 50.8%. Complete thrombus removal without tumor fragmentation under long venotomy on fully exposed involved IVC is recommended for successful result in a bloodless operative field. The applicability of liver mobilization, hepatic vascular exclusion, and cardiopulmonary bypass, can be determined by the level of thrombus. PMID:20052355

  17. Surgical Correction of Congenital Heart Disease in the Adult: Experience with 139 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leidenfrost, Ronald D.; Weldon, Clarence S.

    1978-01-01

    Patients over 18 years of age who have undergone a surgical correction of a congenital cardiac malformation during the period 1968 through 1977 have been reviewed. Those patients with calcific aortic stenosis which was thought, but not proved, to have arisen in a congenitally malformed aortic valve, were excluded from the review. Patients with cystic medial necrosis of the aorta were similarly excluded. There were 139 patients in the series (age range from 18 years to 67 years). The most common defects were those involving the intra-atrial septum and the related great veins, 50%. Abnormalities involving the great arteries including patent ductus arteriosus and coarctation of the aorta accounted for 19%. Common defects of conal development including ventricular septal defects and Tetralogy of Fallot malformations accounted for 15%. Valvular abnormalities including pulmonic stenosis, aortic valve abnormalities and Ebstein's malformation of tricuspid valve accounted for 11.5%. Complex congenital malformations were relatively uncommon, 4%. There were two patients with a combination of acquired and congenital heart disease. There were two operative deaths in the series, both occurring in patients with complex forms of congenital heart disease (multiple ventricular septal defects, double outlet right ventricle). There were two additional postoperative hospital deaths, one occurring following repair of an atrial septal defect from massive pulmonary embolus, and another occurring six weeks following a Fontan procedure performed for tricuspid atresia. Thus, the hospital mortality for the series was 2.9%. This reviewed series reveals the incidence of operable congenital heart defects appearing in an adult cardiac surgical practice and demonstrates that surgical repair can be accomplished with a satisfactory low mortality rate. PMID:697429

  18. Surgical Techniques for Personalized Oncoplastic Surgery in Breast Cancer Patients with Small- to Moderate-Sized Breasts (Part 1): Volume Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Dug; Lee, Jeong Woo; Cho, Young Kyoo; Kim, Wan Wook; Hwang, Seung Ook; Jung, Jin Hyang

    2012-01-01

    Despite the popularity of breast-conserving surgery (BCS), which constitutes 50-60% of all breast cancer surgeries, discussions regarding cosmetic results after BCS are not specifically conducted. The simple conservation of breast tissue is no longer adequate to qualify for BCS completion. The incorporation of oncological and plastic surgery techniques allows for the complete resection of local disease while achieving superior cosmetic outcome. Oncoplastic BCS can be performed in one of the following two ways: 1) volume displacement techniques and 2) volume replacement techniques. This study reports volume displacement surgical techniques, which allow the use of remaining breast tissue after BCS by glandular reshaping or reduction techniques for better cosmetic results. Thorough understanding of these procedures and careful consideration of the patient's breast size, tumor location, excised volume, and volume of the remaining breast tissue during the surgery in choosing appropriate patient and surgical techniques will result in good cosmetic results. Surgery of the contralateral breast may be requested to improve symmetry and may take the form of a reduction mammoplasty or mastopexy. The timing of such surgery and the merits of synchronous versus delayed approaches should be discussed in full with the patients. Because Korean women have relatively small breast sizes compared to Western women, it is not very easy to apply the oncoplastic volume displacement technique to cover defects. However, we have performed various types of oncoplastic volume displacement techniques on Korean women, and based on our experience, we report a number of oncoplastic volume displacement techniques that are applicable to Korean women with small- to moderate-sized breasts. PMID:22493622

  19. A Novel Prevention Bundle to Reduce Surgical Site Infections in Pediatric Spinal Fusion Patients.

    PubMed

    Gould, Jane M; Hennessey, Patricia; Kiernan, Andrea; Safier, Shannon; Herman, Martin

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND The Surgical Care Improvement Project bundle emphasizes operative infection prevention practices. Despite implementing the Surgical Care Improvement Project bundle in 2008, spinal fusion surgical site infections (SF-SSI) continued to be prevalent for this low-volume, high-risk surgery. OBJECTIVE To design a combined pre-, peri-, and postoperative bundle (PPPB) that would lead to sustained reductions in SF-SSI rates. DESIGN Quality improvement project, before-after trial with cost-effectiveness analysis. SETTING Children's hospital. PATIENTS All spinal fusion patients, 2008-2015. INTERVENTION A multidisciplinary team developed the PPPB composed of Surgical Care Improvement Project elements plus improved wound care practices, nursing standard of care, dedicated nursing unit, dermatology assessment tool and consultation, nursing education tool using "teach back" technique, and a "Back Home" kit. SF-SSI rates were compared before (2008-2010) and after (2011-February 2015) implementation of PPPB. PPPB compliance was monitored. RESULTS A total of 224 SF surgeries were performed from 2008 to February 2015. Pre-PPPB analysis revealed median time to SF-SSI of 28 days, secondary to skin and bowel flora. Mean 3-year pre-PPPB SF-SSI rate per 100 SF surgeries was 8.2 (8/98) (2008: 13.3 [4/30], 2009: 2.7 [1/37], 2010: 9.7 [3/31]). Mean SF-SSI rate after PPPB was 2.4 (3/126) (January 2011-February 2015); there was a 71% reduction in mean SSI rate (P=.0695). No SF-SSI occurred in neuromuscular patients (P=.008) after PPPB. Compliance with PPPB elements has been 100%. CONCLUSIONS PPPB led to sustained improvement in SF-SSI rates over 50 months. The PPPB could be reproduced for other surgeries. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:527-534. PMID:26818613

  20. Dysfunction of mechanical heart valve prosthesis: experience with surgical management in 48 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wei-Guo; Hou, Bin; Abdurusul, Adiljan; Gong, Ding-Xu; Tang, Yue; Chang, Qian; Xu, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysfunction of mechanical heart valve prostheses is an unusual but potentially lethal complication after mechanical prosthetic valve replacement. We seek to report our exp