Sample records for surgical oncology patients

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine use among general surgery, hepatobiliary surgery and surgical oncology patients

    PubMed Central

    Schieman, Colin; Rudmik, Luke R.; Dixon, Elijah; Sutherland, Francis; Bathe, Oliver F.

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is becoming more common, particularly among cancer patients. We sought to define the frequency of CAM use among general surgery, hepatobiliary and surgical oncology patients and to define some of the determinants of CAM use in patients with benign and malignant disease. Methods We asked all patients attending the clinics of 3 hepatobiliary/surgical oncology surgeons from 2002 to 2005 to voluntarily respond on first and subsequent visits to a questionnaire related to the use of CAM. We randomly selected patients for review. Results We reviewed a total of 490 surveys from 357 patients. Overall CAM use was 27%. There was significantly more CAM use among cancer (34%) versus noncancer patients (21%; p = 0.008), and the use of CAM was more common in patients with unresectable cancer (51%) than resectable cancer (22%; p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in use between men and women. There did not appear to be a change in CAM use with progression of cancer. The most common CAM was herbs or supplements (58% of all users), which were most frequently used by patients with malignant disease. Among the 27 herbs reported to be ingested, 10 are associated with bleeding and hepatotoxicity, as described in the literature. Conclusion Prospective studies evaluating surgical outcomes related to CAM use are needed. PMID:19865579

  2. The surgical oncology patient: provider obligations and legal rights.

    PubMed

    Waller, D B

    2001-09-01

    The regulation of health care grows more complex and dynamic with each new law and policy implemented to create a general standard of care on which all patients can expect and rely. Most of these new laws and policies, however, are extensions of the following three basic tenants: the duty to treat, the consent to treatment, and the confidentiality of medical information. As these tenets evolve, they afford individuals certain rights before, during, and after they attain the status of patient. PMID:11532674

  3. Decision making in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Lamb, B; Green, J S A; Vincent, C; Sevdalis, N

    2011-09-01

    Decisions in surgical oncology are increasingly being made by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs). Although MDTs have been widely accepted as the preferred model for cancer service delivery, the process of decision making has not been well described and there is little evidence pointing to the ideal structure of an MDT. Performance in surgery has been shown to depend on non-technical skills, such as decision making, as well as patient factors and the technical skills of the healthcare team. Application of this systems approach to MDT working allows the identification of factors that affect the quality of decision making for cancer patients. In this article we review the literature on decision making in surgical oncology and by drawing from the systems approach to surgical performance we provide a framework for understanding the process of decision making in MDTs. Technical factors that affect decision making include the information about patients, robust ICT and video-conferencing equipment, a minimum dataset with expert review of radiological and pathological information, implementation and recording of the MDTs decision. Non-technical factors with an impact on decision making include attendance of team members at meetings, leadership, teamwork, open discussion, consensus on decisions and communication with patients and primary care. Optimising these factors will strengthen the decision making process and raise the quality of care for cancer patients. PMID:20719499

  4. Apneumic laparoscopy in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J J; Smith, R S; Organ, C H

    1994-01-01

    Minimally invasive techniques now play an important role in virtually every aspect of general surgery. While it is unlikely that celiotomy for malignant disease will fall into obscurity as rapidly as open cholecystectomy, greater use of videoscopic techniques in surgical oncology are inevitable and will undoubtably improve patient care. Techniques of isopneumic laparoscopy have already proven useful in trauma, cholecystectomy, bowel resection, herniorrhaphy, and a variety of other procedures. Further advances in this technique are dependent on the development of "user friendly" abdominal wall retraction systems. PMID:7855473

  5. Pediatric surgical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 17 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Ethical Considerations in Pediatric Tumor Management; The Essentials of Radiotherapy for Solid Tumors in Pediatric Patients; Markers in Childhood Solid Tumors; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Neophroblastoma; and The Management of Pulmonary Metastatic Lesions in Pediatric Solid Tumors.

  6. March 2124, 2012 Orlando, Florida Annals of Surgical Oncology

    E-print Network

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    March 21­24, 2012 · Orlando, Florida #12;Annals of Surgical Oncology An Oncology Journal for Surgeons The Official Journal of the Society of Surgical Oncology The Official Journal of the American Cirugia, Hellenic Society of Surgical Oncology, Sociedad Mexicana de Oncologia, and Society of Oncology

  7. Surgical Technique Refinements in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jeffrey C.; Shah, Jatin P.

    2010-01-01

    The head and neck region poses a challenging arena for oncologic surgery. Diseases and their treatment can affect a myriad of functions, including sight, hearing, taste, smell, breathing, speaking, swallowing, facial expression and appearance. This review discusses several areas where refinements in surgical techniques have led to improved patient outcomes. This includes surgical incisions, neck lymphadenectomy, transoral laser microsurgery, minimally invasive thyroid surgery, and the use of vascularized free flaps for oromandibular reconstruction. PMID:20512941

  8. Division of Surgical Oncology announces the appointment of

    E-print Network

    Division of Surgical Oncology announces the appointment of Tracy S. Wang, MD, MPH, FACS Associate Division of Surgical Oncology is pleased and excited to announce the development of a formal Section will remain a part of the Division of Surgical Oncology. I am also pleased to announce the appointment

  9. The Edward J. Tabah Visiting Professor In Surgical Oncology

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    The Edward J. Tabah Visiting Professor In Surgical Oncology Dr. Monica Morrow, MD at the Mc Oncology, Co-Chief of the Breast Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and Professor Chair in Cancer Research and the Chairman of the Department of Surgical Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer

  10. Optimizing Reconstruction of Oncologic Sternectomy Defects Based on Surgical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, James; Garvey, Patrick B; Baumann, Donald P; Zhang, Hong; Rice, David C; Butler, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    Background The optimal strategy for oncologic sternectomy reconstruction has not been well characterized. We hypothesized that the major factors driving the reconstructive strategy for oncologic sternectomy include the need for skin replacement, extent of the bony sternectomy defect, and status of the internal mammary vessels. Study Design We reviewed consecutive oncologic sternectomy reconstructions performed at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center over a 10-year period. Regression models analyzed associations between patient, defect, and treatment factors and outcomes in order to identify patient and treatment selection criteria. We developed a generalized management algorithm based on these data. Results Forty-nine consecutive patients underwent oncologic sternectomy reconstruction (mean follow-up = 18±23 months). More sternectomies were partial (74%) rather than total/sub-total (26%). Most defects (N=40, 82%) required skeletal reconstruction. Pectoralis muscle flaps were most commonly employed for sternectomies with intact overlying skin (64%) and infrequently used when a presternal skin defect was present (36%; p=0.06). Free flaps were more often used for total/sub-total versus partial sternectomy defects (75% vs. 25%, respectively; p=0.02). Complication rates for total/sub-total sternectomy and partial sternectomy were equivalent (46% vs. 44%, respectively; p=0.92). Conclusions Despite more extensive sternal resections, total/sub-total sternectomies resulted in equivalent postoperative complications when combined with the appropriate soft tissue reconstruction. Good surgical and oncologic outcomes can be achieved with defect-characteristic-matched reconstructive strategies for these complex oncologic sternectomy resections. PMID:23619320

  11. Protocol of an expertise based randomized trial comparing surgical Venae Sectio versus radiological Puncture of Vena Subclavia for insertion of Totally Implantable Access Port in oncological patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip Knebel; Lars Fischer; Eva Cremonese; Ruben Lopez-Benitez; Ulrike Stampfl; Boris Radeleff; Hans-Ulrich Kauczor; Markus W Büchler; Christoph M Seiler

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Totally Implantable Access Ports (TIAP) are being extensively used world-wide and can be expected to gain further importance with the introduction of new neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments in oncology. Two different techniques for the implantation can be selected: A direct puncture of a central vein and the utilization of a Seldinger device or the surgical Venae sectio. It is

  12. [Features of hemocomponental therapy in oncological patients].

    PubMed

    Sofronov, G A; Khanevich, M D; Manikhas, G M; Lisianskaia, A S; Selivanov, E A; Feofanova, A V; Fadeev, R V; Giparovich, M A; Pshenkina, N N; Dinikin, M S

    2011-01-01

    The authors present an analysis of specific features of transfusions of erythrocyte containing media in oncological patients. Special attention was given to necessary selection of donor erythrocytes in performing operations with massive intraoperative blood loss. It considerably contributes to a decreased number of posttransfusional reactions and complications. For the recent five years transfusions of erythrocyte containing media to more than 15 thousand patients with surgical treatment were analyzed. Among them the individual selection of donor blood was fulfilled in 2047 cases. Compatible erythrocytes could not be selected in five cases only. In these patients infusions of Perftoran were used as an oxygen carrier both during operation and at the postoperative period. PMID:21848242

  13. Current Status of Endoscopic Laser Surgery in Head and Neck Surgical Oncology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans Edmund Eckel

    2003-01-01

    This review of the Cologne University Medical School experience with oncological laser surgery evaluates the potential role of transoral laser surgery for oral, oropharyngeal, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma by reporting the treatment modalities and results in large, unselected cohorts of consecutive patients from a university-based referral center that prefers transoral laser surgery over open surgical approaches for all head and

  14. Surgical education and training program development for gynecologic oncology: American perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Mitchel S; Bodurka, Diane C

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information about gynecologic oncology fellowship training and guidance in program development. The characteristics necessary for a physician to develop into a successful gynecologic oncologist include an extensive fund of knowledge related to the subspecialty, strong interpersonal skills, the ability to practice within the complex systems required for management of gynecologic cancer patients, surgical expertise, and the clinical ability to provide comprehensive oncologic care for these women. In order for a trainee to acquire these skills, a gynecologic oncology training program must accept only highly qualified individuals as fellows, have a dedicated core faculty, practice in a supportive environment that has appropriate facilities, and provide adequate clinical material. The gynecologic oncology training program must be organized with an emphasis on education of the fellows. Part of the educational program is formal (lectures, assigned reading, basic skill sets, etc.). Training in clinical and surgical skills is a day-to-day process that occurs during the course of patient care. One requirement of The American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG) is that the fellow spends 12 months of protected time doing research. Fellows are also required to take 2 courses, one in biostatistics and one in cancer biology. A thesis of publishable quality is also required. All programs must perform ongoing quality assurance and reassessment of potential areas for improvement. ABOG is responsible for the accreditation and ongoing monitoring of the fellowship programs. PMID:19573707

  15. Satzung des Interdisziplinren Zentrums ,,Surgical Center for Translational Oncology Lbeck" (SCTO-L)

    E-print Network

    Lübeck, Universität zu

    1 Satzung des Interdisziplinären Zentrums ,,Surgical Center for Translational Oncology ­ Lübeck Oncology ­ Lübeck (SCTO-L) ist eine sektionsübergreifende Ein- richtung der Universität zu Lübeck. Ziel des Center for Translational Oncology ­ Lübeck (SCTO-L) soll daher die interdiszipli- näre Forschung und auch

  16. Liver biopsy methods for pediatric oncology patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fredric A. Hoffer

    2000-01-01

    Background. Liver biopsy is a high-risk procedure in oncology patients, and optimal methods for children have not been established.¶Objective. To assess the effectiveness and safety of two methods of performing liver biopsy in pediatric oncology patients.¶Materials and methods. Between May 1997 and July 1999, 51 liver biopsies (22 percutaneous and 29 transjugular) were performed. The 22 percutaneous\\u000a biopsies (13 focal

  17. Doctor-patient interactions in oncology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Ford; Lesley Fallowfield; Shôn Lewis

    1996-01-01

    Studies which apply content analysis techniques to the cancer consultation are few. This descriptive study examines the structure and content of the bad news cancer consultations of 117 outpatients newly referred to the Medical Oncology Department of a large London teaching hospital. From previous communication research three main hypotheses are formed: (i) the cancer consultation is clinician-dominated rather than patient-centred;

  18. Comparison of surgical, functional, and oncological outcomes of open and robot-assisted partial nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Boylu, Ugur; Basatac, Cem; Yildirim, Umit; Onol, Fikret F.; Gumus, Eyup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to compare the surgical, oncological, and functional outcomes of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN) with open partial nephrectomy (OPN) in the management of small renal masses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 2009 and 2013, a total of 46 RAPN patients and 20 OPN patients was included in this study. Patients’ demographics, mean operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), warm ischemia time (WIT), length of hospital stay, pre- and post-operative renal functions, complications and oncological outcomes were recorded, prospectively. RESULTS: Mean tumor size was 4.04 cm in OPN group and 3.56 cm in RAPN group (P = 0.27). Mean R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score was 6.35 in OPN group and 5.35 in RAPN group (P = 0.02). The mean operative time was 152 min in OPN group and 225 min in RAPN group (P = 0.006). The mean EBL in OPN and RAPN groups were 417 ml and 268 ml, respectively (P = 0.001). WIT in OPN group was significantly shorter than RAPN group (18.02 min vs. 23.33 min, P = 0.003). The mean drain removal time and the length of hospital stay were longer in OPN group. There were no significant differences in terms of renal functional outcomes and postoperative complications between groups. CONCLUSION: Minimally invasive surgical management of renal masses with RAPN offers better outcomes in terms of EBL and length of stay. However, the mean operative time and WIT were significantly shorter in OPN group. RAPN is a safe and effective minimally invasive alternative to OPN in terms of oncological and functional outcomes. PMID:25598603

  19. Plastic Surgery for the Oncological Patient

    PubMed Central

    Daigeler, Adrien; Harati, Kamran; Kapalschinski, Nicolai; Goertz, Ole; Hirsch, Tobias; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Kolbenschlag, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The therapy of oncological patients has seen tremendous progress in the last decades. For most entities, it has been possible to improve the survival as well as the quality of life of the affected patients. To supply optimal cancer care, a multidisciplinary approach is vital. Together with oncologists, radiotherapists and other physicians, plastic surgeons can contribute to providing such care in all stages of treatment. From biopsies to the resection of advanced tumors, the coverage of the resulting defects and even palliative care, plastic surgery techniques can help to improve survival and quality of life as well as mitigate negative effects of radiation or the problems arising from exulcerating tumors in a palliative setting. This article aims to present the mentioned possibilities by illustrating selected cases and reviewing the literature. Especially in oncological patients, restoring their quality of life with the highest patient safety possible is of utmost importance. PMID:25593966

  20. Optimising surgical management of elderly cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Hodigere Sripathy Jois; Pope, Daniel; Gennari, Roberto; Audisio, Riccardo A

    2005-01-01

    Background Elderly population is on rise. It is an ethical dilemma how aggressive one should be when it comes to treat cancer in elderly. Presumed fear of increased postoperative morbidity and mortality has resulted in delivery of sub-optimal cancer surgery. Methods In this review article we visit physiology of the aged, tools available to assess surgical risks in oncogeriatric patients, and current practice in the management of common cancers encountered in surgical oncology, with the view of increasing awareness on optimising surgical management of senior patients with cancer. A pubmed search for cancer, surgery, elderly, was carried out. Results Cancer is on rise with increasing age predominantly affecting breast, gastrointestinal tract and lung. Increasingly more surgeons are offering surgery to elderly cancer patient but selection bias is prevalent. Available data reflect short and long-term outcome of cancer surgery in elderly is not greatly different to that of younger patient. Declining physiological reserve along with inability to respond adequately to physiological stress are salient age related changes. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is not tested in surgical patient. There is need for a tool to define individualised operative risk. Preoperative assessment of cancer in elderly is designed to offer this information based on functional status of an individual utilising currently available tools of risk assessment. Conclusion All elderly cancer patients should be offered optimal treatment depending on their functional status not on chronological age. Oncogeriatric patient would benefit from dedicated multidisciplinary approach. Recruitment of elderly cancer patients to more clinical trials is needed to enhance our knowledge and to offer optimum treatment to this unique subgroup. PMID:15788092

  1. Influenza vaccination in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Baluch, Aliyah; Pasikhova, Yanina

    2013-12-01

    It is well established that the immunological response to the seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine is attenuated in cancer patients. Furthermore, rates of seroprotection and seroconversion vary by malignancy type and are higher in patients with solid tumors, as compared either with those with hematologic malignancies or with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell recipients. In 2009, a novel influenza strain prompted development of new vaccines and evaluation of alternative dosing strategies in an attempt to increase the rates of seroconversion in immunocompromised patients, further complicating this issue. Recent literature has demonstrated that the use of myeloablative chemotherapy regimens and biologics is correlated with decreased immunogenicity and response to influenza vaccines. Much debate still exists as to the optimal timing of influenza vaccination. Delaying vaccination from 1 week following standard chemotherapy up to 6 months following rituximab is increasingly supported by studies in this heterogeneous population. PMID:24258350

  2. Candida infection in surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph S. Solomkin; Richard L. Simmons

    1980-01-01

    Candida infections have become a common and serious problem in non-neutropenic general surgical patients. This paper reviews the\\u000a etiologic factors, pathogenesis of systemic candidiasis, and the more common syndromes of infection in surgical patients.\\u000a Prophylactic and systemic therapy is detailed. The most significant factor inCandida infections is depression of host immune function. Significant abnormalities of T-cells, monocytes, and neutrophils have

  3. Protecting Pediatric Oncology Patients From Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Kersun, Leslie S.; Reilly, Anne F.; Coffin, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is a common respiratory pathogen. Its severity can be unpredictable, but people with chronic illness are at increased risk of severe infection, complications, and death from influenza. This review examines evidence to support various strategies to protect pediatric oncology patients from influenza-related morbidity. Influenza vaccination should be considered standard. Additional evidence-supported measures include antiviral treatment, antiviral prophylaxis, cohorting of patients, and hospital infection control measures. Data from other high-risk populations support the vaccination of family members, double-dose or high-dose vaccination, and the use of barrier methods. These measures have the potential to optimize patient outcomes because there will be fewer treatment interruptions for acute illness. These strategies can also protect patients from prolonged hospitalizations and morbidity related to influenza. PMID:23370325

  4. Acute Thoracic Findings in Oncologic Patients.

    PubMed

    Carter, Brett W; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2015-07-01

    Cancer is the second most common cause of mortality in the United States, with >500,000 deaths reported annually. Acute or emergent findings in this group of patients can be a life-threatening phenomenon that results from malignancy or as a complication of therapy. In many cases, these events can be the first clinical manifestation of malignant disease. Oncologic emergencies have been classified as metabolic, hematologic, and structural emergencies. Within the thorax, most acute oncologic findings involve the lungs and airways in the form of drug toxicity, pulmonary infections, or malignant airway compression; the cardiovascular system in the form of pulmonary embolism, superior vena cava syndrome, cardiac tamponade, or massive hemoptysis; the mediastinum in the form of esophageal perforation, acute mediastinitis, or esophagorespiratory fistula; and the osseous spine and spinal cord in the form of invasion and cord compression. Given the life-threatening nature of many of these disease processes, awareness of such complications is critical to making an accurate diagnosis and formulating appropriate treatment strategies. PMID:25803363

  5. Nael Martini: a leader in thoracic surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Rusch, Valerie W; Bains, Manjit S

    2010-03-01

    Nael Martini was one of the leading academic general thoracic surgeons of the late 20th century. His most notable contributions related to the surgical and multimodality treatment of lung cancer. PMID:20172188

  6. Participation in Surgical Oncology Clinical Trials: Gender, Race\\/Ethnicity, and Age-based Disparities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John H. Stewart; Alain G. Bertoni; Jennifer L. Staten; Edward A. Levine; Cary P. Gross

    2007-01-01

    Objective  To characterize the representation of racial\\/ethnic minorities, women, and older persons among participants in surgical trials\\u000a sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The NCI Clinical Trial Cooperative Group surgical oncology trials database was queried for breast, colorectal, lung, and prostate\\u000a cancers treated during the period 2000–2002 (n=13,991). Data from the SEER program and the Census were used to estimate

  7. Expectations and received knowledge by surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SIRKKU RANKINEN; SANNA SALANTERA; KATJA HEIKKINEN; KIRSI JOHANSSON; ANNE KALJONEN; HELI VIRTANEN; HELENA LEINO-KILPI

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Here, the aim is to compare surgical patients' knowledge expectations at admission with the knowledge they received during their hospital stay. Design. The study used a descriptive and comparative design. Setting. The study was conducted on surgical wards at one randomly selected university hospital in Finland. Participants. The sample (n ¼ 237) consisted of surgical patients (traumatological, gastroenterological, urological

  8. Sub-specialty training in head and neck surgical oncology in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Manganaris, Argyris; Black, Myles; Balfour, Alistair; Hartley, Christopher; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Simo, Ricard

    2009-07-01

    Sub-specialty training in otorhinolaryngology and head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) is not standardised across European Union (EU) states and remains diverse. The objective of this study was to assess the current status of sub-specialty training programmes in head and neck surgical oncology within the European Union (EU-15). A postal questionnaire was distributed to 41 representative members of the European Federation of Otorhinolaryngological Societies (EUFOS) in the specialty of ORL-HNS in 15 EU states. The questionnaire included questions regarding the sub-specialty practice, structure, length, access, examination procedures and certification, future developments and also a space for individual comments. Thirty-one respondents (75.6%) from major training centres in 15 different European countries replied. Overall, the data revealed major diversity for all aspects analysed, between and within the different European countries. Only four EU states had formal sub-specialty training in head and neck surgical oncology. This includes Finland, Germany, The Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. In the rest of EU states, the last year of residency programmes is often spent as an introduction to one of the sub-specialties. Sub-specialty training in head and neck surgical oncology within the EU at present is clearly underdeveloped. Issuing a European diploma in ORL-HNS could be an initial step towards assessing the skills acquired during specialist training within the different European countries and formalising specialist training. This would establish a uniform measure for evaluating candidacy for sub-specialty training both across the EU and for USA, Canada or Australia. PMID:19015865

  9. A Graph-Grammar Approach to Represent Context Knowledge in Oncological Patient Records

    E-print Network

    Pommerening, Klaus - Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics & Fachbereich 08

    MPO (Therapy Management in Pediatric Oncology), which supports therapy and monitoring in pediatric oncology-based system TheMPO (Therapy Management in Pediatric Oncology) [5,6], which supports long-term treatmentA Graph-Grammar Approach to Represent Context Knowledge in Oncological Patient Records R. Müllera

  10. Journal of Surgical Oncology Quantitative Comparison of Surgical Margin Histology Following Excision

    E-print Network

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    advances in surgical technique and pathologic analysis, approximately 20­50% of malignant breast lump the effect of thermal injury in breast conservation pathology in a direct comparison of traditional, and histological effect were compared on the same breast tissue cut with each excision instrument. A probability

  11. [Surgical treatment of neoplasms in geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Piccolomini, A; Brandi, C; Vuolo, G; Verre, L; Roviello, F; Di Cosmo, L; Carli, A

    1994-04-01

    The Authors report their experience in the surgical management of cancer in the aged (over 65 year old patients), during the period 1988-1992 at the Istituto Policattedra di Scienze Chirurgiche, University of Siena. They consider colon and rectum, breast, stomach, pancreas and biliary tract neoplasms in relation to site, staging, emergency or delayed surgical treatment, and early postoperative results. Finally, they outline the frequently encountered problems in treating old patients and the most appropriate surgical approach. PMID:8086303

  12. Geriatric medical oncology in the care of elderly cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilbert B. Zulian

    2002-01-01

    Most cancers are diagnosed after 70 years of age but standard management and treatment for elderly cancer patients remain to be established. To determine whether the availability and recognition of medical oncology may influence cancer care in this population, five successive periods were studied. The number of formal written consultations given at the geriatric hospital and at the center for

  13. Training and certification of the surgical oncologist.

    PubMed

    Berman, Russell S; Weigel, Ronald J

    2014-12-01

    Surgical Oncology has evolved as a distinct subspecialty of General Surgery with a well-defined curriculum focused on surgical care of the cancer patient, specific areas of clinical and basic science research focus and specialty journals dedicated to the discipline. The Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO), originally formed as the James Ewing Society, has provided leadership in developing training programs in Surgical Oncology and for three decades has been involved in the approval and oversight of Surgical Oncology training programs. Over this time, Surgical Oncology Fellowship training has expanded and in 2013 there were 103 applicants for 56 fellowship positions in 21 programs. The basic tenants of Surgical Oncology training has remained devoted to the core principles of multidisciplinary care, surgical management of cancer patients and a focus on education in research, clinical trials, community outreach, patient advocacy and leadership in oncology. With the maturation of Surgical Oncology as a separate specialty, Surgical Oncology training programs are now accredited by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and graduates of the programs will soon be offered subspecialty certification in Complex General Surgical Oncology (CGSO) by the American Board of Surgery, which has created a component Surgical Oncology Board (SOB). Similar expansion has occurred in other specialty areas including an expansion of Breast Fellowships, which are still being approved by the SSO. In the 2013 SSO Breast Oncology Match, there were 67 applicants for 54 positions in 39 Breast Fellowship programs. Continued advances in cancer biology and technology will challenge us to evolve training programs in Surgical Oncology to produce surgeons capable of advancing the multidisciplinary care of cancer patients. PMID:25841526

  14. Perceptions of nutrition support in pediatric oncology patients and parents.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Kathleen; Belongia, Meghan; Haddigan Mulberry, Mollie; Schulta, Christina; Phillips, Sharon; Simpson, Pippa M; Nugent, Melodee L

    2013-01-01

    An estimated 60% of pediatric oncology patients experience malnutrition during cancer therapy. Initiation of enteral nutrition (EN) and parenteral nutrition (PN) are interventions aimed at maintaining and promoting growth. Limited literature addressing perceptions of nutrition support methods exists. To develop effective guidelines on nutrition education, it is important to understand perceptions regarding nutrition support. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe perceptions of pediatric oncology patients and parents regarding the use of EN and PN and identify influencing variables. A convenience sample of pediatric oncology patients and parents were surveyed at a large Midwestern children's hospital. The majority of those surveyed chose PN over EN if they or their child were unable to eat or maintain their nutritional status. Perceptions may be influenced by comfort, ease of nutrition or medication administration, experience, health care team's recommendation, choice, and image. This study provides health care professionals an initial opportunity to understand perceptions of EN and PN, which may provide a foundation for a multi-institutional study and enhance patient and family education. PMID:23380526

  15. Mesenteric panniculitis in oncologic patients: PET-CT findings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Zissin; U METSER; D HAIN; E EVEN-SAPIR

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the role of PET\\/CT in differentiating between mesenteric panniculitis (MP) and co-existing MP and mesenteric tumoural involvement. A total of 33 PET\\/CT examinations, of 19 oncologic patients (16 men and three women with ages ranging from 48 years to 83 years) with findings of MP on the CT part of the study

  16. Small liver lesions in oncologic patients: characterization with CT, MRI and contrast-enhanced US.

    PubMed

    Morana, Giovanni; Cugini, Christian; Mucelli, Raffaella Pozzi

    2008-01-01

    Focal liver lesions (FLLs) are frequently discovered during ultrasound examinations either in healthy subjects without a clinical history of cancer or during staging or follow-up procedures in oncologic patients or in routine surveillance of hepatopathic patients. In oncologic patients, the liver is the most common target of metastatic disease and accurate detection and characterisation of FLLs is prognostically fundamental during the initial staging as well as before and after pre-operative chemotherapy, as it can help to identify patients who are most likely to benefit from liver surgery. Moreover, early detection of primary or secondary liver malignancies increases the possibility of curative surgical resection or successful percutaneous ablation. As many FLLs in these patients are benign, a precise and preferably non-invasive method of differentiation from malignant metastatic nodules is needed. Moreover, the continuous follow-up of cancer patients requires an easily available, reliable and cost-effective diagnostic tool for the detection and characterization of FLLs. PMID:18852087

  17. Small liver lesions in oncologic patients: characterization with CT, MRI and contrast-enhanced US

    PubMed Central

    Cugini, Christian; Mucelli, Raffaella Pozzi

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Focal liver lesions (FLLs) are frequently discovered during ultrasound examinations either in healthy subjects without a clinical history of cancer or during staging or follow-up procedures in oncologic patients or in routine surveillance of hepatopathic patients. In oncologic patients, the liver is the most common target of metastatic disease and accurate detection and characterisation of FLLs is prognostically fundamental during the initial staging as well as before and after pre-operative chemotherapy, as it can help to identify patients who are most likely to benefit from liver surgery. Moreover, early detection of primary or secondary liver malignancies increases the possibility of curative surgical resection or successful percutaneous ablation. As many FLLs in these patients are benign, a precise and preferably non-invasive method of differentiation from malignant metastatic nodules is needed. Moreover, the continuous follow-up of cancer patients requires an easily available, reliable and cost-effective diagnostic tool for the detection and characterization of FLLs. PMID:18852087

  18. Enterocolic lymphocytic phlebitis: an oncologic surgical resection without a preoperative pathologic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Huiberts, Astrid A.M.; Donkervoort, Sandra C.; Blok, Willem L.; Blaauwgeers, Hans L.G.

    2014-01-01

    A patient with complaints of an abdominal (mesenteric) mass is presented. Differential diagnosis included neoplastic processes, such as malignant lymphoma, desmoid tumour, a carcinoid or a gastro-intestinal stromal cell tumour. An oncological resection was performed. Despite the malignant appearance of the tumour no malignancy was found with histopathological examination. Vasculitic lesions were seen in venous structures, resembling veno-occlusive disease with signs of recanalization and with the presence of inflammatory cells, mainly lymphocytes. A diagnosis of enterocolic lymphocytic phlebitis was made. This benign condition can mimic malignancy, necessitating a wide excision, also because obtaining a pre-operative histopathological diagnosis is hardly possible. PMID:24876508

  19. [Complementary medicine use in oncology patients].

    PubMed

    Inglin, S; Amsler, S; Arigoni, F; Burton-Jeangros, C; Pargoux-Vallade, C; Sappino, A-P

    2008-05-21

    Through an anonymized questionnaire we assessed the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in a series of cancer patients treated at the Geneva University Hospitals. 152 among the 300 sollicitated patients responded and 39 (26.5%) recognized to use CAM, particularly young, and moderate to highly educated patients. Patients justify their use of CAM to maximize caring ressources, to achieve physical or psychic relief. Most of them recognize to share these therapeutic options with their doctor. Satisfaction with traditional medicine as well as ignorance of CAM are the main arguments provided by non users. The specificity of our hospital context in which results were collected and the lack of a common and popular definition of CAM remain the main limitations of our enquiry. PMID:18616209

  20. Opioid misuse in oncology pain patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane C. Ballantyne

    2007-01-01

    The problem of therapeutic opioid misuse largely affects patients who need opioids to treat chronic pain conditions. Opioid\\u000a misuse is rarely an overt clinical problem during end of life or acute pain treatment. Misuse attaches a stigma to opioid\\u000a use, and makes many patients and prescribers reluctant to use these uniquely effective drugs, even when misuse is unlikely.\\u000a Cancer was

  1. Medical oncology patients’ preferences with regard to health care: development of a patient-driven questionnaire

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Wessels; A. de Graeff; K. Wynia; H. J. Sixma; M. de Heus; M. Schipper; G. T. G. J. Woltjer; S. C. C. M. Teunissen; E. E. Voest

    2009-01-01

    Background: To improve quality of care for cancer patients, it is important to have an insight on the patient’s view on health care and on their specific wishes, needs and preferences, without restriction and without influence of researchers and health care providers. The aim of this study was to develop a questionnaire assessing medical oncology patients’ preferences for health care

  2. Central Line Maintenance Bundles and CLABSIs in Ambulatory Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bundy, David G.; Chen, Allen R.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Pehar, Miriana; Herpst, Cynthia; Fratino, Lisa; Miller, Marlene R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pediatric oncology patients are frequently managed with central lines as outpatients, and these lines confer significant morbidity in this immune-compromised population. We aimed to investigate whether a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle reduces central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and bacteremias in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients. METHODS: We conducted an interrupted time-series study of a maintenance bundle concerning all areas of central line care. Each of 3 target groups (clinic staff, homecare agency nurses, and patient families) (1) received training on the bundle and its importance, (2) had their practice audited, and (3) were shown CLABSI rates through graphs, in-service training, and bulletin boards. CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates were collected for 23 months before and 24 months after beginning the intervention and were compared by using a Poisson regression model. RESULTS: The mean CLABSI rate decreased by 48% from 0.63 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.32 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P = .005). The mean bacteremia rate decreased by 54% from 1.27 bacteremias per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.59 bacteremias per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle significantly reduced CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients with central lines. Further research is needed to determine if maintenance care bundles reduce ambulatory CLABSIs and bacteremia in other adult and pediatric populations. PMID:24101764

  3. Implementation of a Robotic Surgical Program in Gynaecological Oncology and Comparison with Prior Laparoscopic Series

    PubMed Central

    Povolotskaya, Natalia; Woolas, Robert; Brinkmann, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background. Robotic surgery in gynaecological oncology is a rapidly developing field as it offers several technical advantages over conventional laparoscopy. An audit was performed on the outcome of robotic surgery during our learning curve and compared with recent well-established laparoscopic procedure data. Method. Following acquisition of the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, California, USA), we prospectively analysed all cases performed over the first six months by one experienced gynaecologist who had been appropriately trained and mentored. Data on age, BMI, pathology, surgery type, blood loss, morbidity, return to theatre, hospital stay, and readmission rate were collected and compared with a consecutive series over the preceding 6 months performed laparoscopically by the same team. Results. A comparison of two consecutive series was made. The mean age was somewhat different, 55 years in the robotic versus 69 years in the laparoscopic group, but obesity was a feature of both groups with a mean of BMI 29.3 versus 28.06, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.54). Three subgroups of minimal access surgical procedures were performed: total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingooophorectomy (TH + BSO), total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingooophorectomy plus bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy (TH + BSO + BPLND), and radical hysterectomy plus bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy (RH + BPLND). The mean time taken to perform surgery for TH + BSO was longer in the robotic group, 151.2?min compared to 126.3?min in the laparoscopic group. TH + BSO + BPLND surgical time was similar to 178.3?min in robotic group and 176.5?min in laparoscopic group. RH + BPLND surgical time was similar, 263.6?min (robotic arm) and 264.0?min (laparoscopic arm). However, the numbers in this initial analysis were small especially in the last two subgroups and do not allow for statistical analysis. The rate of complications necessitating intervention (Clavien-Dindo classification grade 2/3) was higher in the robotic arm (22.7%) compared to the laparoscopic approach (4.5%). The readmission rate was higher in the robotic group (18.2%) compared to the laparoscopic group (4.5%). The return to theatre in the robotic group was 18.2% and 4.5% in laparoscopic group. Uncomplicated robotic surgery hospital stay appeared to be shorter, 1.3 days compared to the uncomplicated laparoscopic group, 2.5 days. There was no conversion to the open procedure in either arm. Estimated blood loss in all cases was less than 100?mL in both groups. Conclusion. Robotic surgery is comparable to laparoscopic surgery in blood loss; however, the hospital stay in uncomplicated cases appears to be longer in the laparoscopic arm. Surgical robotic time is equivalent to laparoscopic in complex cases but may be longer in cases not requiring lymph node dissection. The robotic surgery team learning curve may be associated with higher rate of morbidity. Further research on the benefits to the surgeon is needed to clarify the whole picture of this versatile novel surgical approach. PMID:25785195

  4. [Surgical treatment of patients for abdominal sepsis].

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 201 patients, suffering abdominal sepsis (AS), which have occurred after operations on abdominal organs, were analyzed. Expediency of application of modern scales for the patients state severity estimation, prognostic sign-posts and dynamic of the pathological process course in every patient was substantiated. Existing systems of prognostication (APACHE II, SOFA, MODS) are applied restrictedly for diagnosis of infection in patients, what demands relaparotomy performance in presence of clinical signs of intraabdominal infection, which persists. For prognostication of the treatment result and determination of indications for relaparotomy conduction in patients, suffering severe AS and infectious-toxic shock (ITSH), the most informative is application of the Manheim's index of peritonitis together with analysis of clinico-laboratory indices for formation of groups of patients in risk, to whom reoperation is indicated. Advantages of relaparotomy "on demand" conduction were proved in comparison with "programmed" relaparotomy during the staged surgical treatment of patients, suffering severe AS and ITSH. Complex surgical treatment with substantiation of indications and choice of adequate method of intervention secures improvement of the treatment results in these severely ill patients. PMID:25507013

  5. [Surgical treatment of patients for abdominal sepsis].

    PubMed

    Kryvoruchko, I A; Usenko, O Iu; Andreieshchev, S A

    2014-08-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 201 patients, suffering abdominal sepsis (AS), which have occurred after operations on abdominal organs, were analyzed. Expediency of application of modern scales for the patients state severity estimation, prognostic sign-posts and dynamic of the pathological process course in every patient was substantiated. Existing systems of prognostication (APACHE II, SOFA, MODS) are applied restrictedly for diagnosis of infection in patients, what demands relaparotomy performance in presence of clinical signs of intraabdominal infection, which persists. For prognostication of the treatment result and determination of indications for relaparotomy conduction in patients, suffering severe AS and infectious-toxic shock (ITSH), the most informative is application of the Manheim's index of peritonitis together with analysis of clinico-laboratory indices for formation of groups of patients in risk, to whom reoperation is indicated. Advantages of relaparotomy "on demand" conduction were proved in comparison with "programmed" relaparotomy during the staged surgical treatment of patients, suffering severe AS and ITSH. Complex surgical treatment with substantiation of indications and choice of adequate method of intervention secures improvement of the treatment results in these severely ill patients. PMID:25417285

  6. The 2013 Society of Surgical Oncology Susan G. Komen for the Cure Symposium: MRI in breast cancer: where are we now?

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Sarah; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Bleicher, Richard J; McCready, David R; King, Tari A

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely applied in the contemporary management of patients with breast cancer and as a screening tool for those at increased risk; however, prospective evidence that the use of breast MRI improves patient outcomes remains limited to screening of known BRCA mutation carriers or women at increased risk based on a strong family history. Despite this, the role of MRI in the routine evaluation of the newly diagnosed breast cancer patient remains a subject of much debate, with widely divergent views on the value of MRI in selecting local therapy. The application of MRI in patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy is an area of active investigation, with several potential benefits, including predicting response to therapy. We review the current state of the literature on the topics of MRI for screening, MRI and short-term surgical outcomes, MRI and long-term surgical outcomes, and MRI and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as presented at the 2013 Society of Surgical Oncology Susan G. Komen for the Cure Symposium, 9 March 2013. PMID:24145992

  7. Adverse events in surgical patients in Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. KABLE; R. W. GIBBERD; A. D. SPIGELMAN

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To determine the adverse event (AE) rate for surgical patients in Australia. Design. A two-stage retrospective medical record review was conducted to determine the occurrence of AEs in hospital admissions. Medical records were screened for 18 criteria and positive records were reviewed by two medical officers using a structured questionnaire. Setting. Admissions in 1992 to 28 randomly selected hospitals

  8. Pathogenesis of infection in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ping; Fang, Xiangming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite the application of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy and advanced technologies, infection remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. Understanding the pathogenesis of surgical infection would offer new insights into the development of biomarkers to predict and stratify infection in patients, and to explore specific strategies to minimize this serious postoperative complication. Recent findings The acute nonspecific inflammatory response triggered by endogenous danger signals evoked by surgical insult is beneficial, while paradoxically associated with reduced resistance to infection. There is growing evidence indicating that primed inflammation by surgical insult exaggerates the dysregulation of the immune-inflammatory response to the invasion of pathogens postoperatively. Innate immune receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), contribute to detecting both pathogen-associated molecular patterns and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns, and to further amplifying inflammatory responses to infection. Current evidence shows the fascinating role of non-TLRs in the process of infection. Non-TLRs, such as membrane-associated triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells family, cytosolic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors and nuclear receptor nuclear family 4 subgroup A receptors, are also crucial in triggering the immune responses and mounting an effective defense against surgical insults and the second hit of infection. Summary Understanding the pivotal role of non-TLRs in sensing exogenous and endogenous molecules, and the influence of primed systemic inflammation and depressed immune status on the defense against pathogen after surgical insult, would be helpful to fully explore the relevant sophisticated phenomena of surgical infection, and to elucidate the occurrence of heterogeneous constellations of clinical signs and symptoms among this special population. PMID:26126129

  9. Supracricoid laryngectomies: oncological and functional results for 152 patients.

    PubMed

    Leone, C A; Capasso, P; Russo, G; D'Errico, P; Cutillo, P; Orabona, P

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the oncological and functional outcomes in patients who underwent supracricoid laryngectomies with a crico-hyoidopexy (SCL-CHP) or a crico-hyoido-epiglottopexy (SCL-CHEP) for the treatment of primary and reccurent laryngeal cancer. A retrospective study was conducted on 152 consecutive patients seen from January 1996 to December 2006. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and were compared according to the type of surgery and clinical stage of the tumour. The mean period before decannulation, nasogastric tube (NGT) removal and recovery of a normal diet and speech were evaluated, and statistical analyses were performed regarding the association with the type of surgery and arytenoidectomy. The median follow-up period was 49.9 months (range: 10-110 months). The 3- and 5-year OS were 87.5 and 83.5%, respectively, and 3- and 5-year DFS were 78.3 and 73.7%, respectively. For patients with early stages tumours, the 5-year OS and DFS were 92.3 and 84.6% respectively, whereas for patients with locally advanced stage tumours, the OS and DFS were 74.3 and 62.2%, respectively. Significant differences in OS and DFS for patients who had early or locally advanced cancers were found (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.0032, respectively). The rate of overall local control was 92.1%, while the mean period until decannulation or NGT removal was 25.1 and 16.6 days, respectively. The mean period until NGT removal was significantly different according to the type of surgery (p = 0.0001) and whether arytenoidectomy was performed (p = 0.0001). The reliable oncological and functional results of SCL for early and locally advanced laryngeal cancers are confirmed by our series of patients. PMID:25709147

  10. Prevention of VTE in Nonorthopedic Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, David A.; Wren, Sherry M.; Karanicolas, Paul J.; Arcelus, Juan I.; Heit, John A.; Samama, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: VTE is a common cause of preventable death in surgical patients. Methods: We developed recommendations for thromboprophylaxis in nonorthopedic surgical patients by using systematic methods as described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines. Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: We describe several alternatives for stratifying the risk of VTE in general and abdominal-pelvic surgical patients. When the risk for VTE is very low (< 0.5%), we recommend that no specific pharmacologic (Grade 1B) or mechanical (Grade 2C) prophylaxis be used other than early ambulation. For patients at low risk for VTE (?1.5%), we suggest mechanical prophylaxis, preferably with intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC), over no prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at moderate risk for VTE (?3%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we suggest low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (Grade 2B), low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 2B), or mechanical prophylaxis with IPC (Grade 2C) over no prophylaxis. For patients at high risk for VTE (?6%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we recommend pharmacologic prophylaxis with LMWH (Grade 1B) or low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 1B) over no prophylaxis. In these patients, we suggest adding mechanical prophylaxis with elastic stockings or IPC to pharmacologic prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at high risk for VTE undergoing abdominal or pelvic surgery for cancer, we recommend extended-duration, postoperative, pharmacologic prophylaxis (4 weeks) with LMWH over limited-duration prophylaxis (Grade 1B). For patients at moderate to high risk for VTE who are at high risk for major bleeding complications or those in whom the consequences of bleeding are believed to be particularly severe, we suggest use of mechanical prophylaxis, preferably with IPC, over no prophylaxis until the risk of bleeding diminishes and pharmacologic prophylaxis may be initiated (Grade 2C). For patients in all risk groups, we suggest that an inferior vena cava filter not be used for primary VTE prevention (Grade 2C) and that surveillance with venous compression ultrasonography should not be performed (Grade 2C). We developed similar recommendations for other nonorthopedic surgical populations. Conclusions: Optimal thromboprophylaxis in nonorthopedic surgical patients will consider the risks of VTE and bleeding complications as well as the values and preferences of individual patients. PMID:22315263

  11. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc.), to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc.), and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.). These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS) has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person's job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information. PMID:19052391

  12. Anxiety and pain in surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angel Martinez-Urrutia

    1975-01-01

    Investigated the effects of surgery on state anxiety (A-state) and perceived pain in 59 white male surgical patients. The Melzack-Torgerson Pain Questionnaire, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Fear of Surgery Scale (FSS) were given the day before the operation and again 10 days after surgery. Results indicate that surgery as a physical threat has an effect on A-state

  13. Illness perception differences between Russian- and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Popov, Nadia; Heruti, Irit; Levy, Sigal; Lulav-Grinwald, Doron; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2014-03-01

    Illness perception influences health and illness behaviors. This study was designed to estimate illness perception differences between Russian-speaking and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients. Changes in illness perception associated with time spent in Israel among Russian-speaking patients were also evaluated. Additionally, we evaluated differences in illness perception of patients exposed to Chernobyl's consequences. A total of 144 oncology patients (77 Hebrew-speaking, 67 Russian-speaking) completed personal data questionnaires and The illness perception questionnaire revised, translated into Russian for this study. Significantly more Russian-speaking oncology patients perceived their illness as chronic and having negative consequences on life (p < .01). Russian-speaking oncology patients tend to have a more negative perception of cancer compared to Hebrew-speaking patients. Time spent in Israel may create more positive perceptions of cancer among these patients. No illness perception differences were found concerning Chernobyl consequences. PMID:24492913

  14. Intracerebral haemorrhage: surgical therapy vs. patient-adapted treatment concept

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Ruth; Schulmeyer Frank Josef; Woertgen Chris; Brawanski Alexander

    2004-01-01

    In spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (SICH), the indication for surgery is still controversial. Therefore we developed clinical guidelines for therapy and compared the outcome of these patients to an exclusively surgically treated group. We retrospectively evaluated outcome in 70 patients with SICH, who were treated only surgically and compared this group with 58 prospectively collected patients, who were treated surgically (n=13)

  15. Positive patient experiences in an Australian integrative oncology centre

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of cancer patients’ utilising complementary and integrative therapies (CIT) within integrative oncology centres across Western Australia. Methods Across four locations 135 patients accessed CIT services whilst undergoing outpatient medical treatment for cancer. Of the 135 patients, 66 (61?±?12 y; female n?=?45; male n?=?21) agreed to complete a personal accounts questionnaire consisting of open-ended questions designed to explore patients’ perceptions of CIT. All results were transcribed into nVivo (v9) and using thematic analysis, key themes were identified. Results Of the 66 participants, 100% indicated they would “recommend complementary therapies to other patients” and 92% stated “CIT would play a significant role in their future lifestyle”. A mean score of 8?±?1 indicated an improvement in participants’ perception of wellbeing following a CIT session. Three central themes were identified: empowerment, support and relaxation. Fourteen sub-themes were identified, with all themes clustered into a framework of multifaceted views held by cancer patients in relation to wellbeing, role of significant others and control. Conclusions Exploration of patients’ experiences reveals uniformly positive results. One of the key merits of the environment created within the centres is patients are able to work through their cancer journey with an increased sense of empowerment, without placing them in opposition to conventional medical treatment. In order to effectively target integrative support services it is crucial to explore the experiences of patients in their own words and use those forms of expression to drive service delivery. PMID:24886476

  16. [Dental and oncological status of patients with tongue carcinoma].

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    After the supervision over patients with cancer of mucous membrane of oral cavity (MMOC) admitted for treatment in the Tver Regional Clinical Oncological Hospital (TRCOH), the analysis of 427 primary revealed cases of cancer of mobile part of the tongue MPoT (S 02) was carried out. The study included retrospective analysis of case records of 237 patients treated from 1997 to 2013 with the diagnosis of MPoT and prospective examination of 190 patients treated by authors in specialized departments of TRCOH. On the basis of questioning of 67 III-IV stages tongue carcinoma patients at the age of 50-59 years clinical course features, cancer risk factors and oral care patterns were studied. It was revealed that patients often make decision to see an oncologist to meet relatives wishes, prefer self-treatment, trust hearings and quacks or simply hope for self-recovery. Studying of dental status revealed high prevalence and intensity of caries. All males and the majority of sampled women weren't informed about additional methods of oral cavity hygiene (dental floss, mouthwashes, gels) and had unsatisfactory or bad level of Fedorov-Volodkina hygienic index. We revealed a high necessity in treatment of caries and its complications, an average of 3.61 and 2.73 teeth needed filling and 4,43 and 1.77 teeth - extraction in male and female patients, correspondently. The received data identify a great need for dental treatment and patient education in patients with tongue malignancy. PMID:25909610

  17. Patients report more discomfort after surgical endodontic retreatment than non-surgical

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey W Hutter

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To observe any systematic difference between surgical and non-surgical endodontic retreatment of endodontic failures.Design: Randomised controlled trial.Intervention Surgical or non-surgical endodontic retreatment.Outcome measures: Patients recorded pain and swelling each postoperative day for 1 week using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Use of analgesia was also recorded.Results: Ninety-two patients were included in the study. Pain and swelling was significantly higher

  18. Safety of pull-type and introducer percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes in oncology patients: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) allows long-term tube feeding. Safety of pull-type and introducer PEG placement in oncology patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies is unknown. Methods Retrospective analysis of 299 patients undergoing PEG tube placement between January 2006 and December 2008 revealed 57 oncology patients. All patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancy were treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. In case of high-grade stenosis introducer Freka® Pexact PEG tube was placed (n = 24) and in all other patients (n = 33) conventional pull-type PEG tube. Short-term complications and mortality rates were compared. Results Patients' characteristics and clinical status were comparable in both groups. Short-term complications were encountered in 11/24 (48%) introducer PEG patients as compared to only 4/33 (12%) pull-type PEG patients (P < 0.05). Accidental removal of the introducer PEG tube occurred in 4/24 (17%) with need for surgical intervention in 1 vs. 0/33 (0%, P < 0.05). Wound infection occurred in 3/24 (12%) leading to septic shock and admission to intensive care unit (ICU) in 1 vs. 3/33 (9%, NS). Finally, 3/24 gastrointestinal perforations (12%) resulted from a difficult placement procedure vs. 1/33 (3%), leading to urgent surgical intervention and admission to ICU. Two introducer PEG patients died at ICU, resulting in an overall mortality rate of 8% vs. 0% (P = 0.091). Conclusion The introducer Freka® Pexact PEG procedure for long-term tube feeding may lead to significantly higher complication and mortality rates in patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. It is suggested to use the conventional pull-type PEG tube placement in this group of patients, if possible. PMID:21410958

  19. Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: attitudes and experiences of oncology patients, oncologists, and the public

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J Emanuel; E. R Daniels; D. L Fairclough; B. R Clarridge

    1996-01-01

    SummaryBackground Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are pressing public issues. We aimed to collect empirical data on these controversial interventions, particularly on the attitudes and experiences of oncology patients.Methods We interviewed, by telephone with vignette-style questions, 155 oncology patients, 355 oncologists, and 193 members of the public to assess their attitudes and experiences in relation to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.Findings About

  20. [Preanesthetic meals in elective surgical patients].

    PubMed

    Tanabe, T; Ebina, M; Ishihara, H; Matsuki, A; Oshima, S; Fukushi, S

    1997-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of preanesthetic meals on the volume and pH of gastric contents in forty elective surgical patients ranging in ages from 20 to 60 years. Twenty patients who were given either isotonic beverage 250 ml or apple juice 250 ml on the morning of the operative day were subjected as control group and twenty patients of the breakfast group took two slices of bread with the above drink. About seven hours following drinking and feeding, the mean values of gastric volume were 20.9 +/- 18.3 ml in the control group and 19.2 +/- 16.3 ml in the breakfast group. The mean values of gastric pH were 4.3 +/- 2.3 in the drink group and 4.6 +/- 2.3 in the breakfast group. There were no significant differences in the gastric volume and pH between the two groups. However, very small amount of the bread was detected in the gastric fluid of three patients in the breakfast group. As preanesthetic drinking and feeding are advantageous for reducing the anxieties of preoperative patients and also for their nutrition during operation, it is encouraging that eating two slices of bread did not induce a significant effect of gastric volume or pH. The minute fragment of bread seems to have no clinically significant effect. PMID:9223882

  1. Information and its impact on satisfaction among surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward Krupat; Marcella Fancey; Paul D. Cleary

    2000-01-01

    This study investigates the association between patient characteristics, reported problems with obtaining information and global evaluations of care among surgical patients. Using data from a large scale study of hospital care, a factor analysis of 30 information-relevant items was conducted with data from a sample of 3602 surgical patients; and correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify the

  2. Surgical trials in oncology. the importance of quality control in the TME trial.

    PubMed

    Klein Kranenbarg, E; van de Velde, C J H

    2002-05-01

    Results from randomised trials provide the best scientific evidence of efficacy or inefficacy of the therapy. The evaluation of surgical procedures involves problems in addition to those associated with medical experimentation. Surgery, unlike a pill, is not a standardised, reproducible entity, but a unique product whose details are defined by, for example, the skill of the surgeon. Quality assurance is important for treatment and also for data handling. The different treatments (surgery, pathology, radiotherapy, etc.) should be familiar to all participating physicians prior to the start of the trial. Instructions can be given by means of a well-written protocol, videotapes, workshops and instructors at the dissection table. The data collection and data check should be done by data managers and co-ordinators for the separate disciplines. Errors and missing data should be completed and feedback to the physician is essential. Close contact between an active co-ordinating data centre, including co-ordinators for the separate disciplines, and all participating physicians is essential to conduct a quality controlled multicentre, multidisciplinary trial. Continuous enthusiasm can be maintained by the organisation of regular workshops, distribution of newsletters and trial up-dates at scientific meetings. The efforts from all of the involved co-ordinators, data managers, instructors and physicians have resulted in a very successful trial with rapid accrual, good quality treatments and procedures, good quality data, and a high participation rate among hospitals and patients. Quality control is expensive and labour-intensive, but it is worthwhile. PMID:11978518

  3. A hospital-based intervention using massage to reduce distress among oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Currin, Jennifer; Meister, Edward Anton

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a Swedish massage intervention on oncology patients' perceived level of distress. Each patient's distress level was measured using 4 distinct dimensions: pain, physical discomfort, emotional discomfort, and fatigue. A total of 251 oncology patients volunteered to participate in this nonrandomized single-group pre- and post design study for over a 3-year period at a university hospital setting in southeastern Georgia. The analysis found a statistically significant reduction in patient-reported distress for all 4 measures: pain (F = 638.208, P = .000), physical discomfort (F = 742.575, P = .000), emotional discomfort (F = 512.000, P = .000), and fatigue (F = 597.976, P = .000). This reduction in patient distress was observed regardless of gender, age, ethnicity, or cancer type. These results lend support for the inclusion of a complementary massage therapy program for hospitalized oncology patients as a means of enhancing their course of treatment. PMID:18453878

  4. Program Evaluation of a Pediatric Oncology Camp For Patients and Siblings

    E-print Network

    Prout, Kerry

    2009-10-01

    to determine consumer satisfaction with camp experience.8 Apart from design, as outlined by Roberts and Steele, several Program Evaluation of a Pediatric Oncology Camp For Patients and Siblings KERRY PROUT is a 2009 graduate from the Psychology... of published evaluations of camps for children with cancer and their families is of concern given that a majority of the states in the country have at least one pediatric 93 oncology camp.17 PURPOSE OF STUDY Due to the potential benefits of program...

  5. No correlation between estimated and actual glomerular filtration rates in pediatric oncology patients

    E-print Network

    Uzunova, Lena; Wong, Anny; Messahel, Boo; Murray, Matthew J.

    2015-03-17

    No correlation between estimated and actual glomerular filtration rates in pediatric oncology patients. Lena Uzunova1, Anny Wong1, Boo Messahel1, Matthew J. Murray1,2 1Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, Addenbrooke’s Hospital... institution study comparing estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with actual GFR in children with cancer. As glomerular filtration is a key route of excretion of many chemotherapy agents, its accurate determination is essential in order to allow...

  6. Surgical outcome in 87 patients with Zenker's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Bonafede, J P; Lavertu, P; Wood, B G; Eliachar, I

    1997-06-01

    Surgical treatment of Zenker's diverticulum is controversial because many different procedures exist. We retrospectively reviewed 87 consecutive patients surgically treated for Zenker's diverticulum at a tertiary care institution from 1976 through 1993. Four surgical procedures were performed: cricopharyngeal myotomy alone (n = 16), excision (hand-sewn) plus myotomy (n = 51), excision (stapler) plus myotomy (n = 11), and diverticulopexy plus myotomy (n = 9). There were three surgical mortalities (3.5%) and a complication rate of 24%. Eighty patients (92%) were available for follow up. Sixty-eight patients (78%) reported excellent relief of symptoms, 10 (13%) reported improvement with occasional symptoms, and two (3%) described persistent dysphagia. No statistical difference in complication rate was found among surgical groups (P = 0.15). Myotomy alone patients had worse outcomes (P = 0.04) compared with the other surgical groups. Median follow-up was 7.5 months. PMID:9185726

  7. The Use of Art in the Medical Decision-Making Process of Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of written informed consent in the 1970s created expectations of shared decision making between doctors and patients that has led to decisional conflict for some patients. This study utilized a collaborative, intrinsic case study approach to the decision-making process of oncology patients who participated in an open art therapy…

  8. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  9. Geriatric oncology: comparing health related quality of life in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Population ageing is increasing the number of people annually diagnosed with cancer worldwide, once most types of tumours are age-dependent. High-quality healthcare in geriatric oncology requires a multimodal approach and should take into account stratified patient outcomes based on factors other than chronological age in order to develop interventions able to optimize oncology care. This study aims to evaluate the Health Related Quality of Life in head and neck cancer patients and compare the scores in geriatric and younger patients. Methods Two hundred and eighty nine head and neck cancer patients from the Oncology Portuguese Institute participated in the Health Related Quality of Life assessment. Two patient groups were considered: the geriatric (? 65 years old, n = 115) and the younger (45-60 years old, n= 174). The EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35 questionnaires were used. Results Head and neck cancer patients were mostly males, 77.4% within geriatric group and 91.4% among younger patients group. The most frequent tumour locations were similar in both groups: larynx, oral cavity and oropharynx - base of the tongue. At the time of diagnosis, most of younger male patients were at disease stage III/IV (55.9%) whereas the majority of younger female patients were at disease stage I/II (83.4%). The geriatric patient distribution was found to be similar in any of the four disease stages and no gender differences were observed. We found that age (geriatrics scored generally worse), gender (females scored generally worse), and tumour site (larynx tumours denounce more significant problems between age groups) clearly influences Health Related Quality of Life perceptions. Conclusions Geriatric oncology assessments signalize age-independent indicators that might guide oncologic geriatric care optimization. Decision-making in geriatric oncology must be based on tumour characteristics and chronological age but also on performance status evaluation, co-morbidity, and patient reported outcomes assessment. PMID:21232097

  10. Professional psychological support and psychotherapy methods for oncology patients. Basic concepts and issues

    PubMed Central

    Cie?lak, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Background The essence of psychological support provided to oncology patients is to adjust its methods to the needs and expectations arising from the distressful experience of cancer and its treatment. Aim The aim of this study is to present methods of professional psychological support to be used in work with oncology patients during the treatment and follow-up stages. Materials and methods The article is a review of psychological and psychotherapy methods most often applied to oncology patients. Conclusion Methods of psychological support depend on the current condition of a patient. The support will be effective if provided in adequate time and place with the patient's express consent and in line with their individual needs and expectations. PMID:24416542

  11. Medical Expertise and Patient Involvement: A Multiperspective Qualitative Observation Study of the Patient’s Role in Oncological Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Peter; Wäscher, Sebastian; Vollmann, Jochen; Schildmann, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Decision making in oncology poses intricate ethical questions because treatment decisions should account not only for evidence-based standards but also for the patient’s individual values and preferences. However, there is a scarcity of empirical knowledge about patient involvement in oncological decision making. Methods. Direct, nonparticipant observation was used as a qualitative research method to gain an understanding of the interplay between medical expertise and patient participation in oncological decision making. Based on a multiperspective approach, observations were performed in three settings (tumor conference, ward round, and outpatient clinic) in the oncology department of a German university hospital. The observation transcripts were analyzed using central features of qualitative data analysis. Results. Major differences were identified regarding the decision-making processes in the three settings related to the patient’s presence or absence. When the patient was absent, his or her wishes were cited only irregularly; however, patients actively advanced their wishes when present. Preselection of treatments by physicians was observed, narrowing the scope of options that were finally discussed with the patient. Dealing with decisions about risky treatments was especially regarded as part of the physician’s professional expertise. Conclusion. The study reveals aspects of decision making for cancer patients that have been underexposed in the empirical and theoretical literature so far. Among these are the relevance of structural aspects for the decisions made and the practice of preselection of treatment options. It should be further discussed how far medical expertise reaches and whether therapeutic decisions can be made without consulting the patient. PMID:24760711

  12. Cooling in Surgical Patients: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Gurreebun, Bibi F.; Zipitis, Christos S.; Edi-Osagie, Ngozi E.; Dady, Ian M.; Sylvan, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Moderate induced hypothermia has become standard of care for children with peripartum hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. However, children with congenital abnormalities and conditions requiring surgical intervention have been excluded from randomised controlled trials investigating this, in view of concerns regarding the potential side effects of cooling that can affect surgery. We report two cases of children, born with congenital conditions requiring surgery, who were successfully cooled and stabilised medically before undergoing surgery. Our first patient was diagnosed after birth with duodenal atresia after prolonged resuscitation, while the second had an antenatal diagnosis of left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia and suffered an episode of hypoxia at birth. They both met the criteria for cooling and after weighing the pros and cons, this was initiated. Both patients were medically stabilised and successfully underwent therapeutic hypothermia. Potential complications were investigated for and treated as required before they both underwent surgery successfully. We review the potential side effects of cooling, especially regarding coagulation defects. We conclude that newborns with conditions requiring surgery need not be excluded from therapeutic hypothermia if they might benefit from it. PMID:24551469

  13. The revolving door: Hospital readmissions of gynecologic oncology patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melissa S. Henretta; Jennifer M. Scalici; Carolyn L. Engelhard; Linda R. Duska

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveRehospitalization within 30days of discharge was identified by the Obama Administration as a target for reducing health care spending. We examined readmissions to our gynecologic oncology service to determine: 1) rates of readmission, 2) indication for readmissions, 3) whether the admission was planned, and 4) costs.

  14. Group Therapy with Patients in the Waiting Room of an Oncology Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnowitz, Edward; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a therapy group for cancer patients, conducted by cotherapists in an oncology waiting room. Group members provided mutual support and shared concerns and coping methods. Medical staff members became more involved and were more able to address the affective needs of the patients and their families. (JAC)

  15. Pediatric Surgical Neuro-Oncology: Current Best Care Practices and Strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James T. Rutka; John S. Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood brain tumors. Gross total surgical resection combined with appropriate adjuvant therapies can achieve a high rate of disease control for low grade gliomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas. High grade gliomas, tumors involving the optic apparatus or diencepahalic structures, diffuse brainstem lesions, and recurrent or metastatic disease still pose considerable

  16. Predictors of expectancies for post-surgical pain and fatigue in breast cancer surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie B. Schnur; Michael N. Hallquist; Dana H. Bovbjerg; Jeffrey H. Silverstein; Angelina Stojceska; Guy H. Montgomery

    2007-01-01

    Expectancies for post-surgical pain and fatigue have previously been found to predict pain and fatigue among breast cancer surgery patients. However, the study of predictors of these expectancies has been neglected. The present study was designed to investigate predictors of expectancies for post-surgical pain and fatigue among breast cancer surgery patients.Four hundred and eighteen women (M=48.3years, SD=13.66years) scheduled to undergo

  17. Psychological functioning of morbidly obese patients after surgical treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WG van Gemert; RM Severeijns; JWM Greve; N Groenman; PB Soeters

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the long-term effects of surgically induced weight loss on the psychological functioning of morbidly obese patients.DESIGN: Comparison between preoperative and postoperative psychometric test results in a cross-sectional study.PATIENTS AND METHODS: Three psychometric tests were administered to 62 morbidly obese patients before and after surgery.RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 85.9±48.1 months. Surgical treatment resulted in a mean weight

  18. Which patients with resectable pancreatic cancer truly benefit from oncological resection: is it destiny or biology?

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis. A technically perfect surgical operation may still not provide a survival advantage for patients with technically resectable pancreatic cancer. Appropriate selection of patients for surgical resections is an imminent issue. Recent studies have provided an important clue on what serum biomarkers may be used to select out the patients who would unlikely benefit from the surgical resection. PMID:25714403

  19. [Clinical significance of albumin parameters in oncology patients].

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, A N; Evtushenko, V A

    2004-01-01

    The paper contains modern data on the potentialities of determining the albumin parameters in clinical oncology. Finding of the total albumin concentration, effective albumin concentration, albumin binding reserve and toxicity index by using the K-35 fluorescence probe can be useful in diagnosing cancer, choosing a treatment scheme and in the course of treatment. The albumin parameters can be used, primarily, on a wide-scale basis in postoperative intensive care. PMID:15717525

  20. The WHO surgical safety checklist: survey of patients’ views

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Stephanie Jane; Rout, Shantanu; Caris, Jochem; Moorthy, Krishna; Mayer, Erik; Darzi, Ara; Sevdalis, Nick; Vincent, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that full implementation of the WHO surgical safety checklist across NHS operating theatres is still proving a challenge for many surgical teams. The aim of the current study was to assess patients’ views of the checklist, which have yet to be considered and could inform its appropriate use, and influence clinical buy-in. Method Postoperative patients were sampled from surgical wards at two large London teaching hospitals. Patients were shown two professionally produced videos, one demonstrating use of the WHO surgical safety checklist, and one demonstrating the equivalent periods of their operation before its introduction. Patients’ views of the checklist, its use in practice, and their involvement in safety improvement more generally were captured using a bespoke 19-item questionnaire. Results 141 patients participated. Patients were positive towards the checklist, strongly agreeing that it would impact positively on their safety and on surgical team performance. Those worried about coming to harm in hospital were particularly supportive. Views were divided regarding hearing discussions around blood loss/airway before their procedure, supporting appropriate modifications to the tool. Patients did not feel they had a strong role to play in safety improvement more broadly. Conclusions It is feasible and instructive to capture patients’ views of the delivery of safety improvements like the checklist. We have demonstrated strong support for the checklist in a sample of surgical patients, presenting a challenge to those resistant to its use. PMID:25038036

  1. Intracerebral haemorrhage: surgical therapy vs. patient-adapted treatment concept.

    PubMed

    Ruth, Albert; Schulmeyer, Frank Josef; Woertgen, Chris; Brawanski, Alexander

    2004-04-01

    In spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (SICH), the indication for surgery is still controversial. Therefore we developed clinical guidelines for therapy and compared the outcome of these patients to an exclusively surgically treated group. We retrospectively evaluated outcome in 70 patients with SICH, who were treated only surgically and compared this group with 58 prospectively collected patients, who were treated surgically (n=13) or medically (n=45). Initial level of consciousness, haematoma volume, and ventricular extension of blood were inversely correlated with mortality (p<0.0001, respectively). Use of clinical guidelines reduced the number of operations without affecting the outcome. We can formulate the following guidelines according to our data: comatose patients with and without brain herniation signs should be treated conservatively. Patients with a haematoma volume between 25 and 85 ml and a clinical deterioration are candidates for surgical therapy. PMID:14975413

  2. Perioperative Warming in Surgical Patients: A Comparison of Interventions.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Brenda; Kerr, Marsi; Van Poperin, Judy; Everett, Cindy; Stommel, Manfred; Lehto, Rebecca H

    2015-08-01

    The four arm study investigates how use of a preoperative forced-air warming blanket and adjustment of ambient surgical room temperature may contribute to prevention of perioperative hypothermia. Active warming interventions may prevent the drop in core temperature that occur as a result of surgical anesthesia. Core body temperatures from a convenience sample of 220 adult surgical patients were sequentially monitored in the preoperative, intraoperative, and post-anesthesia care units (PACU) while receiving: (a) routine surgical care, (b) application of preoperative forced-air warming blanket, (c) application of preoperative forced-air warming blanket with adjustment of ambient surgical room temperatures, or (d) adjustment of ambient surgical room temperature only. Sample characteristics were evenly distributed among the four groups. There were no statistical differences in PACU core body temperatures. The application of forced-air warming blankets and room temperature adjustment interventions were not more effective than current practice in preventing perioperative hypothermia. PMID:24913925

  3. [The experience of the "oncologic patient": (re)conceptualizing the informative act].

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Carlos António

    2007-01-01

    The adaptation of the patient to the conditions of chronic illness makes the information given to the patient one of the most powerful strategies, capable of contributing to a change in the social representation of the patient, from that of a mere clinical case to that of a holistic being. The objective of this study was to investigate the scientific work published in periodicals indexed by the Medline and Lilacs databases between 1990 and 2006 as to the informative act and the different forms in which information is provided to oncology patients. This analysis of the literature led to the conclusion that there has been an increase in the volume of publications, underlining the role of the oncology patient as a catalyst for new strategies for psychosocial adjustment and revealing her key role through her status as a 'professional patient'. PMID:18472547

  4. Duodenocaval Fistula in a Patient with Inferior Vena Cava Leiomyosarcoma Treated by Surgical Resection and Caval Polytetrafluoroethylene Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Davide; Querques, Giulia; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Bonaffini, Pietro Andrea; Sironi, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) leiomyosarcoma represents an extremely rare disease that commonly involves the segment between the inflow of the renal veins and the inflow of the hepatic veins (46% of cases). We report the case of a patient affected by an IVC leiomyosarcoma, treated with surgical resection, caval reconstruction with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and right nephrectomy, followed by external beam radiotherapy. Oncological follow-up was negative for 17 years after this combined treatment, since the patient developed a duodenocaval fistula (DCF). PMID:26185702

  5. Surgical Management of Patients with Chiari I Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Siasios, John; Kapsalaki, Eftychia Z.; Fountas, Kostas N.

    2012-01-01

    Chiari malformations (CMs) constitute a variety of four mainly syndromes (I, II, III, and IV), which describe the protrusion of brain tissue into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum. These malformations frequently occur in combination with other pathological entities such as myelomeningocele, hydrocephalus, and/or hydrosyringomyelia. The recent improvement of imaging techniques has increased not only the rate of CM diagnosis but also the necessity for its early treatment. Several different surgical techniques have been employed in the treatment of patients with symptomatic CM-I. In our current study, a systematic and critical review of the pertinent literature was made for identifying the most commonly employed surgical procedures in the management of these patients. Emphasis was given in outlining the advantages and disadvantages of each surgical approach. Moreover, an attempt was made for defining those parameters that may be prognostic factors for their surgical outcome. There is a consensus that surgical treatment is reserved only for symptomatic patients with CM-I. It has also been postulated that early surgically intervention is usually associated with better outcome. Despite the large number of previously published clinical series, further clinical research with large-scale studies is necessary for defining surgical treatment guidelines in these patients. PMID:22811732

  6. Use of Psychosocial Services Increases after a Social Worker-Mediated Intervention in Gynecology Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Yuko; Shah, Nina R.; Ward, Kristy K.; McHale, Michael T.; Alvarez, Edwin A.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of psychosocial services to gynecologic oncology outpatients by a social worker increases service use. During the initial six weeks (phase I), patients were referred for psychosocial services by clinic staff. During the second six weeks (phase II), a nurse introduced available…

  7. [Informing a patient about surgical treatment for pelvic organ prolapse].

    PubMed

    Letouzey, V; Fritel, X; Pierre, F; Courtieu, C; Marès, P; de Tayrac, R

    2010-04-01

    Inform consent is a major objective in the relation patient-physician. Patient's information becomes doubt when it is insufficient. To answer to medical persons asking about patient's information, pretreatment clinical and paraclinical assessment will be discussed. Reflexion delay, surgical alternative therapy and pre-operatory examination will be exposed. Several critical situations, such as associated hysterectomy, patient's comorbidity (tobacco, obesity) or synthetic mesh reinforcement have to be well-known to inform patient about failures and outcomes. PMID:20362480

  8. Salvage Pelvic Lymph Node Dissection in Recurrent Prostate Cancer: Surgical and Early Oncological Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Van Praet, Charles; Lumen, Nicolaas; Ost, Piet; Fonteyne, Valérie; De Meerleer, Gert; Lambert, Bieke; Delrue, Louke; De Visschere, Pieter; Villeirs, Geert; Decaestecker, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Methodology. Seventeen patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) rise following local treatment for prostate cancer with curative intent underwent open or minimally invasive salvage pelvic lymph node dissection (SLND) for oligometastatic disease (<4 synchronous metastases) or as staging prior to salvage radiotherapy. Biochemical recurrence after complete biochemical response (cBR) was defined as 2 consecutive PSA increases >0,2?ng/mL; and after incomplete biochemical response as 2 consecutive PSA rises. Newly found metastasis on imaging defined clinical progression (CP). Palliative androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) was initiated if >3 metastases were detected or if patients became symptomatic. Kaplan-Meier statistics were applied. Results. Clavien-Dindo grade 1, 2, 3a, and 3b complications were seen in 6, 1, 1, and 2 patients, respectively. Median follow-up time was 22 months. Among 13 patients treated for oligometastatic disease, 8 (67%) had a PSA decline, with 3 patients showing cBR. Median PSA progression-free survival (FS) was 4.1 months and median CP-FS 7 months. Three patients started ADT, resulting in a 2-year ADT-FS rate of 79.5%. Conclusion. SLND is feasible, but postoperative complication rate seems higher than that for primary LND. Biochemical and clinical response duration is limited, but as part of an oligometastatic treatment regime it can defer palliative ADT. PMID:25695051

  9. Effect of Opiates, Anesthetic Techniques, and Other Perioperative Factors on Surgical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Alan David; Patel, Nayan; Bueno, Franklin Rivera; Hymel, Brad; Vadivelu, Nalini; Kodumudi, Gopal; Urman, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Opioid pharmacotherapy is often used to treat cancer pain. However, morphine and other opioid-like substance use in patients with cancer may have significant adverse consequences, including the suppression of both innate and acquired immune responses. Although studies have examined the possibility that regional anesthesia attenuates the immunosuppressive response of surgery, the effects of morphine and other opioid-related substances on tumor progression remain unknown. Methods This article presents an evidence-based review of the influence of opioids and anesthetic technique on the immune system in the context of cancer recurrence. The review focuses on the field of regional anesthesia and the setting of surgical oncologic procedures. The method for perioperative pain management and the technique of anesthesia chosen for patients in cancer surgery were explored. Results General anesthetics have been indicated to suppress both cell-mediated immunity and humoral immunity. Evidence suggests that intravenous opioids suppress the immune system. However, the mechanisms by which anesthetics and analgesics inhibit the immune system are not understood. Compared with the alternatives, regional analgesia offers reduced blood loss and superior postoperative analgesia. Because of these advantages, the use of regional analgesia has increased in oncologic surgeries. Conclusion Immune responses from all components of the immune system, including both the humoral and cell-mediated components, appear to be suppressed by anesthetics and analgesics. The clinical anesthesiologist should consider these factors in the application of technique, especially in cancer surgery. PMID:24940132

  10. Ozone\\/NO-ultrasound method in complicated postoperative wound treatment of oncological patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V. Naboka; V. V. Pedder; V. K. Kosenok; V. N. Mironenko; S. P. Popov; O. N. Osinkina; Y. A. Korchagina; S. V. Dmitrienko; A. Sh. Ahmetiyanov; I. V. Surgutskova; A. V. Pedder

    2009-01-01

    The summary form only given. The new high effective Ozone\\/NO ultrasonic method in complicated postoperative wound treatment of oncological patients is designed and introduced in clinic practice. Method uses the thermocontact, ultrasonic and ozone\\/NO-generating devices which is resolved for clinical application and provides the possibility for treatment the patients by the way of complex application low frequency ultrasound and high

  11. Use of ethyl chloride topical anesthetic to reduce procedural pain in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Zappa, S C; Nabors, S B

    1992-04-01

    Pediatric cancer patients often become anxious, agitated, combative, and uncooperative due to the pain or fear of pain during invasive procedures. Generally, it is not the actual administration of medicines that produces this reaction, but the fear of the needle stick itself. Increased education and implementation of coping mechanisms is often not enough to allay this fear. The tangible solution of using ethyl chloride, an anesthetic spray, before port sticks, lumbar punctures, and bone marrow aspirations, was instituted by the hematology-oncology clinic to determine if the pain, emotional trauma, and fear of cancer treatments could be reduced in oncology patients. Survey results on 60 patients and 60 parents/caretakers showed that when given the choice to use the spray or to refuse its use, 68% of the parents thought that the patient had more of a sense of control and, thus, involvement in their treatment. Seventy-eight percent of the patients reported experiencing less pain associated with procedures. Staff noted an increase in cooperation, less combativeness, and more compliance with treatment. Perceiving the child's discomfort diminished, 87% of the parents/caretakers report feeling less anxious and, therefore, more capable of being supportive to each other and their child. These results verified the staff's perceptions of the advantages of using this noninvasive anesthetic. Ethyl chloride is an easy, effective, concrete approach to reducing procedural pain in pediatric oncology patients. PMID:1617619

  12. Perioperative Glucose Control and Infection Risk in Older Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pearl; Min, Lillian; Mody, Lona

    2014-03-01

    The aging of the U.S. population is leading to an increasing number of surgical procedures performed on older adults. At the same time, the quality of medical care is being more closely scrutinized. Surgical site infection is a widely-assessed outcome. Evidence suggests that strict perioperative serum glucose control among patients with or without diabetes can lower the risk of these infections, but it is unclear whether this control should be applied to older surgical patients. In this clinical review, we discuss current research on perioperative serum glucose management for cardiothoracic, orthopedic, and general/colorectal surgery. In addition, we summarize clinical recommendations and quality-of-care process indicators provided by surgical, diabetes, and geriatric medical organizations. PMID:25431751

  13. Adrenal Insufficiency in High-Risk Surgical ICU Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emanuel P. Rivers; Mario Gaspari; George Abi Saad; Mark Mlynarek; John Fath; H. Matilda Horst; Jacobo Wortsman

    2001-01-01

    Study objectives: To examine the incidence and response to treatment of adrenal insufficiency (AI) in high-risk postoperative patients. Design: Prospective observational case series. Setting: Large urban tertiary-care surgical ICU (SICU). Participants: Adults > 55 years of age who required vasopressor therapy after adequate volume resuscitation in the immediate postoperative period. Interventions: Each patient underwent a cosyntropin (ACTH) stimulation test; at

  14. Regulatory barriers to clinical trial enrollment of adolescent and young adult oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Felgenhauer, Judy; Hooke, Mary C

    2014-06-01

    Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer may face unique challenges if they and their families wish to participate in clinical oncology trials. Regulatory guidelines and funding requirements put in place to protect patients may actually raise barriers to enrollment in clinical trials. Hospital age guidelines may need to be readdressed to better suit the needs of AYA patients. Finally, the creation of the National Clinical Trials Network will provide new opportunities for pediatric and medical oncologists to collaborate in the care of AYA patients. PMID:24918210

  15. The patient-centered medical home in oncology: from concept to reality.

    PubMed

    Page, Ray D; Newcomer, Lee N; Sprandio, John D; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the cost of providing quality cancer care has been subject to an epic escalation causing concerns on the verge of a health care crisis. Innovative patient-management models in oncology based on patient-centered medical home (PCMH) principles, coupled with alternative payments to traditional fee for service (FFS), such as bundled and episodes payment are now showing evidence of effectiveness. These efforts have the potential to bend the cost curve while also improving quality of care and patient satisfaction. However, going forward with FFS alternatives, there are several performance-based payment options with an array of financial risks and rewards. Most novel payment options convey a greater financial risk and accountability on the provider. Therefore, the oncology medical home (OMH) can be a way to mitigate some financial risks by sharing savings with the payer through better global care of the patient, proactively preventing complications, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations. However, much of the medical home infrastructure that is required to reduced total costs of cancer care comes as an added expense to the provider. As best-of-practice quality standards are being elucidated and refined, we are now at a juncture where payers, providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders should work in concert to expand and implement the OMH framework into the variety of oncology practice environments to better equip them to assimilate into the new payment reform configurations of the future. PMID:25993243

  16. Endotoxin-neutralizing capacity of serum from cardiac surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elliott Bennett-Guerrero; G. Robin Barclay; Patricia L. Weng; Carol A. Bodian; Dennis E. Feierman; Frances Vela-Cantos; Michael G. Mythen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine if endotoxin core antibody (EndoCAb) from the serum of cardiac surgical patients neutralizes endotoxin in an ex vivo biologic assay. Design: Prospective blinded cohort study. Setting: Academic medical center. Participants: Patients (n = 203) undergoing cardiac surgery. Interventions: Sera were obtained from patients preoperatively. Measurements and Main Results: EndoCAb levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Sera

  17. Oral-dental concerns of the pediatric oncology patient

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, K.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main concerns of all disciplines in health care today is maintaining the patient's quality of life and comfort during cancer therapy. Oral complications resulting from radiation or chemotherapy can be expected in a large percentage of patients. Conducting a dental evaluation and performing treatment before therapy can help prevent or lessen potential complications. With preventive care and fewer infections, the patient will be able to communicate with friends and family, and optimum care and comfort can be provided.

  18. Physical Fitness TrainingOutcomes for Adult Oncology Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane Drake; Paul Falzer; Deanna Xistris; Garret Robinson; Michael Roberge

    2004-01-01

    Physical activity and exercise participation are important considerations in the study and management of acute and long-term care for cancer patients. Although excessive rest and lack of physical activity are related to diminished physical fitness, reduced functional status, impaired cognition, and diminished quality of life, exercise prescription is not a standard treatment support for patients or survivors of cancer. In

  19. Surgical strategy for sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism an evidence-based approach to surgical strategy, patient selection, surgical access, and reoperations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Radu Mihai; Marcin Barczynski; Maurizio Iacobone; Antonio Sitges-Serra

    2009-01-01

    Purpose  Progress in parathyroid imaging has brought substantial changes in the surgical strategy to approach patients with sporadic\\u000a primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). The present review is focused on the safety and efficacy of limited parathyroid exploration.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Review of the literature focused on studies dealing with unilateral (two-gland exploration) or selective parathyroidectomy\\u000a (one-gland exploration) in selected patients with pHPT and on

  20. Superoxidase dismutase (SOD) topical use in oncologic patients: treatment of acute cutaneous toxicity secondary to radiotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Álvaro Manzanas García; María Concepción López Carrizosa; Carmen Vallejo Ocaña; Pilar Samper Ots; José María Delgado Pérez; Emilia Carretero Accame; Pilar Gómez-Serranillos; Luis de la Morena del Valle

    2008-01-01

    Objective  The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of SOD applied topically in oncologic patients affected by acute\\u000a radiodermatitis.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and method  This study includes 57 patients who showed a dermatitis grade 2 or superior; they were administered SOD ointment b.i.d. (40\\u000a mg, weekly) and follow-up continued for 12 weeks.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  At the end of radiotherapy, 77.1% of the patients

  1. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus in pediatric oncology patients: balancing infection prevention and family-centered care.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasjit; Esparza, Samuel; Patterson, Melanie; Vogel, Kate; Patel, Bijal; Gornick, Wendi

    2013-04-01

    In February 2007, we experienced an abrupt 8-fold increase in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE)-positive pediatric hematology/oncology patients in isolation per day, peaking at 12 patients in isolation per day in June 2007. We enforced and expanded infection prevention practices and initiated a rigorous 6-month clearance process. After noting an eventual decrease, we modified clearance to a 3-month process, maintaining <1 patient/day in isolation by June 2009, subjectively improving family and staff satisfaction after this 2-year process. VRE infection was relatively uncommon (7.8%), although continued VRE colonization portended an overall poorer prognosis. PMID:22627579

  2. Internal Qualification and Credentialing of Radiation Oncology Physicists to Perform Patient Special Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    In the arena of radiation oncology special procedures, medical physicists are often the focus professionals for implementation and administration of advanced and complex technologies. One of the most vexing and challenging aspects of managing complexity concerns the ongoing internal qualification and credentialing of radiation oncology physicists to perform patient special procedures. To demonstrate ongoing qualification, a physicist must: (a) document initial training and successful completion of competencies to implement and perform this procedure, (b) demonstrate familiarity with all aspects of the commissioning and quality assurance process, (c) demonstrate continuing education respecting this procedure, (d) demonstrate the peer-reviewed completion of a minimum number of patient special procedures during a specified time span, and (e) demonstrate satisfactory overall progress toward maintenance of specialty board certification. In many respects, this information complement is similar to that required by an accredited residency program in therapy physics. In this investigation, we report on the design of a management tool to qualify staff radiation oncology physicists to deliver patient procedures. PMID:24427742

  3. What matters to the patient is what really matters: ?quality in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Gross, Anne H

    2015-04-01

    Reflecting on the 40th anniversary of the Oncology Nursing Society led me to recall my own 30-plus years in nursing and how, as a new graduate nurse, almost all oncology care was delivered in the inpatient setting. In my first few years of practice, I mixed my patients' chemotherapy in a medicine room without a ventilated hood and administered those medications without personal protective equipment or the independent RN double checks that have become standard to safe practice today. Through advances in science, tools are now in place to test and make changes, measure impact, and sustain improvements over time. Through advancements in nursing science and oncology research, the ability to treat and cure many cancers and to manage the symptoms and side effects of treatment has improved. Those improvements extend survival; enhance quality of life; and keep patients, staff, and practice environments safer than ever before. In addition, the human side of care has advanced with respect to the quality of interactions with patients and families. Some call this the art of nursing. I call it the essence of our practice. Increasingly, nurses are able to name specific interventions, measure impact, and document outcomes of this so-called art. It is to this human side of our practice that I dedicate this column.?. PMID:25840377

  4. Oncologic outcomes following metastasectomy in colorectal cancer patients developing distant metastases after initial treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Yoon; Suh, Kwang Wook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We performed a comparative analysis of the clinicopathologic features and oncologic outcomes of colorectal cancer patients with metachronous versus synchronous metastasis, according to the prognostic factors. Methods Ninety-three patients who underwent curative resection for distant metastatic colorectal cancer were included in the study between December 2001 and December 2011. We assessed recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with distant metastasis who underwent curative surgery. Results The most common site of distant metastasis was lung alone (n = 19, 51.4%) in patients with metachronous metastasis, while liver alone was most common in those with synchronous metastasis (n = 40, 71.4%). Overall survival rate was significantly different between patients with synchronous metastasis and metachronous metastasis (34.0% vs. 53.7%; P = 0.013). Incomplete resection of the metastatic lesion was significantly related to poor overall survival in both, patients with synchronous metastasis, and metachronous metastasis. Conclusion Our study indicates that patients developing distant metastasis after initial treatment show a different metastatic pattern and better oncologic outcomes, as compared to those presenting with distant metastasis. Resection with tumor free margins significantly improves survival in patients with metachronous as well as synchronous metastasis. PMID:25960988

  5. Oncology patients' and professional nurses' perceptions of important nurse caring behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Caring is the essence of nursing. Caring to be meaningful needs to be based on mutual agreement between nurses and patients as to what constitutes nurse caring behaviors. As a result, healthcare professional can enhance patients' satisfaction of care by providing appropriate caring behavior. However, previous research that combined multiple types of patients, nurses and institutions demonstrated disagreement in prioritizing important behaviors. This paper reports a study that aimed at determining the caring behaviors which oncology patients and oncology nurses perceive to be the most important. Methods This study is a comparative descriptive design that was conducted in an Iranian oncology centre. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 200 patients and 40 nurses to take part in the study. Data were collected over a period of 4 months in 2009 using the Caring Assessment Questionnaire, developed by Larson. Caring behaviors (n = 57) were ranked on a 5-point Likert-type scale and ordered in six subscales: "Being accessible", "Explains and facilitates", "Comforts", "Anticipates", "Trusting relationship", "Monitors and follows through". The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 13.0. The overall mean was calculated for each subscale to determine the rank distribution of the subscales. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test analysis of variables was used to compare patients' and nurses' scores on subscales. Results The results demonstrate that both groups considered the same order of importance of caring, the high ranking of "Monitors and Follows through and "Being Accessible" and the low ranking of "Comforts" and "Trusting Relationships". Also, Patients only ranked "Being accessible" (p = 0.04) and "Explains and facilitates" (p = 0.03) higher than nurses. Conclusions The oncology patients and nurses perceived highly physical aspects of caring and the results provide for nurses to be aware of the need, during their interactions with patients, to validate the effect their intended caring has upon patients. By so doing and with further refinement of the concept of caring for nursing in studies such as this, the practical aim of making patients feel cared for can be achieved. PMID:20550677

  6. Surgical options for patients with shoulder pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Salma Chaudhury; Stephen E. Gwilym; Jane Moser; Andrew J. Carr

    2010-01-01

    Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint in the community, which can arise from diverse causes. Regardless of the cause, mild cases can often be effectively treated conservatively, with options including rest, physiotherapy, pain relief and glucocorticoid injections. If conservative strategies fail after a 3–6 month period then surgery might be considered. Generally, the proportion of patients with shoulder pain

  7. Incidental cancer in patients surgically treated for benign thyroid disease. Our experience at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Costamagna, D; Pagano, L; Caputo, M; Leutner, M; Mercalli, F; Alonzo, A

    2013-01-01

    Increased incidence of incidental cancer in patients operated for benign thyroid disease has been reported. We report our experience about incidental thyroid cancer (ITC) in order to better characterize this nosologic entity. Between 2001 and 2009 a total of 568 patients underwent surgery for benign thyroid disease. Patients with preoperative cytology undetermined or positive for malignancy were excluded. The most frequent indication for surgery was multinodular or diffuse nontoxic goiter. We performed total thyroidectomy in 499 cases and emithyroidectomy in 69 cases. Final histology revealed ITC in 53 patients (9.3%): 44 had papillary carcinoma (20 classic variant and 24 follicular variant), 4 follicular carcinoma, 4 medullary carcinoma and 1 primitive thyroid paraganglioma. The preoperative diagnosis was multinodular or diffuse goiter in 45 cases of ITC and uninodular goiter in 8 cases. We performed total thyroidectomy in 46 case, emithyroidectomy in 4 patients with past history of lobectomy, emithyroidectomy in 3 patients with following radicalization and central neck dissection. In 14 patients the tumor was multifocal and in 12 of these patients the tumor foci were bilateral. The lesion was a microcarcinoma in 34 cases. Mean diameter of the ITC was 1.14 cm. We retrospectively reconsidered the results of preoperative ultrasound examinations in relation to the exact position of the tumor in the specimens and we found a statistically significant association between echogenicity and papillary histotype. Twenty-six patients were followed up at our Hospital. The mean follow-up period was 38.2 months. A relapse was observed in 3/26 patients. Incidental thyroid cancer in patients operated for benign disease has its own surgical and oncological relevance. A correct preoperative assessment, with a careful selection of nodules for fine-needle aspiration cytology on the basis of ultrasound pattern, could better address the choice of surgical procedure. The non irrelevant incidence of incidental thyroid cancer, the eventuality of multifocality and bilaterality and the possible occurrence of relapse, support that total thyroidectomy without residuum is a valuable option for treating benign thyroid conditions such as multinodular goitre. When an incidental cancer is diagnosed after emithyroidectomy, a radicalization with central neck dissection could be considered. We suggest that natural history of papillary microtumors and the correct surgical approach for these lesions could be better defined with a more extensive use of "Porto proposal" criteria. PMID:23463928

  8. Oncologic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This text is devoted to the goal of integrating medical imaging into the field of oncology. This book serves as a guide to the appropriate selection and sequencing of the vast array of imaging techniques currently available. Contents: Staging and classification of cancers; Imaging strategies for oncologic diagnosis and staging; Brain and spinal cord neoplasms; The upper aerodigestive tract: cervical lymph node metastases; Thoracic neoplasms; Esophageal cancer; Malignant neoplasms of the pancreas, the liver, and biliary tract; Prostate cancer; Gynecological neoplasms; Hodgkin's disease and the non-Hodgkin's lymphomas; Tumors of the skeletal system; Pediatric oncology; Computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning; Contributions of interventional radiology to diagnosis and management of the cancer patient; The impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis.

  9. Moving CLABSI Prevention Beyond the ICU: Risk Factors in Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Matthew; Conway, Margaret; Wirth, Kathleen; Potter-Bynoe, Gail; Billett, Amy L.; Sandora, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) frequently complicate the use of central venous catheters (CVCs) among pediatric patients with cancer. Our objectives were to describe the microbiology and identify risk factors for hospital-onset CLABSI in this patient population. Design Retrospective case-control study. Setting Oncology and stem cell transplant units of a freestanding, 396-bed quaternary care pediatric hospital. Participants Case subjects (N=54) were patients with a diagnosis of malignancy and/or stem cell transplant recipients with CLABSI occurring during admission. Controls (N=108) were identified using risk set sampling of hospitalizations among patients with a CVC, matched on date of admission. Methods Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of CLABSI. Results The majority of CLABSI isolates were Gram-positive bacteria (58%). The most frequently isolated organism was Enterococcus faecium, and 6 of 9 isolates were resistant to vancomycin. In multivariate analyses, independent risk factors for CLABSI included platelet transfusion within the prior week (odds ratio [OR], 10.90 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.02–39.38], P<0.001) and CVC placement within the previous month (<1 week vs. ?1 month: OR, 11.71 [95% CI, 1.98–69.20], P=0.02; ?1 week and <1 month vs. ?1 month: OR, 7.37 [95% CI, 1.85–29.36], P=0.004). Conclusions Adjunctive measures to prevent CLABSI among pediatric oncology patients may be most beneficial in the month following CVC insertion and in patients requiring frequent platelet transfusions. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci may be an emerging cause of CLABSI in hospitalized pediatric oncology patients and are unlikely to be treated by typical empiric antimicrobial regimens. PMID:22011534

  10. Medical and surgical advances in the radical prostatectomy patient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Nehra

    2000-01-01

    Maintaining the quality of life after surgery in the radical prostatectomy patient is of paramount importance. One of the major dilemmas in surgical management of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) is preservation of the neurovascular bundle and, hence, erectile function and the continence mechanism. This manuscript addresses anatomical considerations for the surgeon and discusses the following issues with regard to medical

  11. [Salvage cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy failure: principles, indications, patient selection, oncological results and morbidity].

    PubMed

    Hétet, J-F; Colls, P; Pocholle, P; Chauveau, P; Barré, C; Hallouin, P

    2014-11-01

    Potentially curative salvage options for biochemical failure after primary prostatic radiotherapy include salvage radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound and cryotherapy. Salvage cryoablation for recurrent prostate cancer after irradiation failure is currently a well-established therapeutic option, since technical improvements have permitted better oncologic outcomes and lower complications rates over the years. This article reviews surgical technique, oncologic and functional outcomes, as well as morbidity and complications of salvage cryotherapy for local recurrence after external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for prostate cancer. PMID:24910288

  12. A systems approach to preoperative surgical patient skin preparation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawton A. Seal; Deborah Paul-Cheadle

    Background: The merits of a systems approach to preoperative surgical patient skin preparation are presented. A ''system'' may be defined as the addition of an antiseptic bath(s) or shower(s) within 24 hours before the application of a Food and Drug Administration-compliant patient preoperative skin preparation at the time of surgery. The expected outcome from this added effort is a further

  13. GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY PROGRAM The gynecologic oncology program consists of gynecologic cancer experts

    E-print Network

    Arizona, University of

    GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY PROGRAM The gynecologic oncology program consists of gynecologic cancer and participate in a bi-monthly gynecologic oncology tumor board for discussion of patient diagnosis:neoadjuvantchemotherapy,adjuvantchemotherapy, consolidationtherapy,salvagechemotherapy,andhormonaltherapy · Clinicaltrials,includingbothnationalmulti-institution(SouthwestOncology

  14. Patient-Reported Outcomes Are Changing the Landscape in Oncology Care: Challenges and Opportunities for Payers

    PubMed Central

    Zagadailov, Erin; Fine, Michael; Shields, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background A patient-reported outcome (PRO) is a subjective report that comes from a patient without interpretation by a clinician. Because of the increasingly significant role of PROs in the development and evaluation of new medicines, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a formal guidance to describe how PRO instruments will be reviewed and evaluated with respect to claims in approved medical product labeling. Meanwhile, PROs continue to appear in oncology clinical trials more frequently; however, it is unclear how payers and policymakers can use PRO data in the context of decision-making for cancer treatments. Objective The objective of this article is to discuss the challenges and opportunities of incorporating oncology-related PRO data into payer decision-making. Discussion Payer concerns with PRO instruments are often related to issues regarding measurement, relevance, quality, and interpretability of PROs. Payers may dismiss PROs that do not independently predict improved outcomes. The FDA guidance released in 2009 demonstrates, as evidenced by the case of ruxolitinib, how PRO questionnaires can be generated in a relevant, trustworthy, and meaningful way, which provides an opportunity for payers and policy decision makers to focus on how to use PRO data in their decision-making. This is particularly relevant in oncology, where a recent and sizable number of clinical trials include PRO measures. Conclusion As an increasing number of oncology medications enter the market with product labeling claims that contain PRO data, payers will need to better familiarize themselves with the opportunities associated with PRO questionnaires when making coverage decisions. PRO measures will continue to provide valuable information regarding the risk–benefit profile of novel agents. As such, PRO measures may provide evidence that should be considered in payers' decisions and discussions; however, the formal role of PROs and the pertinence of PROs in decision-making has yet to be understood. PMID:24991362

  15. Surgical footwear in rheumatoid arthritis--a patient acceptability study.

    PubMed

    Park, C; Craxford, A D

    1981-04-01

    One hundred patients wih rheumatoid arthritis were questioned about the acceptability of the surgical shoes that they had been prescribed for their foot problems. The approach was made from the records of a surgical supplies manufacturer. While 90 per cent experienced good alleviation of symptoms, 50 per cent had complaints regarding fit, comfort and styling. The implications of changes in the supply of shoes and the staffing of orthotic concerns are discussed, and suggestions are made for the direction of future research. PMID:7279612

  16. Sertraline effectiveness and safety in depressed oncological patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Riccardo Torta; Ilaria Siri; Paola Caldera

    2008-01-01

    Goals of work  Cancer is often burdened by psychological comorbidity, mainly represented by depression, anxiety and adjustment disorders.\\u000a Efficacy and tolerability of sertraline in the treatment of depressive disorders is well known; however, its efficacy and\\u000a safety in patients with cancer has been poorly studied. This study was aimed to provide evidences of effectiveness, safety,\\u000a tolerability and rapidity of action of

  17. Treatment of colorectal cancer in older patients: International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) consensus recommendations 2013.

    PubMed

    Papamichael, D; Audisio, R A; Glimelius, B; de Gramont, A; Glynne-Jones, R; Haller, D; Köhne, C-H; Rostoft, S; Lemmens, V; Mitry, E; Rutten, H; Sargent, D; Sastre, J; Seymour, M; Starling, N; Van Cutsem, E; Aapro, M

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in Europe and worldwide, with the peak incidence in patients >70 years of age. However, as the treatment algorithms for the treatment of patients with CRC become ever more complex, it is clear that a significant percentage of older CRC patients (>70 years) are being less than optimally treated. This document provides a summary of an International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) task force meeting convened in Paris in 2013 to update the existing expert recommendations for the treatment of older (geriatric) CRC patients published in 2009 and includes overviews of the recent data on epidemiology, geriatric assessment as it relates to surgery and oncology, and the ability of older CRC patients to tolerate surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, treatment of their metastatic disease including palliative chemotherapy with and without the use of the biologics, and finally the use of adjuvant and palliative radiotherapy in the treatment of older rectal cancer patients. An overview of each area was presented by one of the task force experts and comments invited from other task force members. PMID:25015334

  18. Results of antibiotic treatment of Hickman-catheter-related infections in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Simon, C; Suttorp, M

    1994-01-01

    A group of 330 oncological patients were supported throughout a 7-year period with central venous catheters (Broviac/Hickman catheters) and underwent standard oncological chemotherapy, because of hematological malignancies or solid tumors (156 children), or a myeloablative conditioning regimen followed by bone marrow transplantation because of leukemia or lymphoma (174 patients: 110 adults, 64 children). Of these, 17 patients (8 after bone marrow transplantation) developed a catheter-related bacteremia and were treated by at least two antibiotics according to the sensitivity of the bacteria. In 1 patient the catheter (infected by Bacillus cereus) was removed on day 25 of antibiotic treatment because of persistent high fever and further positive blood cultures. After bone marrow transplantation, 2 other patients, with a Pseudomonas or a Staphylococcus infection respectively, did not respond to the combined antibiotic treatment and died 1 week and 7 weeks later, respectively, from transplant-related severe graft-versus-host disease. In the other 14 patients antibiotic treatment was successful and removal of the central-vein catheter could be avoided. PMID:8156260

  19. Surgical errors and risks - the head and neck cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Harréus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery. PMID:24403972

  20. Patient participation in the medical decision-making process in haemato-oncology--a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ernst, J; Berger, S; Weißflog, G; Schröder, C; Körner, A; Niederwieser, D; Brähler, E; Singer, S

    2013-09-01

    Cancer patients are showing increased interest in shared decision-making. Patients with haematological illnesses, however, express considerably less desire for shared decision-making as compared with other oncological patient groups. The goal of the current project was to identify the reasons for the lower desire for shared decision-making among patients with haematological illness. We conducted qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 11 haematological patients (39-70 years old) after the beginning of therapy concerning the course and evaluation of medical shared decision-making. The patients were often overwhelmed by the complexity of the illness and the therapy and did not want to assume any responsibility in medical decision-making. They reported a great deal of distress and very traditional paternalistic role expectations with regards to their health care providers, which limited the patients' ability to partake in the decision-making process. In contrast to the socio-cultural support for many other oncological diseases, haematological diseases are not as well supported, e.g. there is a lack of self-help materials, systematic provision of information and support groups for patients, which may be related to a lower empowerment of this patient population. Results show the limits of patient participation in the context of highly complicated medical conditions. In addition to already researched preferences of the physicians and patients for shared decision-making, future research should pay greater attention to the process and other variables relevant to this aspect of the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:23731258

  1. Tuberculosis in pediatric oncology and bone marrow transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andrea T; Airewele, Gladstone; Starke, Jeffrey R

    2014-08-01

    Five children with malignancies (3 hematologic, 1 medulloblastoma, 1 hepatoblastoma) and one bone marrow transplant patient were treated for tuberculosis over a 30-year period. Three had pulmonary disease, 3 disseminated tuberculosis, and 1 had scrofula. Four of five had positive tuberculin skin tests, cultures were positive in 5/6 children. One child died of disseminated TB after engraftment, and one child had hepatotoxicity likely related to tuberculosis therapy. All cases were potentially preventable had they been screened due to established risk factors of foreign birth (4/6) or parental foreign birth (2/6). All children should be screened for latent tuberculosis before chemotherapy. PMID:24623644

  2. A bedside food cart as an alternate food service for acute and palliative oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Pietersma, Patti; Follett-Bick, Sandra; Wilkinson, Brenda; Guebert, Nancy; Fisher, Kim; Pereira, Jose

    2003-09-01

    Patients with advanced cancer experience various problems with eating, and their meals should be tailored to meet their specific needs. Two methods of food service were compared in a shared acute oncology/palliative care unit; an electrical food cart allowing patients to select their food types and portions at the bedside, and a traditional food tray delivery service that relied on meals being prepared in a centralized kitchen and then delivered by tray. Over a 10-day period, lunch meals were delivered by food cart and supper meals via food trays. Twenty-seven out of 32 patients participated in the trial. Patients significantly preferred the food cart to the trays with respect to the timing and appeal of the meal, appropriateness of food types and food portions and the variety of the food choices. A food cart as used in this trial provides a more flexible and appropriate method of food delivery to in-patients in the oncology and palliative unit. Further studies should examine whether this translates to improved caloric intake and quality of life parameters. PMID:12883966

  3. Referral to Medical Oncology: A Crucial Step in the Treatment of Older Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RuiLi Luo; Sharon H. Giordano; Jean L. Freeman; Dong Zhang

    Purpose. Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer produces a substantial survival benefit, but many older patients do not receive chemotherapy. This study examines factors associated with medical oncology con- sultation and evaluates the impact of such consultation on chemotherapy use. Patients and Methods. We used the Surveillance Epi- demiology and End Results-Medicare linked database and identified 7,569 patients, aged

  4. Hepatocellular carcinoma in central Sydney: a 10 year review of patients seen in a medical oncology department

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Desmond Yip; Michael Findlay; Michael Boyer; Martin H. Tattersall

    AIM To report a single Australian oncology unit's experience with the management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in the context of a literature review of the current management issues. METHODS Retrospective case record review of 76 patients with diagnosis of HCC referred to the unit between 1984 and 1995. RESULTS Sixty-three patients had adequate records for analysis. Thirty-six (56%)

  5. Patient safety, competency, and the future of surgical simulation.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    Despite its relatively short track record, simulation has been successfully introduced into the surgical arena in an effort to augment training. Initially a fringe endeavor at isolated centers, simulation has now become a mainstream component of surgical education. The surgical community is now aware that the old adage, "see one, do one, and teach one" is no longer acceptable from the ethical standpoint of practicing procedures on patients. Moreover, financial and time constraints have made teaching outside of the operating room an attractive proposition. Coupled with the growing body of validation, new procedures can now be practiced and proficiency can be acquired on a multitude of simulation platforms. Importantly, simulation standards are being established and there is an unprecedented national acceptance and endorsement of simulation as an invaluable educational tool; in fact, simulation is being mandated for surgical residency programs. Team training will likely expand the impact of surgical simulation considerably and help assure multidimensional competency verification. For both surgery residents and surgeons in practice, simulation holds great promise as a safe, effective, and efficient means of acquiring new skills. PMID:19088586

  6. Hypercapnia Improves Tissue Oxygenation in Morbidly Obese Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Helmut; Reddy, Dayakar; Mandadi, Goutham; Pulley, Debra; Eagon, J Chris; Sessler, Daniel I; Kurz, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Risk of wound infection is increased in morbidly obese surgical patients, in part because a major determinant of wound infection risk, tissue oxygenation, is marginal. Unlike in lean patients, supplemental inspired oxygen (FIO2) only slightly improves tissue oxygenation in obese patients. Mild hypercapnia improves tissue oxygenation in lean, but has not been evaluated in obese patients. We thus tested the hypothesis that mild hypercapnia markedly improves tissue oxygenation in morbidly obese patients given FIO2 80% during major abdominal surgery. Thirty obese patients (body mass index 61.5±17 kg/m2) scheduled for open gastric bypass were randomly assigned to normocapnia (n=15, end-tidal PCO2 35 mmHg) or hypercapnia (n=15, end-tidal PCO2 50 mmHg); FIO2 was 80%. Anesthetic management and other confounding factors were controlled. Tissue oxygen tension was measured subcutaneously at the upper arm using a polarographic probe in a silastic tonometer. Demographic characteristics, cardiovascular measurements, and PaO2 (222±48 versus 230±68 mmHg in normocapnic versus hypercapnic; mean±SD, P=0.705) were comparable in the groups. Tissue oxygen tension, however, was greater in hypercapnic than in normocapnic patients (78±31 versus 56±13 mmHg, P=0.029). Mild hypercapnia increased tissue oxygenation by an amount believed to be clinically important and could potentially reduce the risk of surgical wound infection in morbidly obese patients. PMID:16931680

  7. Colorectal cancer in aged patients. Toward the routine treatment through laparoscopic surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; MARCHESE, S.; FAMOSO, F.; LA CORTE, F.; MARLETTA, S.; LEANZA, G.; ZANGHÌ, G.; LEANZA, V.; INTAGLIATA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in general population. The incidence seems to be higher in older age. Surgery remains the treatment of choice and laparoscopic approach offers numerous benefits. We report our personal experience in elderly patients operated on for colorectal cancer with laparoscopic resection. Patients and methods From January 2003 to September 2013, out of 160 patients aged 65 years or older and operated with minimally invasive techniques, 30 cases affected by colorectal cancer and operated on with laparoscopic approach were analyzed in this study. Results Male/female ratio was 1.35 and mean age 72 years. Constipation, weight loss, anemia and rectal bleeding were the most commonly reported symptoms. Lesions involved descending-sigmoid colon in 53% of cases, rectum in 37% and ascending colon in 10%. Among laparoscopic colorectal operations laparoscopic left colectomy was the most frequently performed, followed by right colectomy, abdominoperineal resection and Hartmann procedure. Operative times ranged from 3 to 5 hours depending on surgical procedure performed. Mean hospital stay was 6 days (range 4–9). Conversion to open approach occurred only in a case of laparoscopic right colectomy (3%) for uncontrolled bleeding. A single case of mortality was reported. In two cases (7%) anastomotic leakage was observed, conservatively treated in one patient and requiring reoperation in the other one. Conclusions Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is feasible and effective for malignancies in elderly population offering several advantages including immunologic and oncologic ones. However an experienced surgical team is essential in reducing risks and complications. PMID:25827663

  8. Quality of life in patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically

    PubMed Central

    Koz?owska, Katarzyna A.; Krokowicz, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ulcerative colitis belongs to the group of inflammatory bowel diseases. The specific symptoms and chronic nature of the disease significantly affect the quality of patients’ lives. Quality-of-life assessment helps to define its determining factors as well as the efficiency of surgical procedures. Aim Quality-of-life evaluation of patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically. Material and methods A retrospective review was carried out on 35 patients with ulcerative colitis, who were treated surgically in the Clinic of General and Colorectal Surgery, University of Medical Sciences in Poznan. The research tools used to assess the quality of life consisted of: the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, a Polish version of the Short Form Health Survey-36, and a questionnaire. Results The mean of the IBDQ scale was 152.51, and the median was 161. In this scale, a higher score indicates better quality of life. The situation in the subjective SF-36 scale is reversed: a lower score indicates better quality of life. The mean of the SF-36 was 115.94, and the median was 58. Many discrepancies in the field (e.g. the influence of determining factors) create a niche for further studies. Conclusions Moreover, quality-of-life evaluation may lead to better patient care, understanding their problems or treatment modifications, and finally may become a kind of therapy efficiency parameter. PMID:25276253

  9. Quality of surgical care and readmission in elderly glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Nuño, Miriam; Ly, Diana; Mukherjee, Debraj; Ortega, Alicia; Black, Keith L.; Patil, Chirag G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Thirty-day readmissions post medical or surgical discharge have been analyzed extensively. Studies have shown that complex interactions of multiple factors are responsible for these hospitalizations. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Medicare database of newly diagnosed elderly glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients who underwent surgical resection between 1991 and 2007. Hospitals were classified into high- or low-readmission rate cohorts using a risk-adjusted methodology. Bivariate comparisons of outcomes were conducted. Multivariate analysis evaluated differences in quality of care according to hospital readmission rates. Results A total of 1,273 patients underwent surgery in 338 hospitals; 523 patients were treated in 228 high-readmission hospitals and 750 in 110 low-readmission hospitals. Patient characteristics for high-versus low-readmission hospitals were compared. In a confounder-adjusted model, patients treated in high- versus low-readmission hospitals had similar outcomes. The hazard of mortality for patients treated at high- compared to low-readmission hospitals was 1.06 (95% CI, 0.095%–1.19%). While overall complications were comparable between high- and low-readmission hospitals (16.3% vs 14.3%; P = .33), more postoperative pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis complications were documented in patients treated at high-readmission hospitals (7.5% vs 4.1%; P = .01). Adverse events and levels of resection achieved during surgery were comparable at high- and low-readmission hospitals. Conclusions For patients undergoing GBM resection, quality of care provided by hospitals with the highest adjusted readmission rates was similar to the care delivered by hospitals with the lowest rates. These findings provide evidence against the preconceived notion that 30-day readmissions can be used as a metric for quality of surgical and postsurgical care.

  10. Surgical treatment of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chen, S F; Kato, Y; Sinha, R; Kumar, A; Watabe, T; Imizu, S; Oda, J; Oguri, D; Sano, H; Hirose, Y

    2015-01-01

    We present our experience with elective microsurgical clipping of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) and analyze this management. A total of 150 patients with UIA were reviewed and data were collected with regard to age, sex, presence of symptoms, location and size of the aneurysms, surgical complications and postoperative 1 year outcomes. Aneurysm size was assessed either by three-dimensional CT angiography or digital subtraction angiogram. Glasgow Outcome Scale was used to assess clinical outcomes. One hundred and fifty patients with 165 aneurysms were treated in this series. The mean size of the UIA was 5.6mm. Eighty aneurysms (48.5%) were less than 5mm in size, and 73 (44.2%) were from 5 to 10mm. Ten (6.1%) of the aneurysms were large and two (1.2%) were giant. One hundred and forty-three were asymptomatic and seven were symptomatic before surgery. The outcome was good in 147 patients (98%), and only three patients (2%) had a treatment-related unfavorable outcome. Five patients experienced transient neurological deficits and one patient experienced permanent neurological deficits. Overall 98.7% of the treated aneurysms were satisfactorily obliterated. Wound complications were seen only in three patients. In conclusion, UIA pose a significant challenge for neurosurgeons, where a delicate balance between benefits and possible risks must be weighed. If the requisite expertise is available, they can be treated surgically with low morbidity and a good outcome at specialized neurovascular centers. PMID:25443084

  11. Robotic-assisted surgery in gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Sinno, Abdulrahman K; Fader, Amanda N

    2014-10-01

    The quest for improved patient outcomes has been a driving force for adoption of novel surgical innovations across surgical subspecialties. Gynecologic oncology is one such surgical discipline in which minimally invasive surgery has had a robust and evolving role in defining standards of care. Robotic-assisted surgery has developed during the past two decades as a more technologically advanced form of minimally invasive surgery in an effort to mitigate the limitations of conventional laparoscopy and improved patient outcomes. Robotically assisted technology offers potential advantages that include improved three-dimensional stereoscopic vision, wristed instruments that improve surgeon dexterity, and tremor canceling software that improves surgical precision. These technological advances may allow the gynecologic oncology surgeon to perform increasingly radical oncologic surgeries in complex patients. However, the platform is not without limitations, including high cost, lack of haptic feedback, and the requirement for additional training to achieve competence. This review describes the role of robotic-assisted surgery in the management of endometrial, cervical, and ovarian cancer, with an emphasis on comparison with laparotomy and conventional laparoscopy. The literature on novel robotic innovations, special patient populations, cost effectiveness, and fellowship training is also appraised critically in this regard. PMID:25274485

  12. Patient selection and surgical results in obstructive sleep apnea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Dündar; M. Gerek; A. Özünlü; S. Yeti?er

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, therapeutic methods have been effective in the management of snoring and sleep apnea. Successful results\\u000a have been possible through conservative and surgical approaches when the nature and site of obstruction is ascertained by\\u000a careful investigation. Sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the upper respiratory tract has been the most valuable\\u000a diagnostic tool in patients with obstructive sleep

  13. Surgical Treatment in Patients with Cervical Osteomyelitis: Single Institute's Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Bang Sang; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jung Yoon; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study practical guidelines and strategies in the treatment of cervical osteomyelitis. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 14 patients who underwent surgical treatment for cervical osteomyelitis from May 2000 to July 2008. We investigated their clinical course, antibiotic regimen, surgical methods, and laboratory and radiologic findings including X-ray, CT and MRI. Results 5 patients had primary spondylodiscitis, 5 patients had post operative spondylodiscitis and 4 patients had tuberculosis in cervical spine. The causative microorganisms were MRSA (5), P. aeruginosa (1), Methicillin resistant coagulase negative streptococcus (1), P. aeruginosa changed to MRSA (1), and 2 patients showed no growth on culture studies. Patients were treated 13.8 weeks (range, 5.4-25.8) with IV antibiotics and then treated for 58.2 days (range, 13-106) with oral antibiotics. Antituberculotic medications were used for a mean of 383.8 days. Patients were treated with anterior debridement and fusion (5), irrigation and debridement (5), simultaneous cervical anterior interbody and transthoracic thoracic interbody fusion (1). 3 patients underwent the planned 2-staged operation, which included an anterior debridement with or without fusion for the 1st operation and posterior instrumentation for 2nd operation. 10 patients (71.4%) had neurologic deficits at the time of diagnosis and 7 patients (70%) among them improved post-operatively. Conclusion Anterior cervical spine surgery is the preferable treatment option in patients with neurological deterioration, extensive bony destruction with expected kyphotic deformity, and uncontrolled infection being managed only with antibiotics. Antibiotics are also important for thorough treatment. PMID:25346763

  14. Generating patient-specific pulmonary vascular models for surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murff, Daniel; Co-Vu, Jennifer; O'Dell, Walter G.

    2015-03-01

    Each year in the U.S., 7.4 million surgical procedures involving the major vessels are performed. Many of our patients require multiple surgeries, and many of the procedures include "surgical exploration". Procedures of this kind come with a significant amount of risk, carrying up to a 17.4% predicted mortality rate. This is especially concerning for our target population of pediatric patients with congenital abnormalities of the heart and major pulmonary vessels. This paper offers a novel approach to surgical planning which includes studying virtual and physical models of pulmonary vasculature of an individual patient before operation obtained from conventional 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. These models would provide clinicians with a non-invasive, intricately detailed representation of patient anatomy, and could reduce the need for invasive planning procedures such as exploratory surgery. Researchers involved in the AirPROM project have already demonstrated the utility of virtual and physical models in treatment planning of the airways of the chest. Clinicians have acknowledged the potential benefit from such a technology. A method for creating patient-derived physical models is demonstrated on pulmonary vasculature extracted from a CT scan with contrast of an adult human. Using a modified version of the NIH ImageJ program, a series of image processing functions are used to extract and mathematically reconstruct the vasculature tree structures of interest. An auto-generated STL file is sent to a 3D printer to create a physical model of the major pulmonary vasculature generated from 3D CT scans of patients.

  15. Practice Patterns and Perceptions of Thoracic Oncology Providers on Tobacco Use and Cessation in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Graham W.; Marshall, James R.; Cummings, K. Michael; Toll, Benjamin; Gritz, Ellen R.; Hutson, Alan; Dibaj, Seyedeh; Herbst, Roy; Dresler, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tobacco use is associated with poor outcomes in cancer patients, but there is little information on the practice patterns or perceptions of tobacco use and smoking cessation by oncology providers. Methods An online survey of practices, perceptions, and barriers to tobacco assessment and cessation in cancer patients was conducted in members of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). Responses of physician level respondents were analyzed and reported. Results Responses from 1,507 IASLC members who completed the survey are reported representing 40.5% of IASLC members. Over 90% of physician respondents believe current smoking affects outcome and that cessation should be a standard part of clinical care. At the initial patient visit, 90% ask patients about tobacco use, 79% ask patients if they will quit, 81% advise patients to stop tobacco use, but only 40% discuss medication options, 39% actively provide cessation assistance, and fewer yet address tobacco at follow-up. Dominant barriers to physician cessation effort are pessimism regarding their ability to help patients stop using tobacco (58%) and concerns about patient resistance to treatment (67%). Only 33% report themselves adequately trained to provide cessation interventions. Discussion Physicians who care for lung cancer patients recognize the importance of tobacco cessation as a necessary part of clinical care, but many still do not routinely provide assistance to their patients. Increasing tobacco cessation will require increased assessment and cessation at diagnosis and during follow-up, increased clinician education, and improved tobacco cessation methods. PMID:23529191

  16. Successful surgical management of ruptured umbilical hernias in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Chatzizacharias, Nikolaos A; Bradley, J Andrew; Harper, Simon; Butler, Andrew; Jah, Asif; Huguet, Emmanuel; Praseedom, Raaj K; Allison, Michael; Gibbs, Paul

    2015-03-14

    Acute umbilical hernia rupture in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and ascites is an unusual, but potentially life-threatening complication, with postoperative morbidity about 70% and mortality between 60%-80% after supportive care and 6%-20% after urgent surgical repair. Management options include primary surgical repair with or without concomitant portal venous system decompression for the control of the ascites. We present a retrospective analysis of our centre's experience over the last 6 years. Our cohort consisted of 11 consecutive patients (median age: 53 years, range: 36-63 years) with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites. Appropriate patient resuscitation and optimisation with intravenous fluids, prophylactic antibiotics and local measures was instituted. One failed attempt for conservative management was followed by a successful primary repair. In all cases, with one exception, a primary repair with non-absorbable Nylon, interrupted sutures, without mesh, was performed. The perioperative complication rate was 25% and the recurrence rate 8.3%. No mortality was recorded. Median length of hospital stay was 14 d (range: 4-31 d). Based on our experience, the management of ruptured umbilical hernias in patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites is feasible without the use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt routinely in the preoperative period, provided that meticulous patient optimisation is performed. PMID:25780312

  17. Successful surgical management of ruptured umbilical hernias in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chatzizacharias, Nikolaos A; Bradley, J Andrew; Harper, Simon; Butler, Andrew; Jah, Asif; Huguet, Emmanuel; Praseedom, Raaj K; Allison, Michael; Gibbs, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Acute umbilical hernia rupture in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and ascites is an unusual, but potentially life-threatening complication, with postoperative morbidity about 70% and mortality between 60%-80% after supportive care and 6%-20% after urgent surgical repair. Management options include primary surgical repair with or without concomitant portal venous system decompression for the control of the ascites. We present a retrospective analysis of our centre’s experience over the last 6 years. Our cohort consisted of 11 consecutive patients (median age: 53 years, range: 36-63 years) with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites. Appropriate patient resuscitation and optimisation with intravenous fluids, prophylactic antibiotics and local measures was instituted. One failed attempt for conservative management was followed by a successful primary repair. In all cases, with one exception, a primary repair with non-absorbable Nylon, interrupted sutures, without mesh, was performed. The perioperative complication rate was 25% and the recurrence rate 8.3%. No mortality was recorded. Median length of hospital stay was 14 d (range: 4-31 d). Based on our experience, the management of ruptured umbilical hernias in patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites is feasible without the use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt routinely in the preoperative period, provided that meticulous patient optimisation is performed. PMID:25780312

  18. Psychosocial support for patients in pediatric oncology: the influences of parents, schools, peers, and technology.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Lalita K; Kato, Pamela M

    2003-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of pediatric cancer can be associated with profound psychosocial changes in the life of young patients. Although nurses, physicians, and other health care professionals are important sources of support, psychosocial support is also available through parents, schools, and peers. This article presents a review of the literature on how parents, schools, and peers affect the coping and adjustment of young patients with cancer and critically reviews interventions directed at improving functioning in these areas. Special attention is paid to recent interventions that exploit technology such as video games, CD-ROMs, and the Internet to provide creative new forms of support for patients in pediatric oncology. Existing research on both technological and interpersonal forms of intervention and support shows promising results, and suggestions for further study are provided. PMID:14567564

  19. Surgical Management of Rhinosinusitis in Onco-Hematological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Girolamo, Stefano; Di Mauro, Roberta; Giacomini, Piergiorgio; Cantonetti, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In onco-hematological diseases, the incidence of paranasal sinuses infection dramatically increase and requires a combination of medical and surgical therapy. Balloon dilatation surgery (DS) is a minimally invasive, tissue preserving procedure. The study evaluates the results of DS for rhinosinusitis in immunocompromised patients. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted in 110 hematologic patients with rhinosinusitis. Twenty-five patients were treated with DS technique and 85 patients with endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). We considered the type of anesthesia and the extent of intra- and postoperative bleeding. Patients underwent Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-20) to evaluate changes in subjective symptoms and global patient assessment (GPA) questionnaire to value patient satisfaction. Results Local anesthesia was employed in 8 cases of DS and in 15 of ESS. In 50 ESS patients, an anterior nasal packing was placed and in 12 cases a repacking was necessary. In the DS group, nasal packing was required in 8 cases and in 2 cases a repacking was placed (P=0.019 and P=0.422, respectively). The SNOT-20 change score showed significant improvement of health status in both groups. However the DS group showed a major improvement in 3 voices: need to blow nose, runny nose, and facial pain/pressure. The 3-month follow-up GPA questionnaire showed an higher satisfaction of DS group. Conclusion Balloon DS represents a potentially low aggressive treatment and appears to be relatively safe and effective in onco-hematologic patients. All these remarks may lead the surgeon to consider a larger number of candidates for surgical procedure. PMID:25436050

  20. Surgical patents and patients--the ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    To??oczko, Tadeusz

    2005-01-01

    It is obvious that every inventor should be rewarded for the intellectual effort, and at the same time be encouraged to successively improve his or her discovery and to work on subsequent innovations. Patents also ensure that patent owners are officially protected against intellectual piracy, but protection of intellectual property may be difficult to accomplish. Nevertheless, it all comes down to this basic question: Does a contradiction exist between medical ethics and the "Medical and Surgical Procedure Patents" system? It may well turn out that medical-procedure patents can have a negative influence on the standard of medical care. Medical-method patents may also interfere with the physician-patient relationship. At present, physicians do not question the usefulness of patent protection for medicines, biotechnology, equipment and devices, but they strongly oppose it for surgical procedures. PMID:15727000

  1. Cardiac tumors: clinical experience and surgical results in 74 patients.

    PubMed

    Miralles, A; Bracamonte, L; Soncul, H; Diaz del Castillo, R; Akhtar, R; Bors, V; Pavie, A; Gandjbackhch, I; Cabrol, C

    1991-10-01

    A series of 75 cardiac tumors in 74 patients were operated on at La Pitie Hospital between 1972 and 1989. There were 73 primary and 2 metastatic tumors. Among the benign neoplasms, 58 were myxomas; seven of the nine malignant tumors were primary heart tumors. The mean age of the patients was 48 years (range, 9 to 75 years); 46 patients were female and 28 male. Fifty-seven percent of the patients had congestive heart failure, 13% had chest pain, 17% had neurological symptoms, and only 1 patient was totally asymptomatic. The cardiac tumors were incidental findings in 3 patients. Complete resection was carried out in 66 benign lesions and only four of the malignant tumors. All patients survived operation, although 4 died in the early postoperative period. Long-term results were excellent in patients with benign lesions, and no recurrences were found. In patients with malignant tumors, surgical procedures were only palliative and aimed at prolonging life; hence, prognosis remained unchanged. PMID:1929651

  2. The prevalence of nutrition impact symptoms and their relationship to quality of life and clinical outcomes in medical oncology patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Tong; E. Isenring; P. Yates

    2009-01-01

    Goals of work  The aims of this secondary analysis were to determine the prevalence of nutrition impact symptoms in medical oncology patients\\u000a at 1, 6, and 12 months after commencement of chemotherapy and to investigate the relationship of these symptoms to quality\\u000a of life (QoL) and performance status.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  A prospective longitudinal survey was conducted in 219 medical oncology patients who

  3. Bacterial bloodstream infections and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in pediatric hematology/oncology patients after anticancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mulla, Naima A; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; El Shafie, Sittana; Janahi, Mohammed; Al-Nasser, Abdullah A; Chandra, Prem

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology and oncology represent a major problem worldwide, but this has not been studied in Qatar. In this study, we investigated the burden of infection and the resistance pattern in the bacterial etiology, in the only tertiary pediatric hematology and oncology center in Qatar. Methods All pediatric cancer patients (n=185) were evaluated retrospectively during the period 2004–2011; a total of 70 (38%) patients were diagnosed with bloodstream infections. Bacterial etiology was determined, along with their susceptibility patterns. Neutropenia, duration of neutropenia, fever, duration of fever, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated throughout the study. Results A total of 70 patients (38%) were diagnosed with acute leukemias, lymphomas, solid tumors, or brain tumors; those patients experienced 111 episodes of bacteremia. The most common Gram-positive (n=64 [55%]) isolates were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=26), Staphylococcus hominis (n=9), and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=7), and the common Gram-negative (n=52 [45%]) isolates were Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=14), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=10), and Escherichia coli (n=7). There was a significant association observed between fever with positive blood culture and different types of cancer (P=0.035). The majority of bacteremia (n=68 [61.3%]) occurred in nonneutropenic episodes. Elevated values of CRP (?5 mg/L) were detected in 82 (95.3%) episodes and were negatively correlated with absolute neutrophil count (ANC) (r=?0.18; P=0.248) among all cases. However, the infection-related fatality rate was 2.2% (n=4), with three caused by Gram-negative pathogens. Multidrug resistant organisms were implicated in 33 (28.4%) cases and caused three of the mortality cases. Conclusion Multidrug resistant organisms cause mortality in pediatric cancer patients. Investigation of antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms may guide successful antimicrobial therapy and improve the surveillance and quality of pediatric malignancy care. PMID:25395866

  4. The effectiveness of a participatory program on fall prevention in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-04-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study, 68 participants were recruited at a medical centre in Taiwan. A 20-min fall prevention program was given to patients. A questionnaire was used to evaluate the effectiveness of program after on day 3 of intervention. The data of fall incidence rates were collected from hospital record. Fall incidences with and without the program were used to compare the effectiveness of intervention. The patients' knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention are better than after intervention. A statistically significant difference in fall incidence rate was observed with (0.0%) and without (19.3%) the program. Our findings suggest that the fact of the bedside is that the most risk for falling in hospital must be communicated to the hospitalized patients. Educating patients about fall prevention and activities associated with falling increases their awareness of the potential of falling and promoting patient safety. PMID:25492057

  5. American society of clinical oncology statement: toward individualized care for patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Peppercorn, Jeffrey M; Smith, Thomas J; Helft, Paul R; Debono, David J; Berry, Scott R; Wollins, Dana S; Hayes, Daniel M; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Schnipper, Lowell E

    2011-02-20

    Patients with advanced incurable cancer face complex physical, psychological, social, and spiritual consequences of disease and its treatment. Care for these patients should include an individualized assessment of the patient's needs, goals, and preferences throughout the course of illness. Consideration of disease-directed therapy, symptom management, and attention to quality of life are important aspects of quality cancer care. However, emerging evidence suggests that, too often, realistic conversations about prognosis, the potential benefits and limitations of disease-directed therapy, and the potential role of palliative care, either in conjunction with or as an alternative to disease-directed therapy, occur late in the course of illness or not at all. This article addresses the American Society of Clinical Oncology's (ASCO's) vision for improved communication with and decision making for patients with advanced cancer. This statement advocates an individualized approach to discussing and providing disease-directed and supportive care options for patients with advanced cancer throughout the continuum of care. Building on ASCO's prior statements on end-of-life care (1998) and palliative care (2009), this article reviews the evidence for improved patient care in advanced cancer when patients' individual goals and preferences for care are discussed. It outlines the goals for individualized care, barriers that currently limit realization of this vision, and possible strategies to overcome these barriers that can improve care consistent with the goals of our patients and evidence-based medical practice. PMID:21263086

  6. Occurrence and preventability of adverse drug events in surgical patients: a systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse drug events (ADEs) are a considerable cause of inhospital morbidity and mortality. Patient flow differs substantially for surgical and nonsurgical patients: surgical patients are subjected to multiple medication changes related to surgical intervention or postoperative care. The objective of this study is to systematically review the occurrence and nature of ADEs in surgical patients. Also, a comparison with nonsurgical patients was made. Methods A search was conducted in Embase and Medline identifying studies that reported observational data on the occurrence and nature of ADEs in surgical hospitalised adult patients. If sufficient data were available, the occurrence of (preventable) ADEs was compared between surgical and nonsurgical patients. Results Six studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The occurrence of ADEs in surgical patients ranged from 2.0 to 27.7 per 100 admissions, from 4.7 to 8.9 per 1,000 patient days, or involved 8.9% of the patients. Proportions of preventable ADEs in surgical patients were 18% and 54%, described in two studies. A head-to-head comparison of surgical patients and nonsurgical patients was possible for five of six studies. The occurrence of ADEs in nonsurgical patients was significantly higher than in surgical patients in three studies. Conclusions ADEs are a relevant problem in surgical patients and nonsurgical patients, with a high proportion of preventable ADEs. The occurrence of ADEs appears to be higher in nonsurgical patients than in surgical patients. However, studies lack details on the differences in nature of ADEs between hospital populations. To improve medication safety this knowledge is essential. PMID:24074346

  7. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  8. Smart CO2 laser surgical system based on autodyne monitoring of laser-evaporated biotissues: first results in oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. K.; Varev, G. A.; Konovalov, A. N.; Kortunov, V. N.; Panchenko, V. Y.; Reshetov, I. V.; Matorin, O. V.; Maiboroda, V. F.; Ul'yanov, V. A.

    2005-08-01

    New method based on techniques of self-induced autodyne effect for diagnostics and control of laser-tissue evaporation by radiation of high-frequency pumped waveguide CO2 laser is developed. This method is used for creation of feed-back for smart CO2 laser surgical system of "Lancet" series. The results of medical testing of the smart laser surgical system are presented.

  9. Surgical outcome after spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Sapkas, George; Kateros, Konstantinos; Papadakis, Stamatios A; Galanakos, Spyros; Brilakis, Emmanuel; Machairas, George; Katonis, Pavlos

    2009-01-01

    Background Ankylosing spondylitis is a rheumatic disease in which spinal and sacroiliac joints are mainly affected. There is a gradual bone formation in the spinal ligaments and ankylosis of the spinal diarthroses which lead to stiffness of the spine. The diffuse paraspinal ossification and inflammatory osteitis of advanced Ankylosing spondylitis creates a fused, brittle spine that is susceptible to fracture. The aim of this study is to present the surgical experience of spinal fractures occurring in patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis and to highlight the difficulties that exist as far as both diagnosis and surgical management are concerned. Methods Twenty patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis were operated due to a spinal fracture. The fracture was located at the cervical spine in 7 cases, at the thoracic spine in 9, at the thoracolumbar junction in 3 and at the lumbar spine in one case. Neurological defects were revealed in 10 patients. In four of them, neurological signs were progressively developed after a time period of 4 to 15 days. The initial radiological study was negative for a spinal fracture in twelve patients. Every patient was assessed at the time of admission and daily until the day of surgery, then postoperatively upon discharge. Results Combined anterior and posterior approaches were performed in three patients with only posterior approaches performed on the rest. Spinal fusion was seen in 100% of the cases. No intra-operative complications occurred. There was one case in which superficial wound inflammation occurred. Loosening of posterior screws without loss of stability appeared in two patients with cervical injuries. Frankel neurological classification was used in order to evaluate the neurological status of the patients. There was statistically significant improvement of Frankel neurological classification between the preoperative and postoperative evaluation. 35% of patients showed improvement due to the operation performed. Conclusion The operative treatment of these injuries is useful and effective. It usually succeeds the improvement of the patients' neurological status. Taking into consideration the cardiovascular problems that these patients have, anterior and posterior stabilization aren't always possible. In these cases, posterior approach can be performed and give excellent results, while total operation time, blood loss and other possible complications are decreased. PMID:19646282

  10. Factors influencing the diagnostic accuracy and management in acute surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Sajid, Muhammad Shafique; Hollingsworth, Thaddeus; McGlue, Mike; Miles, William FA

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy (DA) in acute surgical patients admitted to a District General Hospital. METHODS: The case notes of all acute surgical patients admitted under the surgical team for a period of two weeks were reviewed for the data pertaining to the admission diagnoses, relevant investigations and final diagnoses confirmed by either surgery or various other diagnostic modalities. The diagnostic pathway was recorded from the source of referral [general practitioner (GP), A and E, in-patient] to the correct final diagnosis by the surgical team. RESULTS: Forty-one patients (23 males) with acute surgical admissions during two weeks of study period were evaluated. The mean age of study group was 61.05 ± 23.24 years. There were 111 patient-doctor encounters. Final correct diagnosis was achieved in 85.4% patients. The DA was 46%, 44%, 50%, 33%, 61%, 61%, and 75% by GP, A and E, in-patient referral, surgical foundation year-1, surgical senior house officer (SHO), surgical registrar, and surgical consultant respectively. The percentage of clinical consensus diagnosis was 12%. Surgery was performed in 48.8% of patients. Sixty-seven percent of GP-referred patients, 31% of A and E-referred, and 25% of the in-patient referrals underwent surgery. Surgical SHO made the most contributions to the primary diagnostic pathway. CONCLUSION: Approximately 85% of acute surgical patients can be diagnosed accurately along the diagnostic pathway. Patients referred by a GP are more likely to require surgery as compared to other referral sources. Surgical consultant was more likely to make correct surgical diagnosis, however it is the surgical SHO that contributes the most correct diagnoses along the diagnostic pathway. PMID:25429324

  11. Effects of Video Games on the Adverse Corollaries of Chemotherapy in Pediatric Oncology Patients: A Single-Case Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolko, David J.; Rickard-Figueroa, Jorge L.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed effects of video games on adverse corollaries of chemotherapy in three pediatric oncology patients. Results indicated that access to video games resulted in reduction in the number of anticipatory symptoms experienced and observed, as well as a diminution in the aversiveness of chemotherapy side effects. (Author/NRB)

  12. Impact of whole-body 18F-FDG PET on diagnostic and therapeutic management of Medical Oncology patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marta Zafra; Francisco Ayala; Enrique Gonzalez-Billalabeitia; Elena Vicente; Pedro Gonzalez-Cabezas; Teresa García; José A. Macías; Vicente Vicente

    2008-01-01

    AimMost studies evaluating positron-emission tomography (PET) impact on decision making are based on questionnaires sent to referring physicians, with low response rates and potential bias. Studies directly evaluating influence of PET on routine management of Medical Oncology patients are scarce.

  13. Justification for Application of Recombinant Superoxide Dismutase in the Ozone\\/NOUltrasound Technology for Wound Treatment in Oncological Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valery V. Pedder; Maxim V. Naboka; Irina V. Churilova; Viktor K. Kosenok; Darya V. Egorova

    2010-01-01

    This paper justifies application of the recombinant superoxide dismutase product “Rexod” as one of the active components used in implementation of the ozone\\/NO-ultrasound technologies for treatment of complicated postoperative wounds in oncological patients. The theoretical research has shown that it is necessary to take into account biochemical reaction kinetics with involvement of oxygen active forms, oxygen radicals and nitric oxides

  14. Surgical Preparation: Are Patients “Ready” for Stress Urinary Incontinence Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, L.; Litman, H. J.; Rickey, L.; Dyer, K.Y.; Markland, A.D.; Sirls, L.; Norton, P.; Casiano, E.; Paraiso, M.F.R.; Ghetti, C.; Rahn, D.D.; Kusek, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Hypothesis: Patient preparedness for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) surgery is associated with improvements in post-operative satisfaction, symptoms and quality of life (QoL). This planned secondary analysis examined the association of patient preparedness with surgical outcomes, treatment satisfaction and quality of life. Methods: The ValUE trial compared the effect of pre-operative urodynamic studies to a standardized office evaluation on outcomes of SUI surgery at one year. In addition to primary and secondary outcome measures, patient satisfaction with treatment was measured with a 5-point Likert scale (very dissatisfied to very satisfied) that queried subjects to rate the treatment’s effect on overall incontinence, urge incontinence, SUI, and frequency. Preparedness for surgery was assessed using an 11-question Patient Preparedness Questionnaire (PPQ). Results: Based on PPQ Question 11, 4 out of 5 (81%) of women reported they “agreed” or “strongly agreed” that they were prepared for surgery. Selected demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in unprepared and prepared women. Among SUI severity baseline measures, total UDI score was significantly but weakly associated with preparedness (question 11 of the PPQ) (Spearman r = 0.13, p = 0.001). Although preparedness for surgery was not associated with successful outcomes, it was associated with satisfaction (rs=0.11, p = 0.02) and larger PGI-S improvement (increase) (p=0.008). Conclusions: Approximately half (48%) of women “strongly agreed” that they felt prepared for SUI. Women with higher pre-operative preparedness scores were more satisfied although surgical outcomes did not differ. PMID:23912506

  15. Validation of defining characteristics for the nursing diagnosis of fatigue in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Priscila de Oliveira; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the defining characteristics for the nursing diagnosis of Fatigue in adult oncological patients. It is a cross-sectional, descriptive study with a quantitative perspective, and its type is diagnostic content validation. Data collection was carried out in a University Hospital. The sample was made up of 35 expert nurses. The instrument used was subdivided into four parts. The data was analyzed by descriptive statistics. 15 defining characteristics were identified, considered secondary indicators. With an average weighting of less than 0.50, four defining characteristics were excluded. The defining characteristic Impaired social interaction, added to those described by NANDA-I after review of the literature, was validated with a weighted average of 0.71. It was concluded that the subjectivity of the defining characteristics and the difficulty nurses have in recognizing them influence the identification of this diagnosis. PMID:22991112

  16. The use of herbal therapies in pediatric oncology patients: treating symptoms of cancer and side effects of standard therapies.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Erin L

    2007-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine is increasing in use in the pediatric oncology population. Although there is a multitude of herbal therapies used, the focus of this article is a review of the literature addressing some herbal therapies used to treat the symptoms of cancer and side effects of traditional methods of treatment. Ginger is used in the treatment of nausea and vomiting. St. John's wort is successful in treating depression and anxiety. Echinacea is used as an immunostimulant. Herbal therapies in the pediatric oncology population are usually initiated and managed by parents. Many herbal therapies are beneficial, but some potential herb-drug interactions should be considered. This poses a challenge to the oncology nurse because herbal treatments are managed by the parents and pharmaceuticals are managed by the practitioner. Educating the patient, family, and practitioner is important in ensuring a thorough health history assessment and, subsequently, safe and effective herbal and pharmacological therapies. PMID:17185400

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of primary CNS lymphoma in immunocompetent patients: guidelines from the European Association for Neuro-Oncology.

    PubMed

    Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Bessell, Eric; Bromberg, Jacoline; Hottinger, Andreas F; Preusser, Matthias; Rudà, Roberta; Schlegel, Uwe; Siegal, Tali; Soussain, Carole; Abacioglu, Ufuk; Cassoux, Nathalie; Deckert, Martina; Dirven, Clemens M F; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Graus, Francesc; Henriksson, Roger; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Taphoorn, Martin; Soffietti, Riccardo; Weller, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The management of primary CNS lymphoma is one of the most controversial topics in neuro-oncology because of the complexity of the disease and the very few controlled studies available. In 2013, the European Association of Neuro-Oncology created a multidisciplinary task force to establish evidence-based guidelines for immunocompetent adults with primary CNS lymphoma. In this Review, we present these guidelines, which provide consensus considerations and recommendations for diagnosis, assessment, staging, and treatment of primary CNS lymphoma. Specifically, we address aspects of care related to surgery, systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy, intensive chemotherapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation, radiotherapy, intraocular manifestations, and management of elderly patients. The guidelines should aid clinicians in their daily practice and decision making, and serve as a basis for future investigations in neuro-oncology. PMID:26149884

  18. Assessment of oral mucositis in adult and pediatric oncology patients: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Farrington, Michele; Cullen, Laura; Dawson, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a frequent side effect of cancer treatment and can lead to delayed treatment, reduced treatment dosage, altered nutrition, dehydration, infections, xerostomia, pain, and higher healthcare costs. Mucositis is defined as "inflammatory lesions of the oral and/or gastrointestinal tract caused by high-dose cancer therapies. Alimentary tract mucositis refers to the expression of mucosal injury across the continuum of oral and gastrointestinal mucosa, from the mouth to the anus" (Peterson, Bensadoun, & Roila, 2008, p. ii122). Evidence demonstrates that oral mucositis is quite distressing for patients. In addition, the majority of oncology nurses are unaware of available guidelines related to the care of oral mucositis. A multidisciplinary Oral Mucositis Committee was formed by the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics to develop evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies for adult and pediatric oncology patients experiencing oral mucositis. The first step was implementing an evidence-based nursing oral assessment. The Iowa Model was used to guide this evidence-based practice initiative. The Oral Assessment Guide (OAG) is reliable and valid, feasible, and sensitive to changing conditions. The OAG was piloted on an Adult Leukemia and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit leading to modification and adaptation. The pilot evaluation found 87% of patients had an abnormal oral assessment involving all categories in the tool. Nursing questionnaires showed that staff (8/23; 35% response) felt they were able to identify at risk patients using the OAG (3.3; 1-4 scale), and the tool accurately identifies mucosal changes (2.9; 1-4 scale). A knowledge assessment found nurses correctly identified OAG components 63% of the time. Unlike results from a national survey, most University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics nurses (63%) were aware of national guidelines for prevention and treatment of oral mucositis. Developing an evidence-based nursing policy and updating documentation systems was done before implementation occurred. Computer-based and printed educational materials were developed for nursing staff caring for oncology patients. Team members were responsible for facilitating adoption in clinical areas. After organizational roll out, the nursing assessment was documented in all patients 87% of the time, and 99% for inpatients. The highest risk population, head and neck cancer patients receiving radiation, had documentation in 88% of audited visits. Other clinics required further work. Changing the system to the electronic medical record created an additional need for integration of the evidence-based practice with housewide documentation of oral assessment being completed 60.9% of the time. Use of an evidence-based assessment is the first step in a comprehensive program to reduce a common and highly distressing side effect of cancer treatment. Nursing documentation of oral assessment is well integrated on inpatient units. Opportunities for improvement remain in ambulatory care. Multidisciplinary team collaborations to expand evidence-based assessment and research questions generated from this work will be shared. PMID:20863028

  19. Impact of metabolic syndrome in surgical patients: should we bother?

    PubMed

    Tzimas, P; Petrou, A; Laou, E; Milionis, H; Mikhailidis, D P; Papadopoulos, G

    2015-08-01

    Clinicians inevitably encounter patients who meet the diagnostic criteria for the metabolic syndrome (MetS); these criteria include central obesity, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidaemia, and hyperglycaemia. Regardless of the variations in its definition, MetS may be associated with adverse outcomes in patients undergoing both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. There is a paucity of data concerning the anaesthetic management of patients with MetS, and only a few observational (mainly retrospective) studies have investigated the association of MetS with perioperative outcomes. In this narrative review, we consider the impact of MetS on the occurrence of perioperative adverse events after cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Metabolic syndrome has been associated with higher rates of cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal perioperative events and wound infections compared with patients with a non-MetS profile. Metabolic syndrome has also been related to increased health service costs, prolonged hospital stay, and a greater need for posthospitalization care. Therefore, physicians should be able to recognize the MetS in the perioperative period in order to formulate management strategies that may modify any perianaesthetic and surgical risk. However, further research is needed in this field. PMID:26109210

  20. Futility and the care of surgical patients: ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Grant, Scott B; Modi, Parth K; Singer, Eric A

    2014-07-01

    Futility has been a contentious topic in medicine for several decades. Surgery in critical or end-of-life situations often raises difficult questions about futility. In this article, we discuss the definition of futility, methods for resolving futility disputes, and some ways to reframe the futility debate to a more fruitful discussion about the goals of care, better communication between surgeon and patient/surrogate, and palliative surgical care. Many definitions of futile therapy have been discussed. The most controversial of these is "qualitative futility" which describes a situation in which the treatment provided is likely to result in an unacceptable quality of life. This is an area of continued controversy because it has been impossible to identify universally held beliefs about acceptable quality of life. Many authors have described methods for resolving futility disputes, including community standards and legalistic multi-step due process protocols. Others, however, have abandoned the concept of futility altogether as an unhelpful term. Reframing the issue of futility as one of inadequate physician-patient communication, these authors have advocated for methods of improving communication and strengthening the patient-physician relationship. Finally, we discuss the utilization of consultants who may be of use in resolving futility disputes: ethics committees, palliative care specialists, pastoral care teams, and dedicated patient advocates. Involving these specialists in a futility conflict can help improve communication and provide invaluable assistance in arriving at the appropriate treatment decision. PMID:24849199

  1. Chronic exposure keratopathy complicating surgical correction of ptosis in patients with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter M. Daut; Thomas L. Steinemann; Christopher T. Westfall

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report chronic exposure keratopathy related to surgical ptosis correction in patients with chronic, progressive, external ophthalmoplegia.METHODS: Case reports of three patients with chronic exposure keratopathy following blepharoptosis surgery.RESULTS: We report three patients with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with chronic corneal complications after surgical ptosis repair. All three gave a history of blepharoptosis and extraocular muscle dysfunction. Each presented

  2. Malnutrition and Obesity in Pediatric Oncology Patients: Causes, Consequences, and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Co-Reyes, Erica; Li, Rhea; Huh, Winston; Chandra, Joya

    2012-01-01

    In children with cancer, suboptimal nutrition states are common consequences of the disease and its treatment. These nutrition states have been attributed to a number of etiologies dependent on the patient’s tumor type and treatment, and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Interventions vary from psychosocial to pharmacological and surgical management. Further research is necessary to understand the epidemiology and etiology of these nutrition states. Of great importance is the development and implementation of effective interventions to optimize nutritional status among children with cancer during and after therapy. PMID:22948929

  3. Surgical transposition of the ovaries: Imaging findings in 14 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kier, R.; Chambers, S.K. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Pelvic radiation therapy for cervical or vaginal cancer often leads to ovarian failure. To remove the ovaries from the radiation portal and preserve their function, they can be transposed to the lateral abdomen. Serial imaging studies in 14 patients who had undergone ovarian transposition (five bilateral, nine unilateral) were reviewed. Images obtained included 32 CT scans, 20 sonograms, and one MR image. Most transposed ovaries were located along the paracolic gutters near the iliac crests, creating an extrinsic mass effect on adjacent bowel. Detection of surgical clips on the ovary on CT scans allowed confident recognition of all 19 transposed ovaries. Cysts in the transposed ovaries, noted on most imaging studies, did not correlate with complications of pain or hormonal dysfunction. In one case, a large physiologic cyst in a transposed ovary distorted the cecum and was mistaken for a mucocele of the appendix. In another case, a large ovarian cyst was thought to be tumor recurrence or a lymphocele. These findings indicate that although the transposed ovaries can be recognized on CT scans by the surgical clips attached to the ovaries, the appearance of the ovary does not predict reliably the development of complications.

  4. Global radiation oncology waybill

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garzón, Victor; Rovirosa, Ángeles; Ramos, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Radiation oncology covers many different fields of knowledge and skills. Indeed, this medical specialty links physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even rehabilitation and aesthetics. The current socio-economic situation and professional competences affect the development and future or this specialty. The aim of this article was to analyze and highlight the underlying pillars and foundations of radiation oncology, indicating the steps implicated in the future developments or competences of each. Methods This study has collected data from the literature and includes highlights from discussions carried out during the XVII Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) held in Vigo in June, 2013. Most of the aspects and domains of radiation oncology were analyzed, achieving recommendations for the many skills and knowledge related to physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even supportive care and management. Results Considering the data from the literature and the discussions of the XVII SEOR Meeting, the “waybill” for the forthcoming years has been described in this article including all the aspects related to the needs of radiation oncology. Conclusions Professional competences affect the development and future of this specialty. All the types of radio-modulation are competences of radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the pillars of Radiation Oncology are based on experience and research in every area of Radiation Oncology. PMID:24416572

  5. Rapid Reduction of Central Line Infections in Hospitalized Pediatric Oncology Patients Through Simple Quality Improvement Methods

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung W.; Chang, Lawrence; Hanauer, David A.; Shaffer-Hartman, Jackie; Teitelbaum, Daniel; Lewis, Ian; Blackwood, Alex; Akcasu, Nur; Steel, Janell; Christensen, Joy; Niedner, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) patients are at significant risk for developing central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLA-BSIs) due to their prolonged dependence on such catheters. Effective strategies to eliminate these preventable infections are urgently needed. In this study, we investigated the implementation of bundled central line maintenance practices and their effect on hospital-acquired CLA-BSIs. Materials and Methods CLA-BSI rates were analyzed within a single-institution’s PHO unit between January 2005 and June 2011. In May 2008, a multidisciplinary quality improvement team developed techniques to improve the PHO unit’s safety culture and implemented the use of catheter maintenance practices tailored to PHO patients. Data analysis was performed using time-series methods to evaluate the pre- and post-intervention effect of the practice changes. Results The pre-intervention CLA-BSI incidence was 2.92 per 1000-patient days (PD) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most prevalent pathogen (29%). In the post-intervention period, the CLA-BSI rate decreased substantially (45%) to 1.61 per 1000-PD (p<0.004). Early on, blood and marrow transplant (BMT) patients had a three-fold higher CLA-BSI rate compared to non-BMT patients (p<0.033). With additional infection control countermeasures added to the bundled practices, BMT patients experienced a larger CLA-BSI rate reduction such that BMT and non-BMT CLA-BSI rates were not significantly different post-intervention. Conclusions By adopting and effectively implementing uniform maintenance catheter care practices, learning multidisciplinary teamwork, and promoting a culture of patient safety, the CLA-BSI incidence in our study population was significantly reduced and maintained. PMID:22522576

  6. Patterns of Care in Elderly Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Oncology Patients: A Single-Center Cohort Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shao Hui Huang; Brian O'Sullivan; John Waldron; Gina Lockwood; Andrew Bayley; John Kim; Bernard Cummings; Laura A. Dawson; Andrew Hope; John Cho; Ian Witterick; Eric X. Chen; Jolie Ringash

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the patterns of care for elderly head-and-neck cancer patients with those of younger patients. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of all new mucosal head-and-neck cancer referrals to radiation oncology between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, treatment pattern, tolerance, and outcomes were compared between the elderly (aged

  7. Modified supracricoid laryngectomy: oncological and functional outcomes in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Allegra, Eugenia; Franco, Teresa; Trapasso, Serena; Domanico, Rossana; La Boria, Alessandro; Garozzo, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Background Supracricoid laryngectomy is an organ preservation surgical technique for early-stage glottic tumors. Modified supracricoid laryngectomy using sternohyoid muscles for neoglottis reconstruction is a new surgical technique. This report evaluates oncological and functional outcomes of this new technique and its feasibility in elderly patients. Methods Clinical records from 21 consecutive patients affected by glottic cancer and treated by modified SCL between 2004 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative parameters and quality of voice after modified SCL were retrospectively reviewed. Actuarial overall survival, disease-specific survival rates, and recurrence-free survival rates were assessed. The functional and oncological outcomes of patients over 65 years were compared with those of patients younger than 65 years of age. Results There were no postoperative complications and all of the patients had complete swallowing rehabilitation. Twenty of the 21 patients had decannulation. Two patients received total laryngectomy for locoregional relapse. Overall survival and disease-specific survival rates were 100%. Recurrence-free survival rates were 90.1% and 90% in patients younger and older than 65 years of age, respectively. The larynx preservation index was lower in patients who were older than 65 years of age. The postoperative courses with regard to functional outcome and voice quality in elderly patients were similar to those of patients younger than 65 years of age. Conclusion Modified SCL is a new open organ preservation surgical technique that is oncologically safe. The positive functional and oncological outcomes of this surgical procedure allow it to be performed in elderly patients. PMID:23152678

  8. Epidemiology of candidemia in oncology patients: a 6-year survey in a Portuguese central hospital.

    PubMed

    Sabino, R; Veríssimo, C; Brandão, J; Alves, C; Parada, H; Rosado, L; Paixão, E; Videira, Z; Tendeiro, T; Sampaio, P; Pais, C

    2010-03-01

    This study presents data on the incidence of candidemia in a Portuguese oncology hospital during a 6-year period. The species distribution and their antifungal susceptibility, as well as the clinical outcomes associated with candidemia were evaluated. A total of 119 episodes were reported, with the majority occurring among patients older than 56 years. The most common underlying medical conditions were solid tumors (64.5%) and hematological disease (28.2%). The most frequent species found was Candida albicans (48.7%), followed by C. parapsilosis (20.2%), C. tropicalis (8.4%), C. krusei (6.7%) and C. glabrata (5.0%), but Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were also isolated. Candida albicans was more frequently associated with solid tumors of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts and breast (P=0.005), while non-C. albicans Candida species were most frequently recovered from hematological patients (P=0.007). The mortality rate associated with candidemia was 31.9% (P=0.016). All C. albicans and C. parapsilosis isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, voriconazole and itraconazole. Resistance to caspofungin was only observed in C. albicans and in the R. mucilaginosa isolates. Posaconazole was active against all C. parapsilosis isolates tested but resistant strains were found among C. albicans (4.9%), C. tropicalis (12.5%), C. krusei (25%) and C. glabrata (50%). This study provides useful information regarding the local epidemiology of candidemia in cancer patients. PMID:19657956

  9. Evaluation of Distress and Stress in Cancer Patients in AMIR Oncology Hospital in Shiraz

    PubMed Central

    Mansourabadi, A; Moogooei, M; Nozari, S

    2014-01-01

    Background Routine screening for distress is internationally recommended as a necessary standard for good cancer care given its high prevalence and negative consequences on quality of life. This study attempts to support validation of Distress Thermometer (DT) in Shiraz, Iran and in the second step to investigate privilege/priority of DT over other referent criterion measures. Material and methods In total, 58 outpatients with cancer were recruited from AMIR Oncology hospital in Shiraz, Iran. Each participant completed the DT and a list of 34 possible cancer-related problems (the Problem List), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the 18-item Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18), and a short visual analog scale to determine the understandability of the tools. Results Characteristic analysis revealed that DT cutoff scores ?4 and ?5 had optimal sensitivity and specificity relative to both HADS and BSI-18 cutoff scores for general caseness and more severe psychological distress, respectively. Patients with DT scores ?4 (cases) were more likely to be women suffering from psychological problems in the past experience stressful events in the 3 years ago and encounter more family, emotional, and physical issue related to cancer or cancer treatment (p=0.02). Conclusion Patients indicated that the DT was easier to fill out and to understand than the HADS, but not the BSI-18. The DT was identified as a simple and effective screening instrument for detecting distress in Iranian cancer patients as a first step toward more properly referring those in need to psychosocial intervention. PMID:25598953

  10. Barriers to recruitment for surgical trials in head and neck oncology: A survey of trial investigators. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Three head and neck cancers trials in the United Kingdom were examined to identify barriers to recruitment at the planned rate. The primary barriers were patient preference for one study arm and aversion to randomization. The complexity of patient information, which often was not appropriate to socioeconomic status and English proficiency of the targeted patients, also served as a barrier.

  11. Gender differences in post-operative pain and patient controlled analgesia use among adolescent surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deirdre E Logan; John B Rose

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore gender differences in anticipatory emotional distress, coping strategies, post-operative pain perception, and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) use among adolescent surgical patients. One hundred and two 12–18-year-old adolescents undergoing surgeries with overnight hospital stay were recruited. Participants completed pre-operative measures of anxiety and anticipated pain. Post-operatively, they reported on coping skills, post-operative anxiety, and

  12. Neurological recovery after surgical decompression in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy - a prospective study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Y. Cheung; D. Arvinte; Y. W. Wong; K. D. K. Luk; K. M. C. Cheung

    2008-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is a common clinical problem. No study has examined the pattern of neurological recovery after\\u000a surgical decompression. We conducted a prospective study on the pattern of neurological recovery after surgical decompression\\u000a in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Patients suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy and requiring surgical\\u000a decompression from January 1995 to December 2000 were prospectively included. Upper

  13. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. II. The case of T2N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Frata, Paolo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy); Cellai, Enrico [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Magrini, Stefano M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy)]. E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Bonetti, Bartolomea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy); Vitali, Elisabetta [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy); Tonoli, Sandro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy); Buglione, Michela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy); Paiar, Fabiola [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Barca, Raffaella [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Fondelli, Simona [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Polli, Caterina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Livi, Lorenzo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Biti, Gianpaolo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy)

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second-tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T2 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 256 T2 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Cumulative probability of local control (LC), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups by both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage were evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late-damage incidence and second-tumor cumulative probability (STP) were also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year OS rates were, respectively, 73%, 59%, and 37%. Corresponding values for cumulative LC probability were 73%, 73%, and 70% and for DSS, 89%, 86%, and 85%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Seventy-three percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were larger tumor extent and impaired cord mobility. At multivariate analysis, the same factors retained statistical significance. Twenty-year STP was 23%, with second-tumor deaths less frequent than larynx cancer deaths (20 of 256 vs. 30 of 256). Incidence of late damage was higher in the first decade of accrual (22%) than in the last decade (10%, p = 0.03); the same was true for severe late damage (9% vs. 1.8%). Conclusion: Present-day radical radiotherapy can be considered a standard treatment for T2 glottic cancer. Better results are obtained in patients with less extended disease. Late damage is relatively infrequent, but a careful follow-up is warranted for early detection not only of relapses (because salvage surgery is feasible) but also of second malignant tumors, which constitute a relevant but not the leading cause of death in these patients and are potentially curable.

  14. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. I. The case of T1N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cellai, Enrico [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, Florence, Italy, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Frata, Paolo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy); Magrini, Stefano M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy)]. E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Paiar, Fabiola [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, Florence, Italy, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Barca, Raffaella [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, Florence, Italy, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Fondelli, Simona [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, Florence, Italy, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Polli, Caterina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, Florence, Italy, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Livi, Lorenzo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, Florence, Italy, A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy); Bonetti, Bartolomea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy); Vitali, Elisabetta [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy); De Stefani, Agostina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy); Buglione, Michela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brescia University Hospital, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti', Brescia (Italy); Biti, Gianpaolo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence University Hospital, Florence (Italy); A.O. Careggi, Florence (Italy)

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T1 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 831 T1 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia-Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Actuarial cumulative local control probability (LC), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates have been calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups with both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage have been evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late damage incidence and second tumor cumulative probability (STP) have been also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-, 5-, and 10-year OS was equal to 86%, 77%, and 57%, respectively. Corresponding values for LC were 86%, 84%, and 83% and for DSS 96%, 95%, and 93%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Eighty-seven percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were: male gender, earlier treatment period, larger tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and the use of Cobalt 60. At multivariate analysis, only gender, tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and beam type retained statistical significance. Higher total doses and larger field sizes are significantly related (logistic regression) with a higher late damage incidence. Scatterplot analysis of various combinations of field dimensions and total dose showed that field dimensions >35 and <49 cm{sup 2}, together with doses of >65 Gy, offer the best local control results together with an acceptably low late damage incidence. Twenty-year STP was equal to 23%, with second tumor deaths being more frequent than larynx cancer deaths (67 of 831 vs. 46/831). Conclusion: The results of this study support the opinion, suggested by some international guidelines, that radiotherapy is standard treatment for T1 glottic cancer. Better results are obtained in patients with less extended disease and with 4-6 MV photon beams. The use of doses in excess of 65 Gy and of field sizes of 36-49 cm{sup 2} is probably the best technical choice available. Late damage is infrequent, but careful follow-up is warranted to detect early not only relapses (because conservative salvage surgery is feasible), but also second malignant tumors, which constitute the main cause of death in these patients and are potentially curable.

  15. Surgical revascularization versus amputation for peripheral vascular disease in dialysis patients: a cohort study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine M Logar; Lisa M Pappas; Nirupama Ramkumar; Srinivasan Beddhu

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgical treatment of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) in dialysis patients is controversial. METHODS: We examined the post-operative morbidity and mortality of surgical revascularization or amputation for PVD in a retrospective analysis of United States Renal Data System. Propensity scores for undergoing amputation were derived from a multivariable logistic regression model of amputation. RESULTS: Of the Medicare patients initiated on

  16. Nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of survivin in 67 surgically resected pancreatic cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Tonini; B Vincenzi; D Santini; S Scarpa; T Vasaturo; C Malacrino; R Coppola; P Magistrelli; D Borzomati; A Baldi; A Antinori; M Caricato; G Nuzzo; A Picciocchi

    2005-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive gastrointestinal cancer with less than 10% long-term survivors. The apoptotic pathway deregulation is a postulated mechanism of carcinogenesis of this tumour. The present study investigated the prognostic role of apoptosis and apoptosis-involved proteins in a series of surgically resected pancreatic cancer patients. All patients affected by pancreatic adenocarcinoma and treated with surgical

  17. Preliminary Evidence of an Association Between a Functional Interleukin6 Polymorphism and Fatigue and Sleep Disturbance in Oncology Patients and Their Family Caregivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Miaskowski; Marylin Dodd; Kathryn Lee; Claudia West; Steven M. Paul; Bruce A. Cooper; William Wara; Patrick S. Swift; Laura B. Dunn; Bradley E. Aouizerat

    2010-01-01

    ContextFatigue and sleep disturbance are common problems in oncology patients and their family caregivers (FCs). However, little is known about factors that contribute to interindividual variability in these symptoms or to their underlying biologic mechanisms.

  18. The impact of pain on the quality of life of Taiwanese oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shu-Yuan; Wu, Shu-Fang; Chao, Ta-Chung; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Wu, Wei-Wen; Wang, Tsae-Jyy; Lu, Yu-Yin

    2015-04-01

    This study explored the relationship between participants' pain experience and quality of life (QOL). One hundred nine patients aged 18 years and older who had taken prescribed opioid analgesics for cancer-related pain at a teaching hospital in Taipei, Taiwan, completed the Brief Pain Inventory and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Group Questionnaire. The results indicated that participants in this study had experienced a mean functional QOL of 55.47 (SD 21.48), a mean symptom QOL of 41.97 (SD 16.89), and a mean global QOL of 42.13 (SD 20.69). Participants reported that in the previous 7 days, they had experienced a mean least pain of 1.75 (SD 0.18) and a mean worst pain of 6.81 (SD 0.24). The mean score for average pain intensity was 4.14 (SD 0.21), whereas the mean for current pain level was 2.53 (SD 0.21). The mean pain interference in the patients' daily activities was 3.50 (SD 0.22) on a scale ranging from 0 to 10. Furthermore, a significant correlation existed between global (r = -0.375, p < .01), functional (r = -0.300, p < .01), and symptom (r = 0.405, p < .01) QOL and worst pain. Moreover, the results indicated a significant correlation between global (r = -0.461, p < .01), functional (r = -0.430, p < .01), and symptom (r = 0.505, p < .01) QOL and pain interference. The current results support the observation that cancer pain substantially affects a patient's quality of life. The findings provide empirical support for the need for better programmatic efforts to improve pain management in Taiwanese oncology outpatients. PMID:25193163

  19. A Comparative Study of Conservative versus Surgical Treatment Protocols for 77 Patients with Idiopathic Granulomatous Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Yabano?lu, Hakan; Çolako?lu, Tamer; Belli, Sedat; Aytac, Huseyin Ozgur; Bolat, Filiz Aka; Pourbagher, Ay?in; Tezcaner, Tugan; Yildirim, Sedat; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and demographic data of patients with idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM) and to compare the results of conservative versus surgical treatment protocols. The demographic data, clinical findings, microbiological and pathologic features, scanning and treatment methods, recurrence, and recovery rates of 77 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the type of treatment received. Core biopsies were used to diagnose 37 patients: 26 using incisional biopsies and 14 using excisional biopsies. Of the patient population with IGM, 31 were treated with surgical excision, one with a simple mastectomy, and one with a subcutaneous mastectomy combined with a breast implant, whereas 44 were treated with steroids. The recovery rates of the 44 patients who were treated conservatively were 6 (1-15) months while for the 33 patients who were treated surgically, it was 1 (1-5) month (p = 0.001). Nine patients from the conservative treatment group experienced a recurrence while there were no recurrences in the surgically treated group (p = 0.009). Among all patients, the recurrence rate was 11.7% (9/77) while the average follow-up period was 16.57 ± 18.57 months. As a comparative study between conservative treatment protocols and surgical ones for patients with idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM), this study is the largest to date. A wide surgical excision is the preferred approach for treating patients with IGM because of the low recurrence rate. PMID:25858348

  20. Multiscale modeling and surgical planning for single ventricle heart patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison

    2011-11-01

    Single ventricle heart patients are among the most challenging for pediatric cardiologists to treat, and typically undergo a palliative course of three open-heart surgeries starting immediately after birth. We will present recent tools for modeling blood flow in single ventricle heart patients using a multiscale approach that couples a 3D Navier-Stokes domain to a 0D closed loop lumped parameter network comprised of circuit elements. This coupling allows us to capture the effect of changes in local geometry, such as shunt sizes, on global circulatory dynamics, such as cardiac output. A semi-implicit numerical method is formulated to solve the coupled system in which flow and pressure information is passed between the two domains at the inlets and outlets of the model. A finite element method with outflow stabilization is applied in the 3D Navier-Stokes domain, and the LPN system of ordinary differential equations is solved numerically using a Runge-Kutta method. These tools are coupled via automated scripts to a derivative-free optimization method. Optimization is used to systematically explore surgical designs using clinically relevant cost functions for two stages of single ventricle repair. First, we will present results from optimization of the first stage Blalock Taussig Shunt. Second, we will present results from optimization of a new Y-graft design for the third stage of single ventricle repair called the Fontan surgery. The Y-graft is shown, in simulations, to successfully improve hepatic flow distribution, a known clinical problem. Preliminary clinical experience with the Y-graft will be discussed.

  1. A review of surgical repair methods and patient outcomes for gluteal tendon tears.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Jay R; Bucher, Thomas A; Ball, Simon V; Janes, Gregory C

    2015-01-01

    Advanced hip imaging and surgical findings have demonstrated that a common cause of greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is gluteal tendon tears. Conservative measures are initially employed to treat GTPS and manage gluteal tears, though patients frequently undergo multiple courses of non-operative treatment with only temporary pain relief. Therefore, a number of surgical treatment options for recalcitrant GTPS associated with gluteal tears have been reported. These have included open trans-osseous or bone anchored suture techniques, endoscopic methods and the use of tendon augmentation for repair reinforcement. This review describes the anatomy, pathophysiology and clinical presentation of gluteal tendon tears. Surgical techniques and patient reported outcomes are presented. This review demonstrates that surgical repair can result in improved patient outcomes, irrespective of tear aetiology, and suggests that the patient with "trochanteric bursitis" should be carefully assessed as newer surgical techniques show promise for a condition that historically has been managed conservatively. PMID:25198307

  2. Emerging concepts in biomarker discovery; The US-Japan workshop on immunological molecular markers in oncology

    E-print Network

    2009-01-01

    15213, USA, 23 Medical Oncology and Immunotherapy,Unit, Department of Medical Oncology, Centro di RiferimentoMedical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan, 32 Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology,

  3. Measured dose rate constant from oncology patients administered 18F for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Brian; Holahan, Brian; Aime, Jean; Humm, John; St Germain, Jean; Dauer, Lawrence T. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Patient exposure rate measurements verify published patient dose rate data and characterize dose rates near 2-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) patients. A specific dose rate constant based on patient exposure rate measurements is a convenient quantity that can be applied to the desired distance, injection activity, and time postinjection to obtain an accurate calculation of cumulative external radiation dose. This study reports exposure rates measured at various locations near positron emission tomography (PET) {sup 18}F-FDG patients prior to PET scanning. These measurements are normalized for the amount of administered activity, measurement distance, and time postinjection and are compared with other published data. Methods: Exposure rates were measured using a calibrated ionization chamber at various body locations from 152 adult oncology patients postvoid after a mean uptake time of 76 min following injection with a mean activity of 490 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Data were obtained at nine measurement locations for each patient: three near the head, four near the chest, and two near the feet. Results: On contact with, 30 cm superior to and 30 cm lateral to the head, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.482 (0.511), 0.135 (0.155), and 0.193 (0.223) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. On contact with, 30 cm anterior to, 30 cm lateral to and 1 m anterior to the chest, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.623 (0.709), 0.254 (0.283), 0.190 (0.218), and 0.067 (0.081) {mu}Sv/MBq h respectively. 30 cm inferior and 30 cm lateral to the feet, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.024 (0.022) and 0.039 (0.044) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. Conclusions: The measurements for this study support the use of 0.092 {mu}Sv m{sup 2}/MBq h as a reasonable representation of the dose rate anterior from the chest of patients immediately following injection. This value can then be reliably scaled to the desired time and distance for planning and staff dose evaluation purposes. At distances closer than 1 m, a distance-specific dose rate constant of 0.367 {mu}Sv/MBq h at 30 cm is recommended for accurate calculations. An accurate patient-specific dose rate constant that accounts for patient-specific variables (e.g., distribution and attenuation) will allow an accurate evaluation of the dose rate from a patient injected with an isotope rather than simply utilizing a physical constant.

  4. The oncology palliative care clinic at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre: an early intervention model for patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Breffni; Swami, Nadia; Pope, Ashley; Rodin, Gary; Dougherty, Elizabeth; Mak, Ernie; Banerjee, Subrata; Bryson, John; Ridley, Julia; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2015-04-01

    Several recently published randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the benefits of early palliative care involvement for patients with advanced cancer. In the oncology outpatient setting, palliative care clinics are an ideal site for the provision of early, collaborative support, which can be maintained throughout the cancer trajectory. Despite this, access to ambulatory palliative care clinics is limited, even at tertiary cancer centres. Existing programs for outpatient palliative care are variable in scope and are not well described in the literature. We describe the development and expansion of an outpatient palliative care clinic at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Canada, demonstrating how the clinic functions at a local and regional level. This clinic served as the intervention for a recent large cluster-randomized trial of early palliative care. The model for this service can be adapted by other palliative care programs that aim to provide early, integrated oncology care. PMID:25281230

  5. Evaluating the usefulness of patient education materials on surgical site infection: a systematic assessment.

    PubMed

    Zellmer, Caroline; Zimdars, Peggy; Parker, Sarah; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-02-01

    Patient education is important for the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). The usefulness of available patient education materials is unclear. Using a validated evaluation tool, the Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool, we systematically assessed patient education materials for SSI. We found that available materials performed poorly, and further research is needed in this area. PMID:25541334

  6. Statistical models to predict the need for postoperative intensive care and hospitalization in pediatric surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kanwaljeet J. Anand; Sarah E. Hopkins; Jean A. Wright; Richard R. Ricketts; Dana W. Flanders

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To develop statistical models for predicting postoperative hospital and ICU stay in pediatric surgical patients based on preoperative clinical characteristics and operative factors related to the degree of surgical stress. We hypothesized that preoperative and operative factors will predict the need for ICU admission and may be used to forecast the length of ICU stay or postoperative hospital stay.

  7. Rapid screening for depression – validation of the Brief Case-Find for Depression (BCD) in medical oncology and palliative care patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Jefford; L Mileshkin; K Richards; J Thomson; J P Matthews; J Zalcberg; R Jennens; S-A McLachlan; S Wein; Y Antill; D M Clarke

    2004-01-01

    Depression in oncology patients is under-recognised and associated with poor outcomes. Screening can increase case recognition. The Brief Case-Find for Depression (BCD) is a four-question, interviewer-administered instrument that has been previously validated in a general medical setting. The primary aim of this study was to validate the BCD in a medical oncology\\/palliative care setting, primarily by comparing its association with

  8. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: simonec@mail.nih.gov; Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  9. The Effects of Pain, Gender, and Age on Sleep\\/Wake and Circadian Rhythm Parameters in Oncology Patients at the Initiation of Radiation Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Buffum; Theresa Koetters; Maria Cho; Liz Macera; Steven M. Paul; Claudia West; Bradley Aouizerat; Laura Dunn; Marylin Dodd; Kathryn Lee; Bruce Cooper; William Wara; Patrick Swift; Christine Miaskowski

    2011-01-01

    To date, no studies have evaluated for differences in subjective and objective measures of sleep disturbance in oncology outpatients with and without pain. This descriptive study, recruited 182 patients from 2 radiation therapy (RT) departments at the time of the patient’s simulation visit. Approximately 38% of the sample reported moderate to severe pain (ie, worst pain intensity of 6.2 ±

  10. Method for separating patient and procedural factors while analyzing interdepartmental differences in rates of surgical infections: The Israeli study of surgical infection in abdominal operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Simchen; D. Zucker; Igra Y. Siegman; N. Galai

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method for analyzing differences in the performance of hospitals with respect to outcome by separating patient factors from procedural factors. The setting included a prospective follow-up of a sample of 5571 patients undergoing all types of surgical procedures in general surgery departments of 11 hospitals (20 surgical departments) across Israel. Of

  11. Development of a patient-specific surgical simulator for pediatric laparoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Saber, Nikoo R; Menon, Vinay; St-Pierre, Jean C; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James M; Cyril, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a pediatric patient-specific surgical simulator for the planning, practice, and validation of laparoscopic surgical procedures prior to intervention, initially focusing on the choledochal cyst resection and reconstruction scenario. The simulator is comprised of software elements including a deformable body physics engine, virtual surgical tools, and abdominal organs. Hardware components such as haptics-enabled hand controllers and a representative endoscopic tool have also been integrated. The prototype is able to perform a number of surgical tasks and further development work is under way to simulate the complete procedure with acceptable fidelity and accuracy. PMID:24732536

  12. [The surgical rehabilitation of the patients presenting with chronic suppurative epitympanitis].

    PubMed

    Kamalova, Z Z

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve the efficacy of the surgical treatment of the patients presenting with chronic suppurative epitympanitis. We compared morphological and surgical results of the surgical treatment of the patients with chronic suppurative epitympanitis divided into two groups. Those comprising group 1 underwent sanitation tympanoplasty by open surgery. The patients of group 2 were treated by sanitation surgery of the closed type with the reconstruction of the posterior wall of the external acoustic meauts and obliteration of the mastoid process using a cartilaginous implant in combination with simultaneous tympanoplasty. The surgical technique employed in this study is described. Analysis of the results obtained demonstrated the possibility of complete rehabilitation of the patients comprising group 2. PMID:23268246

  13. Oncologic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis.

  14. One-Year Survival after Surgical Treatment in UlCC-Classified Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Heise; H. Becker; F. Borchard; M. Krüger; H.-D. Röher

    1991-01-01

    In a recent patient cohort surgically treated for pancreatic cancer, the 1987 UICC classification was applied. One-year survival served as the sole parameter for evaluating its prognostic relevance as well as for measuring the impact of the kind of surgical treatment. Of 87 patients 39 (44.8%) were resected, 41 (47.1 %) underwent bypass surgery, and 7 (8.1 %) were only

  15. Surgical results of anterior corpectomy in the aged patients with cervical myelopathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Lu; Xiaotao Wu; Yonggang Li; Xiangfei Kong

    2008-01-01

    Retrospective study on the results of anterior corpectomy for the treatment of cervical myelopathy in patients over 70 years\\u000a old. To evaluate the surgical results of anterior corpectomy in aged patients with multilevel cervical myelopathy and to investigate\\u000a the probable pathomechanism by radiographic study. There are few data focused on the surgical results and post-operative complications\\u000a of anterior corpectomy in aged

  16. Nonadherence in Adolescent Oncology Patients: Preliminary Data on Psychological Risk Factors and Relationships to Outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beth D. Kennard; Sunita M. Stewart; Rebecca Olvera; Roger E. Bawdon; Ann O hAilin; Charles P. Lewis; Naomi J. Winick

    2004-01-01

    Published nonadherence rates in the adolescent oncology population range from 33 to 60% though little is known about the psychological factors that contribute to adherence and the relationship between outcome and nonadherence. Our study was designed to investigate psychological and family factors related to adherence and the relationship between adherence and survival in this population. We evaluated 44 (27 males,

  17. Experiences of patients with cancer and their nurses on the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in oncology units

    PubMed Central

    Rassouli, Maryam; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ghahramanian, Akram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Nikanfar, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although nurses acknowledge that spiritual care is part of their role, in reality, it is performed to a lesser extent. The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses’ and patients’ experiences about the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in the oncology units of Tabriz. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in the oncology units of hospitals in Tabriz. Data were collected through purposive sampling by conducting unstructured interviews with 10 patients and 7 nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: Three categories emerged from the study: (1) “perceived barriers for providing spiritual care” including “lack of preparation for spiritual care,” “time and space constraints,” “unprofessional view,” and “lack of support”; (2) “communication: A way for Strengthening spirituality despite the limitations” including “manifestation of spirituality in the appearances and communicative behaviors of nurses” and “communication: Transmission of spiritual energy”; and (3) “religion-related spiritual experiences” including “life events as divine will and divine exam,” “death as reincarnation,” “trust in God,” “prayer/recourse to Holy Imams,” and “acceptance of divine providence.” Although nurses had little skills in assessing and responding to the patients’ spiritual needs and did not have the organizational and clergymen's support in dealing with the spiritual distress of patients, they were the source of energy, joy, hope, and power for patients by showing empathy and compassion. The patients and nurses were using religious beliefs mentioned in Islam to strengthen the patients’ spiritual dimension. Conclusions: According to the results, integration of spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing is recommended. Patients and nurses can benefit from organizational and clergymen's support to cope with spiritual distress. Researchers should provide a framework for the development of effective spiritual interventions that are sensitive to cultural differences. PMID:25709687

  18. Surgical options for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jörg Lützner; Philip Kasten; Stephan Kirschner; Klaus-Peter Günther

    2009-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a progressive disease that ultimately damages the entire joint. Knee OA should initially be treated conservatively, but surgery should be considered if symptoms persist. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, osteotomy and knee arthroplasty; determining which of these procedures is most appropriate will depend on several factors, including the location and severity of

  19. A graph-grammar approach to represent causal, temporal and other contexts in an oncological patient record.

    PubMed

    Müller, R; Thews, O; Rohrbach, C; Sergl, M; Pommerening, K

    1996-06-01

    The data of a patient undergoing complex diagnostic and therapeutic procedures do not only form a simple chronology of events, but are closely related in many ways. Such data contexts include causal or temporal relationships, they express inconsistencies and revision processes, or describe patient-specific heuristics. The knowledge of data contexts supports the retrospective understanding of the medical decision-making process and is a valuable base for further treatment. Conventional data models usually neglect the problem of context knowledge, or simply use free text which is not processed by the program. In connection with the development of the knowledge-based system THEMPO (Therapy Management in Pediatric Oncology), which supports therapy and monitoring in pediatric oncology, a graph-grammar approach has been used to design and implement a graph-oriented patient model which allows the representation of non-trivial (causal, temporal, etc.) clinical contexts. For context acquisition a mouse-based tool has been developed allowing the physician to specify contexts in a comfortable graphical manner. Furthermore, the retrieval of contexts is realized with graphical tools as well. PMID:8755386

  20. Relationship of different surgical margins with recurrence-free survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Weiyu; Pang, Xufeng; Guo, Weidong; Wu, Liqun; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the impact of different surgical margin and recurrence-free survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The data of 601 patients who underwent curative hepatectomy for HCC between January 1997 and December 2009 were analyzed. Milan group and exceeding Milan group were divided according to the Milan Criteria. Each of them was divided into 3 groups: group A (surgical margin ? 1 mm), group B (1 mm < surgical margin ? 9 mm) and group C (surgical margin ? 10 mm). The relationship between surgical margin and recurrence-free survival in different groups was analyzed. In Milan group recurrence-free survival of group C was more than group B and group B more than group A (P < 0.05). And in the exceeding Milan group recurrence-free surgical of group B was more than group A. There were no statistic differences within groups of B and C. Enlarging surgical margin may increase recurrence-free survival in HCC under Milan criteria.1mm in cases of exceeding Milan criteria may be regarded as the suitable surgical margin for operation of HCC.

  1. Taking care of older cancer patients: Results of a survey addressed to the Chiefs of the Medical Oncology Divisions in Italy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silvio Monfardini; L. Pasetto; A. Jirillo; N. Delai

    2006-01-01

    An open questionnaire on the management of older cancer patients in the Italian Divisions of Medical Oncology was sent to the Chiefs of the units in the last 4 months of the year 2004. One hundred and ninety-nine of 330 (60%) responded. The majority of the Medical Oncologists interviewed agreed that special therapeutic protocols were necessary for elderly cancer patients.

  2. Safety and treatment patterns of angiogenesis inhibitors in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: evidence from US community oncology clinics.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Bruce A; Jolly, Pradeep; Wang, Si-Tien; Fortner, Barry; Scott, Jeffrey; Gilmore, James; Neary, Maureen P; Duh, Mei Sheng

    2012-06-01

    Safety and treatment patterns of sunitinib and sorafenib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) had been previously reported using retrospective chart review of patients treated in US tertiary centers. Because practice patterns may vary between hospital- and office-based settings, this study examined safety and treatment patterns of these agents in US community oncology clinics. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 250 patients with mRCC treated at 18 community oncology clinics. Eligible patients were ?18 years old and received ?1 prescription for sunitinib (n = 131) or sorafenib (n = 119) as first-line anti-angiogenic treatment. Rates of adverse events (AEs) and treatment modifications were analyzed; reasons for treatment modifications were examined. Median duration of first-line sunitinib and sorafenib treatment was 5.9 and 5.5 months, respectively. Among patients treated with sunitinib and sorafenib, 86% (30%) and 87% (28%), respectively, experienced ?1 all-grade (grade 3/4) AE. The most common AEs were fatigue/weakness in sunitinib (all-grade: 42%; grade 3/4: 5%) and skin rash in sorafenib (all-grade: 35%; grade 3/4: 6%). Sixty-two and 64% of patients treated with sunitinib and sorafenib, respectively, had ?1 treatment modification due to AEs. Recorded AE rates in patients with mRCC treated with angiogenesis inhibitors in community practice tended to be lower than in tertiary centers, possibly due to shorter treatment duration. Rates of treatment modifications due to AEs tended to be higher in community practice. This study provides evidence from an office-based setting of unmet need for agents that may provide improved tolerability in mRCC. PMID:21479699

  3. Neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis: Experience with 100 consecutive surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard R. Ricketts; Matthew L. Jerles

    1990-01-01

    One hundred newborns with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) were treated surgically according to a uniform protocol between July, 1980 and June, 1988. The infants (53 females, 47 males) weighed between 600 and 3,800 g, averaging 1,500 g. Twenty-eight weighed less than or equal to 1,000 g, 38 weighed from 1,001 g to 1,500 g, and 34 weighed more than 1,500

  4. Facial aesthetic surgical goals in patients of different cultures.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Jones, Julian M

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of facial aesthetic surgery is to improve the patient's psychological well-being. To achieve this, the surgeon must understand the patient's body image and their aesthetic and psychological expectations. These factors must be judged in the context of their cultural background. The patient's cultural values must also be understood to optimize the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:25049120

  5. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76). Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers. PMID:25243153

  6. [Psychology of patient management: evaluation and quality assurance of psychosocial management in pediatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Kusch, M; Labouvie, H; Jäger, R S; Bode, U

    1997-02-01

    Since the introduction of health-care reform in Germany, quality assurance of inpatient care is required. In paediatric oncology this also includes quality assurance measures of psycho-social care. Care Psychology deals with the development, testing and continual improvement of high-quality psycho-social care. Based on clinical experience, scientific knowledge and ascertained requirements a handbook and manual of service delivery of psycho-social care is formulated and tested in everyday practice. Service performance analyses are carried out, and verified improvements are re-tested in practice. This, as well as additional attempts, should lead to total quality management (TQM) of psycho-social care in paediatric oncology according to the criteria of the European Foundation of Quality Management (EFQM). PMID:9156631

  7. Pretreatment factors significantly influence quality of life in cancer patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Movsas, Benjamin [Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)]. E-mail: bmovsas1@hfhs.org; Scott, Charles [RTOG Headquarters, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Purpose The purpose of this analysis was to assess the impact of pretreatment factors on quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients. Methods and Materials Pretreatment QOL (via Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy [FACT], version 2) was obtained in 1,428 patients in several prospective Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials including nonmetastatic head-and-neck (n = 1139), esophageal (n = 174), lung (n = 51), rectal (n = 47), and prostate (n = 17) cancer patients. Clinically meaningful differences between groups were defined as a difference of 1 standard error of measurement (SEM). Results The mean FACT score for all patients was 86 (20.7-112) with SEM of 5.3. Statistically significant differences in QOL were observed based on age, race, Karnofsky Performance Status, marital status, education level, income level, and employment status, but not by gender or primary site. Using the SEM, there were clinically meaningful differences between patients {<=}50 years vs. {>=}65 years. Hispanics had worse QOL than whites. FACT increased linearly with higher Karnofsky Performance Status and income levels. Married patients (or live-in relationships) had a better QOL than single, divorced, or widowed patients. College graduates had better QOL than those with less education. Conclusion Most pretreatment factors meaningfully influenced baseline QOL. The potentially devastating impact of a cancer diagnosis, particularly in young and minority patients, must be addressed.

  8. Surgical and prosthetic management of a complex edentulous patient for fabrication of complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Comut, A Alper; Somohano, Tanya

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication of well-fitting complete dentures becomes a challenge in the presence of epulis fissuratum in the maxilla or severely resorbed alveolar tissue in the mandible. This clinical report describes the surgical and prosthetic treatment of a patient who presented with both problems. The neutral zone technique was used to improve the stability of the mandibular complete denture. Both dentures were fabricated prior to surgical excision of the epulis fissuratum and inserted immediately following the surgery. PMID:25928971

  9. Macular translocation for surgical management of subfoveal choroidal neovascularizations in patients with AMD: first results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastian Wolf; Alexandra Lappas; Andreas W. A. Weinberger; Bernd Kirchhof

    1999-01-01

    ·   Background: At present no satisfying treatment for subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related\\u000a macular degeneration (AMD) is available. Visual results after successful surgical removal of subfoveal CNV are disappointing.\\u000a This has been explained by a primary dysfunction of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the macular region and the surgical\\u000a trauma to the RPE in patients with AMD.

  10. Physician-accompanied transport of surgical intensive care patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Murray J. Girotti; Giuseppe Pagliarello; Thomas R. Todd; Wilfred Demajo; John Cain; Paul Walker; Alec Patterson

    1988-01-01

    During a one-year period, 107 critically ill adult patients were transferred by a physician-accompanied transport system (PATS).\\u000a Most patients required both tracheal intubation (82 per cent) and mechanical ventilation (71 per cent), while continuous vasopressor\\u000a support was required in 27 per cent of transfers. Patients were classified as either potential organ donors (n = 21) or nondonor\\u000a patients (n =

  11. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  12. Post-surgical neuromas in patients with total alloplastic temporomandibular joint reconstruction: a retrospective case series

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. Granquist; J. C. Chou; H. Giannakopoulos; V. A. Livolsi; P. D. Quinn

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated pain scores and maximal incisal opening (MIO) in patients with total alloplastic temporomandibular joints found to have post-surgical neuromas following revision arthroplasty, compared with patients who underwent revision arthroplasty without neuromas. 19 cases were reviewed of which 11 had neuromas excised. Data were available for 8 cases in the immediate postoperative period and 7 cases had follow-up

  13. Surgical treatment of redisplaced fractures of the distal radius in patients older than 60 years

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jesse B. Jupiter; David Ring; Paul P. Weitzel

    2002-01-01

    Twenty patients aged 60 years or older (average age, 68 y) presented to our institution with a distal radius fracture made complex by virtue of displacement after a closed reduction and cast or external fixation immobilization. Ten of the fractures were volarly angulated and 10 were dorsally angulated. Fifteen patients' hands had associated soft-tissue swelling. Surgical exposure and stable internal

  14. Impact of Fluconazole Prophylaxis on Cortisol Levels in Critically Ill Surgical Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shelley S. Magill; Thanyawee Puthanakit; Sandra M. Swoboda; Kathryn A. Carson; Roberto Salvatori; Pamela A. Lipsett; Craig W. Hendrix

    2004-01-01

    Fluconazole is widely used in the intensive care unit for prevention and treatment of fungal infections. Case reports have described an association between fluconazole and adrenal dysfunction, an important cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. We sought to determine whether 400 mg of fluconazole per day administered to critically ill surgical patients was associated with a reduction

  15. [Correlation of computer tomography findings with surgical findings in patients with myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Adámek, S; Schützner, J; Seidl, Z; Smat, V; Pit'ha, J

    1996-05-01

    A group of patients with myasthenia gravis operated at the Third Surgical Clinic, Faculty Hospital had in 20.5% a thymoma. Before operation CT did not detect the thymoma in 13.8% of the thymomas detected during operation and verified by histological examination. This fact must be taken into account when indicating conservative treatment in a myasthenic patient. PMID:8769003

  16. Investigational tests and treatments performed in terminal stage cancer patients in two weeks before death: Turkish oncology group (TOG) study.

    PubMed

    Türker, ?brahim; Kömürcü, ?eref; Ar?can, Ali; Doruk, Hatice; Özy?lkan, Özgür; Co?kun, Hasan ?enol; Colak, Dil?en; Üçgül Çavu?o?lu, Emel; Ata, Alper; Sezer, Ahmet; Ye?il Ç?nk?r, Havva; ?enler, Filiz Cay; Arpac?, Fikret

    2014-12-01

    Although more palliative care is necessary for terminally ill cancer patients, excess investigational tests, invasive procedures, and treatments are given instead. Between November 2009 and December 2013, six hundred and twenty-four patients with end-stage cancer who were died at inpatient setting evaluated retrospectively. Patients' characteristics, sites of tumor and metastasis, tests and invasive procedures, treatments performed in the last 2 weeks before death were collected from the hospital files and analyzed. Median age of 624 patients was 58 (range 16-96) years. More than half of the patients (370, 59.3%) were men. The most frequent cancer sites were gastrointestinal (GI) system (32.2%), lung (24.0%), and breast (11.1%). Frequent metastatic sites were liver (34.8%), bone (31.5%), lung (23.3%), and/or brain (16.9%). Causes of death were respiratory failure, infections, and/or liver failure in 49.9, 23.9, and 19.4% of patients, respectively. Radiological tests performed in the last 2 weeks before death were ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scan in 25.6, 16.3, 11.4, and 3.8% of patients, respectively. Treatments received were intravenous (i.v) serum infusion, blood transfusion, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), human albumin infusion in 55.9, 44.1, 34.9, and 9.5% of patients, respectively. Invasive procedures such as invasive pain relief, terminal sedation, and chemotherapy performed in 12.6, 4.4, and 10.0% of patients, respectively. Central venous catheter application, paracentesis, thoracentesis, and GI endoscopy were applied in 41.7, 9.8, 5.6, and 3.4% of the patients, respectively. Radiological tests, invasive procedures, TPN, and human albumin transfusion were used excessively in terminal stage cancer patients in our medical oncology inpatient clinics. Invasive pain relief and terminal sedation were still underused in our cancer clinics. There is an urgent need in developing national palliative care program to improve the understanding of end-of-life care in our medical oncology clinics. PMID:25412940

  17. Patterns of Care in Elderly Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Oncology Patients: A Single-Center Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Lockwood, Gina [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bayley, Andrew; Kim, John [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Cummings, Bernard [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dawson, Laura A.; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Witterick, Ian [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chen, Eric X. [Division of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ringash, Jolie, E-mail: Jolie.Ringash@rmp.uhn.on.c [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the patterns of care for elderly head-and-neck cancer patients with those of younger patients. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of all new mucosal head-and-neck cancer referrals to radiation oncology between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, treatment pattern, tolerance, and outcomes were compared between the elderly (aged {>=}75 years) and younger (aged <75 years) cohorts. Results: A total of 2,312 patients, including 452 (20%) elderly and 1,860 (80%) younger patients, were studied. The elderly patients were more likely to be women (36% vs. 27%, p <.01) and to have other malignancies (23% vs. 13%, p <.01), Stage I or II disease (38% vs. 32%, p <.01), and N0 status (56% vs. 42%, p <.01). Treatment was less often curative in intent (79% vs. 93%, p <.01). For the 1,487 patients who received definitive radiotherapy (RT), no differences were found between the elderly (n = 238) and younger (n = 1,249) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. Within the subset of 760 patients who received intensified treatment (concurrent chemoradiotherapy or hyperfractionated accelerated RT), no difference was seen between the elderly (n = 46) and younger (n = 714) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. After a median follow-up of 2.5 years, the 2-year cause-specific survival rate after definitive RT was 72% (range, 65-78%) for the elderly vs. 86% (range, 84-88%) for the younger patients (p <.01). Conclusion: Elderly head-and-neck cancer patients exhibited different clinical characteristics and experienced different patterns of care from younger patients. Although age itself was an adverse predictor of cause-specific survival, its effect was modest. Elderly patients selected for definitive RT or intensified RT showed no evidence of impaired treatment tolerance.

  18. [Efficiency of surgical treatment in patients with laryngeal cancer depending on age].

    PubMed

    Semczuk, B; Szmeja, Z; Janczewski, G; Olszewski, E; Kruk-Zagajewska, A; Horoch, A; Tryka, E; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, E; Sieradzki, A; Santor, A

    1997-01-01

    In the group of 578 patients with larynx cancer that underwent surgical treatment in four clinics of Medical Academies between 1986-87 a comparable analysis of the efficiency of surgical treatment depending on age of the operated patients was carried out. It was found that the difference between age average and the general state of patients was statistically highly important: Statistically significant was also the dependence between the patients' age and the postoperative complications; close to importance was also the dependence between the age and the survival period of patients. 68% of operated patients up to 65 year of age had five-year survival period without any symptoms; but in the group of patients over 65 years of age the analogical survival value was 51%. PMID:9518309

  19. Patient-specific mathematical neuro-oncology: using a simple proliferation and invasion tumor model to inform clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Pamela R; Juliano, Joseph; Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; Rockne, Russell C; Swanson, Kristin R

    2015-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor associated with a poor median survival of 15-18 months, yet there is wide heterogeneity across and within patients. This heterogeneity has been the source of significant clinical challenges facing patients with GBM and has hampered the drive toward more precision or personalized medicine approaches to treating these challenging tumors. Over the last two decades, the field of Mathematical Neuro-oncology has grown out of desire to use (often patient-specific) mathematical modeling to better treat GBMs. Here, we will focus on a series of clinically relevant results using patient-specific mathematical modeling. The core model at the center of these results incorporates two hallmark features of GBM, proliferation [Formula: see text] and invasion (D), as key parameters. Based on routinely obtained magnetic resonance images, each patient's tumor can be characterized using these two parameters. The Proliferation-Invasion (PI) model uses [Formula: see text] and D to create patient-specific growth predictions. The PI model, its predictions, and parameters have been used in a number of ways to derive biological insight. Beyond predicting growth, the PI model has been utilized to identify patients who benefit from different surgery strategies, to prognosticate response to radiation therapy, to develop a treatment response metric, and to connect clinical imaging features and genetic information. Demonstration of the PI model's clinical relevance supports the growing role for it and other mathematical models in routine clinical practice. PMID:25795318

  20. [Objective assessment of symptoms and informing patients of surgical risks].

    PubMed

    de Tayrac, Renaud; Letouzey, Vincent; Marès, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Genital prolapse is a functional pathology presenting with numerous urinary, genito-sexual, and anorectal symptoms. These symptoms are responsible for an alteration of the quality of life, sometimes associated to a real anxiety-depressive syndrome. Because of these complex intricacies, the management of these disorders became multidisciplinary. Tools to measure the impact of prolapse symptoms on the quality of life became a necessity. Such instruments should allow a correlation of the functional symptomatology at the anatomic stage, raise a surgical indication based on the functional disturbance and evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of the various therapeutic procedures. Two validated self-questionnaires in French (short versions of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory [PFDI-20] and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire [PFIQ-7]) are presently available. Moreover, the physician has the legal obligation to provide detailed presurgical information on frequent and severe hazards, expected benefits, functional consequences, therapeutic alternatives and the consequences of nonintervention. Before surgery takes place, the surgical approach, the benefit of using synthetic prostheses, the possibility of uterine and/or ovarian conservation, and some risky conditions such as smoking, obesity and estrogen deficiency should be discussed. PMID:24260838

  1. Impact of total activity variation in 18F-FDG injected with the overall PET image quality in oncology patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishar, H.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Salasiah, M.; Noramaliza, M. N.; Abdul Jalil, N.

    2013-05-01

    The preliminary study aims to investigate whether variation on dose activity 18F-FDG will influence the overall PET image quality in oncology patients. This is a retrospective analysis of 10 oncology patients who were injected with an average of 337.40 ± 38.43 MBq of 18F-FDG for PET/CT whole body examination. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on total activity of 18F-FDG injected: less than 333 MBq (302.96±12.65 MBq) (group 1) and more than 333 MBq (371.85±14.00 MBq) (group 2). Multiple Image Projection (MIP) PET images were scored visually by two qualified nuclear radiologists using a two-point scoring scale (poor and excellent). The agreement between radiologists was analysed using kappa measure of agreement (K). The prediction on poor-to-excellent PET image by the total activity of 18F-FDG injected was analysed using a Chi-squared test (x2). A p value of < 0.05 was considered significant. Agreement on PET image scoring was substantial, with a kappa value of 0.737. However, the prediction of the PET image quality by the total activity injected has been found to be insignificant (p > 0.05). Therefore, there is no strong evidence suggest that the dose injected will influence the PET image quality. Hence, it is recommended to use low-dosed of 18F-FDG technique as it also potentially yields a comparable PET image and reduces radiation burden to the patients.

  2. Surgical Strategy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients with Portal/Hepatic Vein Tumor Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Sun; Qing, Li; Zhongyuan, Yang; Ming, Shi; Wei, Wei; Rongping, Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background Portal/hepatic vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT/HVTT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a sign of advanced stage disease and is associated with poor prognosis. This study investigated the surgical outcomes of patients with HCC and PVTT/HVTT to determine the most appropriate surgical treatment strategy for these patients. Materials and Methods The study population included 77 HCC patients from January 2004 to June 2009 who underwent hepatectomy in our department and were diagnosed with PVTT/HVTT based on pathological examination. The patients were divided into two groups: in group 1, PVTT/HVTT was located in the hepatic resection area and removed with the tumor en bloc (38 cases); in group 2, PVTT/HVTT was beyond the resection line and removed by suction or thrombectomy (39 cases). Concerning the factor of surgical margins, the patients were further divided into four subgroups: group 1A: patients in group 1 with surgical margins ?1 cm (28 cases); group 1B: patients in group 1 with surgical margins >1 cm (9 cases); group 2A: patients in group 2 with surgical margins ?1 cm (28 cases); and group 2B: patients in group 2 with surgical margins >1 cm (9 cases). Results Most of the characteristics of groups 1 and 2 were similar. Patients in group 2 had significantly higher median blood loss (p=0.002) and higher blood transfusion rate (p=0.002) during the operation, which were not considered prognostic factors (p=0.323 and 0.571, respectively). The median overall survival (OS) duration in group 1 was significantly longer than that in group 2 (14.3 vs. 10.4 months, p=0.047). The median OS durations in groups 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B were 14.3, 42.7, 7.5, and 18.0 months, respectively, which were significantly different(p=0.018). Conclusions When PVTT/HVTT is located in the hepatic resection area and removed with the tumor en bloc, the median OS duration is longer. Based on this finding, widening the surgical margins when technically possible may increase OS. PMID:26076461

  3. Touch. The beneficial effects for the surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Tovar, M K; Cassmeyer, V L

    1989-05-01

    Touch can cause positive or negative neurophysiological responses. In the OR, nurses do a great deal of touching, and they need to be aware of the appropriateness of their touch. Touch can be an alternative mode of conveying empathy and caring for certain patients when it is difficult for the nurse to communicate verbal empathy. Touch assessments and interventions need to be included in perioperative nursing care plans to promote the patient's comfort and avoid unwanted physiological responses from the patient. PMID:2729967

  4. Identifying Health Literacy and Health System Navigation Needs Among Rural Cancer Patients: Findings from the Rural Oncology Literacy Enhancement Study (ROLES)

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Donate, Ana P.; Halverson, Julie; Simon, Norma-Jean; Strickland, Jeanne Schaaf; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Smith, Paul D.; Linskens, Rebecca; Wang, Xinyi

    2013-01-01

    Rural residence is associated with disparities in cancer-related outcomes. Guided by the Chronic Care Model (CCM), the Rural Oncology Literacy Enhancement Study (ROLES) assessed health literacy and patient navigation needs among rural cancer patients. A mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) approach was used, including: in-depth interviews, health literacy assessments, and phone surveys with cancer patients (N=53) from 5 oncology clinics in rural Wisconsin; focus groups and selfadministered surveys with staff (N=41) in these clinics. Within four dimensions of the CCM (community resources, self-management support, delivery system design, and decision support), this study uncovered multiple unmet navigation needs, health literacy limitations, and barriers to quality cancer care. System-level implementation of patient navigation and health literacy best practices could contribute to improved cancer care and patient outcomes among rural populations. Further research identifying effective interventions that reduce cancer disparities among rural cancer patients is necessary. PMID:23813542

  5. Clinical-surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder in a psoriatic arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Condylotomy is a surgical procedure that has been used as an option to treat temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. This technique has the advantage of avoiding intra-capsular alterations that might be found involving other surgical procedures. Its use, even when unilateral, has positive effect on treatment of both joints. Methods In order to better evaluate the benefits of a clinical-surgical treatment for TMD, the present report describes the case of a psoriatic arthritis patient. The case was clinically characterized by dental malloclusion, and imaging exams showed joint degeneration of the right mandibular condyle. The patient was treated by condylotomy technique after a prosthetic oral rehabilitation. Results No clinical-radiological signs or symptoms of progression of articular disease were observed within a period of 16 months after surgery. Furthermore, there was functional stability of the temporomandibular joint, total absence of local pain and improvement of mouth opening. Conclusion The present study suggests that condylotomy can be considered as a valid option for the management of TMD, since it has low surgical morbidity and favorable clinical outcomes. In this case, the patient had a medical diagnosis of systemic disease presenting general pain and pain at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in addition of causal agent of TMD (dental malloclusion). The difficulty of finding a single etiology (malocclusion vs. systemic disease) did not exclude the indication of a clinical-surgical treatment to re-establish the balance of TMJ. PMID:23556553

  6. Surgical treatment of multiple knee ligament injuries in 44 patients: 2–8 years follow-up results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matheus Tzurbakis; Andreas Diamantopoulos; Theodoros Xenakis; Anastasios Georgoulis

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the mid-term results of surgical treatment in different groups of patients with multiple knee ligament injuries. Review of our patients’ records revealed that 48 acute and chronic patients were surgically treated for combined knee injury. Due to severe capsular damage in these injuries, open techniques were used. In our treatment protocol, avulsed

  7. Conservative Surgical Treatment of Infected Ulceration of the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint With Osteomyelitis in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Dalla Paola, Luca; Carone, Anna; Morisi, Claudio; Cardillo, Sara; Pattavina, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Ulceration of the plantar aspect of the first metatarsophalangeal joint is a common localization in the diabetic foot. Conservative treatment of this lesion is a challenging problem, performed through the soft tissues and osseous debridement. The present study included a cohort of 28 patients affected by diabetes mellitus and a first ray lesion penetrating the bone. After surgical debridement with removal of the infected bone, we positioned antibiotic-loaded bone cement and stabilized the treated area with an external fixator. All patients with critical limb ischemia had their vascular disease treated before the procedure. The mean follow-up was 12.2 ± 6.9 months. Four patients developed a relapse of the ulceration after the procedure. In the postoperative period, 1 patient (3.57%) developed dehiscence of the surgical site and underwent a second procedure. In the follow-up period, 2 patients (7.14%) experienced bone cement dislocation. In 1 of these patients, a new ulceration was observed dorsally to the surgical site. The approach was surgical revision with bone cement replacement and stabilization with a new external fixator. In the other patient, given the absence of ulcerations, the cement was removed, and arthrodesis with internal stabilization using 2 cannulated screws was performed. One patient (3.57%), who had developed a relapse of ulceration after recurrent critical ischemia, underwent a percutaneous revascularization procedure and transmetatarsal amputation. During the follow-up period, no ulceration recurrences, transfer ulcerations, shoe fit problems, or gait abnormalities were detected in the other 24 patients. Our study presents the results of a technique requiring a 1-stage surgical approach to a relatively common problem, which is often difficult to solve. PMID:25249400

  8. Immediate nipple-areola-sparing mastectomy reconstruction: An update on oncological and reconstruction techniques

    PubMed Central

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Filassi, José Roberto; Gemperli, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is a safe technique in patients who are candidates for conservation breast surgery. However, there is worry concerning its oncological safety and surgical outcome in terms of postoperative complications. The authors reviewed the literature to evaluate the oncological safety, patient selection, surgical techniques, and also to identify the factors influencing postoperative outcome and complication rates. Patient selection and safety related to NSM are based on oncological and anatomical parameters. Among the main criteria, the oncological aspects include the clinical stage of breast cancer, tumor characteristics and location including small, peripherally located tumors, without multicentricity, or for prophylactic mastectomy. Surgical success depends on coordinated planning with the oncological surgeon and careful preoperative and intraoperative management. In general, the NSM reconstruction is related to autologous and alloplastic techniques and sometimes include contra-lateral breast surgery. Choice of reconstructive technique following NSM requires accurate consideration of various patient related factors, including: breast volume, degree of ptosis, areola size, clinical factors, and surgeon’s experience. In addition, tumor related factors include dimension, location and proximity to the nipple-areola complex. Regardless of the fact that there is no unanimity concerning the appropriate technique, the criteria are determined by the surgeon’s experience and the anatomical aspects of the breast. The positive aspects of the technique utilized should include low interference with the oncological treatment, reproducibility, and long-term results. Selected patients can have safe outcomes and therefore this may be a feasible option for early breast cancer management. However, available data demonstrates that NSM can be safely performed for breast cancer treatment in selected cases. Additional studies and longer follow-up are necessary to define consistent selection criteria for NSM. PMID:25114861

  9. Thrombocytopenia following peritonitis in surgical patients. A prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Iberti, T J; Rand, J H; Benjamin, E; Gentili, D R; Gabrielson, G V; Berger, S R; Aufses, A H

    1986-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is commonly found in patients with serious infection. To investigate this phenomenon, 14 consecutive patients (68 +/- 10 years) who underwent laparotomy for bowel perforation and culture-proven peritonitis were prospectively studied. Ten noninfected laparotomy patients served as a control group. None of the 10 control patients developed thrombocytopenia. Of the infected group, 12 of 14 patients (85%) developed thrombocytopenia (less than 100,000/mm3). One patient (9%) developed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Of the remaining 11 patients with thrombocytopenia, platelet counts fell from preoperative level of 350,000 +/- 166,000 to 54,000 +/- 30,000 (p less than 0.001) and reached this nadir 4.3 +/- 2 days after surgery. There was no statistically significant difference in prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, or fibrinogen levels before versus after operation in this group. Bleeding times in seven patients were 5.5 +/- 2 minutes, and bone marrow examination in five patients with platelet counts of less than 50,000/mm3 revealed normal or increased megakaryocytes. No patient in this group bled, had medications held, or received platelet transfusions. Platelet counts increased greater than 100,000/mm3 at a mean of 8.9 +/- 4.1 days after operation. It is concluded that thrombocytopenia is common following surgery for intra-abdominal infection, is not usually associated with DIC, clinical bleeding, or coagulation abnormalities, does not commonly result from bone marrow suppression, and is transient and does not require routine platelet transfusions. PMID:2945517

  10. Surgical Management for Early-Stage Bilateral Breast Cancer Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing-yan; Quan, Chen-lian; Tan, Yu-long; Liu, Guang-yu; Shao, Zhi-min; Wu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the current surgical management strategy for bilateral breast cancer (BBC) patients and to assess the changes in this strategy in China. Methods This is a retrospective review of all patients with early-stage BBC who underwent surgical treatment at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between June 2007 and June 2014. Results A total of 15,337 patients with primary breast cancer were identified. Of these patients, 218 (1.5%) suffered from synchronous bilateral breast cancer (sBBC), and 296 (2.0%) suffered from metachronous bilateral breast cancer (mBBC). Patients with a lobular carcinoma component, those with estrogen receptor-positive cancer, and those with an accompanying sclerosing adenosis in the affected breast tended to develop BBC. The rates of bilateral mastectomy, breast conserving therapy, reconstruction, and combined surgeries were 86.2%, 6.4%, 3.7%, and 3.7%, respectively, for patients with sBBC and 81.1%, 4.4%, 3.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, for patients with mBBC. The interval between bilateral cancers, age at first diagnosis of breast cancer, histopathological type, and stage have significant impacts on the choice of surgery for patients with BBC. Conclusions Bilateral mastectomy was the dominant surgical management for patients with BBC in China, despite the increased application of breast reconstruction surgery observed in recent years. Bilateral prosthetic breast reconstruction was the ideal choice for patients with sBBC. Chinese surgeons should take responsibility for patient education and inform their patients about their surgical options. PMID:25874699

  11. How Closely Should We Follow Gastric Cancer Patients Following Surgical Resection?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sam S. Yoon

    2011-01-01

    The utility of intensive follow-up of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies following surgical resection has been a source of persistent debate. Most of the studies on this topic have been performed for patients with colorectal cancer, and the conclusions are mixed. In a meta-analysis of 8 randomized trials with 2923 colorectal cancer patients, more intensive follow-up was found to detect recurrences

  12. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  13. Surgical Resection of Lung Metastases: Results from 529 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Younes, Riad N.; Gross, Jefferson L.; Taira, Andrea M.; Martins, Andrea Aparecida C.; Neves, Giuliana Sigolo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to determine clinical, pathological, and treatment-relevant variables associated with long-term (90-month) overall survival in patients with lung metastases undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of patients who were admitted with lung metastases, and who underwent thoracotomy for resection, after treatment of a primary tumor. Data were collected regarding demographics, tumor features, treatment, and outcome. RESULTS: Patients (n = 529) were submitted to a total of 776 thoracotomies. Median follow-up time across all patients was 21.6 months (range: 0–192 months). The postoperative complication rate was 9.3%, and the 30-day mortality rate was 0.2%. The ninety-month overall survival rate for all patients was 30.4%. Multivariate analysis identified the number of pulmonary nodules detected on preoperative CT-scan, the number of malignant nodules resected, and complete resection as the independent prognostic factors for overall survival. CONCLUSION: These results confirm that lung metastasectomy is a safe and potentially curative procedure for patients with treated primary tumors. A select group of patients can achieve long-term survival after resection. PMID:19578657

  14. Surgical outcome and prognostic factors in patients with gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Kun Kuk; Lee, Jung Nam; Lee, Woon Kee; Chung, Min; Kim, Yeon Suk

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Gallbladder carcinoma is usually associated with an unfavorable prognosis, and the clinical outcome has not improved much. This study was conducted to evaluate outcomes with gallbladder carcinoma according to the type of surgery performed, and the prognostic factors for survival. Methods One hundred and six patients with gallbladder carcinoma, who underwent surgery for the purpose of curative resection between January 1999 and June 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Results Out of 106 patients, curative resection was achieved in 75 (70.8%). The cumulative 1-, 2- and 5-year survival rates of the gallbladder carcinoma patients were 93.4%, 80.9% and 63.0%, respectively. Radical resections, including extended cholecystectomy, were more beneficial for long term survival of patients. The 5-year survival rate in patients who underwent curative resection (56.9%) was significantly higher than in those who underwent palliative resection (0%, p=0.000). Multivariate analysis revealed that curative resection, preoperative CA19-9, T-stage, N-stage and differentiation of histology were independently significant prognostic factors. Conclusions Curative resection and early detection of patients with gallbladder carcinoma were the most important factors for long term survival. Radical resection improves survival for patients with localized gallbladder carcinoma and can help to access exact prognosis and treatments.

  15. High dependency care: impact of lack of facilities for high-risk surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. R. Loughrey; G. Fitzpatrick; J. Connolly; M. Donnelly

    2002-01-01

    Background  The difference between the level of care available on general ward areas and intensive care units (ICUs) has resulted in the\\u000a development of high dependency units (HDUs).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Aims  This study examined the current perioperative management techniques and clinical care settings of high-risk surgical patients\\u000a in a hospital without a HDU.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A prospective audit of high-risk surgical patients was performed over an

  16. Improving surgical patient flow in a congested recovery area

    E-print Network

    Schwartz, Trevor A

    2012-01-01

    The recent movement in healthcare reform requires hospitals to care for more patients while simultaneously reducing costs. Medical institutions can no longer afford to simply add beds and hire staff to increase capacity. ...

  17. Surgical treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in "Krokodil" drug addicted patients.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Yuri M; Hakobyan, Koryun A; Poghosyan, Anna Yu; Avetisyan, Eduard K

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective study of jaw osteonecrosis treatment in patients using the "Krokodil" drug from 2009 to 2013. On the territory of the former USSR countries there is widespread use of a self-produced drug called "Krokodil". Codeine containing analgesics ("Sedalgin", "Pentalgin" etc), red phosphorus (from match boxes) and other easily acquired chemical components are used for synthesis of this drug, which used intravenously. Jaw osteonecrosis develops as a complication in patients who use "Krokodil". The main feature of this disease is jawbone exposure in the oral cavity. Surgery is the main method for the treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in patients using "Krokodil". 40 "Krokodil" drug addict patients with jaw osteonecrosis were treated. Involvement of maxilla was found in 11 patients (27.5%), mandible in 21 (52.5%), both jaws in 8 (20%) patients. 35 Lesions were found in 29 mandibles and 21 lesions in 19 maxillas. Main factors of treatment success are: cessation of "Krokodil" use in the pre- (minimum 1 month) and postoperative period and osteonecrosis area resection of a minimum of 0.5 cm beyond the visible borders of osteonecrosis towards the healthy tissues. Surgery was not delayed until sequestrum formation. In the mandible marginal or segmental resection (with or without TMJ exarticulation) was performed. After surgery recurrence of disease was seen in 8 (23%) cases in the mandible, with no cases of recurrence in the maxilla. According to our experience in this case series, surgery is the main method for the treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in patients using "Krokodil". Cessation of drug use and jaw resection minimize the rate of recurrences in such patients. PMID:24969764

  18. [Intralobar pulmonary sequestration treated surgically in a patient with sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Sobczy?ski, R; Hawry?kiewicz, I; Pawlicka, L

    1997-01-01

    Pulmonary sequestration is an uncommon but clinically significant congenital malformation characterised by the presence of nonfunctioning lung tissue that receives its blood supply from anomalous systemic arteries and has no communication with the normal bronchial tree. We describe a patient with an intralobar pulmonary sequestration of the left lower lobe associated with sarcoidosis. The patient was treated successfully by resection of the lesion. The postoperative period was uneventful. We found no report where a pulmonary sequestration was associated with sarcoidosis. PMID:9289306

  19. Cultural differences in spiritual care: findings of an Israeli oncologic questionnaire examining patient interest in spiritual care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As professional spiritual care (chaplaincy) is introduced to new cultures worldwide, it bears examining which elements of screening and care are universal and, for those elements showing cultural difference, to study them in each culture. No quantitative spiritual care patient study had previously been done in Israel. Our objectives were twofold: 1) to examine who wants spiritual care in Israel, including demographic and clinical variables, and to compare against other results worldwide to further develop universal screening protocols 2) to see what patients want from spiritual care specifically in the Israeli setting. Methods Self-administered patient questionnaire examining spirituality/religiosity, interest in spiritual care (subdivided by type of care), and key demographic, social, and clinical data. The study setting was an Israeli oncology center at which spiritual care had been recently introduced. Results Data from 364 oncology patient questionnaires found 41% interest in spiritual care, as compared to 35%-54% in American studies. Having previously been visited by a spiritual caregiver predicted patient interest in further spiritual care (AOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.6), suggesting that the new service is being well-received. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis identified additional predictors of openness to receiving spiritual care: self-describing as somewhat/very spiritual vs. not spiritual (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.9 and 6.3, 95% CI 1.8-8.6 and 2.6-15.1) or traditional/religious vs. secular (AOR 2.2 and 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.6 and 1.1-4.0); and receiving one visit a week or less from family and friends (AOR 5.6, 95% CI 2.1-15.1). These findings are in line with previous American studies, suggesting universality across cultures that could be utilized in screening. Differences in demographic data and medical condition were not significant predictors of patient interest, suggesting a cultural difference, where age and education were predictors in the American context. Levels of interest in explicitly religious or spiritual support such as prayer or addressing religious/spiritual questions were much lower than in other cultures. Conclusions Results illustrate the demand for and satisfaction with the new Israeli service. The cross-cultural comparison found both culture-dependent and possibly universal predictors of patient interest, and found lower interest in Israel for explicitly religious/spiritual types of support. PMID:24708816

  20. SURgical interventions with FEIBA (SURF): international registry of surgery in haemophilia patients with inhibitory antibodies.

    PubMed

    Négrier, C; Lienhart, A; Numerof, R; Stephens, D; Wong, W Y; Baghaei, F; Yee, T T

    2013-05-01

    Factor VIII Inhibitor Bypassing Activity (FEIBA) can effectively achieve haemostasis in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. Further evaluation of FEIBA in surgical settings is of significant interest considering the relatively limited prospective data published to date. The aim of the study is to evaluate the perioperative efficacy and safety of FEIBA in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. Haemophilia patients with inhibitors who underwent surgical procedures and received FEIBA for perioperative haemostatic control were prospectively enrolled in an open-label, noninterventional, postauthorization study [SURgical interventions with FEIBA (SURF)]. Outcome measures included haemostatic efficacy, safety, FEIBA exposure and blood loss associated with the perioperative use of FEIBA. Thirty-five surgical procedures were performed at 19 centres worldwide in patients with congenital haemophilia A, congenital haemophilia B, or acquired haemophilia A. Haemorrhagic risk was severe in 37.1% (13 of 35) of the procedures, moderate in 25.7% (9 of 35) and mild in 37.1% (13 of 35). One moderate risk surgery was excluded from the efficacy analyses because it did not meet all protocol requirements. Haemostasis was judged to be 'good' or 'excellent' in 91.2% (31 of 34) of surgical procedures and 'fair' in 8.8% (3 of 34). Among the 12 adverse events, three were serious adverse events (SAEs), two of which were unrelated to FEIBA therapy; one SAE, a clot in an arteriovenous fistula, was deemed to be possibly related to therapy. This prospective investigation confirms that FEIBA can be safely and effectively used when performing surgical procedures in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. PMID:23282031

  1. Pretreatment Quality of Life Predicts for Locoregional Control in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Pajak, Thomas F. [Statistical Headquarters, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Konski, Andre A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Coyne, James C. [Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gwede, Clement K. [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Garden, Adam S. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Spencer, Sharon A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wallace Tumor Institute, Birmingham, AL (United States); Jones, Christopher [Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)], E-mail: bmovsas1@hfhs.org

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prospectively collected health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data from patients enrolled in two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group randomized Phase III head and neck cancer trials (90-03 and 91-11) to assess their value as an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control (LRC) and/or overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: HRQOL questionnaires, using a validated instrument, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H and N), version 2, were completed by patients before the start of treatment. OS and LRC were the outcome measures analyzed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Baseline FACT-H and N data were available for 1,093 patients and missing for 417 patients. No significant difference in outcome was found between the patients with and without baseline FACT-H and N data (p = 0.58). The median follow-up time was 27.2 months for all patients and 49 months for surviving patients. Multivariate analyses were performed for both OS and LRC. Beyond tumor and nodal stage, Karnofsky performance status, primary site, cigarette use, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and altered fractionation schedules, the FACT-H and N score was independently predictive of LRC (but not OS), with p = 0.0038. The functional well-being component of the FACT-H and N predicted most significantly for LRC (p = 0.0004). Conclusions: This study represents, to our knowledge, the largest analysis of HRQOL as a prognostic factor in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. The results of this study have demonstrated the importance of baseline HRQOL as a significant and independent predictor of LRC in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  2. Surgical resection of malignant gliomas-role in optimizing patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nic E

    2013-03-01

    Malignant gliomas represent one of the most devastating human diseases. Primary treatment of these tumours involves surgery to achieve tumour debulking, followed by a multimodal regimen of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Survival time in patients with malignant glioma has modestly increased in recent years owing to advances in surgical and intraoperative imaging techniques, as well as the systematic implementation of randomized trial-based protocols and biomarker-based stratification of patients. The role and importance of several clinical and molecular factors-such as age, Karnofsky score, and genetic and epigenetic status-that have predictive value with regard to postsurgical outcome has also been identified. By contrast, the effect of the extent of glioma resection on patient outcome has received little attention, with an 'all or nothing' approach to tumour removal still taken in surgical practice. Recent studies, however, reveal that maximal possible cytoreduction without incurring neurological deficits has critical prognostic value for patient outcome and survival. Here, we evaluate state-of-the-art surgical procedures that are used in management of malignant glioma, with a focus on assessment criteria and value of tumour reduction. We highlight key surgical factors that enable optimization of adjuvant treatment to enhance patient quality of life and improve life expectancy. PMID:23358480

  3. Surgical management and prognostic factors in patients with subungual melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, K M; el-Naggar, A; Ensign, L G; Ross, M I; Balch, C M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Forty-six cases of subungual melanoma were reviewed to identify significant clinicopathologic prognostic factors, determine the role of DNA content analysis in the biologic assessment of these tumors, and evaluate the effectiveness of amputation level, lymph node dissection (LND), and regional limb perfusion on the survival of these patients. BACKGROUND: Subungual melanoma is a unique and rare subtype of melanoma, constituting only 1% to 3% of cases. Thus, little is known about prognostic factors and optimal management of patients with this disease. Moreover, the appropriate level of amputation and LND and limb perfusion in the management of subungual melanoma remain controversial. METHODS: Forty-six patients underwent amputation alone or in combination with LND and/or regional limb perfusion for primary subungual melanoma. The effects of these treatment modalities and the prognostic significance of patient and tumor-related variables, including DNA flow cytometric data, on overall survival were assessed. RESULTS: Univariate statistical analysis identified six factors that significantly affected patient survival. They were stage at diagnosis (p = 0.0001), percentage of aneuploid cells (p = 0.01), presence of ulceration (p = 0.02) or bone invasion (p = 0.02), thickness of the primary lesion (p = 0.03), and percentage of cells in S-phase (p = 0.03). Multivariate analyses identified tumor stage and S-phase fraction as independent prognostic factors in these patients. Survival did not differ among patients who received amputation alone or those who underwent amputation in combination with LND or perfusion (p = 0.90); however, the use of limb perfusion reduced the incidence of locally recurrent disease. The level of amputation did not affect patient survival (p = 0.74) or the incidence of local recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: The study identified several significant prognostic factors, including DNA flow cytometric parameters, in patients with subungual melanoma. In addition, it showed that conservative amputation of the affected digit at the level of the proximal interphalangeal or metacarpophalangeal/metatarsophalangeal joint appears to be safe, provided that clear margins are obtained. Although isolated limb perfusion may reduce the incidence of local recurrence, LND, or limb perfusion in the routine management of subungual melanoma remains controversial. PMID:8129491

  4. Surgical Treatment of Patients with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shi-Yong; An, Ning; Fang, Xiang; Singh, Prabhdeep; Oommen, Joseph; Yin, Qing; Yang, Mei-Hua; Liu, Yong; Liao, Wei; Gao, Chang-Qing; Yang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a devastating and refractory generalized epilepsy affecting children and adolescents. In this study we report the results of resective surgery in 18 patients with LGS phenotype who underwent single-lobe/lesionectomy or multilobe resection plus multiple subpial transection and/or callosotomy. After surgery, seven patients became completely seizure-free (Engel Class I) and five almost seizure-free (Engel Class II). Additional four had significant seizure control (Engel Class III), and two had no change in seizure frequency (Engel Class IV). Of the 4 patients without any lesion on brain MRI, 2 ended with Engel Class II, 1 with III and the other with IV in Engels' classification. Mean intelligence quotient (IQ) increased from 56.1?±?8.1 (mean?±?SD) before operation to 67.4?±?8.2 (mean?±?SD) after operation, a significant improvement (P = 0.001). Results also indicated that the younger the patient at surgery, or the shorter the interval between onset of seizure and resective operation, the better the intellectual outcome. Our data suggest that resective epilepsy surgery can be successful in patients with LGS phenotype as long as the EEG shows dominance of discharges in one hemisphere and corresponding ipsilateral imaging findings, even with contralateral ictal discharges. PMID:22629163

  5. Prognostic impact of positive surgical margins in surgically treated prostate cancer: Multi-institutional assessment of 5831 patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre I. Karakiewicz; James A. Eastham; Markus Graefen; Ilias Cagiannos; Phillip D. Stricker; Eric Klein; Thomas Cangiano; Fritz H. Schröder; Peter T. Scardino; Michael W. Kattan

    2005-01-01

    ObjectivesTo assess the prognostic significance of a positive surgical margin in the radical prostatectomy specimen, and to test for the presence of statistically significant interactions between surgical margin status and select pathologic stage variables.

  6. Outcomes after Surgical Resection of Head and Neck Paragangliomas: A Review of 61 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Neskey, David M.; Hatoum, Georges; Modh, Rishi; Civantos, Francisco; Telischi, Fred F.; Angeli, Simon I.; Weed, Donald; Sargi, Zoukaa

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the postoperative functional outcome following surgical resection of paragangliomas in patients with and without preoperative cranial nerve dysfunction. Patients who underwent surgical resections of head and neck paragangliomas were reviewed with functional outcomes defined as feeding tube and/or tracheostomy dependence, need for vocal cord medialization, and incidence of cerebral vascular accidents as primary end points. Secondary end points included pre- and postoperative function of lower cranial nerves and the impact of this dysfunction on long-term functional status. Sixty-one patients were identified: 27 with carotid paraganglioma (CP), 21 with jugular paraganglioma (JP), 8 with tympanic paragangliomas, 4 with vagal paragangliomas (VPs), and 1 with aortopulmonary paraganglioma. Following resection, 8 patients were feeding tube dependent, 14 patients required vocal cord medialization, 2 patients suffered strokes, but no patients required tracheostomy tubes. Twenty percent of patients (4/20) with JP and postoperative cranial neuropathies were feeding tube dependent, and 80% of patients (4/5) with CP and postoperative cranial nerve dysfunction were feeding tube dependent. Cranial nerve deficits were more common in patients with JP relative to those with CP. However, when cranial nerve dysfunction was present, our patients with CP had a higher incidence of temporary feeding tube dependence. Overall, 98% of patients were able to resume oral nutrition. PMID:22451821

  7. Surgical Management of the Patient with an Implanted Cardiac Device

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, John D.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Chen, Jonathan; Spotnitz, Henry M.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Edwards, Niloo

    1999-01-01

    Objective To identify the sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) that may alter the performance of implanted cardiac devices and develop strategies to minimize their effects on patient hemodynamic status. Summary Background Data Since the development of the sensing demand pacemaker, EMI in the clinical setting has concerned physicians treating patients with such devices. Implanted cardiovertor defibrillators (ICDs) and ventricular assist devices (VADs) can also be affected by EMI. Methods All known sources of interference to pacemakers, ICDs, and VADs were evaluated and preventative strategies were devised. Results All devices should be thoroughly evaluated before and after surgery to make sure that its function has not been permanently damaged or changed. If electrocautery is to be used, pacemakers should be placed in a triggered or asynchronous mode; ICDs should have arrhythmia detection suspended before surgery. If defibrillation is to be used, the current flow between the paddles should be kept as far away from and perpendicular to the lead system as possible. Both pacemakers and ICDs should be properly shielded if magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, or radiation therapy is to be used. The effect of EMI on VADs depends on the model. Magnetic resonance imaging adversely affects all VADs except the Abiomed VAD, and therefore its use should be avoided in this population of patients. Conclusions The patient with an implanted cardiac device can safely undergo surgery as long as certain precautions are taken. PMID:10561087

  8. Factors influencing surgical outcome in patients with focal cortical dysplasia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Fauser; T Bast; D-M Altenmüller; J Schulte-Mönting; K Strobl; B J Steinhoff; J Zentner; A Schulze-Bonhage

    2008-01-01

    A total of 120 patients with histologically proven focal cortical dysplasias (FCD) were retrospectively analysed for prognostic factors for successful epilepsy surgery. Multivariate data analyses showed that older age at epilepsy surgery, occurrence of secondarily generalised seizures and a multilobar extent of the dysplasia were significant negative predictors. In univariate analyses, longer duration of epilepsy, need for intracranial EEG recordings

  9. Surgical nurses' different understandings of their interactions with patients: a phenomenographic study.

    PubMed

    Jangland, Eva; Larsson, Jan; Gunningberg, Lena

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and describe different ways surgical nurses understand their roles and interactions with patients and their families in a surgical care setting. The surgical nurse has an important role in supporting and encouraging the patient during the hospital stay. It can be a challenge for the nurse to quickly establish a trustful relationship with the patient. The assumption is that nurses' interactions with patients are affected by their understanding and expectations of the roles in the nurse-patient relationship. A qualitative interview approach was used and the interviews were analysed using the phenomenographic method. A strategic sample of 17 registered nurses in two hospitals in Sweden was interviewed. In the analysis four ways of understanding the nurse's role in interactions with the patient were identified: (A) Focusing on medical treatment, following prescribed instructions, and maintaining routines; (B) Providing information, giving service, and coordinating care and treatment; (C) Seeing patients as vulnerable people and helping and supporting them as individuals; and (D) Inviting patients to participate in the caring process and encouraging them to take responsibility in their own care. Seeing each patient as a person with individual needs and personal resources. The first way of understanding, A, focuses on the work task; the other three understandings focus on the patients, but differ in how the nurses see them as people. Understanding A represents a restricted and task-oriented approach, whereas the others are more patient-focused, but also more complex. To realise patient-centred care, nurses should pay attention to all aspects of the interaction. Nurses need to have time at ward meetings or in supervision to discuss and become aware of different ways of understanding their interactions and relationships with patients. In this way new areas of professional development may be opened up. PMID:21158890

  10. Establishing the surgical nurse liaison role to improve patient and family member communication.

    PubMed

    Herd, Hope A; Rieben, Melissa A

    2014-05-01

    Having clear personal communication with a surgical patient's family members decreases the anxiety and increases patient and family member satisfaction. Perioperative team members at one East Coast community hospital implemented a new approach to communication in the perioperative area to address patient satisfaction after patient survey scores declined in the areas of communication and calming fears. An additional consideration was the facility's plan to move to a new facility in which the surgical department would be split across two floors. A literature review revealed that adding a surgical nurse liaison can increase patient, family member, and staff member satisfaction. The administration approved creation of the position, with duties that included managing the waiting area, facilitating interaction between physicians and patients' family members, and assisting with family visits to the perianesthesia unit. After implementation of this position, results of surveys showed increases in patient satisfaction. One year after the position was established, staff members reported they were happy with the position as well. PMID:24766921

  11. The Pain Experience of Post Surgical Patients Following the Implementation of an Evidence-Based Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise Bédard; Margaret Ann Purden; Nicole Sauvé-Larose; Cynthia Certosini; Constance Schein

    2006-01-01

    Effective pain management has been shown to promote earlier mobilization, adequate rest, reduced hospital stays, postoperative complications, and costs. A multidisciplinary quality improvement team worked together to develop and implement a comprehensive evidence-based program for postoperative pain management. The purpose of this study was to assess surgical patients’ pain status, satisfaction, and beliefs with regard to pain management prior to

  12. A surgical gauze appearing as a retrocardiac mass in a patient after coronary artery bypass surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Unverdorben; Udo Bauer; Hartmut Oster; Hellmuth Kraska; Christian Vallbracht

    1999-01-01

    Five years after open chest surgery because of three vessel coronary artery disease a patient was referred for progressing dyspnea and recent onset of atrial fibrillation. A retrocardiac mass was detected on chest X-ray and echocardiography. On CT-scan, the inhomogenous tumor made the diagnosis of a retained surgical gauze likely. Through a left incision the sponge was removed uneventfully and

  13. On the Design of an Interactive, Patient-Specific Surgical Simulator for Mitral Valve Repair

    E-print Network

    On the Design of an Interactive, Patient-Specific Surgical Simulator for Mitral Valve Repair Neil A repair of the mitral valve is a difficult procedure that is often avoided in favor of less effective valve replacement because of the associated technical challenges facing non-expert surgeons

  14. Salem native invents pillow for post-surgical patients By Meg Hibbert

    E-print Network

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Salem native invents pillow for post-surgical patients By Meg Hibbert Garnette Helvey Bane isn't a typical inventor. Statistics show the "typical" one is male and in his 30s, according to Bane, a Salem native who now lives in Grenville, S.C. After having emergency open heart surgery in 2005, Bane invented

  15. Patient safety in surgery: non-technical aspects of safe surgical performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George G Youngson; Rhona Flin

    2010-01-01

    The performance of operative surgery has an understandable focus placed on dexterity, technical precision, as well as the choice of procedure. There is less appreciation of the cognitive and social skills of the individual surgeon and the effect that these have on the surgical team and on patient outcome. This article highlights that impact and explores the contribution of non-technical

  16. The Effectiveness of Adjunctive Hypnosis with Surgical Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guy H. Montgomery; Daniel David; Gary Winkel; Jeffrey H. Silverstein; Dana H. Bovbjerg

    2002-01-01

    Hypnosis is a nonpharmacologic means for managing adverse surgical side effects. Typically, reviews of the hypnosis literature have been narrative in nature, fo- cused on specific outcome domains (e.g., patients' self- reported pain), and rarely address the impact of differ- ent modes of the hypnosis administration. Therefore, it is important to take a quantitative approach to assess- ing the beneficial

  17. Increasing access to medical oncology consultation in older patients with stage II-IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jue Wang; Yong Fang Kuo; Jean Freeman; James S. Goodwin

    2008-01-01

    Background  Resectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was once considered a disease whose sole therapy was surgical resection. Therefore\\u000a it was managed by surgeons. However, with growing evidence of the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy, such patients should also\\u000a be evaluated by a medical oncologist.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, we identified 3,196 patients 66–85 years of\\u000a age

  18. Lesson in psycho-oncology.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jimmie C

    2002-01-01

    As a new subspecialty of oncology, psycho-oncology's emergent role reflects the growing interest and concern over the past 25 years, on the part of both oncologists and the general public, in the psychological, behavioral, and social factors related to cancer prevention and treatment. Today, total care of cancer patients must include concern for psychosocial well-being and management of distress must be fully integrated with the other aspects of the patient's treatment plan. Prevention efforts are rooted in the willingness and ability of individuals to change lifestyle and risk behaviors, and this has to be elucidated by research in psycho-oncology. Further, psycho-oncology advances theory and practice related to the effects of cancer on psychological function and provides expertise in the prevention of cancer. Thus, psycho-oncology has a unique role to play in cancer treatment and prevention. PMID:19266677

  19. The impact of surgical wait time on patient-based outcomes in posterior lumbar spinal surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason Braybrooke; Henry Ahn; Aimee Gallant; Michael Ford; Yigel Bronstein; Joel Finkelstein; Albert Yee

    2007-01-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted on patients undergoing posterior lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spinal\\u000a disorders. The study purpose was to evaluate the effect of wait time to surgery on patient derived generic and disease specific\\u000a functional outcome following surgery. A prolonged wait to surgery may adversely affect surgical outcome. Although there is\\u000a literature on the effect of wait

  20. Effect of severity of stress on whole-body protein kinetics in surgical patients receiving parenteral nutrition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsuguhiko Tashiro; Hideo Yamamori; Kazuya Takagi; Yuichi Morishima; Nobuyuki Nakajima

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to clarify the quantitative relationship between the alteration of protein metabolism and the severity of surgical stress to further understand the mechanisms of body nitrogen losses in surgical trauma. Twenty-one patients undergoing esophagectomy for esophageal cancer (group E), and 22 undergoing gastrectomy or colorectal operations for gastric or colorectal cancer (Group GC) were studied. All patients

  1. Detection of the Echinococcus granulosus diagnostic arc 5 in sera from patients with surgically-confirmed E. multilocularis infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. M. Varela-Díaz; J. Eckert; R. L. Rausch; E. A. Coltorti; U. Hess

    1977-01-01

    Summary The Echinococcus granulosus diagnostic arc 5 was revealed by sera from an Alaskan and a Swiss patient with surgically confirmed E. multilocularis infections. The possibility of each patient harboring a concurrent infection with both parasites may be disregarded on the basis of radiologic, scintillographic and surgical data. This conclusion is compatible with ecologic and epidemiologic considerations. These observations suggest

  2. Vertical maxillary growth after two different surgical protocols in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Bakri, Sherif; Rizell, Sara; Lilja, Jan; Mark, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Objective : The aim of the present study was to compare vertical maxillofacial growth in patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) who were treated using two different surgical protocols. Design : A retrospective cohort study. Subjects : We studied 92 patients with complete UCLP (61 male and 31 female) treated at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden: 46 consecutive patients born between 1965 and 1974 who underwent surgical treatment according to the Wardill-Kilner (W-K) protocol and 46 consecutive patients born between 1982 and 1989 who underwent surgical treatment according to the Gothenburg delayed hard palate closure (DHPC) protocol. Methods : We analyzed lateral cephalograms obtained at 10 years of age. Results : Patients treated according to the Gothenburg DHPC protocol had significantly greater anterior upper facial height, anterior maxillary height, overbite, and inclination of the maxilla than those treated with the W-K protocol. Both techniques led to similar posterior upper facial height. Conclusion : The Gothenburg DHPC protocol in patients with complete UCLP results in more normal anterior maxillary vertical growth and overbite and therefore increased maxillary inclination at 10 years of age. PMID:24144162

  3. High Mortality Rate for Patients Requiring Intensive Care After Surgical Revision Following Bariatric Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathalie Kermarrec; Jean-Pierre Marmuse; Judith Faivre; Sigismond Lasocki; Philippe Mognol; Denis Chosidow; Claudette Muller; Jean-Marie Desmonts; Philippe Montravers

    2008-01-01

    Background  To report the prognosis and management of patients reoperated for severe intraabdominal sepsis (IAS) after bariatric surgery\\u000a (S0) and admitted to the surgical intensive care unit (ICU) for organ failure.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A French observational study in a 12-bed adult surgical intensive care unit in a 1,200-bed teaching hospital with expertise\\u000a in bariatric surgery. From January 2001 to August 2006, 27 morbidly

  4. Surgical treatment strategies and outcome in patients with breast cancer metastatic to the spine: a review of 87 patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph A. Shehadi; Daniel M. Sciubba; Ian Suk; Dima Suki; Marcos V. C. Maldaun; Ian E. McCutcheon; Remi Nader; Richard Theriault; Laurence D. Rhines; Ziya L. Gokaslan

    2007-01-01

    Aggressive surgical management of spinal metastatic disease can provide improvement of neurological function and significant\\u000a pain relief. However, there is limited literature analyzing such management as is pertains to individual histopathology of\\u000a the primary tumor, which may be linked to overall prognosis for the patient. In this study, clinical outcomes were reviewed\\u000a for patients undergoing spinal surgery for metastatic breast

  5. Surgical results of anterior corpectomy in the aged patients with cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Xiaotao; Li, Yonggang; Kong, Xiangfei

    2008-01-01

    Retrospective study on the results of anterior corpectomy for the treatment of cervical myelopathy in patients over 70 years old. To evaluate the surgical results of anterior corpectomy in aged patients with multilevel cervical myelopathy and to investigate the probable pathomechanism by radiographic study. There are few data focused on the surgical results and post-operative complications of anterior corpectomy in aged patients with cervical myelopathy. Twenty patients 70 years of age or older who underwent anterior corpectomy, titanium mesh cage (TMC) reconstruction and anterior plate fixation for the treatment of compressive cervical myelopathy were reviewed. The average age at the time of operation was 75 years. Neurologic deficits before and after surgery were assessed using a scoring system proposed by the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA Score). Clinical results and post-operative complications were compared with those of patients 69 years old or younger as a control. Pre-operative Radiologic evaluation of every patient consisted of anterior-posterior, lateral, bilateral oblique, flextion, and extension radiographs, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine. Any factor causing spinal cord compression and the sign of cervical instability were recorded. Surgical-related complications occurred in seven patients in the aged group. The incidence of complications was 35% in the aged patient group and 9.7% in the control group respectively. Although the difference was striking, no statistical significance was found between the two groups. One patient died of respiratory failure resulting from pulmonary infection. The mortality rate was 5%. The pre-operative mean JOA score was 9.3 (from 3 to 14) in the aged patient group. Nineteen patients were followed at least 2 years and the mean JOA score was 13.4 (from 8 to 17). 68.4% of the aged patients achieved a good or excellent result. There was no statistical difference in the recovery rate of JOA score between the aged group (58.1%) and control group (67.0%). In the pre-operative radiographs, the incidence of cervical instability was much higher in the control group (32%) than in the aged group (5%) and multilevel cord compression caused by posterior disc space osteophytes was more common in the aged group. Anterior corpectomy combined with TMC fusion and plate fixation provides favorable neurologic recovery even in the patients over 70 years old. However, the incidence of surgical related complications shows a conspicuous increasing in the aged patients. Overcompensation mechanism for cervical instability is the probable cause of degenerative cervical spondylotic myelopathy in aged patients. PMID:17972117

  6. [Prevention and treatment of cardiac arrhythmia in patients with congenital heart defects: surgical aspects].

    PubMed

    Horke, Alexander; Tzanavaros, Ioannis

    2014-09-01

    Catheter ablation procedures have become established over the years due to their effectiveness and low invasiveness and have changed the indications for surgical treatment. The main field of activity of cardiac surgery remains the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects which show arrhythmia and necessitate surgical treatment. The combination of surgical ablative measures with a good view of the site using modern ablation instruments, atrial reduction by tissue resection and correction of the defect with the resulting volume relief, bring the best conditions for a curative treatment of arrhythmia. The same applies to the treatment of ventricular tachycardia resulting from old scars and residual defects. Special attention should be given to patients who received a Fontan conversion. This operation is a unique opportunity to relieve volume which in turn reduces the atrial size and at the same time to take ablative measures to restore sinus rhythm. The results are promising with low mortality and morbidity, high efficiency and finally a clear improvement of the functional status of patients. In appropriate cases minimally invasive surgical procedures can help where pharmacological and catheter ablation therapies remain ineffective. PMID:25164600

  7. AT NORTHWESTERN THORACIC ONCOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    cancer research recruitment, and growth in clinical trial volume; and · Enhancing the patient experience in thoracic oncology care delivery, clinical research, and education that draws upon the strengths of diverse-impact lung cancer research linked to innovative, compassionate, and personalized clinical care. THE CANCER

  8. Results of Surgical Treatment on Benign Anal Diseases in Korean HIV-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Perianal diseases are the most common reasons for surgery in HIV-positive patients. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of these surgical procedures in Korean patients, focusing on wound healing and postoperative complications. Retrospective analysis was performed on 72 HIV-positive patients who underwent surgery by a single surgeon for benign anal disease between 1998 and 2011. Of these, 68.1% (49/72) of patients received surgery for condyloma acuminata, 19.4% (14/72) for anal fistulas, 6.9% (5/72) for hemorrhoids, and 5.6% (4/72) for perianal abscesses. Patients with condyloma acuminata received surgical excision with electrical coagulation, and all wounds healed completely within 3 months, though 16.3% (8/49) of these patients experienced recurrence. Twelve of the 49 patients (24.5%) who were treated for condyloma acuminata underwent simultaneous operations for concomitant anal fistulas (n = 6), hemorrhoids (n = 4), and perianal abscesses (n = 2). Overall, 3 postoperative complications developed following a total of 94 procedures, and there was no significant increase in complication rate for patients with a low CD4+ T-cell count ( < 200/µL) compared to those with a higher count. The results demonstrate favorable results following perianal surgery in HIV-positive Korean patients. PMID:25246745

  9. Results of surgical treatment on benign anal diseases in Korean HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Oh, Heung-Kwon; Moon, Sang-Hui; Ryoo, Seungbum; Choe, Eun Kyung; Park, Kyu Joo

    2014-09-01

    Perianal diseases are the most common reasons for surgery in HIV-positive patients. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of these surgical procedures in Korean patients, focusing on wound healing and postoperative complications. Retrospective analysis was performed on 72 HIV-positive patients who underwent surgery by a single surgeon for benign anal disease between 1998 and 2011. Of these, 68.1% (49/72) of patients received surgery for condyloma acuminata, 19.4% (14/72) for anal fistulas, 6.9% (5/72) for hemorrhoids, and 5.6% (4/72) for perianal abscesses. Patients with condyloma acuminata received surgical excision with electrical coagulation, and all wounds healed completely within 3 months, though 16.3% (8/49) of these patients experienced recurrence. Twelve of the 49 patients (24.5%) who were treated for condyloma acuminata underwent simultaneous operations for concomitant anal fistulas (n = 6), hemorrhoids (n = 4), and perianal abscesses (n = 2). Overall, 3 postoperative complications developed following a total of 94 procedures, and there was no significant increase in complication rate for patients with a low CD4+ T-cell count ( < 200/µL) compared to those with a higher count. The results demonstrate favorable results following perianal surgery in HIV-positive Korean patients. PMID:25246745

  10. Surgical Management of Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Marfan Syndrome during Infancy and Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung Re; Kim, Woong-Han; Choi, Eun Seok; Cho, Sungkyu; Jang, Woo Sung; Kim, Yong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitral regurgitation is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity in pediatric patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this study was to contribute to determining the appropriate surgical strategy for these patients. Methods From January 1992 to May 2013, six patients with Marfan syndrome underwent surgery for mitral regurgitation in infancy or early childhood. Results The median age at the time of surgery was 47 months (range, 3 to 140 months) and the median follow-up period was 3.6 years (range, 1.3 to 15.5 years). Mitral valve repair was performed in two patients and four patients underwent mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. There was one reoperation requiring valve replacement for aggravated mitral regurgitation two months after repair. The four patients who underwent mitral valve replacement did not experience any complications related to the prosthetic valve. One late death occurred due to progressive emphysema and tricuspid regurgitation. Conclusion Although repair can be an option for some patients, it may not be durable in infantile-onset Marfan syndrome patients who require surgical management during infancy or childhood. Mitral valve replacement is a feasible treatment option for these patients. PMID:25705592

  11. Indication for surgical treatment in patients with adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis - a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Moramarco, Marc

    2013-01-01

    A recent literature search of the pertinent publications in the field revealed that there is poor evidence that would support surgical intervention in patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS). With complications estimated to exceed 50% over a lifetime, surgical intervention is unwarranted in the 'Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis' AIS population. In the relatively benign population of patients with AIS, according to the findings in literature, we may conclude that the long-term outcome of surgery for AIS creates a more negative end result over the course of a lifetime than the natural history of the condition itself.As a result, surgeons electing to recommend surgery are strongly advised to openly discuss and inform patients of the long-term probability of potential complications occurring after spinal fusion surgery, and document their explanations accordingly. PMID:23705983

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation for patients with degenerative surgical bioprosthetic valves.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Danny; Barbanti, Marco; Tan, John; Webb, John G

    2014-01-01

    Most surgical heart valves currently implanted are bioprosthetic tissue valves. Such valves deteriorate with time, eventually presenting with either stenosis or regurgitation. Reoperation, the current standard of care for failed valves, carries significant risk in terms of both morbidity and mortality. Implantation of a transcatheter valve inside a failed surgical valve (valve-in-valve procedure) has recently emerged as an alternative, less-invasive option. Although the procedure is similar in some aspects to transcatheter aortic valve implantation in the setting of native aortic valve stenosis, there are many differences that deserve special consideration. We review the potential and challenges of valve-in-valve implantation in patients with failing surgical aortic bioprostheses. PMID:24331437

  13. Can Robotic Thyroidectomy Be Performed Safely in Thyroid Carcinoma Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Young Jun; Youn, Yeo-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Since the adoption of the Da Vinci robotic system for remote access thyroid surgery, robotic thyroidectomy (RT) has become a popular surgical option for patients who want to avoid neck scars. Surgeons in South Korea pioneered this surgical technique and have reported successful outcomes. Although many studies have reported that RT is a feasible and safe therapeutic alternative, concerns over the surgical and oncological safety of RT remain. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of RT and compares the surgical safety and oncological completeness of RT with conventional open thyroidectomy. PMID:25309779

  14. Daily baseline skin care in the prevention, treatment, and supportive care of skin toxicity in oncology patients: recommendations from a multinational expert panel

    PubMed Central

    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Humbert, Phillipe; Krutman, Jean; Luger, Thomas; Triller, Raoul; Rougier, André; Seite, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Skin reactions due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy are a significant problem for an important number of cancer patients. While effective for treating cancer, they disturb cutaneous barrier function, causing a reaction soon after initiation of treatment that impacts patient quality of life. Managing these symptoms with cosmetics and nonpharmaceutical skin care products for camouflage or personal hygiene may be important for increasing patient self-esteem. However, inappropriate product choice or use could worsen side effects. Although recommendations exist for the pharmaceutical treatment of skin reactions, there are no recommendations for the choice or use of dermatologic skin care products for oncology patients. The present guidelines were developed by a board of European experts in dermatology and oncology to provide cancer care professionals with guidance for the appropriate use of non-pharmaceutical, dermocosmetic skin care management of cutaneous toxicities associated with radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, including epidermal growth factor inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. The experts hope that these recommendations will improve the management of cutaneous side effects and hence quality of life for oncology patients. PMID:24353440

  15. Concerns and motivations of skeletal Class III patients receiving orthodontic-surgical correction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y H; Hägg, U; Rabie, A B

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the impact of skeletal Class III malocclusion on patients' emotional status, as well as patients' motivations for seeking surgical correction of Class III malocclusion. The sample comprised 140 consecutive Chinese patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion who had been treated with a combined orthodontic-surgical approach. A retrospective analysis was performed, based on questionnaires with answers ranked on a numeric scale (O = not at all; 1 = a little; 2 = moderately; 3 = quite a bit; 4 = extremely). Sixty-seven percent of subjects (40 males and 54 females) returned completed questionnaires. Fifty-four percent had bimaxillary deformities, 32% had mandibular hyperplasia, and 14% had maxillary hypoplasia. Seventy-seven percent received bimaxillary surgery, 15% received maxillary advancement, and 8% received mandibular setback. The results showed that nearly half of the patients had a nickname related to their dentofacial problems, and 8 of 10 of these felt embarrassed or angry about their nickname. Ninety-three percent sought improvement of their facial appearance, 85% wanted an improvement in their dental appearance, and 73% desired an improvement in chewing ability. Seventy-six percent were concerned about surgical risks and 63% about possible pain. The vast majority of Class III patients undergoing orthognathic surgery suffered psychologic and functional problems related to their appearance prior to treatment. Esthetic improvement was the driving force behind seeking treatment. PMID:11563399

  16. Value of PCR in surgically treated patients with staphylococcal infective endocarditis: a 4-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zaloudíková, B; N?mcová, E; Pol, J; Sorm, Z; Wurmová, S; Novotná, K; Van?rková, M; Holá, V; R?ži?ka, F; Dušek, L; N?mec, P; Freiberger, T

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to establish a diagnostic value for broad-range polymerase chain reaction (br-PCR) and staphylococci-specific multiplex PCR (ssm-PCR) performed on surgical material from patients with staphylococcal infective endocarditis (IE). Data were analysed retrospectively from 60 patients with suspected staphylococcal IE and 59 controls who were surgically treated at three cardiosurgery centres over 4 years. Both PCR tests showed high agreement and could be aggregated. In patients with definite and rejected IE, the clinical sensitivity and specificity of PCR reached 89 and 95%, respectively. Tissue culture (TC) and PCR agreed with blood culture (BC) in 29% and 67% of IE cases. TC helped to determine aetiology in five BC negative cases while PCR aided in nine cases. Out of 52 patients with conclusive staphylococcal IE, 40 were diagnosed with S. aureus and 12 with coagulase-negative staphylococci. PCR was shown to be highly superior to TC in confirming preoperative diagnosis of IE. In addition to aid in culture negative patients, PCR helped to establish or refine aetiology in inconclusive cases. We suggest that simultaneous br-PCR and ssm-PCR performed on surgical material together with histopathology could significantly increase the performance of current Duke criteria. PMID:21964590

  17. Surgical management and palliative treatment in bronchial neuroendocrine tumours: a clinical study of 45 patients.

    PubMed

    Srirajaskanthan, R; Toumpanakis, C; Karpathakis, A; Marelli, L; Quigley, A M; Dusmet, M; Meyer, T; Caplin, M E

    2009-07-01

    Bronchial neuroendocrine tumours account for 1-2% of all lung cancers; they are thought to arise from the neuroendocrine cells located in the bronchial mucosa. The majority of the literature available comprises surgical series and there is a scarcity of data available for the management of patients with inoperable disease. We present a series of 45 patients referred to our institution from 1998 to 2006, with a mean follow-up of 54 months. Histological diagnosis from our department was available for 39 patients, with the remainder having had histological assessment performed previously. Typical carcinoid was present in 25 cases, atypical in 9 cases, large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma in 4 and 1 case of small cell lung carcinoma. All patients were staged at time of initial diagnosis with CT scan, in addition Octreoscans were performed when appropriate. Twenty-six of these 45 cases had unresectable disease, whilst the remainder were treated with surgical resection. Initial therapy with surgical resection was performed in 19 patients, 2 of whom had undergone neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Recurrence occurred in 7 (36.8%), average duration of disease-free survival post-surgery was 61 months. Chemotherapy was first line therapy in five cases, four achieved disease stabilization and one case had progressive disease. Somatostatin analogues were used as first line therapy in six patients, for symptom control and anti-tumour effect. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, with Yttrium-90 DOTA-Octreotate, was given in two cases, both of whom achieved disease stabilization for 9-12 months respectively. There was a significant difference between Stage 4 and Stage 1 disease at presentation and survival. In conclusion curative surgical resection is treatment of choice, however, chemotherapy, somatostatin analogues and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy offers palliation improving both symptoms and mortality. PMID:19070398

  18. Impact of medical therapy on patients with Crohn’s disease requiring surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Fu, YT Nancy; Hong, Thomas; Round, Andrew; Bressler, Brian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of medical therapy on Crohn’s disease patients undergoing their first surgical resection. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated all patients with Crohn’s disease undergoing their first surgical resection between years 1995 to 2000 and 2005 to 2010 at a tertiary academic hospital (St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada). Patients were identified from hospital administrative database using the International Classification of Diseases 9 codes. Patients’ hospital and available outpatient clinic records were independently reviewed and pertinent data were extracted. We explored relationships among time from disease diagnosis to surgery, patient phenotypes, medication usage, length of small bowel resected, surgical complications, and duration of hospital stay. RESULTS: Total of 199 patients were included; 85 from years 1995 to 2000 (cohort A) and 114 from years 2005 to 2010 (cohort B). Compared to cohort A, cohort B had more patients on immunomodulators (cohort A vs cohort B: 21.4% vs 56.1%, P < 0.0001) and less patients on 5-aminosalysilic acid (53.6% vs 29.8%, P = 0.001). There was a shift from inflammatory to stricturing and penetrating phenotypes (B1/B2/B3 38.8% vs 12.3%, 31.8% vs 45.6%, 29.4% vs 42.1%, P < 0.0001). Both groups had similar median time to surgery. Within cohort B, 38 patients (33.3%) received anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agent. No patient in cohort A was exposed to anti-TNF agent. Compared to patients not on anti-TNF agent, ones exposed were younger at diagnosis (anti-TNF vs without anti-TNF: A1/A2/A3 39.5% vs 11.8%, 50% vs 73.7%, 10.5% vs 14.5%, P = 0.003) and had longer median time to surgery (90 mo vs 48 mo, P = 0.02). Combination therapy further extended median time to surgery. Using time-dependent multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, patients who were treated with anti-TNF agents had a significantly higher risk to surgery (adjusted hazard ratio 3.57, 95%CI: 1.98-6.44, P < 0.0001) compared to those without while controlling for gender, disease phenotype, smoking status, and immunomodulator use. CONCLUSION: Significant changes in patient phenotypes and medication exposures were observed between the two surgical cohorts separated by a decade. PMID:25206286

  19. Predictive factors for complications in elderly patients who underwent head and neck oncologic surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alvaro Sanabria; André L. Carvalho; Rosana L. Melo; José Magrin; Mauro K. Ikeda; José G. Vartanian; Luiz P. Kowalski

    2008-01-01

    Background. Postoperative complications are rele- vant outcomes in patients with head and neck tumor who have undergone surgery. Few trials have assessed predictive factors in older patients. We assessed the predictive effect of preopera- tive clinical factors on postoperative complications. Methods. We conducted a cohort study with 242 patients older than 70 years with head and neck cancer who underwent

  20. Prognostic Value of Anatomical Dominance of Coronary Circulation in Patients with Surgical Myocardial Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Omerbasic, Edin; Hasanovic, Aida; Omerbasic, Amir; Pandur, Sanko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study evaluated the frequency of domination of the coronary arteries types in patients treated by surgical myocardial revascularization. The aim of the study was to determine whether the left coronary circulation dominance is a prognostic factor for poorer outcome in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Material and methods: A total sample consisted of 100 patients with coronary artery disease that were treated with coronary artery bypass grafting at the Clinic for Cardiac Surgery, Clinical Center of the University of Sarajevo. To all patients on the basis of preoperative coronary angiography was determined the dominance of the coronary arteries. Patients included in the study were divided into two groups, with the left and right with coronary dominance. Results: Left coronary dominance in a sample of patients was present in 21/100 (21%), right in 69/100 (69%) and balanced in 10/100 (10%) cases. Female gender was significantly more frequent in patients with left coronary dominance and proved to be a stronger predictor of poorer outcome, especially in combination with left main stenosis of the left coronary artery and left coronary dominance. Inability of revascularization of the r. interventricularis posterior (RIVP) was statistically significantly higher in case of left dominance 9/21 (42.9%), compared to the right 16/79 (20.3%), p=0.033. Lethal outcome was more common in case of left dominance in relation to the right (9.4% vs 0.9%). The incidence of surgical complications, respiratory, neurological and renal complications was not significantly different between groups, while the length of hospital stay was significantly higher in the group of patients with left dominance, p = 0.003. Conclusion: Left coronary dominance is an important risk factor for patients undergoing surgical myocardial revascularization. PMID:25870467

  1. Common Features in Patients With Superior Canal Dehiscence Declining Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Benamira, Lina Zahra; Maniakas, Anastasios; Alzahrani, Musaed; Saliba, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Background Superior canal dehiscence (SCD) is a benign condition in which a surgical treatment may be considered depending on the patients’ tolerance of their symptoms. In this study, we aim to identify driving factors behind the patients’ choice of a surgical management over watchful waiting. Methods Sixty-two patients with cochlear and/or vestibular symptoms and a temporal bone high-resolution CT (HRCT) scan showing SCD were included in the study. All patients have been offered either surgical management or watchful waiting. Results Of these, 28 elected surgery and 34 declined it. The operated group showed more cochlear (6.6 vs. 2.4) symptoms than the non-operated group (P < 0.001) except for hypoacousis, but no significant difference (P = 0.059) was found for the number of vestibular symptoms between both groups (3.4 vs. 1.1). Footstep and eating hyperacousis were both present in 57.1% of operated vs. 3% of non-operated patients (P < 0.001). Oscillopsia with effort and with walking was found in 50% and 35.7% of operated patients, respectively, but none in the non-operated group (P < 0.001). Hearing tuning fork at malleolus and Valsalva and pneumatic speculum induced vertigo showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.003, P < 0.001, P = 0.010 respectively). Cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) thresholds, air and bone conduction thresholds, and mean air-bone gap (ABG) were similar in the two populations (P > 0.05). The average dehiscence size was 4.7 mm (2.0 - 8.0 mm) and 3.8 mm (1.3 - 7.7 mm) in the operated and non-operated patients, respectively (P = 0.421). Conclusions The natures of cochleovestibular signs and symptoms were shown to be key factors in patients’ choice of a surgical management whereas paraclinical tests seem to be less significant in the patients’ decision for a surgical treatment. PMID:25780478

  2. Utilitarian prioritization of radiation oncology patients based on maximization of population tumour control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Li, W.; Jennings, L.; Kearvell, R.; Bydder, S.

    2013-06-01

    An objective method for establishing patient prioritization in the context of a radiotherapy waiting list is investigated. This is based on a utilitarian objective, being the greatest probability of local tumour control in the population of patients. A numerical simulation is developed and a clinical patient case-mix is used to determine the influence of the characteristics of the patient population on resulting optimal patient scheduling. With the utilitarian objective, large gains in tumour control probability (TCP) can be achieved for individuals or cohorts by prioritizing patients for that fraction of the patient population with relatively small sacrifices in TCP for a smaller fraction of the population. For a waiting list in steady state with five patients per day commencing treatment and leaving the list (and so with five patients per day entering the list), and a mean wait time of 35 days and a maximum of 90 days, optimized wait times ranged from a mean of one day for patients with tumour types with short effective doubling times to a mean of 66.9 days for prostate cancer patients. It is found that, when seeking the optimal daily order of patients on the waiting list in a constrained simulation, the relative rather than absolute value of TCP is the determinant of the resulting optimal waiting times. An increase in the mean waiting time mostly influences (increases) the optimal waiting times of patients with fast-growing tumours. The proportional representation of groups (separated by tumour type) in the patient population has an influence on the resulting distribution of optimal waiting times for patients in those groups, though has only a minor influence on the optimal mean waiting time for each group.

  3. Surgical treatment outcomes of patients with bilateral warthin tumors in the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2014-01-01

    We describe the treatment outcomes of patients with bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland according to surgical methods. The medical records of ten patients with bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland who underwent surgery between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Ten patients were included in the study and 13 parotidectomies were performed. Patients with bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland were divided into three groups according to the surgical methods used to treat these individuals. In group 1, the patients were closely observed without undergoing contralateral parotidectomy after unilateral parotidectomy. In group 2, the patients underwent concurrent bilateral parotidectomies. In group 3, the patient underwent contralateral parotidectomy 2 months after unilateral parotidectomy was performed. The overall rate of transient facial nerve dysfunction was 31%. Our findings suggest that concurrent superficial parotidectomy may be an appropriate method for treating bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland, at least for desired patients. The symptoms of this type of tumor and physical examination findings are frequently non-specific and present in the unilateral parotid gland. Therefore, a high degree of discernment is needed and imaging techniques are essential for the determining the correct pre-operative diagnosis. PMID:24533403

  4. [Late results of surgical treatment in patients, suffering complicated forms of chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ratchyk, V M; Orlovs'ky?, D V; Makarchuk, V A; Zemlians'ky?, D É; Orlovs'ky?, V V

    2014-12-01

    Late results of treatment were analyzed in 58 patients, suffering complicated forms of chronic pancreatitis, to whom draining and resectional-draining surgical interventions were performed. On average the patients age was (49.90 ± 8.59) yrs, there were 42 (72.4%) men and 16 (27.6%) women. During period of the 3 yrs postoperative follow- up in the patients the pain syndrome severity have reduced essentially and quality of life improved, comparing with those indices after resectional-draining interventions. PMID:25842879

  5. Surgical evaluation and treatment of the patient with chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Holloran-Schwartz, M Brigid

    2014-09-01

    Treatment of patients with chronic pelvic pain is assisted by detailed history, physical examination, pain diary, and ultrasonography. The possibility of other contributing systems (eg, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, musculoskeletal) should also be addressed and treatment initiated if present. A diagnostic surgical procedure is helpful in patients for whom medical management or whose severity of pain warrants an urgent diagnosis. Limited evidence exists to support adhesions, endometriosis, ovarian cysts, ovarian remnants, and hernias as being causes of chronic pelvic pain. In select patients, ovarian cystectomy, excision of endometriosis and ovarian remnants, adhesiolysis, hysterectomy, hernia repair, and presacral neurectomy may provide relief. PMID:25155118

  6. New Patient Guide Page 1 of 9 Thank you for choosing the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. Here at UCSF, we are

    E-print Network

    Walter, Peter

    -353-7070 Surgical Oncology Fax: 415-353-7050 Medical Oncology Fax: 415-353-7692 UCSF Cancer Center, Urologic Surgery-353-7171 Surgical Oncology Fax: 415-353-7093 Medical Oncology Fax: 415-353-7107 UCSF Cancer Center, Endocrine-353-9900 Surgical Oncology Fax: 415-353-7050 Medical Oncology Fax: 415-885-3802 UCSF Cancer Center, Gynecologic

  7. Prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients before the start of chemotherapy: potential of the distress thermometer as an ultra-brief screening instrument

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Jorge; Campla, Cristóbal; D’Aguzan, Nicole; Barraza, Soledad; Padilla, Oslando; Sánchez, Cesar; Palma, Silvia; González, Matías

    2014-01-01

    Emotional distress (ED) is greater for oncology patients in comparison with the general population, and this has implications for the quality of life of the patient and his/her family, adherence to the treatment, and eventually, survivorship. In general, the detection of these symptoms is low, which explains the need for detection systems appropriate to the clinical reality of the oncology team. The objective of this study is to evaluate for the first time the usefulness of an ultra-brief screening instrument [distress thermometer (DT)], in a group of Chilean oncology patients. A total of 166 outpatients were evaluated at the Cancer Center of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, before starting chemotherapy. Two screening instruments were applied: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and DT. The application of HADS resulted in a prevalence of 32.7% of anxiety symptoms (HADS-A ? 8), 15.7% of depression symptoms (HADS-D ? 8), and 39.8% had a total score of HADS-T ? 11. The DT resulted in the prevalence of 32.5% of distress or ED (DT ? 5). The validity of the DT was evaluated as a screening tool in comparison with HADS, observing, in relation to the anxiety scale (HADS-A), a sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 78.4% (DT ? 4); depression (HADS-D), a sensitivity of 69.2% and specificity of 74.3% (DT ? 5); and in relation to the total scale (HADS-T), a sensitivity of 68.2% and specificity of 73.0% (DT ? 4). This study demonstrates the elevated prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients, before the start of chemotherapy, and confirms the potential of the DT as a brief screening instrument with easy application. The DT will allow the clinician to increase the detection threshold in the Chilean oncology population, intervene in a timely manner, and contribute to the comprehensive handling of the oncology patient without affecting the time needed for assistance. PMID:24966889

  8. Surgical outcomes of Korean ulcerative colitis patients with and without colitis-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yong Sik; Cho, Yong Beom; Park, Kyu Joo; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Yoon, Sang Nam; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Lee, Kil Yeon; Kim, Hungdai; Lee, Ryung-Ah; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinicopathologic characteristics of surgically treated ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and to compare the characteristics of UC patients with colitis-associated cancer (CAC) to those without CAC. METHODS: Clinical data on UC patients who underwent abdominal surgery from 1980 to 2013 were collected from 11 medical institutions. Data were analyzed to compare the clinical features of patients with CAC and those of patients without CAC. RESULTS: Among 415 UC patients, 383 (92.2%) underwent total proctocolectomy, and of these, 342 (89%) were subjected to ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. CAC was found in 47 patients (11.3%). Adenocarcinoma was found in 45 patients, and the others had either neuroendocrine carcinoma or lymphoma. Comparing the UC patients with and without CAC, the UC patients with CAC were characteristically older at the time of diagnosis, had longer disease duration, underwent frequent laparoscopic surgery, and were infrequently given preoperative steroid therapy (P < 0.001-0.035). During the 37 mo mean follow-up period, the 3-year overall survival rate was 82.2%. CONCLUSION: Most Korean UC patients experience early disease exacerbation or complications. Approximately 10% of UC patients had CAC, and UC patients with CAC had a later diagnosis, a longer disease duration, and less steroid treatment than UC patients without CAC. PMID:25834319

  9. Comparison of surgical and endovascular approach in management of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas: A single center experience of 27 patients

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Sankalp; Khan, Shariq A.; McDonagh, David L.; Britz, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is a rare spinal vascular malformation with an annual incidence of 5-10 cases per million. The data on efficacy, recurrence rates and complications of endovascular versus surgical treatment of SDAVF is limited. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 27 adult patients with a diagnosis of SDAVF and who underwent treatment at Duke University Hospital between January 1, 1993 and December 31, 2012. We compared the outcome measures by Aminoff–Logue score (ALS) in patients who underwent treatment with endovascular embolization versus surgical ligation of fistula. We compared complication rates, recurrence rates as well as data on long-term follow up in these patients. Results: Out of 27 patients in the study, 10 patients underwent endovascular embolization (Onyx was used in 5 patients and NBCA in 5 patients) as the first line therapy. Seventeen patients underwent surgical ligation as initial therapeutic modality. Patients in both groups showed significant improvement in clinical status (ALS) after treatment. One patient in endovascular group developed spinal infarction due to accidental embolization of medullary artery. Three patients in embolization group had recurrence of fistula during the course of follow up requiring surgical ligation. Two patients in surgical group developed local wound infection. None of the patients in surgical group had recurrence of fistula during the course of follow up. Conclusions: Endovascular embolization and surgical ligation are effective treatment strategies for SDAVF. Our observations show that surgical ligation may offer permanent cure without any recurrence. Endovascular approach is associated with higher incidence of recurrence, especially with use of onyx. PMID:24575322

  10. Surgical Treatment for Patients with Krukenberg Tumor of Stomach Origin: Clinical Outcome and Prognostic Factors Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rong; Ren, Chao; Jia, Yong-Nin; Li, Jin; Guo, Wei-Jian

    2013-01-01

    Krukenberg tumor originated from stomach in female patients is common in clinical practice, but it is still uncertain whether surgical resection of ovarian metastases could improve the outcome. Some studies suggested that a certain group of patients could benefit from the resection of ovarian metastases. However, conclusions were different between studies and there was no data to illustrate if certain molecular markers were associated with patients’ survival. In this study, we analyzed the effects of resection of ovarian metastases, and investigated prognostic factors in 133 patients with ovarian metastases originated from stomach. Furthermore, we examined the expression of some cancer stem cells (CSCs) markers or related molecules in 64 ovarian metastases specimens and analyzed the correlation between these molecules and patients’ survival. We found that the median overall survival (mOS) of all 133 patients was 16 months, and “gastrectomy” and “without ascites” were two independent prognostic factors associated with longer survival. The mOS of the patients with gastrectomy was longer than that of patients had not undergone gastrectomy (19 vs. 9 months, p?=?0.048). Patients without ascites survived longer than those with ascites (mOS: 21 vs. 13 months, p?=?0.008). We also found that Sox2, CD44 or CD133 positive expression in ovarian metastases were risk factors correlated with poor survival, and Sox2 expression was an independent prognostic indicator. These results suggested that ovarian metastasectomy might help to prolong the survivor of some patients with Krukenberg tumor originated from stomach. Patients without ascites, and with resected or resectable primary gastric cancer lesion could get benefit from and be potential candidate for surgical treatment. The expression of Sox2 might serve as a prognostic indicator for predicting patients’ survival and be helpful for selecting patients in future. PMID:23874550

  11. Surgical treatment for patients with Krukenberg tumor of stomach origin: clinical outcome and prognostic factors analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Hua, Rui-Xi; Jiang, Rong; Ren, Chao; Jia, Yong-Nin; Li, Jin; Guo, Wei-Jian

    2013-01-01

    Krukenberg tumor originated from stomach in female patients is common in clinical practice, but it is still uncertain whether surgical resection of ovarian metastases could improve the outcome. Some studies suggested that a certain group of patients could benefit from the resection of ovarian metastases. However, conclusions were different between studies and there was no data to illustrate if certain molecular markers were associated with patients' survival. In this study, we analyzed the effects of resection of ovarian metastases, and investigated prognostic factors in 133 patients with ovarian metastases originated from stomach. Furthermore, we examined the expression of some cancer stem cells (CSCs) markers or related molecules in 64 ovarian metastases specimens and analyzed the correlation between these molecules and patients' survival. We found that the median overall survival (mOS) of all 133 patients was 16 months, and "gastrectomy" and "without ascites" were two independent prognostic factors associated with longer survival. The mOS of the patients with gastrectomy was longer than that of patients had not undergone gastrectomy (19 vs. 9 months, p?=?0.048). Patients without ascites survived longer than those with ascites (mOS: 21 vs. 13 months, p?=?0.008). We also found that Sox2, CD44 or CD133 positive expression in ovarian metastases were risk factors correlated with poor survival, and Sox2 expression was an independent prognostic indicator. These results suggested that ovarian metastasectomy might help to prolong the survivor of some patients with Krukenberg tumor originated from stomach. Patients without ascites, and with resected or resectable primary gastric cancer lesion could get benefit from and be potential candidate for surgical treatment. The expression of Sox2 might serve as a prognostic indicator for predicting patients' survival and be helpful for selecting patients in future. PMID:23874550

  12. Pain experience and satisfaction with postoperative pain control among surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Pathmawathi; Ramasamy, Suguna; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Chinna, Karuthan; Rosli, Roshaslina

    2014-10-30

    Alleviating acute pain and providing pain relief are central to caring for surgical patients as pain can lead to many adverse medical consequences. This study aimed to explore patients' experience of pain and satisfaction with postoperative pain control. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 107 respondents who had undergone abdominal surgery in the surgical ward of an urban hospital using the Revised American Pain Society's Patient Outcome and Satisfaction Survey Questionnaires (APS-POQ-R). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and chi-square test. Chi-square test showed significant association between race (P?=?0.038), education level (P???0.001), previous operation status (P?=?0.032) and operation status (P???0.001). Further analysis on nominal regression, association between dissatisfaction with factors of operation status (46.09 (95% CI 7.456, 284.947)) and previous operation status (13.38 (95% CI 1.39, 128.74)) was found to be significant. Moderate to high levels of pain intensity in the last 24?h after surgery, as well as moderate to high rates of pain-related interference with care activities were most reported. Pain still remains an issue among surgical patients, and effective pain management and health education are needed to manage pain more effectively after surgery. PMID:25355297

  13. Patterns of Technical Error Among Surgical Malpractice Claims An Analysis of Strategies to Prevent Injury to Surgical Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott E. Regenbogen; Caprice C. Greenberg

    Objective: To identify the most prevalent patterns of technical errors in surgery, and evaluate commonly recommended interven- tions in light of these patterns. Summary Background Data: The majority of surgical adverse events involve technical errors, but little is known about the nature and causes of these events. We examined characteristics of technical errors and common contributing factors among closed surgical

  14. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  15. Graves' disease: a review of surgical indications, management, and complications in a cohort of 59 patients.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, P; Gangidi, S; Kotrotsos, G; Cunliffe, D

    2015-06-01

    An analysis of 59 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for the treatment of Graves' disease over a 6-year period was conducted in order to assess the current indications and identify any specific factors that may influence the patient's decision to opt for surgical treatment. A comparison of outcomes between the current study and a similar one from Hong Kong was also attempted. Patient preference was the most common reason for opting for surgery over radioactive iodine in both studies. Other indications for surgery, such as Graves' ophthalmopathy, patient refusal for radioactive iodine, large goitre with pressure symptoms, planning for pregnancy, young age, and intolerance to anti-thyroid drugs, were also similar in the two groups. There were no statistically significant differences in laryngeal nerve palsy between the two groups. The rates of permanent hypoparathyroidism in patients in Hong Kong and in the present study were 5.4% and 5.1%, respectively. No patient in either study had recurrent Graves' disease after total thyroidectomy. Our findings confirmed that patient preference is the leading indication for surgery, implicating a continuous misconception of radioactive substances and increasing confidence in surgical outcomes. In experienced hands, the risks of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury and permanent hypoparathyroidism remain minimal. PMID:25726089

  16. Regional anaesthesia to improve pain outcomes in paediatric surgical patients: a qualitative systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Schaldenbrand, K; Wallis, B; De Oliveira, G S

    2014-09-01

    Summary The development of analgesic interventions in paediatric surgical patients is often limited by the inherent difficulties of conducting large randomized clinical trials to test interventions in those patients. Regional anaesthesia is a valid strategy to improve postoperative pain in the adult surgical population, but the effects of regional anaesthesia on postoperative pain outcomes in paediatric patients are currently not well defined. The main objective of the current review was to systematically evaluate the use of regional anaesthesia techniques to minimize postoperative pain in paediatric patients. A systematic search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of the regional anaesthesia techniques on postoperative pain outcomes in paediatric surgical patients' procedures. Seventy-three studies on 5125 paediatric patients were evaluated. Only few surgical procedures had more than one small randomized controlled trial favouring the use of regional anaesthesia to minimize postoperative pain (ophthalmological surgery, cleft lip repair, inguinal hernia, and urological procedures). Additional evidence is required to support the use of specific regional anaesthesia techniques to improve postoperative pain for several surgical procedures (craniectomy, adenotonsillectomy, appendectomy, cardiac surgery, umbilical hernia repair, upper and lower extremity) in paediatric patients. Currently, only a very limited number of regional anaesthesia techniques have demonstrated significant improvement on postoperative pain outcomes for a restricted number of surgical procedures. More studies are needed in order to establish regional anaesthesia as a valid strategy to improve analgesia in the paediatric surgical population. PMID:24907283

  17. Enteral glutamine 0.3-0.4mg/kg/day supplementation in surgical patients with head and neck malignancy: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Azman, Mawaddah; MohdYunus, Mohd Razif; Sulaiman, Suhaina; SyedOmar, Syed Nabil

    2014-07-01

    Background: Glutamine supplementation is a novel approach to perioperative nutritional management. Methods: This study was a prospective randomised clinical trial of effects of enteral glutamine supplementation in surgical patients with head and neck malignancy in a tertiary centre. This study measured the effects of supplementation within 4 weeks post oncology surgery period in relation to fat free mass, serum albumin and quality of life scores. Results: The study population consisted of 44 patients. There was significant difference in serum albumin (p<0.001), fat free mass (p<0.001) and quality of life scores (p<0.05) between control and interventional limbs. Significant correlation exist between fat free mass and quality of life score difference in our study population (p<0.05). Conclusion: Enteral glutamine supplementation significantly improves fat free mass, serum albumin and quality of life scores post operatively and maintenance of lean body mass correlated with improved postoperative outcomes in terms of patient quality of life. Head Neck, 2014. PMID:24992652

  18. Evaluation of a Model for Glycemic Prediction in Critically Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pappada, Scott M.; Cameron, Brent D.; Tulman, David B.; Bourey, Raymond E.; Borst, Marilyn J.; Olorunto, William; Bergese, Sergio D.; Evans, David C.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P. A.; Papadimos, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated a neural network model for prediction of glucose in critically ill trauma and post-operative cardiothoracic surgical patients. A prospective, feasibility trial evaluating a continuous glucose-monitoring device was performed. After institutional review board approval, clinical data from all consenting surgical intensive care unit patients were converted to an electronic format using novel software. This data was utilized to develop and train a neural network model for real-time prediction of serum glucose concentration implementing a prediction horizon of 75 minutes. Glycemic data from 19 patients were used to “train” the neural network model. Subsequent real-time simulated testing was performed in 5 patients to whom the neural network model was naive. Performance of the model was evaluated by calculating the mean absolute difference percent (MAD%), Clarke Error Grid Analysis, and calculation of the percent of hypoglycemic (?70 mg/dL), normoglycemic (>70 and <150 mg/dL), and hyperglycemic (?150 mg/dL) values accurately predicted by the model; 9,405 data points were analyzed. The models successfully predicted trends in glucose in the 5 test patients. Clark Error Grid Analysis indicated that 100.0% of predictions were clinically acceptable with 87.3% and 12.7% of predicted values falling within regions A and B of the error grid respectively. Overall model error (MAD%) was 9.0% with respect to actual continuous glucose modeling data. Our model successfully predicted 96.7% and 53.6% of the normo- and hyperglycemic values respectively. No hypoglycemic events occurred in these patients. Use of neural network models for real-time prediction of glucose in the surgical intensive care unit setting offers healthcare providers potentially useful information which could facilitate optimization of glycemic control, patient safety, and improved care. Similar models can be implemented across a wider scale of biomedical variables to offer real-time optimization, training, and adaptation that increase predictive accuracy and performance of therapies. PMID:23894489

  19. Does Hormone Therapy Reduce Disease Recurrence in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy? An Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard K. Valicenti; Kwounghwa Bae; Jeff Michalski; Howard Sandler; William Shipley; Alex Lin; James Cox

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect on freedom from biochemical failure (bNED) or disease-free survival (DFS) by adding hormone therapy (HT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (HDRT). Methods and Materials: We used 883 analyzable prostate cancer patients who enrolled on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-06, a Phase I\\/II dose escalation trial, and whose mean planning

  20. Strict infection control measures do not prevent clonal spread of coagulase negative staphylococci colonizing central venous catheters in neutropenic hemato-oncologic patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cindy van Pelt; Jan Nouwen; Elly Lugtenburg; Cindy van der Schee; Simon de Marie; Paula Schuijff; Henri Verbrugh; Bob Löwenberg; Alex van Belkum; Margreet Vos

    2003-01-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) are a main cause of catheter related infections (CRI). Earlier studies (1994–1996) revealed a high incidence of CRI (6 per 1000 catheter days) among neutropenic hemato-oncologic patients in the Erasmus MC Hematology Department (Rotterdam, The Netherlands). This was mainly explained by expansion of two methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) clones (Nouwen et al., J. Clin. Microbiol.

  1. A Phase II Study of VEPA\\/FEPP Chemotherapy for Aggressive Lymphoma in Elderly Patients: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG9203

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fumi Mizoroki; Yuko Hirose; Masayuki Sano; Haruhiko Fukuda; Kensei Tobinai; Masanori Shimoyama; Masanobu Nakata; Masafumi Taniwaki; Fumio Kawano; Kimiharu Uozumi; Kenichi Sawada; Shiro Fukuhara; Kaori Nasu; Yoichiro Ohno; Hironobu Toki; Atsushi Togawa; Masahiro Kikuchi; Tomomitsu Hotta

    2006-01-01

    The Lymphoma Study Group (LSG) of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group conducted a phase II trial of LSG12 therapy for 45 elderly\\u000a patients with aggressive lymphoma to clarify whether LSG12 reduces severe infection without lowering the complete response\\u000a (CR) rate in comparison with LSG4. LSG12, which consisted of a regimen of vincristine, cyclophosphamide, prednisolone, doxorubicin,\\u000a vindesine, etoposide, and procarbazine (VEPA\\/FEPP),

  2. Gender, Race, and Survival: A Study in Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases Patients Utilizing the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory M. M. Videtic; Chandana A. Reddy; Samuel T. Chao; Thomas W. Rice; David J. Adelstein; Gene H. Barnett; Tarek M. Mekhail; Michael A. Vogelbaum; John H. Suh

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To explore whether gender and race influence survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with brain metastases, using our large single-institution brain tumor database and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) brain metastases classification. Methods and materials: A retrospective review of a single-institution brain metastasis database for the interval January 1982 to September 2004 yielded

  3. Recruiting minority cancer patients into cancer clinical trials: a pilot project involving the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and the National Medical Association. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This paper may be useful for researchers interested in enhancing their interactions with community physicians and increasing the number of minority patients referred to clinical trials. It describes a study conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) in collaboration with the National Medical Association (NMA) to better understand barriers and solutions to African-American (AA) accrual and to test several recommended low-cost strategies.

  4. A surgical gauze appearing as a retrocardiac mass in a patient after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Unverdorben, M; Bauer, U; Oster, H; Kraska, H; Vallbracht, C

    1999-03-01

    Five years after open chest surgery because of three vessel coronary artery disease a patient was referred for progressing dyspnea and recent onset of atrial fibrillation. A retrocardiac mass was detected on chest X-ray and echocardiography. On CT-scan, the inhomogenous tumor made the diagnosis of a retained surgical gauze likely. Through a left incision the sponge was removed uneventfully and the dyspnea resolved. PMID:10399616

  5. Surgical management of gastric cancer: Review and consideration for total care of the gastric cancer patient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samielle Brancato; Thomas J. Miner

    2008-01-01

    Opinion statement  Surgical therapy remains the most effective modality in the treatment of gastric cancer. Staging laparoscopy with laparoscopic\\u000a ultrasound may increase the accuracy of staging and prevent patients with unresectable gastric cancer from undergoing unnecessary\\u000a operations. Resection of proximal and distal gastric cancer is best accomplished with an appropriate gastrectomy that ensures\\u000a adequate resection margins. A D2 lymphadenectomy can be

  6. [Myocardial cytoprotection with trimetazidine in patients with ischemic heart disease during surgical stress].

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, I V; Goncharova, L L; Miroshnichenko, A G; Petrash, V V; Pokrovskaia, L A

    1999-01-01

    Fluctuations of the thiol disulfide system were shown to be interrelated with changes in the ECG indices. Trimetazidine since it has antioxidant properties was found to be effective in patients with low thiol disulfide ratios. A single dose of 0.8 mg/kg of the body mass was shown to inhibit the appearance of stress-dependent ischemic symptoms during surgical procedures. PMID:10645577

  7. Surgical Correction of Scoliosis in Children with Spastic Quadriplegia: Benefits, Adverse Effects, and Patient Selection

    PubMed Central

    Legg, Julian; Davies, Evan; Raich, Annie L.; Dettori, Joseph R.; Sherry, Ned

    2014-01-01

    Study Rationale?Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of nonprogressive syndromes of posture and motor impairment associated with lesions of the immature brain. Spastic quadriplegia is the most severe form with a high incidence of scoliosis, back pain, respiratory compromise, pelvic obliquity, and poor sitting balance. Surgical stabilization of the spine is an effective technique for correcting deformity and restoring sitting posture. The decision to operate in this group of patients is challenging. Objectives?The aim of this study is to determine the benefits of surgical correction of scoliosis in children with spastic quadriplegia, the adverse effects of this treatment, and what preoperative factors affect patient outcome after surgical correction. Materials and Methods?A systematic review was undertaken to identify studies describing benefits and adverse effects of surgery in spastic quadriplegia. Factors affecting patient outcome following surgical correction of scoliosis were assessed. Studies involving adults and nonspastic quadriplegia were excluded. Results?A total of 10 case series and 1 prospective and 3 retrospective cohort studies met inclusion criteria. There was significant variation in the overall risk of complications (range, 10.9?70.9%), mortality (range, 2.8?19%), respiratory/pulmonary complications (range, 26.9?57.1%), and infection (range, 2.5?56.8%). Factors associated with a worse outcome were a significant degree of thoracic kyphosis, days in the intensive care unit, and poor nutritional status. Conclusion?Caregivers report a high degree of satisfaction with scoliosis surgery for children with spastic quadriplegia. There is limited evidence of preoperative factors that can predict patient outcome after scoliosis. There is a need for well-designed prospective studies of scoliosis surgery in spastic quadriplegia. PMID:24715871

  8. Time trends of surgical treatment and the prognosis for Japanese patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maehara, Y; Kakeji, Y; Oda, S; Takahashi, I; Akazawa, K; Sugimachi, K

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer is much higher in Japan than in other countries even though diagnostics and treatments of such patients have improved. The objective of this study was to present an overview of the past, present and future of surgical treatment for our patients with gastric cancer. We analysed data on 2152 Japanese men and women with gastric cancer who underwent surgical resection from 1965 to 1995 at Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan, based on a univariate and the multivariate analysis. We focused on time trends of surgical treatment and the postoperative outcome. Over the years, there have been favourable changes in the numbers of patients with early gastric cancer. In all cases of gastric cancer, the rate of 18% in the first six year period (group 1) was 57% in the last 5 year period (group 6). Size of the tumour was smaller, well-differentiated tumour tissue was more common, and lymphatic involvement was less frequent. Lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis and peritoneal dissemination all decreased. Extensive lymph node dissection was more frequently done and the rate of curative resection (curability A and B) increased. With increases in identifying the early stage of cancer and better perioperative care, mortality rates 30 days after the surgery greatly decreased. Multivariate analysis revealed that the 10 factors of depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, lymph node dissection, tumour size, liver metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, lymphatic invasion, vascular invasion, lesion in the whole stomach and lesion in the middle stomach were independent factors for determining the prognosis. Detection of the tumour in an early stage, standardized surgical treatment, including routine lymph node dissection, close follow-up schedules and better perioperative management are expected to increase survival time for patients with this malignancy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10993643

  9. [Results of surgical treatment of laryngeal cancer in elderly patients in 1946-95].

    PubMed

    Kulczy?ski, B; Szmeja, Z; Skonieczny, J; Wierzbicka, M

    1997-01-01

    In the years 1946-1995 in Karol Marcinkowski University School of Medical Sciences, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery the long term results on 2223 patients with laryngeal cancer treated surgically according to the age were evaluated. Five year survival rates after total laryngectomy in elderly persons was 44.2%. Five year survival rates (67.7%) after partial laryngectomy justify their application in suitably chosen cases of cancer of the larynx. PMID:9640047

  10. Clinical characteristics of patients with asymptomatic intracranial meningiomas and results of their surgical management.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingcheng; Wang, Long; Ye, Fei; Chen, Jingcao; Lei, Ting; Chen, Jian

    2015-07-01

    Surgery performed during the asymptomatic phase of meningioma remains controversial. The effects of surgery and the factors associated with postsurgical complications and patient prognosis were studied to optimize surgical decisions for clinicians who treat asymptomatic patients. The medical records of 513 patients with meningiomas (112 patients were asymptomatic) treated at our hospital from May 2007 to April 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The results were analyzed with univariate and multivariate analyses. Asymptomatic meningiomas were characterized by a more common cerebral hemispheric location, a smaller size, and a lack of peritumoral edema. A significantly higher Simpson I resection rate of 95.2 % was achieved in tumors located in the cerebral hemisphere; in contrast, a rate of 66.7 % was obtained in tumors located at the skull base (P?=?0.003). The overall postsurgical complication rate was 13.6 %, which was lower than the rate of 21.7 % in the symptomatic patients. Hemiplegia was the most common complication, which occurred most often in the patients with tumors in parietal locations (P?=?0.015). Ninety-two percent of the asymptomatic patients achieved a Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score of 5 1 year after the operation, and significantly more patients younger than 60 years of age obtained a GOS score of 5 compared with patients older than 60 years of age (P?=?0.006). To achieve maximal tumor resection and good patient recovery, tumor location and patient age should be carefully considered prior to choosing to perform surgery in asymptomatic patients. PMID:25697143

  11. Patient-to-patient spread of a single strain of Corynebacterium striatum causing infections in a surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, A H; van Belkum, A; van Pelt, C; Bruining, H A; Mouton, J W; Verbrugh, H A

    1996-01-01

    Over a 12-month period, Corynebacterium striatum strains were isolated from clinical specimens from 14 patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit. These isolates were identical by morphology and biotype and displayed the same antibiogram. Ten isolates were found to be the sole possible pathogen. These 10 isolates were from six patients, three of whom had signs of infection at the time of positive culture. Further typing was performed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis, by which all strains were identical and were found to differ to various degrees from reference strains and from isolates found in clinical samples from other wards. In a case-control study the only independent risk factor for acquiring the strain was intubation for longer than 24 h (odds ratio, 20.09; 95% confidence interval, 2.29 to 176.09). The same strain was isolated from surfaces and from air sampled in the direct vicinity of infected patients but never from surfaces or air in other places of the ward. The strain was not isolated from the ventilators. The strain was cultured from the hands of personnel attending to infected patients, but no long-term carriers were found among members of the hospital personnel, suggesting transient carriage only. We conclude that C. striatum can cause serious nosocomial infections in surgical intensive care unit patients and may spread from patient to patient via the hands of attending personnel. PMID:8862563

  12. A videofluoroscopic study comparing severe swallowing disorders in patients treated surgically or with radiation for oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Santini, L; Robert, D; Lagier, A; Giovanni, A; Dessi, P; Fakhry, N

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the causal mechanisms of severe swallowing disorders after the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Twenty-six patients with severe swallowing disorders at ?12 months after treatment for oropharyngeal cancer were analyzed retrospectively using videofluoroscopy. Fourteen patients (54%) had been treated with surgery (±postoperative radiotherapy), while 12 patients (46%) had been treated with (chemo)radiotherapy. Videofluoroscopy analysis showed a localized alteration in the surgical excision area resulting in impaired tongue root retraction in the surgical group (P=0.012), while general impairment of the pharyngeal, laryngeal, and upper oesophagus sphincter was found in the non-surgical group. Aspirations in the surgical group most often occurred after swallowing, while in the non-surgical group, they occurred during and after swallowing (P=0.039). This analysis by videofluoroscopy provides important insights into the mechanisms giving rise to swallowing disorders after the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25697064

  13. Cancer-related neuropathic pain in out-patient oncology clinics: a European survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although pain is frequently experienced by patients with cancer, it remains under-treated. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of cancer-related neuropathic pain (CRNP) in patients with chronic pain who attended an outpatient clinic for standard care in Europe (irrespective of the reason or stage of the cancer). The secondary aims of this study were to characterise pain and cancer in patients with CRNP (including treatment) and to evaluate the usefulness of the painDETECT (PD-Q) screening tool to help physicians identify a potential neuropathic component of cancer-related pain. Methods An observational, non-interventional, cross-sectional, multi-centre study of adult patients with cancer using patient and physician case report forms (CRFs). Patients with CRNP were identified by physicians’ clinical assessments after examining the completed PD-Q. Results A total of 951 patients visiting outpatient clinics across Europe were enrolled in this study between August 2010 and July 2011. Of these, 310 patients (32.60%; 95% confidence interval 29.62, 35.58) were identified as having CRNP. Twenty-nine of 39 (74.4%) physicians who completed the CRF relating to the PD-Q considered it a useful tool to help detect CRNP in daily practice and 28 of 39 (71.8%) indicated that they would use this tool in the future for most or some of their patients. Data from physicians before and after review of the completed PD-Qs showed a shift in clinical opinion (either to positive CRNP diagnosis [yes] or negative CRNP diagnosis [no]) in respect of 142 patients; about half of which (74) were categorised with an initial diagnosis of unknown. Opinions also shifted from a no to a yes diagnosis in 10 patients and from a yes to a no diagnosis in 51 patients. Conclusions Approximately one-third of adults with cancer experiencing chronic pain attending outpatient clinics as part of routine care were considered to have CRNP in the opinion of the physicians after considering scores on the PD-Q. While physicians did not consider the PD-Q to be a useful tool for all patients, shifts in diagnosis before and after the use of this tool indicate that it may help physicians identify CRNP, especially where there is initial uncertainty. PMID:24200014

  14. Anaesthesia for ophthalmologic surgical procedures in a patient with advanced amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kowalik, Maciej M; Smiatacz, Tomasz; Pajuro, Robert; Skowro?ski, Roman; Trocha, Hanna; Nyka, Walenty; Raczy?ska, Krystyna; Wujtewicz, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Anaesthesia procedures for surgical interventions in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are not commonly found in clinical practice, and often have special considerations that must be taken into account in treatment planning. As a result, these procedures are rarely subject to publication, rendering it difficult for the anaesthesiologists to find useful and reliable information on this topic. ALS also presents a contraindication to the use of nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs during general anaesthesia. Case presentation In the case presented here, a 52-year old, White man, the progression of the disease to tetraparesis and respiratory failure, in addition to having the patient on chronic mechanical ventilation support, provided additional challenges to the handling team. The maturation of cataracts severely impaired communication with the patient, and surgical treatment of the cataract presented the only means to save communication. Such interventions are generally performed under local anaesthesia with the advice of the attending anaesthesiologist. However, in this case the patients' announcements during the operation would be unreadable to the advising anaesthesiologist. Here, the authors share experiences from a successfully applied combination of topical and general anaesthesia for two cataract operations and a vitrectomy. This was tolerated well by the patient, and without any side-effects. Conclusion The applied treatment resulted in a substantial improvement of the vision and allowed communication to be maintained with the patient. PMID:19021894

  15. Synthetic mesh repair for incisional hernia treatment in high-risk patients for surgical site occurrences.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Gernot; Weitzendorfer, Michael; Kalcher, Veronika; Emmanuel, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Patients with incisional hernias (IH) and risk factors for surgical site occurrences (SSOs) such as defined comorbidities and/or potential contaminations are considered to be treated with bioprosthetics. A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who had undergone elective IH repair with synthetic mesh materials between 2009 and 2013 was conducted. Only patients who were classified into Grades II and III according to the classification of the Ventral Hernia Working Group (VHWG) were considered for the study. Primary outcome parameter was the incidence of SSO. The relationships among demographics, hernia characteristics, surgical technique, and SSOs were also evaluated. Overall, 108 patients were included (Grade II: 68, Grade III: 40). SSO was identified in 14 patients. Having two or more comorbidities (P = 0.04), an open sublay technique (P = 0.005), duration of operation (P = 0.02), larger hernia defects (P = 0.001), and using larger mesh sizes (P = 0.01) were associated with significantly higher rates of SSO. Affiliation to VHWG Grading II or III showed no impact on SSO occurrence. Synthetic mesh repair both in an "open sublay" and laparoscopic intraperitoneal technique is safe regarding patients with risk factors for SSO. The recommendations of the VHWG must be declined and a modification of the grading system is warranted overlooking a more liberal use of synthetic meshes. PMID:25831186

  16. Surgical Treatment Options for the Young and Active Middle-Aged Patient with Glenohumeral Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Hsu, Andrew; Lin, Emery C.; Chalmers, Peter; Ellman, Michael; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic chondral lesions in young and active middle-aged patients continues to be a challenging issue. Surgeons must differentiate between incidental chondral lesions from symptomatic pathology that is responsible for the patient's pain. A thorough history, physical examination, and imaging work up is necessary and often results in a diagnosis of exclusion that is verified on arthroscopy. Treatment of symptomatic glenohumeral chondral lesions depends on several factors including the patient's age, occupation, comorbidities, activity level, degree of injury and concomitant shoulder pathology. Furthermore, the size, depth, and location of symptomatic cartilaginous injury should be carefully considered. Patients with lower functional demands may experience success with nonoperative measures such as injection or anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapy. When conservative management fails, surgical options are broadly classified into palliative, reparative, restorative, and reconstructive techniques. Patients with lower functional demands and smaller lesions are best suited for simpler, lower morbidity palliative procedures such as debridement (chondroplasty) and cartilage reparative techniques (microfracture). Those with higher functional demands and large glenohumeral defects will usually benefit more from restorative techniques including autograft or allograft osteochondral transfers and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Reconstructive surgical options are best suited for patients with bipolar lesions. PMID:22536515

  17. [The oncologic patient with chronic pain. An approach on care from the nursing perspective].

    PubMed

    Nobre, Cidália de Fátima Carvoeiras

    2008-01-01

    This is a study of descriptive, exploratory and qualitative nature. It aims at identifying how nurses perceive chronic pain in cancer patients and analyses how nurses care for cancer patients with chronic pain. There were semistructured interviews with an intentional sample of six nurses from the services of Chemotherapy and Medicine III from the Baixo Alentejo Hospital Center. We found that the nurses understand pain through verbal and non verbal language of patients. Nurses pointed out some difficulties with the assessement of pain, the pharmacologic and non-phamarcologic treatments. PMID:19341049

  18. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology-oncology patients: factors associated with catheter removal and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amos; Yaniv, Isaac; Solter, Ester; Freud, Enrique; Samra, Zmira; Stein, Jerry; Fisher, Salvador; Levy, Itzhak

    2006-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the factors associated with antibiotic failure leading to tunneled central venous catheter (CVC) removal during catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CABSIs) and with recurrence and reinfection in children with cancer. All cases of CABSI in patients attending the Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology between November 2000 and November 2003 were reviewed. A total of 207 episodes of CABSI, including multiple episodes involving the same catheter, were identified in 146 of 410 tunneled CVCs (167 Hickman, 243 implantable ports). The most common organism isolated was coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS). The CVC was removed in 96 (46%) episodes. Hypotension, persistent bacteremia, previous stem cell transplantation, multiple CABSIs in the same CVC, exit-site infection, inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy, and Candida infection were all significantly associated with increased risk of catheter removal (P < 0.05, odds ratios 7.81, 1.14, 2.22, 1.93, 3.04, 2.04 and 24.53, respectively). There were 12 episodes of recurrent infection, all except 1 caused by CONS (odds ratio 20.5, P = 0.006). Inappropriate empiric therapy, especially in implantable ports, was the only mutable risk factor for antibiotic failure. Because CONS was the predominant isolate in these devices, adding glycopeptides to the empiric therapy for suspected implantable-port CABSI might decrease the removal rate. This issue should be explored in future controlled trials. PMID:16394888

  19. Epidemiology and outcome of candidaemia in patients with oncological and haematological malignancies: results from a population-based surveillance in Spain.

    PubMed

    Puig-Asensio, M; Ruiz-Camps, I; Fernández-Ruiz, M; Aguado, J M; Muñoz, P; Valerio, M; Delgado-Iribarren, A; Merino, P; Bereciartua, E; Fortún, J; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Almirante, B

    2015-05-01

    A prospective, population-based surveillance on candidaemia was implemented in five metropolitan areas of Spain from May 2010 to April 2011. We aimed to describe the distribution and susceptibility pattern of Candida species, and to evaluate risk factors for mortality in patients with oncological (solid tumours) and haematological malignancies. Adults (?16 years) with cancer were included in the present report. Impact of therapeutic strategies on 7- and 30-day mortality were analysed by logistic regression, adjusting for propensity score by inverse weighting probability of receiving early antifungal treatment and catheter removal. We included 238 (32.6%) patients (195 oncological, 43 haematological). Compared with oncological patients, haematological patients were more likely to have received chemotherapy (53.5% versus 17.4%, p < 0.001) or corticosteroids (41.9% versus 21%, p < 0.001), and have neutropenia (44.2% versus 1.5%, p < 0.001). Overall, 14.8% of patients developed breakthrough candidaemia. Non-albicans Candida species (71.1% versus 55.6%, p 0.056) and Candida tropicalis (22.2% versus 7.6%, p 0.011) were more frequent in haematological patients. Based on EUCAST breakpoints, 27.6% of Candida isolates were non-susceptible to fluconazole. Resistance to echinocandins was negligible. Mortality at 7 and 30 days was 12.2% and 31.5%, respectively, and did not differ significantly between the patient groups. Prompt antifungal therapy together with catheter removal (?48 hours) was associated with lower mortality at 7 days (adjusted OR 0.05; 95% CI 0.01-0.42) and 30 days (adjusted OR 0.27; 95% CI 0.16-0.46). In conclusion, non-albicans species are emerging as the predominant isolates, particularly in haematological patients. Prompt, adequate antifungal treatment plus catheter removal may lead to a reduction in mortality. PMID:25703212

  20. Patient Centeredness and Engagement in Quality-of-Care Oncology Research.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Steven B; Gayer, Christopher; Murphy, Elizabeth; Majhail, Navneet S; Baker, K Scott

    2015-05-01

    More than a decade after the Institute of Medicine (IOM) first studied the quality of cancer care, obstacles to achieving high-quality care remain, and studies suggest that cancer care is often not as patient centered, accessible, coordinated, or evidence based as it could be. Patients, their families, and clinicians face a wide range of complex and often confusing choices regarding their health and health care concerns and require trustworthy information to decide which options are best for them. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) strives to fund clinical comparative effectiveness research, guided by patients, caregivers, and the broader health care community, that will provide high-integrity, evidence-based information to help people make informed health care decisions. This mission is well aligned with the IOM's recent conceptual framework and corresponding recommendations that recognize that addressing the needs of patients with cancer and their families is the most important component of a high-quality cancer care delivery system. PCORI seeks the opportunity to partner with diverse interdisciplinary research teams who demonstrate a strong commitment to the inclusion and engagement of patients and stakeholders as they work to develop high-quality cancer care delivery systems. We see rich opportunities for such partnership in the cancer care community, given the wealth of well-established patient advocacy groups and organizations and cutting-edge research institutions, all of which are working toward the common goal of improving the quality of cancer care for patients and their families. This article and the project it describes provide an example of an avenue for advancing this goal. PMID:25852140

  1. Qualitative approach to patient-reported outcomes in oncology: protocol of a French study

    PubMed Central

    Orri, Massimiliano; Sibeoni, Jordan; Labey, Mathilde; Bousquet, Guilhem; Verneuil, Laurence; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The past decade has been characterised by movement from a doctor-centred to a patient-centred approach to treatment outcomes, in which doctors try to see the illness through their patients’ eyes. Patients, family members and doctors are the three participants in cancer care, but their perspectives about what have been helpful during cancer treatment have never simultaneously and explicitly compared in the same qualitative study. The aim of this study project is to explore patients’ perspectives about the care they receive, as well as families’ and doctors’ perspectives about what have been helpful for the patient. These three points of view will be compared and contrasted in order to analyse the convergences and divergences in these perspectives. Methods and analysis This is a national multicentre qualitative study. Participants will be constituted by three different subsamples: (1) patients with cancer (skin, breast, urological and lung cancers), (2) their relatives, and (3) their referring physicians. Recruitment will follow the purposive sample technique, and the final sample size will be determined by data saturation. Data will be collected through open-ended semistructured interviews and independently analysed with NVivo V.10 software by three researchers according to the principles of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Ethics and dissemination The research protocol received approval from the University Paris Descartes review board (IRB number: 20140600001072), and participants will provide written consent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to focus on the simultaneous exploration of the separate points of view of patients, families and doctors about the care received during the cancer care journey. We expect that our findings will help to improve communication and relationships between doctors, patients and families. Comparison of these three points of view will provide information about the convergences and divergences of these perspectives and how to address the needs of all three groups. PMID:26163035

  2. Nursing education as an intervention to decrease fatigue perception in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Godino, Carolina; Jodar, Lina; Durán, Angela; Martínez, Isabel; Schiaffino, Anna

    2006-04-01

    People with cancer have identified fatigue as a major obstacle to normal functioning and a good quality of life. It is a nearly universal symptom for patients undergoing primary antineoplasic therapy or treatment with biologic response modifiers (BRM) and is extremely common in patients with persistent or advanced disease. The aim of the study was to determine whether nursing education decreased the perception of fatigue in patients with colon or gastric cancer. We compared the fatigue level between two groups of patients who received the same treatment and had the same type of cancer (experimental group and control group). We provided an individualised and structured nursing intervention with education to the experimental group. We followed up the fatigue level in both groups with three different measures on the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Fatigue (FACT-F) Scale. After the nursing intervention there was a decrease in the level of fatigue in the experimental group, whereas the group of patients that did not receive this intervention showed an increase in fatigue level along the treatment. The nursing intervention with the individualised education and counselling has provided patients with cancer with an effective tool to manage fatigue. PMID:16618589

  3. The ultimate constant of head and neck oncology—the physician-patient relationship.

    PubMed

    Day, Terry A

    2014-12-01

    Head and neck surgeons have the unique opportunity to engage with humans in life and death situations. We are confronting cancer, cure, failure, self-image, and most of all, a bond with the patient and family. We would like to view our expertise in head and neck surgery and the world of caring for our patients much like a Brigadoon. However, we daily are confronted with ever-changing and evolving approaches to health care that do not involve the physician or the patient. What kind of world is healthcare without a physician-patient interaction? Yes, there is the government-supported electronic medical record, which is here to stay (until our electrical and/or wired network fails). Yes, there is new technology, including robotic surgery and telemedicine and efforts to link these to our cell phones and applications, making care and expertise more available across long distances. And yes, there exist goals to extend care beyond the physician to other health care professions as the buffer between the physician and the patient, sometimes to reduce cost and sometimes to make care more ubiquitous. However, an Internet search will show that most say that the only constant in healthcare is change. I propose that the ultimate constant in healthcare is the physician-patient relationship. PMID:25068431

  4. User interface paradigms for patient-specific surgical planning: lessons learned over a decade of research.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Kevin; Stephanides, Michael; Schendel, Stephen; Ross, Muriel

    2005-01-01

    This paper covers work in virtual reality-based, patient-specific surgical planning over the past decade. It aims to comprehensively examine the user interface paradigms and system designs during that period of time and to objectively analyze their effectiveness for the task. The goal is to provide useful feedback on these interface and implementation paradigms to aid other researchers in this field. First, specialized systems for specific clinical use were produced with a limited set of visualization tools. Later, through collaboration with NASA, an immersive virtual environment was created to produce high-fidelity images for surgical simulation, but it underestimated the importance of collaboration. The next system, a networked, distributed virtual environment, provided immersion and collaboration, but the immersive paradigm was found to be of a disadvantage and the uniqueness of the framework unwieldy. A virtual model, workbench-style display was then created using a commercial package, but limitations of each were soon apparent. Finally, a specialized display, with an integrated visualization and simulation system is described and evaluated. Lessons learned include: surgical planning is an abstract process unlike surgical simulation; collaboration is important, as is stereo visualization; and that high-resolution preoperative images from standard viewpoints are desirable, but interaction is truly the key to planning. PMID:15755538

  5. Patient safety in dermatologic surgery: Part I. Safety related to surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Timothy J; Lolis, Margarita; Goldberg, David J; MacFarlane, Deborah F

    2015-07-01

    Surgical procedures involve unique elements related to patient safety. One must be aware of potential complications and safety issues within the practice of dermatologic surgery. Developing a high level of competence in skin surgery will address some safety issues, while implementing protocols and redundancies provides systems-based correction for other safety issues. We provide an in-depth review of patient safety in dermatologic surgery. In particular, we highlight the most common safety issues and methods for reducing error. PMID:26089045

  6. Department of Oncology Oncology Student Research Day

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    Department of Oncology 8th Annual Oncology Student Research Day Thursday, June 23, 2011 GUIDELINES be downloaded from http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/oncology/education.html For standardization, the abstract itself must be based on results that have not been published in any journal prior to the Oncology Student Research Day

  7. [Immediate and long-term results of surgical treatment of patients for traumatic mandibular fracture].

    PubMed

    Kopchak, A V

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of immediate and long-term results of the surgical treatment of 286 patients, operated for traumatic mandibular fractures in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, National O. O. Bogomolets Medical University. In 67% of patients the anatomical shape of the bone was adequately restored. The presence of residual displacements in other cases was determined by the fracture type and localization, the technical complexity of the surgical intervention, lack of fixation rigidity under certain functional load conditions. In long terms of observation the infection and inflammatory complications were observed in 13.4% of patients, delayed unition and non-unition of bone fragments occurred--in 4.7%, arthosis with persistent dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint--in 6.7%, fibrous ankylosis--in 1.3%. Secondary displacement of fragments was observed in 23.5% of patients due to insufficient stiffness and reliaability of the bone-fixatorsystem. The non-precise reposition of fragments and secondary displacements in the early and late postoperative period were the main cause of occlusal disturbances of various severities, noted in 28% of operated patients, limitation of mouth opening (10%), TMJ disorders and changes in masticatory stereotype (33%), the sensation of pain and discomfort in tough food chewing (35%). A statistical analysis of the effectiveness of different osteosynthesis methods depending on the type and localization of the fracture was carried out and recommendations for usage of fixation devices in clinical practice were given. PMID:24923155

  8. Two surgical procedures for esophagogastric variceal bleeding in patients with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Yuan, Li-Juan; Dong, Rui; Yin, Ji-Kai; Wang, Qing; Li, Tao; Li, Jiang-Bin; Du, Xi-Lin; Lu, Jian-Guo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinical value of a splenorenal shunt plus pericardial devascularization (PCVD) in portal hypertension (PHT) patients with variceal bleeding. METHODS: From January 2008 to November 2012, 290 patients with cirrhotic portal hypertension were treated surgically in our department for the prevention of gastroesophageal variceal bleeding: 207 patients received a routine PCVD procedure (PCVD group), and 83 patients received a PCVD plus a splenorenal shunt procedure (combined group). Changes in hemodynamic parameters, rebleeding, encephalopathy, portal vein thrombosis, and mortality were analyzed. RESULTS: The free portal pressure decreased to 21.43 ± 4.35 mmHg in the combined group compared with 24.61 ± 5.42 mmHg in the PCVD group (P < 0.05). The changes in hemodynamic parameters were more significant in the combined group (P < 0.05). The long-term rebleeding rate was 7.22% in the combined group, which was lower than that in the PCVD group (14.93%), (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Devascularization plus splenorenal shunt is an effective and safe strategy to control esophagogastric variceal bleeding in PHT. It should be recommended as a first-line treatment for preventing bleeding in PHT patients when surgical interventions are considered. PMID:24409071

  9. Scoliosis in patients with Prader Willi Syndrome – comparisons of conservative and surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Goodall, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    In children with Prader Willi syndrome (PWS), besides growth hormone (GH) therapy, control of the food environment and regular exercise, surgical treatment of scoliosis deformities seems the treatment of choice, even though the risks of spinal surgery in this specific population is very high. Therefore the question arises as to whether the risks of spinal surgery outweigh the benefits in a condition, which bears significant risks per se. The purpose of this systematic review of the Pub Med literature was to find mid or long-term results of spinal fusion surgery in patients with PWS, and to present the conservative treatment in a case study of nine patients with this condition. Types of studies included; all kinds of studies; retrospective and prospective ones, which reported upon the outcome of scoliosis surgery in patients with PWS. Types of participants included: patients with scoliosis and PWS. Type of intervention: surgery. Search strategy for identification of the studies; Pub Med; limited to English language and bibliographies of all reviewed articles. Nine patients with PWS from our data-base treated conservatively have been found, being 19 years or over at the time this study has been performed. The results of conservative management are described and related to the natural history and treatment results found in the Pub Med review. From 2210 titles displayed in the Pub Med database with the key word being "Prader Willi syndrome", 5 different papers were displayed at the date of the search containing some information on the outcome of surgery and none appeared to contain a mid or long-term follow-up. The PWS patients treated conservatively from our series all stayed below 70° and some of which improved. If the curve of scoliosis patients with PWS can be kept within certain limits (usually below 70 degrees) conservatively, this treatment seems to have fewer complications than surgical treatments. The results of our retrospective study of nine patients demonstrate that scoliosis in this entity plays only a minor role and surgery is unnecessary when high quality conservative management exists. There is lack of the long follow-up studies in post-surgical cases in patients with PWS and scoliosis. The rate of complications of spinal fusion in patients with PWS and scoliosis is very high and the death rates have been found to be higher than in patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS). The long-term side-effects of the intervention are detrimental, so that the risk-benefit ratio favours the conservative approaches over spinal fusion surgery. PMID:19419581

  10. The importance of cleanrooms for the treatment of haemato-oncological patients

    PubMed Central

    Matoušková, Ivanka

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of cleanrooms in health care centres is to prevent hospital infections or leakage of a highly infectious agent (the source of haemorrhagic fevers, SARS, etc.) into the ambient environment and subsequently possibly threatening other individuals. Patients with haematological malignancies or after autologous or allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) rank among immunosuppressed individuals. Prolonged and deep neutropenia is considered a key risk factor of the occurrence of an exogenous infection. One of the possibilities of preventing an exogenous infection in these patients is to place them in a “cleanroom” for the crucial period of time. Cleanrooms are intensive care units with reverse isolation. The final part of the general article below provides an overview of the technology and types of cleanrooms for immunosuppressed patients in compliance with the current recommendations and technical standards. PMID:23788892

  11. Risk Assessment of BRONJ in Oncologic Patients Treated with Bisphosphonates: Follow-Up to 18 Months

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Lucia; Nori, Alessandra; Berlin, Ricarda Sara; Mazur, Marta; Orsini, Giovanna; Putignano, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Bisphosphonates related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a pathological condition characterized by bone exposure or latent infection in patients treated with the drug. The aim of the study is to monitor the BRONJ level of risk health in patients with cancer, according to a preventive clinical protocol, which is firstly aimed at reducing risk factors such as the periodontal infections. Materials and Methods. 10 patients participated in the protocol and were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 18 months of treatment with bisphosphonates, through full mouth plaque and bleeding scores (FMPS and FMBS), clinical attachment level (CAL) measurement, and the occurrence of osteonecrosis. Results. The mean plaque and bleeding were reduced and the CAL has not shown significant changes and in no cases was there manifestation of BRONJ. Conclusion. The protocol proved crucial for the maintenance of good oral health conditions by eliminating the risk of BRONJ during the observation period. PMID:25258628

  12. Rotational assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with reconstructive gastrointestinal surgical anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Zouhairi, Majed El; Watson, James B; Desai, Svetang V; Swartz, David K; Castillo-Roth, Alejandra; Haque, Mahfuzul; Jowell, Paul S; Branch, Malcolm S; Burbridge, Rebecca A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the success rates of performing therapy utilizing a rotational assisted enteroscopy device in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in surgically altered anatomy patients. METHODS: Between June 1, 2009 and November 8, 2012, we performed 42 ERCPs with the use of rotational enteroscopy for patients with altered anatomy (39 with gastric bypass Roux-en-Y, 2 with Billroth II gastrectomy, and 1 with hepaticojejunostomy associated with liver transplant). The indications for ERCP were: choledocholithiasis: 13 of 42 (30.9%), biliary obstruction suggested on imaging: 20 of 42 (47.6%), suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: 4 of 42 (9.5%), abnormal liver enzymes: 1 of 42 (2.4%), ascending cholangitis: 2 of 42 (4.8%), and bile leak: 2 of 42 (4.8%). All procedures were completed with the Olympus SIF-Q180 enteroscope and the Endo-Ease Discovery SB overtube produced by Spirus Medical. RESULTS: Successful visualization of the major ampulla was accomplished in 32 of 42 procedures (76.2%). Cannulation of the bile duct was successful in 26 of 32 procedures reaching the major ampulla (81.3%). Successful therapeutic intervention was completed in 24 of 26 procedures in which the bile duct was cannulated (92.3%). The overall intention to treat success rate was 64.3%. In terms of cannulation success, the intention to treat success rate was 61.5%. Ten out of forty two patients (23.8%) required admission to the hospital after procedure for abdominal pain and nausea, and 3 of those 10 patients (7.1%) had a diagnosis of post-ERCP pancreatitis. The average hospital stay was 3 d. CONCLUSION: It is reasonable to consider an attempt at rotational assisted ERCP prior to a surgical intervention to alleviate biliary complications in patients with altered surgical anatomy. PMID:25789100

  13. Oncological and functional outcome of conservative surgery for primary supraglottic cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Maurizi; G. Paludetti; J. Galli; F. Ottaviani; G. D’Abramo; G. Almadori

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the oncological and functional outcome of conservative surgical treatment of primary\\u000a supraglottic squamous cell carcinoma (SGSCC) and related neck disease in order to verify the effectiveness of supraglottic\\u000a laryngectomy (SL) and the validity of an “observation” policy in the control of clinically negative (N0) necks. Of a total\\u000a of 252 consecutive patients

  14. Violent Behavior in Cancer Patients--A Rarely Addressed Phenomenon in Oncological Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grube, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dealing with violent cancer patients can be particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to collect data on the frequency, quality, and underlying variables affecting violent behavior as well as to examine the role played by this behavior in the premature interruption of treatment. A total of 388 cancer inpatients were examined by…

  15. Attitudes of Medical Students Toward Psychiatric, Oncologic, and General Medical Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachtel, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The variables affecting ratings of the importance of biopsychosocial versus biomedical assessments are examined. It was hypothesized that students would perceive the relative importance of biomedical and biopsychosocial assessments differentially based on the diagnoses of the patients and the students' level of training. (MLW)

  16. Oncology Nursing Education: Nursing Students' Commitment of "Presence" with the Dying Patient and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Sandra M.; Hogan, Nancy S.

    2003-01-01

    Following a chaplain's lecture on the end of life, nursing students wrote reaction papers on appropriate ways to support dying patients and their families. Six processes emerged, including the core concept of the nurse's presence at the bedside. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  17. Surgical planning and patient-specific biomechanical simulation for tracheal endoprostheses interventions.

    PubMed

    González Ballester, Miguel A; Pérez del Palomar, Amaya; López Villalobos, José Luís; Rodríguez, Laura Lara; Trabelsi, Olfa; Pérez, Frederic; Ginel Cañamaque, Angel; Cortés, Emilia Barrot; Rodríguez Panadero, Francisco; Doblaré Castellano, Manuel; Herrero Jover, Javier

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a system for computer-assisted surgical planning of tracheal surgeries. The system allows to plan the intervention based on CT images of the patient, and includes a virtual database of commercially available prostheses. Automatic segmentation of the trachea and apparent pathological structures is obtained using a modified region growing algorithm. A method for automatic adaptation of a finite element mesh allows to build a patient-specific biomechanical model for simulation of the expected performance of the implant under physiological movement (swallowing, sneezing). Laboratory experiments were performed to characterise the tissues present in the trachea, and movement models were obtained from fluoroscopic images of a patient. Results are reported on the planning and biomechanical simulation of two patients that underwent surgery at our hospital. PMID:20426122

  18. [Characteristics of anesthesia in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta undergoing orthopedic surgical procedures].

    PubMed

    Tripkovi?, Branko; Anti?evi?, Darko; Buljan, Melita; Jakovina-Blažekovi?, Sanja; Oreškovi?, Zrinka; Kubat, Ozren

    2014-01-01

    The aim is to show our experience in anesthesia of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) who have undergone orthopedic surgical procedures. This is a retrospective analysis of OI patients treated at our Department from 1980 to 2012. We analyzed demographics, comorbidities, preoperative characteristics, anesthesia types, anesthetics and intraoperative and postoperative complications. In the given period, 26 OI patients were treated, using 103 surgeries, and 103 anesthesia procedures. Most procedures, a total of 68, were used in children aged 0-10 years. According to the diagnosis, OI type III was mostly encountered. The rating of the American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) physical status was II in most cases, a total of 99. General anesthesia was used in 89 cases, and regional anesthesia in 14. Fourteen intraoperative complications were seen, mostly difficult intubation, and six postoperative cardiovascular instability cases. With careful preparation, and knowledge of pitfalls, anesthesia in these patients should be a safe procedure. PMID:25632774

  19. Risk Factors for Cisplatin-Associated Ototoxicity in Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yancey, Allison; Harris, Michael S.; Egbelakin, Akinbode; Gilbert, Jaimie; Pisoni, David B.; Renbarger, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapy agent against several pediatric malignancies. One of its side effects is irreversible sensorineural hearing damage that is highly variable with a reported incidence of 22–70%. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and identify clinical predictors of cisplatin-related ototoxicity. Procedures We performed a retrospective chart review of 102 pediatric patients who had completed cisplatin therapy for osteosarcoma, neuroblastoma, hepatoblastoma, or germ cell tumor. Patients were diagnosed at Riley Hospital for Children between January 1995 and June 2008, were less than 18 years old at diagnosis, and had normal hearing prior to therapy. Audiograms were scored using the Brock scale (0–4), a validated grading system for cisplatin-related hearing loss. Results Forty-two percent of the patients experienced hearing loss and 28% had moderate to severe ototoxicity (Brock score ?2). Males were at significantly greater risk for developing hearing loss than were females (P = 0.005, OR 4.812). Age at cancer diagnosis was inversely related to severity of ototoxicity. Patients who suffered Brock grade 3 ototoxicity had a mean age of 4.5 years versus 11.5 years and 7.2 years for grades 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.02). Cumulative cisplatin dose was also identified as a risk factor for development of ototoxicity (P = 0.03). Conclusions Gender and cumulative dose are important clinical biomarkers of cisplatin ototoxicity. Severity of ototoxicity may be inversely related to age at time of exposure, with very young patients exhibiting higher grades of hearing loss following cisplatin therapy. PMID:22431292

  20. The Cross Cancer Institute Multidisciplinary Summer Studentship in Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology: Teaching students to see through patients’ eyes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shilo Lefresne; Desiree Nielsen; Alysa Fairchild

    2011-01-01

    Purpose  In this paper, the psychosocial oncology-themed Cross Cancer Institute Multidisciplinary Summer Studentship in Palliative\\u000a and Supportive Care in Oncology is described from the perspective of the first participants and supervising faculty.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  This 6-week inter-professional elective exposed pre-licensure students to issues facing patients and their families following\\u000a a diagnosis of cancer, through treatment, recovery, recurrence, palliation, and end-of-life.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Participants gained experience

  1. Is Postoperative Pain a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy? Expectancy Effects on Postoperative Pain and Patient-Controlled Analgesia Use Among Adolescent Surgical Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deirdre E. Logan; John B. Rose

    2005-01-01

    Objective To explore relationships among anxiety, anticipated pain, coping styles, postoperative pain, and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) use among adolescent surgical patients and their parents. Methods Sixty-five 12- to 18-year-old surgical patients undergoing surgery with postoperative PCA pain management were included. Before surgery, adolescents and parents reported anxiety and expected levels of postoperative pain. Pain catastrophizing and coping style were assessed

  2. The preoperative assessment in the planning of surgical management of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric patient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel L. Keene; E. C. G. Ventureyra

    2000-01-01

    Surgical intervention in refractory epilepsy in children offers the hope of seizure control. For the patient, the preoperative\\u000a assessment is a major factor in whether he or she is selected as a patient who will potentially benefit. It also plays an\\u000a important part in the choice of the surgical intervention to be used. This paper reviews the investigations available and

  3. Category-Specific Naming and Recognition Deficits in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Drane, Daniel L.; Ojemann, George A.; Aylward, Elizabeth; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Johnson, L. Clark; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Miller, John W.; Tranel, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Objective Based upon Damasio's “Convergence Zone” model of semantic memory, we predicted that epilepsy surgical patients with anterior temporal lobe (TL) seizure onset would exhibit a pattern of category-specific naming and recognition deficits not observed in patients with seizures arising elsewhere. Methods We assessed epilepsy patients with unilateral seizure onset of anterior TL or other origin (n = 22), pre- or postoperatively, using a set of category-specific items and a conventional measure of visual naming (Boston Naming Test: BNT). Results Category-specific naming deficits were exhibited by patients with dominant anterior TL seizure onset/resection for famous faces and animals, while category-specific recognition deficits for these same categories were exhibited by patients with nondominant anterior TL onset/resection. Patients with other seizure onset did not exhibit category-specific deficits. Naming and recognition deficits were frequently not detected by the BNT, which samples only a limited range of stimuli. Interpretation Consistent with the “convergence zone” framework, results suggest that the nondominant anterior TL plays a major role in binding sensory information into conceptual percepts for certain stimuli, while dominant TL regions function to provide a link to verbal labels for these percepts. Although observed category-specific deficits were striking, they were often missed by the BNT, suggesting that they are more prevalent than recognized in both pre- and postsurgical epilepsy patients. Systematic investigation of these deficits could lead to more refined models of semantic memory, aid in the localization of seizures, and contribute to modifications in surgical technique and patient selection in epilepsy surgery to improve neurocognitive outcome. PMID:18206185

  4. Surgical Outcomes after Traumatic Vertebral Fractures in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    An, Seong-Bae; Kim, Keung-Nyun; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory rheumatic disease mainly affecting the axial skeleton. The rigid spine may secondarily develop osteoporosis, further increasing the risk of spinal fracture. In this study, we reviewed fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis that had been clinically diagnosed to better define the mechanism of injury, associated neurological deficit, predisposing factors, and management strategies. Methods Between January 2003 and December 2013, 12 patients with 13 fractures with neurological complications were treated. Neuroimaging evaluation was obtained in all patients by using plain radiography, CT scan, and MR imaging. The ASIA Impairment Scale was used in order to evaluate the neurologic status of the patients. Management was based on the presence or absence of spinal instability. Results A total of 9 cervical and 4 thoracolumbar fractures were identified in a review of patients in whom ankylosing spondylitis had been diagnosed. Of these, 7 fractures were associated with a hyperextension mechanism. 10 cases resulted in a fracture by minor trauma. Posttraumatic neurological deficits were demonstrated in 11 cases and neurological improvement after surgery was observed in 5 of these cases. Conclusions Patients with ankylosing spondylitis are highly susceptible to spinal fracture and spinal cord injury even after only mild trauma. Initial CT or MR imaging of the whole spine is recommended even if the patient's symptoms are mild. The patient should also have early surgical stabilization to correct spinal deformity and avoid worsening of the patient's neurological status. PMID:25328647

  5. Prevalence of deep vein thrombosis in acutely admitted ambulatory non-surgical intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Data on prevalence rates of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in different patient populations are scarce. Most studies on this topic focus on older patients or patients with malignancies, immobilization or thrombophilia. Less is known about the VTE risk profile of non-surgical patients presenting with a variety of medical diseases of differing severity. Aim of the present study was to investigate VTE prevalence in a pospective cohort study of ambulatory medical intensive care unit patients within 24 h after acute admission. Methods Prospective cohort study of 102 consecutive patients after acute admission to medical intensive care unit. Ultrasound compression sonography, APACHE-II-Scoring and laboratory examination was performed within 24 hours after admission.Possible determinants of a high risk of VTE were examined. In all patients with a confirmed diagnosis of DVT or suspicion of PE thoracic computer tomography (CT) was performed. Results VTE was found in 7.8% out of 102 of patients, mean APACHE-II-Score was 14 (mortality risk of about 15%). Thrombus location was femoropopliteal in 5 patients, iliacal in 2 and peroneal in 1 patient. Five VTE patients had concomitant PE (62.5% of VTE, 4.9% of all patients). No predictors of prevalent VTE were identified from univariable regression analysis although relative risk was high in patients with a history of smoking (RR 3.40), immobility (RR 2.50), and elevated D-Dimer levels (RR 3.49). Conclusions Prevalent VTE and concomitant PE were frequent in acutely admitted ICU patients. PMID:24996222

  6. Benefit from prolonged dose-intensive chemotherapy for infants with malignant brain tumors is restricted to patients with ependymoma: a report of the Pediatric Oncology Group randomized controlled trial 9233/34

    PubMed Central

    Strother, Douglas R.; Lafay-Cousin, Lucie; Boyett, James M.; Burger, Peter; Aronin, Patricia; Constine, Louis; Duffner, Patricia; Kocak, Mehmet; Kun, Larry E.; Horowitz, Marc E.; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-01-01

    Background The randomized controlled Pediatric Oncology Group study 9233 tested the hypothesis that dose-intensive (DI) chemotherapy would improve event-free survival (EFS) for children <3 years of age with newly diagnosed malignant brain tumors. Methods Of 328 enrolled eligible patients, diagnoses were medulloblastoma (n = 112), ependymoma (n = 82), supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (sPNET, n = 38) and other malignant brain tumors (n = 96), and were randomized to 72 weeks of standard dose chemotherapy (Regimen A, n = 162) or DI chemotherapy (Regimen B, n = 166). Radiation therapy (RT) was recommended for patients with evidence of disease at completion of chemotherapy or who relapsed within 6 months of chemotherapy completion. Results Distributions of EFS for Regimens A and B were not significantly different (P = 0.32) with 2- and 10-year rates of 22.8% ± 3.3% and 15.4% ± 3.7%, and 27.1% ± 3.4% and 20.8% ± 3.8%, respectively. Thus, the study hypothesis was rejected. While distributions of EFS and OS were not significantly different between Regimens A and B for patients with medulloblastoma and sPNET, DI chemotherapy resulted in significantly improved EFS distribution (P = .0011) (2-year EFS rates of 42.1% vs. 19.6% with SD chemotherapy), but not OS distribution, for patients with centrally confirmed ependymoma. The degree of surgical resection affected EFS, OS or both for most tumor groups. Approximately 20%, 40% and 20% of patients with medulloblastoma, ependymoma treated with DI chemotherapy, and sPNET, respectively appear to have been cured without RT. Of 11 toxic deaths on study, 10 occurred on the DI chemotherapy arm. Conclusions Prolonged dose-intensive chemotherapy given to infants with malignant brain tumors resulted in increased EFS only for patients with ependymoma. PMID:24335695

  7. Losartan vs. amlodipine treatment in elderly oncologic hypertensive patients: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Motta, Massimo; Russo, Cristina; Vacante, Marco; Liardo, Rocco Luca Emanuele; Reitano, Francesca; Cammalleri, Lisa; Costanzo, Mario; Benfatto, Giuseppe; Frazzetto, Paola; Mondati, Enrico; Malaguarnera, Michele; Pennisi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Elderly neoplastic patients frequently may show hypertension and hyperuricemia, before and after chemotherapeutic treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of losartan which is an antihypertensive drug with uricosuric properties vs. amlodipine in hypertensive neoplastic elderly patients. This was an open-labeled, randomized, comparative trial. The study was performed as a 30-day study. Seventy patients with cancer were randomly assigned to receive losartan or amlodipine. Blood pressure (BP), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels, creatinine, serum and urinary uric acid, creatinine and uric acid clearance were determined before and after chemotherapy. One day after chemotherapy in losartan group vs. amlodipine group we observed a significant difference in urinary uric acid (p<0.001) of 18 mg/24 h vs. 40 mg/24 h. Thirty days after chemotherapy we observed a significant difference in azotemia of 0.0 mg/dl vs. 3.8 mg/dl (p<0.001), serum uric acid of 0.05 mg/dl vs. 0.49 mg/dl (p<0.001), urinary uric acid (p<0.001) of 23 mg/24 h vs. 0.0 mg/24 h, GFR of 2 ml/min/1.73 m(2) vs. -8 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (p<0.05) and systolic BP (SBP) of 3.6 mmHg vs. 0.8 mmHg (p<0.05). The findings of the present study support the effective role of losartan compared to amlodipine in treating hypertension and hyperuricemia in elderly patients under chemotherapeutic treatment. PMID:20569998

  8. Toxocarosis and putative DRESS syndrome in an oncological patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wutte, Nora; Palfner, Michael; Auer, Herbert; Ruckenbauer, Gerald; Valentin, Thomas; Seeber, Katharina; Aberer, Werner; Krause, Robert; Hoenigl, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Toxocarosis is a parasitic infection caused by Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati. Their definite hosts are the domestic dog and cat, where their adult forms live within the lumen of the small intestine. In humans, infective larvae hatch after ingestion of eggs, but the juvenile stages fail to develop into mature adult worms. Instead, they migrate through the body with the potential to affect virtually every body site. DRESS syndrome (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is a serious cutaneous drug reaction, which also involves other organ systems. We report on a 45-year-old man who was admitted with fever up to 40?°C, skin rash and pruritus not responding to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Laboratory results showed a slightly elevated white blood cell count, with 62?% eosinophils. History revealed contact to roaming cats. Travel history was unremarkable. Extensive diagnostic workup was performed, and the patient was finally diagnosed with DRESS syndrome, responded to systemic corticosteroid therapy and was discharged. Serology for Toxocara came back positive a few days later. Stool was again sent for microscopy and was found positive for Giardia lamblia, which was treated with a 5-day course of metronidazole. The patient had again developed rash and eosinophilia (62?%). Total immunoglobulin (Ig)E was 1,689 U/l (normal limit: patient had no further complaints. Although generalized exanthema due to Toxocara has not yet been described in literature, toxocarosis is known to cause a wide spectrum of cutaneous manifestations. Whether our patient had both, a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms and a parasitic infection, or whether a hypersensitivity reaction to Toxocara antigen was mimicking a DRESS syndrome remains unclear. PMID:24249317

  9. Assessment tools for the evaluation of pain in the oncology patient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen O. Anderson; Holcombe Boulevard

    2007-01-01

    The control of cancer pain is an essential goal in the care of patients with cancer. Inadequate pain assessment by health\\u000a care providers is a major risk factor for undertreatment of pain. Repeated and accurate pain assessment is required for optimal\\u000a pain management. Pain assessment tools such as simple rating scales and short pain questionnaires can facilitate routine measurement\\u000a of

  10. Systems oncology: towards patient-specific treatment regimes informed by multiscale mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Powathil, Gibin G; Swat, Maciej; Chaplain, Mark A J

    2015-02-01

    The multiscale complexity of cancer as a disease necessitates a corresponding multiscale modelling approach to produce truly predictive mathematical models capable of improving existing treatment protocols. To capture all the dynamics of solid tumour growth and its progression, mathematical modellers need to couple biological processes occurring at various spatial and temporal scales (from genes to tissues). Because effectiveness of cancer therapy is considerably affected by intracellular and extracellular heterogeneities as well as by the dynamical changes in the tissue microenvironment, any model attempt to optimise existing protocols must consider these factors ultimately leading to improved multimodal treatment regimes. By improving existing and building new mathematical models of cancer, modellers can play important role in preventing the use of potentially sub-optimal treatment combinations. In this paper, we analyse a multiscale computational mathematical model for cancer growth and spread, incorporating the multiple effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the patient survival probability and implement the model using two different cell based modelling techniques. We show that the insights provided by such multiscale modelling approaches can ultimately help in designing optimal patient-specific multi-modality treatment protocols that may increase patients quality of life. PMID:24607841

  11. Post-surgical outcome of 57 patients with Mycobacterium xenopi pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Parrot, R G; Grosset, J H

    1988-03-01

    The outcome of 57 surgically treated cases with pulmonary infection due to Mycobacterium xenopi was studied. Success without any complications was observed in 21 patients while complications were observed in the other 36, during the 1st year (early complications) after surgery in 26 patients and after the 1st year (late complications) in 10. Early complications included two deaths, four relapses, two treatment failures, six cases of respiratory impairment, four cancers and 21 immediate post-operative complications which required 19 supplementary operations. Early complications were more frequent (p less than 0.05) in patients with pleural and/or emphysematous lesions. Late complications included 10 deaths, eight relapses, four pulmonary infections and five cancers. They were more frequent (p less than 0.05) in patients with the following risk factors: under nutrition, smoking/alcohol abuse, gastric ulcers with or without gastrectomy, associated serious illness, respiratory impairment and extensive pre-surgical radiographic lesions. In no case was infection due to M. xenopi directly responsible for lack of improvement. PMID:3176182

  12. Long-term follow-up of lid surgery for trichiasis in the Gambia: Surgical success and patient perceptions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R J C Bowman; B Jatta; H Faal; R Bailey; A Foster; G J Johnson

    2000-01-01

    Background Surgery is an important component of the SAFE strategy which has been shown to improve visual acuity. There are limited data on long-term surgical success and patient perceptions and satisfaction. A sample of patients from the Gambia who had undergone previous lid surgery for trichiasis were therefore examined for recurrence of trichiasis and interviewed for patient satisfaction.Methods Health centre

  13. The Impact of Workers' Compensation on Outcomes of Surgical and Nonoperative Therapy for Patients with a Lumbar Disc Herniation SPORT

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Steven J.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Blood, Emily A.; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Pransky, Glenn S.; Weinstein, James N.

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Prospective randomized and observational cohorts. Objective To compare outcomes of patients with and without workers' compensation who had surgical and nonoperative treatment for a lumbar intervertebral disc herniation (IDH). Summary of Background Data Few studies have examined the association between worker's compensation and outcomes of surgical and nonoperative treatment. Methods Patients with at least 6 weeks of sciatica and a lumbar IDH were enrolled in either a randomized trial or observational cohort at 13 US spine centers. Patients were categorized as workers' compensation or nonworkers' compensation based on baseline disability compensation and work status. Treatment was usual nonoperative care or surgical discectomy. Outcomes included pain, functional impairment, satisfaction and work/disability status at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results Combining randomized and observational cohorts, 113 patients with workers' compensation and 811 patients without were followed for 2 years. There were significant improvements in pain, function, and satisfaction with both surgical and nonoperative treatment in both groups. In the nonworkers' compensation group, there was a clinically and statistically significant advantage for surgery at 3 months that remained significant at 2 years. However, in the workers' compensation group, the benefit of surgery diminished with time; at 2 years no significant advantage was seen for surgery in any outcome (treatment difference for SF-36 bodily pain [?5.9; 95% CI: ?16.7–4.9] and physical function [5.0; 95% CI: ?4.9–15]). Surgical treatment was not associated with better work or disability outcomes in either group. Conclusion Patients with a lumbar IDH improved substantially with both surgical and nonoperative treatment. However, there was no added benefit associated with surgical treatment for patients with workers' compensation at 2 years while those in the nonworkers' compensation group had significantly greater improvement with surgical treatment. PMID:20023603

  14. Patient safety in surgical environments: Cross-countries comparison of psychometric properties and results of the Norwegian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arvid S Haugen; Eirik Søfteland; Geir E Eide; Monica W Nortvedt; Karina Aase; Stig Harthug

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: How hospital health care personnel perceive safety climate has been assessed in several countries by using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety (HSOPS). Few studies have examined safety climate factors in surgical departments per se. This study examined the psychometric properties of a Norwegian translation of the HSOPS and also compared safety climate factors from a surgical setting to

  15. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  16. Anesthetic care during thiopental tests to evaluate epileptic patients for surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Kofke, W A; Dasheiff, R M; Dong, M L; Whitehurst, S; Caldwell, M

    1993-07-01

    A thiopental test 2 weeks after insertion of intracranial electrodes may be used to evaluate patients with refractory epilepsy for surgical therapy. Barbiturates normally produce beta activity on the electroencephalogram. The absence of this response in a monitored brain region implies focal cerebral dysfunction. We describe a technique used to perform this test and the resultant morbidity. The thiopental test consists of intravenous injection of thiopental, 25 mg, every 30 s until either corneal reflexes are abolished, 1,000 mg of thiopental has been administered, or adverse events occur. In children, the dose is adjusted to approximately 0.3 mg/kg of thiopental every 20 s. A retrospective chart review was performed on 104 patients who underwent thiopental tests at the University of Pittsburgh Epilepsy Center. Records were systematically reviewed for thiopental dose, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation in arterial blood, time to responsivity, need for airway intervention, and occurrence of nausea or vomiting. Thirty-six patients developed upper airway obstruction which required jaw lift maneuver, six patients were given 1,000 mg of thiopental without loss of corneal reflexes, and one patient briefly sustained an arterial saturation of 67%. Five patients exhibited electrographic seizures with clinical seizures evident in two patients. No permanent effects were evident in any patient as a consequence of the test. We conclude, with appropriate monitoring and personnel, that the thiopental test, as described, can be performed safely with acceptable morbidity. PMID:8400755

  17. Adverse Clinical and Economic Outcomes Attributable to Methicillin Resistance among Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Surgical Site Infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John J. Engemann; Yehuda Carmeli; Sara E. Cosgrove; Vance G. Fowler; Melissa Z. Bronstein; Sharon L. Trivette; Jane P. Briggs; Daniel J. Sexton; Keith S. Kaye

    2003-01-01

    Data for 479 patients were analyzed to assess the impact of methicillin resistance on the outcomes of patients with Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infections (SSIs). Patients infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) had a greater 90-day mortality rate than did patients infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA; adjusted odds ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-7.2). Patients infected with MRSA had

  18. The ChQoL questionnaire: an Italian translation with preliminary psychometric results for female oncological patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background in Occidental languages, no widely accepted questionnaire is available which deals with health related quality of life from the specific point of view of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Some psychometric tools of this kind are available in Chinese. One of them is the Chinese Quality of Life questionnaire (ChQoL). It comprises 50 items, subdivided in 3 Domains and 13 Facets. The ChQoL was built from scratch on the basis of TCM theory. It is therefore specifically valuable for the TCM practitioner. This paper describes our translation into Italian of the ChQoL, its first application to Occidental oncological patients, and some of its psychometric properties. Methods a translation scheme, originally inspired by the TRAPD procedure, is developed. This scheme focuses on comprehensibility and clinical usefulness more than on linguistic issues alone. The translated questionnaire is tested on a sample of 203 consecutive female patients with breast cancer. Shapiro-Wilk normality tests, Fligner-Killeen median tests, exploratory Two-step Cluster Analysis, and Tukey's test for non-additivity are applied to study the outcomes. Results an Italian translation is proposed. It retains the TCM characteristics of the original ChQoL, it is intelligible to Occidental patients who have no previous knowledge of TCM, and it is useful for daily clinical practice. The score distribution is not Normal, and there are floor and ceiling effects. A Visual Analogue Scale is identified as a suitable choice. A 3-point Likert scale can also efficiently describe the data pattern. The original scales show non-additivity, but an Anscombe-Tukey transformation with ? = 1.5 recovers additivity at the Domain level. Additivity is enhanced if different ? are adopted for different Facets, except in one case. Conclusions the translated questionnaire can be adopted both as a filing system based on TCM and as a source of outcomes for clinical trials. A Visual Analogue Scale is recommended, but a simpler 3-point Likert scale also suitably fits data. When estimating missing data, and when grouping items within Domain in order to build a summary Domain index, an Anscombe-Tukey transformation should be applied to the raw scores. PMID:20868514

  19. Comparative evaluation of plasma ROM levels in chronic periodontitis patients before and after non-surgical and surgical periodontal therapy: A clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Sohini; Gowda, Triveni M.; Mehta, Dhoom S.; Kumar, Tarun A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Chronic periodontitis (CP) is associated with increased levels of blood reactive oxygen species (ROS). So, treatment of CP may lead to decrease in blood ROS. However, not much literature is available comparing the effect of surgical and non-surgical periodontal treatment on blood ROS levels. Reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) are a useful measure of blood ROS. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of periodontal treatment on plasma ROM levels in CP patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty CP patients and 15 controls were monitored. Plasma samples were collected at baseline and the clinical parameters were recorded. The CP patients were randomly divided into two groups: Scaling and root planing (Group II) and periodontal flap surgery (Group III). Both groups were re-evaluated 1 and 2 months after therapy. Clinical parameters were reviewed, plasma samples collected, and ROM levels were determined using a spectrophotometric technique. Results: At baseline, the ROM levels for Group II and Group III were 519.8 ± 62.4 and 513.4 ± 74.7 CARR U, respectively, which were higher than Group I value (282.9 ± 23.9, P < 0.001). Periodontal treatment in CP patients resulted in improvement of clinical parameters and a highly significant reduction in plasma ROM level (P < 0.001) after 2 months. Also, there was a more significant reduction in plasma ROM levels in Group III as compared to Group II (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In CP patients, surgical periodontal treatment was more effective in lowering the plasma ROM levels than when non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed alone and, therefore, may be more beneficial in reducing systemic oxidative stress. PMID:24872618

  20. Patient, Surgery, and Hospital Related Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections following Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios; Memtsoudis, Stavros; Poultsides, Lazaros A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) following total hip arthroplasty (THA) have a significantly adverse impact on patient outcomes and pose a great challenge to the treating surgeon. Therefore, timely recognition of those patients at risk for this complication is very important, as it allows for adopting measures to reduce this risk. This review discusses literature reported risk factors for SSI after THA. These can be classified into patient-related factors (age, gender, obesity, comorbidities, history of infection, primary diagnosis, and socioeconomic profile), surgery-related factors (allogeneic blood transfusion, DVT prophylaxis and coagulopathy, duration of surgery, antibiotic prophylaxis, bearing surface and fixation, bilateral procedures, NNIS index score, and anesthesia type), and hospital-related factors (duration of hospitalization, institution and surgeon volume, and admission from a healthcare facility). All these factors are discussed with respect to potential measures that can be taken to reduce their effect and consequently the overall risk for infection.

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary intervention in patients with surgically altered anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Siripun, Aroon; Sripongpun, Pimsiri; Ovartlarnporn, Bancha

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) in patients with surgically altered anatomies. METHODS: We performed a search of the MEDLINE database for studies published between 2001 to July 2014 reporting on EUS-BD in patients with surgically altered anatomy using the terms “EUS drainage” and “altered anatomy”. All relevant articles were accessed in full text. A manual search of the reference lists of relevant retrieved articles was also performed. Only full-text English papers were included. Data regarding age, gender, diagnosis, method of EUS-BD and intervention, type of altered anatomy, technical success, clinical success, and complications were extracted and collected. Anatomic alterations were categorized as: group 1, Billroth?I; group 2, Billroth II; group 4, Roux-en-Y with gastric bypass; and group 3, all other types. RESULTS: Twenty three articles identified in the literature search, three reports were from the same group with different numbers of cases. In total, 101 cases of EUS-BD in patients with altered anatomy were identified. Twenty-seven cases had no information and were excluded. Seventy four cases were included for analysis. Data of EUS-BD in patients categorized as group 1, 2 and 4 were limited with 2, 3 and 6 cases with EUS-BD done respectively. Thirty four cases with EUS-BD were reported in group 3. The pooled technical success, clinical success, and complication rates of all reports with available data were 89.18%, 91.07% and 17.5%, respectively. The results are similar to the reported outcomes of EUS-BD in general, however, with limited data of EUS-BD in patients with altered anatomy rendered it difficult to draw a firm conclusion. CONCLUSION: EUS-BD may be an option for patients with altered anatomy after a failed endoscopic-retrograde-cholangiography in centers with expertise in EUS-BD procedures in a research setting. PMID:25789101

  2. Thirteen years follow-up of heart myxoma operated patients: what is the appropriate surgical technique?

    PubMed Central

    Siminelakis, Stavros; Kakourou, Alexandra; Batistatou, Alexandra; Sismanidis, Stelios; Ntoulia, Alexandra; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Syminelaki, Theodora; Apostolakis, Eleftherios; Tsiouda, Theodora; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac myxoma is a benign neoplasm that represents the most prevalent primary tumor of the heart. If not treated with the right surgical technique recurrence occurs. Aim of our study is to present our surgical approach and the histology of the tumors resected. Methods All patients, except for one, underwent extracorporeal circulation and mild hypothermia, right atrial or both atrial incision and excision of the fossa ovalis, followed by prosthetic patch suturing. All specimens were submitted for microscopic evaluation (haematoxylin-eosin). We contacted personally each patient and asked them to complete a standardized questionnaire, concerning their peri-operative characteristics. Results Six cases were “active” myxomas, 3 were “mildly active” and 3 were “inactive”. “Normal differentiation” was seen in 6, “medium” in 1 and “poor” in 5 cases. In our series there were no recurrences recorded during the follow-up period. Conclusions The ideal approach, according to our experience is right atrial or both atrial incision as described by Shumacker and King, with excision of the fossa ovalis and the surrounding tissues and closure with a pericardial patch. Such a technique provides an excellent long-term survival in these patients. PMID:24672697

  3. Endoscopic Evaluation of Surgically Altered Bowel in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sinh, Preetika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases often undergo surgical procedures for medically refractory disease or colitis associated dysplasia. Endoscopic evaluation of the surgically altered bowel is often needed to assess for disease recurrence, its severity, and for therapy. It is important to obtain and review the operative report and abdominal imaging before performing the endoscopy. Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can be safely performed in most patients with inflammatory bowel disease with altered bowel anatomy under conscious sedation without fluoroscopy. Carefully planned stricture therapy with balloon dilation or needle knife stricturotomy can be performed for simple, short, and fibrotic strictures. A multidisciplinary approach involving a team of endoscopist, endoscopy nurse, colorectal surgeon, gastrointestinal pathologist, and gastrointestinal radiologist is important for a safe and effective endoscopy. We attempt to review the aspects that need consideration before the endoscopy, the technique of endoscopy, and briefly the therapies that can be performed during endoscopy of the bowel through an ileostomy, a colostomy, in the diverted large bowel or ileal pouch, and small bowel after stricturoplasty and bowel bypass surgery in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25806847

  4. Intensive medical student involvement in short-term surgical trips provides safe and effective patient care: a case review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The hierarchical nature of medical education has been thought necessary for the safe care of patients. In this setting, medical students in particular have limited opportunities for experiential learning. We report on a student-faculty collaboration that has successfully operated an annual, short-term surgical intervention in Haiti for the last three years. Medical students were responsible for logistics and were overseen by faculty members for patient care. Substantial planning with local partners ensured that trip activities supplemented existing surgical services. A case review was performed hypothesizing that such trips could provide effective surgical care while also providing a suitable educational experience. Findings Over three week-long trips, 64 cases were performed without any reported complications, and no immediate perioperative morbidity or mortality. A plurality of cases were complex urological procedures that required surgical skills that were locally unavailable (43%). Surgical productivity was twice that of comparable peer institutions in the region. Student roles in patient care were greatly expanded in comparison to those at U.S. academic medical centers and appropriate supervision was maintained. Discussion This demonstration project suggests that a properly designed surgical trip model can effectively balance the surgical needs of the community with an opportunity to expose young trainees to a clinical and cross-cultural experience rarely provided at this early stage of medical education. Few formalized programs currently exist although the experience above suggests the rewarding potential for broad-based adoption. PMID:21884604

  5. Internal carotid artery surgical revascularization in a pediatric patient with Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Westbroek, Erick M; Mukerji, Nitin; Kalanithi, Paul; Steinberg, Gary K

    2015-02-01

    Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, episodic lymphopenia, renal failure, and cerebrovascular disease secondary to arteriosclerosis and myointimal hyperplasia. In this paper the authors report the first known application of internal carotid artery (ICA) surgical revascularization to relieve a high-grade focal stenosis of the ICA in a pediatric patient, a 6-year-old boy with SIOD. The clinical presentation, imaging features, operative technique, and postoperative course are described and the molecular genetics, pathophysiology, and treatment considerations in SIOD are discussed. PMID:25431900

  6. Surgical Site Infection Caused by Aeromonas hydrophila in a Patient with Underlying Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Frincy Khandelwal; Ahmed, Nishat Hussain; Grover, Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonas skin and soft tissue infections in cancer patients can lead to serious life threatening conditions such as cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis and myonecrosis. We report here a case of surgical site infection, post radical mastectomy, in a 58-year-old female with carcinoma breast. Cultures of exudates from the wound grew Aeromonas hydrophila on repeated occasions. Recovery was uneventful following targeted antimicrobial therapy and regular dressing of the wound. Early suspicion, diagnosis, and treatment with potent antibiotics are needed to prevent any further complications resulting from infection by this emerging pathogen. PMID:25737989

  7. Surgical Site Infection Caused by Aeromonas hydrophila in a Patient with Underlying Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nishat Hussain; Grover, Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonas skin and soft tissue infections in cancer patients can lead to serious life threatening conditions such as cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis and myonecrosis. We report here a case of surgical site infection, post radical mastectomy, in a 58-year-old female with carcinoma breast. Cultures of exudates from the wound grew Aeromonas hydrophila on repeated occasions. Recovery was uneventful following targeted antimicrobial therapy and regular dressing of the wound. Early suspicion, diagnosis, and treatment with potent antibiotics are needed to prevent any further complications resulting from infection by this emerging pathogen. PMID:25737989

  8. Current indications for surgical repair in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and ascending aortic ectasia.

    PubMed

    Etz, Christian D; Misfeld, Martin; Borger, Michael A; Luehr, Maximilian; Strotdrees, Elfriede; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Preventive surgical repair of the moderately dilated ascending aorta/aortic root in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is controversial. Most international reference centers are currently proposing a proactive approach for BAV patients with a maximum ascending aortic/root diameter of 45?mm since the risk of dissection/rupture raises significantly with an aneurysm diameter >50?mm. Current guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the joint guidelines of the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) recommend elective repair in symptomatic patients with dysfunctional BAV (aortic diameter ?45?mm). In asymptomatic patients with a well-functioning BAV, elective repair is recommended for diameters ?50?mm, or if the aneurysm is rapidly progressing (rate of 5?mm/year), or in case of a strong family history of dissection/rupture/sudden death, or with planned pregnancy. As diameter is likely not the most reliable predictor of rupture and dissection and the majority of BAV patients may never experience an aortic catastrophe at small diameters, an overly aggressive approach almost certainly will put some patients with BAV unnecessarily at risk of operative and early mortality. This paper discusses the indications for preventive, elective repair of the aortic root, and ascending aorta in patients with a BAV and a moderately dilated-or ectatic-ascending aorta. PMID:23050195

  9. Current Indications for Surgical Repair in Patients with Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Ascending Aortic Ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Etz, Christian D.; Misfeld, Martin; Borger, Michael A.; Luehr, Maximilian; Strotdrees, Elfriede; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Preventive surgical repair of the moderately dilated ascending aorta/aortic root in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is controversial. Most international reference centers are currently proposing a proactive approach for BAV patients with a maximum ascending aortic/root diameter of 45?mm since the risk of dissection/rupture raises significantly with an aneurysm diameter >50?mm. Current guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the joint guidelines of the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) recommend elective repair in symptomatic patients with dysfunctional BAV (aortic diameter ?45?mm). In asymptomatic patients with a well-functioning BAV, elective repair is recommended for diameters ?50?mm, or if the aneurysm is rapidly progressing (rate of 5?mm/year), or in case of a strong family history of dissection/rupture/sudden death, or with planned pregnancy. As diameter is likely not the most reliable predictor of rupture and dissection and the majority of BAV patients may never experience an aortic catastrophe at small diameters, an overly aggressive approach almost certainly will put some patients with BAV unnecessarily at risk of operative and early mortality. This paper discusses the indications for preventive, elective repair of the aortic root, and ascending aorta in patients with a BAV and a moderately dilated—or ectatic—ascending aorta. PMID:23050195

  10. [Surgical obliteration in the patients presenting with post-traumatic changes in the frontal sinus].

    PubMed

    Ianborisov, T M

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop indications for the surgical obliteration of the frontal sinus (FS) and evaluation of the results of this treatment in the patients with pathological conditions in FS resulting from an injury. A total of 49 patients (19 women and 30 men) aged from 16 to 72 years with various post-traumatic pathologies affecting the frontal sinus were examined and treated. The time span between receiving the injury and admittance to the hospital varied from 3 months to 18 years. Forty four (89.8%) patients of the 44 enrolled in the study underwent obliterative surgery. During the follow-up period, 38 (86.4%) patients of the 44 had no complaints and were completely satisfied with the cosmetic outcome of the treatment. The following conclusions were drawn from the results of this study. (1) preoperative examination of the patients suffering the consequences of an injury to the frontal sinus must include CT and MRI for the determination of the changes that do not allow to preserve FS intact as an air cavity. (2) the indications for obliterative surgery on the frontal sinus include lateral localization of mucocele, nasal liquorrhea through the frontal sinus, extensive cicatrical and/or bony obliteration of the frontal ostium, extensive lesions of FS mucosa and inefficient FS draining by the median drainage technique for the treatment of polypous pansinusitis. (3) the surgical approach for frontal sinus obliteration depends on the character of traumatic skin changes in the frontal region and the size of the sinus. (4) MRI of paranasal sinuses in the postoperative period is of high informative value for both the estimation of the transplant state and the diagnostics of complications. PMID:23268247

  11. Controversial issues of optimal surgical timing and patient selection in the treatment planning of otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shiao, An-Suey; Kuo, Chin-Lung; Cheng, Hsiu-Lien; Wang, Mao-Che; Chu, Chia-Huei

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of clinical factors on the outcomes of otosclerosis surgery and support patients' access to evidence-based information in pre-operative counseling to optimize their choices. A total of 109 ears in 93 patients undergoing stapes surgery in a tertiary referral center were included. Variables with a potential impact on hearing outcomes were recorded, with an emphasis on factors that were readily available pre-operatively. Hearing success was defined as a post-operative air-bone gap ?10 dB. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors independently contributing to the prediction of hearing success. The mean follow-up period was 18.0 months. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that none of the pre-operative factors (piston type, age, sex, affected side, tinnitus, vertigo, and pre-operative hearing thresholds) affected hearing success significantly (all p > 0.05). In conclusion, self-crimping Nitinol piston provides comparable hearing outcomes with conventional manual-crimping prostheses. However, Nitinol piston offers a technical simplification of a surgical procedure and an easier surgical choice for patients. In addition, age is not a detriment to hearing gain and instead might result in better use of hearing aids in older adults, thus facilitating social hearing recovery. Finally, hearing success does not depend on the extent of pre-operative hearing loss. Hence, patients with poor cochlear function should not be considered poor candidates for surgery. The predictive model has established recommendations for otologists for better case selection, and factors that are readily available pre-operatively may inform patients more explicitly about expected post-operative audiometric results. PMID:23632874

  12. Outcomes for incisional hernia repair in patients undergoing concomitant surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Altom, Laura K; Graham, Laura A; Gray, Stephen H; Snyder, Christopher W; Vick, Catherine C; Hawn, Mary T

    2012-02-01

    The safety and efficacy of performing concomitant surgical procedures with an incisional hernia repair (IHR) is not well understood. There are conflicting reports on the outcomes for permanent mesh implantation in the setting of clean-contaminated procedures. The purpose of this study was to review the effect of concomitant surgical procedures on IHR outcomes. This is a retrospective multisite cohort of patients undergoing elective IHR at 16 Veterans Affairs hospitals from 1998 to 2002. Concomitant procedure status, hernia characteristics, and operative details were determined using physician-abstracted operative notes. Hernia outcomes of recurrence and mesh explantation were determined from the medical chart. ?(2) tests, Kaplan-Meier curves, and Cox regression were used to evaluate the effects of concomitant status on hernia outcomes. Of the 1495 elective IHRs, 75 (4.8%) were same site and 56 (3.8%) different site concomitant procedures. At median follow-up of 69.3 months (range 19.1-98.3), 33.6 per cent of patients had a recurrence, mesh explantation, or both. Permanent mesh placement was less likely among concomitant procedures as compared with nonconcomitant procedures (P < 0.0001). Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models of hernia outcomes resulted in an increased hazard for recurrence among same site clean procedures (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 1.8, P = 0.03) and an increased hazard for mesh explantation among same site clean-contaminated procedures (HR = 8.4, P = 0.002). Concomitant same site procedures are significantly associated with adverse hernia outcomes as compared with isolated IHR or IHR with other site concomitant procedures. The high failure rate of hernia repairs among same site concomitant procedures should be taken into account during the surgical decision-making process. PMID:22369837

  13. Continuous cardiac output measurement: pulse contour analysis vs thermodilution technique in cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Rödig, G; Prasser, C; Keyl, C; Liebold, A; Hobbhahn, J

    1999-04-01

    We have analysed the clinical agreement between two methods of continuous cardiac output measurement pulse contour analysis (PCCO) and a continuous thermodilution technique (CCO), were both compared with the intermittent bolus thermodilution technique (BCO). Measurements were performed in 26 cardiac surgical patients (groups 1 and 2, 13 patients each, with an ejection fraction > 45% and < 45%, respectively) at 12 selected times. During operation, mean differences (bias) between PCCO-BCO and CCO-BCO did not differ in either group. However, phenylephrine-induced increases in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) by approximately 60% resulted in significant differences. Significantly higher absolute bias values of PCCO-BCO compared with CCO-BCO were also found early after operation in the ICU. Thus PCCO and CCO provided comparable measurements during coronary bypass surgery. After marked changes in SVR, further calibration of the PCCO device is necessary. PMID:10472216

  14. Recurrence of vestibular (acoustic) schwannomas in surgical patients where preservation of facial and cochlear nerve is the priority.

    PubMed

    Cerullo, L; Grutsch, J; Osterdock, R

    1998-12-01

    The risk of tumour recurrence was measured in a series of surgically treated vestibular (acoustic) schwannoma patients where preservation of facial and cochlear nerve function was a routine objective. This report describes the influence of this surgical philosophy on the hazards of tumour recurrence or continued growth from residual tumour cells left in situ. A series of 116 consecutive vestibular schwannoma patients underwent primary surgical resection in a general community hospital by a single neurosurgeon. Recurrence of a tumour was assessed radiologically. Eighteen patients experienced a recurrence. No relationship was found between recurrence and age, residual coagulated morsels of tumour, preoperative tumour size, or opening of the internal auditory canal. Time to recurrence ranged from six to one hundred and forty-eight months and all but two recurrent lesions were non symptomatic. Lifelong follow-up of these patients is therefore, suggested. PMID:10070464

  15. Percutaneous Antegrade Varicocele Embolization Via the Testicular Vein in a Patient with Recurrent Varicocele After Surgical Repair.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Carlos J; El-Hilal, Alexander H; Darcy, Michael D

    2014-09-01

    This is a case report of an adolescent male who underwent surgical ligation for a left-sided varicocele that recurred 2 years later. Standard retrograde embolization via the left renal vein was not possible, because there was no connection from the renal vein to the gonadal vein following surgical ligation. The patient was treated via antegrade access of the spermatic vein at the inguinal level with subsequent coil embolization. PMID:25192950

  16. Impaired microvascular endothelial function is restored by acute lower-limb exercise in post-surgical varicose vein patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markos Klonizakis; Garry Tew; Jonathan Michaels; John Saxton

    2009-01-01

    Evidence exists that cutaneous microvascular endothelial dysfunction persists in patients following varicose vein surgery. This study compared cutaneous microvascular function between post-surgical varicose vein patients and healthy controls and investigated whether any impairment of function can be attenuated by acute lower-limb exercise. Cutaneous flux responses of the gaiter area were measured in supine and standing positions before and after a

  17. Prevalence and Predictors of Adverse Events in Older Surgical Patients: Impact of the Present on Admission Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hongsoo; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Kovner, Christine; Zhao, Zhonglin; Boockvar, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To examine the effects of the present on admission (POA) indicator on the prevalence of and factors associated with postsurgical adverse events in older patients. Design and Methods: This is a secondary data analysis of 82,898 surgical patients aged 65 years or older in 252 acute care hospitals in California in 2004. Four…

  18. Prophylaxis of Candida infections in adult trauma and surgical intensive care patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mario Cruciani; Fausto de Lalla; Carlo Mengoli

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether systemic antifungal prophy- laxis decreases infectious morbidity and mortality in nonneutropenic, critically ill, trauma and surgical in- tensive care unit (ICU) adult patients. Design: Systematic review and meta- analysis of randomized clinical trials. We used a fixed effect model, with risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Participants: Patients admitted to ICU after surgery or

  19. Improving the Definition of Tumor Bed Boost With the Use of Surgical Clips and Image Registration in Breast Cancer Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Youlia M. Kirova; Pablo Castro Pena; Tarek Hijal; Nathalie Fournier-Bidoz; Fatima Laki; Brigitte Sigal-Zafrani; Rémi Dendale; Marc A. Bollet; Francois Campana; Alain Fourquet

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of a boost technique. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients underwent tumorectomy with placement of two or more clips in the surgical cavity before breast remodeling. Preoperative and postoperative computed tomography scans, with match-point registration, were performed on all patients. The relationship between the location of the gross tumor volume (GTV), defined on the preoperative scan,

  20. Surgical management of dural arteriovenous fistulas of the transverse-sigmoid sinus in 42 patients.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Morgan, Michael Kerin

    2013-04-01

    A retrospective study was performed to analyse a prospectively collected database from a single surgeon (M.K.M.) of transverse-sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF) between 1991 and August 2011. During the study period, 144 patients with 160 DAVF were managed. Sixty-five of the DAVF were located in the transverse-sigmoid sinus and 42 were treated with surgery, or embolisation and surgery. All patients who underwent surgery were symptomatic with retrograde cortical venous drainage. The average follow-up period was 18months (range, 2-82months). Total elimination of the DAVF was achieved in all instances, including two patients (5%) who required further surgery after postoperative cerebral angiography showed that some venous drainage had persisted after the first operation. There was no new permanent neurological deficit or mortality attributable to surgery. Our institutional experience shows that in selected patients with transverse-sigmoid sinus DAVF, the involved sinus can be surgically resected with a high success rate and it is as safe as many alternative options. We suggest that this definitive treatment option should be offered to patients, and the outcome should be compared to other treatment modalities. PMID:23352348

  1. HematologyOncology Doernbecher Hematology Oncology

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    -0644 or toll free: 888 346-0644 #12;HEMATOLOGYOnCOLOGY 2 Pediatric Hematology Oncology O V E R V I E W Oregon the field of pediatric hematology/oncology, and each physician has a focused area of expertise . Pediatric . Campus Drive Portland, OR 97239 Pediatric Hematology Oncology Our team is always available to you

  2. Postoperative Pain Management among Surgically Treated Patients in an Ethiopian Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Woldehaimanot, Tewodros Eyob; Eshetie, Tesfahun Chanie; Kerie, Mirkuzie Woldie

    2014-01-01

    Background Incidence of postoperative pain has been reported to be between 47–100%. Ineffective postoperative pain management results in tangible and intangible costs. The purpose of this study was to assess the processes and outcomes of pain management in the surgical wards of Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia. Methods and Findings A prospective cross sectional study was conducted among 252 postoperative patients during February 13 to April 30, 2012. A contextually modified and validated (Cronbach’s ? coefficient of 0.78) American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire was used to assess pain experience of patients. Patients’ charts were reviewed to assess the pattern of analgesic use. Incidence of postoperative pain was 91.4%, and remained high over 3 measurements (McNemar’s; p<0.05), and 80.1% of the patients were undertreated. The mean pain intensity, and pain interference on functional status were 6.72±1.44 and 5.61±1.13 on a 10 point Numerical rating scale respectively; both being strongly correlated(r?=?0.86: p<0.001). Pain intensity was varied by ethnicity, education and preoperative information (ANOVA; P<0.05). Only 50% of the patients were adequately satisfied with their pain management. As needed (prn), solo analgesic, null analgesic, and intramuscular orders were noted for 31.3%, 89.29%, 9.7% and 20.1% of the prescription orders respectively. Though under dose, diclofenac and tramadol were the top prescribed medications, and only 57% of their dose was administered. Linear regression model showed that the predictors of satisfaction were sex of an individual and pain interference with functional status. Conclusion Despite patients’ paradoxical high satisfaction with pain management, the majority of patients were inadequately and inappropriately treated. Thus, further research is needed to determine how best to break down current barriers to effective pain management. PMID:25033399

  3. Clinical and surgical outcomes after lumbar laminectomy: An analysis of 500 patients

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Abt, Nicholas B.; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to determine the clinical and surgical outcomes following lumbar laminectomy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of neurosurgical patients who underwent first-time, bilateral, 1-3 level laminectomies for degenerative lumbar disease. Patients with discectomy, complete facetectomy, and fusion were excluded. Results: Five hundred patients were followed for an average of 46.79 months. Following lumbar laminectomy, patients experienced statistically significant improvement in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, weakness, and sensory deficits. The rate of intraoperative durotomy was 10.00%; however, 1.60% experienced a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak. The risk of experiencing at least one postoperative complication with a lumbar laminectomy was 5.60%. Seventy-two patients (14.40%) required reoperations for progression of degenerative disease over a mean of 3.40 years. The most common symptoms prior to reoperation included back pain (54.17%), radiculopathy (47.22%), weakness (18.06%), sensory deficit (15.28%), and neurogenic claudication (19.44%). The relative risk of reoperation for patients with postoperative back pain was 6.14 times higher than those without postoperative back pain (P < 0.001). Of the 72 patients undergoing reoperations, 55.56% underwent decompression alone, while 44.44% underwent decompression and posterolateral fusions. When considering all-time reoperations, the lifetime risk of requiring a fusion after a lumbar laminectomy based on this study (average follow-up of 46.79 months) was 8.0%. Conclusion: Patients experienced statistically significant improvements in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, motor weakness, and sensory deficit following lumbar laminectomy. Incidental durotomy rate was 10.00%. Following a first-time laminectomy, the reoperation rate was 14.4% over a mean of 3.40 years. PMID:26005583

  4. Surgical management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Vincent G.; Kanagarajah, Prashanth

    2011-01-01

    Upper tract urothelial cell carcinoma accounts for 5% of all urothelial tumors. Compared to lower urinary tract tumors, upper tract urothelial carcinoma is diagnosed more frequently at advanced stages. Open radical nephroureterectomy remains the gold standard treatment option for upper tract tumors. However, with the advancement of minimally invasive techniques and the benefits of these procedures regarding perioperative morbidity, cosmesis, and earlier convalescence, these options have shown promise in managing the patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma. Despite the perioperative advantages, concerns exist on the oncological safety after minimally invasive surgery. In this article, we provide a comprehensive overview of the surgical management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma. PMID:21716884

  5. AgNORs in cardiomyocytes from surgical patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mamaev, N N; Kovalyeva, O V; Amineva, Kh K; Gudkova AYa; Maier YuB; Polykarpov, I S; Schneider YuA; Proshin, S N; Lebedev, L V

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the interphase ribosomal RNA cistron activity of cardiomyocytes in surgical patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease by means of the nucleolar organiser region silver staining (AgNOR) technique. METHODS: Nucleoli were investigated in myocardial samples obtained from 46 patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease before, during, and soon after cardioplegia ischaemia. Cryostat sections of 10 microns thickness were air dried, fixed in methanol/glacial acetic acid (3:1) for 15 minutes, rinsed carefully with distilled water, incubated in 2 N formic acid for 10 minutes, and impregnated with silver colloid solution for 2.5-3 minutes at 68-70 degrees C. The lightly counterstained sections were examined under oil immersion at x1000 magnification. For the estimation of AgNOR numbers at least 100 silver stained cardiomyocyte and fibroblast nuclei were counted in each section. On the basis of these data, the mean number of AgNORs in each nucleus was determined. The Student's t test was used to compare the groups tested. RESULTS: The initial mean numbers of AgNORs varied greatly, demonstrating a difference between groups of patients with or without antecedent myocardial infarction (9.5 v 11.0; p < 0.05). During myocardial arrest, the numbers of AgNORs in cardiomyocytes were decreased in all but seven patients, while those in fibroblasts tended to increase. At the stage of reperfusion and myocardial warming, in all but three patients the numbers of AgNORs in cardiomyocytes either normalised or were even higher than the initial value. CONCLUSIONS: The AgNOR count in cardiomyocytes is a very sensitive test for the measurement of cardiac function in surgical patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease and could be useful for monitoring myocardial status during the course of surgery, including cardioplegia. The high risk group for surgery included patients with antecedent myocardial infarction and severe heart failure. It is thought that a reversible nucleolin/fibrillarin/pre-rRNA/small nucleolar RNA modification might account for this fast decline then rise in the AgNOR count in cardiomyocytes at the stages of cardioplegia and reperfusion, respectively. PMID:9893749

  6. Prevalence of calcification of the mitral valve annulus in patients undergoing surgical repair of mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Fusini, Laura; Ghulam Ali, Sarah; Tamborini, Gloria; Muratori, Manuela; Gripari, Paola; Maffessanti, Francesco; Celeste, Fabrizio; Guglielmo, Marco; Cefalù, Claudia; Alamanni, Francesco; Zanobini, Marco; Pepi, Mauro

    2014-06-01

    Factors correlating to mitral annulus calcification (MAC) include risk factors predisposing to atherosclerosis. In patients with mitral valve (MV) prolapse (MVP), other anatomic or mechanical factors have been supposed to facilitate MAC. The aims of this study were, in patients with MVP undergoing MV repair, (1) to describe the prevalence and characteristics of MAC, (2) to correlate MAC with clinical risk factors, coronary involvement, and aortic valve disease, and (3) to describe prevalence, site, and extension of MAC in fibroelastic deficiency (FED) versus Barlow's disease (BD) and correlate MAC to surgical outcomes (repair vs replacement). In 410 consecutive patients with MVP suitable for surgical MV repair, detailed clinical and echocardiographic data were collected to characterize MAC in BD and FED. MAC was found in 99 patients (24%). Age, female gender, coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular risk factors were correlated with MAC. MAC was equally distributed in FED and BD groups despite patients with FED being older with more cardiovascular risk factors. The most common localization of MAC was annular involvement adjacent to P2 (75%), P1 (31%), and P3 (35%). The presence of MAC affected surgical outcomes in both groups (8% patients with MAC underwent replacement after a first attempt of repair vs 3% without MAC). MAC is a common finding in patients undergoing MV repair, and several clinical characteristics correlate with MAC either in FED or BD. In conclusion, despite very high percentage of repairability, MAC influences surgical outcomes and very detailed echo evaluation is advocated. PMID:24837266

  7. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients: Surgical Clips as Surrogate for Breast Excision Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Ruiter, Peter de; Remeijer, Peter; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Rasch, Coen [Radiotherapy Department, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Radiotherapy Department, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the use of surgical clips as a surrogate for localization of the excision cavity and to quantify the stability of the clips' positions during the course of external beam radiotherapy for breast cancer patients, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one breast cancer patients with surgical clips placed in the breast excision cavity were treated in a supine position with 28 daily fractions. CBCT scans were regularly acquired for a setup correction protocol. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were registered to the planning CT scans, using gray-value registration of the excision cavity region and chamfer matching of the clips. Subsequently, residual setup errors (systematic [{Sigma}] and random [{sigma}]) of the excision cavity were estimated relative to the clips' registration. Finally, the stability of the clips' positions were quantified as the movement of each separate clip according to the center of gravity of the excision cavity. Results: When clips were used for online setup corrections, the residual errors of the excision cavity were {Sigma}{sub left-right} = 1.2, {sigma}{sub left-right} = 1.0; {Sigma}{sub cranial-caudal} = 1.3, {sigma}{sub cranial-caudal} = 1.2; and {Sigma}{sub anterior-posterior} = 0.7, {sigma}{sub anterior-posterior} = 0.9 mm. Furthermore, the average distance (over all patients) between the clips and centers of gravity of the excision cavities was 18.8 mm (on the planning CT) and was reduced to 17.4 mm (measured on the last CBCT scan). Conclusion: Clips move in the direction of the center of gravity of the excision cavity, on average, 1.4 mm. The clips are good surrogates for locating the excision cavity and providing small residual errors.

  8. PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name Radiography (Radiotherapy and Oncology)

    E-print Network

    Weyde, Tillman

    (Radiotherapy and Oncology) Award BSc (Hons) School School of Health Sciences Department or equivalent Division radiotherapy treatment for cancer patients. The BSc(Hons) Radiography (Radiotherapy & Oncology) programme to health and disease. Recognise and apply recent developments in the practice of oncology in particular

  9. Survey of attitudes of nurses and junior doctors to co-management of high risk surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Andrew; Jones, Daryl; Story, David A; Heland, Melodie; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2013-06-01

    Managing post-operative surgical patients can be complex, with many patients at risk of complications and mortality. We piloted a model for co-management of high risk surgical patients: the post-operative surveillance team (POST). We conducted a survey to test the proposition that POST would be popular with nurses and junior doctors. We conducted a questionnaire survey of nurses and doctors involved with the POST programme. Fifty-three nurses and 10 doctors responded to the survey: 60% response rate. Of 63 respondents: 62 (98%; 95% CI: 92-100%) agreed that POST was valuable, 61 (97%; 95% CI: 89-99%) agreed that POST should continue, and 61 (97%; 95% CI: 89-99%) agreed that they enjoyed working with POST. In open ended responses 39% commented that POST provided supervision, mentoring, education, or collaboration. We conclude that POST was popular with surgical ward nurses and doctors. This popularity is one factor supporting a permanent service. PMID:23869503

  10. Surgical Outcomes for Primary Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachments in Patients with Pseudophakia after Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Soo Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical features and surgical outcomes for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachments (RDs) in patients with pseudophakia after phacoemulsification. Methods The medical records of patients with pseudophakia after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation who had undergone surgery for primary rhegmatogenous RDs with a minimum duration of follow-up of 12 months were reviewed retrospectively. Results A total of 104 patients were enrolled in this study and 106 eyes were analyzed. Post-operative retinal attachment was achieved in 87 of the eyes (82.1%) and the final visual acuities (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution) were improved to 0.65 ± 0.49 from the baseline measurement of 1.51 ± 1.14 (p < 0.001). Re-operations were performed in 24 of the eyes (22.6%) and there were no visible retinal breaks in 30 of the eyes (28.3%). The failure to identify a retinal break during surgery was associated with a lower rate of retinal reattachment, worse final visual acuity, and a higher rate of re-operation (p = 0.002, p = 0.02, and p = 0.002, respectively). The location of the identified retinal break was more common in the superotemporal quadrant than in the other quadrants. Conclusions The inability to identify a retinal break during surgery was associated with a poor final outcome. Other factors were less important for the functional and anatomic success in patients with pseudophakic RDs. PMID:22131776

  11. Surgical treatment of large substernal thyroid goiter: analysis of 12 patients

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bo; Jiang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Jianjie; He, Yujun; Wen, Yayuan; Zhang, Shu; Luo, Donglin

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the clinical presentation, surgical treatment, complications, and risk of malignancy for large substernal goiter. From March 2010 to December 2012, 12 patients with large substernal thyroid goiter who underwent surgery in our Department were enrolled in the study. Their medical records were retrospectively analyzed. Collar-shaped incision was adequate for resection of the lesions in 10 (83%) patients, while two (17%) patients required combined cervical-thoracic incision. In addition, one case was subjected to postoperative tracheotomy. Transient hypocalcaemia occurred in one case. The incidence of transient hoarseness, tracheomalacia and hypothyroidism was 8.3%. There was no perioperative bleeding, thyroid storm as well as other serious complications. All patients were clinically cured. Therefore, cervical collar incision is nearly always adequate for most cases of larger substernal goiter, and sternotomy can be avoided. Furthermore, the application of intraoperative ultrasonic knife can effectively reduce intraoperative and postoperative complications. Aggressive perioperative management is crucial for the successful removal of large substernal goiter. PMID:23936586

  12. Ultrasonography-Guided Surgical Clip Placement for Tumor Localization in Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Inyoung; Kook, Shin Ho; Choi, Yoon Jung; Park, Chan Heun; Park, Yong Lai; Kim, Dong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the feasibility of using surgical clips as markers for tumor localization and their effect on the imaging evaluation of treatment responses after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Methods A total of 16 breast cancers confirmed by needle biopsy in 15 patients were included in this study from October 2012 to June 2014. Under ultrasonography (US)-guidance, the surgical clips were placed prior to NAC. Additional mammography, breast US, and breast magnetic resonance examinations were performed within 10 days before surgery. The time period from marker insertion to operation date was documented. Images acquired via the three modalities were evalu-ated for the following parameters: location of clip, clip migration (>1 cm), the presence of complications from clip placement, and the effect of clips on the assessment of treatment. Results The mean time period was 128.6±34.4 days (median, 132.0 days) from the date of clip insertion to the date of surgery. The mean number of inserted clips was 2.3±0.7 (median, 2.0). Clip migration was not visualized by imaging in any patient, and there were no complications reported. Surgical clips did not negatively affect the assessment of treatment responses to NAC. Conclusion Surgical clips may replace commercial tissue markers for tumor localization in breast cancer patients undergoing NAC without migration. Surgical clips are well tolerated and safe for the patient, easily visualized on imaging, do not interfere with treatment response, and are cost-effective. PMID:25834610

  13. Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Leanne M.; Middleton, Philippa F.; Anthony, Adrian; Hamdorf, Jeffrey; Cregan, Patrick; Scott, David; Maddern, Guy J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of surgical simulation compared with other methods of surgical training. Summary Background Data: Surgical simulation (with or without computers) is attractive because it avoids the use of patients for skills practice and provides relevant technical training for trainees before they operate on humans. Methods: Studies were identified through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and other databases until April 2005. Included studies must have been randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing any training technique using at least some elements of surgical simulation, which reported measures of surgical task performance. Results: Thirty RCTs with 760 participants were able to be included, although the quality of the RCTs was often poor. Computer simulation generally showed better results than no training at all (and than physical trainer/model training in one RCT), but was not convincingly superior to standard training (such as surgical drills) or video simulation (particularly when assessed by operative performance). Video simulation did not show consistently better results than groups with no training at all, and there were not enough data to determine if video simulation was better than standard training or the use of models. Model simulation may have been better than standard training, and cadaver training may have been better than model training. Conclusions: While there may be compelling reasons to reduce reliance on patients, cadavers, and animals for surgical training, none of the methods of simulated training has yet been shown to be better than other forms of surgical training. PMID:16495690

  14. Surgical management of regional lymph nodes in patients with melanoma. Experience with 4682 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Slingluff, C L; Stidham, K R; Ricci, W M; Stanley, W E; Seigler, H F

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a large number of patients with cutaneous melanoma who had or who were at risk for lymph node metastases to contribute to the understanding of the behavior of and appropriate management of draining nodes. A major goal of the study was to reassess the clinical impact of elective lymph node dissections (ELND) in a large patient population. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Large retrospective studies suggest that ELND may improve the prognosis of patients with intermediate thickness melanomas; however, that improvement has not been observed in two randomized prospective controlled trials. METHODS: The charts of 4682 patients treated at a single institution for localized or regional disease were reviewed individually. The median follow-up was 4.7 years, with 814 patients followed more than 10 years. The data were tabulated and evaluated with the aid of a computer data base system. RESULTS: Among patients with nodal metastases, 10% of nodal metastases were to contralateral nodes, and 6% were to nodal basins that would not be predicted by classic models of lymphatic drainage; in 13% of patients, nodal metastases occurred to greater than one nodal basin (3% of the entire study group). For all thickness ranges, the incidence of nodal metastases was comparable to the incidence of distant metastases; intermediate-thickness lesions had no relative predilection for nodal metastases. At the initial evaluation, regional nodal basins were clinically negative in 3550 patients, of whom 911 (25.7%) underwent ELND. Stratified into five thickness groups (< 0.76 mm, 0.76 to 1.5 mm, 1.5 to 2.5 mm, 2.5 to 4 mm, and > 4 mm), pathologically positive nodes were identified in 0%, 5%, 16%, 24%, and 36%, respectively (16% overall). Among the 911 patients who underwent ELND, 214 (23%) had nodal metastases, 143 at the time of ELND and 71 at a later date. Of these 71 patients, 31 (44%) had nodal metastases in a previously dissected nodal basin, and 40 (56%) had them in basins not previously dissected. The survival of patients with clinically negative nodes treated with and without ELND were compared. The two groups were well matched for major prognostic factors. Stratified by Breslow thickness and primary site, no significant improvement in survival was observed with ELND. CONCLUSIONS: Because of the significant incidence of metastases to contralateral and atypical nodal basins, lymphoscintigraphy may be justified for the preoperative evaluation of patients for ELND. However, the therapeutic value of ELND is questionable as a result of (1) the finding that the risk of nodal metastases is not relatively more common than is that of distant metastases among patients with intermediate-thickness melanomas, (2) the fact that only 16% of ELND were positive, (3) the finding that ELND may not prevent recurrent nodal disease in the dissected basin, and (4) the absence of any apparent impact on survival among patients who underwent ELND. PMID:8129482

  15. Effects of Degree of Surgical Correction for Flatfoot Deformity in Patient-Specific Computational Models.

    PubMed

    Spratley, E M; Matheis, E A; Hayes, C W; Adelaar, R S; Wayne, J S

    2015-08-01

    A cohort of adult acquired flatfoot deformity rigid-body models was developed to investigate the effects of isolated tendon transfer with successive levels of medializing calcaneal osteotomy (MCO). Following IRB approval, six diagnosed flatfoot sufferers were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their scans used to derive patient-specific models. Single-leg stance was modeled, constrained solely through physiologic joint contact, passive soft-tissue tension, extrinsic muscle force, body weight, and without assumptions of idealized mechanical joints. Surgical effect was quantified using simulated mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) X-rays, pedobarography, soft-tissue strains, and joint contact force. Radiographic changes varied across states with the largest average improvements for the tendon transfer (TT) + 10 mm MCO state evidenced through ML and AP talo-1st metatarsal angles. Interestingly, 12 of 14 measures showed increased deformity following TT-only, though all increases disappeared with inclusion of MCO. Plantar force distributions showed medial forefoot offloading concomitant with increases laterally such that the most corrected state had 9.0% greater lateral load. Predicted alterations in spring, deltoid, and plantar fascia soft-tissue strain agreed with prior cadaveric and computational works suggesting decreased strain medially with successive surgical repair. Finally, joint contact force demonstrated consistent medial offloading concomitant with variable increases laterally. Rigid-body modeling thus offers novel advantages for the investigation of foot/ankle biomechanics not easily measured in vivo. PMID:25465617

  16. Systematic review of the use of computer simulation modeling of patient flow in surgical care.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Boris G; Sanchez, Victor; Vasilakis, Christos

    2011-02-01

    Computer simulation has been employed to evaluate proposed changes in the delivery of health care. However, little is known about the utility of simulation approaches for analysis of changes in the delivery of surgical care. We searched eight bibliographic databases for this comprehensive review of the literature published over the past five decades, and found 34 publications that reported on simulation models for the flow of surgical patients. The majority of these publications presented a description of the simulation approach: 91% outlined the underlying assumptions for modeling, 88% presented the system requirements, and 91% described the input and output data. However, only half of the publications reported that models were constructed to address the needs of policy-makers, and only 26% reported some involvement of health system managers and policy-makers in the simulation study. In addition, we found a wide variation in the presentation of assumptions, system requirements, input and output data, and results of simulation-based policy analysis. PMID:20703590

  17. Recent advances and limitations of surgical treatment for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Keiichi

    2011-05-10

    Recent advances in surgical treatment for pancreatic cancer have been remarkable. Pancreatoduodenectomy is a standard surgical procedure for cancer of the pancreatic head, and is now indicated even for elderly patients over 80 years of age. Pancreatoduodenectomy with combined resection of the peripancreatic vessels has improved survival, but extended resection including lymph nodes is considered to have no extra survival benefit. Furthermore, laparoscopic resection procedures including pancreatoduodenectomy, distal pancreatectomy, enucleation and central pancreatectomy can now be performed safely. Neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy using gemcitabine may further improve the surgical outcome. An understanding of the oncological aspects of pancreatic cancer and the development of surgical techniques and chemotherapy may further contribute to improving the outcome of surgery for pancreatic cancer. PMID:21611099

  18. Trial-based cost-effectiveness analysis comparing surgical and endoscopic drainage in patients with obstructive chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Laramée, Philippe; Wonderling, David; Cahen, Djuna L; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G; Gouma, Dirk J; Bruno, Marco J; Pereira, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    Objective Published evidence indicates that surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct was more effective than endoscopic drainage for patients with chronic pancreatitis. This analysis assessed the cost-effectiveness of surgical versus endoscopic drainage in obstructive chronic pancreatitis. Design This trial-based cost-utility analysis (ISRCTN04572410) was conducted from a UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective and during a 79-month time horizon. During the trial the details of the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and pancreatic insufficiency were collected. The resource use was varied in the sensitivity analysis based on a review of the literature. The health outcome was the Quality-Adjusted Life Year (QALY), generated using EQ-5D data collected during the trial. There were no pancreas-related deaths in the trial. All-cause mortality from the trial was incorporated into the QALY estimates in the sensitivity analysis. Setting Hospital. Participants Patients with obstructive chronic pancreatitis. Primary and secondary outcome measures Costs, QALYs and cost-effectiveness. Results The result of the base-case analysis was that surgical drainage dominated endoscopic drainage, being both more effective and less costly. The sensitivity analysis varied mortality and resource use and showed that the surgical option remained dominant in all scenarios. The probability of cost-effectiveness for surgical drainage was 100% for the base case and 82% in the assessed most conservative case scenario. Conclusions In obstructive chronic pancreatitis, surgical drainage is highly cost-effective compared with endoscopic drainage from a UK NHS perspective. PMID:24065699

  19. Lower Incidence of Hypo-Magnesemia in Surgical Intensive Care Unit Patients in 2011 Versus 2001

    PubMed Central

    Denny, John T.; Pantin, Enrique; Chiricolo, Antonio; Tse, James; Jan, Thomas; Chaudhry, Mohammad; Barsoum, Sylviana; Denny, Angela M.; Papp, Denes; Morgan, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypo-magnesemia is described to occur in as many as 65% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Magnesium (Mg) is a cofactor in over 300 enzymatic reactions involving energy metabolism, protein, and nucleic acid synthesis. The membrane pump that creates the electrical gradient across the cell membrane is dependent on Mg, and it is important in the activity of electrically excitable tissues. Since Mg regulates the movement of calcium in smooth muscle cells, it is also important in peripheral vascular tone and blood pressure. Studies have linked hypo-magnesemia to multiple chronic diseases and to a higher mortality rate. Methods To explore trends within our own tertiary care surgical ICU, we sampled our patients’ laboratory records in 2001 and in 2011. Hypo-magnesemia in our ICU is defined as an Mg less than 2.0 mg/dL. Results This retrospective review of all SICU patients from October to December revealed that there was a significant increase (P < 0.01) in the patients with their serum Mg level measured between 2001 (89%) and 2011 (95%). There was a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in patients with hypomagnesemia (< 2 mg/dL) between 2001 (47.5%) and 2011 (33.0%). On the other hand, there was a significant increase (P < 0.001) in patients with normal serum Mg level (> 2 mg/dL) between 2001 (52.5%) and 2011 (67.0%). Conclusions There was not only more monitoring of Mg in 2011, but a lower incidence of hypo-Mg compared to 2001. Possible explanations include changing patterns of antibiotic and diuretic use, less amphotericin use, more frequent laboratory surveillance, and better trained ICU practitioners. PMID:25699122

  20. Nursing outcomes content validation according to Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) for clinical, surgical and critical patients.

    PubMed

    Seganfredo, Deborah Hein; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the Nursing Outcomes (NO) from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) for the two Nursing Diagnoses (ND) most frequent in hospitalized surgical, clinical and critical patients. The content validation of the REs was performed adapting the Fehring Model. The sample consisted of 12 expert nurses. The instrument for data collection consisted of the NOs proposed by NOC for the two NDs in the study, its definition and a five-point Likert scale. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The NOs that obtained averages of 0.80 or higher were validated. The ND Risk for Infection was the most frequent, being validated eight (38.1%) of 21 NOs proposed by the NOC. The ND Self-Care Deficit: Bathing/Hygiene was the second most frequent and five (14.28%) out of 35 NOs were validated. PMID:21412627

  1. Surgical outcomes of craniocervial junction meningiomas: A series of 22 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Mohamad; Ma, Ting Martin; Xu, Risheng; Weingart, Jon; Olivi, Alessandro; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Tamargo, Rafael J.; Brem, Henry; Bydon, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective We present our experience in managing craniocervical junction meningiomas and discuss various surgical approaches and outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 22 consecutive cases of craniocervical junction meningiomas operated on between August 1995 and May 2012. Results There were 15 female and 7 male patients (mean age: 54 years). Meningiomas were classified based on origin as spinocranial (7 cases) or craniospinal (15 cases). Additionally, the tumors were divided into anatomical location relative to the brainstem or spinal cord: there were 2 anterior tumors, 7 anterolateral, 12 lateral, and 1 posterolateral. Surgical approaches included the posterior midline sub-occipital approach (9 cases), the far lateral approach (12 cases) and the lateral retrosigmoid approach (1 case). Gross-total resection was achieved in 45% of patients and subtotal in 55%. The most common post-operative complications were cranial nerve (CN) IX and X deficits. The mortality rate was 4.5%. There have been no recurrences to date with a mean follow-up was 46.5 months and the mean Karnofsky score at the last follow-up of 82.3. In this series, spinocranial tumors were detected at a smaller size (p = 0.0724) and treated earlier (p = 0.1398) than craniospinal tumors. They were associated with a higher rate of total resection (p = 0.0007), fewer post-operative CN IX or X deficits (p = 0.0053), and shorter hospitalizations (p = 0.08). Conclusion Our experience suggests that posterior midline suboccipital or far-lateral approaches with minimal condylar drilling and vertebral artery mobilization were suitable for most cases in this series. PMID:24438809

  2. Determinants of Malnutrition and Post-operative Complications in Hospitalized Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, José Luiz Braga

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The study aimed to determine the nutritional status (NS) of hospitalized surgical patients and investigate a possible association between NS and type of disease, type of surgery and post-operative complications. The gender, age, disease, surgery, complications, length of hospital stay, number of medications, laboratory test results, and energy intake of 388 hospitalized surgical patients were recorded. NS was determined by classical anthropometry. The inclusion criteria were: nutritional status assessment done within the first 24 hours of admission, age ?20 years, and complete medical history. Univariate and multiple Cox's regression analyses were employed to determine which variables were possible risk factors of malnutrition and complications. Malnutrition was more common in males (p=0.017), individuals aged 70 to 79 years (p=0.000), and individuals with neoplasms and digestive tract diseases (p=0.000). Malnourished individuals had longer hospital stays (p=0.013) and required more medications (p=0.001). The risk of malnutrition was associated with age and disease. Individuals aged 70 years or more had a two-fold increased risk of malnutrition (p=0.014; RR=2.207; 95% CI 1.169-4.165); those with neoplasms (p=0.008; RR=14.950; 95% CI 2.011-111.151) and those having digestive tract diseases (p=0.009; RR=14.826; 95% CI 1.939-113.362) had a 14-fold increased risk of malnutrition. Complications prevailed in older individuals (p=0.016), individuals with longer hospital stays (p=0.007), and individuals who died (p=0.002). The risk of complications was associated with age and BMI. In the present study, the risk of malnutrition was associated with age and type of disease; old age and low BMI may increase complications. PMID:25395903

  3. Timing of Surgical Intervention with Cochlear Implant in Patients with Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tien-Chen; Lee, Li-Ang; Chao, Wei-Chieh; Tsou, Yung-Ting; Ng, Shu-Hang

    2013-01-01

    Objectives (1) To report the speech perception and intelligibility results of Mandarin-speaking patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) after cochlear implantation (CI); (2) to compare their performance with a group of CI users without LVAS; (3) to understand the effects of age at implantation and duration of implant use on the CI outcomes. The obtained data may be used to guide decisions about CI candidacy and surgical timing. Methods Forty-two patients with LVAS participating in this study were divided into two groups: the early group received CI before 5 years of age and the late group after 5. Open-set speech perception tests (on Mandarin tones, words and sentences) were administered one year after implantation and at the most recent follow-up visit. Categories of auditory perception (CAP) and Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) scale scores were also obtained. Results The patients with LVAS with more than 5 years of implant use (18 cases) achieved a mean score higher than 80% on the most recent speech perception tests and reached the highest level on the CAP/SIR scales. The early group developed speech perception and intelligibility steadily over time, while the late group had a rapid improvement during the first year after implantation. The two groups, regardless of their age at implantation, reached a similar performance level at the most recent follow-up visit. Conclusion High levels of speech performance are reached after 5 years of implant use in patients with LVAS. These patients do not necessarily need to wait until their hearing thresholds are higher than 90 dB HL or PB word score lower than 40% to receive CI. They can do it “earlier” when their speech perception and/or speech intelligibility do not reach the performance level suggested in this study. PMID:24282608

  4. Spine deformities in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, type IV - late results of surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Spinal deformities in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome are usually progressive and may require operative treatment. There is limited number of studies describing late results of surgery in this disease. Methods This is a retrospective study of the records of 11 patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, treated surgically between 1990 and 2007. All patients underwent surgical treatment for spinal deformity. Duration of operation, type of instrumentation, intraoperative blood loss, complications and number of additional surgeries were noted. Radiographic measurement was performed on standing AP and lateral radiographs acquired before surgery, just after and at final follow up. Results The mean follow up period was 5.5 ± 2.9 years (range 1-10 years). The mean preoperative thoracic and lumbar curve were 109.5 ± 19.9° (range 83° - 142°) and 75.6 ± 26.7° (range 40° - 108°) respectively. Posterior spine fusion alone was performed on 6 patients and combined anterior and posterior fusion (one- or two stage) on 5 cases. Posterior segmental spinal instrumentation was applied with use of hooks, screws and wires. The mean postoperative thoracic and lumbar curve improved to 79.3 ± 16.1° (range 56° - 105°) and 58.5 ± 27.7° (range 10° - 95°) respectively, with a slight loss of correction during follow up. The average thoracic and lumbar correction was 26.4 ± 14.9% (range 5.3 - 50.4%) and 26.3 ± 21.2% (range 7.9 - 75%). Postoperatively, the mean kyphosis was 79.5 ± 40.3° (range 21° -170°), and lordosis was 50.8 ± 18.6° (range 20° -79°). Hyperkyphosis increased during follow up while lordosis remained stable. Mean Th12-L2 angle was -3.5 ±9.9° (range -19° - 15°) postoperatively and did not change significantly during follow up. Conclusions Huge spinal deformities in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome require complex and extensive surgery. There is a big risk of sagittal imbalance in this group. PMID:21108838

  5. Medical Oncology as a Discipline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Kennedy

    1997-01-01

    Medical oncology has become a major subspecialty discipline of internal medicine within only 25 years. The special skill of oncologists is judgement in matters relating to cancer. This specialty brought the necessary expertise for cancer management into the community, improved care of patients with cancer worldwide, and provided a significant impact on cancer education and cancer research. Current manpower needs

  6. The Prevalence of Malnutrition and Effectiveness of STRONGkids Tool in the Identification of Malnutrition Risks among Pediatric Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Durakba?a, Çi?dem Ulukaya; Fettaho?lu, Selma; Bayar, Ahu; Mutus, Murat; Okur, Hamit

    2014-01-01

    Background: High prevalence of malnutrition along with the risk for the development of malnutrition in hospitalised children has been reported. However, this problem remains largely unrecognised by healthcare workers. Aims: To determine the prevalence of malnutrition and effectiveness of STRONGkids nutritional risk screening (NRS) tool in the identification of malnutrition risk among pediatric surgical patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: A total of 494 pediatric surgical patients (median age 59 months, 75.8% males) were included in this prospective study conducted over 3 months. SD-scores surgical patients. Acute malnutrition was identified in 10.1% of patients and more commonly in patients aged ?60 months than aged >60 months (13.4 vs. 6.6%, p=0.012). Chronic malnutrition was identified in 23 (4.6%) of patients with no significant difference between age groups. There were 7 (1.4%) children with coexistent acute and chronic malnutrition. The STRONGkids tool revealed that 35.7% of patients were either in the moderate or high risk group for malnutrition. Malnutrition, as revealed by anthropometric measurements, was more likely in the presence of gastrointestinal (26.9%, p=0.004) and inguinoscrotal/penile surgery (4.0%, p=0.031), co-morbidities affecting nutritional status (p<0.001) and inpatient admissions (p=0.014). Among patients categorized as low risk for malnutrition, there were more outpatients than inpatients (89.3 vs. 10.7%, p<0.001) and more elective surgery cases than emergency surgery cases (93.4 vs. 6.6%, p<0.001). Conclusion: Providing data on the prevalence of malnutrition and risk of malnutrition in a prospectively recruited group of hospitalised pediatric surgical patients, the data acquired in the present study emphasise the need to raise clinician’s awareness about the importance of nutritional status assessment among hospitalised pediatric patients and the benefits of identifying patients at the risk of nutritional depletion before malnutrition occurs. Our findings support the use of the STRONGkids tool among pediatric surgical patients to identify patients at risk for malnutrition and to increase the physician’s awareness of nutritional assessment among hospitalised patients upon admission. PMID:25667785

  7. The use of surveillance and preventative measures for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infections in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ) found that Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with up to 375,000 infections and 23,000 deaths in the United States. It is a major cause of surgical site infections, with a higher mortality and longer duration of care than Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. A multifactorial bundled approach is needed to control this epidemic, with single interventions unlikely to have a significant impact on attenuating MRSA infection rates. Active surveillance has been studied in a wide range of surgical patients, including surgical intensive care and non-intensive care units; cardiac, vascular, orthopedic, obstetric, head and neck cancer and gastrostomy patients. There is sufficient evidence demonstrating a beneficial effect of surveillance and eradication prior to surgery to recommend its use on an expanded basis. Studies on MRSA surveillance in surgical patients that were published over the last 10 years were reviewed. In at least five of these studies, the MRSA colonization status of patients was reported to be a factor in preoperative antibiotic selection, with the modification of treatment regiments including the switching to vancomycin or teicoplanin in MRSA positive preoperative patients. Several authors also used decolonization protocols on all preoperative patients but used surveillance to determine the duration of the decolonization. Universal decolonization of all patients, regardless of MRSA status has been advocated as an alternative prevention protocol in which surveillance is not utilized. Concern exists regarding antimicrobial stewardship. The daily and universal use of intranasal antibiotics and/or antiseptic washes may encourage the promotion of bacterial resistance and provide a competitive advantage to other more lethal organisms. Decolonization protocols which indiscriminately neutralize all bacteria may not be the best approach. If a patient's microbiome is markedly challenged with antimicrobials, rebuilding it with replacement commensal bacteria may become a future therapy. Preoperative MRSA surveillance allows the selection of appropriate prophylactic antibiotics, the use of extended decolonization protocols in positive patients, and provides needed data for epidemiological studies. PMID:24847437

  8. Plyometric and agility training into the regimen of a patient with post-surgical anterior knee pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leanne Newberry; Mark D. Bishop

    2006-01-01

    ObjectivesThe objective of this case report is to present an approach to clinical outcome assessment for a high-level athlete with post-surgical anterior knee pain. Additionally systematic dosage and patient response to plyometric and agility training exercises is presented.

  9. [Electronic data processing of patient performance assessment and nursing care documentation on the surgical intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Grohs, N; Brandt, J; Muhl, E

    1997-01-01

    A software was created that picks up the attainments and procedures of a surgical intensive care unit on a computer to control and handle the processes and operations. After the data have been obtained, they are used for science and for the controlling department to establish what costs are incurred for a patient. PMID:9574438

  10. Comparative study of the efficacy of fluconazole versus amphotericin B\\/flucytosine in surgical patients with systemic mycoses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Kujath; C. Boos; K. Lerch; P. Kochendörfer

    1993-01-01

    Summary In an open, prospective, randomized study, the efficacy of fluconazole was compared with that of the combination amphotericin B\\/flucytosine. Forty surgical patients with deep-seated mycoses were included in the study. Absolute inclusion criteria were histological finding of fungi in a tissue sample taken during surgery from e. g. peritoneum, pancreas, lungs or trachea, a positive blood culture or candida

  11. Continuous intravenous insulin infusion reduces the incidence of deep sternal wound infection in diabetic patients after cardiac surgical procedures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony P Furnary; Kathryn J Zerr; Gary L Grunkemeier; Albert Starr

    1999-01-01

    Background. Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for deep sternal wound infection after open heart surgical procedures. We previously showed that elevated postoperative blood glucose levels are a predictor of deep sternal wound infection in diabetic patients. Therefore, we hypothesized that aggressive intravenous pharmacologic control of postoperative blood glucose levels would reduce the incidence of deep sternal wound infection.Methods. In

  12. [The results of surgical treatment of patients with laryngeal carcinoma in years 1988-1989 in four departments of otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    Semczuk, B; Szmeja, Z; Janczewski, G; Olszewski, E; Kruk-Zagajewska, A; Horoch, A; Tryka, E; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, E; Sieradzki, A

    1998-01-01

    In a group of 579 patients with laryngeal carcinoma treated surgically in years 1988-1989 in four departments of otorhinolaryngology of the Medical Academies in Pozna?, Warsaw, Cracow and Lublin, 72% survived 3 years without recurrence and 59% survived 5 years. Similar results were obtained in years 1986-1987. The authors discuss in detail the reasons for failures of the surgical treatment, i.e.: supraglottic localization of the cancer, its extensiveness in the larynx, the stage of clinical development, general condition of the patient, effectiveness of the operation, regularity of postsurgical examination, the degree of histological malignancy, blood transfusion during the operation, distant metastases, little efficiency of medical service in early diagnosis of laryngeal cancer, avoiding postsurgical radiation, subjective factors of the patients and the choice of the optimal method of the treatment. Few patients can be cured if the initial treatment fails. PMID:9760765

  13. [Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 3 in a patient after surgical treatment of Cushing syndrome].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Szkróbka, Witold; Okopie?, Bogus?aw

    2011-01-01

    In light of research carried out in recent years, it seems that autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes occur much more frequently than previously estimated. The underestimation of their real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical picture. On the basis of the clinical presentation, autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes may be divided into four different types. The most frequent of them, type 3, is composed of autoimmune thyroid disease associated with type 1 diabetes or other autoimmune conditions with the exception of Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In this article, we report a case of a young woman, with a family history of autoimmune disorders, in whom type 3 autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome developed several months after adrenalectomy performed because of Cushing syndrome. We describe in details diagnostic and treatment strategies applied in our patient and their impact on the course and outcome of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome. We conclude that immunosuppressive effects of glucocorticoid excess resulting from the presence of Cushing syndrome inhibited or reduced intensity of inflammatory processes responsible for the development of organ-specific autoimmune endocrine disorders. This case illustrates the need for clinical awareness of autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes in patients after surgically-induced normalization of adrenocortical hormone levels. PMID:22335143

  14. Comparative Effectiveness Research in Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Sonali; Tergas, Ana I.

    2015-01-01

    The field of gynecologic oncology is faced with a number of challenges including how to incorporate new drugs and procedures into practice, how to balance therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of treatment, how to individualize therapy to particular patients or groups of patients, and how to contain the rapidly rising costs associated with oncologic care. In this chapter we examine three common and highly debated clinical scenarios in gynecologic oncology: the initial management of ovarian cancer, the role of lymphadenectomy in the treatment of endometrial cancer, and the choice of adjuvant therapy for ovarian cancer. PMID:25677027

  15. Clinical evaluation with 18 months follow-up of new PTTM enhanced dental implants in maxillo-facial post-oncological patients

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Piero; Jamshir, Sara; Brauner, Edoardo; Di Carlo, Stefano; Ceci, Antonio; Piccoli, Luca; Pompa, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of this study is to present 18 months follow-up results of porous tantalum trabecular metal-enhanced titanium dental implant (PTTM) in implant supported prosthesis in post-oncological patients. Materials and methods A total of 25 PTTM implants were placed in each jaw of 6 patients that met specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Resonance Frequency Analysis (RFA) was conducted and Implant stability was recorded in ISQ values (Osstell ISQ, Osstell AB, Goteborg, Sweden) at implant placement and after 2,4,6,12 and 18 months of functional loading. Mean bone loss was also evaluated at the same interval of time on each periapical radiographs, bone levels were calculated by measuring the distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone to implant contact. Results Cumulative implant survival rate is 100% (n=25/25) to date and mean ISQ values recorded were: 72.14±5.61 (range= 50–81) at surgery, 64.39±8.12 (range=44–74) after 2 months, 74.26±7.14 (range=44–74) after 4 months, 76.84±7.65 (range=60–83) after 6 months, 78.13±4.14 (range=64–84) after 12 months and 80.22±6.23 (range=68–89) after 18 months of functional loading. Mean crestal marginal bone loss was 0.19±0.25 mm after 2 months of functional loading on periapical radiographs, 0.22±0.4 mm at 4 months, 0.3±0.46 mm at 6 months, 0.57±0.62 at 1 year and 0.64±0.60 mm after 18 months. Conclusions The results of this study, even if limited by the number of implants placed indicate that PTTM dental implants have a clinical efficacy in prosthetic rehabilitation of post-oncological patients, due to trabecular structure of the porous Ta metal that increases bone-implant connection values. PMID:25774249

  16. Safety and Efficacy of a New Parenteral Lipid Emulsion (SMOFlipid) in Surgical Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Multicenter Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norbert Mertes; Helmut Grimm; Peter Fürst; Peter Stehle

    2006-01-01

    Background\\/Aims: A new lipid emulsion based on soybean oil, medium chain triglycerides, olive oil and fish oil (SMOFlipid) was tested for safety, tolerance, metabolic and clinical efficacy in surgical patients. Methods: In a prospective, double-blind European multicenter study, postoperative patients (elective abdominal or thoracic surgery) were randomized to receive isonitrogenous, isoenergetic (30–35 kcal\\/kg) total parenteral nutrition over 5 postoperative days

  17. The surgical management of recurrent or residual pleomorphic adenomas of the parotid gland. Analysis and results in 40 patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Leverstein; R. M. Tiwari; G. B. Snow; J. E. van der Wal; I. van der Waal

    1997-01-01

    From 1974 to 1995, 40 patients were treated surgically at the University Hospital Vrije, Universiteit Amsterdam for recurrent\\u000a or residual pleomorphic adenomas of the parotid gland after previous surgery. The median interval between the initial procedure\\u000a and surgery for the recurrence was 122 months. Eleven patients had one or more attempts to resect tumor recurrences prior\\u000a to referral. During reoperation

  18. Acute and chronic effects of surgical thromboendarterectomy on exercise capacity and ventilatory efficiency in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T Iwase; N Nagaya; M Ando; T Satoh; F Sakamaki; S Kyotani; H Takaki; Y Goto; Y Ohkita; M Uematsu; N Nakanishi; K Miyatake

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo assess acute and chronic effects of surgical thromboendarterectomy on exercise capacity and ventilatory efficiency in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).DESIGNCardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed in 20 patients with CTEPH before thromboendarterectomy (baseline), one month after (early phase), and four months after (late phase). Peak oxygen uptake (peakV?o2) and the ventilatory response to carbon dioxide production (V?e-V?co2 slope)

  19. Radical surgical resection and high-dose intraoperative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) in patients with recurrent gynecologic cancers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary L Gemignani; Kaled M Alektiar; Mario Leitao; Boris Mychalczak; Dennis Chi; Ennapadam Venkatraman; Richard R Barakat; John P Curtin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine the outcome for patients with recurrent gynecologic tumors treated with radical resection and combined high-dose intraoperative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT).Methods and Materials: Between November 1993 and June 1998, 17 patients with recurrent gynecologic malignancies underwent radical surgical resection and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The mean age of the study group was 49 years (range 28–72 years). The site of the

  20. Determination of Prognostic Factors in Japanese Patients With Advanced Gastric Cancer Using the Data From a Randomized Controlled Trial, Japan Clinical Oncology Group 9912

    PubMed Central

    Boku, Narikazu; Mizusawa, Junki; Takashima, Atsuo; Yamada, Yasuhide; Yoshino, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Fukase, Kazutoshi; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Goto, Masahiro; Nishina, Tomohiro; Tamura, Takao; Tsuji, Akihito; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Background. In advanced gastric cancer (AGC), no globally accepted prognostic scoring system has been developed. Therefore, we explored baseline prognostic factors in Japanese AGC patients using the data from a randomized controlled trial, Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) 9912, which investigated the efficacy of systemic chemotherapy as a first-line treatment. Patients and Methods. Prognostic factors and prognostic indices for overall survival were screened and evaluated in patients enrolled in JCOG9912 using the Cox proportional hazard model. The Royal Marsden Hospital prognostic model was also applied to the JCOG9912 trial. Results. A total of 650 (92.3%) of the 704 patients randomized in the JCOG9912 trial, for whom complete data were available for multivariate analyses, was included in the present study (5-fluorouracil arm, n = 215; irinotecan plus cisplatin arm, n = 216; S-1 arm, n = 219). The median survival time (MST) for all patients was 11.8 months. To construct a prognostic index, we selected four risk factors by multivariate analysis: performance status ? 1, number of metastatic sites ? 2, no prior gastrectomy, and elevated alkaline phosphatase. MSTs were 17.0 months for patients categorized into the low-risk group, who had zero or one risk factor (n = 225); 10.4 months for patients in the moderate-risk group, who had two or three risk factors (n = 368); and 5.0 months for patients in the high-risk group, who had all four risk factors (n = 57). Conclusion. In the present study, we propose a new prognostic index for patients with AGC. This can be used for more appropriate patient stratification in future clinical trials. PMID:24668328

  1. [Fetal oncology].

    PubMed

    Jakobovits, Akos

    2007-12-16

    The author presents a review of benign and malignant tumors that may affect the fetus. Virtually all tumors that occur in children and adults may also develop in the fetus, and can be found in the neonate. For their early diagnosis ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are of critical importance. These techniques represent the cutting edge of contemporary diagnostic technology. Regretfully, the progress in perinatal diagnostic methodology has not been matched, as yet, by comparable therapeutic options. These are still in their experimental stages. Only a few centers perform surgical interventions. Options vary about the risk-benefit ratios of the respective operative procedures. PMID:18055362

  2. Beyond patient reported pain: perfusion magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates reproducible cerebral representation of ongoing post-surgical pain.

    PubMed

    Howard, Matthew A; Krause, Kristina; Khawaja, Nadine; Massat, Nathalie; Zelaya, Fernando; Schumann, Gunter; Huggins, John P; Vennart, William; Williams, Steven C R; Renton, Tara F

    2011-01-01

    Development of treatments for acute and chronic pain conditions remains a challenge, with an unmet need for improved sensitivity and reproducibility in measuring pain in patients. Here we used pulsed-continuous arterial spin-labelling [pCASL], a relatively novel perfusion magnetic-resonance imaging technique, in conjunction with a commonly-used post-surgical model, to measure changes in regional cerebral blood flow [rCBF] associated with the experience of being in ongoing pain. We demonstrate repeatable, reproducible assessment of ongoing pain that is independent of patient self-report. In a cross-over trial design, 16 participants requiring bilateral removal of lower-jaw third molars underwent pain-free pre-surgical pCASL scans. Following extraction of either left or right tooth, repeat scans were acquired during post-operative ongoing pain. When pain-free following surgical recovery, the pre/post-surgical scanning procedure was repeated for the remaining tooth. Voxelwise statistical comparison of pre and post-surgical scans was performed to reveal rCBF changes representing ongoing pain. In addition, rCBF values in predefined pain and control brain regions were obtained. rCBF increases (5-10%) representing post-surgical ongoing pain were identified bilaterally in a network including primary and secondary somatosensory, insula and cingulate cortices, thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, midbrain and brainstem (including trigeminal ganglion and principal-sensory nucleus), but not in a control region in visual cortex. rCBF changes were reproducible, with no rCBF differences identified across scans within-session or between post-surgical pain sessions. This is the first report of the cerebral representation of ongoing post-surgical pain without the need for exogenous tracers. Regions of rCBF increases are plausibly associated with pain and the technique is reproducible, providing an attractive proposition for testing interventions for on-going pain that do not rely solely on patient self-report. Our findings have the potential to improve our understanding of the cerebral representation of persistent painful conditions, leading to improved identification of specific patient sub-types and implementation of mechanism-based treatments. PMID:21373203

  3. Beyond Patient Reported Pain: Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Demonstrates Reproducible Cerebral Representation of Ongoing Post-Surgical Pain

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Matthew A.; Krause, Kristina; Khawaja, Nadine; Massat, Nathalie; Zelaya, Fernando; Schumann, Gunter; Huggins, John P.; Vennart, William; Williams, Steven C. R.; Renton, Tara F.

    2011-01-01

    Development of treatments for acute and chronic pain conditions remains a challenge, with an unmet need for improved sensitivity and reproducibility in measuring pain in patients. Here we used pulsed-continuous arterial spin-labelling [pCASL], a relatively novel perfusion magnetic-resonance imaging technique, in conjunction with a commonly-used post-surgical model, to measure changes in regional cerebral blood flow [rCBF] associated with the experience of being in ongoing pain. We demonstrate repeatable, reproducible assessment of ongoing pain that is independent of patient self-report. In a cross-over trial design, 16 participants requiring bilateral removal of lower-jaw third molars underwent pain-free pre-surgical pCASL scans. Following extraction of either left or right tooth, repeat scans were acquired during post-operative ongoing pain. When pain-free following surgical recovery, the pre/post-surgical scanning procedure was repeated for the remaining tooth. Voxelwise statistical comparison of pre and post-surgical scans was performed to reveal rCBF changes representing ongoing pain. In addition, rCBF values in predefined pain and control brain regions were obtained. rCBF increases (5–10%) representing post-surgical ongoing pain were identified bilaterally in a network including primary and secondary somatosensory, insula and cingulate cortices, thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, midbrain and brainstem (including trigeminal ganglion and principal-sensory nucleus), but not in a control region in visual cortex. rCBF changes were reproducible, with no rCBF differences identified across scans within-session or between post-surgical pain sessions. This is the first report of the cerebral representation of ongoing post-surgical pain without the need for exogenous tracers. Regions of rCBF increases are plausibly associated with pain and the technique is reproducible, providing an attractive proposition for testing interventions for on-going pain that do not rely solely on patient self-report. Our findings have the potential to improve our understanding of the cerebral representation of persistent painful conditions, leading to improved identification of specific patient sub-types and implementation of mechanism-based treatments. PMID:21373203

  4. Impact of bleeding-related complications and\\/or blood product transfusions on hospital costs in inpatient surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael E Stokes; Xin Ye; Manan Shah; Katie Mercaldi; Matthew W Reynolds; Marcia FT Rupnow; Jeffrey Hammond

    2011-01-01

    Background  Inadequate surgical hemostasis may lead to transfusion and\\/or other bleeding-related complications. This study examines the\\u000a incidence and costs of bleeding-related complications and\\/or blood product transfusions occurring as a consequence of surgery\\u000a in various inpatient surgical cohorts.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A retrospective analysis was conducted using Premier's Perspective™ hospital database. Patients who had an inpatient procedure\\u000a within a specialty of interest (cardiac, vascular, non-cardiac

  5. Study of patient satisfaction in a surgical unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, P.H.; Gupta, Shakti

    2012-01-01

    Background The hospitals have evolved from being an isolated sanatorium to a place with five star facilities. Patients and their relatives coming to the hospital not only expect world-class treatment, but also other facilities to make their stay comfortable in the hospital. This change in expectation has come due to tremendous growth of media and its exposure, as well as commercialization and improvement in facilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of patient/relatives satisfaction at tertiary care teaching hospital and feedback from them for improvement of the same. Methods The study was conducted by 1. Review of available national and international literature on the subject. 2. Carrying out survey amongst 50 patients and their relatives at one of the surgical unit by using structured questionnaire. 3. By analyzing the data using appropriate statistical methods. Results Eighty two percent people were satisfied with the service at admission counter while 81% were satisfied with room preparation at the time of admission. The nursing services satisfied 80% of people while 92% were satisfied with explanation about disease and treatment by doctor. The behavior of nurses, doctors and orderlies satisfied 92, 92 and 83% of people. The cleanliness of toilets satisfied only 49% while diet services satisfied 78% of people. Conclusion The five major satisfiers were behavior of doctors, explanation about disease and treatment, courtesy of staff at admission counter, behavior and cooperation of nurses. The five major dissatisfiers were cleanliness of toilets, quality of food, explanation about rules and regulation, behavior of orderlies and sanitary attendant and room preparedness. PMID:25983455

  6. Limb salvage in musculoskeletal oncology: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of musculoskeletal sarcomas has made vast strides in the last few decades. From an era where amputation was the only option to the current day function preserving resections and complex reconstructions has been a major advance. The objectives of extremity reconstruction after oncologic resection include providing skeletal stability where necessary, adequate wound coverage to allow early subsequent adjuvant therapy, optimising the aesthetic outcome and preservation of functional capability with early return to function. This article highlights the concepts of surgical margins in oncology, discusses the principles governing safe surgical resection in these tumors and summarises the current modalities and recent developments relevant to reconstruction after limb salvage. The rationale of choice of a particular resection modality, the unique challenges of reconstruction in skeletally immature individuals and the impact of adjuvant modalities like chemotherapy and radiotherapy on surgical outcomes are also discussed. PMID:25190911

  7. The Potential Impact of Functional Imaging on Decision Making and Outcome in Patients Undergoing Surgical Revascularization.

    PubMed

    Plass, Andre; Goetti, Robert P; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Caliskan, Etem; Stolzmann, Paul; Wieser, Monika; Donati, Olivio; Alkadhi, Hatem; Falk, Volkmar

    2015-06-01

    Objective?Coronary angiography (CA) remains the standard for preoperative planning for surgical revascularization. However, besides anatomical imaging, current guidelines recommend additional functional imaging before a therapy decision is made. We assess the impact of functional imaging on the strategy of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with particular regards on postoperative patency and myocardial perfusion. Methods?After CA, 55 patients (47 males/8 females; age: 65.1?±?9.5 years) underwent perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) before isolated CABG (n?=?31), CABG and concomitant valve surgery (valve?+?CABG; n?=?10) and isolated valve surgery (n?=?14; control). DSCT was used for analysis of significant stenosis, CMR for myocardial-perfusion to discriminate between: no ischemia (normal), ischemia, or scar. The results, unknown to the surgeons, were compared with CA and related to the location and number of distal anastomoses. Nineteen CABG patients underwent follow-up CMR and DSCT (FU: 13?±?3 months) to compare the preop findings with the postop outcomes. Results?Thirty-nine patients either received CABG alone (n?=?31) or a combined procedure (n?=?10) with a total of 116 distal anastomoses. DSCT was compared with CA regarding accuracy of coronary stenosis and showed 91% sensitivity, 88% specificity, and negative/positive predictive values of 89/90%. In total, 880 myocardial segments (n?=?55, 16 segments/patient) were assessed by CMR. In 17% (149/880) of segments ischemia and in 8% (74/880) scar tissue was found. Interestingly, 14% (16/116) of bypass-anastomoses were placed on non-ischemic myocardium and 3% (4/116) on scar tissue. In a subgroup of 19 patients 304 segments were evaluated. Thirty-nine percent (88/304) of all segments showed ischemia preoperatively, while 94% (83/88) of these ischemic segments did not show any ischemia postoperatively. In regard to performed anastomoses, 79% of all grafts (49/62) were optimally placed, whereas 21% (13/62) were either placed into non-ischemic myocardium or scar tissue, including 10% occluded grafts (6/62). Conclusion?In the whole cohort analysis, 17% of grafts were placed in regions with either no ischemia or scar tissue. The subgroup analysis revealed that 94% of all ischemic segments were successfully revascularized after CABG. Thus, functional imaging could be a promising tool in preoperative planning of revascularization strategy. Avoidance of extensive and unnecessary grafting could further optimize outcomes after CABG. PMID:25463355

  8. Risk of bleeding in surgical patients treated with topical bovine thrombin sealants: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew W; Clark, John; Crean, Sheila; Samudrala, Srinath

    2008-01-01

    Background One of the most anticipated, but potentially serious complications during or after surgery are bleeding events. Among the many potential factors associated with bleeding complications in surgery, the use of bovine thrombin has been anecdotally identified as a possible cause of increased bleeding risk. Most of these reports of bleeding events in association with the use of topical bovine thrombin have been limited to case reports lacking clear cause and effect relationship determination. Recent studies have failed to establish significant differences in the rates of bleeding events between those treated with bovine thrombin and those treated with either human or recombinant thrombin. Methods We conducted a search of MEDLINE for the most recent past 10 years (1997–2007) and identified all published studies that reported a study of surgical patients with a clear objective to examine the risk of bleeding events in surgical patients. We also specifically noted the reporting of any topical bovine thrombin used during surgical procedures. We aimed to examine whether there were any differences in the risk of bleeds in general surgical populations as compared to those studies that reported exposure to topical bovine thrombin. Results We identified 21 clinical studies that addressed the risk of bleeding in surgery. Of these, 5 studies analyzed the use of bovine thrombin sealants in surgical patients. There were no standardized definitions for bleeding events employed across these studies. The rates of bleeds in the general surgery studies ranged from 0.1%–20.2%, with most studies reporting rates between 2.6%–4%. The rates of bleeding events ranged from 0.0%–13% in the bovine thrombin studies with most studies reporting between a 2%–3% rate. Conclusion The risk of bleeds was not clearly different in those studies reporting use of bovine thrombin in all patients compared to the other surgical populations studied. A well-designed and well-controlled study is needed to accurately examine the bleeding risks in surgical patients treated and unexposed to topical bovine thrombin, and to evaluate the independent risk associated with topical bovine thrombin as well as other risk factors. PMID:18348725

  9. A contemporary, single-institutional experience of surgical versus expectant management of congenital heart disease in trisomy 13 and 18 patients.

    PubMed

    Costello, John P; Weiderhold, Allison; Louis, Clauden; Shaughnessy, Conner; Peer, Syed M; Zurakowski, David; Jonas, Richard A; Nath, Dilip S

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine a large institutional experience of patients with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 in the setting of comorbid congenital heart disease and present the outcomes of surgical versus expectant management. It is a retrospective single-institution cohort study. Institutional review board approved this study. Thirteen consecutive trisomy 18 patients and three consecutive trisomy 13 patients (sixteen patients in total) with comorbid congenital heart disease who were evaluated by our institution's Division of Cardiovascular Surgery between January 2008 and December 2013 were included in the study. The primary outcome measures evaluated were operative mortality (for patients who received surgical management), overall mortality (for patients who received expectant management), and total length of survival during follow-up. Of the thirteen trisomy 18 patients, seven underwent surgical management and six received expectant management. With surgical management, operative mortality was 29 %, and 80 % of patients were alive after a median follow-up of 116 days. With expectant management, 50 % of patients died before hospital discharge. Of the three patients with trisomy 13, one patient underwent surgical management and two received expectant management. The patient who received surgical management with complete repair was alive at last follow-up over 2 years after surgery; both patients managed expectantly died before hospital discharge. Trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 patients with comorbid congenital heart disease can undergo successful cardiac surgical intervention. In this population, we advocate that nearly all patients with cardiovascular indications for operative congenital heart disease intervention should be offered complete surgical repair over palliative approaches for moderately complex congenital cardiac anomalies. PMID:25612784

  10. Complex Osteotomies of Tibial Plateau Malunions Using Computer-Assisted Planning and Patient-Specific Surgical Guides.

    PubMed

    Fürnstahl, Philipp; Vlachopoulos, Lazaros; Schweizer, Andreas; Fucentese, Sandro F; Koch, Peter P

    2015-08-01

    The accurate reduction of tibial plateau malunions can be challenging without guidance. In this work, we report on a novel technique that combines 3-dimensional computer-assisted planning with patient-specific surgical guides for improving reliability and accuracy of complex intraarticular corrective osteotomies. Preoperative planning based on 3-dimensional bone models was performed to simulate fragment mobilization and reduction in 3 cases. Surgical implementation of the preoperative plan using patient-specific cutting and reduction guides was evaluated; benefits and limitations of the approach were identified and discussed. The preliminary results are encouraging and show that complex, intraarticular corrective osteotomies can be accurately performed with this technique. For selective patients with complex malunions around the tibia plateau, this method might be an attractive option, with the potential to facilitate achieving the most accurate correction possible. PMID:25932528

  11. Carpal valgus in llamas and alpacas: Retrospective evaluation of patient characteristics, radiographic features and outcomes following surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Barbara; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F.; Huber, Michael J.; Parker, Jill E.; Semevolos, Stacy A.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated outcomes of surgical treatment for carpal valgus in New World camelids and correlated successful outcome (absence of carpal valgus determined by a veterinarian) with patient characteristics and radiographic features. Univariable and multivariable analyses of retrospective case data in 19 camelids (33 limbs) treated for carpal valgus between 1987 and 2010 revealed that procedures incorporating a distal radial transphyseal bridge were more likely (P = 0.03) to result in success after a single surgical procedure. A greater degree of angulation (> 19°, P = 0.02) and younger age at surgery (< 4 months, P = 0.03) were associated with unsuccessful outcome. Overall, 74% of limbs straightened, 15% overcorrected, and 11% had persistent valgus following surgical intervention. To straighten, 22% of limbs required multiple procedures, not including implant removal. According to owners, valgus returned following implant removal in 4 limbs that had straightened after surgery. PMID:25477542

  12. Carpal valgus in llamas and alpacas: Retrospective evaluation of patient characteristics, radiographic features and outcomes following surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Barbara; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F; Huber, Michael J; Parker, Jill E; Semevolos, Stacy A

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated outcomes of surgical treatment for carpal valgus in New World camelids and correlated successful outcome (absence of carpal valgus determined by a veterinarian) with patient characteristics and radiographic features. Univariable and multivariable analyses of retrospective case data in 19 camelids (33 limbs) treated for carpal valgus between 1987 and 2010 revealed that procedures incorporating a distal radial transphyseal bridge were more likely (P = 0.03) to result in success after a single surgical procedure. A greater degree of angulation (> 19°, P = 0.02) and younger age at surgery (< 4 months, P = 0.03) were associated with unsuccessful outcome. Overall, 74% of limbs straightened, 15% overcorrected, and 11% had persistent valgus following surgical intervention. To straighten, 22% of limbs required multiple procedures, not including implant removal. According to owners, valgus returned following implant removal in 4 limbs that had straightened after surgery. PMID:25477542

  13. An Administrative Data Approach to Examining Perioperative Antibiotic Use in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zevallos, Jose P

    2015-07-01

    The choice of perioperative antibiotics for head and neck oncologic surgery is the subject of significant controversy. Given the ever-increasing number of antibiotic options available, as well as the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, there is a need for renewed research on this important topic. In their recent publication, Langerman and colleagues explore the relationship between antibiotic choice, surgical site infections, and antibiotic-induced complications in patients undergoing total laryngectomy. They demonstrate wide variability in antibiotic regimens among patients undergoing total laryngectomy, as well as an association between increased risk of surgical site infections and clindamycin use. This study addresses a controversial subject affecting the daily care of patients with head and neck cancer, and the findings have the potential to significantly affect management. It also highlights the strengths and inherent limitations of an administrative data approach to head and neck cancer clinical research. PMID:26124464

  14. Gender, Race, and Survival: A Study in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases Patients Utilizing the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M., E-mail: videtig@ccf.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chao, Samuel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Brain Tumor and NeuroOncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rice, Thomas W. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Adelstein, David J. [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Barnett, Gene H. [Brain Tumor and NeuroOncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Mekhail, Tarek M. [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Vogelbaum, Michael A. [Brain Tumor and NeuroOncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Suh, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Brain Tumor and NeuroOncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To explore whether gender and race influence survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with brain metastases, using our large single-institution brain tumor database and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) brain metastases classification. Methods and materials: A retrospective review of a single-institution brain metastasis database for the interval January 1982 to September 2004 yielded 835 NSCLC patients with brain metastases for analysis. Patient subsets based on combinations of gender, race, and RPA class were then analyzed for survival differences. Results: Median follow-up was 5.4 months (range, 0-122.9 months). There were 485 male patients (M) (58.4%) and 346 female patients (F) (41.6%). Of the 828 evaluable patients (99%), 143 (17%) were black/African American (B) and 685 (83%) were white/Caucasian (W). Median survival time (MST) from time of brain metastasis diagnosis for all patients was 5.8 months. Median survival time by gender (F vs. M) and race (W vs. B) was 6.3 months vs. 5.5 months (p = 0.013) and 6.0 months vs. 5.2 months (p = 0.08), respectively. For patients stratified by RPA class, gender, and race, MST significantly favored BFs over BMs in Class II: 11.2 months vs. 4.6 months (p = 0.021). On multivariable analysis, significant variables were gender (p = 0.041, relative risk [RR] 0.83) and RPA class (p < 0.0001, RR 0.28 for I vs. III; p < 0.0001, RR 0.51 for II vs. III) but not race. Conclusions: Gender significantly influences NSCLC brain metastasis survival. Race trended to significance in overall survival but was not significant on multivariable analysis. Multivariable analysis identified gender and RPA classification as significant variables with respect to survival.

  15. Body Mass Index and its Association with Clinical Outcomes for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Enrolled on Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Schiller, Joan H.; Bonomi, Philip B.; Sandler, Alan B.; Brahmer, Julie R.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Johnson, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Obesity increases the risk of death from many adverse health outcomes and has also been linked with cancer outcomes. The impact of obesity on outcomes of advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients is unclear. Methods The authors evaluated the association of body mass index and outcomes in 2585 eligible patients enrolled to three consecutive first-line trials conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. Body mass index was categorized as underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (BMI: 18.5 to < 25 kg/m2), overweight (BMI: 25 to < 30 kg/m2) and obese (BMI ? 30 kg/m2). In addition to analyzing overall and progression-free survival, reasons for treatment discontinuation were also assessed by BMI group. Results 4.6% of patients were underweight, 44.1% were normal weight, 34.3% of patients were classified as overweight, and 16.9% were obese. Non-proportional hazards existed for obese patients relative to the other three groups of patients, with a change in OS hazard occurring at approximately 16 months. In multivariable Cox models, obese patients had superior outcomes earlier on study compared to normal/overweight patients 0.86 (p=0.04, 95% CI: 0.75–0.99), but later experienced increased hazard 1.54 (p<0.001, 95% CI: 1.22–1.94), indicating a time effect while undergoing treatment. Conclusion Data from these three trials suggest differential outcomes associated with body mass index, and additional studies of the mechanisms underlying this observation, as well as dietary and lifestyle interventions, are warranted to help optimize therapy. PMID:23887169

  16. A comparison of medium-chain and long-chain triglycerides in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z M; Zhang, S Y; Wang, X R; Yang, N F; Zhu, Y; Wilmore, D

    1993-01-01

    Available lipid emulsions made from soybean or safflower oil are classified as long-chain triglycerides (LCT). In contrast, medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) emulsions have different physical properties and are metabolized by other biochemical pathways. To compare the differences between these two fat emulsions, the authors studied 12 surgical patients and 6 volunteers. These subjects were randomly assigned to receive parenteral nutrition with MCT or LCT emulsion. Measurement of arterial and venous concentration differences across the forearm demonstrated that muscle utilization was significantly improved with MCT administration. There was also a trend toward improved nitrogen balance in the MCT group, and less weight loss in the postoperative period also was observed in this group. During the fat clearance test, the serum ketone concentrations were significantly higher in the MCT than the LCT group. The improvement in nitrogen retention may be associated with increasing ketone and insulin levels. Fat emulsions containing 50% MCT are safe for use in parenteral nutrition and may provide an alternate fuel that improves protein metabolism. PMID:8439215

  17. Essential Oils for Complementary Treatment of Surgical Patients: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Stea, Susanna; Beraudi, Alina; De Pasquale, Dalila

    2014-01-01

    Aromatherapy is the controlled use of plant essences for therapeutic purposes. Its applications are numerous (i.e., wellbeing, labour, infections, dementia, and anxiety treatment) but often they have not been scientifically validated. The aim of the present study is to review the available literature to determine if there is evidence for effectiveness of aromatherapy in surgical patients to treat anxiety and insomnia, to control pain and nausea, and to dress wound. Efficacy studies of lavender or orange and peppermint essential oils, to treat anxiety and nausea, respectively, have shown positive results. For other aspects, such as pain control, essential oils therapy has shown uncertain results. Finally, there are encouraging data for the treatment of infections, especially for tea tree oil, although current results are still inconclusive. It should also be considered that although they are, allergic reactions and toxicity can occur after oral ingestion. Therefore, while rigorous studies are being carried out, it is important that the therapeutic use of essential oils be performed in compliance with clinical safety standards. PMID:24707312

  18. The change in upper tract urolithiasis composition, surgical treatments and outcomes of para and quadriplegic patients over time.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Marisa M; Gettman, Matthew T; Patterson, David E; Rangel, Laureano; Krambeck, Amy E

    2014-10-01

    Stone disease in patients with spinal cord injury is a source of morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have indicated a decrease in infection-based urolithiasis in recent decades. We aimed to identify changes in stone composition and surgical outcomes in patients with para and quadriplegia over time. A retrospective review of para and quadriplegic patients from 1986 to 2011 who underwent surgical intervention for urolithiasis was performed, identifying 95 patients. The Mantel-Haenszel Chi square test was used to compare change in stone composition over time. The mean patient age was 44.0 years (range 18-88) and treatment included percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) 40 (42.1 %), ureteroscopy 28 (29.5 %), shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) 26 (27.4 %), and nephrectomy 1 (1 %). Overall stone-free status was found in 47.4 % with 19.0 % requiring a repeat procedure. The median hospital stay for patients undergoing SWL was 2.5 days, ureteroscopy 5 days, and PCNL 6 days. Infection-based stone composition was identified in 23 patients (36.5 %). We evaluated the linear change in percent of each stone component over time and identified increasing components of calcium oxalate dihydrate (p = 0.002) and calcium carbonate (p = 0.009). However, over a period of 25 years, the incidence of infection-based stone did not change (p = 0.57). Para and quadriplegic patients with urolithiasis can be difficult to treat surgically with prolonged hospitalizations, low stone-free status, and often require additional procedures. Despite improvements in antibiotic agents and management of neurogenic bladders, infection-based calculi continue to be a significant source of morbidity to this patient population. PMID:25015593

  19. Characterization of Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Surgical Wards' Patients in a Nigerian University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Deboye O.; Adeyanju, Adeniran; Schaumburg, Frieder; Akinyoola, Akinyele L.; Lawal, Oladejo O.; Amusa, Yemisi B.; Köck, Robin; Becker, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to developed countries, only limited data on the prevalence, resistance and clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus are available for African countries. Since S. aureus carriage is a risk factor for postoperative wound infection, patients who had been hospitalized in surgical wards in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital were screened for S. aureus carriage. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped (spa, agr) and assigned to multilocus sequence types (MLST). Species affiliation, methicillin-resistance, and the possession of pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAg), exfoliative toxins (ETs) and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) were analyzed. Of 192 patients screened, the S. aureus carrier rate was 31.8 % (n?=?61). Of these isolates, 7 (11.5%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). The isolates comprised 24 spa types. The most frequent spa types were t064, t084, t311, and t1931, while the most prevalent MLST clonal complexes were CC5 and CC15. The most frequent PTSAg genes detected were seg/sei (41.0%) followed by seb (29.5%), sea (19.7%), seh (14.7%) and sec (11.5). The difference between the possession of classical and newly described PTSAg genes was not significant (63.9% versus 59.0% respectively; P?=?0.602). PVL encoding genes were found in 39.3% isolates. All MRSA isolates were PVL negative, SCCmec types I and VI in MLST CC 5 and CC 30, respectively. Typing of the accessory gene regulator (agr) showed the following distribution: agr group 1 (n?=?20), group II (n?=?17), group III (n?=?14) and group IV (n?=?10). Compared to European data, enterotoxin gene seb and PVL-encoding genes were more prevalent in Nigerian methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, which may therefore act as potential reservoir for PVL and PTSAg genes. PMID:23935883

  20. Comparison of two ventilation modes in post-cardiac surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Samantaray, Aloka; Hemanth, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Background: The cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB)-associated atelectasis accounted for most of the marked post-CPB increase in shunt and hypoxemia. We hypothesized that pressure-regulated volume-control (PRVC) modes having a distinct theoretical advantage over pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) by providing the target tidal volume at the minimum available pressure may prove advantageous while ventilating these atelactic lungs. Methods: In this prospective study, 36 post-cardiac surgical patients with a PaO2/FiO2 (arterial oxygen tension/Fractional inspired oxygen) < 300 after arrival to intensive care unit (ICU), (n = 34) were randomized to receive either PRVC or PCV. Air way pressure (Paw) and arterial blood gases (ABG) were measured at four time points [T1: After induction of anesthesia, T2: after CPB (in the ICU), T3: 1 h after intervention mode, T4: 1 h after T3]. Oxygenation index (OI) = [PaO2/ {FiO2 × mean airway pressure (Pmean)}] was calculated for each set of data and used as an indirect estimation for intrapulmonary shunt. Results: There is a steady and significant improvement in OI in both the groups at first hour [PCV, 27.5(3.6) to 43.0(7.5); PRVC, 26.7(2.8) to 47.6(8.2) (P = 0.001)] and second hour [PCV, 53.8(6.4); PRVC, 65.8(7.4) (P = 0.001)] of ventilation. However, the improvement in OI was more marked in PRVC at second hour of ventilation owing to significant low mean air way pressure compared to the PCV group [PCV, 8.6(0.8); PRVC, 7.7(0.5), P = 0.001]. Conclusions: PRVC may be useful in a certain group of patients to reduce intrapulmonary shunt and improve oxygenation after cardiopulmonary bypass-induced perfusion mismatch. PMID:21804799

  1. The surgical treatment of lordoscoliosis and hyperlordosis in patients with quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Karampalis, C; Tsirikos, A I

    2014-06-01

    We describe 13 patients with cerebral palsy and lordoscoliosis/hyperlordosis of the lumbar spine who underwent a posterior spinal fusion at a mean age of 14.5 years (10.8 to 17.4) to improve sitting posture and relieve pain. The mean follow-up was 3.3 years (2.2 to 6.2). The mean pre-operative lumbar lordosis was 108(°) (80 to 150(°)) and was corrected to 62(°) (43(°) to 85(°)); the mean thoracic kyphosis from 17(°) (-23(°) to 35(°)) to 47(°) (25(°) to 65(°)); the mean scoliosis from 82(°) (0(°) to 125(°)) to 22(°) (0(°) to 40(°)); the mean pelvic obliquity from 21(°) (0(°) to 38(°)) to 3(°) (0(°) to 15(°)); the mean sacral slope from 79(°) (54(°) to 90(°)) to 50(°) (31(°) to 66(°)). The mean pre-operative coronal imbalance was 5 cm (0 cm to 8.9 cm) and was corrected to 0.6 cm (0 to 3.2). The mean sagittal imbalance of -8 cm (-16 cm to 7.8 cm) was corrected to -1.6 cm (-4 cm to 2.5 cm). The mean operating time was 250 minutes (180 to 360 minutes) and intra-operative blood loss 0.8 of estimated blood volume (0.3 to 2 estimated blood volume). The mean intensive care and hospital stay were 3.5 days (2 to 8) and 14.5 days (10 to 27), respectively. Three patients lost a significant amount of blood intra-operatively and subsequently developed chest or urinary infections and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. An increased pre-operative lumbar lordosis and sacral slope were associated with increased peri-operative morbidity: scoliosis and pelvic obliquity were not. A reduced lumbar lordosis and increased thoracic kyphosis correlated with better global sagittal balance at follow-up. All patients and their parents reported excellent surgical outcomes. Lordoscoliosis and hyperlordosis are associated with significant morbidity in quadriplegic patients. They are rare deformities and their treatment is challenging. Sagittal imbalance is the major component: it can be corrected by posterior fusion of the spine with excellent functional results. PMID:24891582

  2. Management of Temporomandibular Joint Reankylosis in Syndromic Patients Corrected with Joint Prostheses: Surgical and Rehabilitation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Luigi C.; Consorti, Giuseppe; Elia, Giovanni; Tieghi, Riccardo; Galiè, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA) is a severe disorder described as an intracapsular union of the disc-condyle complex to the temporal articular surface with bony fusion. The management of this disability is challenging and rarely based on surgical and rehabilitation protocols. We describe the treatment in two young adults affected by Goldenhar syndrome and Pierre Robin sequence with reankylosis after previous surgical treatments. There are three main surgical procedures for the treatment of TMJA: gap arthroplasty, interpositional arthroplasty, and joint reconstruction. Various authors have described reankylosis as a frequent event after treatment. Treatment failure could be associated with surgical errors and/or inadequate intensive postoperative physiotherapy. Surgical treatment should be individually tailored and adequate postoperative physiotherapy protocol is mandatory for success. PMID:24624260

  3. Pre-surgical Alveolar Molding in A Newborn Patient with Complete Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate-A Report

    PubMed Central

    Nandlal, B; Reddy, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    Clefts of the lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP) are the most common congenital malformations seen in the head and neck region. Children with CLAP face a vast variety of problems like feeding difficulties, hearing loss (ear infections), missing or malformed teeth and speech defects, along with psychosocial stigma which influences the social development and rehabilitation of such patients. Management of CLAP has been recognized as a unique challenge for parents as well as medical team. Pre-surgical alveolar molding has shown promising results in solving the problems which are associated with CLAP, to a great extent. We are reporting a case of a newborn patient with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, who had inability in suckling and nasal regurgitation of oral fluids since birth, which were aided by providing a Pre-surgical alveolar molding to facilitate feeding and also to improve future facial appearance. This article highlights the effectiveness of alveolar molding appliance which was used to direct growth of the alveolar ridges and lips in the pre surgical treatment of cleft lip and palate. As a result of this appliance, the primary surgical repair of the nose and lip which was done, healed under minimal tension, thereby reducing scar formation and improving the aesthetic results. PMID:24995251

  4. Magnesium Lowers the Incidence of Postoperative Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia in Congenital Heart Surgical Patients: Is There a Relationship to Surgical Procedure Complexity?

    PubMed

    He, Dingchao; Sznycer-Taub, Nathaniel; Cheng, Yao; McCarter, Robert; Jonas, Richard A; Hanumanthaiah, Sridhar; Moak, Jeffrey P

    2015-08-01

    Magnesium sulfate was given to pediatric cardiac surgical patients during cardiopulmonary bypass period in an attempt to reduce the occurrence of postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia (PO JET). We reviewed our data to evaluate the effect of magnesium on the occurrence of JET and assess a possible relationship between PO JET and procedure complexity. A total of 1088 congenital heart surgeries (CHS), performed from 2005 to 2010, were reviewed. A total of 750 cases did not receive magnesium, and 338 cases received magnesium (25 mg/kg). All procedures were classified according to Aristotle score from 1 to 4. Overall, there was a statistically significant decrease in PO JET occurrence between the two groups regardless of the Aristotle score, 15.3 % (115/750) in non-magnesium group versus 7.1 % (24/338) in magnesium group, P < 0.001. In the absence of magnesium, the risk of JET increased with increasing Aristotle score, P = 0.01. Following magnesium administration and controlling for body weight, surgical and aortic cross-clamp times in the analyses, reduction in adjusted risk of JET was significantly greater with increasing Aristotle level of complexity (JET in non-magnesium vs. magnesium group, Aristotle level 1: 9.8 vs. 14.3 %, level 4: 11.5 vs. 3.2 %; odds ratio 0.54, 95 % CI 0.31-0.94, P = 0.028). Our data confirmed that intra-operative usage of magnesium reduced the occurrence of PO JET in a larger number and more diverse group of CHS patients than has previously been reported. Further, our data suggest that magnesium's effect on PO JET occurrence seemed more effective in CHS with higher levels of Aristotle complexity. PMID:25762470

  5. Prevalence of risk factors for platelet transfusion refractoriness in multitransfused hemato-oncological patients at tertiary care center in North India

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Vijay; Sharma, Ratti Ram; Malhotra, Pankaj; Marwaha, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to determine the prevalence and assess the risk factors responsible for platelet transfusion refractoriness in hemato-oncological patients. Materials and Methods: The study included 30 patients. Twelve were clinically diagnosed as aplastic anemia and the 18 were of acute myeloid leukemia. A prospective 3 months follow-up was planned to monitor the response of platelet transfusion therapy, based on their posttransfusion corrected count increment at 1st and 24th h. Based on the observations, patients were categorized into refractory and nonrefractory groups. Common nonimmunological causes such as fever, sepsis, bleeding, disseminated intravascular coagulation, chemotherapy, splenomegaly, ABO mismatch, and antithymocyte globulin therapy were monitored. Among the immunological causes, presence of antihuman leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antibodies and platelet glycoprotein antibodies in patient's serum were monitored. Results: During the study period, 17 (56.66%) patients did not show desired platelet count increment. Transfusion requirements of refractory group for both red cell and platelet product were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in comparison to nonrefractory group. Among immunological causes, anti HLA class I antibodies (P < 0.013), antihuman platelet antigen-5b antibodies (P < 0.033) were significantly associated with refractoriness. Among nonimmunological causes, bleeding (P < 0.019, odd ratio 8.7), fever (P < 0.08, odd ratio 5.2), and infection (P < 0.07, odd ratio 5.4) were found to associated with refractoriness. Conclusion: Platelet refractoriness should be suspected in multitransfused patients not showing expected increment in platelet counts and thoroughly investigated to frame further guidelines in order to ensure proper management of these kind of patients. PMID:25722575

  6. WR-2721 (amifostine) infusion in patients with Ewing's sarcoma receiving ifosfamide and cyclophosphamide with mesna: drug and thiol levels in plasma and blood cells, a Pediatric Oncology Group study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdul-Kader Souid; Robert C. Fahey; Ronald L. Dubowy; Gerald L. Newton; Mark L. Bernstein

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Previous WR-2721 human pharmacokinetic studies were limited to plasma levels in patients receiving platinum-based compounds,\\u000a and none includes the effects of WR-2721 on endogenous thiols. In the present study (Pediatric Oncology Group study no. 9457),\\u000a we measured the levels of WR-2721, its active metabolites, as well as cysteine and glutathione in whole blood, plasma, and\\u000a blood cells in patients

  7. [Ileocolic free autograft in advanced cervical oncology].

    PubMed

    Sartoris, A; Succo, G; Mioli, P R; Merlino, G

    1999-02-01

    In head and neck oncology, cancer of the hypopharynx and esophagus still proves difficult to interpret because all treatments give poor results. In order to improve the quality of life for these patients as quickly as possible, one-step reconstructive methods such as the gastric pull-up and free autografts of revascularized intestinal segments are increasingly being used. This work presents a method for a free autograft of the ileocolic segment. After cervical pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy, this method provides a continent aerodigestive carrefour, protected by the ileocolic valve. Three patients successfully underwent this procedure. Deglutition and phonation were recovered quite quickly: between 18 and 38 days. On the basis of the results and after further, more in-depth experience--including adequate follow-up and post-radiotherapy coloesophageal electromanometry to determine the presence and type of motor propulsion exerted by the distal esophagus--the authors conclude that this method is one of the most interesting options available for the surgical reconstruction of pharyngoesophageal circular defects. PMID:10418189

  8. [The national union for private hospital oncology].

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Gérard

    2013-06-01

    In the French health system, social security is the same for both public and private hospitals regardless of their status. In terms of number of patients screened, diagnosed, or treated, independant medicine is the most important sector in the French oncology. The multitude of organizations representing private hospitals or independant oncologists, physicians, radiologists or pathologists have a common organization, the National Union for Private Hospital Oncology (UNHPC). It bases its action on two founding postulates to ensure the quality of the oncology practice : the medical and managerial cultures are complementary and should be articulated ; the quality of organizations is as important as professional competence. PMID:23735663

  9. An association of ABO non-identical platelet and cryoprecipitate transfusions with altered red cell transfusion needs in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Refaai, Majed A.; Fialkow, Lawrence B.; Heal, Joanna M.; Henrichs, Kelly F.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Phipps, Richard P.; Masel, Edward; Smith, Brian H.; Corsetti, James P.; Francis, Charles W.; Bankey, Paul E.; Blumberg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Background Transfusion of ABO non-identical plasma, platelets and cryoprecipitate is routine practice even though adverse effects can occur. Methods and Materials Our hospital changed transfusion practice in 2005 and adopted a policy of providing ABO identical blood components to all patients when feasible. We retrospectively compared the transfusion requirements, length of stay, and in-hospital mortality in relation to ABO blood group in surgical patients who received platelet transfusions before and after this change to determine if it resulted in any benefit. Results Prior to the change in practice both group B and AB patients received more ABO non-identical platelet transfusion (p = 0.0004), required significantly greater numbers of red cell transfusions (p = 0.04), and had 50% longer hospital stays (p = 0.039) than group O and A patients. Following the policy change, there was a trend for fewer red cell transfusions (p = 0.17) and length of stay in group B and AB patients than group O or A patients. Overall, the mortality rate per red cell transfusion decreased from 15.2 per 1000 to 11.0 per 1000 (p = 0.013). Conclusions These results, in the context of previous findings, suggest that providing ABO identical platelets and cryoprecipitate might be associated with reduction in transfusion requirements and improve outcomes in surgical patients. PMID:21414009

  10. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  11. Investigating the cost-effectiveness of videotelephone based support for newly diagnosed paediatric oncology patients and their families: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background Providing ongoing family centred support is an integral part of childhood cancer care. For families living in regional and remote areas, opportunities to receive specialist support are limited by the availability of health care professionals and accessibility, which is often reduced due to distance, time, cost and transport. The primary aim of this work is to investigate the cost-effectiveness of videotelephony to support regional and remote families returning home for the first time with a child newly diagnosed with cancer Methods/design We will recruit 162 paediatric oncology patients and their families to a single centre randomised controlled trial. Patients from regional and remote areas, classified by Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA+) greater than 0.2, will be randomised to a videotelephone support intervention or a usual support control group. Metropolitan families (ARIA+ ? 0.2) will be recruited as an additional usual support control group. Families allocated to the videotelephone support intervention will have access to usual support plus education, communication, counselling and monitoring with specialist multidisciplinary team members via a videotelephone service for a 12-week period following first discharge home. Families in the usual support control group will receive standard care i.e., specialist multidisciplinary team members provide support either face-to-face during inpatient stays, outpatient clinic visits or home visits, or via telephone for families who live far away from the hospital. The primary outcome measure is parental health related quality of life as measured using the Medical Outcome Survey (MOS) Short Form SF-12 measured at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks. The secondary outcome measures are: parental informational and emotional support; parental perceived stress, parent reported patient quality of life and parent reported sibling quality of life, parental satisfaction with care, cost of providing improved support, health care utilisation and financial burden for families. Discussion This investigation will establish the feasibility, acceptability and cost-effectiveness of using videotelephony to improve the clinical and psychosocial support provided to regional and remote paediatric oncology patients and their families. PMID:17335589

  12. A HIERARCHY OF COMPUTATIONALLY DERIVED SURGICAL AND PATIENT INFLUENCES ON METAL ON METAL PRESS-FIT ACETABULAR CUP FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, S G; Phillips, A T M; Bull, A M J; Cobb, J P

    2014-01-01

    The impact of anatomical variation and surgical error on excessive wear and loosening of the acetabular component of large diameter metal on metal hip arthroplasties was measured using a multi-factorial analysis through 112 different simulations. Each surgical scenario was subject to eight different daily loading activities using finite element analysis. Excessive wear appears to be predominantly dependent on cup orientation, with inclination error having a higher influence than version error, according to the study findings. Acetabular cup loosening, as inferred from initial implant stability, appears to depend predominantly on factors concerning the area of cup-bone contact, specifically the level of cup seating achieved and the individual patient’s anatomy. The extent of press fit obtained at time of surgery did not appear to influence either mechanism of failure in this study. PMID:22513086

  13. On the Design of an Interactive, Patient-Specific Surgical Simulator for Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tenenholtz, Neil A.; Hammer, Peter E.; Schneider, Robert J.; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical repair of the mitral valve is a difficult procedure that is often avoided in favor of less effective valve replacement because of the associated technical challenges facing non-expert surgeons. In the interest of increasing the rate of valve repair, an accurate, interactive surgical simulator for mitral valve repair was developed. With a haptic interface, users can interact with a mechanical model during simulation to aid in the development of a surgical plan and then virtually implement the procedure to assess its efficacy. Sub-millimeter accuracy was achieved in a validation study, and the system was successfully used by a cardiac surgeon to repair three virtual pathological valves. PMID:24511427

  14. Prothrombin complex concentrate in surgical patients: retrospective evaluation of vitamin K antagonist reversal and treatment of severe bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Prothrombin complex concentrates are recommended for rapid reversal of vitamin K anticoagulants. As they normalize levels of vitamin K dependent clotting factors and re-establish hemostasis, they may also be used as adjunctive therapy in patients with major bleeding. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of prothrombin complex concentrates in the surgical setting. Methods The case notes of 50 patients requiring urgent oral anticoagulation reversal (n = 12) or with severe perioperative coagulopathic bleeding (n = 38) who received an infusion of prothrombin complex concentrate (Beriplex P/N(R) 500) at the surgical department of the University of Munich Hospital, Germany were retrospectively reviewed. Efficacy of prothrombin complex concentrate application was evaluated using the Quick test, reported as an international normalized ratio, hemodynamic measurements and requirement for blood products. Safety assessments included whole blood hemoglobin levels and specific parameters of organ dysfunction. Results Baseline characteristics were comparable, except that mean baseline international normalized ratio and hemoglobin levels were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in anticoagulation reversal than in bleeding patients. In anticoagulation reversal, the international normalized ratio was significantly reduced (from 2.8 +/- 0.2 at baseline to 1.5 +/- 0.1, P < 0.001) after one prothrombin complex concentrate infusion (median dose 1500 IU; lower quartile 1,000, upper quartile 2,000). No major bleeding was observed during surgery after prothrombin complex concentrate administration. Only one patient received platelets and red blood cell transfusion after prothrombin complex concentrate administration. In bleeding patients, infusion of prothrombin complex concentrate (median dose 2,000 IU; lower quartile 2,000, upper quartile 3,000) significantly reduced the INR from 1.7 +/- 0.1 at baseline to 1.4 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.001). This decrease was unrelated to fresh frozen plasma or vitamin K administration. Bleeding stopped after prothrombin complex concentrate administration in 4/11 (36%) patients with surgical bleeding and 26/27 (96%) patients with diffuse bleeding. Hemoglobin levels increased significantly from baseline in bleeding patients (P < 0.05) and mean arterial pressure stabilized (P < 0.05). No thrombotic events or changes in organ function were reported in any patient. Conclusions Prothrombin complex concentrate application effectively reduced international normalized ratios in anticoagulation reversal, allowing surgical procedures and interventions without major bleeding. In bleeding patients, the improvement in coagulation after prothrombin complex concentrate administration was judged to be clinically significant. PMID:19948037

  15. Timing of Salvage Hormonal Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients With Unfavorable Prognosis Treated With Radiotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31

    SciTech Connect

    Souhami, Luis, E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.c [McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pilepich, Miljenko [University of California Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sandler, Howard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31 was a randomized trial comparing radiotherapy (RT) alone vs. RT plus adjuvant androgen suppression for life in unfavorable-prognosis carcinoma of the prostate. We examined the impact of early initiation of salvage hormonal therapy (HT) in relapsing patients randomized to RT alone arm. Methods and Materials: Patients were divided into two groups: early salvage HT and late salvage HT. The early salvage group was defined as receiving HT with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of less than 10 ng/mL, and the late salvage HT group had a PSA level of 10 ng/mL or greater. The outcomes were overall survival (OS), cause-specific mortality (CSM), and local failure (LF). The Kaplan-Meier estimation and log-rank test were used for OS, and the cumulative incidence estimation and Gray's test were used for CSM and LF. Proportional hazards regression models were used to compare the outcomes adjusted for other covariates. Results: The median follow-up times of surviving patients in the early and late salvage HT groups were about 11 and 13 years, respectively. The late salvage HT group had significantly more post-prostatectomy patients and patients with high Gleason scores. After adjustment for all covariates, OS was significantly longer in the early salvage HT group (hazard ratio, 1.5; p = 0.01). However, there were no statistically significant differences in LF or CSM between the groups. Conclusions: The early introduction of salvage HT resulted in improved OS but not improved CSM and LF. A randomized trial to define the optimal salvage hormonal timing is warranted in this group of patients with PSA recurrence after RT.

  16. Individualised Surgical Treatment of Patients with an Adenocarcinoma of the Distal Oesophagus or Gastro-Oesophageal Junction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. F. Hulscher; J. J. B. van Lanschot

    2005-01-01

    In this review we discuss the different strategies to improve surgical outcomes after potentially curative resection for oesophageal adenocarcinoma. For tumours of the distal oesophagus, there is a 17% survival benefit after transthoracic resection with two-field lymph node dissection when compared with transhiatal resection. This survival benefit is absent for tumours of the gastro-oesophageal junction or gastric cardia. These patients

  17. Peri-Operative Glucose Control in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery as a Surgical Site Infection Prevention Strategy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bergstrom; J. Bruch; W. James; M. Bushey; D. Blackhurst

    2004-01-01

    ISSUE: Tight control of blood glucose levels in the peri-operative period appears to lead to fewer surgical site infections (SSI) in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Individuals undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) at Greenville Memorial Hospital (GMH) were found to have poor glucose control (6.7 percent of baseline had all glucose levels of less than 200 during the 48 hours

  18. Quality of life and functional level in elderly patients surviving surgical intensive care 1 1 No competing interests declared

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pascal Udekwu; Brett Gurkin; Dale Oller; Luanne Lapio; Jennifer Bourbina

    2001-01-01

    Background:The elderly consume up to one third of health care resources and have become a target for cost reduction efforts. This study was performed to evaluate elderly survivors of surgical critical illness using perceived quality of life and activities of daily living as indicators of value of care.Study Design:Six hundred seventy-two patients age 70 years and older admitted to a

  19. Post-pericardiotomy syndrome in pediatric patients following surgical closure of secundum atrial septal defects: incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Heching, Howard J; Bacha, Emile A; Liberman, Leonardo

    2015-03-01

    Surgical repair for atrial septal defects (ASD) generally occurs during childhood. Post-pericardiotomy syndrome (PPS) after cardiac surgery has a reported incidence of 1-40 %. We focused exclusively on secundum ASD repair to evaluate the incidence of PPS. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence of PPS after surgical repair of secundum ASD and investigate what risk factors may be predictive of its development. A retrospective study was performed, and 97 patients who underwent surgical closure of a secundum ASD were identified. 27 (28 %) were diagnosed with PPS within the first postoperative year. Diagnosis was made if they had evidence of new or worsening pericardial effusion and the presence of ?2 of the following criteria: fever >72 h postoperatively, irritability, pleuritic chest pain, or pericardial friction rub. Closure of secundum ASDs was performed at a median age of 3.8 years (Interquartile Range (IQR): 2.2-6.0 years) and a median weight of 14.3 kilograms (IQR: 10.9-19.3 kilograms). The median time for development of PPS was 8 days post-op (IQR: 5-14). Significantly, 19 (27 %) of 70 patients in the non-PPS group had a small pericardial effusion on their discharge echocardiogram, while of the 27 patients who developed PPS, 17 (63 %) had a small pericardial effusion on their discharge echocardiogram (p = 0.001). PPS is relatively common following surgical closure of secundum ASDs. A small pericardial effusion on discharge echocardiogram is predictive of development of PPS postoperatively. In patients who develop PPS, there is a good response to therapy with a benign course. PMID:25293428

  20. Beyond Patient Reported Pain: Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Demonstrates Reproducible Cerebral Representation of Ongoing Post-Surgical Pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew A. Howard; Kristina Krause; Nadine Khawaja; Nathalie Massat; Fernando Zelaya; Gunter Schumann; John P. Huggins; William Vennart; Steven C. R. Williams; Tara F. Renton; Bernhard Baune

    2011-01-01

    Development of treatments for acute and chronic pain conditions remains a challenge, with an unmet need for improved sensitivity and reproducibility in measuring pain in patients. Here we used pulsed-continuous arterial spin-labelling [pCASL], a relatively novel perfusion magnetic-resonance imaging technique, in conjunction with a commonly-used post-surgical model, to measure changes in regional cerebral blood flow [rCBF] associated with the experience

  1. The role of additional information in the compliance, satisfaction, psychological, and emotion responses of non-surgical patients with low back pain: An exploratory investigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oney d. Fitzpatrick JR

    1995-01-01

    Noncompliance and the psychological and emotional states of patients with low back pain are major concerns for health professionals. The current study evaluated whether amount of information available to patients enhanced compliance to a medical regimen and whether it reduced negative emotions in patients with low back pain. Forty-five orthopaedic non-surgical patients with low back pain were randomly assigned to

  2. Electronic surgical record management.

    PubMed

    Rockman, Justin

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the challenges surgical practices face in coordinating surgeries and how the electronic surgical record management (ESRM) approach to surgical coordination can solve these problems and improve efficiency. Surgical practices continue to experience costly inefficiencies when managing surgical coordination. Application software like practice management and electronic health record systems have enabled practices to "go digital" for their administrative, financial, and clinical data. However, surgical coordination is still a manual and labor-intensive process. Surgical practices need to create a central and secure record of their surgeries. When surgical data are inputted once only and stored in a central repository, the data are transformed into active information that can be outputted to any form, letter, calendar, or report. ESRM is a new approach to surgical coordination. It enables surgical practices to automate and streamline their processes, reduce costs, and ensure that patients receive the best possible care. PMID:20480775

  3. Microbiology of Explanted Suture Segments from Infected and Noninfected Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krepel, Candace J.; Marks, Richard M.; Rossi, Peter J.; Sanger, James; Goldblatt, Matthew; Graham, Mary Beth; Rothenburger, Stephen; Collier, John; Seabrook, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    Sutures under selective host/environmental factors can potentiate postoperative surgical site infection (SSI). The present investigation characterized microbial recovery and biofilm formation from explanted absorbable (AB) and nonabsorbable (NAB) sutures from infected and noninfected sites. AB and NAB sutures were harvested from noninfected (70.9%) and infected (29.1%) sites in 158 patients. At explantation, devices were sonicated and processed for qualitative/quantitative bacteriology; selective sutures were processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Bacteria were recovered from 85 (53.8%) explanted sites; 39 sites were noninfected, and 46 were infected. Suture recovery ranged from 11.1 to 574.6 days postinsertion. A significant difference in mean microbial recovery between noninfected (1.2 isolates) and infected (2.7 isolates) devices (P < 0.05) was noted. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), Peptostreptococcus spp., Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia spp. were recovered from infected devices, while commensal skin flora was recovered from noninfected devices. No significant difference in quantitative microbial recovery between infected monofilament and multifilament sutures was noted. Biofilm was present in 100% and 66.6% of infected and noninfected devices, respectively (P < 0.042). We conclude that both monofilament and braided sutures provide a hospitable surface for microbial adherence: (i) a significant difference in microbial recovery from infected and noninfected sutures was noted, (ii) infected sutures harbored a mixed flora, including multidrug-resistant health care-associated pathogens, and (iii) a significant difference in the presence or absence of a biofilm in infected versus noninfected explanted devices was noted. Further studies to document the benefit of focused risk reduction strategies to minimize suture contamination and biofilm formation postimplantation are warranted. PMID:23175247

  4. Master Online Advanced Oncology Master Online Advanced Oncology

    E-print Network

    Ulm, Universität

    Master Online Advanced Oncology Master Online Advanced Oncology Study part-time ­ team Oncology, addressing clinical oncologists as well as scientists in the field of oncology. The study program and scientists in the field of oncology to study in a timely and locally flexible manner and prepare

  5. Microsurgical Chest Wall Reconstruction After Oncologic Resections

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbier, Michael; Dittler, S.; Kreutzer, C.

    2011-01-01

    Defect reconstruction after radical oncologic resection of malignant chest wall tumors requires adequate soft tissue reconstruction with function, stability, integrity, and an aesthetically acceptable result of the chest wall. The purpose of this article is to describe possible reconstructive microsurgical pathways after full-thickness oncologic resections of the chest wall. Several reliable free flaps are described, and morbidity and mortality rates of patients are discussed. PMID:22294944

  6. Cytokine gene associations with self-report ratings of morning and evening fatigue in oncology patients and their family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Dhruva, Anand; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Cooper, Bruce; Paul, Steven M; Dodd, Marylin; West, Claudia; Wara, William; Lee, Kathryn; Dunn, Laura B; Langford, Dale J; Merriman, John D; Baggott, Christina; Cataldo, Janine; Ritchie, Christine; Kober, Kord M; Leutwyler, Heather; Miaskowski, Christine

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate for differences in variations in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes between participants who were classified as having low and high levels of morning and evening fatigue and to evaluate for differences in phenotypic characteristics between these two groups. In a sample of 167 oncology outpatients with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer and 85 of their family caregivers, growth mixture modeling was used to identify latent classes of individuals based on ratings of morning and evening fatigue obtained prior to, during, and for 4 months following completion of radiation therapy. Differences in single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes in 15 cytokine genes were evaluated between the latent classes. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the effect of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics on morning and evening fatigue class membership. Associations were found between morning fatigue and number of comorbidities as well as variations in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA) rs1800629 and rs3093662. Evening fatigue was associated with caring for children at home and variations in interleukin 4 (IL4) rs2243248 and TNFA rs2229094. Younger age and lower performance status were associated with both morning and evening fatigue. These findings suggest that inflammatory mediators are associated with the development of morning and evening fatigue. However, because different phenotypic characteristics and genomic markers are associated with diurnal variations in fatigue, morning and evening fatigue may be distinct but related symptoms. PMID:24872120

  7. Relationship of Coping and Social Support to Depression, Perceived Pain, and Health-related Outcomes in Post-surgical Coronary Bypass Grafting Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theresa A. Kovacs

    2007-01-01

    This research proposal highlights the potential outcomes: post-surgical CABG patients with little or no positive coping methods will reflect signiflcant levels of depression, pain and lower HRQL scores and that post-surgical CABG with low levels of social support will show significant levels of depression, pain and lower HRQL scores. This research will also define and clarify the interrelationships between these

  8. Possible forms of heart-rate variability and their application: use of heart-rate variability in assessment of surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T.-Y. Slonim; M. Slonim; G. Daychman; L. Roytblat; I. Ovsyshcher

    1997-01-01

    A new approach has been proposed for the estimation of variables based on Heart Rate Variability during a surgical operation. The following variables, Heart Rate Variability Index, Normalized Inert Rate Variability Index and Integral Estimation have been introduced and used for the analysis and estimation of surgical procedures in 7 patients. All variables have a clear physical meaning; they are

  9. Sexual Oncology: Sexual Health Issues in Women with Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L. Krychman; Leanne Pereira; Jeanne Carter; Alison Amsterdam

    2006-01-01

    Sexual problems are widespread among female cancer patients and survivors. Dysfunction may result from various oncologic therapies such as surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormonal manipulation, and cytostatic medication. Additionally, psychologic distress that the patient or her partner experiences during diagnosis and treatment of malignancy can impair a healthy female sexual response cycle. A sexual rehabilitation program in an oncology setting

  10. Audiotapes of oncology consultations: only for the first consultation?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Knox; P. N. Butow; R. Devine; M. H. N. Tattersall

    2002-01-01

    Background: Patients value audiotapes of their oncology consultations and letters summarising the discussion, and report improved recall and satisfaction when they receive them. However, studies to date have provided these interventions only after the initial or 'bad news' consultation. This study aimed to evaluate the utility of audiotaping routine follow-up oncology consultations. Patients and methods: This was a prospective study

  11. Efficacy of Parenteral Nutrition Supplemented With Glutamine Dipeptide to Decrease Hospital Infections in Critically Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Estívariz, Concepción F.; Griffith, Daniel P.; Luo, Menghua; Szeszycki, Elaina E.; Bazargan, Niloofar; Dave, Nisha; Daignault, Nicole M.; Bergman, Glen F.; McNally, Therese; Battey, Cindy H.; Furr, Celeste E.; Hao, Li; Ramsay, James G.; Accardi, Carolyn R.; Cotsonis, George A.; Jones, Dean P.; Galloway, John R.; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nosocomial infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Clinical benefits of glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition may occur in hospitalized surgical patients, but efficacy data in different surgical subgroups are lacking. The objective was to determine whether glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition differentially affects nosocomial infection rates in selected subgroups of SICU patients. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized, controlled study of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide-supplemented parenteral nutrition in SICU patients requiring parenteral nutrition and SICU care after surgery for pancreatic necrosis, cardiac, vascular, or colonic surgery. Subjects (n = 59) received isocaloric/isonitrogenous parenteral nutrition, providing 1.5 g/kg/d standard glutamine-free amino acids (STD-PN) or 1.0 g/kg/d standard amino acids + 0.5 g/kg/d glutamine dipeptide (GLN-PN). Enteral feedings were advanced as tolerated. Nosocomial infections were determined until hospital discharge. Results Baseline clinical/metabolic data were similar between groups. Plasma glutamine concentrations were low in all groups and were increased by GLN-PN. GLN-PN did not alter infection rates after pancreatic necrosis surgery (17 STD-PN and 15 GLN-PN patients). In nonpancreatic surgery patients (12 STD-PN and 15 GLN-PN), GLN-PN was associated with significantly decreased total nosocomial infections (STD-PN 36 vs GLN-PN 13, P < .030), bloodstream infections (7 vs 0, P < .01), pneumonias (16 vs 6, P < .05), and infections attributed to Staphylococcus aureus (P < .01), fungi, and enteric Gram-negative bacteria (each P < .05). Conclusions Glutamine dipeptide-supplemented parenteral nutrition did not alter infection rates following pancreatic necrosis surgery but significantly decreased infections in SICU patients after cardiac, vascular, and colonic surgery. PMID:18596310

  12. Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Forastiere, Arlene [Departments of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kian Ang, K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

  13. Prospective assessment of systemic therapy followed by surgical removal of metastases in selected patients with renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Daliani, Danai D.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Papandreou, Christos N.; Wang, Xuemei; Swisher, Stephen; Wood, Christopher G.; Swanson, David A.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Jonasch, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish prospectively objective selection criteria for metastasectomy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), as selection criteria for metastasectomy in are not well established. Patients and methods Between 1991 and 1999, 38 patients with mRCC with responsive or stable disease after initial systemic therapy, and with potentially resectable disease, were enrolled. Patients had a metastasectomy with curative intent and received consolidative adjuvant systemic therapy. Results Of the patients enrolled, 79% had stable disease after initial systemic therapy and 21% had a partial or complete response. Most (84%) had metastasectomy of one organ site. There was surgically no evidence of disease (sNED) in 76%. Operative morbidity and mortality were acceptable and 90% of the patients received adjuvant systemic therapy. The median (95% confidence interval) survival was 4.7 (3.0–7.8) years, and the median time to progression was 1.8 (0.8–3.1) years. Eight of 38 patients (21%) remained free of disease by the end of the study. Significant predictors of outcome were lack of sNED after metastasectomy, and the presence of pulmonary metastases. The median overall survival for those who had sNED was 5.6 years, vs 1.4 years for those who did not (P < 0.001). Conclusions Metastasectomy in patients with mRCC not progressing after systemic therapy is feasible, with acceptable morbidity. Predictive factors for long-term outcome include pulmonary metastases and sNED. Future work evaluating treatments that can convert many patients into surgical candidates will increase the cure rate of patients with mRCC. PMID:19338544

  14. Retrospective Analysis of Prognostic Factors in 205 Patients with Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Who Underwent Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Ning; Chen, Liang-Si; Ge, Ping-Jiang; Song, Xin-Han; Chen, Shao-hua; Wu, Yi-Long

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the most important factors affecting the prognosis of the patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the larynx. Methods Based on the clinical and follow-up data, 205 patients with SCC of the larynx receiving total laryngectomy, partial laryngectomy, or CO2 laser surgery in GuangDong General Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. A survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and a multivariable analysis of prognostic factors was carried out using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results Subtypes of carcinoma included 69.8% glottic and 30.2% supraglottic. Most patients were in N0 stage (77.6%), and 22.4% patients were in N1?N3 stage. Over half of the patients were in T1?T2 stage (55.1%), 20.0% in T3, and 24.9% in T4. Mean follow-up duration was 49.2 months. The survival rates 1, 2, and 3 years after the surgery were 99.0%, 91.7%, and 81.5%, respectively. The survival rate for those patients with clinical stage IV was significantly lower than for those with clinical stage I and II (p<0.001 and p?=?0.013, respectively). The disease-free progression rates 1, 2, and 3 years after the surgery were 83.9%, 74.6%, and 71.2%, respectively. Futhermore, those patients with a Charlson score of 1 to 2 and ?3 had higher risk of mortality than those with a Charlson score of 0 (hazard ratios of 1.8 and 2.41 p?=?0.042 and p?=?0.008). Multivariable analysis revealed that clinical stage, surgical margin, and comorbidity were significantly associated with both mortality and disease-free progression. Conclusion The surgical resection margin, clinical stage, and comorbidity were independent factors affecting the laryngeal cancer prognosis. The survival rates were lower for patients with advanced laryngeal cancer, positive surgical margins, or severe comorbidity, suggesting the importance of early diagnosis, early treatment, negative surgical margins, and conditions of comorbidity. PMID:23593169

  15. La qualità di vita dopo ricostruzione mammaria in pazienti mastectomizzate: gli effetti delle dimensioni di personalità The quality of life in patients who received mastectomy: the effects of personality dimensions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. BELLINO; P. BOGETTI; E. PARADISO; M. FENOCCHIO; P. PAROLA; E. BAGLIONI; F. BOGETTO

    Summary Objectives Breast reconstruction has become an integral part of the treatment of breast cancer, with the aim to reduce patients' impairment in everyday life after oncological demoli- tion. However, literature data indicate that not all the patients are equally satisfied with surgical outcome: while some patients experience a significant improvement in health related quality of life, others develop anxiety

  16. Life quality changes within 26 month after the non-surgical treatment in patients with deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ye; Luo, Jun; Cao, Qiang; Bai, Chao; Magovia, Sairike

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to investigate the life quality of lower-extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) patients 26 m after progressive decompression elasticity socks therapy. Methods: SF-36 scale was used to record the life quality scores in 74 patients with acute and subacute deep venous thrombosis, all the patients received the non-surgical treatment. The eight dimensions of life quality variation were documented and analyzed. Results: The baseline data were comparable (P = 1.000 for age, P = 0.655 for sex). At the time of admission and at different time points after discharge, there were significant differences for eight dimensions in patients with deep vein thrombosis (Ps < 0.001). In addition that eight dimensions scores were significantly different between the score at 2 months, 4 months after discharge and the score at certain individual stages (Ps < 0.05), there were no significant difference for eight dimensions scores at different stages (Ps > 0.05). Conclusions: Showed slow improvement within six months of deep vein thrombosis in patients with non-surgical treatment, the life quality scores entered the plateau stage, the life quality of the RP and the PF dimension were slightly impaired, the VT dimension showed relatively obvious damage, the remaining dimensions can recover to healthy levels. The blood circulation activation drugs may help maintain the stability of life quality and delay the occurrence of PTS. The turning point of life quality did not show and required extended follow-up period.

  17. Five-Year Follow-Up of a Patient with Bilateral Carotid Body Tumors after Unilateral Surgical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Tolga; Uyar, Ibrahim; Demir, Hale Bolgi; Sahin, Mazlum; Gundogdu, Gokcen

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 34 Final Diagnosis: Carotid body tumor Symptoms: Dysphagia • hoarseness • non-tender neck swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Carotid body tumors are rare, highly vascularized neoplasms that arise from the paraganglia located at the carotid bifurcation. Surgery is the only curative treatment. However, treatment of bilateral carotid body tumors represents a special challenge due to potential neurovascular complications. Case Report: We present the therapeutic management of a 34-year-old woman with bilateral carotid body tumors. The patient underwent surgical resection of the largest tumor. It was not possible to resect the tumor without sacrificing the ipsilateral vagal nerve. Due to unilateral vagal palsy, we decide to withhold all invasive therapy and to observe contralateral tumor growth with serial imaging studies. The patient is free of disease progression 5 years later. Conclusions: Treatment of bilateral CBTs should focus on preservation of the quality of life rather than on cure of the disease. In patients with previous contralateral vagal palsies, the choice between surgery and watchful waiting is a balance between the natural potential morbidity and the predictable surgical morbidity. Therefore, to avoid bilateral cranial nerve deficits, these patients may be observed until tumor growth is determined, and, if needed, treated by radiation therapy. PMID:25278171

  18. The Singapore Liver Cancer Recurrence (SLICER) Score for Relapse Prediction in Patients with Surgically Resected Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Soo Fan; Ng, Elizabeth Shu-Hui; Li, Huihua; Ong, Yu-Han; Choo, Su Pin; Ngeow, Joanne; Toh, Han Chong; Lim, Kiat Hon; Yap, Hao Yun; Tan, Chee Kiat; Ooi, London Lucien Peng Jin; Chung, Alexander Yaw Fui; Chow, Pierce Kah Hoe; Foo, Kian Fong; Tan, Min-Han; Cheow, Peng Chung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Surgery is the primary curative option in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current prognostic models for HCC are developed on datasets of primarily patients with advanced cancer, and may be less relevant to resectable HCC. We developed a postoperative nomogram, the Singapore Liver Cancer Recurrence (SLICER) Score, to predict outcomes of HCC patients who have undergone surgical resection. Methods Records for 544 consecutive patients undergoing first-line curative surgery for HCC in one institution from 1992–2007 were reviewed, with 405 local patients selected for analysis. Freedom from relapse (FFR) was the primary outcome measure. An outcome-blinded modeling strategy including clustering, data reduction and transformation was used. We compared the performance of SLICER in estimating FFR with other HCC prognostic models using concordance-indices and likelihood analysis. Results A nomogram predicting FFR was developed, incorporating non-neoplastic liver cirrhosis, multifocality, preoperative alpha-fetoprotein level, Child-Pugh score, vascular invasion, tumor size, surgical margin and symptoms at presentation. Our nomogram outperformed other HCC prognostic models in predicting FFR by means of log-likelihood ratio statistics with good calibration demonstrated at 3 and 5 years post-resection and a concordance index of 0.69. Using decision curve analysis, SLICER also demonstrated superior net benefit at higher threshold probabilities. Conclusion The SLICER score enables well-calibrated individualized predictions of relapse following curative HCC resection, and may represent a novel tool for biomarker research and individual counseling. PMID:25830231

  19. [Specific aspects of pathogenesis and strategies in the comprehensive surgical treatment of the diabetic foot in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Fedorenko, V P; Fedorenko, A V; Smereka, A V; Bo?ko, R L

    2001-08-01

    Retrospective analysis of complex surgical treatment of 590 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), complicated by necrotic-inflammatory affection (NIAF) of foot for 1991-2000 yrs period was conducted. At the time of first hospitalization age of patients had constituted at average (60.3 +/- 0.4) yr, duration of DM--(14.1 +/- 0.3) yr, in 11.2% patients DM was revealed for the first time. High amputation of lower extremity was done in 147 (35.1%) of 419 patients with disorders of its arterial blood supply, postoperative lethality had constituted 10.2%, general lethality--6.4%. Duration of stay in hospital had constituted at average (52.8 +/- 0.4) days. Strategy of complex surgical treatment of NIAF envisages: survival of the patient; complete healing (epithelization) of operative wound; securing the supportive function of foot. Disorder of sequence of this principles causes the increase of the reoperations frequency, lethality and material expenses. The problem solution envisages not so much the struggle with vascular consequences of DM, as prophylaxis of occurrence of these complications. PMID:11794117

  20. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brawley, Otis W. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, and American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, and American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  1. Primary prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in patients with hematologic malignancies. Recommendations of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society for Haematology and Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Cornely, Oliver A.; Böhme, Angelika; Buchheidt, Dieter; Einsele, Hermann; Heinz, Werner J.; Karthaus, Meinolf; Krause, Stefan W.; Krüger, William; Maschmeyer, Georg; Penack, Olaf; Ritter, Jörg; Ruhnke, Markus; Sandherr, Michael; Sieniawski, Michal; Vehreschild, Jörg-Janne; Wolf, Hans-Heinrich; Ullmann, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    There is no widely accepted standard for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with hematologic malignancies. The Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society for Haematology and Oncology assigned a committee of hematologists and infectious disease specialists to develop recommendations. Literature data bases were systematically searched for clinical trials on antifungal prophylaxis. The studies identified were shared within the committee. Data were extracted by two of the authors (OAC and MSi). The consensus process was conducted by email communication. Finally, a review committee discussed the proposed recommendations. After consensus was established the recommendations were finalized. A total of 86 trials were identified including 16,922 patients. Only a few trials yielded significant differences in efficacy. Fluconazole 400 mg/d improved the incidence rates of invasive fungal infections and attributable mortality in allogeneic stem cell recipients. Posaconazole 600 mg/d reduced the incidence of IFI and attributable mortality in allogeneic stem cell recipients with severe graft versus host disease, and in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome additionally reduced overall mortality. Aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B reduced the incidence rate of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Posaconazole 600 mg/d is recommended in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome or undergoing allogeneic stem cell recipients with graft versus host disease for the prevention of invasive fungal infections and attributable mortality (Level A I). Fluconazole 400 mg/d is recommended in allogeneic stem cell recipients until development of graft versus host disease only (Level A I). Aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B is recommended during prolonged neutropenia (Level B II). PMID:19066334

  2. A prospective observational study to evaluate G-CSF usage in patients with solid tumors receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy in Italian clinical oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Barni, S; Lorusso, V; Giordano, M; Sogno, G; Gamucci, T; Santoro, A; Passalacqua, R; Iaffaioli, V; Zilembo, N; Mencoboni, M; Roselli, M; Pappagallo, G; Pronzato, P

    2014-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a severe dose-limiting side effect of myelosuppressive chemotherapy in patients with solid tumors. Clinical practice guidelines recommend primary prophylaxis with G-CSF in patients with an overall ? 20 % risk of FN. AIOM Italian guidelines recommend starting G-CSF within 24-72 h after chemotherapy; for daily G-CSF, administration should continue until the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) is 1 × 10(9)/L post-nadir and should not be terminated after ANC increase in the early days of administration. The aim of this study was to assess guideline adherence in oncology practice in Italy. In this multicenter, prospective, observational study, patients were enrolled at the first G-CSF use in any cycle and were followed for two subsequent cycles (or until the end of chemotherapy if less than two additional cycles). Primary objective was to explore G-CSF use in Italian clinical practice; therefore, data were collected on the G-CSF type, timing of administration, and number of doses. 512 eligible patients were enrolled (median age, 62). The most common tumor types were breast (36 %), lung (18 %), and colorectal (13 %). A total of 1,164 G-CSF cycles (daily G-CSF, 718; pegfilgrastim, 446) were observed. Daily G-CSF was administered later than 72 h after chemotherapy in 42 % of cycles, and the median [range] number of doses was four [1, 10]. Pegfilgrastim was administered later than 72 h in 8 % of cycles. G-CSF prophylaxis in Italy is frequently administered in a manner which is not supported by evidence-based guidelines. As this practice may lead to poor outcomes, educational initiatives are recommended. PMID:24307348

  3. Use of Cystatin C and Serum Creatinine for the Diagnosis of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Patients Undergoing Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography at an Oncology Centre

    PubMed Central

    Fortalesa Melo, Joao Italo; Chojniak, Rubens; Costa Silva, Debora Helena; Oliveira Junior, Jose Carlos; Vieira Bitencourt, Almir Galvão; Holanda Silva, Diego; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Silva, Hernandes Cerqueira Souza; Dias, Denis Guilherme Teixeira; Rodrigues, Winglison Carli; Brancucci, Ellen Luzia; Cruz, Barbara Martins Soares; Schiavon, Beatriz Nunes; Argenton, Juliana Luz Passos; Camporini, Margareth Arrivabene; Zocchio, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to assess renal function using as laboratory measurements serum creatinine and cystatin C concentrations before and after administration of low-osmolarity (nonionic) iodinated contrast medium in patients with cancer undergoing computed tomography (CT). Methods This prospective study included 400 oncologic outpatients. Serum creatinine and cystatin C concentrations were measured before and 72 h after contrast administration. Glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) were estimated using serum creatinine–based [Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Cockroft-Gault and cystatin C based (Larsson) equations. Exploratory data analysis was performed. The nonparametric Wilcoxon test was used to compare pre and post contrast of test results and estimated clearance. The confidence interval used in the analysis was 95%. Results Compared with the pre-contrast values, the mean serum creatinine concentration was significantly higher and average GFRs estimated using MDRD and Cockcroft-Gault equations were significantly lower after the administration of contrast (p <0.001). It was also observed a significant increase after contrast in the concentration of Cystatin C (p = 0.015). In addition, a decrease in GFR estimated using the average Larsson (p = 0.021) was observed between time points. However, none of the patients presented clinically significant nephropathy. Conclusions Assessment using serum creatinine and cystatin C concentrations showed changes in renal function among patients with cancer undergoing contrast-enhanced CT examination in this study. No significant renal damage related to the use of low-osmolarity iodinated contrast medium of the type and dosage employed in this study was observed. This contrast medium is thus safe for use in patients with cancer. PMID:25961558

  4. Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum and Salivary Concentrations of Visfatin in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Abolfazli, Nader; Jabali, Sahar; Saleh Saber, Fariba; Babaloo, Zohreh; Shirmohammadi, Adileh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Visfatin, mainly secreted by visceral adipose tissue, especially by macrophages, plays an important role in regulating the defense and immune functions, and functions as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and more importantly as a proinflammatory mediator. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on serum and salivary levels of visfatin in patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis. Materials and methods. Eighteen patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis were selected based on periodontal parameters of gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and radiographic parameters. Serum and salivary samples were collected at baseline and one month following non-surgical periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing ([SRP]). Visfatin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15, using paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results. Mean salivary and serum levels of visfatin significantly decreased after non-surgical periodontal treatment (P<0.05). Changes in salivary visfatin levels were more prominent. Conclusion. According to the findings of this study it seems that there is a direct relationship between periodontal tissue inflammation and disease activity with salivary and serum visfatin levels. PMID:25973148

  5. Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum and Salivary Concentrations of Visfatin in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Abolfazli, Nader; Jabali, Sahar; Saleh Saber, Fariba; Babaloo, Zohreh; Shirmohammadi, Adileh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Visfatin, mainly secreted by visceral adipose tissue, especially by macrophages, plays an important role in regulating the defense and immune functions, and functions as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and more importantly as a proinflammatory mediator. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on serum and salivary levels of visfatin in patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis. Materials and methods. Eighteen patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis were selected based on periodontal parameters of gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and radiographic parameters. Serum and salivary samples were collected at baseline and one month following non-surgical periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing ([SRP]). Visfatin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15, using paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results. Mean salivary and serum levels of visfatin significantly decreased after non-surgical periodontal treatment (P<0.05). Changes in salivary visfatin levels were more prominent. Conclusion. According to the findings of this study it seems that there is a direct relationship between periodontal tissue inflammation and disease activity with salivary and serum visfatin levels. PMID:25973148

  6. Evaluation of serum anti-cardiolipin antibodies after non-surgical periodontal treatment in chronic periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Kiany, Farin; Hedayati, Azita

    2014-02-14

    The present study investigated the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum level of anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCLA), which are potentially involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases in periodontal patients. Twenty volunteers (11 females and 9 males) with the mean age of 40.55 years participated in this study. Generalized chronic periodontitis was diagnosed through clinical periodontal examination at baseline visit. This examination included measuring the probing pocket depth and clinical attachment loss. Plaque index and gingival index were also recorded. After baseline examination, all the subjects received full-mouth non-surgical periodontal treatment. Subjects returned for a final visit 6 weeks after the last session of scaling for reevaluation of the periodontal parameters. At baseline and final visits 2 ml of venous blood was collected from each patient and an available commercially enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for analyzing aCLA (IgM and IgG). The collected data were analyzed using the paired sample t test. Mean levels of both forms of aCLA, before and after treatment, showed statistically significant difference (P = 0.003 for IgM and P = 0.001 for IgG). In addition, study results showed significant reductions in periodontal parameters after non-surgical periodontal therapy (P < 0.001). The results of this study suggested that successful periodontal therapy can improve the serum level of one of the inflammatory biomarkers involved in the cardiovascular problems. PMID:24526469

  7. Strict infection control measures do not prevent clonal spread of coagulase negative staphylococci colonizing central venous catheters in neutropenic hemato-oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    van Pelt, Cindy; Nouwen, Jan; Lugtenburg, Elly; van der Schee, Cindy; de Marie, Simon; Schuijff, Paula; Verbrugh, Henri; Löwenberg, Bob; van Belkum, Alex; Vos, Margreet

    2003-09-22

    Coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) are a main cause of catheter related infections (CRI). Earlier studies (1994-1996) revealed a high incidence of CRI (6 per 1000 catheter days) among neutropenic hemato-oncologic patients in the Erasmus MC Hematology Department (Rotterdam, The Netherlands). This was mainly explained by expansion of two methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) clones (Nouwen et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 36 (1998) 2696-2702). In a new, 16-bed unit in the same institution, we investigated the effect of strict clinical isolation measures on the incidence of CRI. During two 6-month screening periods (period I: April 1998-December 1998 and period II: April 1999-October 1999) all patients receiving a central venous catheter were prospectively monitored for the development of CRI. During period I every visitor of the cubicles had to wear hair caps, masks, gowns and gloves. During period II these procedures were abolished, but hands were cleansed using alcohol and masks were worn during both periods in case of coughing and sneezing. All CoNS strains isolated from blood cultures were genetically classifies by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The incidence of CRI during period I was 13.0 per 1000 catheter days, in comparison to 9.6 in period II (P=0.84). During this latter period, 19 CRI were diagnosed, 14 catheter related bacteremia episodes (CRB) and five local infections. Seventy-two percent (n=9) of CRB were due to a CoNS. The mean catheter survival until appearance of a CRI increased from 43 days during period I to 78 days in period II (P=0.39). The mean catheter survival until infection related removal was increased from 43 days to 133 days (P=0.12). During period I less experienced intervention radiologists introduced the catheters, which may have limited the efficacy of the strict hygiene measures. Thus, abolishing strict isolation precautions had no negative effect on the incidence of CRI. After genotyping of 38 MRSE strains isolated from blood and central venous catheter cultures of 12 patients in period II, eight PFGE types were found. Three types were found in more than one patient, but based on epidemiological data patient-to-patient spread could not be proven. No genotypic identity between patient and personnel CoNS isolates was shown and the two major clonal types that were present between 1994 and 1996 were not encountered. However, from December 1998 onwards new MRSE clones could be identified (types E and J). In conclusion, despite a constant rate of CRI and implementation of optimal patient care, clonal spread of MRSE strains was not prevented by strict hygiene measures. PMID:13129649

  8. [Familial neoplasms: investigation of genealogic trees of patients surgically treated for colonic adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Caroti Ghelli, C; Presciuttini, S; Scarcello, E; Vannucci, L; Mosca, F

    1994-01-01

    In order to study the familial aggregation of colorectal cancer we investigated the pedigrees of the patients with adenocarcinoma of the large bowel who underwent a surgical operation between november 1990 and october 1992 at the Istituto di Chirurgia Generale e Sperimentale Of Pisa University. For each proband, information was obtained on his/her four grandparents and all their second generation descendants. The final sample included 99 probands and 1455 relatives. Only two cases with diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis were excluded. As a control group, we applied the same methodology to the spouses of probands, collecting in the end a sample of 72 families including 1163 individuals. The frequency of both colorectal and extracolonic cancer was higher in the relatives of cases than in the control group, for all the relationships. Among the first degree relatives, the empirical risk of colorectal cancer was 1/30 among the case families and 1/139 among the control families, for a 4.6 fold increase in risk. For cancers at all sites (colorectal excluded), the corresponding risk were 1/8 and 1/12. We computed the posterior probability of dying from cancer for a random individual, given the known affection status of one or more of his/her relatives of specified relationship. For an individual with one first degree relative affected by colorectal cancer the posterior risk of the same tumor was 1/15, compared to a value of 1/70 for the entire control population. Considering all cancers, colorectal excluded, we obtained the result that for a person with at least three affected relatives, one of first, one of second and one of third degree, the probability of dying from colorectal cancer was 6%. The distribution of the number of affected individuals for kindred was highly skewed, with a few families responsible of a large part of the observed familial aggregation. This was true for both the cases of colorectal cancer and for all-site cancer. However, no family fulfilled the criterion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndromes I or II). PMID:7733573

  9. Secondary traumatic stress in oncology staff.

    PubMed

    Quinal, Leonida; Harford, Stephanie; Rutledge, Dana N

    2009-01-01

    As empathetic caregivers, oncology staff may be prone to secondary traumatic stress (STS). Secondary traumatic stress results from exposure to persons who have experienced trauma and from giving care to such persons. The presence of STS among oncology staff has not been documented. This correlational descriptive study examined STS among oncology staff at a 500-bed Magnet-designated community hospital by determining the presence of individual symptoms and frequency with which diagnostic criteria for STS are met. Also determined were associations between STS demographic characteristics and specific stress-reduction activities.In this study, 43 staff members from a