Science.gov

Sample records for survey meter test

  1. Arduino based radiation survey meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Lombigit, Lojius; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Azman, Azraf; Dolah, Taufik; Muzakkir, Amir; Jaafar, Zainudin; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Ramli, Abd Aziz Mhd; Zain, Rasif Mohd; Said, Fazila; Khalid, Mohd Ashhar; Taat, Muhamad Zahidee

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design of new digital radiation survey meter with LND7121 Geiger Muller tube detector and Atmega328P microcontroller. Development of the survey meter prototype is carried out on Arduino Uno platform. 16-bit Timer1 on the microcontroller is utilized as external pulse counter to produce count per second or CPS measurement. Conversion from CPS to dose rate technique is also performed by Arduino to display results in micro Sievert per hour (μSvhr-1). Conversion factor (CF) value for conversion of CPM to μSvhr-1 determined from manufacturer data sheet is compared with CF obtained from calibration procedure. The survey meter measurement results are found to be linear for dose rates below 3500 µSv/hr.

  2. Modal Survey Test of the SOTV 2X3 Meter Off-Axis Inflatable Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engberg, Robert C.; Lassiter, John O.; McGee, Jennie K.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has had several projects involving inflatable space structures. Projects in solar thermal propulsion have had the most involvement, primarily inflatable concentrators. A flight project called Shooting Star Experiment initiated the first detailed design, analysis and testing effort involving an inflatable concentrator that supported a Fresnel lens. The lens was to concentrate the sun's rays to provide an extremely large heat transfer for an experimental solar propulsion engine. Since the conclusion of this experiment, research and development activities for solar propulsion at Marshall Space Flight Center have continued both in the solar propulsion engine technology as well as inflatable space structures. Experience gained in conducting modal survey tests of inflatable structures for the Shooting Star Experiment has been used by dynamic test engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center to conduct a modal survey test on a Solar Orbital Transfer Vehicle (SOTV) off-axis inflatable concentrator. This paper describes how both previously learned test methods and new test methods that address the unique test requirements for inflatable structures were used. Effects of the inherent nonlinear response of the inflatable concentrator on test methods and test results are noted as well. Nine analytical mode shapes were successfully correlated to test mode shapes. The paper concludes with several "lessons learned" applicable to future dynamics testing and shows how Marshall Space Flight Center has utilized traditional and new methods for modal survey testing of inflatable space structures.

  3. Shallow (2-meter) temperature surveys in Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado 2m Survey Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: Shallow temperature surveys are useful in early-stage geothermal exploration to delineate surface outflow zones, with the intent to identify the source of upwelling, usually a fault. Detailed descriptions of the 2-meter survey method and equipment design can be found in Coolbaugh et al. (2007) and Sladek et al. (2007), and are summarized here. The survey method was devised to measure temperature as far below the zone of solar influence as possible, have minimal equilibration time, and yet be portable enough to fit on the back of an all-terrain vehicle (ATV); Figure 2). This method utilizes a direct push technology (DPT) technique where 2.3 m long, 0.54” outer diameter hollow steel rods are pounded into the ground using a demolition hammer. Resistance temperature devices (RTD) are then inserted into the rods at 2-meter depths, and allowed to equilibrate for one hour. The temperatures are then measured and recorded, the rods pulled out of the ground, and re-used at future sites. Usually multiple rods are planted over the course of an hour, and then the sampler returns back to the first station, measures the temperatures, pulls the rods, and so on, to eliminate waiting time. At Wagon Wheel Gap, 32 rods were planted around the hot springs between June 20 and July 1, 2012. The purpose was to determine the direction of a possible upflow fault or other structure. Temperatures at 1.5m and 2m depths were measured and recorded in the attribute table of this point shapefile. Several anomalous temperatures suggest that outflow is coming from a ~N60W striking fault or shear zone that contains the quartz-fluorite-barite veins of the adjacent patented mining claims. It should be noted that temperatures at 2m

  4. Feasibility of Mossbauer survey meter for hydrocarbon and mineral reserves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of developing a Mossbauer survey meter for geophysical prospecting was investigated. Various critical requirements that will have to be met by the source and absorber crystals in such an instrument were identified. It was concluded that a survey meter based on (Rh-103 resonance (40 kev) yields Rh-103) isomeric transition is feasible and should be developed.

  5. Advanced smoke meter development survey and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitz, R. W.; Penney, C. M.; Stanforth, C. M.; Shaffernocker, W. M.

    1984-01-01

    Ideal smoke meter characteristics are determined to provide a basis for evaluation of candidate systems. Five promising techniques are analyzed in detail to evaluate compilance with the practical smoke meter requirements. Four of the smoke measurement concepts are optical methods: Modulated Transmission (MODTRAN), Cross Beam Absorption Counter (CBAC), Laser Induced Incandescence (LIN), and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS). A rapid response filter instrument called a Taper Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) is also evaluated. For each technique, the theoretical principles are described, the expected performance is determined, and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed The expected performance is evaluated against each of the smoke meter specifications, and the key questions for further study are given. The most promising smoke meter technique analyzed was MODTRAN, which is a variation on a direct transmission measurement. The soot-laden gas is passed through a transmission cell, and the gas pressure is modulated by a speaker.

  6. A model survey meter using undoped poly (ether sulfone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Kanayama, Masaya; Sato, Nobuhiro; Kitamura, Hisashi; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2015-04-01

    The large region surrounding the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has necessitated the use of numerous radiation survey meters with large, robust substrates. The survey meters require efficient scintillation materials that do not require doping and have dimensional stability, such as poly (ether sulfone) (PES) resins. Here, we demonstrate the performance of a model survey meter that uses large PES plates with polished, mirrored surfaces and rough, scattering surfaces. Light collection efficiencies from plates having one or more of these surfaces were quantitatively Characterised with 36Cl-, 60Co-, 137Cs-radioactive sources. The count rates of plates having a combination of mirrored/scattering-surfaces are >1.6 times that for plates having two mirrored surfaces. In addition, a significant amount of radiation-induced light generated in the PES is trapped inside the plate because of its relatively high refractive index. The results indicate that large, undoped PES plates can be used in radiation survey meters.

  7. Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter

    DOEpatents

    Todd, R.A.

    1980-05-12

    A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for couting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensation circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

  8. Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Richard A.

    1981-01-01

    A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for counting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensated circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

  9. Evaluating Metal Probe Meters for Soil Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Inexpensive metal probe meters that are sold by garden stores can be evaluated by students for their accuracy in measuring soil pH, moisture, fertility, and salinity. The author concludes that the meters are inaccurate and cannot be calibrated in standard units. However, the student evaluations are useful in learning the methods of soil analysis…

  10. Meter Accuracy Seafloor Geodesy using Repeated Multibeam Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSanto, J. B.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Ship-board multibeam surveys are a useful tool in measuring tectonic deformation of the seafloor, having been used to measure the ~50 m of surface slip along the Japan trench during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with an uncertainty of 20 m (Fujiwara et al, 2011, Science). In this study, we investigate the improvement in positioning accuracy obtainable when comparing multibeam and sidescan surveys repeated along the same track to within 1/10 of the critical baseline and taken at a slow ship speed of 1 knot. We compare two surveys of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis fitting these criteria with two coincident surveys of the Cocos Ridge, taken at 11 knots. Both pairs of surveys were collected using a Simrad EM120 sonar system aboard the RV Roger Revelle. We find the multibeam surveys of the Juan de Fuca ridge axis sufficient to measure displacements accurate to better than 2 m, a marked improvement over the 50 m accuracy of the Cocos ridge surveys. Likewise, we can measure displacement accurate to 2 m using the sidescan data from the Juan de Fuca surveys. This accuracy is sufficient to observe meter-level horizontal movements on the deep ocean associated with large earthquakes and landslides.

  11. Operational test and evaluation of the meter engineering development model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damore, R. J.; Mah, C. P.

    1982-11-01

    The Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E) of the Meaning Etraction Through Estimated Relevance (METER) System was conducted at Hq Military Airlift Command, Scott AFB, ILL. The Two year effort provided for continuing enhancement of the METER system, as well as tailoring it to interface with the operational message processing system. Analyst training and evaluation of METER's potential utility to the intelligence community were covered.

  12. Test results of the DOE/Sandia 17 meter VAWT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellums, R. O.; Worstell, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    A review is given of the test program of a 17 meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine VAWT. Performance test results are discussed including difficulties encountered during the VAWT operation along with ways of solving these problems.

  13. EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter test results

    SciTech Connect

    Mersman, C.R.

    1993-09-01

    The results of tests evaluating the electric switching portion of the EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter (ECPM) are presented. The ECPM is a modified parking meter that allows the purchase of 120 or 240 volt electric power. The ECPM is designed to make electricity available at any vehicle parking location. The test results indicate that the ECPM operated without failure thru a series of over current and ground fault tests at three different test temperatures. The magnitude of current required to trip the over current protection circuitry varied with temperature while the performance of the ground fault interruption circuitry did not change significantly with the test temperature.

  14. EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersman, C. R.

    1993-09-01

    The results of tests evaluating the electric switching portion of the EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter (ECPM) are presented. The ECPM is a modified parking meter that allows the purchase of 120 or 240 volt electric power. The ECPM is designed to make electricity available at any vehicle parking location. The test results indicate that the ECPM operated without failure through a series of over current and ground fault tests at three different test temperatures. The magnitude of current required to trip the over current protection circuitry varied with temperature while the performance of the ground fault interruption circuitry did not change significantly with the test temperature.

  15. Discuss the testing problems of ultraviolet irradiance meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun'an; Lin, Fangsheng

    2014-09-01

    Ultraviolet irradiance meters are widely used in many areas such as medical treatment, epidemic prevention, energy conservation and environment protection, computers, manufacture, electronics, ageing of material and photo-electric effect, for testing ultraviolet irradiance intensity. So the accuracy of value directly affects the sterile control in hospital, treatment, the prevention level of CDC and the control accuracy of curing and aging in manufacturing industry etc. Because the display of ultraviolet irradiance meters is easy to change, in order to ensure the accuracy, it needs to be recalibrated after being used period of time. By the comparison with the standard ultraviolet irradiance meters, which are traceable to national benchmarks, we can acquire the correction factor to ensure that the instruments working under accurate status and giving the accurate measured data. This leads to an important question: what kind of testing device is more accurate and reliable? This article introduces the testing method and problems of the current testing device for ultraviolet irradiance meters. In order to solve these problems, we have developed a new three-dimensional automatic testing device. We introduce structure and working principle of this system and compare the advantages and disadvantages of two devices. In addition, we analyses the errors in the testing of ultraviolet irradiance meters.

  16. Test temperature compensated gas meters with sonic nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Giglio, P.F.

    1983-01-01

    Explains how a sonic nozzle test facility gives accurate, repeatable results in all temperatures. Niagara Mohawk Power Corp., in late 1963, made a decision to introduce the temperature compensated gas meter into their system to facilitate outdoor meter locations. The test facility was constructed utilizing a water and ethylene glycol bath to condition the gas meter and test medium (air) to the nominal temperature requirements. Sonic nozzles produced extremely repeatable test results from the very beginning. Meter testing time could be considerably reduced due to the inherent repeatability of the sonic nozzles and the simplicity of accurately measuring time, temperature and the relative humidity of the test medium. The sonic nozzles were connected to the outlet of the bell prover with their inlet facing the bell prover side of the connection. A vacuum source was then connected to the outlet side of the sonic nozzle to provide the differential pressure necessary to achieve sonic flow. Based on the test results it was decided to utilize 3-psi vacuum for the calibration of the sonic nozzles.

  17. Comparison Test and its Evaluation of Flowmeters for Heat Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hae-Man; Choi, Yong-Moon; Yoon, Byung-Ro

    2010-06-01

    This study selected a total of 24 heat flowmeters consisting of three types: impeller, electromagnetic and ultrasonic, 8 meters each. The diameter was 0.05 m (9 meters), 0.08 m (9 meters), and 0.15 m (6 meters). In accordance with the OIML R 75 testing method accuracy, installation position, external environment, and durability were tested, and the flowmeter property field test was conducted in the field where of heat supply from winter to summer in order to select the type of heat flowmeter best suited for the circumstances in Korea. According to the test result, all 3 types of flowmeters met the OIML Recommendation, but the result of the field test showed that the electromagnetic flowmeters displayed a deviation at the low flow rate during summer. The impeller flowmeters showed accuracy suggested by the OIML Recommendation, but the ultrasonic flowmeter, a next-generation flowmeter, which is strong against contamination, low in maintenance-rate, and high in accuracy as it has no moving part, was found to be the best choice.

  18. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. 162.050-19... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of oil content meters and meter. A typical test rig is described...

  19. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. 162.050-19... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of oil content meters and meter. A typical test rig is described...

  20. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. 162.050-19... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of oil content meters and meter. A typical test rig is described...

  1. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. 162.050-19... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of oil content meters and meter. A typical test rig is described...

  2. Testing meter, rhythm, and tempo discriminations in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Carl Erick; Cook, Robert G

    2010-10-01

    Rhythmic grouping and discrimination is fundamental to music. When compared to the perception of pitch, rhythmic abilities in animals have received scant attention until recently. In this experiment, four pigeons were tested with three types of auditory rhythmic discriminations to investigate their processing of this aspect of sound and music. Two experiments examined a meter discrimination in which successively presented idiophonic sounds were repeated in meters of different lengths in a go/no-go discrimination task. With difficulty, the birds eventually learned to discriminate between 8/4 and 3/4 meters constructed from cymbal and tom drum sounds at 180 beats per minute. This discrimination subsequently transferred to faster tempos, but not to different drum sounds or their combination. Experiment 3 tested rhythmic and arrhythmic patterns of sounds. After 40 sessions of training, these same pigeons showed no discrimination. Experiment 4 tested repetitions of a piano sound at fast and slow tempos. This discrimination was readily learned and showed transfer to novel tempos. The pattern of results suggests that pigeons can time periodic auditory events, but their capacity to understand generalized rhythmic groupings appears limited. PMID:20600695

  3. Modal Test of Six-Meter Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nijo; Buehrle, Ralph; Templeton, Justin; Lindell, Mike; Hancock, Sean M.

    2014-01-01

    A modal test was performed on the six-meter Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) test article to gain a firm understanding of the dynamic characteristics of the unloaded structure within the low frequency range. The tests involved various configurations of the HIAD to understand the influence of the tri-torus, the varying pressure within the toroids and the influence of straps. The primary test was conducted utilizing an eletrodynamic shaker and the results were verified using a step relaxation technique. The analysis results show an increase in the structure's stiffness with respect to increasing pressure. The results also show the rise of coupled modes with the tri-torus configurations. During the testing activity, the attached straps exhibited a behavior that is similar to that described as fuzzy structures in the literature. Therefore extensive tests were also performed by utilizing foam to mitigate these effects as well as understand the modal parameters of these fuzzy sub structures. Results are being utilized to update the finite element model of the six-meter HIAD and to gain a better understanding of the modeling of complex inflatable structures.

  4. Price current-meter standard rating development by the U.S. geological survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, E.F.; Schwarz, G.E.; Thibodeaux, K.G.; Turcios, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed new standard rating tables for use with Price type AA and pygmy current meters, which are employed to measure streamflow velocity. Current-meter calibration data, consisting of the rates of rotation of meters at several different constant water velocities, have shown that the original rating tables are no longer representative of the average responsiveness of newly purchased meters or meters in the field. The new rating tables are based on linear regression equations that are weighted to reflect the population mix of current meters in the field and weighted inversely to the variability of the data at each calibration velocity. For calibration velocities of 0.3 m/s and faster, at which most streamflow measurements are made, the new AA-rating predicts the true velocities within 1.5% and the new pygmy-meter rating within 2.0% for more than 95% of the meters. At calibration velocities, the new AA-meter rating is up to 1.4% different from the original rating, and the new pygmy-meter rating is up to 1.6% different.

  5. Testing of a 10-meter Quadrant Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, James L.; Mann, Troy; Behun, Vaughn; Macy, Brian; Barker, Peter; Murphy, David

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address the technical challenges and requirements of modal testing a solar sail system (Fig. 1). Specific objectives of this work are to investigate the effectiveness (i.e. accuracy, precision, repeatability, etc.) of laser vibrometer measurements obtained on solar sail components (i.e. sail membrane quadrant and masts) actuated with various excitation methods in vacuum conditions. Results from this work will be used to determine the appropriate test technique for testing large scale full quadrant flight-like solar sail system hardware in vacuum conditions. This paper will focus on the dynamic tests conducted in-vacuum on a 10-meter solar sail quadrant development by AEC-ABLE as part of a ground demonstrator system development program funded by NASA's In-Space Propulsion program. One triangular shaped quadrant of a solar sail membrane (Fig. 2) was modal tested in a 1 Torr vacuum environment using various excitation techniques including, shaker excitation through the masts, magnetic excitation (Ref. 3), and surface-bonded piezoelectric patch actuators (Ref. 4 & 5). The excitation methods are evaluated for their applicability to in-vacuum ground testing and their traceability to the development of on-orbit flight test techniques. The solar sail masts (Fig. 3) were also tested in ambient atmospheric conditions and vacuum using various excitation techniques and these methods will also be assessed for their ground test capabilities and traceability to on-orbit flight testing.

  6. Family housing metering test. A test program to determine the feasibility of installing utility meters in military family housing, developing energy ceilings, and operating a penalty billing system for occupants who overconsume energy. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Appendices: Feasibility Study of Utility Metering for Family Housing Units at Public Works Center, Great Lakes, Illinois; Photographs Showing Meter Reading Problems and Typical Meter Installations; Family Housing Survey; Family Housing Mock Utility Billing System User Manual; Analyses of Familiy Housing Norms; The Utility Norm Analysis Task of the Energy Conservation Program; ADP Portion of the Billing System; Occupant Guide to the Military Family Housing Utility Billing Test; NAVFAC Utility Billing System Study; PACNAVFACENGCOM Audit Report; Alternative Strategies for Optimizing Energy Supply, Distribution, and Consumption Systems on Naval Bases; Energy Conservation Attitudes and Behaviors of Navy Family Housing Residents; and The Corry Kil-A-Watt Newsletter.

  7. TESTING OF A 20-METER SOLAR SAIL SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, J. L.; Behun, V.; Mann, T.; Murphy D.; Macy, B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the structural dynamic tests conducted in-vacuum on the Scalable Square Solar Sail (S(sup 4)) System 20-meter test article developed by ATK Space Systems as part of a ground demonstrator system development program funded by NASA's In-Space Propulsion program1-3. These tests were conducted for the purpose of validating analytical models that would be required by a flight test program to predict in space performance4. Specific tests included modal vibration tests on the solar sail system in a 1 Torr vacuum environment using various excitation locations and techniques including magnetic excitation at the sail quadrant corners, piezoelectric stack actuation at the mast roots, spreader bar excitation at the mast tips, and bi-morph piezoelectric patch actuation on the sail cords. The excitation methods were evaluated for their suitability to in-vacuum ground testing and their traceability to the development of on-orbit flight test techniques. The solar sail masts were also tested in ambient atmospheric conditions and these results are also discussed.

  8. TESTING OF A 20-METER SOLAR SAIL SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Jim L.; Behun, Vaughan; Mann, Troy; Murphy, Dave; Macy, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the structural dynamic tests conducted in-vacuum on the Scalable Square Solar Sail (S(sup 4)) System 20-meter test article developed by ATK Space Systems as part of a ground demonstrator system development program funded by NASA's In-Space Propulsion program. These tests were conducted for the purpose of validating analytical models that would be required by a flight test program to predict in space performance. Specific tests included modal vibration tests on the solar sail system in a 1 Torr vacuum environment using various excitation locations and techniques including magnetic excitation at the sail quadrant corners, piezoelectric stack actuation at the mast roots, spreader bar excitation at the mast tips, and bi-morph piezoelectric patch actuation on the sail cords. The excitation methods are evaluated for their suitability to in-vacuum ground testing and their traceability to the development of on-orbit flight test techniques. The solar sail masts were also tested in ambient atmospheric conditions and these results are also discussed.

  9. Monitoring the Environment: The Use of Electronic Meters and Chemical or Bacteriological Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crellin, J. R.; Tranter, J.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of electronic environmental meters available for use in schools. Included are conductivity, oxygen, pH, and temperature meters. Chemical test papers and kits for use in environmental studies are included. (BB)

  10. Calibrating/testing meters in hot water test bench VM7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, E.; Stolt, K.; Lau, P.; Mattiasson, K.

    A Hot Water Test Bench, VM7, has been developed and constructed for the calibration and testing of volume and flowmeters, in a project at the National Volume Measurement Laboratory at the Swedish National Testing and Research Institute. The intended area of use includes use as a reference at audit measurements, e.g. for accredited laboratories, calibration of meters for the industry and for the testing of hot water meters. The objective of the project, which was initiated in 1989, was to design equipment with stable flow and with a minimal temperature drop even at very low flow rates. The principle of the design is a closed system with two pressure tanks at different pressures. The water is led from the high pressure tank through the test object and the volume standard, in the form of master meters or a piston prover alternatively, to the low pressure tank. Calibrations/tests are made comparing the indication of the test object to that of master meters covering the current flow rate. These are, in the same test cycle, calibrated to the piston prover. Alternatively, the test object can be calibrated directly to the piston prover.

  11. Initial structural response measurements for the Sandia 34-meter VAWT test bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    1988-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has designed and constructed a 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) Test Bed. The machine will be used to advance research in aerodynamics and structural dynamics, improve fatigue life prediction capabilities, and investigate control algorithms and systems concepts. The Test Bed has extensive instrumentation including 70 strain gauges to measure blade and tower response. Immediately after the blades were mounted, blade gravity stresses were measured and a modal analysis on the stationary rotor was performed to determine zero rpm modal frequencies. Assembly and start-up tests have been completed, and testing is in the machine characterization phase. Resonance surveys are underway to fully characterize the modal frequencies and mode shapes of the rotor, drive train and support cables. Measured gravity stresses, centrifugal stresses, and modal frequencies are compared to predicted values.

  12. Initial structural response measurements for the Sandia 34-meter VAWT (vertical axis wind turbine) Test Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, T.D.

    1988-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has designed and constructed a 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) Test Bed. The machine will be used to advance research in aerodynamics and structural dynamics, improve fatigue life prediction capabilities, and investigate control algorithms and systems concepts. The Test Bed has extensive instrumentation including 70 strain gauges to measure blade and tower response. Immediately after the blades were mounted, blade gravity stresses were measured and a modal analysis on the stationary rotor was performed to determine zero rpm modal frequencies. Assembly and start-up tests have been completed, and testing is in the machine characterization phase. Resonance surveys are underway to fully characterize the modal frequencies and mode shapes of the rotor, drive train and support cables. Measured gravity stresses, centrifugal stresses, and modal frequencies are compared to predicted values. 11 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Model validation of the Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed Turbine using substructure modal-testing

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Lauffer, J.P.; Gomez, A.J.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    The Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed Turbine is a vertical-axis wind turbine, thirty-four meters in diameter, designed to provide a test-bed for research in aerodynamics, structures and control. In order to design a large wind turbine, knowledge of the modal frequencies and mode shapes is essential for predicting structural response. During the design, analytical or finite element models are utilized for estimates of these modal parameters. However, when hardware becomes available, modal testing can be used to verify or update the models. The concept of substructure modal testing was developed for the Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed in order to more fully evaluate the accuracy of the finite element model. Instead of performing only one test on the entire turbine, separate tests and analyses were performed on major substructures of the turbine, including three separate blade sections, the tower supported by the guy cables, and the entire turbine. The results were then compared to analytical predictions from the finite element models of the substructures and the entire turbine. 8 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. 46 CFR 162.050-27 - Oil content meter: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oil content meter: Approval tests. 162.050-27 Section 162.050-27 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Pollution Prevention Equipment § 162.050-27 Oil content meter: Approval tests....

  15. Special electronic distance meter calibration for precise engineering surveying industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jaroslav; Štroner, Martin; Urban, Rudolf

    2015-05-01

    All surveying instruments and their measurements suffer from some errors. To refine the measurement results, it is necessary to use procedures restricting influence of the instrument errors on the measured values or to implement numerical corrections. In precise engineering surveying industrial applications the accuracy of the distances usually realized on relatively short distance is a key parameter limiting the resulting accuracy of the determined values (coordinates, etc.). To determine the size of systematic and random errors of the measured distances were made test with the idea of the suppression of the random error by the averaging of the repeating measurement, and reducing systematic errors influence of by identifying their absolute size on the absolute baseline realized in geodetic laboratory at the Faculty of Civil Engineering CTU in Prague. The 16 concrete pillars with forced centerings were set up and the absolute distances between the points were determined with a standard deviation of 0.02 millimetre using a Leica Absolute Tracker AT401. For any distance measured by the calibrated instruments (up to the length of the testing baseline, i.e. 38.6 m) can now be determined the size of error correction of the distance meter in two ways: Firstly by the interpolation on the raw data, or secondly using correction function derived by previous FFT transformation usage. The quality of this calibration and correction procedure was tested on three instruments (Trimble S6 HP, Topcon GPT-7501, Trimble M3) experimentally using Leica Absolute Tracker AT401. By the correction procedure was the standard deviation of the measured distances reduced significantly to less than 0.6 mm. In case of Topcon GPT-7501 is the nominal standard deviation 2 mm, achieved (without corrections) 2.8 mm and after corrections 0.55 mm; in case of Trimble M3 is nominal standard deviation 3 mm, achieved (without corrections) 1.1 mm and after corrections 0.58 mm; and finally in case of Trimble

  16. Borehole Gravity Meter Surveys at the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, Jeffrey D.; Mann, Ethan

    2007-04-06

    Microg-LaCoste (MGL) was contracted by Pacfic Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to record borehole gravity density data in 3 wells at the HanfordWaste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The survey was designed to provide highly accurate density information for use in seismic modeling. The borehole gravity meter (BHGM) tool has a very large depth of investigation (hundreds of feet) compared to other density tools so it is not influenced by casing or near welbore effects, such as washouts.

  17. Tracking subsystem test requirements survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, D. H.; Tatosian, C. G.; Bynum, M. C.; Zook, A. W.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of the test and checkout requirements of the tracking portion of the communications and tracking subsystem was performed to evaluate adequacy of planned tests and test requirement documents. Emphasis is placed on identifying test completeness, duplications, and omissions. Items that may save time, aid in testing, and present a more complete integrated test program are also noted. The results of this survey are summarized.

  18. Surface accuracy measurement sensor test on a 50-meter antenna surface model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, R. B.; Burcher, E. E.; Stump, C. W.; Saunders, C. G.; Brooks, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Surface Accuracy Measurement Sensor (SAMS) is a telescope with a focal plane photo electric detector that senses the lateral position of light source targets in its field of view. After extensive laboratory testing the engineering breadboard sensor system was installed and tested on a 30 degree segment of a 50-meter diameter, mesh surface, antenna model. Test results correlated well with the laboratory tests and indicated accuracies of approximately 0.59 arc seconds at 21 meters range. Test results are presented and recommendations given for sensor improvements.

  19. A mercury flow meter for ion thruster testing. [response time, thermal sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of operation of the thermal flow meter is presented, and a theoretical model is used to determine design parameters for a device capable of measuring mercury flows in the range of 0 to 5 gm/hr. Flow meter construction is described. Tests performed using a positive displacement mercury pump as well as those performed with the device in the feed line of an operating thruster are discussed. A flow meter response time of about a minute and a sensitivity of about 10 mv/gm/hr are demonstrated. Additional work to relieve a sensitivity of the device to variations in ambient temperature is indicated to improve its quantitative performance.

  20. Design, fabrication, and test of a graphite/epoxy metering truss. [as applied to the LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oken, S.; Skoumal, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A graphite/epoxy metering truss as applied to the large space telescope was investigated. A full-scale truss was designed, fabricated and tested. Tests included static limit loadings, a modal survey and thermal-vacuum distortion evaluation. The most critical requirement was the demonstration of the dimensional stability provided by the graphite/epoxy truss concept. Crucial to the attainment of this objective was the ability to make very sophisticated thermal growth measurements which was provided by a seven beam laser interferometer. The design of the basic truss elements were tuned to provide the high degree of dimensional stability and stiffness required by the truss. The struts and spider assembly were fabricated with Fiberite's AS/934 and HMS/934 broadgoods. The rings utilized T300 graphite fabricate with the same materials. The predicted performance of the truss was developed using the NASTRAN program. These results showed conformance with the critical stiffness and thermal distortion requirements and correlated well with the test results.

  1. Hardware and operating features of the adaptive wall test section for the 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1989-01-01

    A 13- by 13-inch adaptive wall test section was installed in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel circuit. This test section has four solid walls and is configured for two-dimensional airfoil testing. The top and bottom walls are flexible and movable, whereas the sidwalls are rigid and fixed. The test section has a turntable to support airfoil models, a survey mechanism to probe the model wake, and provisions for a sidewall boundary-layer-control system. Details of the adaptive wall test section, the tunnel circuit modifications, the supporting instrumentation, the monitoring and control hardware, and the wall adaptation strategy are discussed. Sample results of shakedown tests with the test section empty and with an airfoil installed are also included.

  2. The patient as a radioactive source: an intercomparison of survey meters for measurements in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Uhrhan, K; Drzezga, A; Sudbrock, F

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the radiation exposure in nuclear medicine is evaluated by measuring dose rates in the proximity of patients and those in close contact to sources like capsules and syringes. A huge number of different survey meters (SMs) are offered commercially. This topic has recently gained interest since dosemeters and active personal dosemeters (APD) for the new dose quantities (ambient and directional dose equivalent) have become available. One main concern is the practical use of SMs and APD in daily clinical routines. Therefore, the radiation field of four common radiopharmaceuticals containing (18)F, (90)Y, (99m)Tc and (131)I in radioactive sources or after application to the patient was determined. Measurements were carried out with different SMs and for several distances. Dose rates decline significantly with the distance to the patient, and with some restrictions, APD can be used as SMs. PMID:25071244

  3. Ground Testing A 20-Meter Inflation Deployed Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Troy; Behun, Vaughn; Lichodziejewski, David; Derbes, Billy; Sleight, David

    2006-01-01

    Solar sails have been proposed for a variety of future space exploration missions and provide a cost effective source of propellantless propulsion. Solar sails span very large areas to capture and reflect photons from the Sun and are propelled through space by the transfer of momentum from the photons to the solar sail. The thrust of a solar sail, though small, is continuous and acts for the life of the mission without the need for propellant. Recent advances in materials and ultra-low mass gossamer structures have enabled a host of useful space exploration missions utilizing solar sail propulsion. The team of L Garde, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Ball Aerospace, and NASA Langley Research Center, under the direction of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Office (ISP), has been developing a scalable solar sail configuration to address NASA s future space propulsion needs. The 100-m baseline solar sail concept was optimized around the one astronomical unit (AU) Geostorm mission, and features a Mylar sail membrane with a striped-net sail suspension architecture with inflation-deployed sail support beams consisting of inflatable sub-Tg (glass transition temperature) rigidizable semi-monocoque booms and a spreader system. The solar sail has vanes integrated onto the tips of the support beams to provide full 3-axis control of the solar sail. This same structural concept can be scaled to meet the requirements of a number of other NASA missions. Static and dynamic testing of a 20m scaled version of this solar sail concept have been completed in the Space Power Facility (SPF) at the NASA Glenn Plum Brook facility under vacuum and thermal conditions simulating the operation of a solar sail in space. This paper details the lessons learned from these and other similar ground based tests of gossamer structures during the three year solar sail project.

  4. TRL Assessment of Solar Sail Technology Development Following the 20-Meter System Ground Demonstrator Hardware Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Roy M.; Adams, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Projects Office sponsored two separate, independent solar sail system design and development demonstration activities during 2002-2005. ATK Space Systems of Goleta, CA was the prime contractor for one development team and L' Garde, Inc. of Tustin, CA was the prime contractor for the other development team. The goal of these activities was to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of solar sail propulsion from 3 towards 6 by the year 2006. Component and subsystem fabrication and testing were completed successfully, including the ground deployment of 10-meter and 20-meter demonstration hardware systems under vacuum conditions. The deployment and structural testing of the 20-meter solar sail systems was conducted in the 30 meter diameter Space Power Facility thermal-vacuum chamber at NASA Glenn Plum Brook in April though August, 2005. This paper will present the results of the TRL assessment following the solar sail technology development activities associated with the design, development, analysis and testing of the 20-meter system ground demonstrators.

  5. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  6. Design and calibration of a novel transient radiative heat flux meter for a spacecraft thermal test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Chunchen; Hu, Peng; Cheng, Xiaofang

    2016-06-01

    Radiative heat flux measurement is significantly important for a spacecraft thermal test. To satisfy the requirements of both high accuracy and fast response, a novel transient radiative heat flux meter was developed. Its thermal receiver consists of a central thermal receiver and two thermal guarded annular plates, which ensure the temperature distribution of the central thermal receiver to be uniform enough for reasonably applying lumped heat capacity method in a transient radiative heat flux measurement. This novel transient radiative heat flux meter design can also take accurate measurements regardless of spacecraft surface temperature and incident radiation spectrum. The measurement principle was elaborated and the coefficients were calibrated. Experimental results from testing a blackbody furnace and an Xenon lamp show that this novel transient radiative heat flux meter can be used to measure transient radiative heat flux up to 1400 W/m2 with high accuracy and the response time of less than 10 s.

  7. Design and calibration of a novel transient radiative heat flux meter for a spacecraft thermal test.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chunchen; Hu, Peng; Cheng, Xiaofang

    2016-06-01

    Radiative heat flux measurement is significantly important for a spacecraft thermal test. To satisfy the requirements of both high accuracy and fast response, a novel transient radiative heat flux meter was developed. Its thermal receiver consists of a central thermal receiver and two thermal guarded annular plates, which ensure the temperature distribution of the central thermal receiver to be uniform enough for reasonably applying lumped heat capacity method in a transient radiative heat flux measurement. This novel transient radiative heat flux meter design can also take accurate measurements regardless of spacecraft surface temperature and incident radiation spectrum. The measurement principle was elaborated and the coefficients were calibrated. Experimental results from testing a blackbody furnace and an Xenon lamp show that this novel transient radiative heat flux meter can be used to measure transient radiative heat flux up to 1400 W/m(2) with high accuracy and the response time of less than 10 s. PMID:27370482

  8. An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, T J; Riedhauser, S R

    1999-12-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site including three neighboring areas during August and September 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the Nevada Test Site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey included the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The results of the aerial survey showed a terrestrial background exposure rate that varied from less than 6 microroentgens per hour (mR/h) to 50 mR/h plus a cosmic-ray contribution that varied from 4.5 mR/h at an elevation of 900 meters (3,000 feet) to 8.5 mR/h at 2,400 meters (8,000 feet). In addition to the principal gamma-emitting, naturally occurring isotopes (potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228), the man-made radioactive isotopes found in this survey were cobalt-60, cesium-137, europium-152, protactinium-234m an indicator of depleted uranium, and americium-241, which are due to human actions in the survey area. Individual, site-wide plots of gross terrestrial exposure rate, man-made exposure rate, and americium-241 activity (approximating the distribution of all transuranic material) are presented. In addition, expanded plots of individual areas exhibiting these man-made contaminations are given. A comparison is made between the data from this survey and previous aerial radiological surveys of the Nevada Test Site. Some previous ground-based measurements are discussed and related to the aerial data. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from the gamma-ray measurements collected during this survey agreed very well with the exposure rates inferred from previous aerial surveys.

  9. Comparison of current meters used for stream gaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Thibodeaux, Kirk G.; Kaehrle, William R.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is field and laboratory testing the performance of several current meters used throughout the world for stream gaging. Meters tested include horizontal-axis current meters from Germany, the United Kingdom, and the People's Republic of China, and vertical-axis and electromagnetic current meters from the United States. Summarized are laboratory test results for meter repeatability, linearity, and response to oblique flow angles and preliminary field testing results. All current meters tested were found to under- and over-register velocities; errors usually increased as the velocity and angle of the flow increased. Repeatability and linearity of all meters tested were good. In the field tests, horizontal-axis meters, except for the two meters from the People's Republic of China, registered higher velocity than did the vertical-axis meters.

  10. SOFIA telescope modal survey test and test-model correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keas, Paul; Brewster, Rick; Guerra, Jorge; Lampater, Ulrich; Kärcher, Hans; Teufel, Stefan; Wagner, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    The NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) employs a 2.5-meter reflector telescope in a Boeing 747SP. The telescope is housed in an open cavity and will be subjected to aeroacoustic and inertial disturbances. The image stability goal for SOFIA is 0.2 arc-seconds (RMS). Throughout the development phase of the project, analytical models were employed to predict the image stability performance of the telescope, and to evaluate pointing performance improvement measures. These analyses clearly demonstrated that key aspects which determined performance were: 1) Disturbance environment and relevant load-paths 2) Telescope modal behavior 3) Sensor and actuator placement 4) Control algorithm design The SOFIA program is now entering an exciting phase in which the characteristics of the telescope and the cavity environment are being verified through ground and airborne testing. A modal survey test (MST) was conducted in early 2008 to quantify the telescope modal behavior. We will give a brief overview of analytical methods which have been employed to assess/improve the pointing stability performance of the SOFIA telescope. In this context, we will describe the motivation for the MST, and the pre-test analysis which determined the modes of interest and the required MST sensor/shaker placement. A summary will then be given of the FEM-test correlation effort, updated end-to-end simulation results, and actual data coming from telescope activation test flights.

  11. The Impeller Meter for measuring aquifer permeability variations: Evaluation and comparison with other tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, Fred J.; Morin, Roger H.; Hess, Alfred E.; Melville, Joel G.; Güven, Oktay

    1989-07-01

    A knowledge of the variation of horizontal hydraulic conductivity with vertical position, K(z), is important in understanding the transport and dispersive properties of aquifers. Using an impeller meter to measure the discharge distribution in a screened well while pumping at a constant rate is a promising technique for obtaining the K(z) function. Such an application is described herein, and the resulting K(z) functions are compared with those obtained previously using tracer tests and multilevel slug tests. Impeller meter data were the most convenient to obtain, and tracer data the most difficult. The K(z) functions obtained by the three methods were not identical but quite similar overall. This similarity between both borehole tests and the larger-scale tracer test showed that nonstationary hydraulic conductivity trends, in a stochastic hydrologic sense, exist in the test aquifer. The impeller meter method was better able to detect the higher K layers than was the multilevel slug approach. Overall, the results suggest that a practical strategy for "fitting" impeller meter, tracer, or multilevel slug test data to a given aquifer is to use the selected testing procedure to obtain a dimensionless distribution and then a standard pumping test to measure . Combining both types of information enables dimensional values for K(z) to be calculated. In low permeability aquifers or near the bottom of a test well the fluid velocity due to pumping may be below the stall velocity of an impeller. Thus there is a definite need for the commercial development of more sensitive flow-measuring devices such as heat pulse flowmeters (Hess, 1986), which will extend the resolution of this field method.

  12. TRL Assessment of Solar Sail Technology Development Following the 20-Meter System Ground Demonstrator Hardware Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Roy M.; Montgomery, Edward E.; Montgomery, Sandy; Adams, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Projects Office has been sponsoring 2 separate, independent system design and development hardware demonstration activities during 2002-2005. ATK Space Systems of Goleta, CA was the prime contractor for one development team and L'Garde, Inc. of Tustin, CA was the prime contractor for the other development team. The goal of these activities was to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of solar sail propulsion from 3 towards 6 by the year 2006. Component and subsystem fabrication and testing were completed successfully, including the ground deployment of 10-meter and 20-meter ground demonstration hardware systems under vacuum conditions. The deployment and structural testing of the 20-meter solar sail systems was conducted in the 30 meter diameter Space Power Facility thermal-vacuum chamber at NASA Glenn Plum Brook in April though August, 2005. This paper will present the results of the TRL assessment following the solar sail technology development activities associated with the design, development, analysis and testing of the 20-meter system ground demonstrators. Descriptions of the system designs for both the ATK and L'Garde systems will be presented. Changes, additions and evolution of the system designs will be highlighted. A description of the modeling and analyses activities performed by both teams, as well as testing conducted to raise the TRL of solar sail technology will be presented. A summary of the results of model correlation activities will be presented. Finally, technology gaps identified during the assessment and gap closure plans will be presented, along with "lessons learned", subsequent planning activities and validation flight opportunities for solar sail propulsion technology.

  13. Your Glucose Meter

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Your Glucose Meter Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Español Basic Facts 7 Tips for Testing Your Blood Sugar and Caring for Your Meter Glucose meters test ...

  14. Near-field testing of the 5-meter model of the tetrahedral truss antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, Neill; Cencich, Tom; Osborn, Jim; Osmanski, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    This report documents the technical results from near-field testing of the General Dynamics 5-meter model of the tetrahedral truss antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility. A 5-meter square side of the tetrahedral served as the perimeter of the antenna, and a mesh surface and extensive surface contouring cord network was used to create a parabolic aperture shape to within an rms accuracy of 30 mils or better. Pattern measurements were made with offset feed systems radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report discusses the method of collecting the data, system measurement accuracy, the test data compiled, and diagostics and isolation of causes of pattern results. The technique of using near-field phase for measuring surface mechanical tolerances is included. Detailed far field antenna patterns and their implications are provided for all tests conducted.

  15. Near-field Testing of the 15-meter Model of the Hoop Column Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, J.; Kefauver, N.; Cencich, T.; Osborn, J.; Osmanski, J.

    1986-01-01

    The technical results from near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility are documented. The antenna consists of a deployable central column and a 15 meter hoop, stiffened by cables into a structure with a high tolerance repeatable surface and offset feed location. The surface has been configured to have four offset parabolic apertures, each about 6 meters in diameter, and is made of gold plated molybdenum wire mesh. Pattern measurements were made with feed systems radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, 2.225, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report (Volume 1) covers the testing from an overall viewpoint and contains information of generalized interest for testing large antennas. This volume discusses the deployment of the antenna in the Martin Facility and the measurements to determine mechanical stability and trueness of the reflector surface, gives the test program outline, and gives a synopsis of antenna electromagnetic performance. Three techniques for measuring surface mechanical tolerances were used (theodolites, metric cameras, and near-field phase), but only the near-field phase approach is included. The report also includes an error analysis. A detailed listing of the antenna patterns are provided for the 2.225 Ghz feed in Volume 3 of this report, and for all other feeds in Volume 2.

  16. Dynamic tests during cow milking with different types of milk meters.

    PubMed

    Amirante, P; Bianchi, P; Montel, G L

    2005-01-01

    This study is related to the POM - Measure 2 - Project B15 'Veterinary services computerization and technical support to livestock farms', in which innovative plants solutions has been introduced to recognize the single animal to measure the quantity of produced milk, to centralize and automate the management, in different cow and sheep and goats breedings in Puglia and Basilicata regions. The experimentation has foreseen dynamic tests, during the real milking of the cows, in an apulian plant in which different measurers of the quantity of milk have been installed: weigh jar, electronic weighing 'bascule' milk-meter, electronic proportional milk-meter. In a mechanical point of view, the vacuum level and the vacuum fluctuations in three different milk pipe sections have been valued: at short milk tube, downstream from the claw, prior to the milk meter. Comparing the results, authors deduced that the electronic milkmeters, like the electronic proportional milk meter, allows inferior vacuum degree variations and less mechanical solicitations in cow udder; such situation is particularly evident with higher milk flow. The study also underlines that the vacuum drops during milking can be very critical if not immediately compensate with a suitable planning and periodic revision of the plants. PMID:20437372

  17. Dynamic and Static Shape Test/Analysis Correlation of a 10 Meter Quadrant Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Lively, Peter S.; Gaspar, James L.; Murphy, David M.; Trautt, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes finite element analyses and correlation studies to predict deformations and vibration modes/frequencies of a 10-meter quadrant solar sail system. Thin film membranes and booms were analyzed at the component and system-level. The objective was to verify the design and structural responses of the sail system and to mature solar sail technology to a TRL 5. The focus of this paper is in test/analysis correlation.

  18. First Accelerator Test of the Kinematic Lightweight Energy Meter (KLEM) Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, P.; Chilingarian, A.; Donnelly, J.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Grebenyuk, V.; Kalinin, A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The essence of the KLEM (Kinematic Lightweight Energy Meter) instrument is to directly measure the elemental energy spectra of high-energy cosmic rays by determining the angular distribution of secondary particles produced in a target. The first test of the simple KLEM prototype has been performed at the CERN SPS test-beam with 180 GeV pions during 2001. The results of the first test analysis confirm that, using the KLEM method, the energy of 180 GeV pions can be measured with a relative error of about 67%, which is very close to the results of the simulation (65%).

  19. Chamber for testing metered-dose propellant-driven aerosols of immunologically relevant proteins.

    PubMed

    Brown, A R; Pickrell, J A

    1994-12-01

    A small aerosol chamber was developed for testing and delivery of aerosols of immunologically important proteins to the respiratory tracts of rodents. The chamber was designed to accommodate the small aerosol volumes produced by metered-dose propellant-driven aerosol canisters. Metered bursts of protein aerosols released into the chamber could be sampled for their particle sizes or used to expose the noses of up to six mice to the aerosols. The chamber consisted of a polyethylene tank with two removable plexiglass end plates. One end plate accommodated the propellant-driven, metered-dose, aerosol vial. The other end of the tank was fitted with a plate accepting aerosol sampling devices or a plate containing mouse restrainers. Uniform concentrations of aerosolized proteins were obtained at different positions in the chamber when sampled for particles of respirable size. Respirable-sized protein particles produced by propellant-driven aerosols ranged from 5 to 50% of total aerosolized protein. Propellant-driven aerosols of proteins released in the chamber produced aerosol particles equivalent to 15-26 micrograms of total protein exposure to the respiratory tract of each mouse. The chamber permitted aerosol releases without risk of operator exposure. This aerosol chamber will permit the testing of protein aerosols for their immunologic consequences to the respiratory tract. Potential proteins for testing in this device include immunizing vaccine antigens, immunomodulating cytokine proteins, and passive antibody aerosol therapies against respiratory infections. PMID:7527068

  20. A multispectral scanner survey of the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. Date of survey: August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Howard, M.E.; Shines, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    The Multispectral Remote Sensing Department of the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an airborne multispectral scanner survey of a portion of the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. The survey was conducted on August 21 and 22, 1993, using a Daedalus AADS1268 scanner and coincident aerial color photography. Flight altitudes were 5,000 feet (1,524 meters) above ground level for systematic coverage and 1,000 feet (304 meters) for selected areas of special interest. The multispectral scanner survey was initiated as part of an interim and limited investigation conducted to gather preliminary information regarding historical hazardous material release sites which could have environmental impacts. The overall investigation also includes an inventory of environmental restoration sites, a ground-based geophysical survey, and an aerial radiological survey. The multispectral scanner imagery and coincident aerial photography were analyzed for the detection, identification, and mapping of man-made soil disturbances. Several standard image enhancement techniques were applied to the data to assist image interpretation. A geologic ratio enhancement and a color composite consisting of AADS1268 channels 10, 7, and 9 (mid-infrared, red, and near-infrared spectral bands) proved most useful for detecting soil disturbances. A total of 358 disturbance sites were identified on the imagery and mapped using a geographic information system. Of these sites, 326 were located within the Tonopah Test Range while the remaining sites were present on the imagery but outside the site boundary. The mapped site locations are being used to support ongoing field investigations.

  1. Status of advanced airfoil tests in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladson, C. L.; Ray, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A joint NASA/U.S. industry program to test advanced technology airfoils in the Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Tunnel (TCT) was formulated under the Langley ACEE Project Office. The objectives include providing U.S. industry an opportunity to compare their most advanced airfoils to the latest NASA designs by means of high Reynolds number tests in the same facility. At the same time, industry would again experience in the design and construction of cryogenic test techniques. The status and details of the test program are presented. Typical aerodynamic results obtained, to date, are presented at chord Reynolds number up to 45 x 10(6) and are compared to results from other facilities and theory. Details of a joint agreement between NASA and the Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsantalt fur Luft- and Raumfahrt e.V. (DFVLR) for tests of two airfoils are also included. Results of these tests will be made available as soon as practical.

  2. NaK Plugging Meter Design for the Feasibility Test Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Reid, Robert S.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2008-01-01

    The design and predicted performance of a plugging meter for use in the measurement of NaK impurity levels are presented. The plugging meter is incorporated into a Feasibility Test Loop (FTL), which is a small pumped-NaK loop designed to enable the rapid, small-scale evaluation of techniques such as in situ purification methods and to permit the measurement of bulk material transport effects (not mechanisms) under flow conditions that are representative of a fission surface power reactor. The FTL operates at temperatures similar to those found in a reactor, with a maximum hot side temperature of 900 K and a corresponding cold side temperature of 860 K. In the plugging meter a low flow rate bypass loop is cooled until various impurities (primarily oxides) precipitate out of solution. The temperatures at which these impurities precipitate are indicative of the level of impurities in the NaK. The precipitates incrementally plug a small orifice in the bypass loop, which is detected by monitoring changes in the liquid metal flow rate.

  3. 77 FR 40586 - Draft NIST Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7823, Advanced Metering Infrastructure Smart Meter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Metering Infrastructure Smart Meter Upgradeability Test Framework; Request for Comments AGENCY: National... Metering Infrastructure Smart Meter Upgradeability Test Framework (Draft NISTIR 7823). This draft document... process for the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) Smart Meters. The target audience for Draft...

  4. Fabrication and Deployment Testing of Solar Sail Quadrants for a 20-Meter Solar Sail Ground Test System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Greg; Case, David; Moore, Jim

    2005-01-01

    A 20-meter Scalable Square Solar Sail (S(sup 4)) System was produced and successfully completed functional vacuum testing in NASA Glenn's Space Power Facility at Plum Brook Station Ohio in May 2005. The S(sup 4) system was designed and developed by ATK Space Systems, and the design and production of the Solar Sails for this system was carried out by SRS Technologies. The S(sup 4) system consists of a central structure with four deployable carbon fiber masts that support four triangular sails. SRS has developed an effective and efficient design for triangular sail quadrants that are supported at three points and provide a flat reflective surface with a high fill factor. This sail design is robust enough for deployments in a one atmosphere, one gravity environment and incorporates several advanced features including adhesiveless seaming of membrane strips, compliant edge borders to allow for film membrane cord strain mismatch without causing wrinkling and low mass (3% of total sail mass) ripstop. This paper will outline some of the sail design and fabrication processes and the mature production, packaging and deployment processes that have been developed. This paper will also detail the successful ambient and vacuum testing of the sails and the ATK spacecraft structure. Based on recent experience and testing, SRS is confidant that high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 5-6 solar sails in the 40-120-meter size range with areal density in the 4-5 grams per square meters (sail minus structure) range can be produced with existing technology. Additional film production research will lead to further reductions in film thickness to less than 1 micron enabling production of sails with areal densities as low as 2.0 grams per square meters using the current design, resulting in a system areal densities as low as 5.3 grams per square meters (sail and structure). These areal densities are low enough to allow nearly all of the Solar Sail missions that have been proposed by the

  5. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, materials, tooling, manufacturing processes, quality control, test procedures, and results associated with the fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components exhibiting a near zero coefficient of thermal expansion are described. Analytical methods were utilized, with the aid of a computer program, to define the most efficient laminate configurations in terms of thermal behavior and structural requirements. This was followed by an extensive material characterization and selection program, conducted for several graphite/graphite/hybrid laminate systems to obtain experimental data in support of the analytical predictions. Mechanical property tests as well as the coefficient of thermal expansion tests were run on each laminate under study, the results of which were used as the selection criteria for the single most promising laminate. Further coefficient of thermal expansion measurement was successfully performed on three subcomponent tubes utilizing the selected laminate.

  6. Computational investigation of the discharge coefficient of bellmouth flow meters in engine test facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebourn, Charles Lynn

    2002-11-01

    In this thesis computation of the discharge coefficient of bellmouth flow meters installed in engine test facilities is presented. The discharge coefficient is a critical parameter for accurately calculating flow rate in any flow meter which operates by means of creating a pressure differential. Engine airflow is a critical performance parameter and therefore, it is necessary for engine test facilities to accurately measure airflow. In this report the author investigates the use of computational fluid dynamics using finite difference methods to calculate the flow in bellmouth flow meters and hence the discharge coefficient at any measurement station desired. Experimental boundary layer and core flow data was used to verify the capability of the WIND code to calculate the discharge coefficient accurately. Good results were obtained for Reynolds numbers equal to or greater than about three million which is the primary range of interest. After verifying the WIND code performance, results were calculated for a range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers. Also the variation in discharge coefficient as a function of measurement location was examined. It is demonstrated that by picking the proper location for pressure measurement, sensitivity to measurement location can be minimized. Also of interest was the effect of bellmouth geometry. Calculations were performed to investigate the effect of duct to bellmouth diameter ratio and the eccentricity of the bellmouth contraction. In general the effects of the beta ratio were seen to be quite small. For the eccentricity, the variation in discharge coefficient was as high as several percent for axial locations less than half a diameter downstream from the throat. The second portion of the thesis examined the effect of a turbofan engine stationed just downstream of the bellmouth flow meter. The study approximated this effect by examining a single fan stage installed in the duct. This calculation was performed by making use of a

  7. The Sandia 34-meter VAWT (Vertical Axis Wind Turbine) test bed

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, T.D.; Berg, D.E.; Gallo, L.R.; Grover, R.D.; Klimas, P.C.; Ralph, M.E.; Rumsey, M.A.; Stephenson, W.A.; Sutherland, H.J.

    1987-10-01

    The Wind Energy Research Division of Sandia National Laboratories has been funded by the Wind/Ocean Technology Division of the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and build a 34-meter diameter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) incorporating the results of recent research in VAWT aerodynamics and structural dynamics. The design and fabrication of all turbine parts has been completed, and construction of the turbine is now nearing completion, with preliminary testing underway. Turbine design and construction are reviewed and the major components of the system are summarized in this paper. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, J P

    1997-02-01

    There are several portable peak flow meters available. These instruments vary in construction and performance. Guidelines are recommended for minimum performance and testing of portable peak flow meters, with the aim of establishing a procedure for standardizing all peak flow meters. Future studies to clarify the usefulness of mechanical test apparatus and clinical trials of peak flow meters are also recommended. PMID:9098706

  9. Design, fabrication, and test of a Graphite/Epoxy Metering Shell (GEMS). [for the large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A program to design, fabricate and test a dimensionally stable metering structure in support of the large space telescope (LST) program is discussed. Graphite/epoxy was the material selected as the only viable candidate material which can meet the stringent thermal expansion criteria of the LST. A metering shell was designed and fabricated, with emphasis on dimensional stability in conjunction with low cost. Thermal expansion test coupons extracted from the layups of the skin panels indicated the attainment of a coefficient of thermal expansion of 0.0666 micrometers/m K. Subsequent thermal vacuum chamber tests on the complete metering shell demonstrated an expansion of the 2.95-meter overall length of 0.27 micrometers/K. Static and dynamics tests, which demonstrated adequacy with respect to limit loads and stiffness, were also accomplished.

  10. Development of the 15-meter hoop-column antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, T. G.; Butler, D. H.; Belvin, K.; Allen, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    The development of the 15-meter hoop/column antenna system is presented. The 15-meter deployable structure is discussed along with the mulitple-beam feed system development and the structures and RF testing planned in 1985. The topics presented are: overview of antenna development activities; development of 15-meter reflector and kinematic deployment tests; preliminary modal survey test results and future structural dynamics tests; and radio frequency subsystems and near field testing.

  11. SIMPLIFIED PRACTICAL TEST METHOD FOR PORTABLE DOSE METERS USING SEVERAL SEALED RADIOACTIVE SOURCES.

    PubMed

    Mikamoto, Takahiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Kurosawa, Tadahiro

    2016-09-01

    Sealed radioactive sources which have small activity were employed for the determination of response and tests for non-linearity and energy dependence of detector responses. Close source-to-detector geometry (at 0.3 m or less) was employed to practical tests for portable dose meters to accumulate statistically sufficient ionizing currents. Difference between response in the present experimentally studied field and in the reference field complied with ISO 4037 due to non-uniformity of radiation fluence at close geometry was corrected by use of Monte Carlo simulation. As a consequence, corrected results were consistent with the results obtained in the ISO 4037 reference field within their uncertainties. PMID:27521204

  12. Capacitance Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Anders Precision Instrument Co.'s original meter could not measure dissipation leakage in capacitors. Seeking to add that capability, the company planned an advanced model. Before starting work, company president, Thomas Anderson, sought technical assistance from NASA's NERAC (New England Research Application Center). Anderson wanted a survey of the status and capabilities of NASA's electronic measuring devices. NERAC performed a search of six databases, including NASA's and provided a comprehensive report on state of the art worldwide.

  13. Test plan for the 34 meter vertical axis wind turbine test bed located at Bushland, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, W.A.

    1986-12-01

    A plan is presented for the testing and evaluation of a new 500 kw vertical axis wind turbine test bed. The plan starts with the initial measurements made during construction, proceeds through evaluation of the design, the development of control methods, and finally to the test bed phase where new concepts are evaluated and in-depth studies are performed.

  14. PROOF OF PRINCIPAL TEST TO FEED AND METER GRANULAR COAL INTO 450 PSIG GAS PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Derek L. Aldred

    1999-04-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate proof of principal to feed and meter granular coal into 450 psig gas pressure for use with pressurized fluidized bed combustors. This report summarizes work undertaken in the first quarter of 1999 in support of that objective. Materials testers have been designed and built to assess properties relevant to performance in the Stamet pump. Testing has been carried out to evaluate these properties for materials to be pumped. A small scale pump has been modified and preliminary testing has been carried out to assess the effectiveness of the sealing and venting modifications, and the effect of outlet material sealing plug length on required HP and gas leakage. The sealing and venting modifications worked well, and measurements of gas leakage and power requirements were in line with predictions made from the measured materials properties and pump geometry. Changes to the large scale pump test rig to upgrade to the necessary 450 psig pressure rating have been defined and components ordered. The data from the materials and small scale pump testing is being used to define the necessary changes to the large scale SBIR test pump to reach the 450 psig target.

  15. Strain gauge validation experiments for the Sandia 34-meter VAWT (Vertical Axis Wind Turbine) test bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Herbert J.

    1988-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has erected a research oriented, 34- meter diameter, Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine near Bushland, Texas. This machine, designated the Sandia 34-m VAWT Test Bed, is equipped with a large array of strain gauges that have been placed at critical positions about the blades. This manuscript details a series of four-point bend experiments that were conducted to validate the output of the blade strain gauge circuits. The output of a particular gauge circuit is validated by comparing its output to equivalent gauge circuits (in this stress state) and to theoretical predictions. With only a few exceptions, the difference between measured and predicted strain values for a gauge circuit was found to be of the order of the estimated repeatability for the measurement system.

  16. Strain gauge validation experiments for the Sandia 34-meter VAWT (vertical axis wind turbine) Test Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, H.J.

    1988-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has erected a research oriented, 34- meter diameter, Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine near Bushland, Texas. This machine, designated the Sandia 34-m VAWT Test Bed, is equipped with a large array of strain gauges that have been placed at critical positions about the blades. This manuscript details a series of four-point bend experiments that were conducted to validate the output of the blade strain gauge circuits. The output of a particular gauge circuit is validated by comparing its output to ''equivalent'' gauge circuits (in this stress state) and to theoretical predictions. With only a few exceptions, the difference between measured and predicted strain values for a gauge circuit was found to be of the order of the estimated repeatability for the measurement system. 8 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Performance of a New Meter Designed for Assisted Monitoring of Blood Glucose and Point-of-Care Testing

    PubMed Central

    MacRury, Sandra; Srinivasan, Aparna; Mahoney, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Blood glucose (BG) meters used for assisted monitoring of blood glucose (AMBG) require different attributes compared with meters designed for home use. These include safety considerations (i.e., minimized risk of blood-borne pathogen transmission), capability for testing multiple blood sample types, and enhanced performance specifications. The OneTouch® Verio™Pro+ BG meter is designed to incorporate all of these attributes. Methods Meter accuracy was assessed in clinical studies with arterial, venous, and capillary blood samples with a hematocrit range of 22.9–59.8%. The effect of interferents, including anticoagulants, on accuracy was evaluated. The meter disinfection protocol was validated, and instructions for use and user acceptance of the system were assessed. Results A total of 97% (549/566) of BG measures from all blood sample types and 95.5% (191/200) of arterial blood samples were within ±12 mg/dl or 12.5% of reference measurements. The system was unaffected by 4 anticoagulants and 57 of 59 endogenous and exogenous compounds; it was affected by 2 compounds: pralidoxime iodide and xylose. Bleach wipes were sufficient to disinfect the meter. Users felt that the meter's quality control (QC) prompts would help them to comply with regulatory requirements. Conclusions The meter provided accurate measurements of different blood samples over a wide hematocrit range and was not affected by 57 physiologic and therapeutic compounds. The QC prompts and specific infection-mitigating design further aid to make this meter system practical for AMBG in care facilities. PMID:23566997

  18. Evaluation and testing of metering pumps for high-level nuclear waste slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.E.; Perez, J.M. Jr.; Blair, H.T.

    1986-06-01

    The metering pump system that delivers high-level liquid wastes (HLLW) slurry to a melter is an integral subsystem of the vitrification process. The process of selecting a pump for this application began with a technical review of pumps typically used for slurry applications. The design and operating characteristics of numerous pumps were evaluated against established criteria. Two pumps, an air-displacement slurry (ADS) pump and an air-lift pump, were selected for further development. In the development activity, from FY 1983 to FY 1985, the two pumps were subjected to long-term tests using simulated melter feed slurries to evaluate the pumps' performances. Throughout this period, the designs of both pumps were modified to better adapt them for this application. Final reference designs were developed for both the air-displacement slurry pump and the air-lift pump. Successful operation of the final reference designs has demonstrated the feasibility of both pumps. A fully remote design of the ADS pump has been developed and is currently undergoing testing at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Five designs of the ADS pump were tested and evaluated. The initial four designs proved the operating concept of the ADS pump. Weaknesses in the ADS pump system were identified and eliminated in later designs. A full-scale air-lift pump was designed and tested as a final demonstration of the air-lift pump's capabilities.

  19. Test of prototype liquid-water-content meter for aircraft use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Hermann E.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the effort undertaken to meet the objectives of National Science Foundation Grant ATM-9207345 titled 'Test of Prototype Liquid-Water-Content Meter for Aircraft Use.' Three activities were proposed for testing the new aircraft instrument, PVM-100A: (1) Calibrate the PVM-100A in a facility where the liquid-water-content (LWC) channel, and the integrated surface area channel (PSA) could be compared to standard means for LWC and PSA measurements. Scaling constant for the channels were to be determined in this facility. The fog/wind tunnel at ECN, Petten, The Netherlands was judged the most suitable facility for this effort. (2) Expose the PVM-100A to high wind speeds similar to those expected on research aircraft, and test the anti-icing heaters on the PVM-100A under typical icing conditions expected in atmospheric clouds. The high-speed icing tunnel at NRC, Ottawa, Canada was to be utilized. (3) Operate the PVM-100A on an aircraft during cloud penetrations to determine its stability and practicality for such measurements. The C-131A aircraft of the University of Washington was the aircraft of opportunity for these-tests, which were to be conducted during the 4-week Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June of 1992.

  20. Pressure distribution data from tests of 2.29-meter (7.5-ft.) span EET high-lift research model in Langley 4- by 7-meter tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A 2.29 m (7.5 ft.) span high-lift research model equipped with full-span leading-edge slat and part-span double-slotted trailing-edge flap was tested in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel to determine the low speed performance characteristics of a representative high aspect ratio suprcritical wing. These tests were performed in support of the Energy Efficient Transport (EET) program which is one element of the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) project. Static longitudinal forces and moments and chordwise pressure distributions at three spanwise stations were measured for cruise, climb, two take-off flap, and two landing flap wing configurations. The tabulated and plotted pressure distribution data is presented without analysis or discussion.

  1. Are the 10 Meter and 6 Minute Walk Tests Redundant in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Gail F.; Hutchinson, Karen; Lorenz, Douglas J.; Buehner, Jeffrey J.; VanHiel, Leslie R.; Sisto, Sue Ann; Basso, D. Michele

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship and redundancy between gait speeds measured by the 10 Meter Walk Test (10MWT) and 6 Minute Walk Test (6MWT) after motor incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). To identify gait speed thresholds supporting functional ambulation as measured with the Spinal Cord Injury Functional Ambulation Inventory (SCI-FAI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Seven outpatient rehabilitation centers from the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation NeuroRecovery Network (NRN). Participants 249 NRN patients with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) level C (n = 20), D (n = 179) and (n = 50) iSCI not AIS evaluated, from February 2008 through April 2011. Interventions Locomotor training using body weight support and walking on a treadmill, overground and home/community practice. Main Outcome Measure(s) 10MWT and 6MWT collected at enrollment, approximately every 20 sessions, and upon discharge. Results The 10MWT and 6MWT speeds were highly correlated and the 10MWT speeds were generally faster. However, the predicted 6MWT gait speed from the 10MWT, revealed increasing error with increased gait speed. Regression lines remained significantly different from lines of agreement, when the group was divided into fast (≥0.44 m/s) and slow walkers (<0.44 m/s). Significant differences between 6MWT and 10MWT gait speeds were observed across SCI-FAI walking mobility categories (Wilcoxon sign rank test p<.001), and mean speed thresholds for limited community ambulation differed for each measure. The smallest real difference for the 6MWT and 10MWT, as well as the minimally clinically important difference (MCID) values, were also distinct for the two tests. Conclusions While the speeds were correlated between the 6MWT and 10MWT, redundancy in the tests using predictive modeling was not observed. Different speed thresholds and separate MCIDs were defined for community ambulation for each test. PMID:24788068

  2. 40 CFR 201.23 - Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100 feet) distance of the noise from locomotive and... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT; INTERSTATE RAIL CARRIERS Measurement Criteria § 201.23 Test site, weather...

  3. 40 CFR 201.23 - Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100 feet) distance of the noise from locomotive and... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT; INTERSTATE RAIL CARRIERS Measurement Criteria § 201.23 Test site, weather...

  4. Design, fabrication and acoustic tests of a 36 inch (0.914 meter) statorless turbotip fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. G.; Stempert, D. L.; Uhl, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    The LF336/E is a 36 inch (0.914 meter) diameter fan designed to operate in a rotor-alone configuration. Design features required for modification of the existing LF336/A rotor-stator fan into the LF336/E statorless fan configuration are discussed. Tests of the statorless fan identified an aerodynamic performance deficiency due to inaccurate accounting of the fan exit swirl during the aerodynamic design. This performance deficiency, related to fan exit static pressure levels, produced about a 20 percent thrust loss. A study was then conducted for further evaluation of the fan exit flow fields typical of statorless fan systems. This study showed that through proper selection of fan design variables such as pressure ratio, radius ratio, and swirl distributions, performance of a statorless fan configuration could be improved with levels of thrust approaching the conventional rotor-stator fan system. Acoustic measurements were taken for the statorless fan system at both GE and NASA, and when compared to other lift fan systems, showed noise levels comparable to the quietest lift fan configuration which included rotor-stator spacing and acoustic treatment. The statorless fan system was also used to determine effects of rotor leading edge serrations on noise generations. A cascade test program identified the serration geometry based on minimum pressure losses, wake turbulence levels and noise generations.

  5. USER'S GUIDE FOR SURVEY METER AND FILM BADGE DOSIMETRY DATA BASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual describes the Nevada Test Site data storage and retrieval system designed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This system contains two distinct subsets of off-site radiological measurements collected during early nuclear atmospheric tests at the Nevada Test S...

  6. Test production of a mirror segment for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oota, Tetsuji; Shinonaga, Hirohiko; Akutsu, Kotaro; Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Itaru; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Iye, Masanori; Yamashita, Takuya; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2012-09-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) is a next-generation optical/infrared telescope to be constructed on Mauna Kea, Hawaii toward the end of this decade, as an international project. Its 30 m primary mirror consists of 492 off-axis aspheric segmented mirrors. This paper describes the progress of the test fabrication of an outermost mirror segment for the TMT as a joint R&D program between National Astronomical Observatory and Canon. A zero-expansion glass CLEARCERAM™ blank was polished by a computer-controlled small-tool polishing machine (CSSP, Canon) and its surface shape was measured by a touch-probe measuring machine(A-Ruler, Canon). Residuals of lower Zernike terms of the surface shape were 11 nmRMS, clearing the original specifications based on the structure function. There remains, however, a need to fulfill latest revised specifications. Possible solutions to improve and achieve the new specifications and a plan for revising the process for mass production are also described.

  7. Survey of fracture toughness test methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. F., Jr.; Jones, M. H.; Srawley, J. E.

    1968-01-01

    Comprehensive survey presents current methods of fracture toughness testing that are based on linear elastic fracture mechanics. General principles of the basic two dimensional crack stress field model are discussed in relation to real three dimensional specimens. Methods of test instrumentation and procedure are described.

  8. THE VERTICAL PLANAR MOTION MECHANISM; A DYNAMIC TEST APPARATUS FOR EVALUATING CURRENT METERS AND OTHER MARINE INSTRUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective was to provide a dynamic test apparatus that can produce known, controlled high frequency dynamics for the evaluation of current meters and other marine instrumentation. Of primary interest is the establishment of flow sensor measurement capabilities, and he...

  9. Wide Field Infra-Red Survey Telescope (WFIRST) 2.4-Meter Mission Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, D.; Aaron, K.; Alplanalp, L.; Anderson, K.; Capps, R.; Chang, Z.; Dooley, J.; Egerman, R.; Goullioud, R.; Klein, D.; Kruk, J.; Kuan, G.; Melton, M.; Ruffa, J.; Underhill, M.; Buren, D. Van

    2013-01-01

    The most recent study of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission is based on reuse of an existing 2.4m telescope. This study was commissioned by NASA to examine the potential science return and cost effectiveness of WFIRST by using this significantly larger aperture telescope. We review the science program envisioned by the WFIRST 2012-2013 Science Definition Team (SDT), an overview of the mission concept, and the telescope design and status. Comparisons against the previous 1.3m and reduced cost 1.1m WFIRST design concepts are discussed. A significant departure from past point designs is the option for serviceability and the geostationary orbit location which enables servicing and replacement instrument insertion later during mission life. Other papers at this conference provide more in depth discussion of the wide field instrument and the optional exoplanet imaging coronagraph instrument.

  10. An aerial radiological survey of Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site, Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, R.C.

    1996-10-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site from January 27 to February 7,1982. Parallel lines were flown at an altitude of 100 feet (30 meters) above ground level with line spacing intervals of 200 feet (61 meters) over a 170-square-mile (440-square-kilometer) area. This covered both Frenchman Flat and the area of the Nellis Range Complex where a fallout deposition plume had exited the Nevada Test Site to the east. The aerial data obtained were reduced to a man-made radiation contour map and overlaid on a U.S. Geological Survey map. The survey detected the presence of fission and activation products. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Commercial Sensory Survey Radiation Testing Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Dolphic, Michael D.; Thorbourn, Dennis O.; Alexander, James W.; Salomon, Phil M.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Sensor Technology Commercial Sensor Survey task is geared toward benefiting future NASA space missions with low-cost, short-duty-cycle, visible imaging needs. Such applications could include imaging for educational outreach purposes or short surveys of spacecraft, planetary, or lunar surfaces. Under the task, inexpensive commercial grade CMOS sensors were surveyed in fiscal year 2007 (FY07) and three sensors were selected for total ionizing dose (TID) and displacement damage dose (DDD) tolerance testing. The selected sensors had to meet selection criteria chosen to support small, low-mass cameras that produce good resolution color images. These criteria are discussed in detail in [1]. This document discusses the progress of radiation testing on the Micron and OmniVision sensors selected in FY07 for radiation tolerance testing.

  12. Fabrication end Deployment Testing of Meter Solar Sail Quadrants for a Scaleable Square Solar Sail Ground Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Greg; Case, David; Moore, Jim

    2005-01-01

    In order for solar sail propulsion technologies to be considered as a viable option for a wide range of near term practical missions a predictable, stable, reliable, manufactureable, scaleable, and cost effective system must be developed and tested first on earth and then on orbit. The design and development of a Scaleable Square Solar Sail System (S^4) is well underway a t AEC-Able Engineering Co. Inc., and the design and production of the Solar Sails for this system is being carried out by SRS Technologies. In April and May of 2004 a single quadrant 10-meter system was tested at NASA LARC's vacuum chamber and a four quadrant 20-meter system has been designed and built for deployment and testing in the Spring of 2005 at NASA/Glenn Research Center's Plumb Brook Facility. SRS has developed an effective and efficient design for triangular sail quadrants that are supported are three points and provide a flat reflective surface with a high fill factor. This sail design is robust enough for deployments in a one atmosphere, one gravity environment and incorporates several advanced features including adhesiveless seaming of membrane strips, compliant edge borders to allow for film membrane cord strain mismatch without causing wrinkling and low mass (3% of total sail mass) ripstop. This paper will outline the sail design and fabrication process, the lessons learned and the resulting mature production, packaging and deployment processes that have been developed. It will also highlight the scalability of the equipment and processes that were developed to fabricate and package the sails. Based on recent experience, SRS is confidant that flight worthy solar sails in the 40-120-meter size range with areal density in the 4-5g/sq m (sail minus structure) range can be produced with existing technology. Additional film production research will lead to further reductions in film thickness to less than 1 micron enabling production of sails with areal densities as low as 20 g/sq m

  13. A Survey of UML Based Regression Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahad, Muhammad; Nadeem, Aamer

    Regression testing is the process of ensuring software quality by analyzing whether changed parts behave as intended, and unchanged parts are not affected by the modifications. Since it is a costly process, a lot of techniques are proposed in the research literature that suggest testers how to build regression test suite from existing test suite with minimum cost. In this paper, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of using UML diagrams for regression testing and analyze that UML model helps in identifying changes for regression test selection effectively. We survey the existing UML based regression testing techniques and provide an analysis matrix to give a quick insight into prominent features of the literature work. We discuss the open research issues like managing and reducing the size of regression test suite, prioritization of the test cases that would be helpful during strict schedule and resources that remain to be addressed for UML based regression testing.

  14. Data from tests of a R4 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.; Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Hill, A. S.; Mueller, R.; Redeker, G.

    1984-01-01

    Aerodynamic data for the DFVLR R4 airfoil are presented in both graphic and tabular form. The R4 was tested in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) at Mach number from 0.60 to 0.78 at angles of attack from -2.0 to 8.0 degrees. The airfoil was tested at Reynolds numbers of 4, 6, 10, 15, 30, and 40 million based on the 152.32 mm chord.

  15. Test plan for evaluation of primary exhaust ventilation flow meters for double shell hydrogen watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, W.E.

    1996-05-02

    This document is a plan for testing four different flow meters for use in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of Double Shell Tanks on the hydrogen watch list that do not already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 241-AW-101, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, and 241-SY-103. The anticipated airflow velocity in these tanks range from 0.25 m/s(50 ft/min) to 1.78 m/s (350 ft/min). Past experiences at Hanford are forcing the evaluation and selection of instruments to be used at the low flow and relatively high humidity conditions found in these tanks. Based on the results of this test, a flow meter shall be chosen for installation in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of the above mentioned waste tanks.

  16. Designing surveys for tests of gravity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2011-12-28

    Modified gravity theories may provide an alternative to dark energy to explain cosmic acceleration. We argue that the observational programme developed to test dark energy needs to be augmented to capture new tests of gravity on astrophysical scales. Several distinct signatures of gravity theories exist outside the 'linear' regime, especially owing to the screening mechanism that operates inside halos such as the Milky Way to ensure that gravity tests in the solar system are satisfied. This opens up several decades in length scale and classes of galaxies at low redshift that can be exploited by surveys. While theoretical work on models of gravity is in the early stages, we can already identify new regimes that cosmological surveys could target to test gravity. These include: (i) a small-scale component that focuses on the interior and vicinity of galaxy and cluster halos, (ii) spectroscopy of low-redshift galaxies, especially galaxies smaller than the Milky Way, in environments that range from voids to clusters, and (iii) a programme of combining lensing and dynamical information, from imaging and spectroscopic surveys, respectively, on the same (or statistically identical) sample of galaxies. PMID:22084295

  17. Buckling tests of two 4.6-meter-diameter, magnesium ring-stiffened conical shells loaded under external pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. K.; DAVIS R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Two ring-stiffened magnesium conical shells with a 120 deg apex angle and a 4.6-meter diameter were loaded to failure by a uniform external pressure. The cones differed from one another only in the number of internal stiffening rings. Test specimen details, test procedure, and test results are discussed. Both buckling and prebuckling data are compared with appropriate theoretical predictions. Measured strains in skin and rings agreed well with theoretical predictions. Extensive imperfection measurements were made and reported on both cones in the as fabricated condition.

  18. Intercomparison of environmental gamma doses measured with A NaI (Tl) survey meter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in the Poonch division of Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Muhammad; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Ahmad, Khalil; Akhter, Jabeen; Khan, Abdul Razzaq; Saeed, Raja Azhar; Rahman, Saeed Ur; Matiullah; Rajput, Muhammad Usman

    2014-12-01

    This study presents the intercomparison of the outdoor environmental gamma dose rates measured using a NaI (Tl) based survey meter along with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and estimation of excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR), for the inhabitants of Poonch division of the Azad Kashmir, Pakistan. CaF2: Dy (TLD-200) card dosimeters were installed at height of 1 m from ground at fifteen different locations covering the entire Poonch division comprising of three districts. During three distinct two month time periods within the six month study period, all the installed dosimeters were exposed to outdoor environmental gamma radiations, retrieved and read out at Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Health Physics Division, PINSTECH laboratory, Islamabad. The ambient outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were also taken with NaI (Tl) based portable radiometric instrument at 1 m above the ground. To estimate the annual gamma doses, NaI (Tl) based survey data were used for one complete year following the deployment of the dosimeters. The mean annual gamma dose rates measured by TLDs and survey meter were found as 1.47±0.10 and 0.862±0.003 mGy/y respectively. Taking into account a 29% outdoor occupancy factor, the annual average effective dose rate for individuals was estimated as 0.298±0.04 and 0.175±0.03 mSv/y by TLDs and survey meter, respectively. For outdoor exposure, the ELCR was calculated from the TLD and survey meter measurements. The environmental outdoor average annual effective dose obtained in present study are less than the estimated world average terrestrial and cosmic gamma ray dose rate of 0.9 mSv/y reported in UNSCEAR 2000. The possible origins of gamma doses in the area and incompatibilities of results obtained from the two different measurement techniques are also discussed. PMID:25484014

  19. Optical metrology for testing an all-composite 2-meter diameter mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catanzaro, B.; Thomas, James A.; Small, D.; Johnston, R.; Barber, D.; Connell, S.; Whitmore, S.; Cohen, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory (formerly known as FIRST) consists of a 3.5 m space telescope designed for use in the long IR and sub-milimeter wavebands. To demonstrate the viability of a carbon fiber composite telescope for this application, Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) manufactured a fast (f/1), large (2 m), lightweight (10.1 kg/m squared) demonstration mirror. A key challenge in demonstrating the performance of this novel mirror was to characterize the surface accuracy at cryogenic (70 K) temperatures. A wide variety of optical metrology techniques were investigated and a brief survey of empirical test results and limitations of the various techniques will be presented in this paper. Two complementary infrared (IR)techniques operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns were chosen for further development: (1) IR Twyman-Green Phase Shifting Interferometry (IR PSI) and (2) IR Shack-Hartmann (IR SH) Wavefront Sensing. Innovative design modifications made to an existing IR PSI to achieve high-resolution, scannable, infrared measurements of the composite mirror are described. The modified interferometer was capable of measuring surface gradients larger than 350 microradians. The design and results of measurements made with a custom-built IR SH Wavefrong Sensor operating at 10.6 microns are also presented. A compact experimental setup permitting simultaneous operation of both the IR PSI and IR SH tools is shown. The advantages and the limitations of the two key IR metrology tools are discussed.

  20. [Development of a simple quantitative method for the strontium-89 concentration of radioactive liquid waste using the plastic scintillation survey meter for beta rays].

    PubMed

    Narita, Hiroto; Tsuchiya, Yuusuke; Hirase, Kiyoshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2012-11-01

    Strontium-89 (89Sr: pure beta, E; 1.495 MeV-100%, halflife: 50.5 days) chloride is used as pain relief from bone metastases. An assay of 89Sr is difficult because of a pure beta emitter. For management of 89Sr, we tried to evaluate a simple quantitative method for the 59Sr concentration of radioactive liquid waste using scintillation survey meter for beta rays. The counting efficiency of the survey meter with this method was 35.95%. A simple 30 minutes measurement of 2 ml of the sample made the quantitative measurement of 89Sr practical. Reducing self-absorption of the beta ray in the solution by counting on the polyethlene paper improved the counting efficiency. Our method made it easy to manage the radioactive liquid waste under the legal restrictions. PMID:23402205

  1. Mathematical modeling of a survey-meter used to measure radioactivity in human thyroids: Monte Carlo calculations of the device response and uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Kutsen, Semion; Minenko, Victor; Khrouch, Valeri; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of Monte Carlo modeling of the SRP-68-01 survey meter used to measure exposure rates near the thyroid glands of persons exposed to radioactivity following the Chernobyl accident. This device was not designed to measure radioactivity in humans. To estimate the uncertainty associated with the measurement results, a mathematical model of the SRP-68-01 survey meter was developed and verified. A Monte Carlo method of numerical simulation of radiation transport has been used to calculate the calibration factor for the device and evaluate its uncertainty. The SRP-68-01 survey meter scale coefficient, an important characteristic of the device, was also estimated in this study. The calibration factors of the survey meter were calculated for 131I, 132I, 133I, and 135I content in the thyroid gland for six age groups of population: newborns; children aged 1 yr, 5 yr, 10 yr, 15 yr; and adults. A realistic scenario of direct thyroid measurements with an “extended” neck was used to calculate the calibration factors for newborns and one-year-olds. Uncertainties in the device calibration factors due to variability of the device scale coefficient, variability in thyroid mass and statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo method were evaluated. Relative uncertainties in the calibration factor estimates were found to be from 0.06 for children aged 1 yr to 0.1 for 10-yr and 15-yr children. The positioning errors of the detector during measurements deviate mainly in one direction from the estimated calibration factors. Deviations of the device position from the proper geometry of measurements were found to lead to overestimation of the calibration factor by up to 24 percent for adults and up to 60 percent for 1-yr children. The results of this study improve the estimates of 131I thyroidal content and, consequently, thyroid dose estimates that are derived from direct thyroid measurements performed in Belarus shortly after the Chernobyl accident. PMID:22245289

  2. Plugging meter

    DOEpatents

    Nagai, Akinori

    1979-01-01

    A plugging meter for automatically measuring the impurity concentration in a liquid metal is designed to have parallel passages including a cooling passage provided with a plugging orifice and with a flow meter, and a by-pass passage connected in series to a main passage having another flow meter, so that the plugging points may be obtained from the outputs of both flow meters. The plugging meter has a program signal generator, a flow-rate ratio setter and a comparator, and is adapted to change the temperature of the plugging orifice in accordance with a predetermined pattern or gradient, by means of a signal representative of the temperature of plugging orifice and a flow-rate ratio signal obtained from the outputs of both flow meters. This plugging meter affords an automatic and accurate measurement of a multi-plugging phenomenon taking place at the plugging orifice.

  3. A summary of Reynolds number effects on some recent tests in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Stainback, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Reynolds number effects noted from selected test programs conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT) are discussed. The tests, which cover a unit Reynolds number range from about 2.0 to 80.0 million per foot, summarize effects of Reynolds number on: (1) aerodynamic data from a supercritical airfoil, (2) results from several wall interference correction techniques, and (3) results obtained from advanced, cryogenic tests techniques. The test techniques include: (1) use of a cryogenic sidewall boundary layer removal system, (2) detailed pressure and hot wire measurements to determine test section flow quality, and (3) use of a new hot film system suitable for transition detection in a cryogenic wind tunnel. The results indicate that Reynolds number effects appear most significant when boundary layer transition effects are present and at high lift conditions when boundary layer separation exists on both the model and the tunnel sidewall.

  4. Flight Tests Results from Supersonic Deployment of an 18-Foot Diameter (5.49 meter) Towed Ballute Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhue, Robert J.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1969-01-01

    A ram-air-inflated, towed ballute decelerator having a maximum frontal diameter of 18 feet (5.49 meters) was deployed during free flight at a Mach number of 3.15 and a dynamic pressure of 38.5 lb/ft(exp 2) (1843.4 newtons/m(exp 2)). Deployment and extraction of the test ballute were normal but inflation stopped about 1 second after mortar firing and produced an average plateau drag force of 1500 pounds (6.7 kN) for about 1 second. Approximately 30 percent of expected total frontal area was obtained.

  5. Track/train dynamics test report modal survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The modal survey vibration test conducted on an 80 ton open hopper freight car is described. The test data, the post-test update of the modal survey test requirements and procedure, and an index to the test data are presented. Photographs of actual measurement locations and the test historical log are included.

  6. Partial correlation between lower muscle thickness, 10-meter walk test, and the timed up & go test in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Chang-Kyo; Kim, Won-hyo; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between lower extremity muscle thickness and gait ability through the 10-meter walk and timed up and go tests. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 28 children (20 males and 8 females) with spastic cerebral palsy undergoing physical therapy at D hospital in D city, South Korea participated in this study. Partial correlation analysis was performed to analyze the correlation between lower extremity muscle thickness and gait ability (10-meter walk test and timed up and go test). [Results] There was a positive correlation between muscle thickness and the 10-meter walk test (RF=0.41 and VL=0.52). Correlation between the muscle thickness and the timed up and go had a negative correlation (VL=−0.45, MG=−0.51, and LG=−0.39). [Conclusion] In children with cerebral palsy, knee extensor muscles that are more developed increased gait ability and calf muscles that are more developed increased sit to stand ability. PMID:27313383

  7. Partial correlation between lower muscle thickness, 10-meter walk test, and the timed up & go test in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chang-Kyo; Kim, Won-Hyo; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between lower extremity muscle thickness and gait ability through the 10-meter walk and timed up and go tests. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 28 children (20 males and 8 females) with spastic cerebral palsy undergoing physical therapy at D hospital in D city, South Korea participated in this study. Partial correlation analysis was performed to analyze the correlation between lower extremity muscle thickness and gait ability (10-meter walk test and timed up and go test). [Results] There was a positive correlation between muscle thickness and the 10-meter walk test (RF=0.41 and VL=0.52). Correlation between the muscle thickness and the timed up and go had a negative correlation (VL=-0.45, MG=-0.51, and LG=-0.39). [Conclusion] In children with cerebral palsy, knee extensor muscles that are more developed increased gait ability and calf muscles that are more developed increased sit to stand ability. PMID:27313383

  8. Tabulation of data from tests of an NPL 9510 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    The tabulated data from tests of a six inch chord NPL 9510 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The tests were performed over the following range of conditions: Mach numbers of 0.35 to 0.82, total temperature of 94 K to 300 K, total pressure of 1.20 to 5.81 atm, Reynolds number based on chord of 1.34 x 10 to the 6th to 48.23 x 10 to the 6th, and angle of attack of 0 deg to 6 deg. The NPL 9510 airfoil was observed to have decreasing drag coefficient up to the highest test Reynolds number.

  9. Finite Element Analysis and Test Correlation of a 10-Meter Inflation-Deployed Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Michii, Yuki; Lichodziejewski, David; Derbes, Billy; Mann. Troy O.; Slade, Kara N.; Wang, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Under the direction of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Office, the team of L Garde, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Ball Aerospace, and NASA Langley Research Center has been developing a scalable solar sail configuration to address NASA's future space propulsion needs. Prior to a flight experiment of a full-scale solar sail, a comprehensive phased test plan is currently being implemented to advance the technology readiness level of the solar sail design. These tests consist of solar sail component, subsystem, and sub-scale system ground tests that simulate the vacuum and thermal conditions of the space environment. Recently, two solar sail test articles, a 7.4-m beam assembly subsystem test article and a 10-m four-quadrant solar sail system test article, were tested in vacuum conditions with a gravity-offload system to mitigate the effects of gravity. This paper presents the structural analyses simulating the ground tests and the correlation of the analyses with the test results. For programmatic risk reduction, a two-prong analysis approach was undertaken in which two separate teams independently developed computational models of the solar sail test articles using the finite element analysis software packages: NEiNastran and ABAQUS. This paper compares the pre-test and post-test analysis predictions from both software packages with the test data including load-deflection curves from static load tests, and vibration frequencies and mode shapes from vibration tests. The analysis predictions were in reasonable agreement with the test data. Factors that precluded better correlation of the analyses and the tests were uncertainties in the material properties, test conditions, and modeling assumptions used in the analyses.

  10. Structural Analysis and Test Comparison of a 20-Meter Inflation-Deployed Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Mann, Troy; Lichodziejewski, David; Derbes, Billy

    2006-01-01

    Under the direction of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Office, the team of L Garde, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Ball Aerospace, and NASA Langley Research Center has been developing a scalable solar sail configuration to address NASA s future space propulsion needs. Prior to a flight experiment of a full-scale solar sail, a comprehensive test program was implemented to advance the technology readiness level of the solar sail design. These tests consisted of solar sail component, subsystem, and sub-scale system ground tests that simulated the aspects of the space environment such as vacuum and thermal conditions. In July 2005, a 20-m four-quadrant solar sail system test article was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Space Power Facility to measure its static and dynamic structural responses. Key to the maturation of solar sail technology is the development of validated finite element analysis (FEA) models that can be used for design and analysis of solar sails. A major objective of the program was to utilize the test data to validate the FEA models simulating the solar sail ground tests. The FEA software, ABAQUS, was used to perform the structural analyses to simulate the ground tests performed on the 20-m solar sail test article. This paper presents the details of the FEA modeling, the structural analyses simulating the ground tests, and a comparison of the pretest and post-test analysis predictions with the ground test results for the 20-m solar sail system test article. The structural responses that are compared in the paper include load-deflection curves and natural frequencies for the beam structural assembly and static shape, natural frequencies, and mode shapes for the solar sail membrane. The analysis predictions were in reasonable agreement with the test data. Factors that precluded better correlation of the analyses and the tests were unmeasured initial conditions in the test set-up.

  11. Comprehensive testing of Nedwind 12-Meter wind turbine blades at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Larwood, S.; Musial, W.

    2000-03-13

    This paper describes the structural testing of two NedWind 25 12-m blades at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The tests were conducted under the Standards, Measurement and Testing (SMT) Program in conjunction with tests conducted by four European laboratories to develop a common database of blade testing methods. All of the laboratories tested duplicate copies of blades taken from series production. Blade properties, including weight, center of gravity, natural frequencies, stiffness, and damping, were determined. Static load tests were performed at 110% of the extreme design load for strain verification. NREL performed single-axis and two-axis fatigue tests using business-as-usual testing practices. The single-axis test combined equivalent life loading for the edge and flap spectra into a single resultant load. The two-axis test applied the edge and flap components independently at a phase angle of 90{degree}. Damage areas were observed at (1) the trailing edge, which cracked near the maximum chord; (2) between the steel root collar and the composite, where circumferential cracking was noted; and (3) along the top of the spar between the 2,500-mm and 4,200-mm stations, where a notable increase in acoustic emissions was detected. NREL observed that the onset of damage occurred earlier in the single-axis test.

  12. Goldstone field test activities: Sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    The goals are to conduct a research and development program aimed at determining the most effective way to do SETI within the constraints of current technology and estimated budgets. The general search strategy adopted is that which is recommended by the SETI Science Working Group. The strategy for an all sky survey for SETI was further developed over the last year. Scan patterns, scan rates, and signal detection algorithms were developed. Spectral power measurement instrumentation was tested at the Venus Station of the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. A specially designed radio frequency interference (RFI) measurement system was built and installed at the Venus Station. A data base management system for storage and retrieval of the RFI data was partially implemented on a VAX 750 computer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  13. High Reynolds number tests of a Boeing BAC I airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Hill, A. S.; Ray, E. J.; Rozendaal, R. A.; Butler, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of an advanced-technology airfoil was conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). This investigation represents the first in a series of NASA/U.X. industry two dimensional airfoil studies to be completed in the Advanced Technology Airfoil Test program. Test temperature was varied from ambient to about 100 K at pressures ranging from about 1.2 to 6.0 atm. Mach number was varied from about 0.40 to 0.80. These variables provided a Reynolds number (based on airfoil chord) range from about .0000044 to .00005. This investigation was specifically designed to: (1) test a Boeing advanced airfoil from low to flight-equivalent Reynolds numbers; (2) provide the industry participant (Boeing) with experience in cryogenic wind-tunnel model design and testing techniques; and (3) demonstrate the suitability of the 0.3-m TCT as an airfoil test facility. All the objectives of the cooperative test were met. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixed transition, Mach number, and Reynolds number on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil. Also included are remarks on the model design, the model structural integrity, and the overall test experience.

  14. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Pollution Prevention Equipment... Figure 162.050-19. The mixture pipe shown in Figure 162.050-19 is the portion of test rig piping between... per minute or more. (d) The mixture pipe on a test rig must have a uniform inside diameter. FIGURE...

  15. High Voltage Testing of a 5-meter Prototype Triaxial HTS Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Tuncer, Enis; Pace, Marshall O; Gouge, Michael J; Demko, Jonathan A; Lindsay, David T

    2007-01-01

    High voltage tests were performed on a 5-m long prototype triaxial HTS cable (supplied by Ultera) at ORNL in preparation for installation of a 200-m HTS cable of the same design at the AEP utility substation in Columbus, Ohio. The triaxial design comprises three concentric phases and shield around a common former with the phase to phase dielectric at cryogenic temperature. Advantages of this design include increased current density, a reduced amount of HTS tape needed, and reduced heat load. The phase to phase voltage will be 13.2 kVrms (7.6 kVrms to ground). Preliminary testing was done on half-scale and full-scale terminations which successfully passed AC withstand, partial discharge, and impulse tests. High voltage tests conducted on the 5-m cable with the cable straight and after bending 90 degrees were ac withstand to 39 kVrms, partial discharge inception, and a minimum of 10 positive and 10 negative lightning waveform impulses at 110 kV. Phase to phase insulation was tested by applying high voltage to each phase one at a time with all the other phases grounded. Partial discharge data will be presented. The 5-m prototype triaxial HTS cable passed all the HV tests performed, with a PD inception voltage significantly above the required voltage.

  16. Test Results for a 25 Meter Prototype Fault Current Limiting Hts Cable for Project Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, C. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; Demko, J. A.; Ellis, A.; James, D. R.; Gouge, M. J.; Tuncer, E.

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has tested a 25-m long prototype High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cable with inherent Fault-Current Limiting (FCL) capability at its HTS cable test facility. The HTS-FCL cable and terminations were designed and fabricated by Ultera, which is a joint venture between Southwire and nkt cables. System integration and HTS wire were provided by American Superconductor Corporation who was the overall team leader of the project. The ultimate goal of the 25-m HTS-FCL cable test program was to verify the design and ensure the operational integrity for the eventual installation of a ˜200-m fully functional HTS-FCL cable in the Consolidated Edison electric grid located in downtown New York City. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable consisted of a three-phase (3-Φ) HTS Triax™ design with a cold dielectric between the phases. The HTS-FCL cable had an operational voltage of 13.8 kV phase-to-phase (7967 V phase-to-ground) and an operating current of 4000 Arms per phase, which is the highest operating current to date of any HTS cable. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable was subjected to a series of cryogenic and electrical tests. Test results from the 25-m HTS-FCL cable are presented and discussed.

  17. Buckling test of a 3-meter-diameter corrugated graphite-epoxy ring-stiffened cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    A three m diameter by three m long corrugated cylindrical shell with external stiffening rings was tested to failure by buckling. The corrugation geometry for the graphite epoxy composite cylinder wall was optimized to withstand a compressive load producing an ultimate load intensity of 157.6 kN/m without buckling. The test method used to produce the design load intensity was to mount the specimen as a cantilevered cylinder and apply a pure bending moment to the end. A load introduction problem with the specimen was solved by using the BOSOR 4 shell of revolution computer code to analyze the shell and attached loading fixtures. The cylinder test loading achieved was 101 percent of design ultimate, and the resulting mass per unit of shell wall area was 1.96 kg/sq m.

  18. Overview of the 6 Meter HIAD Inflatable Structure and Flexible TPS Static Load Test Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Greg; Kazemba, Cole; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony; Hughes, Steve; Cassell, Alan; Cheatwood, Neil

    2014-01-01

    To support NASAs long term goal of landing humans on Mars, technologies which enable the landing of heavy payloads are being developed. Current entry, decent, and landing technologies are not practical for this class of payloads due to geometric constraints dictated by current launch vehicle fairing limitations. Therefore, past and present technologies are now being explored to provide a mass and volume efficient solution to atmospheric entry, including Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIADs). At the beginning of 2014, a 6m HIAD inflatable structure with an integrated flexible thermal protection system (TPS) was subjected to a static load test series to verify the designs structural performance. The 6m HIAD structure was constructed in a stacked toroid configuration using nine inflatable torus segments composed of fiber reinforced thin films, which were joined together using adhesives and high strength textile woven structural straps to help distribute the loads throughout the inflatable structure. The 6m flexible TPS was constructed using multiple layers of high performance materials to protect the inflatable structure from heat loads that would be seen during atmospheric entry. To perform the static load test series, a custom test fixture was constructed. The fixture consisted of a structural tub rim with enough height to allow for displacement of the inflatable structure as loads were applied. The bottom of the tub rim had an airtight seal with the floor. The centerbody of the inflatable structure was attached to a pedestal mount as seen in Figure 1. Using an impermeable membrane seal draped over the test article, partial vacuum was pulled beneath the HIAD, resulting in a uniform static pressure load applied to the outer surface. During the test series an extensive amount of instrumentation was used to provide many data sets including: deformed shape, shoulder deflection, strap loads, cord loads, inflation pressures, and applied static load

  19. SOAR 4.2 Meter Telescope: evolution of drive and pointing performance from early predictions to final testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Marvin F.; Reese, Edward O.

    2003-02-01

    Based on its certification testing, the 4.2 Meter SOAR Telescope can be described as one of the most precise pointing instruments in the world, however, this was achieved a little differently than other telescopes. This instrument utilizes gear drives in azimuth, direct drives in altitude, and rolling element bearings on both axes instead of hydrostatic bearings. This combination of features provides a lower initial cost, significantly lower operating costs, simple maintenance, less potential for contaminating both the environment and the optics, less thermal effects and a greater degree of safety. This is achieved by relying on a sophisticated servo control system adapted from much larger radio astronomy instruments and rolling element bearing designs with exceptionally low friction torque. The design approach was not "stumbled upon" but rather performance was predicted from the initial studies, through the proposal, the early design stages, up through the final "as built" configuration. This paper traces the development of the performance estimates through that period.

  20. 46 CFR 162.050-27 - Oil content meter: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with category C and D oil-like noxious liquid substances to meet the requirements of 33 CFR 151.41(b... this section, must be Arabian light crude oil. (7) Each test must be performed at an ambient... use with crude oils, it is fed with a mixture of water and the first oil listed in Table...

  1. Tests of a 3 meter curved superconducting beam transport dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Allinger, J E; Carroll, A S; Danby, G T; DeVito, B; Jackson, J W; Leonhardt, W J; Prodell, A G; Weisenbloom, J

    1981-01-01

    Initial tests of one of the curved 3 m long superconducting dipole magnets intended to generate 6.0 T and produce a 20.4/sup 0/ bend in the primary proton beam to a new D-target station at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS have been completed. Although this magnet, whose window frame design generally follows that of the successful 8/sup 0/ and Model T superconducting dipoles, demonstrates many of the desirable characteristics of these earlier magnets such as excellent quench propagation and good ramping properties, it has only reached a disappointingly low magnetic field of 3.5 to 4.0 T. Because of the great interest in superconducting magnet technology, this report will describe the diagnostic tests performed and plans for future modifications.

  2. Sultan: an 8 Tesla, 1 meter bore test facility for the outer solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Pasotti, G.; Ricci, M.V.; Sacchetti, N.; Spadoni, M.

    1981-09-01

    In the framework of the international collaboration among SIN-Villigen (CH), ECN-Patten (NL) and CNEN-Frascati (I) aiming at the realization of the SULTAN (SUpraLeitender TestANlage) test facility the CNEN contribution is concerned with the realization of the outer part of the solenoid, i.e., the section which will provide the 6T field in the useful region, the remaining 2T being supplied by the coaxial ECN insert. A description of the 6T superconducting solenoid is presented. The main features are: (1) pancake structure wound by a Nb-Ti multifilamentary hollow cable; and (2) cooling by forced flow of slightly subcooled liquid helium. Details of the design, winding technique and structure, the hydraulic circuitry as well as the status report of the construction are discussed. 10 refs.

  3. Description of the US Army small-scale 2-meter rotor test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, Arthur E., III; Berry, John D.

    1987-01-01

    A small-scale powered rotor model was designed for use as a research tool in the exploratory testing of rotors and helicopter models. The model, which consists of a 29 hp rotor drive system, a four-blade fully articulated rotor, and a fuselage, was designed to be simple to operate and maintain in wind tunnels of moderate size and complexity. Two six-component strain-gauge balances are used to provide independent measurement of the rotor and fuselage aerodynamic loads. Commercially available standardized hardware and equipment were used to the maximum extent possible, and specialized parts were designed so that they could be fabricated by normal methods without using highly specialized tooling. The model was used in a hover test of three rotors having different planforms and in a forward flight investigation of a 21-percent-scale model of a U.S. Army scout helicopter equipped with a mast-mounted sight.

  4. Design, fabrication and test of a 4750 Newton-meter-second double Gimbal control moment gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lewis; Golley, Paul; Krome, Henning; Blondin, Joseph; Gurrisi, Charles; Kolvek, John

    1989-01-01

    The development of a prototype Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) is discussed. Physical characteristics and the results of functional testing are presented to demonstrate the level of system performance obtained. Particular attention is given to how the man-rated mission requirement influenced the choice of the materials, fabrication, and design details employed. Comparisons are made of the measured system responses against the prediction generated by computer simulation.

  5. Flow-Meter and Passive Diffusion Bag Tests and Potential Influences on the Vertical Distribution of Contaminants in Wells at Galena Airport, Galena, Alaska, August to October 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peterson, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Past activities at Galena Airport, a U.S. Air Force Base in Galena, Alaska, have resulted in ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds. The primary contaminants are petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. The U.S. Geological Survey and Earth Tech, in cooperation with the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, conducted investigations at Galena Airport from August to October 2002 using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers and borehole flow-meter testing to examine the vertical distribution of ground-water contamination in selected wells. This investigation was limited to the vicinity of building 1845 and to the area between building 1845 and the Yukon River. In addition, the U.S. Geological Survey was asked to determine whether additional wells are needed to more clearly define the nature and extent of the ground-water contamination at the Air Force Base. Little or no vertical water movement occurred under ambient conditions in the wells tested at Galena Airport, Alaska, in August 2002. All of the ambient vertical flows detected in wells were at rates less than the quantitative limit of the borehole flow meter (0.03 gallons per minute). In wells 06-MW-07 and 10-MW-01, no vertical flow was detected. In wells where ambient flow was detected, the direction of flow was downward. In general, concentrations of volatile organic compounds detected in the low-flow samples from wells at Galena Airport were approximately the same concentrations detected in the closest polyethylene diffusion bag sample for a wide variety of volatile organic compounds. The data indicate that the polyethylene diffusion bag sample results are consistent with the low-flow sample results. Vertical profiling of selected wells using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers at Galena Airport showed that from September 30 to October 1, 2002, little vertical change occurred in volatile organic compound concentrations along the screen length despite the fact that

  6. Quality Test Various Existing dem in Indonesia Toward 10 Meter National dem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amhar, Fahmi

    2016-06-01

    Indonesia has various DEM from many sources and various acquisition date spreaded in the past two decades. There are DEM from spaceborne system (Radarsat, TerraSAR-X, ALOS, ASTER-GDEM, SRTM), airborne system (IFSAR, Lidar, aerial photos) and also terrestrial one. The research objective is the quality test and how to extract best DEM in particular area. The method is using differential GPS levelling using geodetic GPS equipment on places which is ensured not changed during past 20 years. The result has shown that DEM from TerraSAR-X and SRTM30 have the best quality (rmse 3.1 m and 3.5 m respectively). Based on this research, it was inferred that these parameters are still positively correlated with the basic concept, namely that the lower and the higher the spatial resolution of a DEM data, the more imprecise the resulting vertical height.

  7. Near-field testing of the 15-meter hoop-column antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Lyle C.; Adams, Richard R.; Bailey, M. C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Butler, David H.; Campbell, Thomas G.

    1989-01-01

    A 15-m-diameter antenna was tested to verify that dimensional tolerances for acceptable performance could be achieved and to verify structural, electromagnetic, and mechanical performance predictions. This antenna utilized the hoop column structure, a gold plated molybdenum mesh reflector, and 96 control cables to adjust the reflector conformance with a paraboloid. The dimensional conformance of the antenna structure and surface was measured with metric camera and theodolites. Near field pattern data were used to assess the electromagnetic performance at five frequencies from 2.225 to 11.6 GHz. The reflector surface was adjusted to greatly improve electromagnetic performance with a finite element model and the surface measurements. Measurement results show that antenna surface figure and adjustments and electromagnetic patterns agree well with predictions.

  8. Solar Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The instrument pictured is an inexpensive solar meter which is finding wide acceptance among architects, engineers and others engaged in construction of solar energy facilities. It detects the amount of solar energy available at a building site, information necessary to design the most efficient type of solar system for a particular location. Incorporating technology developed by NASA's Lewis Research Center, the device is based upon the solar cell, which provides power for spacecraft by converting the sun's energy to electricity. The meter is produced by Dodge Products, Inc., Houston, Texas, a company formed to bring the technology to the commercial marketplace.

  9. Pretest Report for the Full Span Propulsive Wing/Canard Model Test in the NASA Langley 4 x 7 Meter Low Speed Wind Tunnel Second Series Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, V. R.

    1986-01-01

    A full span propulsive wing/canard model is to be tested in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 4 x 7 meter low speed wind tunnel. These tests are a continuation of the tests conducted in Feb. 1984, NASA test No.290, and are being conducted under NASA Contract NAS1-17171. The purpose of these tests is to obtain extensive lateral-directional data with a revised fuselage concept. The wings, canards, and vertical tail of this second test series model are the same as tested in the previous test period. The fuselage and internal flow path have been modified to better reflect an external configuration suitable for a fighter airplane. Internal ducting and structure were changed as required to provide test efficiency and blowing control. The model fuselage tested during the 1984 tests was fabricated with flat sides to provide multiple wing and canard placement variations. The locations of the wing and canard are important variables in configuration development. With the establishment of the desired relative placement of the lifting surfaces, a typically shaped fuselage has been fabricated for these tests. This report provides the information necessary for the second series tests of the propulsive wing/canard model. The discussion in this report is limited to that affected by the model changes and to the second series test program. The pretest report information for test 290 which is valid for the second series test was published in Rockwell report NR 83H-79. This report is presented as Appendix 1 and the modified fuselage stress report is presented as Appendix 2 to this pretest report.

  10. Saturation meter

    DOEpatents

    Gregurech, S.

    1984-08-01

    A saturation meter for use in a pressurized water reactor plant comprising a differential pressure transducer having a first and second pressure sensing means and an alarm. The alarm is connected to the transducer and is preset to activate at a level of saturation prior to the formation of a steam void in the reactor vessel.

  11. Drug test feasibility in a general population household survey.

    PubMed

    Fendrich, Michael; Johnson, Timothy P; Wislar, Joseph S; Hubbell, Amy

    2004-03-01

    Drug testing was used as an adjunct to a general population household drug use survey administered via audio computer assisted self-interview. Participants, ages 18-40 years residing in Chicago, were recruited to participate in three different biological tests (hair, oral fluid, and urine) presented in random order subsequent to completing an interview. Subjects had the option of participating in zero to three different tests. We examined participation/refusal in tests, reaction to testing requests, as well as variables associated with participation and reaction. Subjects were randomly assigned to a low (US$ 10 per test) or high (US$ 20 per test) incentive condition. Over 90% of the sample participated in at least one test, usually the oral fluid test. Associations between refusal status and two variables, socioeconomic status (SES) and presence of children in the household, provided partial support for the notion that drug test participation parallels the survey response process in general. Incentive level did not directly increase drug test participation. Reporting of recent illicit drug use was associated with participation in only one procedure, hair testing. Type of test offered and individual differences in willingness to be drug tested were important predictors of drug test refusal and subject reaction to testing requests. Compared with urine and hair testing, oral fluid testing had lower refusal rates and was generally more acceptable to respondents in a general population survey. The findings support the feasibility of incorporating multiple drug tests with modest incentives into general population household surveys on drug abuse. PMID:15036546

  12. An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Lyons

    2009-07-31

    As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man

  13. 16-foot transonic tunnel test section flowfield survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, J. A.; Abeyounis, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    A flow survey has been made of the test section of the NASA Langley Research Center 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at subsonic and supersonic speeds. The survey was performed using five five-hole pyramid-head probes mounted at 14 inch intervals on a survey rake. Probes were calibrated at freestream Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.95 and from 1.18 to 1.23. Flowfield surveys were made at Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.90 and at Mach 1.20. The surveys were made at tunnel stations 130.6, 133.6, and 136.0. By rotating the survey rake through 180 degrees, a cylindrical volume of the test section 4.7 feet in diameter and 5.4 feet long centered about the tunnel centerline was surveyed. Survey results showing the measured test section upflow and sideflow characteristics and local Mach number distributions are presented. The report documents the survey probe calibration techniques used, summarizes the procedural problems encountered during testing, and identifies the data discrepancies observed during the post-test data analysis.

  14. High Reynolds number tests of a Douglas DLBA 032 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles B.; Dress, David A.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Wilcox, Peter A.; Bui, Minh H.

    1986-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a Douglas advanced-technology airfoil was conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT). The temperature was varied from 227 K (409 R) to 100 K (180 R) at pressures ranging from about 159 kPa (1.57 atm) to about 514 kPa (5.07 atm). Mach number was varied from 0.50 to 0.78. These variables provided a Reynolds number range (based on airfoil chord) from 6.0 to 30.0 x 10 to the 6th power. This investigation was specifically designed to: (1) test a Douglas airfoil from moderately low to flight-equivalent Reynolds numbers, and (2) evaluate sidewall-boundary-layer effects on transonic airfoil performance characteristics by a systematic variation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and sidewall-boundary-layer removal. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixing transition, Mach number, Reynolds number, and sidewall-boundary-layer removal on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil. Also included are remarks on model design and model structural integrity.

  15. Survey of Facilities for Testing Photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    42-page report describes facilities capable of testing complete photovoltaic systems, subsystems, or components. Compilation includes facilities and capabilities of five field centers of national photovoltaics program, two state-operated agencies, and five private testing laboratories.

  16. Transformer and Meter Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoms, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Numerically-controlled 5-axis machine tool uses transformer and meter to determine and indicate whether tool is in home position, but lacks built-in test mode to check them. Tester makes possible test, and repair of components at machine rather then replace them when operation seems suspect.

  17. Survey Of High Speed Test Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheewala, Tushar

    1988-02-01

    The emerging technologies for the characterization and production testing of high-speed devices and integrated circuits are reviewed. The continuing progress in the field of semiconductor technologies will, in the near future, demand test techniques to test 10ps to lOOps gate delays, 10 GHz to 100 GHz analog functions and 10,000 to 100,000 gates on a single chip. Clearly, no single test technique would provide a cost-effective answer to all the above demands. A divide-and-conquer approach based on a judicial selection of parametric, functional and high-speed tests will be required. In addition, design-for-test methods need to be pursued which will include on-chip test electronics as well as circuit techniques that minimize the circuit performance sensitivity to allowable process variations. The electron and laser beam based test technologies look very promising and may provide the much needed solutions to not only the high-speed test problem but also to the need for high levels of fault coverage during functional testing.

  18. Aerodynamic performance and pressure distributions for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Renaldo V.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Ray, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents in graphic and tabular forms the aerodynamic coefficient and surface pressure distribution data for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The test was another in a series of tests involved in the joint NASA/U.S. Industry Advanced Technology Airfoil Tests program. This 14% thick supercritical airfoil was tested at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.76 and angles of attack from -2.0 to 6.0 degrees. The test Reynolds numbers were 4 million, 6 million, 10 million, 15 million, 30 million, 40 million, and 45 million.

  19. A Survey of Aviation English Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderson, J. Charles

    2010-01-01

    The Lancaster Language Testing Research Group was commissioned in 2006 by the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (Eurocontrol) to conduct a validation study of the development of a test called ELPAC (English Language Proficiency for Aeronautical Communication), intended to assess the language proficiency of air traffic…

  20. 1993 triggered lighnting test program: Environments within 20 meters of the lighting channel and small area temporary protection concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.J.; Schnetzer, G.H.

    1994-03-01

    Vertical electric fields, azimuthal magnetic fields, and earth step potentials at ground level have been measured at 10 and 20 meters from the base of triggered lightning flashes. For incident stroke peak currents in the range of 4.4 to 29 kA, vertical electric field change amplitudes as high as 210 kV/m were observed at 10 m, with rise times of the order of a few microseconds. Magnetic fields were found to follow Ampere`s law closely at both 10 and 20 m. Earth step potentials measured over a 0.5-m radial distance at the 10-m and 20m stations were linear with and had the same waveforms as the stroke currents. The step voltages exhibited a l/r distance dependence between the two measurement distances. A model that incorporates the presence of a thin surface layer, due to rain water saturation, of much higher conductivity than the bulk of the underlying earth is proposed to explain the observed behavior. Tests were also carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of several concepts for protecting a small exposed object, such as a piece of ordnance at the site of a transportation accident, from either a direct strike or from the indirect effects of electromagnetic fields produced by a nearby lightning flash to ground. Photographs of the occurrence of significant radial filamentary arcing along the surface of the ground from the strike points were acquired. This type of arcing, with a maximum radial extent of at least 20 m, was observed on six of seven of triggered flashes and on all strokes of 15-kA peak amplitude or higher.

  1. Feasibility of Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters for the Production of Discharge Records from U.S. Geological Survey Streamflow-Gaging Stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Ross, Jerry H.

    2002-01-01

    It is feasible to use acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVM's) installed at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations to compute records of river discharge. ADVM's are small acoustic current meters that use the Doppler principle to measure water velocities in a two-dimensional plane. Records of river discharge can be computed from stage and ADVM velocity data using the 'index velocity' method. The ADVM-measured velocities are used as an estimator or 'index' of the mean velocity in the channel. In evaluations of ADVM's for the computation of records of river discharge, the USGS installed ADVM's at three streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana: Kankakee River at Davis, Fall Creek at Millersville, and Iroquois River near Foresman. The ADVM evaluation study period was from June 1999 to February 2001. Discharge records were computed, using ADVM data from each station. Discharge records also were computed using conventional stage-discharge methods of the USGS. The records produced from ADVM and conventional methods were compared with discharge record hydrographs and statistics. Overall, the records compared closely from the Kankakee River and Fall Creek stations. For the Iroquois River station, variable backwater was present and affected the comparison; because the ADVM record compensates for backwater, the ADVM record may be superior to the conventional record. For the three stations, the ADVM records were judged to be of a quality acceptable to USGS standards for publications and near realtime ADVM-computed discharges are served on USGS real-time data World Wide Web pages.

  2. Deformation Analysis of 2004-2013 Dome Extrusions at Volcan de Colima, Mexico Using Tilt Meter Surveys Registered on Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Ruiz, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Volcán de Colima, Mexico is located on the Central Western part of this country and it is considered one of the most active volcano in Mexico. During the period of 2004-2013 three extrusions have occurred with the presence of inflation- deflation. Measurements of deformation tilt changes during the period 2004-2013 at Volcán de Colima (Mexico) was carried out to determine the origin of the activity during this period that is characterized by a sequence of effusive-explosive episodes. These sequences occurred on October 2004 and February 2007 was registered by sequences of inflation-deflation principally on two tilt sensors deployed around the volcano edifice. The tiltmeter net used in this study is composed of 5 sensors deployed around the volcano edifice at altitudes of 3060 masl (COIA), 3200 masl (PCJ1), 2590 masl (PC02), 2200 masl (EHJ1) and 2070 masl (PC01). The activity of Volcán de Colima during this period 2004-2013 can be summarized by the occurrence of three lava extrusions in October 2004, February 2007, and 2012. An explosive activity sequences in year 2005 and 2012. After the extrusion on February 2007 a deflation phase is registered with the tilt sensors until 2010 which explain the low activity that characterize the behavior of the volcano during the periods of time. Here we show the analysis of the activity during the 2004-2013 period using the tiltmeter surveys of the Volcan de Colima net.

  3. Fracture toughness testing data: A technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Technical abstracts for about 90 significant documents relating to fracture toughness testing for various structural materials including information on plane strain and the developing areas of mixed mode and plane stress test conditions are presented. An overview of the state-of-the-art represented in the documents that have been abstracted is included. The abstracts in the report are mostly for publications in the period April 1962 through April 1974. The purpose of this report is to provide, in quick reference form, a dependable source for current information in the subject field.

  4. Near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna. Volume 2: Near- and far-field plots for the LaRC feeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, J.; Kefauver, N.; Cencich, T.; Osborn, J.

    1986-01-01

    The technical results from near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility are described. The antenna consists of a deployable central column and a 15-meter hoop, stiffened by cable into a structure with a high tolerance repeatable surface and offset feed location. The surface has been configured to have four offset parabolic apertures, each about 6 meters in diameter, and is made of gold plated molybdenum wire mesh. Pattern measurements were made with feed systems radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, 2.225, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report (Volume II) gives the detailed patterns measured with the LaRC feeds (7.73, 11.60, 2.27, and 4.26 GHz). Volume I covers the testing from an overall viewpoint and contains information of generalized interest for testing large antennas, including the deployment of the antenna in the Martin Facility and the measurements to determine mechanical stability and trueness of the reflector surface, the test program outline, and a synopsis of antenna electromagnetic performance. A detailed listing of the antenna patterns are provided for the 2.225 Ghz feed in Volume III of this report.

  5. Near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna. Volume 3: Near- and far-field plots for the JPL feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, J.; Kefauver, N.; Cencich, T.; Osborn, J.

    1986-01-01

    Technical results from near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility are discussed. The antenna consists of a deployable central column and a 15 meter hoop, stiffened by cables into a structure with a high tolerance repeatable surface and offset feed location. The surface has been configured to have four offset parabolic apertures, each about 6 meters in diameter, and is made of gold plated molybdenum wire mesh. Pattern measurements were made with feed system radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, 2.225, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report (Volume 3) gives the detailed patterns measured with the JPL feed (2.225 GHz). Volume 1 covers the testing from an overall viewpoint and contains information of generalized interest for testing large antennas, including the deployment of the antenna in the Martin Facility and the measurements to determine mechanical stability and trueness of the reflector surface, the test program outline, and a synopsis of antenna electromagnetic performance. A detailed listing of the antenna patterns for the LaRC feeds (7.3, 11.60, 2.27, and 4.26 GHz) are given in Volume 2 of this report.

  6. Near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna. Volume 3: Near- and far-field plots for the JPL feed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, J.; Kefauver, N.; Cencich, T.; Osborn, J.

    1986-03-01

    Technical results from near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility are discussed. The antenna consists of a deployable central column and a 15 meter hoop, stiffened by cables into a structure with a high tolerance repeatable surface and offset feed location. The surface has been configured to have four offset parabolic apertures, each about 6 meters in diameter, and is made of gold plated molybdenum wire mesh. Pattern measurements were made with feed system radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, 2.225, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report (Volume 3) gives the detailed patterns measured with the JPL feed (2.225 GHz). Volume 1 covers the testing from an overall viewpoint and contains information of generalized interest for testing large antennas, including the deployment of the antenna in the Martin Facility and the measurements to determine mechanical stability and trueness of the reflector surface, the test program outline, and a synopsis of antenna electromagnetic performance. A detailed listing of the antenna patterns for the LaRC feeds (7.3, 11.60, 2.27, and 4.26 GHz) are given in Volume 2 of this report.

  7. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Nevada Test Site, Mercury, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS), conducted June 22 through July 10, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the NTS. The Survey covers all environment media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations and activities performed at the NTS, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by the Battelle Columbus Division under contract with DOE. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the NTS Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the NTS Survey. 165 refs., 42 figs., 52 tabs.

  8. Test results of flight guidance for fuel conservative descents in a time-based metered air traffic environment. [terminal configured vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Person, L. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA developed, implemented, and flight tested a flight management algorithm designed to improve the accuracy of delivering an airplane in a fuel-conservative manner to a metering fix at a time designated by air traffic control. This algorithm provides a 3D path with time control (4D) for the TCV B-737 airplane to make an idle-thrust, clean configured (landing gear up, flaps zero, and speed brakes retracted) descent to arrive at the metering fix at a predetermined time, altitude, and airspeed. The descent path is calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard pressure and temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithms are described and flight test results are presented.

  9. Development and test results of a flight management algorithm for fuel conservative descents in a time-based metered traffic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Cannon, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    A simple flight management descent algorithm designed to improve the accuracy of delivering an airplane in a fuel-conservative manner to a metering fix at a time designated by air traffic control was developed and flight tested. This algorithm provides a three dimensional path with terminal area time constraints (four dimensional) for an airplane to make an idle thrust, clean configured (landing gear up, flaps zero, and speed brakes retracted) descent to arrive at the metering fix at a predetermined time, altitude, and airspeed. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard pressure and temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithm is described. The results of the flight tests flown with the Terminal Configured Vehicle airplane are presented.

  10. Survey-guided load research: An end-use analysis methodology test

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, W.M.

    1993-08-01

    Energy use by end-use equipment is a function of the rated capacity of the equipment, frequency of use, and duration of each use. Many end used include multiple states, each with a different capacity, frequency, and duration. Some equipment provides benefits that are related to other uses, resulting in an indirect linkage between the primary energy-using equipment and the end use. Water heaters are one example. End-use metering of energy-using equipment provides the most accurate measure of energy use. Nevertheless, this energy-use ``signal`` is buried in background ``noise`` due to variations in the capacity, frequency, and duration of each end use and end user. Reliable estimates of energy use depend on a variety of methods to increase the ``signal-to-noise`` ratio (i.e., reduce the variance). Research of the energy consumption of household end-uses contains some inherent sampling problems: intrusiveness, cost, extensive data generated, analyses are time and computationally intensive. The goal of the methodology test described in this paper was to address these problems through a method that focused end-use analyses on a limited set of issues and data for program evaluation purposes. The approach tested used a detailed survey of end-use metered subjects to identify the pattern of end-use behavior as an alternative to estimating the frequency and duration of each use from the end-use data itself.

  11. Diagnostic Testing at UK Universities: An E-Mail Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Jonathan; Levi, Margaret; Wilson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In July 2009, an e-mail survey was sent to various UK universities to gain information regarding current practices concerning mathematics diagnostic testing, and to provide an update from the review "Diagnostic Testing for Mathematics" published by the LTSN MathsTEAM Project in 2003. A total of 38 university departments were contacted and the…

  12. Calibration of the 13- by 13-inch adaptive wall test section for the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Hill, Acquilla S.

    1990-01-01

    A 13 by 13 inch adaptive wall test section was installed in the 0.3 Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel circuit. This new test section is configured for 2-D airfoil testing. It has four solid walls. The top and bottom walls are flexible and movable whereas the sidewalls are rigid and fixed. The wall adaptation strategy employed requires the test section wall shapes associated with uniform test section Mach number distributions. Calibration tests with the test section empty were conducted with the top and bottom walls linearly diverged to approach a uniform Mach number distribution. Pressure distributions were measured in the contraction cone, the test section, and the high speed diffuser at Mach numbers from 0.20 to 0.95 and Reynolds numbers from 10 to 100 x 10 (exp 6)/per foot.

  13. Survey of US Correctional Institutions for Routine HCV Testing.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Curt G; Kurth, Ann E; Bazerman, Lauri; Solomon, Liza; Patry, Emily; Rich, Josiah D; Kuo, Irene

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain HCV testing practices among US prisons and jails, we conducted a survey study in 2012, consisting of medical directors of all US state prisons and 40 of the largest US jails, that demonstrated a minority of US prisons and jails conduct routine HCV testing. Routine voluntary HCV testing in correctional facilities is urgently needed to increase diagnosis, enable risk-reduction counseling and preventive health care, and facilitate evaluation for antiviral treatment. PMID:25393180

  14. Survey of US Correctional Institutions for Routine HCV Testing

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Ann E.; Bazerman, Lauri; Solomon, Liza; Patry, Emily; Rich, Josiah D.; Kuo, Irene

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain HCV testing practices among US prisons and jails, we conducted a survey study in 2012, consisting of medical directors of all US state prisons and 40 of the largest US jails, that demonstrated a minority of US prisons and jails conduct routine HCV testing. Routine voluntary HCV testing in correctional facilities is urgently needed to increase diagnosis, enable risk-reduction counseling and preventive health care, and facilitate evaluation for antiviral treatment. PMID:25393180

  15. Preliminary test results of a flight management algorithm for fuel conservative descents in a time based metered traffic environment. [flight tests of an algorithm to minimize fuel consumption of aircraft based on flight time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Cannon, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    A flight management algorithm designed to improve the accuracy of delivering the airplane fuel efficiently to a metering fix at a time designated by air traffic control is discussed. The algorithm provides a 3-D path with time control (4-D) for a test B 737 airplane to make an idle thrust, clean configured descent to arrive at the metering fix at a predetermined time, altitude, and airspeed. The descent path is calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard pressure and temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithms and the results of the flight tests are discussed.

  16. A flight management algorithm and guidance for fuel-conservative descents in a time-based metered air traffic environment: Development and flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple airborne flight management descent algorithm designed to define a flight profile subject to the constraints of using idle thrust, a clean airplane configuration (landing gear up, flaps zero, and speed brakes retracted), and fixed-time end conditions was developed and flight tested in the NASA TSRV B-737 research airplane. The research test flights, conducted in the Denver ARTCC automated time-based metering LFM/PD ATC environment, demonstrated that time guidance and control in the cockpit was acceptable to the pilots and ATC controllers and resulted in arrival of the airplane over the metering fix with standard deviations in airspeed error of 6.5 knots, in altitude error of 23.7 m (77.8 ft), and in arrival time accuracy of 12 sec. These accuracies indicated a good representation of airplane performance and wind modeling. Fuel savings will be obtained on a fleet-wide basis through a reduction of the time error dispersions at the metering fix and on a single-airplane basis by presenting the pilot with guidance for a fuel-efficient descent.

  17. High Reynolds number tests of the cast 10-2/DOA 2 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dress, D. A.; Stanewsky, E.; Mcguire, P. D.; Ray, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of an advanced technology airfoil, the CAST 10-2/DOA 2, were conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT). This was the third of a series of tests conducted in a cooperative airfoil research program between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Deutsche Forschungsund Versuchsanstalt fur Luft- und Raumfahrt e. V. For these tests, temperature was varied from 270 K to 110 K at pressures from 1.5 to 5.75 atmospheres. Mach number was varied from 0.60 to 0.80, and the Reynolds number (based on airfoil chord) was varied from 2 to 20 million. The aerodynamic data for the 7.62 cm chord airfoil model used in these tests is presented without analysis. Descriptions of the 0.3-m TCT, the airfoil model, the test instrumentation, and the testing procedures are included.

  18. 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model specification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arundel, Samantha T.; Archuleta, Christy-Ann M.; Phillips, Lori A.; Roche, Brittany L.; Constance, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    In January 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center began producing the 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model data product. This new product was developed to provide high resolution bare-earth digital elevation models from light detection and ranging (lidar) elevation data and other elevation data collected over the conterminous United States (lower 48 States), Hawaii, and potentially Alaska and the U.S. territories. The 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model consists of hydroflattened, topographic bare-earth raster digital elevation models, with a 1-meter x 1-meter cell size, and is available in 10,000-meter x 10,000-meter square blocks with a 6-meter overlap. This report details the specifications required for the production of the 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model.

  19. Survey of aircraft subcritical flight flutter testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, R.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a survey of U. S., British and French subcritical aircraft flight flutter testing methods are presented and evaluation of the applicability of these methods to the testing of the space shuttle are discussed. Ten U. S. aircraft programs covering the large civil transport aircraft and a variety of military aircraft are reviewed. In addition, three major French and British programs are covered by the survey. The significant differences between the U. S., French and British practices in the areas of methods of excitation, data acquisition, transmission and analysis are reviewed. The effect of integrating the digital computer into the flight flutter test program is discussed. Significant saving in analysis and flight test time are shown to result from the use of special digital computer routines and digital filters.

  20. Pressure distributions from high Reynolds number transonic tests of an NACA 0012 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladson, Charles L.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Johnson, William G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the 2-D test section of the Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel on a NACA 0012 airfoil to obtain aerodynamic data as a part of the Advanced Technology Airfoil Test (ATAT) program. The test program covered a Mach number range of 0.30 to 0.82 and a Reynolds number range of 3.0 to 45.0 x 10 to the 6th power. The stagnation pressure was varied between 1.2 and 6.0 atmospheres and the stagnation temperature was varied between 300 K and 90 K to obtain these test conditions. Tabulated pressure distributions and integrated force and moment coefficients are presented as well as plots of the surface pressure distributions. The data are presented uncorrected for wall interference effects and without analysis.

  1. High Reynolds number tests of the CAST 10-2/DOA 2 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dress, D. A.; Mcguire, P. D.; Stanewsky, E.; Ray, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of an advanced technology airfoil, the CAST 10-2/DOA 2, was conducted in the Langley 0.3 meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3 m TCT). This was the first of a series of tests conducted in a cooperative National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fur Luft- und Raumfahrt e. V. (DFVLR) airfoil research program. Test temperature was varied from 280 K to 100 K to pressures from slightly above 1 to 5.8 atmospheres. Mach number was varied from 0.60 to 0.80, and the Reynolds number (based on airfoil chord) was varied from 4 x 10 to the 8th power to 45 x 10 to the 6th power. This report presents the experimental aerodynamic data obtained for the airfoil and includes descriptions of the airfoil model, the 0.3 m TCT, the test instrumentation, and the testing procedures.

  2. The psychometric testing of the Nursing Teamwork Survey in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Bragadóttir, Helga; Kalisch, Beatrice J; Smáradóttir, Sigríður Bríet; Jónsdóttir, Heiður Hrund

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Nursing Teamwork Survey-Icelandic (NTS-Icelandic), which was translated from US English to Icelandic. The Nursing Teamwork Survey, with 33 items, measures overall teamwork and five factors of teamwork: trust, team orientation, backup, shared mental models, and team leadership. The psychometric testing of the NTS-Icelandic was carried out on data from a pilot study and a national study. The sample for a pilot study included 123 nursing staff from five units, and the sample for a national study included 925 nursing staff from 27 inpatient units. The overall test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient in the pilot study was 0.693 (lower bound = 0.498, upper bound = 0.821) (p < 0.001). The Cronbach's alpha reliability for the total scale and subscales ranged from 0.737 to 0.911. A confirmatory factor analysis indicated a good fit of the data from the national study with the five-factor model for nursing teamwork. The NTS-Icelandic tested valid and reliable in this study. Study findings support further use of the Nursing Teamwork Survey internationally. PMID:26878834

  3. 40 CFR 201.23 - Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. 201.23 Section 201.23 Protection of... locomotive and rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. (a) The standard test site shall be... contribution from the operation of the load cell, if any, including load cell contribution during test....

  4. 40 CFR 201.23 - Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. 201.23 Section 201.23 Protection of... locomotive and rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. (a) The standard test site shall be... contribution from the operation of the load cell, if any, including load cell contribution during test....

  5. 40 CFR 201.23 - Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. 201.23 Section 201.23 Protection of... locomotive and rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. (a) The standard test site shall be... contribution from the operation of the load cell, if any, including load cell contribution during test....

  6. HIV testing in national population-based surveys: experience from the Demographic and Health Surveys.

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vinod; Vaessen, Martin; Boerma, J. Ties; Arnold, Fred; Way, Ann; Barrere, Bernard; Cross, Anne; Hong, Rathavuth; Sangha, Jasbir

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the methods used in the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) to collect nationally representative data on the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and assess the value of such data to country HIV surveillance systems. METHODS: During 2001-04, national samples of adult women and men in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Ghana, Mali, Kenya, United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia were tested for HIV. Dried blood spot samples were collected for HIV testing, following internationally accepted ethical standards. The results for each country are presented by age, sex, and urban versus rural residence. To estimate the effects of non-response, HIV prevalence among non-responding males and females was predicted using multivariate statistical models for those who were tested, with a common set of predictor variables. RESULTS: Rates of HIV testing varied from 70% among Kenyan men to 92% among women in Burkina Faso and Cameroon. Despite large differences in HIV prevalence between the surveys (1-16%), fairly consistent patterns of HIV infection were observed by age, sex and urban versus rural residence, with considerably higher rates in urban areas and in women, especially at younger ages. Analysis of non-response bias indicates that although predicted HIV prevalence tended to be higher in non-tested males and females than in those tested, the overall effects of non-response on the observed national estimates of HIV prevalence are insignificant. CONCLUSIONS: Population-based surveys can provide reliable, direct estimates of national and regional HIV seroprevalence among men and women irrespective of pregnancy status. Survey data greatly enhance surveillance systems and the accuracy of national estimates in generalized epidemics. PMID:16878227

  7. Modal survey test of the oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paule, David W.

    The modal survey test of the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) projected for the Space Shuttle, and the revision to the NASTRAN mathematical model of the (OSSE) primary structure, are discussed. The updated model is used to predict element loads for the calculation of margins of safety. Changes including alteration of the stiffness of the springs representing the rotational stiffnesses of the gearboxes, and lowering of the stiffnesses of the aft diagonal strut and the back plate, brought the frequencies of the first six modes of the NASTRAN model to within 4 percent of the test modes.

  8. [Development of ultrasonic power meter].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongxin; Hu, Changming; Zheng, Yan; Xu, Honglei; Zhou, Wohua; Wu, Ziwen; Yu, Liudan; Hao, Jiandong; Luo, Yifan

    2014-07-01

    This article describes the design and development of an ultrasonic power meter which is consist of an electronic balance, a practice target, an acoustic enclosures and a blocking. The electronic balance mounted on the blocking is linked with the practice target by connecting rod. By adjusting the blocking makes the practice target suspended above ultrasound probe, and then the ultrasonic power can be measured. After initial tests, the ultrasonic power meter performanced with good stability and high precision. PMID:25330604

  9. MSFC Test Results for Selected Mirrors: Brush-Wellman/Goodrich 0.5 meter Joined-Beryllium Mirror; IABG 0.5 meter C/SiC Mirror; Xinetics 0.5 meter SiC Mirror; and Kodak 0.23 meter SiO2 Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James; Blackwell, Lisa; Matthews, Gary; Eng, Ron; Stahl, Phil; Hraba, John; Thornton, Gary

    2002-01-01

    The results of cryo tests performed at the XRCF on the above mirrors will be presented. Each mirror was tested from room-temperature to around 30 K. The first three were tested together on a 3-mirror stand in the large chamber using the PhaseCam interferometer, while the Kodak mirror was tested in the small chamber using the EPI interferometer.

  10. Cross-cultural differences in meter perception.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Beste; Trehub, Sandra E; Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2013-03-01

    We examined the influence of incidental exposure to varied metrical patterns from different musical cultures on the perception of complex metrical structures from an unfamiliar musical culture. Adults who were familiar with Western music only (i.e., simple meters) and those who also had limited familiarity with non-Western music were tested on their perception of metrical organization in unfamiliar (Turkish) music with simple and complex meters. Adults who were familiar with Western music detected meter-violating changes in Turkish music with simple meter but not in Turkish music with complex meter. Adults with some exposure to non-Western music that was unmetered or metrically complex detected meter-violating changes in Turkish music with both simple and complex meters, but they performed better on patterns with a simple meter. The implication is that familiarity with varied metrical structures, including those with a non-isochronous tactus, enhances sensitivity to the metrical organization of unfamiliar music. PMID:22367155

  11. High Reynolds number transonic tests on a NACA 0012 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladson, Charles L.; Hill, S. Acquilla

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the two-dimensional test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel on a NACA 0012 airfoil to obtain aerodynamic data as a part of the Advanced Technology Airfoil Test (ATAT) program. The test program covered a Mach number range of 0.30 to 0.82 and a Reynolds number range of 3.0 to 45.0 x 10 to the 6th. The stagnation pressure was varied between 1.2 and 6.0 atmospheres and the stagnation temperature was varied between 300 K and 90 K to obtain these test conditions. Plots of the spanwise variation of drag coefficient as a function of normal force coefficient and the variation of the basic aerodynamic characteristics with angle of attack are shown. The data are presented uncorrected for wall interference effects and without analysis.

  12. Repeatability and oblique flow response characteristics of current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Thibodeaux, Kirk G.; Kaehrle, William R.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory investigation into the precision and accuracy of various mechanical-current meters are presented. Horizontal-axis and vertical-axis meters that are used for the measurement of point velocities in streams and rivers were tested. Meters were tested for repeatability and response to oblique flows. Both horizontal- and vertical-axis meters were found to under- and over-register oblique flows with errors generally increasing as the velocity and angle of flow increased. For the oblique flow tests, magnitude of errors were smallest for horizontal-axis meters. Repeatability of all meters tested was good, with the horizontal- and vertical-axis meters performing similarly.

  13. Cosmological Tests of General Relativity with tomographic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Alessandra; Zhao, Gongbo; Pogosian, Levon; Zylberberg, Joel

    2010-02-01

    Future cosmological surveys, combining galaxy counts and weak lensing measurements, will map the evolution of matter perturbations and gravitational potentials from the matter dominated epoch until today. In addition to tightening the constraints on allowed expansion histories, the combination of these measurements will test the relationships between matter overdensities, local curvature, and the Newtonian potential. These relation- ships can be modi?ed in alternative theories of gravity and by exotic forms of Dark Energy. I will present a study of the potential of upcoming and future tomographic surveys, such as DES and LSST, with the aid of CMB and supernovae data, to detect departures from the growth of perturbations expected within General Relativity with a cosmological constant. )

  14. Seismic surveys test on Innerhytta Pingo, Adventdalen, Svalbard Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Rossi, Giuliana; Petronio, Lorenzo; Accaino, Flavio; Romeo, Roberto; Wheeler, Walter

    2015-04-01

    We present the preliminary results of an experimental full-wave seismic survey test conducted on the Innnerhytta a Pingo, located in the Adventdalen, Svalbard Islands, Norway. Several seismic surveys were adopted in order to study a Pingo inner structure, from classical reflection/refraction arrays to seismic tomography and surface waves analysis. The aim of the project IMPERVIA, funded by Italian PNRA, was the evaluation of the permafrost characteristics beneath this open-system Pingo by the use of seismic investigation, evaluating the best practice in terms of logistic deployment. The survey was done in April-May 2014: we collected 3 seismic lines with different spacing between receivers (from 2.5m to 5m), for a total length of more than 1 km. We collected data with different vertical geophones (with natural frequency of 4.5 Hz and 14 Hz) as well as with a seismic snow-streamer. We tested different seismic sources (hammer, seismic gun, fire crackers and heavy weight drop), and we verified accurately geophone coupling in order to evaluate the different responses. In such peculiar conditions we noted as fire-crackers allow the best signal to noise ratio for refraction/reflection surveys. To ensure the best geophones coupling with the frozen soil, we dug snow pits, to remove the snow-cover effect. On the other hand, for the surface wave methods, the very high velocity of the permafrost strongly limits the generation of long wavelengths both with these explosive sources as with the common sledgehammer. The only source capable of generating low frequencies was a heavy drop weight system, which allows to analyze surface wave dispersion below 10 Hz. Preliminary data analysis results evidence marked velocity inversions and strong velocity contrasts in depth. The combined use of surface and body waves highlights the presence of a heterogeneous soil deposit level beneath a thick layer of permafrost. This is the level that hosts the water circulation from depth controlling

  15. High Reynolds number tests of a NASA SC(3)-0712(B) airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Hill, A. S.; Eichmann, O.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a NASA 12-percent-thick, advanced-technology supercritical airfoil was conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). This investigation represents another in the series of NASA/U.S. industry two-dimensional airfoil studies to be completed in the Advanced Technology Airfoil Tests program. Test temperature was varied from 220 K to 96 K at pressures ranging from 1.2 to 4.3 atm. Mach number was varied from 0.60 to 0.80. These variables provided a Reynolds number range from 4,400,000 to 40,000,000 based on a 15.24-cm (6.0-in.) airfoil chord. This investigation was designed to test a NASA advanced-technology airfoil from low to flight-equivalent Reynolds numbers, provide experience in cryogenic wind tunnel model design and testing techniques, and demonstrate the suitability of the 0.3-m TCT as an airfoil test facility. The aerodynamic results are presented as integrated force and moment coefficients and pressure distributions. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixed transition, Mach number, and Reynolds number on the aerodynamic characteristics. Also included are remarks on the model design, the model structural integrity, and the overall test experience.

  16. Pressure distribution from high Reynolds number tests of a NASA SC(3)-0712(B) airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Hill, A. S.; Eichmann, O.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a NASA 12-percent-thick, advanced-technology supercritical airfoil was conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). This investigation represents another in the series of NASA/U.S. industry two-dimensional airfoil studies to be completed in the Advanced Technology Airfoil Tests program. Test temperature was varied from 220 K to 96 K at pressures ranging from 1.2 to 4.3 atm. Mach number was varied from 0.50 to 0.80. This investigation was designed to: (1) test a NASA advanced-technology airfoil from low to flight equivalent Reynolds numbers, (2) provide experience in cryogenic wind-tunnel model design and testing techniques, and (3) demonstrate the suitability of the 0.3-m TCT as an airfoil test facility. All the test objectives were met. The pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated format and as plots of pressure coefficient versus position on the airfoil. This report was prepared for use in conjunction with the aerodynamic coefficient data published in NASA-TM-86371. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixed transition. Also included are remarks on the model design and fabrication.

  17. Pressure distributions from high Reynolds number tests of a Boeing BAC 1 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Hill, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation designed to test a Boeing advanced-technology airfoil from low to flight-equivalent Reynolds numbers has been completed in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. This investigation represents the first in a series of NASA/U.S. industry two-dimensional airfoil studies to be completed in the Advanced Technology Airfoil Test program. Test temperature was varied from ambient to about 100 K at pressures ranging from about 1.2 to 6.0 atm. Mach number was varied from about 0.40 to 0.80. These variables provided a Reynolds number (based on airfoil chord) range from 4.4 X 10 to the 6th power to 50.0 X 10 to the 6th power. All the test objectives were met. The pressure data are presented without analysis in plotted and tabulated formats for use in conjunction with the aerodynamic coefficient data published as NASA TM-81922. At the time of the test, these pressure data were considered proprietary and have only recently been made available by Boeing for general release. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixed transition. Also included are remarks on the model design, the model structural integrity, and the overall test experience.

  18. Design and initial testing of a one-bladed 30-meter-diameter rotor on the NASA/DOE mod-O wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, R. D.; Ensworth, C. B. F.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of a one-bladed horizontal-axis wind turbine has been of interest to wind turbine designers for many years. Many designs and economic analyses of one-bladed wind turbines have been undertaken by both United States and European wind energy groups. The analyses indicate significant economic advantages but at the same time, significant dynamic response concerns. In an effort to develop a broad data base on wind turbine design and operations, the NASA Wind Energy Project Office has tested a one-bladed rotor at the NASA/DOE Mod-O Wind Turbine Facility. This is the only known test on an intermediate-sized one-bladed rotor in the United States. The 15.2-meter-radius rotor consists of a tip-controlled blade and a counterweight assembly. A rigorous test series was conducted in the Fall of 1985 to collect data on rotor performance, drive train/generator dynamics, structural dynamics, and structural loads. This report includes background information on one-bladed rotor concepts, and Mod-O one-bladed rotor test configuration, supporting design analysis, the Mod-O one-blade rotor test plan, and preliminary test results.

  19. The Eastland Prostate Cancer Survey: instrument development and psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    Eastland, Taryn Y; Dancy, Barbara L

    2013-03-01

    African-American (AA) women could be instrumental in communicating positive prostate screening behavior to the significant males in their lives. However, little is known about AA women's prostate cancer attitudes, perceived behavioral control, subjective norms, intentions, behaviors, and knowledge regarding prostate cancer screening. This study describes the development and psychometric testing of the Eastland Prostate Cancer Survey (EPCS). A nonexperimental, correlational study with 200 AA women was used to test the psychometric properties of the six-subscale EPCS with 66 items. Construct validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability for the EPCS were acceptable and resulted in an eight-subscale EPCS with 56 items. Cronbach's alphas for the subscales ranged from 0.69 to 0.92. The EPCS is a culturally sensitive, gender-relevant instrument that could be used by community health providers to develop community health programs aimed at engaging AA women in the promotion of prostate cancer screening for AA men. PMID:23288607

  20. Benzyl salicylate: a survey of consumer patch-test sensitization.

    PubMed

    Kohrman, K A; Booman, K A; Dorsky, J; Rothenstein, A S; Sedlak, R I; Steltenkamp, R J; Thompson, G R

    1983-12-01

    The potential of benzyl salicylate, an important fragrance and flavour ingredient, to induce hypersensitivity or to elicit reactions to pre-existing hypersensitivity in the general population was evaluated by analysing patch-test data. Results obtained from fragrance and formulator companies for a total of 10,538 patch tests on benzyl salicylate alone, on a variety of household and personal care consumer products and on fragrance blends containing benzyl salicylate were analysed as part of this survey. No induced or elicited responses directly attributable to benzyl salicylate were observed in the 35 patch tests on benzyl salicylate alone, or in the 10,503 patch tests on consumer products or fragrance blends containing benzyl salicylate. The highest concentration of benzyl salicylate tested in the consumer-product tests was 2 X 10(-1)%, and benzyl salicylate alone was tested at 10% in ethanol. This study indicates that benzyl salicylate has a very low potential to induce hypersensitivity ('induced' reactions) or to elicit reactions presumably attributable to pre-existing sensitization ('elicited' reactions) and thus supports the safe use of benzyl salicylate in consumer products and fragrance blends. PMID:6686578

  1. Correlation Results for a Mass Loaded Vehicle Panel Test Article Finite Element Models and Modal Survey Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maasha, Rumaasha; Towner, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    High-fidelity Finite Element Models (FEMs) were developed to support a recent test program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The FEMs correspond to test articles used for a series of acoustic tests. Modal survey tests were used to validate the FEMs for five acoustic tests (a bare panel and four different mass-loaded panel configurations). An additional modal survey test was performed on the empty test fixture (orthogrid panel mounting fixture, between the reverb and anechoic chambers). Modal survey tests were used to test-validate the dynamic characteristics of FEMs used for acoustic test excitation. Modal survey testing and subsequent model correlation has validated the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FEMs. The modal survey test results provide a basis for the analysis models used for acoustic loading response test and analysis comparisons

  2. Highlights of experience with a flexible walled test section in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Ray, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The unique combination of adaptive wall technology with a contonuous flow cryogenic wind tunnel is described. This powerful combination allows wind tunnel users to carry out 2-D tests at flight Reynolds numbers with wall interference essentially eliminated. Validation testing was conducted to support this claim using well tested symmetrical and cambered airfoils at transonic speeds and high Reynolds numbers. The test section hardware has four solid walls, with the floor and ceiling flexible. The method of adapting/shaping the floor and ceiling to eliminate top and bottom wall interference at its source is outlined. Data comparisons for different size models tested and others in several sophisticated 2-D wind tunnels are made. In addition, the effects of Reynolds number, testing at high lift with associated large flexible wall movements, the uniqueness of the adapted wall shapes, and the effects of sidewall boundary layer control are examined. The 0.3-m TCT is now the most advanced 2-D research facility anywhere.

  3. Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

    2000-01-01

    A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

  4. Survey of Experimental Tests of the IBA Model

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of experimental tests of the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) Model is presented covering even and odd mass nuclei in the region from A ≈ 80 to A ≈ 230. Both positive and negative parity states with both high and low spin are discussed. Topics included concern energy levels, electromagnetic transition rates, two nucleon transfer and inelastic scattering. Special attention is given to nuclear symmetries and transitional regions. Comparison with other models is made where appropriate. The distinction between IBA-1 and IBA-2 is discussed including their respective areas of applicability.

  5. High Reynolds Number Test of the Boeing TR77 Airfoil in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Flechner, Stuart G.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Rozendaal, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    A Boeing TR77 airfoil associated with the Advanced Technology Airfoil Test (ATAT) program was tested in the Langley 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Limited analysis of the data indicated that increasing Reynolds number for a fixed Mach number resulted in increased normal-force, nose-down pitching moment, and decreased drag coefficient. Increasing Mach number while keeping the Reynolds number constant yielded the expected increase in normal-force slopes, nose-down pitching moment coefficients, and decrease in angle of attack associated with maximum normal-force coefficient. Turbulent boundary layer flow was achieved over the airfoil at low Reynolds numbers for the test Mach number range using aluminum discs.

  6. High Reynolds Number tests of the NASA SC(2)-0012 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Lawing, Pierce L.

    1987-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of the NASA SC(2)-0012 airfoil has been conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. This investigation supplements the two-dimensional airfoil studies of the Advanced Technology Airfoil Test Program. The Mach number was varied from 0.60 to 0.84. The stagnation temperature and pressure were varied to provide a Reynolds number range from 6 to 40 x 10 to the 6th power based on a 6.0-in. (15.24-cm) airfoil chord. No corrections for wind-tunnel wall interference have been made to the data. The aerodynamic results are presented as integrated force and moment coefficients and pressure distributions without any analysis.

  7. Evolution, calibration, and operational characteristics of the two-dimensional test section of the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladson, Charles L.; Ray, Edward J.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a review of the development of the world's first cryogenic pressure tunnel, the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT). Descriptions of the instrumentation, data acquisition systems, and physical features of the two-dimensional 8- by 24-in, (20.32 by 60.96 cm) and advanced 13- by 13-in (33.02 by 33.02 cm) adaptive-wall test-section inserts of the 0.3-m TCT are included. Basic tunnel-empty Mach number distributions, stagnation temperature distributions, and power requirements are included. The Mach number capability of the facility is from about 0.20 to 0.90. Stagnation pressure can be varied from about 80 to 327 K.

  8. Noise data from tests of a 1.83 meter (6-ft-) diameter variable-pitch 1.2-pressure-ratio fan (QF-9)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, F. W.; Wazyniak, J. A.; Friedman, R.

    1975-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic data for a 1.83-meter (6-ft.) diameter fan suitable for a quiet engine for short-takeoff-and-landing (STOL) aircraft are documented. The QF-9 rotor blades had an adjustable pitch feature which provided a means for testing at several rotor blade setting angles, including one for reverse thrust. The fan stage incorporated features for low noise. Far-field noise around the fan was measured without acoustic suppression over a range of operating conditions for six different rotor blade setting angles in the forward thrust configuration, and for one in the reverse configuration. Complete results of one-third-octave band analysis of the data are presented in tabular form. Also included are power spectra, data referred to the source, and sideline perceived noise levels.

  9. Discussion series on PURPA related topics: metering

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, J I

    1980-08-01

    Time-differentiated metering of electricity consumption and demand is required in both rate-structure experimentation and the implementation of most time-of-use rate designs. Time-differentiated metering takes three major forms: multi-register watthour meters, magnetic-tape recording meters, and remote automatic meter-reading systems. The majority of projects selected magnetic-tape meters for their flexibility with respect to rate structure, load-survey capabilities, and ready availability. The small-scale, experimental nature of the projects reduced the significance of the large difference in per-unit cost and operational/maintenance complexity between this form of metering and the multi-register form. Magnetic-tape meters are not likely candidates for system-wide implementation of time-differentiated metering. Automatic remote-meter-reading systems were not adequately available during the project years; those projects attempting to use these were unable to bring them to full operational status before project termination, due to the many problems of design, quality control, and equipment acquisition encountered. Delays in acquisition and problems of quality control also followed the selection of magnetic-tape meters and multi-register meters by a number of the projects. Though less complex than automatic remote-reading systems, these technologies are still new and more complex than standard watthour metering. Thus, both equipment vendors and utilities encountered numerous problems in getting properly functioning meters to the service entrances on time. A variety of factors contributed to installation delays, including unforeseen space limitations, incompatible wiring, problems of task organization, and customer reluctance.

  10. Test Of Astronomy STandards TOAST Survey of K-12 Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie; Stork, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    Discipline-based education research in astronomy is focused on understanding the underlying mental mechanisms used by students when learning astronomy and teachers when teaching astronomy. Systematic surveys of K-12 teacher' knowledge in the domain of astronomy are conducted periodically in order to better focus and improve professional development. These surveys are most often done when doing contemporary needs assessments or when new assessment instruments are readily available. Designed by Stephanie J. Slater of the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research, the 29-item multiple-choice format Test Of Astronomy STandards - TOAST is a carefully constructed, criterion-referenced instrument constructed upon a solid list of clearly articulated and widely agreed upon learning objectives. The targeted learning concepts tightly align with the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's 1996 National Science Education Standards. Without modification, the TOAST is also aligned with the significantly less ambitious 2013 Next Generation Science Standards created by Achieve, Inc., under the auspices of the National Research Council. This latest survey reveals that K-12 teachers still hold many of the same fundamental misconceptions uncovered by earlier surveys. This includes misconceptions about the size, scale, and structure of the cosmos as well as misconceptions about the nature of physical processes at work in astronomy. This suggests that professional development in astronomy is still needed and that modern curriculum materials are best served if they provide substantial support for implementation.

  11. Calibration of water-velocity meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaehrle, William R.; Bowie, James E.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior, as part of its responsibility to appraise the quantity of water resources in the United States, maintains facilities for the calibration of water-velocity meters at the Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center's Hydraulic Laboratory Facility, NSTL, Mississippi. These meters are used in hydrologic studies by the Geological Survey, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Department of Energy, state agencies, universities, and others in the public and private sector. This paper describes calibration facilities, types of water-velocity meters calibrated, and calibration standards, methods and results.

  12. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  13. A tuberculin skin test survey among Ghanaian school children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ghana has not conducted a national tuberculin survey or tuberculosis prevalence survey since the establishment of the National Tuberculosis Control Programme. The primary objective of this study was therefore to determine the prevalence of tuberculin skin sensitivity in Ghanaian school children aged 6-10 years in 8 out of 10 regions of Ghana between 2004 and 2006. Methods Tuberculin survey was conducted in 179 primary schools from 21 districts in 8 regions. Schools were purposively selected so as to reflect the proportion of affluent private and free tuition public schools as well as the proportion of small and large schools. Results Of the 24,778 children registered for the survey, 23,600 (95.2%) were tested of which 21,861 (92.6%) were available for reading. The age distribution showed an increase in numbers of children towards older age: 11% of the children were 6 years and 25%, 10 years. Females were 52.5% and males 47.5%. The proportion of girls was higher in all age groups (range 51.4% to 54.0%, p < 0.001). BCG scar was visible in 89.3% of the children. The percentage of children with a BCG scar differed by district and by age. The percentage of children with a BCG scar decreased with increasing age in all districts, reflecting increasing BCG vaccination coverage in Ghana in the last ten years. The risk of tuberculosis infection was low in the northern savannah zones compared to the southern coastal zones. Using a cut-off of 15 mm, the prevalence of infection ranged from 0.0% to 5.4% and the Annual Risks of Tuberculosis Infection 0.0% to 0.6%. There was an increase in the proportion of infected children after the age of 7 years. Children attending low and middle-class schools had a higher risk of infection than children attending upper-class schools. Conclusion Tuberculosis infection is still a public health problem in Ghana and to monitor the trend, the survey needs to be repeated at 5 years interval. PMID:20102620

  14. A Matter of Meter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Writing verse is a learning experience. Arranging words, sounds and syllables can turn everyday language into metered language (language that can be measured), and metered language is the definition of verse. This article discusses the use of meter in helping students establish sets of syllables and lines that can be counted, enabling them to…

  15. Practical applications of genotypic surveys for forensic STR testing.

    PubMed

    Holt, C L; Stauffer, C; Wallin, J M; Lazaruk, K D; Nguyen, T; Budowle, B; Walsh, P S

    2000-08-14

    Legitimate genotype frequency estimation for multiallelic loci relies on component allele frequencies, as population surveys represent only a fraction of possible DNA profiles. Multilocus genotypes from two ethnic human populations, African American (n=195) and U.S. Caucasian (n=200), were compiled at 13 STR loci that are used worldwide in forensic investigation (D3S1358, vWA, FGA, D16S539, TH01, TPOX, CSF1PO, D8S1179, D21S11, D18S51, D5S818, D13S317, and D7S820). Sex-specific AmpFlSTR multiplexes provided stringent PCR-based STR typing specifically optimized for multicolor fluorescence detection. Heterozygosity at each STR locus ranged from 0.57 to 0.89 and encompassed from seven (TH01) to twenty-one (D21S11) alleles. Homozygosity tests, tests based on the distinct numbers of observed homozygous and heterozygous classes, log likelihood ratio tests, and exact tests assessed that the degree of divergence from theoretical Hardy-Weinberg proportions for all 13 STRs does not have practical consequence in genotype frequency estimation. Departures from linkage equilibrium, between loci, that imposed significance to forensic calculations were not indicated by observed variance of the number of heterozygous loci or Karlin interclass correlation tests. For forensic casework, reliable multilocus profile estimates may be obtained from the product of component genotype frequencies, each calculated through application of the Hardy-Weinberg equation to population database allele frequency estimates reported here. The average probability that two randomly selected, unrelated individuals possess an identical thirteen-locus DNA profile was one in 1.8x10(15) African Americans and one in 3.8x10(14) U.S. Caucasians. PMID:10940595

  16. A series of low-altitude aerial radiological surveys of selected regions within Areas 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 18, and 25 at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, D.P.

    1999-12-01

    A series of low-altitude, aerial radiological surveys of selected regions within Areas 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 18,and 25 of the Nevada Test Site was conducted from December 1996 through June 1999. The surveys were conducted for the US Department of Energy by the Remote Sensing Laboratory, located in Las Vegas, Nevada, and maintained and operated by Bechtel Nevada. The flights were conducted at a nominal altitude of 15 meters above ground level along a set of parallel flight lines spaced 23 meters apart. The purpose of these low-altitude surveys was to measure, map, and define the areas of americium-241 activity. The americium contamination will be used to determine the areas of plutonium contamination. Americium-241 activity was detected within 8 of the 11 regions. The three regions where americium-241 was not detected were in the inactive Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex in Area 25, which encompassed the Test Cell A and Test Cell C reactor test stands and the Reactor Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly facility.

  17. The effects of meter orientation downstream of a short radius elbow on electromagnetic flow meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justensen, Jared C.

    Electromagnetic flowmeters (known as magnetic flow meters) are a widely used type of flowmeter. The accuracy of magnetic flow meters are a function of several factors, not the least of which is the flow condition inside the pipe. It has been shown that disturbances in the velocity profile affects the accuracy of a magnetic flow meter (Luntta, 1998). Accordingly, manufacturers of magnetic flow meters give installation guidelines. These guidelines help prevent the user from installing the meter in a pipe configuration that is likely to cause the meter to produce inaccurate results. Although most manufacturers provide recommendations about the amount of straight pipe that is necessary upstream of the meter, little is said about the orientation of the meter in relation to upstream disturbances. This study examines the performance of magnetic flow meters when positioned at two different orientations: EIP (electrodes in plane with an upstream 90-degree short radius elbow) and EOP (electrodes out of plane). Four different meters were included in the study in which a baseline straight pipe test was first performed using over fifty diameters of straight pipe upstream of each meter. The straight pipe test was used to determine the baseline accuracy of each of the meters over a velocity range that is typical for the size and function of the meters. Meters were then installed at five different locations downstream from a 90-degree short-radius elbow. At each location the meters were tested in two orientations at five different flow rates. The intent of the research is to show that the orientation of a magnetic flow meter affects the meter's ability to produce accurate flow readings when it is installed downstream of a flow disturbance. The results from this research showed a significant shift in measurement accuracy when the meter was in EIP and EOP orientations. All of the meters in the study produced accuracy readings at one point of another that were outside the specified

  18. Clinically relevant test methods to establish in vitro equivalence for spacers and valved holding chambers used with pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs).

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jolyon; Dolovich, Myrna B

    2012-08-01

    Regulatory guidance in Canada and Europe recommends that the manufacturer of an inhaled drug product delivered by pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) identify a spacer (S) or valved holding chamber (VHC) to be used with their designated product. It therefore becomes necessary to include the S/VHC in the process of establishing bioequivalence (BE) to the reference pMDI product for both new-entry generic and subsequent market entry products (SMEPs). S/VHCs substantially modify the aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of the inhaled medication, and potentially the spatial distribution of the mass of active pharmaceutical ingredient(s) [API(s)] depositing in the respiratory tract. The processes whereby S/VHCs can influence BE outcomes are examined, and the inadequacy of compendial in vitro methods to provide pertinent information to assess BE for the pMDI+VHC combination is highlighted. A three-part strategy is proposed whereby in vitro testing for BE can simulate more clinically-relevant conditions than in the current compendial procedures: 1. The inclusion of a short delay between inhaler actuation and sampling onset is appropriate when determining APSD at flow rate(s) suitable for the intended patient population; 2. Assessment of total emitted mass ex S/VHC by simulating tidal breathing pattern(s) appropriate for intended use; 3. Incorporation of appropriate face model(s), representative of the intended patient age range(s), into test procedures for S/VHCs with facemask, enabling clinically-appropriate dead space and fit-to-face to be simulated. Although the compendial authorities have been slow to recognize the need for such in vitro testing, a Canadian standard provides direction for implementing most proposals, which should result in better performance predictions and more appropriate clinical outcomes, highlighting similarities and differences between reference and test products. PMID:22857273

  19. Net metering programs

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Y H

    1996-12-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest from the renewable energy industry and environmental groups in net metering. The reason for this interest is that net metering is a simple, low-cost, and easily administered method to encourage direct customer investment in renewable energy technologies. The renewable energy industry supports net metering because it removes an economic disincentive for potential customers by increasing the value of the electricity generated by renewable energy technologies. Environmental groups support net metering because it promotes clean energy production. The concept of net metering programs is to allow the electric meters of customers with generating facilities to turn backwards when their generators are producing more energy than the customers` demand. Net metering allows customers to use their generation to offset their consumption over the entire billing period, not just instantaneously. This offset would enable customers with generating facilities to receive retail prices for more of the electricity they generate. Without a net metering program, utilities usually install a second meter to measure any electricity that flows back to the utility grid and purchase it at a rate that is much lower than the retail prices. There are various net metering programs in the country. Most are available to customer-owned small generating facilities only, some further restrict the eligibility to renewable energy technologies. This Topical Issues Brief discusses how these net metering programs have been implemented by different utilities an states, what the rationales are behind may net metering programs, and what the potential impact of net metering may be on the deployment of renewable energy technologies.

  20. Seepage meters and Bernoulli's revenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Reich, C.D.; Hickey, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of seepage data from a network of 50 permanently deployed submarine seepage meters, specially constructed from fiberglass, indicates that the devices artificially advect (Bernoulli effect) shallow ground water. Reverse flow into the rock was not observed even when adjacent piezometers installed 2-m to 20-m below the rock-water interface indicated negative groundwater heads. Quantitative testing of five different designs, including conventional end-of-oil-drum designs, indicates that meters presenting positive relief on the sea floor are subject to the Bernoulli effect when placed in areas where there are waves and/or currents. Advection does not appear to be caused by flexing of the collection bags.

  1. Vision Test Validation Study for the Health Examination Survey Among Youths 12-17 years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jean

    A validation study of the vision test battery used in the Health Examination Survey of 1966-1970 was conducted among 210 youths 12-17 years-old who had been part of the larger survey. The study was designed to discover the degree of correspondence between survey test results and clinical examination by an opthalmologist in determining the…

  2. Objectives and first results of the NASA SETI Sky Survey field tests at Goldstone, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Olsen, E. T.; Crow, R. B.; Downs, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives and preliminary results of the initial field tests of the prototype hardware and software for the NASA SETI program are reviewed with emphasis on the Sky Survey component of the NASA search strategy. In particular, attention is given to field test instrumentation, sky pixelation, sky survey field tests, baseline tests, antenna control tests, and radio frequency interference survey. The test results and observational experience will be used to finalize the design of the SETI Sky Survey processing system and to optimize the observational strategy and procedures in time to begin a full-scale Microwave Observing Program in 1990.

  3. Designing, Testing, and Validating an Attitudinal Survey on an Environmental Topic: A Groundwater Pollution Survey Instrument for Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacosta-Gabari, Idoya; Fernandez-Manzanal, Rosario; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Research in environmental attitudes' assessment has significantly increased in recent years. The development of specific attitude scales for specific environmental problems has often been proposed. This paper describes the Groundwater Pollution Test (GPT), a 19-item survey instrument using a Likert-type scale. The survey has been used with…

  4. Performance of ice meter and weight assemblies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, V.R.; Futrell, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of three ice meters and weight assemblies used by the U.S. Geological Survey and Environment Canada were compared in a towing tank. Each meter was rated individually on a rod suspension and then rerated on a cable suspension, with the appropriate weight assembly. Vertical and veer cable angles were measured along with meter yaw angle. The effect of the weight assembly on the rod-suspension rating for each meter was illustrated by computing a correction coefficient which ranged between 0.88 and 1.10 depending on the weight system used and the fluid velocity. A sluch-n-all type weight assembly least affected the meter rating and was the most stable in all flow conditions. (USGS)

  5. High Altitude Flight Test of a 40-Foot Diameter (12.2 meter) Ringsail Parachute at Deployment Mach Number of 2.95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1970-01-01

    A 40-foot-nominal-diameter (12.2-meter) modified ringsail parachute was flight tested as part of the NASA Supersonic High Altitude Parachute Experiment (SHAPE) program. The 41-pound (18.6-kg) test parachute system was deployed from a 239.5-pound (108.6-kg) instrumented payload by means of a deployment mortar when the payload was at an altitude of 171,400 feet (52.3 km), a Mach number of 2.95, and a free-stream dynamic pressure of 9.2 lb/sq ft (440 N/m(exp 2)). The parachute deployed properly, suspension line stretch occurring 0.54 second after mortar firing with a resulting snatch-force loading of 932 pounds (4146 newtons). The maximum loading due to parachute opening was 5162 pounds (22 962 newtons) at 1.29 seconds after mortar firing. The first near full inflation of the canopy at 1.25 seconds after mortar firing was followed immediately by a partial collapse and subsequent oscillations of frontal area until the system had decelerated to a Mach number of about 1.5. The parachute then attained a shape that provided full drag area. During the supersonic part of the test, the average axial-force coefficient varied from a minimum of about 0.24 at a Mach number of 2.7 to a maximum of 0.54 at a Mach number of 1.1. During descent under subsonic conditions, the average effective drag coefficient was 0.62 and parachute-payload oscillation angles averaged about &loo with excursions to +/-20 degrees. The recovered parachute was found to have slight damage in the vent area caused by the attached deployment bag and mortar lid.

  6. Reliability, Agreement and Minimal Detectable Change of the Timed Up & Go and the 10-Meter Walk Tests in Older Patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Marques, Alda; Cruz, Joana; Quina, Sara; Regêncio, Maria; Jácome, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the interrater and intrarater reliability and agreement and the minimal detectable change (MDC) of the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test and the 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT) in older patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Patients (≥ 60 years old) living in the community were asked to attend 2 sessions with 48-72-hour interval. In session 1, participants completed the TUG and 10MWT twice (2 trials) and were assessed by 2 raters. In session 2, they repeated the tests twice and were assessed by 1 rater. Interrater and intrarater reliability were calculated for the exact scores (using data from trial 1) and mean scores (mean of 2 trials) using Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC2,1 and ICC2,2, respectively). Interrater and intrarater agreement were explored with the Bland & Altman method. The MDC95 was calculated from the standard error of measurement. Sixty participants (72.43 ± 6.90 years old) completed session 1 and 41 participants session 2. Excellent ICC values were found for the TUG test (interrater: ICC2,1 = 0.997 ICC2,2 = 0.999; intrarater: ICC2,1 = 0.921 ICC2,2 = 0.964) and 10MWT (interrater: ICC2,1 = 0.992 ICC2,2 = 0.997; intrarater: ICC2,1 = 0.903 ICC2,2 = 0.946). Good interrater and intrarater agreement was also found for both tests. The MDC95 was 2.68 s and 1.84 s for the TUG and 0.40 m/s and 0.30 m/s for the 10MWT considering the exact and mean scores, respectively. Findings suggest that the TUG test and the 10MWT are reliable and have acceptable measurement error. Therefore, these measures may be used to assess functional balance (TUG) and gait (10MWT) deficits in older patients with COPD. PMID:26643361

  7. Tsunami Questionnaire Survey in Heraklion Test Site, Crete Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorgiou, Antonia; Tsimi, Christina; Orfanogiannaki, Katerina; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos; Sachpazi, Maria; Lavigne, Franck; Grancher, Delphine

    2015-04-01

    The Heraklion city (Crete Island, Greece) has been chosen as one of the test-sites for the EU-FP7ASTARTE tsunami project. Heraklion is the biggest city in Crete Isl. and the fourth biggest in Greece with a population of about 120,000 which, however, during the summer vacation period nearly doubles. In the past, Heraklion was hit by strong, destructive tsunamis such as the ones of AD 8 August 1303, 10 October 1650 and 9 July 1956. The first and the third were caused by large tectonic earthquakes associated with the eastern segment of the Hellenic Arc the first and with the back-arc extensional regime the third. The one of 1650 was associated with the eruption of the Columbo submarine volcano in the Santorini volcanic complex. One of the activities scheduled for WP9 of ASTARTE project, which aims at building tsunami resilient societies in Europe, is dedicated to organize questionnaire surveys among the populations of the several ASTARTE test-sites. Although the questionnaire is comprised by more than 50 questions, the central concept is to better understand what people know about tsunamis and if they are ready to cope with risks associated with future tsunami occurrences. In Heraklion the survey was conducted during tourism peak season of July 2014, thus questionnaires were collected by both local people and tourists, thus representing a variety of countries. We attempted to keep balance between males and females, while the age ranged from 15 to 65. Totally, 113 persons were interviewed of which 62 were females and 51 males. From the point of view of origin, 58 out of 113 were local people and residents, 22 were Greek tourists and 29 foreign tourists. Generally, the questionnaire consists of four parts. In the first, people were asked about their relation with the area of Heraklion. In the second part, the questions considered the knowledge that people have on tsunamis as a natural, hazardous phenomenon. More precisely, people were asked questions such as what a

  8. PRESCILA: a new, lightweight neutron rem meter.

    PubMed

    Olsher, Richard H; Seagraves, David T; Eisele, Shawna L; Bjork, Christopher W; Martinez, William A; Romero, Leonard L; Mallett, Michael W; Duran, Michael A; Hurlbut, Charles R

    2004-06-01

    Conventional neutron rem meters currently in use are based on 1960's technology that relies on a large neutron moderator assembly surrounding a thermal detector to achieve a rem-like response function over a limited energy range. Such rem meters present an ergonomic challenge, being heavy and bulky, and have caused injuries during radiation protection surveys. Another defect of traditional rem meters is a poor high-energy response above 10 MeV, which makes them unsuitable for applications at high-energy accelerator facilities. Proton Recoil Scintillator-Los Alamos (PRESCILA) was developed as a low-weight (2 kg) alternative capable of extended energy response, high sensitivity, and moderate gamma rejection. An array of ZnS(Ag) based scintillators is located inside and around a Lucite light guide, which couples the scintillation light to a sideview bialkali photomultiplier tube. The use of both fast and thermal scintillators allows the energy response function to be optimized for a wide range of operational spectra. The light guide and the borated polyethylene frame provide moderation for the thermal scintillator element. The scintillators represent greatly improved versions of the Hornyak and Stedman designs from the 1950's, and were developed in collaboration with Eljen Technology. The inherent pulse height advantage of proton recoils over electron tracks in the phosphor grains eliminates the need for pulse shape discrimination and makes it possible to use the PRESCILA probe with standard pulse height discrimination provided by off-the-shelf health physics counters. PRESCILA prototype probes have been extensively tested at both Los Alamos and the German Bureau of Standards, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. Test results are presented for energy response, directional dependence, linearity, sensitivity, and gamma rejection. Initial field tests have been conducted at Los Alamos and these results are also given. It is concluded that PRESCILA offers a viable

  9. Real life experience with multipath ultrasonic gas flow meters

    SciTech Connect

    Sakariassen, R.

    1996-12-31

    Multipath ultrasonic gas flow meters are to be considered as newcomers among flow meters for large, high pressure gas flows. Although the advantages of this type of meters are many and obvious, the metering community is still hesitating to go for it mainly because of lack of experience. The objective of this paper is to present the experience of Statoil after more than six years experience with multipath ultrasonic gas flow meters. Their experience includes laboratory testing and operation in the field for a variety of designs and dimensions. This paper presents the accuracy achieved by such meters including comparison between ultrasonic meters and orifice metering systems in operation, the unique possibilities that this type of meter offers for on-line verification of performance and installation effects. Of particular interest should be noted that in the vicinity of low-noise control valves, such meters could stop functioning completely if no precautions are taken.

  10. Obtaining Test Blueprint Weights from Job Analysis Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spray, Judith; Huang, Chi-Yu

    2000-01-01

    Presents a method for combining multiple scale responses from job or task surveys based on a hierarchical rating scheme. Provides the rationale for placing the resulting ordinal information on an interval scale of measurement using the Rasch model. Also suggests a method for linking two or more surveys using the Rasch model and the BIGSTEPS…

  11. Laboratory Diagnostics Market in East Africa: A Survey of Test Types, Test Availability, and Test Prices in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Lee F.; Elbireer, Ali; Jackson, J. Brooks; Amukele, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnostic laboratory tests are routinely defined in terms of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of use. But the actual clinical impact of a diagnostic test also depends on its availability and price. This is especially true in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. We present a first-of-its-kind report of diagnostic test types, availability, and prices in Kampala, Uganda. Methods Test types (identity) and availability were based on menus and volumes obtained from clinical laboratories in late 2011 in Kampala using a standard questionnaire. As a measure of test availability, we used the Availability Index (AI). AI is the combined daily testing volumes of laboratories offering a given test, divided by the combined daily testing volumes of all laboratories in Kampala. Test prices were based on a sampling of prices collected in person and via telephone surveys in 2015. Findings Test volumes and menus were obtained for 95% (907/954) of laboratories in Kampala city. These 907 laboratories offered 100 different test types. The ten most commonly offered tests in decreasing order were Malaria, HCG, HIV serology, Syphilis, Typhoid, Urinalysis, Brucellosis, Stool Analysis, Glucose, and ABO/Rh. In terms of AI, the 100 tests clustered into three groups: high (12 tests), moderate (33 tests), and minimal (55 tests) availability. 50% and 36% of overall availability was provided through private and public laboratories, respectively. Point-of-care laboratories contributed 35% to the AI of high availability tests, but only 6% to the AI of the other tests. The mean price of the most commonly offered test types was $2.62 (range $1.83–$3.46). Interpretation One hundred different laboratory test types were in use in Kampala in late 2011. Both public and private laboratories were critical to test availability. The tests offered in point-of-care laboratories tended to be the most available tests. Prices of the most common tests ranged from $1

  12. H-alpha survey of M33 with the six-meter telescope Morphology of the general diffuse emission, evidence for a chaotic medium of bubbles and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtes, G.; Petit, H.; Petit, M.; Sivan, J.-P.; Dodonov, S.

    1987-03-01

    A complete photographic H-alpha survey of M33 has been carried out with the f/1 focal reducer of Courtes (1964, 1972), attached to the prime focus of the 6-m telescope of the Soviet Special Astrophysical Observatory. A list of 748 distinct H II regions has been compiled from the survey photographs. 410 nebulae are newly identified objects. The others were previously cataloged by Boulesteix et al. (1974). The photographs are presented together with identification charts. They reveal an impressive, entirely new appearance for the ionized gas in M33. The 'classical' H II regions are seen bathing in a very chaotic background of H-alpha emission: rings, loops, and arc-shaped and filamentary structures are present everywhere all over the galaxy in and between the arms.

  13. Balanced Flow Meters without Moving Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R.; VanBuskirk, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Balanced flow meters are recent additions to an established class of simple, rugged flow meters that contain no moving parts in contact with flow and are based on measurement of pressure drops across objects placed in flow paths. These flow meters are highly accurate, minimally intrusive, easily manufacturable, and reliable. A balanced flow meter can be easily mounted in a flow path by bolting it between conventional pipe flanges. A balanced flow meter can be used to measure the flow of any of a variety of liquids or gases, provided that it has been properly calibrated. Relative to the standard orifice-plate flow meter, the balanced flow meter introduces less turbulence and two times less permanent pressure loss and is therefore capable of offering 10 times greater accuracy and repeatability with less dissipation of energy. A secondary benefit of the reduction of turbulence is the reduction of vibration and up to 15 times less acoustic noise generation. Both the balanced flow meter and the standard orifice-plate flow meter are basically disks that contain holes and are instrumented with pressure transducers on their upstream and downstream faces. The most obvious difference between them is that the standard orifice plate contains a single, central hole while the balanced flow meter contains multiple holes. The term 'balanced' signifies that in designing the meter, the sizes and locations of the holes are determined in an optimization procedure that involves balancing of numerous factors, including volumetric flow, mass flow, dynamic pressure, kinetic energy, all in an effort to minimize such undesired effects as turbulence, pressure loss, dissipation of kinetic energy, and non-repeatability and nonlinearity of response over the anticipated range of flow conditions. Due to proper balancing of these factors, recent testing demonstrated that the balanced flow-meter performance was similar to a Venturi tube in both accuracy and pressure recovery, but featured reduced

  14. Discharge Measurements in Shallow Urban Streams Using a Hydroacoustic Current Meter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, G.T.; Morlock, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    Hydroacoustic current-meter measurements were evaluated in small urban streams under a range of stages, velocities, and channel-bottom materials. Because flow in urban streams is often shallow, conventional mechanical current-meter measurements are difficult or impossible to make. The rotating-cup Price pygmy meter that is widely used by the U.S. Geological Survey and other agencies should not be used in depths below 0.20 ft and velocities less than 0.30 ft/s. The hydroacoustic device provides measurements at depths as shallow as 0.10 ft and velocities as low as 0.10 ft/s or less. Measurements using the hydroacoustic current meter were compared to conventional discharge measurements. Comparisons with Price-meter measurements were favorable within the range of flows for which the meters are rated. Based on laboratory and field tests, velocity measurements with the hydroacoustic cannot be validated below about 0.07 ft/s. However, the hydroacoustic meter provides valuable information on direction and magnitude of flow even at lower velocities, which otherwise could not be measured with conventional measurements.

  15. Effect of vertical motion on current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kallio, Nicholas A.

    1966-01-01

    The effect of vertical motion on the performance of current meters at various stream velocities was evaluated to determine whether accurate discharge measurements can be made from a bobbing boat. Three types of current meters--Ott, Price, and vane types--were tested under conditions simulating a bobbing boat. A known frequency and amplitude of vertical motion were imparted to the current meter, and the related effect on the measured stream velocity was determined. One test of the Price meter was made under actual conditions, using a boat and standard measuring gear. The results of the test under actual conditions verified those obtained by simulating the vertical movements of a boat. The tests show that for stream velocities below 2.5 feet per second the accuracy of all three meters is significantly affected when the meters are subjected to certain conditions of vertical motion that can occur during actual field operations. Both the rate of vertical motion and the frequency of vertical oscillation affect the registration of the meter. The results of these tests, presented in the form of graphs and tables, can be used as a guide to determine whether wind and stream flow are within an acceptable range for a reliable discharge measurement from a boat.

  16. Groundwater-Seepage Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, Harry G.; Reay, William G.

    1993-01-01

    Instrument measures seepage of groundwater into inland or coastal body of water. Positioned at depth as great as 40 meters, and measures flow at low rate and low pressure differential. Auxiliary pressure meter provides data for correlation of flow of groundwater with tides and sea states. Seepage meter operates independently for several weeks. Its sampling rate adjusted to suit hydrologic conditions; to measure more frequently when conditions changing rapidly. Used in water-quality management and for biological and geological research. Potential industrial uses include measurement of seepage of caustic and corrosive liquids.

  17. DC attenuation meter

    DOEpatents

    Hargrove, Douglas L.

    2004-09-14

    A portable, hand-held meter used to measure direct current (DC) attenuation in low impedance electrical signal cables and signal attenuators. A DC voltage is applied to the signal input of the cable and feedback to the control circuit through the signal cable and attenuators. The control circuit adjusts the applied voltage to the cable until the feedback voltage equals the reference voltage. The "units" of applied voltage required at the cable input is the system attenuation value of the cable and attenuators, which makes this meter unique. The meter may be used to calibrate data signal cables, attenuators, and cable-attenuator assemblies.

  18. SHELS: TESTING WEAK-LENSING MAPS WITH REDSHIFT SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Ramella, Massimo E-mail: mkurtz@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: ian@het.brown.ed

    2010-02-01

    Weak-lensing surveys are emerging as an important tool for the construction of 'mass-selected' clusters of galaxies. We evaluate both the efficiency and completeness of a weak-lensing selection by combining a dense, complete redshift survey, the Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS), with a weak-lensing map from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). SHELS includes 11,692 redshifts for galaxies with R <= 20.6 in the 4 deg{sup 2} DLS field; the survey is a solid basis for identifying massive clusters of galaxies with redshift z approx< 0.55. The range of sensitivity of the redshift survey is similar to the range for the DLS convergence map. Only four of the 12 convergence peaks with signal to noise >=3.5 correspond to clusters of galaxies with M approx> 1.7 x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}. Four of the eight massive clusters in SHELS are detected in the weak-lensing map yielding a completeness of approx50%. We examine the seven known extended cluster X-ray sources in the DLS field: three can be detected in the weak-lensing map, three should not be detected without boosting from superposed large-scale structure, and one is mysteriously undetected even though its optical properties suggest that it should produce a detectable lensing signal. Taken together, these results underscore the need for more extensive comparisons among different methods of massive cluster identification.

  19. A Survey of Research on the C-Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein-Braley, Christine; Raatz, Ulrich

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems encountered with the cloze test and describes the development and use of an alternate test, the C-Test. The C-Test consists of a number of short tests. Beginning in the second sentence, the second half of every second word is deleted until the required number of mutilations is reached. (SED)

  20. Space Age Meter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Julie

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the history and evolution of measurement standards from 3000 BC to the modern metric system. Traces measurement techniques from comparisons with the human body to use of atomic clocks and lasers to establish the length of a meter. (JM)

  1. Peak flow meter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measure the amount of air that can be ... become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow ...

  2. Preliminary test results of the joint FAA-USAF-NASA runway research program. Part 1: Traction measurements of several runways under wet and dry conditions with a Boeing 727, a diagonal-braked vehicle, and a mu-meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.; Yager, T. J.; Sleeper, R. K.; Merritt, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    The stopping distance, brake application velocity, and time of brake application were measured for two modern jet transports, along with the NASA diagonal-braked vehicle and the British Mu-Meter on several runways, which when wetted, cover the range of slipperiness likely to be encountered in the United States. Tests were designed to determine if correlation between the aircraft and friction measuring vehicles exists. The test procedure, data reduction techniques, and preliminary test results obtained with the Boeing 727, the Douglas DC-9, and the ground vehicles are given. Time histories of the aircraft test run parameters are included.

  3. Objectives and first results of the NASA SETI sky survey field tests at Goldstone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Olsen, E. T.; Crow, R. B.; Gosline, R. M.; Downs, G. S.; Quirk, M. P.; Lokshin, A.; Solomon, J.

    1986-01-01

    Field tests of SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) prototype hardware and software began in March 1985 at Goldstone. With emphasis on the sky survey component of the NASA SETI search strategy, the article describes the survey characteristics, the detection strategy, and preliminary results of system tests.

  4. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  5. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  6. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  7. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  8. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  9. DIGITAL Q METER

    DOEpatents

    Briscoe, W.L.

    1962-02-13

    A digital Q meter is described for measuring the Q of mechanical or electrical devices. The meter comprises in combination a transducer coupled to an input amplifier, and an upper and lower level discriminator coupled to the amplifier and having their outputs coupled to an anticoincidence gate. The output of the gate is connected to a scaler. The lower level discriminator is adjusted to a threshold level of 36.8 percent of the operating threshold level of the upper level discriminator. (AEC)

  10. Ride-Quality Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.; Dempsey, T. K.; Clevenson, S. A.; Stephens, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Single- and combined-Axis discomfort are corrected by effects of noise and vibration to yield measure of total discomfort experienced by rider. Three modules transform mathematically-weighted rms accelerations, which represent physical vibration characteristics, into subjective discomfort units. Portable "ride-quality" meter measures passenger discomfort and acceptability of vehicle interior noise and vibration. Meter especially suited for determining vehicle comfort and design tradeoffs and for comparing ride quality of vehicles.

  11. Arrival Metering Precision Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Mercer, Joey; Homola, Jeffrey; Hunt, Sarah; Gomez, Ashley; Bienert, Nancy; Omar, Faisal; Kraut, Joshua; Brasil, Connie; Wu, Minghong, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the background, method and results of the Arrival Metering Precision Study (AMPS) conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center in May 2014. The simulation study measured delivery accuracy, flight efficiency, controller workload, and acceptability of time-based metering operations to a meter fix at the terminal area boundary for different resolution levels of metering delay times displayed to the air traffic controllers and different levels of airspeed information made available to the Time-Based Flow Management (TBFM) system computing the delay. The results show that the resolution of the delay countdown timer (DCT) on the controllers display has a significant impact on the delivery accuracy at the meter fix. Using the 10 seconds rounded and 1 minute rounded DCT resolutions resulted in more accurate delivery than 1 minute truncated and were preferred by the controllers. Using the speeds the controllers entered into the fourth line of the data tag to update the delay computation in TBFM in high and low altitude sectors increased air traffic control efficiency and reduced fuel burn for arriving aircraft during time based metering.

  12. Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    2007-10-15

    The report provides an overview of the development of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). Metering has historically served as the cash register for the utility industry. It measured the amount of energy used and supported the billing of customers for that usage. However, utilities are starting to look at meters in a whole different way, viewing them as the point of contact with customers in supporting a number of operational imperatives. The combination of smart meters and advanced communications has opened up a variety of methods for utilities to reduce operating costs while offering new services to customers. A concise look is given at what's driving interest in AMI, the components of AMI, and the creation of a business case for AMI. Topics covered include: an overview of AMI including the history of metering and development of smart meters; a description of the key technologies involved in AMI; a description of key government initiatives to support AMI; an evaluation of the current market position of AMI; an analysis of business case development for AMI; and, profiles of 21 key AMI vendors.

  13. Effects of Testing Conditions on Conceptual Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Lin; Reay, Neville W.; Lee, Albert; Bao, Lei

    2008-01-01

    Pre-testing and post-testing is a commonly used method in Physics Education Research to assess student learning gains. It is well recognized in the community that timings and incentives in delivering conceptual tests can impact test results. However, it is difficult to control these variables across different studies. As a common practice, a…

  14. 0.3 Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Full Description: The Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic tunnel (0.3-m TCT) is used for testing two-dimensional airfoil sections and other models at high Reynolds numbers. The tunnel can operate continuously over a range of Mach numbers from about 0.1 to above 1.2, with a stagnation pressure from 14.7 to 88.0 psia (1 to 6 atmospheres) and a stagnation temperature from -320F to 130F (78 K to 328 K). This results in a maximum Reynolds number capability in excess of 100 x 106 per foot. The adaptive walls, floor, and ceiling in the 13-in. by 13-in. (33-cm by 33-cm) test section can be moved to the free-stream streamline shape, eliminating or reducing the wall effects on the model. The combination of flight Reynolds numbers capability and minimal wall interference makes the 0.3-m TCT a powerful tool for aeronautical research at transonic speeds. The Mach number, pressure, temperature, and adaptive wall shape are automatically controlled. The test section has computer-controlled angle of attack and traversing wake survey-probe systems. The facility has been modified to also use alternate test media--a heavy gas (sulfur hexafluoride, SF6), or air, both with a newly installed heat exchanger.

  15. Nonparametric Statistical Tests in Business Education Survey Research--the Kolmogorov-Smirnov Two-Sample Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, David R.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the application of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample tests, as an alternative to the Chi-square test, for survey research problems in business education and includes a computer program written for the convenience of researchers. The two-sample test is recommended for differentiating independent distributions. (MF)

  16. Testing sky brightness models against radial dependency: A dense two dimensional survey around the city of Madrid, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, J.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Ocaña, F.; Pila-Díez, B.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Pascual, S.; Tapia, C.; Gallego, J.; Fernández, A.; Nievas, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a study of the night sky brightness around the extended metropolitan area of Madrid using Sky Quality Meter (SQM) photometers. The map is the first to cover the spatial distribution of the sky brightness in the centre of the Iberian peninsula. These surveys are necessary to test the light pollution models that predict night sky brightness as a function of the location and brightness of the sources of light pollution and the scattering of light in the atmosphere. We describe the data-retrieval methodology, which includes an automated procedure to measure from a moving vehicle in order to speed up the data collection, providing a denser and wider survey than previous works with similar time frames. We compare the night sky brightness map to the nocturnal radiance measured from space by the DMSP satellite. We find that (i) a single source model is not enough to explain the radial evolution of the night sky brightness, despite the predominance of Madrid in size and population and (ii) that the orography of the region should be taken into account when deriving geo-specific models from general first-principles models. We show the tight relationship between these two luminance measures. This finding sets up an alternative roadmap to extended studies over the globe that will not require the local deployment of photometers or trained personnel.

  17. Projective Test Use among School Psychologists: A Survey and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojnoski, Robin L.; Morrison, Rhonda; Brown, Melissa; Matthews, William J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of projective techniques by school psychologists has been a point of interest and debate, with a number of survey studies documenting usage. The purpose of this study is to update the status of projective use among school psychologists, with a specific focus on their use in the social emotional assessment of children in schools. In…

  18. Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1991-02-01

    The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  19. 40 CFR 1065.220 - Fuel flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fuel flow meter. 1065.220 Section 1065... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.220 Fuel flow meter... described in § 1065.667. (2) In the following cases, you may use a fuel flow meter signal that does not...

  20. 20 Meter Solar Sail Analysis and Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, B. K.; Lively, P. S.; Banik, J.; Murphy, D. M.; Trautt, T. A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes finite element analyses and correlation studies to predict deformations and vibration modes/frequencies of a 20-meter solar sail system developed by ATK Space Systems. Under the programmatic leadership of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's In-Space Propulsion activity, the 20-meter solar sail program objectives were to verify the design, to assess structural responses of the sail system, to implement lessons learned from a previous 10-meter quadrant system analysis and test program, and to mature solar sail technology to a technology readiness level (TRL) of 5. For this 20 meter sail system, static and ground vibration tests were conducted in NASA Glenn Research Center's 100 meter diameter vacuum chamber at Plum Brook station. Prior to testing, a preliminary analysis was performed to evaluate test conditions and to determine sensor and actuator locations. After testing was completed, an analysis of each test configuration was performed. Post-test model refinements included updated properties to account for the mass of sensors, wiring, and other components used for testing. This paper describes the development of finite element models (FEM) for sail membranes and masts in each of four quadrants at both the component and system levels, as well as an optimization procedure for the static test/analyses correlation.

  1. Recommended protocols based on a survey of current practice in genotoxicity testing laboratories: study evaluation.

    PubMed

    Brillinger, R L; Nestmann, E R; Sigal, E A; Swierenga, S H

    1991-02-01

    The approach used in the survey of current methodologies used in mammalian cell genotoxicity testing (unscheduled DNA synthesis, mutation, cell transformation and cytogenetics testing) is discussed. The recommended protocols, described in the preceding papers, were developed using responses to detailed questionnaires. This summary outlines general observations related to the survey methodology and to the protocols themselves. Also discussed are the qualities of an effective survey; the evolution of a survey and of a protocol; and the contributions and limitations of this study. PMID:1996127

  2. Concepts, tools, and strategies for effluent testing: An international survey

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whole effluent testing (also called Direct Toxicity Assessment) remains a critical long-term assessment tool for aquatic environmental protection. Use of animal alternative approaches for wastewater testing is expected to increase as more regulatory authorities routinely require ...

  3. Effects of simulated ice on the performance of price type-AA current meter rotors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.

    1994-01-01

    Slush ice readily adheres to the standard metal rotor of the winter Price type-AA current meter and affects the ability of the meter to measure the flow velocity accurately. Tests conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey Hydraulics Laboratory at Stennis Space Center, Mississippi, attempt to quantify the effects of slush ice on the performance of standard Price type-AA meter metal rotors. Test data obtained for rotors filled with simulated slush are compared with data for solid-cup polymer and standard hollow-cup metal rotors. Partial filling of the cups only marginally affects rotor performance at velocities greater than 15.24 centimeters per second. However, when cups are filled or over-filled with simulated slush, rotor performance is noticeably affected. Errors associated with slush over-filling and filling of cups are also significant when flows are angled vertically.

  4. Testing model independent modified gravity with future large scale surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Contaldi, Carlo R. E-mail: c.contaldi@ic.ac.uk

    2011-12-01

    Model-independent parametrisations of modified gravity have attracted a lot of attention over the past few years and numerous combinations of experiments and observables have been suggested to constrain the parameters used in these models. Galaxy clusters have been mentioned, but not looked at as extensively in the literature as some other probes. Here we look at adding galaxy clusters into the mix of observables and examine how they could improve the constraints on the modified gravity parameters. In particular, we forecast the constraints from combining Planck satellite Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurements and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) cluster catalogue with a DES-like Weak Lensing (WL) survey. We find that cluster counts significantly improve the constraints over those derived using CMB and WL. We then look at surveys further into the future, to see how much better it may be feasible to make the constraints.

  5. Airborne-biogeochemical survey test-case results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, William E.; Chang, Sheng-Huei; Raines, Gary L.; Canney, Frank C.; Ashley, Roger

    1980-01-01

    Airborne spectroradiometer surveys over several forest-covered sulfide bodies indicate that mineralization has affected the overlying vegetation; anomalous spectral reflectivity properties can be detected in the vegetation using appropriate remote-sensing interments and data-reduction techniques. Mineralization induces subtle changes in the shape of the chlorophyll a and b absorption spectrum between 550 and 750 nm. The observed spectral variations appear specifically to be on the wings of the broad red chlorophyll bars, centered at about 680 nm.

  6. Tip aerodynamics and acoustics test: A report and data survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jeffrey L.; Watts, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand helicopter rotor tip aerodynamics and acoustics, a flight test was conducted by NASA Ames Research Center. The test was performed using the NASA White Cobra and a set of highly instrumented blades. All aspects of the flight test instrumentation and test procedures are explained. Additionally, complete data sets for selected test points are presented and analyzed. Because of the high volume of data acquired, only selected data points are presented. However, access to the entire data set is available to the researcher on request.

  7. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Casson, William H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.; Kleck, Jeffrey H.; Beverding, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  8. The swift UVOT stars survey. I. Methods and test clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S.; Bond, Howard E.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Berrier, Joshua L.; Gronwall, Caryl A.; Holland, Stephen T.; Breeveld, Alice A.; Brown, Peter J. E-mail: blp14@psu.edu E-mail: caryl@astro.psu.edu E-mail: aab@mssl.ucl.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stellar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, near-UV sensitivity, and 2.″3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the near-UV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems specific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color–magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, producing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M79 and easily identifies a known post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  9. A survey on open source software testing tools: a preliminary study in 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Seyed Amir; Sim, Jason Chin Lung; Sim, Kwan Yong

    2011-12-01

    Software Testing is a costly and time consuming process in software development. Therefore, software testing tools are often deployed to automate the process in order to reduce cost and improve efficiency. However, many of them are proprietary and expensive. Hence, open source software testing tools could be an appealing alternative. In this paper, we survey the current states of open source software testing tools from three aspects, namely, their availability for different programming platforms and types testing activities, maintenance of the tools and license limitations. From the 152 tools surveyed, we found that open source software testing tools not only are widely available for popular programming platforms, but also support a wide range of testing activities. Furthermore, we also found that more than half of the tools surveyed have been actively maintained and updated by the open source communities. Finally, these tools have very few licensing limitations for commercial use, customization and redistribution.

  10. Correlates of HIV testing among women in Malawi: results from the 2006 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey.

    PubMed

    Siziya, Seter; Muula, Adamson S; Rudatsikira, Emmanuel; Mataya, Ronald H

    2008-11-01

    We report a study of women 15-49 years aimed at assessing correlates of HIV testing and having received test results in a nationally representative survey of women in Malawi. A total of 26 259 women were recruited into the study, of whom 3712 (14.1%) had ever been tested for HIV infection and received their results. We found that age and education were not significantly associated with HIV testing but marital status, wealth, region were. Contrary to our expectations that women who had delivered a child were more likely to have been ever tested when accessing prenatal and intra-partum care, we found that women who had delivered a child in the 2 years before the survey were less likely to have ever been tested. We suggest that by 2006 when the survey was conducted, prenatal and intra-partum care were not important avenues for HIV testing in Malawi. PMID:18803613