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Sample records for suspected active tuberculosis

  1. Use of a T cell interferon gamma release assay in the investigation for suspected active tuberculosis in a low prevalence area

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In settings with low background prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) infection, interferon-γ release assays (IGRA) could be useful for diagnosing active TB. This study aims to evaluate the performance of QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT-G) in the investigation for suspected active TB, with particular attention to patients originating in high-incidence countries. Furthermore, factors associated with QFT-G results in patients with active TB were assessed. Methods From patients investigated for clinically suspected active TB, blood was obtained for QFT-G testing, in addition to routine investigations. Positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values for QFT-G were calculated, comparing patients with confirmed TB and those with other final diagnoses. QFT-G results in TB patients originating from countries with intermediate or high TB incidence were compared with QFT-G results from a control group of recently arrived asymptomatic immigrants from high-incidence countries. Factors associated with QFT-G outcome in patients with confirmed TB were assessed. Results Among 141 patients, 41/70 (58.6%) with confirmed TB had a positive QFT-G test, compared to 16/71 (22.6%) patients with other final diagnoses, resulting in overall PPV of 71.9% and NPV of 67.6%. For patients with pulmonary disease, PPV and NPV were 61.1% and 67.7%, respectively, and 90.5% and 66.7% for subjects with extrapulmonary manifestations. Comparing patients from high-incidence countries with controls yielded a PPV for active TB of 76.7%, and a NPV of 82.7%. Patients with confirmed TB and positive QFT-G results were characterized by a lower median peripheral white blood cell count (5.9 × 109/L vs. 8.8 × 109/L; P < 0.001) and a higher median body mass index (22.7 vs. 20.7; P = 0.043) as compared to QFT-G-negative TB patients. Conclusion The overall PPV and NPV of QFT-G for identifying active TB were unsatisfactory, especially for pulmonary disease. Thus, the usefulness of QFT-G for this purpose is

  2. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Tuberculosis Suspects in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Cadmus, Simeon Idowu; Diarra, Bassirou; Traore, Brehima; Maiga, Mamoudou; Siddiqui, Sophia; Tounkara, Anatole; Falodun, Olutayo; Lawal, Wole; Adewole, Isaac Folurunso; Murphy, Rob; van Soolingen, Dick; Taiwo, Babafemi

    2016-01-01

    In Nigeria, one of the highest tuberculosis (TB) burdened nations, sputum smear microscopy is routinely employed for TB diagnosis at Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS) Centers. This diagnostic algorithm does not differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Between December 2008 and January 2009, consecutive patients diagnosed with TB were screened for inclusion at 10 DOTS centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. To verify Mycobacterium species in patients diagnosed, we cultured and identified mycobacterial isolates using PCR, line probe assay, and spoligotyping techniques. From 48 patients screened, 23 met the inclusion criteria for the study. All the 23 study patients had a positive culture. Overall, we identified 11/23 patients (48%) with MTC only, 9/23 (39%) with NTM only, and 3/23 (13%) with evidence of both MTC and NTM. Strains of MTC identified were Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) genotype (n = 12), M. africanum (n = 1), and the genotype family T (n = 1). Four M. avium-intracellulare-M. scrofulaceum complexes, one M. chelonae complex, one M. abscessus, and one M. intracellulare were identified. Our findings underscore the need to incorporate molecular techniques for more precise diagnosis of TB at DOTS centers to improve clinical outcomes and safe guard public health, particularly in TB endemic countries. PMID:27099795

  3. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Tuberculosis Suspects in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Cadmus, Simeon Idowu; Diarra, Bassirou; Traore, Brehima; Maiga, Mamoudou; Siddiqui, Sophia; Tounkara, Anatole; Falodun, Olutayo; Lawal, Wole; Adewole, Isaac Folurunso; Murphy, Rob; van Soolingen, Dick; Taiwo, Babafemi

    2016-01-01

    In Nigeria, one of the highest tuberculosis (TB) burdened nations, sputum smear microscopy is routinely employed for TB diagnosis at Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS) Centers. This diagnostic algorithm does not differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Between December 2008 and January 2009, consecutive patients diagnosed with TB were screened for inclusion at 10 DOTS centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. To verify Mycobacterium species in patients diagnosed, we cultured and identified mycobacterial isolates using PCR, line probe assay, and spoligotyping techniques. From 48 patients screened, 23 met the inclusion criteria for the study. All the 23 study patients had a positive culture. Overall, we identified 11/23 patients (48%) with MTC only, 9/23 (39%) with NTM only, and 3/23 (13%) with evidence of both MTC and NTM. Strains of MTC identified were Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) genotype (n = 12), M. africanum (n = 1), and the genotype family T (n = 1). Four M. avium-intracellulare-M. scrofulaceum complexes, one M. chelonae complex, one M. abscessus, and one M. intracellulare were identified. Our findings underscore the need to incorporate molecular techniques for more precise diagnosis of TB at DOTS centers to improve clinical outcomes and safe guard public health, particularly in TB endemic countries. PMID:27099795

  4. Comparative Study of GeneXpert with ZN Stain and Culture in Samples of Suspected Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Ashish; Bhatia, Vinay; Dutt, Sarjana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis remains one of the deadliest communicable diseases. There are number of tests available for the diagnosis of tuberculosis but conventional microscopy has low sensitivity and culture although gold standard, but takes longer time for positivity. On the other side, Nucleic acid amplification techniques due to its rapidity and sensitivity not only help in early diagnosis and management of tuberculosis especially in patients with high clinical suspicion like immunocompromised patients, history of contact with active tuberculosis patient etc., but also curtail the transmission of the disease. Aim To evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Nucleic acid amplification assay (GeneXpert) using respiratory samples in patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis and compare with AFB smear microscopy (Ziehl Neelsen stain) and Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) culture. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the respiratory samples of suspected pulmonary tuberculosis (including Bronchoalveolar lavage and sputum) of 170 patients from Jan 2015 to Nov 2015 for ZN stain, culture and GeneXpert (Xpert® MTB/Rif assay). The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of GeneXpert and ZN microscopy were calculated using Liquid culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as gold standard. Results A total of 170 patient samples were evaluated in final analysis. Of these, 14 samples were positive by all three methods used in our study. The overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of GeneXpert were 86.8%, 93.1%, 78.5% and 96% respectively and for BAL sample, 81.4%, 93.4%, 73.3% and 95.7% respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of AFB smear microscopy were 22.2%, % and 78.5% respectively and for BAL sample 22.2% and 100% respectively. For AFB negative samples sensitivity and specificity were 79.1% and 93.1% respectively. Conclusion GeneXpert has a higher sensitivity than AFB smear microscopy in

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and HIV Co-Infection among Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis Suspected Cases at the University of Gondar Hospital, Northwestern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Fanosie, Alemu; Gelaw, Baye; Tessema, Belay; Tesfay, Wogahta; Admasu, Aschalew; Yitayew, Gashaw

    2016-01-01

    Background Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis (EPTB) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are interrelated as a result of immune depression. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates and the burden of HIV co-infection among EPTB suspected patients. Method An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among EPTB suspected patients at the University of Gondar Hospital. Socio-demographic characteristics and other clinical data were collected using a pretested questionnaire. GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay was performed to diagnosis Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Rifampicin resistance. All samples were also investigated by cytology and culture. The HIV statuses of all patients were screened initially by KHB, and all positive cases were further re-tested by STAT-pack. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20 computer software and a P-value of < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results A total of 141 extrapulmonary suspected patients were enrolled in this study. The overall prevalence of culture confirmed extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection was 29.8%, but the GeneXpert result showed a 26.2% prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection. The 78.4% prevalence of extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection was found to be higher among the adult population. The prevalence of HIV infection among EPTB suspected patients was 14.1%, while it was 32.4% among GeneXpert-confirmed extrapulmonary TB cases (12/37). Tuberculosis lymphadenitis was the predominant (78.4%) type of EPTB infection followed by tuberculosis cold abscess (10.7%). Adult hood, previous history of contact with known pulmonary tuberculosis patients, and HIV co-infection showed a statistically significant association with extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection (P<0.013). Conclusion The prevalence of culture confirmed-EPTB infection was high, and a higher EPTB-HIV co-infection was also observed. PMID:26950547

  6. Cost-benefit analysis of Xpert MTB/RIF for tuberculosis suspects in German hospitals.

    PubMed

    Diel, Roland; Nienhaus, Albert; Hillemann, Doris; Richter, Elvira

    2016-02-01

    Our objective was to assess the cost-benefit of enhancing or replacing the conventional sputum smear with the real-time PCR Xpert MTB/RIF method in the inpatient diagnostic schema for tuberculosis (TB).Recent data from published per-case cost studies for TB/multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB and from comparative analyses of sputum microscopy, mycobacterial culture, Xpert MTB/RIF and drug susceptibility testing, performed at the German National Reference Center for Mycobacteria, were used. Potential cost savings of Xpert MTB/RIF, based on test accuracy and multiple cost drivers, were calculated for diagnosing TB/MDR-TB suspects from the hospital perspective.Implementing Xpert MTB/RIF as an add-on in smear-positive and smear-negative TB suspects saves on average €48.72 and €503, respectively, per admitted patient as compared with the conventional approach. In smear-positive and smear-negative MDR-TB suspects, cost savings amount to €189.56 and €515.25 per person, respectively. Full replacement of microscopy by Xpert MTB/RIF saves €449.98. In probabilistic Monte-Carlo simulation, adding Xpert MTB/RIF is less costly in 46.4% and 76.2% of smear-positive TB and MDR-TB suspects, respectively, but 100% less expensive in all smear-negative suspects. Full replacement by Xpert MTB/RIF is also consistently cost-saving.Using Xpert MTB/RIF as an add-on to and even as a replacement for sputum smear examination may significantly reduce expenditures in TB suspects. PMID:26647440

  7. Evaluation of methods for detection and identification of Mycobacterium species in patients suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, A. M.; Juttel, I. D.; Kawacubo, E. M.; Dalmarco, E. M.; Blatt, S. L.; Cordova, C. M. M.

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis control is a priority for the Ministry of Health policies in Brazil. In the present work, the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was standardized, and the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was evaluated comparing baciloscopy, culture and PCR tests. The study was carried out with 117 sputum samples from different patients suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis, for whom physicians had ordered a baciloscopy test. Baciloscopy was performed using the Ziehl-Neelsen method, and culture was performed by incubation of treated samples in Lowenstein-Jensen’s medium at 37°C for eight weeks. For PCR, DNA was amplified with a specific pair of primers to the M. tuberculosis complex, with a resulting product of 123 bp from the insertion element IS6110. Three (2.56%) samples presented a positive baciloscopy result and a positive PCR result (100% agreement), and nine (7.69%) presented Mycobacterium sp. growth in culture (P= 0.1384). Among six samples with positive results in culture, one was identified by PCR-RFLP as belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex and one was identified as a non-tuberculosis mycobacteria. Sensitivity and specificity of PCR compared to culture were 33.3% and 100%, respectively. PMID:24031276

  8. Evaluation of methods for detection and identification of Mycobacterium species in patients suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marchi, A M; Juttel, I D; Kawacubo, E M; Dalmarco, E M; Blatt, S L; Cordova, C M M

    2008-10-01

    Tuberculosis control is a priority for the Ministry of Health policies in Brazil. In the present work, the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was standardized, and the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was evaluated comparing baciloscopy, culture and PCR tests. The study was carried out with 117 sputum samples from different patients suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis, for whom physicians had ordered a baciloscopy test. Baciloscopy was performed using the Ziehl-Neelsen method, and culture was performed by incubation of treated samples in Lowenstein-Jensen's medium at 37°C for eight weeks. For PCR, DNA was amplified with a specific pair of primers to the M. tuberculosis complex, with a resulting product of 123 bp from the insertion element IS6110. Three (2.56%) samples presented a positive baciloscopy result and a positive PCR result (100% agreement), and nine (7.69%) presented Mycobacterium sp. growth in culture (P= 0.1384). Among six samples with positive results in culture, one was identified by PCR-RFLP as belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex and one was identified as a non-tuberculosis mycobacteria. Sensitivity and specificity of PCR compared to culture were 33.3% and 100%, respectively. PMID:24031276

  9. [Investigation of the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph node aspirates of the suspected tularemia lymphadenitis cases].

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Nurhan; Celebi, Bekir; Kavas, Semra; Simşek, Hülya; Kılıç, Selçuk; Sezen, Figen; Arslantürk, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Recently reports of cervical tuberculous lymphadenitis and oropharyngeal tularemia which are the most common infectious causes of granulomatous lymphadenitis, have been significantly increased in Turkey. The differentiation of cervical tuberculous lymphadenitis and oropharyngeal tularemia is usually confusing on the basis of clinical and histopathological findings. Thus, in tularemia endemic areas, the patients are more commonly evaluated in terms of tularemia lymphadenitis leaving tuberculosis out. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cervical lymph node aspirates, obtained from tularemia suspected cases. A total of 105 oropharyngeal tularemia-suspected cases which were found negative for Francisella tularensis by bacteriological (culture), molecular (PCR) and serological (microagglutination) methods, were included in the study. The samples had been previously studied at National Tularemia Reference Laboratory, Turkish Public Health Institution, between 2009-2011. The study samples were evaluated in terms of M.tuberculosis by culture and real-time PCR (rtPCR) methods in the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory. Both Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) medium and liquid-based MGIT (BD, USA) automated culture system were used for mycobacterial culture. Samples that yielded mycobacterial growth were identified as M.tuberculosis by immunochromotographic test (BD, USA). The lymph node aspirates of 65 patients who were F.tularensis PCR negative but antibody positive, were used as the control group. As a result, M.tuberculosis was found to be positive in 9 (8.6%) of 105 tularemia-negative lymph node aspirates, sent to our laboratory from different geographic regions for the investigation of tularemia. Six of the M.tuberculosis positive cases were male and the age range of the patients was 26-85 years. The presence of M.tuberculosis was detected only by culture in two samples, only by rtPCR in five samples and both by culture and

  10. Characterization of mycobacterium isolates from pulmomary tuberculosis suspected cases visiting Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory at Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute, Addis Ababa Ethiopia: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mathewos, Biniam; Kebede, Nigatu; Kassa, Tesfu; Mihret, Adane; Getahun, Muluwork

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize mycobacterium isolates from pulmomary tuberculosis suspected cases visiting National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory at Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute, for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis from January 4 to February 22, 2010 with total samples of 263. Methods Sputum specimens were collected and processed; the deposits were cultured. For culturing Lowenstein Jensen medium (LJ) and Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (BACTEC MGIT 960) were used. Capilia Neo was used for detecting NTM isolates from isolates of BACTEC MGIT 960. In Armauer Hansen Research Institute, Addis Ababa Ethiopia, Deletion typing PCR method for species identification (from confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) isolates by Capilia Neo) was done. Results Out of 263 enrolled in the study, 124 and 117 of them were positive for mycobacterium growth by BACTEC MGIT 960 and LJ culture method, respectively. From BACTEC MGIT 960 positive media of 124 isolates, 117 were randomly taken to perform Capilia TB Neo test. From these 7 (6%) of them were found to be NTM and 110 (94%) were MTBC. From these 110 MTBC isolates, 81 of them were randomly taken and run by the deletion typing RD9 PCR method of molecular technique. Out of these 78 (96.3%) were found to be species of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 3 (3.7%) were found to be not in the MTBC. Regarding the types of methods of culture media, Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (BACTEC MGIT 960) method was found to have excellent agreement (with kappa value of 0.78) with the routine method of LJ. Conclusions Pulmonary tuberculosis suspected cases visiting the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory at EHNRI that were confirmed to be pulmonary tuberculosis are caused by the species of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, hence treatment regimen including pyrazinamide can be applied to the patients as the first choice in the study area in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. There is indication of the presence of NTM in

  11. Use of GeneXpert Mycobacterium tuberculosis/rifampicin for rapid detection of rifampicin resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of clinically suspected multi-drug resistance tuberculosis cases

    PubMed Central

    Guenaoui, Kheira; Ouardi, Aissa; Zeggai, Soumia; Sellam, Feriel; Bekri, Farid; Cherif Touil, Sakina

    2016-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistance (MDR) TB is defined as tuberculosis (TB) disease caused by a strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) that was resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampicin (RIF). Emerging Multidrug-Resistant TB is one of the major concerns of health policy and rapid detection of M. tuberculosis and detection of RIF resistance in infected patients are essential for disease management. The aim of this study was to evaluate patterns of RIF resistance in cases of sputum positive pulmonary TB by using GeneXpert MTB/RIF and comparing between phenotypic and genotypic testing of RIF resistance in MTB strains of clinically suspected MDR-TB isolated cases in western Algeria. Methods In this study 50 sputum positive cases of pulmonary TB who were potential MDR suspect were included. Their sputum samples were collected and subjected to sputum smear microscopy, culture and conventional MTB/RIF test followed by GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay. Results Of total 50 cases included in this study, MTB was detected in all patients (100%) by GeneXpert MTB/RIF. However, RIF’s resistance was detected in only 21 cases (42%) by GeneXpert MTB/RIF. All RIF resistant strains detected by GeneXpert MTB/RIF were phenotypically confirmed as MDR strains. 42.85% of cases were retreatment failure cases, retreatment cases smear positive at 4 months were 23.82%. While 19.05% of cases were retreatment cases smear positive at diagnosis, and 14.28% patient had history of contact with MDR-TB. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Xpert MTB/RIF to detect RIF resistance in comparison to conventional phenotypic drug susceptibility technique were found equal to the rates of 100%, 100%, 100% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay is efficient and reliable technique for the rapid diagnostic of TB. It’s simplicity, high sensitivity and specificity for RIF resistance detection make this technique a very attractive tool for

  12. Factors associated to referral of tuberculosis suspects by private practitioners to community health centres in Bali Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The contrast between the low proportion of tuberculosis (TB) suspects referred from private practitioners in Bali province and the high volume of TB suspects seeking care at private practices suggests problems with TB suspect referral from private practitioners to the public health sector. We aimed to identify key factors associated with the referral of TB suspects by private practitioners. Methods We conducted a case-control study conducted in Bali province, Indonesia. The cases were private practitioners who had referred at least one TB suspect to a community health centre between 1 January 2007 and the start of data collection, while the controls were private practitioners who had not referred a single TB suspect in the same time. Results The following factors were independently associated with referral of TB suspects by private practitioners: having received information about the directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS) strategy (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.1 – 3.8), ever having been visited by a district TB program officer (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.0 – 4.5), availability of TB suspect referral forms in the practice (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.5-5.2), and less than 5 km distance between the private practice and the laboratory for smear examination (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.2-4.0). Conclusions Education and exposure of private practitioners to the TB program improves referral of TB suspects from private practitioners to the national TB program. We recommend that the TB program provides all private practitioners with information about the DOTS strategy and TB suspect referral forms, and organizes regular visits to private practitioners. PMID:24165352

  13. Detection and Quantification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Sputum of Culture-Negative HIV-infected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Madico, Guillermo; Mpeirwe, Moses; White, Laura; Vinhas, Solange; Orr, Beverley; Orikiriza, Patrick; Miller, Nancy S.; Gaeddert, Mary; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Palaci, Moises; Kreiswirth, Barry; Straight, Joe; Dietze, Reynaldo; Boum, Yap; Jones-López, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is critical for timely initiation of treatment and interruption of transmission. Yet, despite recent advances, many patients remain undiagnosed. Culture, usually considered the most sensitive diagnostic method, is sub-optimal for paucibacillary disease. Methods We evaluated the Totally Optimized PCR (TOP) TB assay, a new molecular test that we hypothesize is more sensitive than culture. After pre-clinical studies, we estimated TOP’s per-patient sensitivity and specificity in a convenience sample of 261 HIV-infected pulmonary TB suspects enrolled into a TB diagnostic study in Mbarara, Uganda against MGIT culture, Xpert MTB/RIF and a composite reference standard. We validated results with a confirmatory PCR used for sequencing M. tuberculosis. Measurements and Results Using culture as reference, TOP had 100% sensitivity but 35% specificity. Against a composite reference standard, the sensitivity of culture (27%) and Xpert MTB/RIF (27%) was lower than TOP (99%), with similar specificity (100%, 98% and 87%, respectively). In unadjusted analyses, culture-negative/TOP-positive patients were more likely to be older (P<0·001), female (P<0·001), have salivary sputum (P = 0·05), sputum smear-negative (P<0.001) and less advanced disease on chest radiograph (P = 0.05). M. tuberculosis genotypes identified in sputum by DNA sequencing exhibit differential growth in culture. Conclusions These findings suggest that the TOP TB assay is accurately detecting M. tuberculosis DNA in the sputum of culture-negative tuberculosis suspects. Our results require prospective validation with clinical outcomes. If the operating characteristics of the TOP assay are confirmed in future studies, it will be justified as a “TB rule out” test. PMID:27391604

  14. Factors Influencing Delayed Health Care Seeking Among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects in Rural Communities in Ntcheu District, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Nyasulu, Peter; Phiri, Faith; Sikwese, Simon; Chirwa, Tobias; Singini, Isaac; Banda, Hastings T; Banda, Rhoda; Mhembere, Tichaona; Chimbali, Henry; Ngwira, Bagrey; Munthali, Alister C

    2016-07-01

    Delayed diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) among individuals suspected of having TB may lead to continued transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in communities, higher mortality rates, and increase in government health expenditure because of prolonged illness due to late diagnosis and treatment initiation. The study explored factors leading to delayed health care seeking among individuals living in Ntcheu District, Malawi. Two key informant interviews, 16 in-depth interviews, and three focus group discussions were conducted. Participants were aged 18 years and older and never had TB. Data were analyzed using content analysis and factors were identified: inadequate knowledge about cause and transmission of TB, low self-awareness of personal risk to TB, cultural and traditional beliefs about sources of TB, stigma, and strong belief in witchcraft as a cause of illness. The TB Control Program needs to invest in social mobilization and education of communities to mitigate early health care seeking. PMID:26015428

  15. Diagnostic 'omics' for active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Haas, Carolin T; Roe, Jennifer K; Pollara, Gabriele; Mehta, Meera; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-01-01

    The decision to treat active tuberculosis (TB) is dependent on microbiological tests for the organism or evidence of disease compatible with TB in people with a high demographic risk of exposure. The tuberculin skin test and peripheral blood interferon-γ release assays do not distinguish active TB from a cleared or latent infection. Microbiological culture of mycobacteria is slow. Moreover, the sensitivities of culture and microscopy for acid-fast bacilli and nucleic acid detection by PCR are often compromised by difficulty in obtaining samples from the site of disease. Consequently, we need sensitive and rapid tests for easily obtained clinical samples, which can be deployed to assess patients exposed to TB, discriminate TB from other infectious, inflammatory or autoimmune diseases, and to identify subclinical TB in HIV-1 infected patients prior to commencing antiretroviral therapy. We discuss the evaluation of peripheral blood transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics to develop the next generation of rapid diagnostics for active TB. We catalogue the studies published to date seeking to discriminate active TB from healthy volunteers, patients with latent infection and those with other diseases. We identify the limitations of these studies and the barriers to their adoption in clinical practice. In so doing, we aim to develop a framework to guide our approach to discovery and development of diagnostic biomarkers for active TB. PMID:27005907

  16. Adrenal function in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D J; Naraqi, S; Temu, P; Turtle, J R

    1989-01-01

    Although tuberculosis is a recognised cause of adrenal insufficiency, little is known about adrenal function in patients with active tuberculosis. Ninety Melanesian adults with active tuberculosis (30 pulmonary, 30 miliary, 30 extrapulmonary) had adrenal function assessed prospectively before and three to four weeks after starting antituberculous chemotherapy. Basal serum cortisol concentrations were normal in 55 (61%) and raised in 35 (39%) of the subjects. No patient had a low basal cortisol concentration. After Synacthen stimulation, cortisol responses were normal in 81 (92%) of the patients and subnormal in seven (8%). After antituberculous chemotherapy the response to Synacthen stimulation was normal in all but one patient. It is concluded that adrenal dysfunction is an uncommon problem in patients with active tuberculosis, and that, contrary to recent reports, antituberculous chemotherapy regimens that include rifampicin do not have an adverse effect on adrenal function. PMID:2763243

  17. Determination of Urinary Neopterin/Creatinine Ratio to Distinguish Active Tuberculosis from Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael; Hargreaves, Dougal S.; Scott, Anne; Housley, David; Walters, Andrew; Mulla, Rohinton

    2016-01-01

    Background. Biomarkers to distinguish latent from active Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis infection in clinical practice are lacking. The urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio can quantify the systemic interferon-gamma effect in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. Methods. In a prospective observational study, urinary neopterin levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with active tuberculosis, in people with latent M. tuberculosis infection, and in healthy controls and the urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio was calculated. Results. We included a total of 44 patients with M. tuberculosis infection and nine controls. 12 patients had active tuberculosis (8 of them culture-confirmed). The median age was 15 years (range 4.5 to 49). Median urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio in patients with active tuberculosis was 374.1 micromol/mol (129.0 to 1072.3), in patients with latent M. tuberculosis infection it was 142.1 (28.0 to 384.1), and in controls it was 146.0 (40.3 to 200.0), with significantly higher levels in patients with active tuberculosis (p < 0.01). The receiver operating characteristics curve had an area under the curve of 0.84 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.97) (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Urinary neopterin/creatinine ratios are significantly higher in patients with active tuberculosis compared to patients with latent infection and may be a significant predictor of active tuberculosis in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:27433370

  18. Prevalence of Non-Tuberculosis Mycobacterial Infections among Tuberculosis Suspects in Iran: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Mohammad Javad; Dabiri, Hossein; Darban-Sarokhalil, Davood; Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The infections due to Non-Tuberculosis Mycobacteria (NTM) are becoming an important health problem in many countries in the world. Globally, an increase in NTM infections has been reported from many countries around the world. However, limited information is available about the prevalence of NTM infections in Iran. Material and Methods The data of the prevalence of NTM infections were collected from databases such as PubMed, Web of science, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, Iranmedex, and Scientific Information Database. Comprehensive Meta-Analysis (V2.0, Biostat) software was used to analyze the data. Results The meta-analyses showed that the prevalence of NTM infections was 10.2% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 6.3-15.9) among culture-positive cases of tuberculosis (TB) in Iran. The further stratified analyses indicated that the prevalence of NTM was higher in studies that were done after year 2000. Additionally, M. simiae (43.3% [95% CI 36.8-50.0]), M. intracellucar (27.3% [95% CI 0.7-95.5]) and M. fortuitum (22.7% [95% CI 16.1-30.9]) were the most prevalent NTM species, respectively. Discussion The relatively high prevalence of NTM infections (10.2%) among culture positive cases for TB underlines the need for greater enforcement of infection control strategies. Establishment of appropriate diagnostic criteria and management guidelines for NTM diseases and expanding the number and quality of regional reference laboratories may facilitate more accurate action for prevention and control of NTM infections in Iran. PMID:26052701

  19. [Management of TB suspected cases of drug resistant tuberculosis requiring a second treatment].

    PubMed

    Caminero, José A

    2004-06-01

    The management of patients with resistance to anti tuberculous drugs is complex and therefore must be managed by physician specialists. The most difficult patients are the cases in retreatment, where some very different possibilities are possible, as abandonment, failures and relapses. Patients with multi-drug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis are the most difficult to treat; MDR appears in all the failures or non-adherences to the treatment regime. To elaborate a scheme of retreatment for these patients, two guidelines must be followed: (1) do not rely on outcomes of drug susceptibility tests and (2) a detailed history of drug treatment must be considered of paramount importance. With this information, a retreatment scheme can be formulated that involves the use of at least three drugs not previously taken by the patient. For a successful control of tuberculosis, the national tuberculosis programs in Latin American countries must assure careful management of newly diagnosed patients. Secondly, if resources are available, a bank of second-line drugs must be ready for managing retreatment situations (e.g., 3 Z-Kn-Eth-Of/15 Z-Eth-Of) if first line drug treatments fail. Using individualized retreatment with second line drugs is recommended only in industrialized countries, and for a few middle income countries as a last resort. PMID:15495588

  20. Health Seeking Behaviour and Associated Factors among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects in Lay Armachiho District, Northwest Ethiopia: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Dachew, Berihun Assefa; Kassa Woreta, Hiwot; Mekonnen Kelkay, Mengistu; Ashenafie, Tesfaye Demeke

    2016-01-01

    Studies in the northern part of Ethiopia showed high prevalence of undiagnosed cluster of tuberculosis cases within the community which demanded an investigation of the health care seeking behaviour of tuberculosis suspects. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Lay Armachiho district, Northwest Ethiopia. Individuals who had cough for at least two weeks and aged greater than or equal to 15 years were included in the study. Data were collected by interview using pretested and structured questionnaire. Logistic regression was computed and adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence interval was calculated. Out of the total population surveyed (29, 735), 663 (2.2%) individuals were found to be pulmonary tuberculosis suspects. Majority of the suspects reported that they had visited a modern health care facility. Those aged 15 to 34 and aged 35–54 had secondary educational level and above; those who were civil servants, those who were farmers, those who had previous history of tuberculosis treatment, and those who perceived that they were sick were more likely to visit a modern health care facility. The proportion of respondents who had taken traditional measures was found to be higher than some other districts. Improving the socioeconomic status of the community is recommended. PMID:27022483

  1. Activities of the korean institute of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Sungweon; Kim, Hee Jin

    2014-12-01

    The Korean National Tuberculosis Association (KNTA) set up the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis (KIT) in 1970 to foster research and technical activities pertaining to tuberculosis (TB). The KNTA/KIT had successfully conducted a countrywide TB prevalence survey from 1965 to 1995 at 5-year intervals. The survey results (decline in TB rates) established Korea as a country that had successfully implemented national control programs for TB. The KIT developed the Korea Tuberculosis Surveillance System and the Laboratory Management Information System, both of which were transferred to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention after its establishment. The KIT functions as a central and supranational reference TB laboratory for microbiological and epidemiological research and provides training and education for health-care workers and medical practitioners. Recently, the KIT has expanded its activities to countries such as Ethiopia, Laos, and Timor-Leste to support TB control and prevention. The KIT will continue to support research activities and provide technical assistance in diagnosing the infection until it is completely eliminated in Korea. PMID:25861580

  2. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  3. Evaluation of the efficiency of nested q-PCR in the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex directly from tuberculosis-suspected lesions in post-mortem macroscopic inspections of bovine carcasses slaughtered in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ricardo César Tavares; Furlanetto, Leone Vinícius; Maruyama, Fernanda Harumy; Araújo, Cristina Pires de; Barros, Sílvia Letícia Bomfim; Ramos, Carlos Alberto do Nascimento; Dutra, Valéria; Araújo, Flábio Ribeiro de; Paschoalin, Vânia Margaret Flosi; Nakazato, Luciano; Figueiredo, Eduardo Eustáquio de Souza

    2015-08-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a zoonotic disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). The quick and specific detection of this species is of extreme importance, since BTB may cause economic impacts, in addition to presenting imminent risks to human health. In the present study a nested real-time PCR test (nested q-PCR) was used in post-mortem evaluations to assess cattle carcasses with BTB-suspected lesions. A total of 41,193 cattle slaughtered in slaughterhouses located in the state of Mato Grosso, were examined. Of the examined animals, 198 (0.48%) showed BTB-suspected lesions. M. bovis was isolated in 1.5% (3/198) of the samples. Multiplex-PCR detected MTC in 7% (14/198) of the samples. The nested q-PCR test detected MTC in 28% (56/198) of the BTB-suspected lesions, demonstrating higher efficiency when compared to the multiplex-PCR and conventional microbiology. Nested q-PCR can therefore be used as a complementary test in the national program for control and eradication of bovine tuberculosis. PMID:25863190

  4. Gene Regulatory Networks Activated during Chronic Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic tuberculosis represents a burden for most of world’s population. Several genes were found to be up-regulated at the late stage of chronic tuberculosis when DNA microarray protocol was used to analyze murine tuberculosis. Rv0348 is a potential transcriptional regulator that is highly expresse...

  5. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  6. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with ...

  7. The relationship between chitotriosidase activity and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Deng, J; Li, W; Su, C; Xia, Y; Wang, M; Li, X; Abuaku, B K; Tan, H; Wen, S W

    2015-11-01

    Chitotriosidase, secreted by activated macrophages, is a biomarker of activated macrophages. In this study, we explored whether chitotriosidase could be adopted as a biomarker to evaluate the curative effect on tuberculosis (TB). Five counties were randomly selected out of 122 counties/cities/districts in Hunan Province, China. Our cases were all TB patients who were newly diagnosed or had been receiving treatment at the Centers for Disease Control (CDCs) of these five counties between April and August in 2009. Healthy controls were selected from a community health facility in the Kaifu district of Changsha City after frequency-matching of gender and age with the cases. Chitotriosidase activity was evaluated by a fluorometric assay. Categorical variables were analysed with the χ 2 test. Measurement data in multiple groups were tested with analysis of variance and least significant difference (LSD). Correlation between chitotriosidase activity and the degree of radiological extent (DRE) was examined by Spearman's rank correlation test. The average chitotriosidase activity levels of new TB cases, TB cases with different periods of treatment (6 months) and the control group were 54·47, 34·77, 21·54, 12·73 and 10·53 nmol/h.ml, respectively. Chitotriosidase activity in TB patients declined along with the continuity of treatment. The chitotriosidase activity of both smear-positive and the smear-negative pulmonary TB patients decreased after 6 months' treatment to normal levels (P < 0·05). Moreover, chitotriosidase activity was positively correlated with DRE (r = 0·607, P < 0·001). Our results indicate that chitotriosidase might be a marker of TB treatment effects. However, further follow-up study of TB patients is needed in the future. PMID:26418349

  8. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ben; Smith, Robert; Nguyen, Quyen; Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Lopez Quezada, Landys; Somersan, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Little, David; Pingle, Maneesh; Zhang, David; Ballinger, Elaine; Zimmerman, Matthew; Dartois, Véronique; Hanson, Paul; Mitscher, Lester A; Porubsky, Patrick; Rogers, Steven; Schoenen, Frank J; Nathan, Carl; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2016-07-14

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  9. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  10. Evaluation of two line probe assays for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance, and non-TB Mycobacteria in HIV-infected individuals with suspected TB.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Kendall, Michelle A; Wu, Xingye; Lourenço, Maria Cristina; Jentsch, Ute; Swindells, Susan; Qasba, Sarojini S; Sanchez, Jorge; Havlir, Diane V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Sanne, Ian M; Firnhaber, Cynthia

    2014-04-01

    Limited performance data from line probe assays (LPAs), nucleic acid tests used for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance are available for HIV-infected individuals, in whom paucibacillary TB is common. In this study, the strategy of testing sputum with GenoType MTBDRplus (MTBDR-Plus) and GenoType Direct LPA (Direct LPA) was compared to a gold standard of one mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture. HIV-positive (HIV(+)) individuals with suspected TB from southern Africa and South America with <7 days of TB treatment had 1 sputum specimen tested with Direct LPA, MTBDR-Plus LPA, smear microscopy, MGIT, biochemical identification of mycobacterial species, and culture-based drug-susceptibility testing (DST). Of 639 participants, 59.3% were MGIT M. tuberculosis culture positive, of which 276 (72.8%) were acid-fast bacillus (AFB) smear positive. MTBDR-Plus had a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 100%, with sensitivities of 44.1% in AFB smear-negative versus 94.6% in AFB smear-positive specimens. For specimens that were positive for M. tuberculosis by MTBDR-Plus, the sensitivity and specificity for rifampin resistance were 91.7% and 96.6%, respectively, and for isoniazid (INH) they were 70.6% and 99.1%. The Direct LPA had a sensitivity of 88.4% and a specificity of 94.6% for M. tuberculosis detection, with a sensitivity of 72.5% in smear-negative specimens. Ten of 639 MGIT cultures grew Mycobacterium avium complex or Mycobacterium kansasii, half of which were detected by Direct LPA. Both LPA assays performed well in specimens from HIV-infected individuals, including in AFB smear-negative specimens, with 72.5% sensitivity for M. tuberculosis identification with the Direct LPA and 44.1% sensitivity with MTBDR-Plus. LPAs have a continued role for use in settings where rapid identification of INH resistance and clinically relevant NTM are priorities. PMID:24430455

  11. Identifying an active case of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, G; Alarcon, E; Jittimanee, S; Walusimbi, M; Sebek, M; Berga, E; Villa, T S

    2008-04-01

    The best practice standards set out in chapter 2 of the Best Practice guide focus on the various aspects of identifying an active case of TB and aim to address some of the challenges associated with case detection. The importance of developing a good relationship with the patient from the start, when he or she is often most vulnerable, is emphasised. The first standard focuses on the assessment of someone who might have TB and the second gives detailed guidance about the collection of sputum for diagnosis. The standards are aimed at the health care worker, who assesses the patient when he or she presents at a health care facility and therefore needs to be familiar with the signs, symptoms and risk factors associated with TB. Having suspected TB, the health care worker then needs to ensure that the correct tests are ordered and procedures are followed so that the best quality samples possible are sent to the laboratory and all documentation is filled out clearly and correctly. The successful implementation of these standards can be measured by the accurate and prompt reporting of results, the registration of every case detected and the continued attendance of every patient who needs treatment. PMID:18371262

  12. Blood or Urine IP-10 Cannot Discriminate between Active Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases Different from Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Linda; Cannas, Angela; Aloi, Francesco; Nsubuga, Martin; Sserumkuma, Joseph; Nazziwa, Ritah Angella; Jugheli, Levan; Lukindo, Tedson; Girardi, Enrico; Reither, Klaus; Goletti, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10), either in blood or in urine, has been proposed as a tuberculosis (TB) biomarker for adults. This study aims to evaluate the potential of IP-10 diagnostics in children from Uganda, a high TB-endemic country. Methods. IP-10 was measured in the blood and urine concomitantly taken from children who were prospectively enrolled with suspected active TB, with or without HIV infection. Clinical/microbiological parameters and commercially available TB-immune assays (tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB-Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT)) were concomitantly evaluated. Results. One hundred twenty-eight children were prospectively enrolled. The analysis was performed on 111 children: 80 (72%) of them were HIV-uninfected and 31 (27.9%) were HIV-infected. Thirty-three healthy adult donors (HAD) were included as controls. The data showed that IP-10 is detectable in the urine and blood of children with active TB, independent of HIV status and age. However, although IP-10 levels were higher in active TB children compared to HAD, the accuracy of identifying “active TB” was low and similar to the TST and QFT-IT. Conclusion. IP-10 levels are higher in children with respiratory illness compared to controls, independent of “TB status” suggesting that the evaluation of this parameter can be used as an inflammatory marker more than a TB test. PMID:26346028

  13. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes. PMID:26377143

  14. Identification of new diamine scaffolds with activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bogatcheva, Elena; Hanrahan, Colleen; Nikonenko, Boris; Samala, Rowena; Chen, Ping; Gearhart, Jacqueline; Barbosa, Francis; Einck, Leo; Nacy, Carol A.; Protopopova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    A diverse 5,000-compound library was synthesized from commercially available diamines and screened for activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro, revealing 143 hits with MIC equal to or less than 12.5 µM. New prospective scaffolds with antitubercular activity derived from homopiperazine, phenyl- and benzyl substituted piperazines, 4-aminomethylpiperidine, 4-aminophenylethylamine, 4,4'-methylenebiscyclohexylamine were identified. Compound SQ775 derived from homopiperazine, and compound SQ786 derived from benzylpiperazine had potent antimicrobial activity against M. tuberculosis in experimental animals in vivo. PMID:16722620

  15. Spooky Suspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacifici, Lara

    2011-01-01

    This activity presents an option for covering biology content while engaging students in an investigation that highlights the spirit of Halloween. Students are engaged in the story line and have fun trying to solve the mystery kidnapping by using science skills to examine the evidence and eliminate some ghoulish suspects. (Contains 1 figure.)

  16. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  17. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  18. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  19. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  20. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  1. Native New Zealand plants with inhibitory activity towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants have long been investigated as a source of antibiotics and other bioactives for the treatment of human disease. New Zealand contains a diverse and unique flora, however, few of its endemic plants have been used to treat tuberculosis. One plant, Laurelia novae-zelandiae, was reportedly used by indigenous Maori for the treatment of tubercular lesions. Methods Laurelia novae-zelandiae and 44 other native plants were tested for direct anti-bacterial activity. Plants were extracted with different solvents and extracts screened for inhibition of the surrogate species, Mycobacterium smegmatis. Active plant samples were then tested for bacteriostatic activity towards M. tuberculosis and other clinically-important species. Results Extracts of six native plants were active against M. smegmatis. Many of these were also inhibitory towards M. tuberculosis including Laurelia novae-zelandiae (Pukatea). M. excelsa (Pohutukawa) was the only plant extract tested that was active against Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Our data provide support for the traditional use of Pukatea in treating tuberculosis. In addition, our analyses indicate that other native plant species possess antibiotic activity. PMID:20537175

  2. Involvement of Antilipoarabinomannan Antibodies in Classical Complement Activation in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hetland, Geir; Wiker, Harald G.; Høgåsen, Kolbjørn; Hamasur, Beston; Svenson, Stefan B.; Harboe, Morten

    1998-01-01

    We examined alternative and classical complement activation induced by whole bacilli of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis products. After exposure to BCG, there were higher levels of the terminal complement complex in sera from Indian tuberculosis patients than in sera from healthy controls. The addition of BCG with or without EGTA to these sera indicated that approximately 70 to 85% of the total levels of the terminal complement complex was formed by classical activation. Sera from Indian tuberculosis patients contained more antibody to lipoarabinomannan (LAM) than sera from healthy Indians. Levels of anti-LAM immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2), but not anti-LAM IgM, correlated positively with classical activation induced by BCG in the sera. By flow cytometry, deposition of C3 and terminal complement complex on bacilli incubated with normal human serum was demonstrated. The anticomplement staining was significantly reduced in the presence of EGTA and EDTA. Flow cytometry also revealed the binding of complement to BCG incubated with rabbit anti-LAM and then with factor B-depleted serum. This indicates that classical activation plays a major role in complement activation induced by mycobacteria and that anti-LAM IgG on the bacilli can mediate this response. Classical complement activation may be important for the extent of phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis by mononuclear phagocytes, which may influence the course after infection. PMID:9521145

  3. Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Grobler, Liesl; Nagpal, Sukrti; Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Sinclair, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis and malnutrition are linked in a complex relationship. Tuberculosis may cause undernutrition through increased metabolic demands and decreased intake, and nutritional deficiencies may worsen the disease, or delay recovery by depressing important immune functions. At present, there is no evidence-based nutritional guidance for adults and children being treated for tuberculosis. Objectives To assess the effects of oral nutritional supplements in people being treated with antituberculous drug therapy for active tuberculosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 1, 2016), MEDLINE (from 1946 to 4 February 2016), EMBASE (from 1980 to 4 February 2016), LILACS (from 1982 to 4 February 2016), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the Indian Journal of Tuberculosis up to 4 February 2016, and checked the reference lists of all included studies. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared any oral nutritional supplement given for at least four weeks with no nutritional intervention, placebo, or dietary advice only for people being treated for active tuberculosis. The primary outcomes of interest were all-cause death, and cure at six and 12 months. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, and extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. We presented the results as risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous variables, and mean differences (MD) for continuous variables, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Where appropriate, we pooled data from trials with similar interventions and outcomes. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Main results Thirty-five trials

  4. MicroRNA-365 in macrophages regulates Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced active pulmonary tuberculosis via interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qingzhang; Li, Hui; Shao, Hua; Li, Chunling; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the relationship between microRNA (miR)-365 expression and the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA and protein in patients with active tuberculosis. From June 2011 to June 2014, 48 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were included in the study. In addition, 23 healthy subjects were enrolled as control. Macrophages were collected by pulmonary alveolus lavage. In addition, serum and mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood. The levels of miR-365 and IL-6 in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of IL-6 in macrophages and mononuclear cells was measured using Western blotting, while that in serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Expression of IL-6 mRNA and protein was significantly enhanced in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Increase of IL-6 protein concentration in serum was probably due to the release of IL-6 protein from mononuclear cells in the blood. In addition, miR-365 levels were significantly lowered in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Up-regulated IL-6 expression in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis is related to the down-regulation of miR-365, suggesting that miR-365 may regulate the occurrence and immune responses of active pulmonary tuberculosis via IL-6. PMID:26629035

  5. MicroRNA-365 in macrophages regulates Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced active pulmonary tuberculosis via interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingzhang; Li, Hui; Shao, Hua; Li, Chunling; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the relationship between microRNA (miR)-365 expression and the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA and protein in patients with active tuberculosis. From June 2011 to June 2014, 48 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were included in the study. In addition, 23 healthy subjects were enrolled as control. Macrophages were collected by pulmonary alveolus lavage. In addition, serum and mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood. The levels of miR-365 and IL-6 in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of IL-6 in macrophages and mononuclear cells was measured using Western blotting, while that in serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Expression of IL-6 mRNA and protein was significantly enhanced in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Increase of IL-6 protein concentration in serum was probably due to the release of IL-6 protein from mononuclear cells in the blood. In addition, miR-365 levels were significantly lowered in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Up-regulated IL-6 expression in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis is related to the down-regulation of miR-365, suggesting that miR-365 may regulate the occurrence and immune responses of active pulmonary tuberculosis via IL-6. PMID:26629035

  6. An acidic sphingomyelinase Type C activity from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garza, Jorge; González-Salazar, Francisco; Quinn, Frederick D; Karls, Russell K; De La Garza-Salinas, Laura Hermila; Guzmán-de la Garza, Francisco J; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomyelinases (SMases) catalyze the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphorylcholine. Sphingolipids are recognized as diverse and dynamic regulators of a multitude of cellular processes mediating cell cycle control, differentiation, stress response, cell migration, adhesion, and apoptosis. Bacterial SMases are virulence factors for several species of pathogens. Whole cell extracts of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains H37Rv and CDC1551 were assayed using [N-methyl-(14)C]-sphingomyelin as substrate. Acidic Zn(2+)-dependent SMase activity was identified in both strains. Peak SMase activity was observed at pH 5.5. Interestingly, overall SMase activity levels from CDC1551 extracts are approximately 1/3 of those of H37Rv. The presence of exogenous SMase produced by M. tuberculosis during infection may interfere with the normal host inflammatory response thus allowing the establishment of infection and disease development. This Type C activity is different from previously identified M. tuberculosis SMases. Defining the biochemical characteristics of M. tuberculosis SMases helps to elucidate the roles that these enzymes play during infection and disease. PMID:26948102

  7. LL-37 immunomodulatory activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Hancock, Robert E W; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  8. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  9. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to address TB and HIV coinfection around the world? The President’s U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS ... of those suffering from HIV/AIDS around the world. PEPFAR’s Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and ...

  10. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tiruviluamala, Parvathi; Reichman, Lee B

    2002-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Of these, the most common species to infect humans is M. tuberculosis. The TB bacillus is an extremely successful human pathogen, infecting two billion persons worldwide; an estimated 2 to 3 million people die from tuberculosis each year. In the United States, TB rates decreased steadily at the rate of 5% per year from 1953 until 1985 when the trend reversed, with the number of TB cases peaking in 1992. Outbreaks of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were reported, and these cases were documented to be transmitted in nosocomial and congregate settings, including hospitals and prisons. AIDS patients infected with M. tb developed disease rapidly, and case-fatality rates of >80% were noted in those infected with multidrug-resistant M. tb. Intensive intervention, at enormous cost, caused the number of TB cases to decline. This article discusses factors that led to the increase in TB cases, their subsequent decline, and measures needed in the future if TB is to be eliminated in the United States. PMID:11910069

  11. Increased Complement C1q Level Marks Active Disease in Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingxia; Liu, Haiying; Zhang, Guoliang; Deng, Qunyi; Huang, Jian; Gao, Zhiliang; Zhou, Boping; Feng, Carl G.; Chen, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    Background Complement functions as an important host defense system and complement C5 and C7 have been implicated in immunopathology of tuberculosis. However, little is known about the role of other complement components in tuberculosis. Methods Complement gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of tuberculosis patients and controls were determined using whole genome transcriptional microarray assays. The mRNA and protein levels of three C1q components, C1qA, C1qB, and C1qC, were further validated by qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The percentages of C1q expression in CD14 positive cells were determined by flow cytometry. Finally, C1qC protein level was quantified in the pleural fluid of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis pleurisy. Results C1q expression increases significantly in the peripheral blood of patients with active tuberculosis compared to healthy controls and individuals with latent TB infection. The percentage of C1q-expressing CD14 positive cells is significantly increased in active TB patients. C1q expression in the peripheral blood correlates with sputum smear positivity in tuberculosis patients and is reduced after anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Notably, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that C1qC mRNA levels in peripheral blood efficiently discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection and healthy controls. Additionally, C1qC protein level in pleural effusion shows improved power in discriminating tuberculosis from non-tuberculosis pleurisy when compared to other inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. Conclusions C1q expression correlates with active disease in human tuberculosis. C1q could be a potential diagnostic marker to discriminate active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection as well as tuberculosis pleurisy from non-tuberculosis pleurisy. PMID:24647646

  12. LAG3 Expression in Active Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Bonnie L.; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus–induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4+ T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response. PMID:25549835

  13. EFFECT OF PYRAZINAMIDASE ACTIVITY ON PYRAZINAMIDE RESISTANCE IN MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Patricia; Ferrer, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; López-Llano, Jon; Fuentes, Patricia; Valencia, Eddy; Zimic, Mirko J.

    2009-01-01

    Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to pyrazinamide is associated with mutations in the pncA gene, which codes for pyrazinamidase. The association between the enzymatic activity of mutated pyrazinamidases and the level of pyrazinamide resistance remains poorly understood. Twelve M. tuberculosis clinical isolates resistant to pyrazinamide were selected based on Wayne activity and localization of pyrazinamidase mutation. Recombinant pyrazinamidases were expressed and tested for their kinetic parameters (activity, kcat, Km, and efficiency). Pyrazinamide resistance level was measured by Bactec-460TB and 7H9 culture. The linear correlation between the resistance level and the kinetic parameters of the corresponding mutated pyrazinamidase was calculated. The enzymatic activity and efficiency of the mutated pyrazinamidases varied with the site of mutation and ranged widely from low to high levels close to the corresponding of the wild-type enzyme. The level of resistance was significantly associated with pyrazinamidase activity and efficiency, but only 27.3% of its statistical variability was explained. Although pyrazinamidase mutations are indeed associated with resistance, the loss of pyrazinamidase activity and efficiency as assessed in the recombinant mutated enzymes is not sufficient to explain a high variability of the level of pyrazinamide resistance, suggesting that complementary mechanisms for pyrazinamide resistance in M. tuberculosis with mutations in pncA are more important than currently thought. PMID:19249243

  14. Burden of tuberculosis in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed Central

    Guwatudde, David; Zalwango, Sarah; Kamya, Moses R.; Debanne, Sara M.; Diaz, Mireya I.; Okwera, Alphonse; Mugerwa, Roy D.; King, Charles; Whalen, Christopher C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis in one of Uganda's poor peri-urban areas. METHODS: Multi-stage sampling was used to select a sample of households whose members were evaluated for presence of signs and/or symptoms of active tuberculosis; history of tuberculosis treatment; and relevant demographic, socioeconomic, and household environment characteristics. Patients with suspected tuberculosis underwent standardized evaluation for active disease. FINDINGS: A sample of 263 households with 1142 individuals was evaluated. Nineteen people were classified as having had tuberculosis during the one-year reference period (May 2001-April 2002): nine (47%) cases already had been diagnosed through the health care system, while 10 cases (53%) were diagnosed through the survey. The prevalences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 14.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 7.8-20.3) and 4.4 (CI = 0.83-7.89) per thousand, respectively. The incidences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 9.2 (CI = 3.97-14.4) and 3.7 (CI = 0.39-6.95) per thousand per year, respectively. CONCLUSION: The rate of tuberculosis in this peri-urban community was exceptionally high and may be underestimated by current surveillance systems. The need for interventions aimed at reducing tuberculosis transmission in this, and other similar communities with high case rates, is urgent. PMID:14758406

  15. Development of an instrument for measuring activities of daily living in persons with suspected cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Maria M; Marcusson, Jan; Wressle, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Background According to the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, structured assessment of function and activity has high priority when evaluating suspected cognitive impairment or dementia. Aim/objectives The aim was to develop and psychometrically test an instrument to measure the ability to perform activities of daily living tasks in patients with suspected cognitive impairment. Material and methods The Cognitive Impairment in Daily Life (CID) instrument (for self-reported and informant-based assessments) has been developed in several phases. Content validity was achieved through five expert panels using a Content Validity Index (CVI). The content was tested further in a pilot study of 49 patients and 49 relatives from primary care or a specialist memory clinic. Results Content validity was good with a CVI index of 0.83. All patients considered that the included activities were relevant to them and reflected the difficulties they were experiencing. Most relatives considered the activities included in the instrument as adequate and captured the patients' difficulties in daily life. Some adjustments of the tasks and scale were suggested and these were implicated after each phase. In general, relatives reported that patients had more difficulties performing the activities than the patients reported themselves. Conclusion The CID instrument seems promising in terms of content validity. Further testing of reliability and construct validity is ongoing. PMID:26853384

  16. Turning off the tap: stopping tuberculosis transmission through active case-finding and prompt effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Courtney M; Amanullah, Farhana; Dharmadhikari, Ashwin; Nardell, Edward A; Seddon, James A; Vasilyeva, Irina; Zhao, Yanlin; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Becerra, Mercedes C

    2015-12-01

    To halt the global tuberculosis epidemic, transmission must be stopped to prevent new infections and new cases. Identification of individuals with tuberculosis and prompt initiation of effective treatment to rapidly render them non-infectious is crucial to this task. However, in settings of high tuberculosis burden, active case-finding is often not implemented, resulting in long delays in diagnosis and treatment. A range of strategies to find cases and ensure prompt and correct treatment have been shown to be effective in high tuberculosis-burden settings. The population-level effect of targeted active case-finding on reducing tuberculosis incidence has been shown by studies and projected by mathematical modelling. The inclusion of targeted active case-finding in a comprehensive epidemic-control strategy for tuberculosis should contribute substantially to a decrease in tuberculosis incidence. PMID:26515675

  17. Diagnostic value of antibody responses to multiple antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in active and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Senoputra, Muhammad Andrian; Shiratori, Beata; Hasibuan, Fakhrial Mirwan; Koesoemadinata, Raspati Cundarani; Apriani, Lika; Ashino, Yugo; Ono, Kenji; Oda, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Makoto; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Hattori, Toshio

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the antibody responses to 10 prospective Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) antigens and evaluated their ability to discriminate between latent (LTBI) and active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Our results indicate that plasma levels of anti-α-crystallin (ACR), antilipoarabinomannan, anti-trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate, and anti-tubercular-glycolipid antigen antibodies were higher in patients with active TB, compared to those in the LTBI and control subjects. No differences in the antibodies were observed between the control and LTBI subjects. Antibodies against the glycolipid antigens could not distinguish between Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC)-negative TB patients and MAC-infected LTBI individuals. The most useful serological marker was antibodies to ACR, with MAC-negative TB patients having higher titers than those observed in MAC-positive LTBI and control subjects. Our data indicate that antibody to ACR is a promising target for the serological diagnosis of patients with active TB patients. When dealing with antiglycolipid antibodies, MAC coinfection should always be considered in serological studies. PMID:26307672

  18. Direct inhibitors of InhA active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Manjunatha, Ujjini H.; Rao, Srinivasa P. S.; Kondreddi, Ravinder Reddy; Noble, Christian G.; Camacho, Luis R.; Tan, Bee H.; Ng, Seow H.; Ng, Pearly Shuyi; Ma, N. L.; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Herve, Maxime; Barnes, S. Whitney; Yu, Weixuan; Kuhen, Kelli; Blasco, Francesca; Beer, David; Walker, John R.; Tonge, Peter J.; Glynne, Richard; Smith, Paul W.; Diagana, Thierry T.

    2015-01-01

    New chemotherapeutic agents are urgently required to combat the global spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The mycobacterial enoyl reductase, InhA, is one of the few clinically-validated targets in tuberculosis drug discovery. Here, we report the identification of a new class of direct InhA inhibitors, the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones, using phenotypic high-throughput whole-cell screening. This class of orally-active compounds showed potent bactericidal activity against common isoniazid-resistant TB clinical isolates. Biophysical studies revealed that 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones bound specifically to InhA in an NADH-dependent manner and blocked the enoyl-substrate binding pocket. The lead compound NITD-916 directly blocked InhA in a dose-dependent manner and showed in vivo efficacy in acute and established mouse models of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Collectively, our structural and biochemical data open up new avenues for rational structure-guided optimization of the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridone class of compounds for the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:25568071

  19. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of fungus Phomopsis stipata

    PubMed Central

    de Prince, Karina Andrade; Sordi, Renata; Pavan, Fernando Rogério; Barreto Santos, Adolfo Carlos; Araujo, Angela R.; Leite, Sergio R.A.; Leite, Clarice Q. F.

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine the anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of the metabolites produced by the endophitic fungus Phomopsis stipata (Lib.) B. Sutton, (Diaporthaceae), cultivated in different media. The antimycobacterial activity was assessed through the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA) and the cytotoxicity test performed on macrophage cell line. The extracts derived from fungi grown on Corn Medium and Potato Dextrose Broth presented the smallest values of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and low cytotoxicity, which implies a high selectivity index. This is the first report on the chemical composition and antitubercular activity of metabolites of P. stipata, as well as the influence of culture medium on these properties. PMID:24031821

  20. Esophageal tuberculosis: mimicry of gastrointestinal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Damtew, B; Frengley, D; Wolinsky, E; Spagnuolo, P J

    1987-01-01

    A case of tuberculous involvement of the esophagus was studied in an adult with mediastinal lymphadenopathy unrecognized by roentgenography of the chest. The roentgenographic and endoscopic features in this case were more consistent with malignancy than with tuberculosis. Nineteen additional cases from the English-language literature were reviewed. Although esophageal tuberculosis is a rare disease, it should be strongly suspected in a patient with dysphagia who has a positive tuberculin skin test, active pulmonary disease, or mediastinal adenopathy. PMID:3823717

  1. High Incidence of Tuberculosis Infection in Rheumatic Diseases and Impact for Chemoprophylactic Prevention of Tuberculosis Activation during Biologics Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fengmin; Zhang, Shu; Jiang, Ting; Shen, Jie; Zhu, Qi; Yue, Tao; Shao, Lingyun; Gao, Yan; Feng, Yun; Weng, Xinhua; Zou, Hejian; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a long-term follow-up study in patients with rheumatic diseases who were candidates for biologics treatment to evaluate the effects of biologic agents on the risk of tuberculosis infection and the effect of prophylactic treatment on tuberculosis activation. One hundred one patients with rheumatic diseases who were candidates for biologics treatment were recruited, and 57 healthy subjects were recruited as controls. Tuberculin skin test (TST) and the T-SPOT.TB test were performed for all subjects at baseline. Follow-up testing by the T-SPOT.TB assay was performed every 6 months in patients with rheumatic diseases and at 2 years of recruitment in the healthy controls. In patients with rheumatic diseases and healthy controls, the TST-positive (induration, ≥10 mm) rates were 37.6% (38/101) and 34.0% (18/53), respectively (P > 0.05), while the T-SPOT.TB-positive rates were 46.5% (47/101) and 21.1 (12/57), respectively (P = 0.0019). Fifty-two patients were followed up at month 6 with a T-SPOT.TB-positive rate of 40.4%, and 49 were followed up for ≥12 months with a T-SPOT.TB-positive rate of 36.7%, with no significant difference in the positive rate at different time points including baseline (P > 0.05). Long-term follow-up revealed that conversion to T-SPOT.TB positivity occurred only in the biologics treatment group, with a positive conversion rate of 11.2% (4/38). Most importantly, no latent tuberculosis developed into active tuberculosis during follow-up with T-SPOT.TB screening and preemptive treatment with isoniazid. Biologics treatment appears to increase the risk of tuberculosis infection. However, tuberculosis activation could be prevented by preemptive isoniazid treatment in patients with latent tuberculosis infection while receiving biologics therapy. PMID:23554465

  2. Evaluation of Xpert® MTB/RIF Assay in Induced Sputum and Gastric Lavage Samples from Young Children with Suspected Tuberculosis from the MVA85A TB Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Geldenhuys, Hennie; Schmidt, Bey-Marrie; Luabeya, Angelique Kany Kany; Mulenga, Humphrey; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hanekom, Willem A.; Mahomed, Hassan; McShane, Helen; Hatherill, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis is limited by the paucibacillary respiratory samples obtained from young children with pulmonary disease. We aimed to compare accuracy of the Xpert® MTB/RIF assay, an automated nucleic acid amplification test, between induced sputum and gastric lavage samples from young children in a tuberculosis endemic setting. Methods We analyzed standardized diagnostic data from HIV negative children younger than four years of age who were investigated for tuberculosis disease near Cape Town, South Africa [2009–2012]. Two paired, consecutive induced sputa and early morning gastric lavage samples were obtained from children with suspected tuberculosis. Samples underwent Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube [MGIT] culture and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. We compared diagnostic yield across samples using the two-sample test of proportions and McNemar’s χ2 test; and Wilson’s score method to calculate sensitivity and specificity. Results 1,020 children were evaluated for tuberculosis during 1,214 admission episodes. Not all children had 4 samples collected. 57 of 4,463[1.3%] and 26 of 4,606[0.6%] samples tested positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis on MGIT culture and Xpert MTB/RIF assay respectively. 27 of 2,198[1.2%] and 40 of 2,183[1.8%] samples tested positive [on either Xpert MTB/RIF assay or MGIT culture] on induced sputum and gastric lavage samples, respectively. 19/1,028[1.8%] and 33/1,017[3.2%] admission episodes yielded a positive MGIT culture or Xpert MTB/RIF assay from induced sputum and gastric lavage, respectively. Sensitivity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 8/30[26.7%; 95% CI: 14.2–44.4] for two induced sputum samples and 7/31[22.6%; 11.4–39.8] [p = 0.711] for two gastric lavage samples. Corresponding specificity was 893/893[100%;99.6–100] and 885/890[99.4%;98.7–99.8] respectively [p = 0.025]. Conclusion Sensitivity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was low, compared to MGIT culture, but diagnostic performance of Xpert MTB

  3. New 2-Thiopyridines as Potential Candidates for Killing both Actively Growing and Dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryabova, Olga; Kaprelyants, Arseny; Makarov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    From in vivo observations, a majority of M. tuberculosis cells in latently infected individuals are in a dormant and probably nonculturable state, display little metabolic activity, and are phenotypically resistant to antibiotics. Despite many attempts, no specific antimicrobials effective against latent tuberculosis have yet been found, partly because of a lack of reliable and adequate in vitro models for screening of drug candidates. We propose here a novel in vitro model of M. tuberculosis dormancy that meets the important criteria of latency, namely, nonculturability of cells, considerable reduction of metabolic activity, and significant phenotypic resistance to the first-line antibiotics rifampin and isoniazid. Using this model, we found a new group of 2-thiopyridine derivatives that had potent antibacterial activity against both actively growing and dormant M. tuberculosis cells. By means of the model of M. tuberculosis nonculturability, several new 2-thiopyridine derivatives were found to have potent antitubercular activity. The compounds are effective against both active and dormant M. tuberculosis cells. The bactericidal effects of compounds against dormant M. tuberculosis was confirmed by using three different in vitro models of tuberculosis dormancy. The model of nonculturability could be used as a reliable tool for screening drug candidates, and 2-thiopyridine derivatives may be regarded as prominent compounds for further development of new drugs for curing latent M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:24126578

  4. Effect of Active Case Finding on Prevalence and Transmission of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Dhaka Central Jail, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Banu, Sayera; Rahman, Md. Toufiq; Uddin, Mohammad Khaja Mafij; Khatun, Razia; Khan, Md. Siddiqur Rahman; Rahman, Md. Mojibur; Uddin, Syed Iftekhar; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Heffelfinger, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding tuberculosis (TB) transmission dynamics is essential for establishing effective TB control strategies in settings where the burden and risk of transmission are high. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of active screening on controlling TB transmission and also to characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains for investigating transmission dynamics in a correctional setting. Methods The study was carried out in Dhaka Central Jail (DCJ), from October 2005 to February 2010. An active case finding strategy for pulmonary TB was established both at the entry point to the prison and inside the prison. Three sputum specimens were collected from all pulmonary TB suspects and subjected to smear microscopy, culture, and drug susceptibility testing as well as genotyping which included deletion analysis, spoligotyping and analysis of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU). Results A total of 60,585 inmates were screened during the study period. We found 466 inmates with pulmonary TB of whom 357 (77%) had positive smear microscopy results and 109 (23%) had negative smear microscopy results but had positive results on culture. The number of pulmonary TB cases declined significantly, from 49 cases during the first quarter to 8 cases in the final quarter of the study period (p=0.001). Deletion analysis identified all isolates as M. tuberculosis and further identified 229 (70%) strains as ‘modern’ and 100 (30%) strains as ‘ancestral’. Analysis of MIRU showed that 347 strains (85%) exhibited unique patterns, whereas 61 strains (15%) clustered into 22 groups. The largest cluster comprised eight strains of the Beijing M. tuberculosis type. The rate of recent transmission was estimated to be 9.6%. Conclusions Implementation of active screening for TB was associated with a decline in TB cases in DCJ. Implementation of active screening in prison settings might substantially reduce the national burden of TB in Bangladesh

  5. Chromospheric activity in Delta Scuti stars - The suspected variable Tau Cygni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fracassini, M.; Pasinetti Fracassini, L. E.; Mariani, A.; Pastori, L.; Teays, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution IUE spectra of the suspected variable Tau Cyg were obtained to search for a possible variability of the Mg II h, k double-peaked emission. The observations, spanning an interval of about 6.3 h, have shown flux excursions within or just near 15 percent, a value suggested as the detection limit of actual variations with IUE spectra. A variability, difficult to explain, could be present in the ratios Fk2v/Fk2r. The emission fluxes seem to be higher than those of the Delta Scuti variables Rho Pup and Beta Cas. This comparison could give some insights on the possible role of the convection on the pulsational and chromospheric activities of Tau Cyg. A positive correlation between the total emission fluxes and the rotational velocities of these stars was found.

  6. Immunopathogenesis of tuberculosis and novel mechanisms of vaccine activity.

    PubMed

    Schrager, Lewis K; Izzo, Angelo; Velmurugan, Kamalakannan

    2016-08-01

    The 4th Global Forum on TB Vaccines, convened in Shanghai, China, from 21 - 24 April 2015, brought together a wide and diverse community involved in tuberculosis vaccine research and development to discuss the current status of, and future directions for this critical effort. This paper summarizes the sessions on Immunopathogenesis of Tuberculosis, and Immunopathogenesis and Novel Mechanisms of Vaccine Activity. Summaries of all sessions from the 4th Global Forum are compiled in a special supplement of Tuberculosis. PMID:27450395

  7. Prevalence, Risk Factors and Social Context of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Prison Inmates in Tajikistan

    PubMed Central

    Winetsky, Daniel E.; Almukhamedov, Olga; Pulatov, Dilshod; Vezhnina, Natalia; Dooronbekova, Aizhan; Zhussupov, Baurzhan

    2014-01-01

    Setting Tuberculosis (TB) is highly prevalent in prisons of the former Soviet Union. Objective To understand the behavioral, demographic and biological factors placing inmates in Tajikistan at risk for active TB. Design We administered a behavioral and demographic survey to 1317 inmates in two prison facilities in Sughd province, Tajikistan along with radiographic screening for pulmonary TB. Suspected cases were confirmed bacteriologically. Inmates undergoing TB treatment were also surveyed. In-depth interviews were conducted with former prisoners to elicit relevant social and behavioral characteristics. Results We identified 59 cases of active pulmonary TB (prevalence 4.5%). Factors independently associated with increased prevalence of active TB were: HIV-infection by self-report (PR 7.88; 95%CI 3.40–18.28), history of previous TB (PR 10.21; 95%CI 6.27–16.63) and infrequent supplemental nutrition beyond scheduled meals (PR 3.00; 95%CI 1.67–5.62). Access to supplemental nutrition was associated with frequency of visits from friends and family and ability to rely on other inmates for help. Conclusion In prison facilities of Tajikistan, HIV-infection, injection drug use and low access to supplemental nutrition were associated with prevalent cases of active pulmonary TB. Policies that reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users and improve the nutritional status of socially isolated inmates may alleviate the TB burden in Tajikistan’s prisons. PMID:24465861

  8. T-SPOT.TB in Detection of Active Tuberculosis During Pregnancy: A Retrospective Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiaopei; Guo, Xuxiao; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Maoshui

    2016-01-01

    Background Interferon-gamma release assays have not been validated in active TB among pregnant women. Therefore, the objective of this retrospective study was to estimate the diagnostic value of T-SPOT.TB in active TB among pregnant women. Material/Methods Between May 2012 and May 2015, 26 consecutive pregnant women with suspected TB were enrolled in our study. The clinicopathological characteristics and T-SPOT.TB results were reviewed and analyzed. Results Pregnant patients were divided into a TB group (n=21) and a Non-TB group (n=5). In the TB group, 5 patients had pulmonary TB, 5 had pulmonary TB+ extrapulmonary TB, and 11 had exclusively extrapulmonary TB. The most common site of extrapulmonary TB was pleural (n=11). Statistical analysis showed that the lymphocyte count in the TB group was lower than in the Non-TB group (P<0.05). For detection of active TB during pregnancy, T-SPOT.TB had a high sensitivity of 100.0% (84.5%–100.0%) and a specificity of 80.0% (37.6–96.4%). Conclusions T-SPOT.TB shows good performance in detection of active tuberculosis during pregnancy. Interferon gamma release assay for TB screening of pregnant women is recommended in clinical practice because it may be a more appropriate diagnostic tool than the tuberculin skin test. PMID:26732770

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lipolytic Enzymes as Potential Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Belinda; Lecoufle, Mélanie; Tuaillon, Edouard; Dedieu, Luc; Canaan, Stéphane; Valverde, Viviane; Kremer, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Background New diagnosis tests are urgently needed to address the global tuberculosis (TB) burden and to improve control programs especially in resource-limited settings. An effective in vitro diagnostic of TB based on serological methods would be regarded as an attractive progress because immunoassays are simple, rapid, inexpensive, and may offer the possibility to detect cases missed by standard sputum smear microscopy. However, currently available serology tests for TB are highly variable in sensitivity and specificity. Lipolytic enzymes have recently emerged as key factors in lipid metabolization during dormancy and/or exit of the non-replicating growth phase, a prerequisite step of TB reactivation. The focus of this study was to analyze and compare the potential of four Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipolytic enzymes (LipY, Rv0183, Rv1984c and Rv3452) as new markers in the serodiagnosis of active TB. Methods Recombinant proteins were produced and used in optimized ELISA aimed to detect IgG and IgM serum antibodies against the four lipolytic enzymes. The capacity of the assays to identify infection was evaluated in patients with either active TB or latent TB and compared with two distinct control groups consisting of BCG-vaccinated blood donors and hospitalized non-TB individuals. Results A robust humoral response was detected in patients with active TB whereas antibodies against lipolytic enzymes were infrequently detected in either uninfected groups or in subjects with latent infection. High specifity levels, ranging from 93.9% to 97.5%, were obtained for all four antigens with sensitivity values ranging from 73.4% to 90.5%, with Rv3452 displaying the highest performances. Patients with active TB usually exhibited strong IgG responses but poor IgM responses. Conclusion These results clearly indicate that the lipolytic enzymes tested are strongly immunogenic allowing to distinguish active from latent TB infections. They appear as potent biomarkers providing high

  10. Determinants of active pulmonary tuberculosis in Ambo Hospital, West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mengiste, Bezatu; Mesfin, Frehiwot; Godana, Wanzahun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis seen in cases in Ambo Hospital, Ethiopia. Design A facility-based prospective case-control study. Setting Patients attending Ambo Hospital from 01 December 2011 to 29 March 2012. Participants The sample included 312 adult patients attending Ambo Hospital. The main outcome measure was presence of active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Explanatory measures Age, gender, occupation, educational status, marital status, place of residence, patient history of TB, family history of TB, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, smoking, alcohol intake, khat chewing, body mass index (BMI), employment, diabetes, history of asthma, previous history of worm infestation, history of hospitalisation, number of adults living in the household (HH), person per room, housing condition. Results A total of 312 study participants, including 104 active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases (cases) and 208 non-active PTB cases (controls), were recruited for the present study. Having one or more family member with a history of TB (OR = 4.4; 95% CI: 1.50–12.90), marital status (OR = 7.6; 95% CI: 2.2–12.6), male gender (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.4–7), rural residence (OR = 3.3; P = 0.012), being a current or past smoker (OR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.1–7.2), BMI < 18.5 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.03–4.2), HIV infection (OR = 8.8; 95% CI: 2.4–23.8) and a history of worm infestation (OR = 6.4; 95% CI: 2.6–15.4) remained significant independent host-related factors for active PTB. Conclusion Patients who came from a compound with more than two HHs were more likely to develop active PTB than those who came from a compound with only one HH. Those who lived in houses with no windows were more likely to develop active PTB than those who lived in houses with one or more windows, had a family history of TB, lived in rural areas. Sex of the patient was a predicting factor. Not being the owner of the house was

  11. Analysis of Immune Responses against a Wide Range of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens in Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kassa, Desta; Ran, Leonie; Geberemeskel, Wudneh; Tebeje, Mekashaw; Alemu, Amelewerk; Selase, Alemayehu; Tegbaru, Belete; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Friggen, Annemieke H.; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Wolday, Dawit; Messele, Tsehaynesh

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing host immune responses to molecular targets of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essential to develop effective immunodiagnostics and better vaccines. We investigated the immune response against a large series of M. tuberculosis antigens, including 5 classical and 64 nonclassical (39 DosR regulon-encoded, 4 resuscitation-promoting factor [RPF], and 21 reactivation-associated) antigens in active-pulmonary-tuberculosis (TB) patients. Whole blood from TB patients (n = 34) was stimulated in vitro with M. tuberculosis antigens. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was measured after 7 days of stimulation, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The majority of the study participants responded to the classical M. tuberculosis antigens TB10.4 (84.8%), early secreted antigenic target-6 kDa (ESAT-6)/CFP-10 (70.6%), and purified protein derivative (PPD) (55.9%). However, only 26.5% and 24.2% responded to HSP65 and Ag85A/B, respectively. Of the 64 nonclassical antigens, 23 (33.3%) were immunogenic (IFN-γ levels, >62 pg/ml) and 8 were strong inducers of IFN-γ (IFN-γ levels, ≥100 pg/ml). The RPF antigens were the most immunogenic. In addition, we observed distinct cytokine expression profiles in response to several M. tuberculosis antigens by multiplex immunoassay. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and IL-6 were commonly detected at high levels after stimulation with 4/15 latency antigens (Rv0081, Rv2006, Rv2629, and Rv1733c) and were found especially in supernatants of the three strong IFN-γ inducers (Rv2629, Rv1009, and Rv2389c). IL-8, IL-6, and IL-17 were exclusively detected after stimulation with Rv0574c, Rv2630, Rv1998, Rv054c, and Rv2028c. In conclusion, in active-pulmonary-TB patients, we identified 23 new immunogenic M. tuberculosis antigens. The distinct expression levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 in response to specific subsets of M. tuberculosis antigens may be promising for the development of immunodiagnostics

  12. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  13. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  14. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  15. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  16. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  17. Meropenem inhibits D,D-carboxypeptidase activity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Arora, Kriti; Lloyd, John R; Lee, Ill Y; Nair, Vinod; Fischer, Elizabeth; Boshoff, Helena I M; Barry, Clifton E

    2012-10-01

    Carbapenems such as meropenem are being investigated for their potential therapeutic utility against highly drug-resistant tuberculosis. These β-lactams target the transpeptidases that introduce interpeptide cross-links into bacterial peptidoglycan thereby controlling rigidity of the bacterial envelope. Treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) with the β-lactamase inhibitor clavulanate together with meropenem resulted in rapid, polar, cell lysis releasing cytoplasmic contents. In Mtb it has been previously demonstrated that 3-3 cross-linkages [involving two diaminopimelate (DAP) molecules] predominate over 4-3 cross-linkages (involving one DAP and one D-alanine) in stationary-phase cells. We purified and analysed peptidoglycan from Mtb and found that 3-3 cross-linkages predominate throughout all growth phases and the ratio of 4-3/3-3 linkages does not vary significantly under any growth condition. Meropenem treatment was accompanied by a dramatic accumulation of unlinked pentapeptide stems with no change in the tetrapeptide pools, suggesting that meropenem inhibits both a D,D-carboxypeptidase and an L,D-transpeptidase. We purified a candidate D,D-carboxypeptidase DacB2 and showed that meropenem indeed directly inhibits this enzyme by forming a stable adduct at the enzyme active site. These results suggest that the rapid lysis of meropenem-treated cells is the result of synergistically inhibiting the transpeptidases that introduce 3,3-cross-links while simultaneously limiting the pool of available substrates available for cross-linking. PMID:22906310

  18. MEROPENEM INHIBITS D,D-CARBOXYPEPTIDASE ACTIVITY IN MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Arora, Kriti; Lloyd, John R.; Lee, Ill Young; Nair, Vinod; Fischer, Elizabeth; Boshoff, Helena I.M.; Barry, Clifton E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Carbapenems such as meropenem are being investigated for their potential therapeutic utility against highly drug-resistant tuberculosis. These β-lactams target the transpeptidases that introduce interpeptide cross-links into bacterial peptidoglycan thereby controlling rigidity of the bacterial envelope. Treatment of M. tuberculosis (Mtb) with the β-lactamase inhibitor clavulanate together with meropenem resulted in rapid, polar, cell lysis releasing cytoplasmic contents. In Mtb it has been previously demonstrated that 3-3 cross-linkages (involving two diaminopimelate (DAP) molecules) predominate over 4-3 cross-linkages (involving one DAP and one D-alanine) in stationary-phase cells. We purified and analyzed peptidoglycan from Mtb and found that 3-3 cross-linkages predominate throughout all growth phases and the ratio of 4-3/3-3 linkages does not vary significantly under any growth condition. Meropenem treatment was accompanied by a dramatic accumulation of unlinked pentapeptide stems with no change in the tetrapeptide pools, suggesting that meropenem inhibits both a D,D-carboxypeptidase and an L,D-transpeptidase. We purified a candidate D,D-carboxypeptidase DacB2 and showed that meropenem indeed directly inhibits this enzyme by forming a stable adduct at the enzyme active site. These results suggest that the rapid lysis of meropenem-treated cells is the result of synergistically inhibiting the transpeptidases that introduce 3,3-cross-links while simultaneously limiting the pool of available substrates available for cross-linking. PMID:22906310

  19. Active and latent tuberculosis among HIV-positive injecting drug users in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Meijerink, Hinta; Wisaksana, Rudi; Lestari, Mery; Meilana, Intan; Chaidir, Lydia; van der Ven, Andre JAM; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Injecting drug use (IDU) is associated with tuberculosis but few data are available from low-income settings. We examined IDU in relation to active and latent tuberculosis (LTBI) among HIV-positive individuals in Indonesia, which has a high burden of tuberculosis and a rapidly growing HIV epidemic strongly driven by IDU. Methods Active tuberculosis was measured prospectively among 1900 consecutive antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve adult patients entering care in a clinic in West Java. Prevalence of LTBI was determined cross-sectionally in a subset of 518 ART-experienced patients using an interferon-gamma release assay. Results Patients with a history of IDU (53.1%) more often reported a history of tuberculosis treatment (34.8% vs. 21.9%, p<0.001), more often received tuberculosis treatment during follow-up (adjusted HR=1.71; 95% CI: 1.25–2.35) and more often had bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (OR=1.67; 95% CI: 0.94–2.96). LTBI was equally prevalent among people with and without a history of IDU (29.1 vs. 30.4%, NS). The risk estimates did not change after adjustment for CD4 cell count or ART. Conclusions HIV-positive individuals with a history of IDU in Indonesia have more active tuberculosis, with similar rates of LTBI. Within the HIV clinic, LTBI screening and isoniazid preventive therapy may be prioritized to patients with a history of IDU. PMID:25690530

  20. Diagnostic Utility of QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Ahmed; Hamdan, AL-Jahdali; Salim, Baharoon; Yosra, Ali; Hani, Mohamed; Abdullah, AL-Harbi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The utility of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-G) test in the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease has been validated in high and low tuberculosis-prevalent (TB) countries. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the performance of the QFT-G test in the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease among tuberculosis patients in an intermediate prevalent country. Setting and Design: A retrospective study at the King Abdulaziz Medical City-Riyadh (KAMC-R) Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia, including tuberculosis, admitted to KAMC-R between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. We included only patients with an available result of the QFT-G test. A total of 142 tuberculosis cases and 226 pneumonia cases were studied, to assess the utility of the QFT-G test in diagnosing tuberculosis cases. Results: Among the tuberculosis (n = 142) cases, the QFT-G tested positive in 68.3%, negative in 23.2%, and indeterminate in 12 cases (8.5%). Of the 226 pneumonia cases, the QFT-G tested positive in only 20.4%, while a majority of 66.4% tested negative, with 30 cases (13.3%) being indeterminate. When we excluded 42 patients with indeterminate results, the QFT-G test achieved a sensitivity of 74.6% [95% CI: 66.09 to 81.65%] and specificity of 76.53 % [95% CI: 69.85 to 82.15%] in the diagnosis of tuberculosis cases. Conclusions: This study concludes that the QFT-G test is a useful tool for detecting tuberculosis disease when used as an adjunct tool for the diagnosis of active TB cases. It certainly cannot be used solely and indiscriminately, separate from other clinical and radiological information, in the diagnosis of active tuberculosis cases. PMID:26392718

  1. Managing suspect radioactive material in the DOE system -- A program to establish lower activity disposal criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, C.G.; Shuman, R.; Rogers, V.

    1994-12-31

    Operations at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear installations routinely generate radioactively contaminated waste. A large portion of this waste has extremely low levels of radioactive contamination or is suspect waste. Despite these very low levels of contamination, this waste is disposed of as low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or mixed waste. Doing so depleted limited available disposal capacity while providing little or no incremental benefit to the public health and safety. Efforts have been made by federal agencies, states, and industry to establish less rigorous control criteria for waste with low levels of radioactive contamination. The DOE addressed the establishment of lower activity disposal criteria in its threshold limit guidance in the early 1980s, but, to date, nor formal limits have emerged from the Department. A number of DOE installation have calculated suitable site-specific release limits. Efforts by other federal agencies range from proposed dose criteria for Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) waste developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to policy statements by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on BRC waste which were subsequently withdrawn. Such limits may be developed incrementally, focusing first on waste streams that are easily characterized and that will provide the greatest immediate benefit to the DOE system. Limits may then be developed for waste streams containing more complex mixtures of radionuclides. Separate limits may be developed for each DOE site, taking into account the site-specific disposal conditions, or a single set of limits may be developed for the entire DOE system. Once lower activity disposal limits are established, DOE installations will need to develop waste characterization methods adequate to ensure compliance with the new lower activity disposal criteria.

  2. Discriminating Active Tuberculosis from Latent Tuberculosis Infection by flow cytometric measurement of CD161-expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qianting; Xu, Qian; Chen, Qi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Mingxia; Cai, Yi; Liu, Haiying; Zhou, Yiping; Deng, Guofang; Deng, Qunyi; Zhou, Boping; Kornfeld, Hardy; Chen, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) significantly increases the possibility for early diagnosis of tuberculosis, but IGRAs alone cannot discriminate active TB from LTBI. Therefore, fast and reliable discrimination of active tuberculosis, especially bacteriology negative tuberculosis, from LTBI is a great necessity. Here we established an assay based on flow cytometric multiparameter assay assessing expression of CD161 along with CD3, CD4, and CD8, whereby a set of indices formulated by the percentages of CD3+CD161+, CD3+CD4+CD161+ and CD3+CD8+CD161+ T cells multiplied with lymphocyte/monocyte ratio were established. Application of the CD3+CD8+CD161+ index to compare a cohort of active tuberculosis with a cohort of LTBI or health control yielded 0.7662 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6559–0.8552) or 0.7922 (95%  CI 0.6846–0.8763) for sensitivity and 0.9048 (95%  CI 0.8209–0.9580) or 0.8939 (95% CI 0.8392–0.9349) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB+; the corresponding results were 0.7481 (95%  CI 0.6648–0.8198) or 0.7557 (95%  CI 0.6730–0.8265) for sensitivity and 0.8571 (95%  CI 0.7637–0.9239) or 0.8603 (95%  CI 0.8008–0.9075) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB−. Our results reveal that in combination with IGRAs, CD161-based indices provide a novel, fast diagnostic solution addressing the limitation of current tuberculosis diagnostics. PMID:26643453

  3. Active case finding of tuberculosis: historical perspective and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Golub, J. E.; Mohan, C. I.; Comstock, G. W.; Chaisson, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite a history of remarkable scientific achievements in microbiology and therapeutics, tuberculosis (TB) continues to pose an extraordinary threat to human health. Case finding and treatment of TB disease are the principal means of controlling transmission and reducing incidence. This review presents a historical perspective of active case finding (ACF) of TB, detailing case detection strategies that have been used over the last century. This review is divided into the following sections: mass radiography, house-to-house surveys, out-patient case detection, enhanced case finding, high-risk populations and cost-effectiveness. The report concludes with a discussion and recommendations for future case finding strategies. Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of these methods will help inform and shape ACF as a TB control policy in the twenty-first century. PMID:16333924

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces apoptosis in gamma/delta T lymphocytes from patients with advanced clinical forms of active tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, R; Kindlelán, J M; Carracedo, J; Sánchez-Guijo, P; Ramírez, R

    1997-01-01

    Antigens from inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra induce activation in a subpopulation of gamma/delta (gamma/delta) T lymphocytes in a manner that resembles that of superantigens from alpha/beta T cells. After culture in vitro with H37Ra proteins, gamma/delta T lymphocytes from patients with advanced clinical forms of active tuberculosis (ACF-TBC) display cytotoxic activity against homotypic target cells exposed to H37Ra. Cytotoxicity by gamma/delta T lymphocytes from ACF-TBC patients occurs in a range similar to that observed in healthy subjects. Following activation, H37Ra-stimulated gamma/delta T lymphocytes from healthy subjects did proliferate in the presence of exogenous recombinant human interleukin 2. However, under the same conditions, gamma/delta T lymphocytes from ACF-TBC patients not only did not proliferate but died by apoptosis. These results suggest that in gamma/delta T lymphocytes from patients with ACF-TBC, antigens from M. tuberculosis may induce cell activation that leads to apoptotic cell death. PMID:9008275

  5. The Cyclic Peptide Ecumicin Targeting ClpC1 Is Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Kim, Jin-Yong; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Akopian, Tatos; Hong, Seungpyo; Jin, Ying-Yu; Kandror, Olga; Kim, Jong-Woo; Lee, In-Ae; Lee, Sun-Young; McAlpine, James B.; Mulugeta, Surafel; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Wang, Yuehong; Yang, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Tae-Mi; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Pauli, Guido F.; Cho, Sanghyun

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) has lent urgency to finding new drug leads with novel modes of action. A high-throughput screening campaign of >65,000 actinomycete extracts for inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis viability identified ecumicin, a macrocyclic tridecapeptide that exerts potent, selective bactericidal activity against M. tuberculosis in vitro, including nonreplicating cells. Ecumicin retains activity against isolated multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis. The subcutaneous administration to mice of ecumicin in a micellar formulation at 20 mg/kg body weight resulted in plasma and lung exposures exceeding the MIC. Complete inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth in the lungs of mice was achieved following 12 doses at 20 or 32 mg/kg. Genome mining of lab-generated, spontaneous ecumicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains identified the ClpC1 ATPase complex as the putative target, and this was confirmed by a drug affinity response test. ClpC1 functions in protein breakdown with the ClpP1P2 protease complex. Ecumicin markedly enhanced the ATPase activity of wild-type (WT) ClpC1 but prevented activation of proteolysis by ClpC1. Less stimulation was observed with ClpC1 from ecumicin-resistant mutants. Thus, ClpC1 is a valid drug target against M. tuberculosis, and ecumicin may serve as a lead compound for anti-TB drug development. PMID:25421483

  6. ANALYSIS OF THE SPECTRA OF GENETIC ACTIVITY PRODUCED BY KNOWN OR SUSPECTED HUMAN CARCINOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For 24 agents classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as known or suspected human carcinogens, we previously catalogued the qualitative genetic bioassay data available in the literature. In the present analysis, dose information, where available, was added t...

  7. The reliability analysis of Xpert-positive result for smear-negative and culture-negative specimen collected from bone and joint tuberculosis suspects

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guomei; Mu, Jing; Wang, Guirong; Huo, Fengmin; Dong, Lingling; Li, Yunxu

    2016-01-01

    Background The Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Xpert; Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) has been widely used for pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis. In clinical practice, specimen yielding smear-negative, culture-negative but Xpert-positive results is frequently confronted. Due to the notorious possibility of contamination that molecular tests always been thought of, Xpert-positive results without bacteriological supporting evidence arouse great confusions to clinicians. Methods A retrospective study was performed. From April 2014 to February 2015, 852 clinical specimens were Xpert-positive. The results of Xpert assay, bacteriological and pathological examinations from either the same specimens or from the specimens collected during same clinical operations were investigated. Results A total of 90 specimens with Xpert-positive but smear-negative and culture-negative results were recruited, and 81 of them were pus specimens collected from Bone and Joint Tuberculosis (BJTB) patients. According to the pathological examination results, 77 of the 81 pus specimens, 8 of 9 other types of specimens were confirmed as either TB or strongly suggestive of TB; three pus specimens and one biopsy tissue were also suggested TB but with less stronger evidence; only one pus specimen was not TB suggestive. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that Xpert could be trusted for BJTB diagnosis even when no supporting bacteriological evidence is available in high TB prevalence settings. Our results will alleviate the confusion among clinicians in such scenarios. PMID:27293838

  8. Screening strategies for active tuberculosis: focus on cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dobler, Claudia Caroline

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in screening for active tuberculosis (TB), also called active case-finding (ACF), as a possible means to achieve control of the global TB epidemic. ACF aims to increase the detection of TB, in order to diagnose and treat patients with TB earlier than if they had been diagnosed and treated only at the time when they sought health care because of symptoms. This will reduce or avoid secondary transmission of TB to other people, with the long-term goal of reducing the incidence of TB. Here, the history of screening for active TB, current screening practices, and the role of TB-diagnostic tools are summarized and the literature on cost-effectiveness of screening for active TB reviewed. Cost-effectiveness analyses indicate that community-wide ACF can be cost-effective in settings with a high incidence of TB. ACF among close TB contacts is cost-effective in settings with a low as well as a high incidence of TB. The evidence for cost-effectiveness of screening among HIV-infected persons is not as strong as for TB contacts, but the reviewed studies suggest that the intervention can be cost-effective depending on the background prevalence of TB and test volume. None of the cost-effectiveness analyses were informed by data from randomized controlled trials. As the results of randomized controlled trials evaluating different ACF strategies will become available in future, we will hopefully gain a better understanding of the role that ACF can play in achieving global TB control. PMID:27418848

  9. A case report of suspected hepatopulmonary syndrome secondary to ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO, Yasuyuki; TORISU, Shidow; HAGIO, Mitsuyoshi; YAMAGUCHI, Ryoji; MIZUTANI, Shinya; NAGANOBU, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a respiratory complication of hepatic disease, that is well recognized in humans and defined by the presence of 1) liver disease, 2) hypoxemia and/or high alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaDO2) and 3) intrapulmonary vasodilatation. The present report describes a similar case of HPS in a dog. A six-month-old Papillon was diagnosed with ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis and showed progressive increases in AaDO2 over the course of the following six months. The presence of intrapulmonary vasodilatation was confirmed by agitated saline contrast transthoracic echocardiography. Also, the absence of congenital cardiac defect was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. From these results, we suspected that this dog had HPS. This is the first description of suspected canine HPS. PMID:26616155

  10. Activity of 5-chloro-pyrazinamide in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zahoor; Tyagi, Sandeep; Minkowski, Austin; Almeida, Deepak; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Peck, Kaitlin M.; Welch, John T.; Baughn, Anthony D.; Jacobs, Williams R.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Pyrazinamide is an essential component of first line anti-tuberculosis regimen as well as most of the second line regimens. This drug has a unique sterilizing activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Its unique role in tuberculosis treatment has lead to the search and development of its structural analogues. One such analogue is 5-chloro-pyrazinamide (5-Cl-PZA) that has been tested under in vitro conditions against M. tuberculosis. The present study was designed with an aim to assess the activity of 5-Cl-PZA, alone and in combination with first-line drugs, against murine tuberculosis. Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 5-Cl-PZA in Middlebrook 7H9 broth (neutral pH) and the inhibitory titre of serum from mice that received a 300 mg/kg oral dose of 5-Cl-PZA 30 min before cardiac puncture were determined. To test the tolerability of orally administered 5-Cl-PZA, uninfected mice received doses up to 300 mg/kg for 2 wk. Four weeks after low-dose aerosol infection either with M. tuberculosis or M. bovis, mice were treated 5 days/wk with 5-Cl-PZA, at doses ranging from 37.5 to 150 mg/kg, either alone or in combination with isoniazid and rifampicin. Antimicrobial activity was assessed by colony-forming unit counts in lungs after 4 and 8 wk of treatment. Results: The MIC of 5-Cl-PZA against M. tuberculosis was between 12.5 and 25 μg/ml and the serum inhibitory titre was 1:4. Under the same experimental conditions, the MIC of pyrazinamide was >100 μg/ml and mouse serum had no inhibitory activity after a 300 mg/kg dose; 5-Cl-PZA was well tolerated in uninfected and infected mice up to 300 and 150 mg/kg, respectively. While PZA alone and in combination exhibited its usual antimicrobial activity in mice infected with M. tuberculosis and no activity in mice infected with M. bovis, 5-Cl-PZA exhibited antimicrobial activity neither in mice infected with M. tuberculosis nor in mice infected with M. bovis. Interpretation

  11. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB. We conducted a nested case–control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates. From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78–0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66–0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine. In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  12. MHEALTH INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT TO SUPPORT PATIENTS WITH ACTIVE TUBERCULOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Iribarren, Sarah J.; Beck, Susan L.; Pearce, Patricia F.; Chirico, Cristina; Etchevarria, Mirta; Rubinstein, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile Health (mHealth) based interventions have been increasingly used to improve a broad range of health outcomes. However, few researchers have reported on the process or the application of theory to guide the development of mHealth based interventions, or specifically for tuberculosis (TB) treatment management. Aims To describe the steps, process, and considerations in developing a text messaging-based intervention to promote treatment adherence and provide support to patients with active TB. Methods Traditional qualitative techniques, including semi-structured interviews, field notes, content analysis, iterative coding, and thematic analysis, were used to design and document the intervention development with a multidisciplinary team of researchers, clinicians, administrators, and patients who were in active TB treatment. The Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model was used to guide the coding scheme for content analysis of patient-directed TB educational material and intervention development. Results The development steps included: a) establishing intervention components, including justifications, considerations, timing and frequency of components; b) developing educational messages, including cultural adaption, text or short message service (SMS) formatting, and prioritizing message delivery order; and c) determining implementation protocol. A set of 16 IMB-based messages were developed for the educational component. Final intervention development was achieved in 3 months. Conclusion A collaborative approach and application of a theory to guide the intervention design and development is supported. Although a collaborative approach was more time consuming, it resulted in a more responsive, culturally appropriate, and comprehensive intervention. Considerations for developing a text messaging based intervention are provided and may serve as a guide for similar interventions. Further empirical evidence is needed for applying the IMB model

  13. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shown by X-ray in active service. 3.370 Section 3.370 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service. (a) Active disease. X-ray evidence alone may be adequate for grant of direct...

  14. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shown by X-ray in active service. 3.370 Section 3.370 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service. (a) Active disease. X-ray evidence alone may be adequate for grant of direct...

  15. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shown by X-ray in active service. 3.370 Section 3.370 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service. (a) Active disease. X-ray evidence alone may be adequate for grant of direct...

  16. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shown by X-ray in active service. 3.370 Section 3.370 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service. (a) Active disease. X-ray evidence alone may be adequate for grant of direct...

  17. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shown by X-ray in active service. 3.370 Section 3.370 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service. (a) Active disease. X-ray evidence alone may be adequate for grant of direct...

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of the Nitroimidazole TBA-354 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, S.; Yang, T. J.; Kim, Y.; Wang, Y.; Lu, Y.; Wang, B.; Xu, J.; Mdluli, K.; Ma, Z.; Franzblau, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Nitroimidazoles are a promising new class of antitubercular agents. The nitroimidazo-oxazole delamanid (OPC-67683, Deltyba) is in phase III trials for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, while the nitroimidazo-oxazine PA-824 is entering phase III for drug-sensitive and drug-resistant tuberculosis. TBA-354 (SN31354[(S)-2-nitro-6-((6-(4-trifluoromethoxy)phenyl)pyridine-3-yl)methoxy)-6,7-dihydro-5H-imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]oxazine]) is a pyridine-containing biaryl compound with exceptional efficacy against chronic murine tuberculosis and favorable bioavailability in preliminary rodent studies. It was selected as a potential next-generation antituberculosis nitroimidazole following an extensive medicinal chemistry effort. Here, we further evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties and activity of TBA-354 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. TBA-354 is narrow spectrum and bactericidal in vitro against replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with potency similar to that of delamanid and greater than that of PA-824. The addition of serum protein or albumin does not significantly alter this activity. TBA-354 maintains activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv isogenic monoresistant strains and clinical drug-sensitive and drug-resistant isolates. Spontaneous resistant mutants appear at a frequency of 3 × 10−7. In vitro studies and in vivo studies in mice confirm that TBA-354 has high bioavailability and a long elimination half-life. In vitro studies suggest a low risk of drug-drug interactions. Low-dose aerosol infection models of acute and chronic murine tuberculosis reveal time- and dose-dependent in vivo bactericidal activity that is at least as potent as that of delamanid and more potent than that of PA-824. Its superior potency and pharmacokinetic profile that predicts suitability for once-daily oral dosing suggest that TBA-354 be studied further for its potential as a next-generation nitroimidazole. PMID:25331696

  19. [Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases proposed for treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha antagonist drugs].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2006-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology (SPR) and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology (SPP) have developed guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (AT) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD), namely rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) antagonists. Due to the high risk of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with IJD, LTBI and AT screening should be performed as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis. Even if TB screening was performed at the beginning of the disease, the evaluation should be repeated before starting anti-TNF-a therapy. When TB (LTBI or AT) treatment is indicated, it should be performed before the beginning of anti-TNF-a therapy. If the IJD activity requires urgent anti-TNF-a therapy, these drugs can be started after two months of antituberculosis therapy in AT cases, or after one month in LTBI cases. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If abnormal, e.g. Gohn complex, the patient should be treated as LTBI; residual lesions require the exclusion of AT and patients with history of untreated or incomplete TB treatment should be treated as LTBI. In cases of suspected active lesions, AT diagnosis should be confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test (TST), with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If induration is less than 5 mm, the test should be repeated after 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and should be considered negative if the result is again inferior to 5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment. If TST is performed in immunosuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-a therapy, even in the presence of a negative test. PMID:17117328

  20. IFNG-mediated immune responses enhance autophagy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in patients with active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rovetta, Ana I; Peña, Delfina; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Recalde, Gabriela M; Pellegrini, Joaquín; Bigi, Fabiana; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Gutierrez, Marisa; Colombo, María I; García, Verónica E

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires IFNG. Besides, IFNG-mediated induction of autophagy suppresses survival of virulent Mtb in macrophage cell lines. We investigated the contribution of autophagy to the defense against Mtb antigen (Mtb-Ag) in cells from tuberculosis patients and healthy donors (HD). Patients were classified as high responders (HR) if their T cells produced significant IFNG against Mtb-Ag; and low responders (LR) when patients showed weak or no T cell responses to Mtb-Ag. The highest autophagy levels were detected in HD cells whereas the lowest quantities were observed in LR patients. Interestingly, upon Mtb-Ag stimulation, we detected a positive correlation between IFNG and MAP1LC3B-II/LC3-II levels. Actually, blockage of Mtb-Ag-induced IFNG markedly reduced autophagy in HR patients whereas addition of limited amounts of IFNG significantly increased autophagy in LR patients. Therefore, autophagy collaborates with human immune responses against Mtb in close association with specific IFNG secreted against the pathogen. PMID:25426782

  1. The Structure Activity Relationship of Urea Derivatives as Anti-Tuberculosis Agents

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joshua R.; North, Elton J.; Hurdle, Julian G.; Morisseau, Christophe; Scarborough, Jerrod S.; Sun, Dianqing; Korduláková, Jana; Scherman, Michael S.; Jones, Victoria; Grzegorzewicz, Anna; Crew, Rebecca M.; Jackson, Mary; McNeil, Michael R.; Lee, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of tuberculosis is becoming more difficult due to the ever increasing prevalence of drug resistance. Thus, it is imperative that novel anti-tuberculosis agents, with unique mechanisms of action, be discovered and developed. The direct anti-tubercular testing of a small compound library led to discovery of adamantyl urea hit compound 1. In this study, the hit was followed up through the synthesis of an optimization library. This library was generated by systematically replacing each section of the molecule with a similar moiety until a clear structure activity relationship was obtained with respect to anti-tubercular activity. The best compounds in this series contained a 1-adamantyl-3-phenyl urea core and had potent activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis plus an acceptable therapeutic index. It was noted that the compounds identified and the pharmacophore developed is consistent with inhibitors of epoxide hydrolase family of enzymes. Consequently, the compounds were tested for inhibition of representative epoxide hydrolases: M. tuberculosis EphB and EphE; and human soluble epoxide hydrolase. Many of the optimized inhibitors showed both potent EphB and EphE inhibition suggesting the antitubercular activity is through inhibition of multiple epoxide hydrolyase enzymes. The inhibitors also showed potent inhibition of humans soluble expoxide hydrolyase, but limited cytotoxicity suggesting that future studies must be towards increasing the selectivity of epoxide hydrolyase inhibition towards the M. tuberculosis enzymes. PMID:21840723

  2. Impaired activation of Stat1 and c-Jun as a possible defect in macrophages of patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Solís, H; Quiñones-Falconi, F; Zarain-Herzberg, A; Amieva-Fernández, R I; López-Vidal, Y

    2009-10-01

    Studies of patients with active tuberculosis (TB) and infected healthy individuals have shown that interferon (IFN)-gamma is present in sites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in comparable levels. This suggests that there is a deficiency in the macrophage response to IFN-gamma in TB patients. We used recombinant human IFN-gamma to stimulate adherent monocyte-derived macrophages from three groups of people: patients with active tuberculosis (TBP), their healthy household contacts (HHC) and healthy uninfected controls from the community (CC). We then evaluated the ability of the macrophages to inhibit the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv as well as their cytokine profile at early in infection (48 h). After IFN-gamma treatment, macrophages of healthy individuals (HHC and CC) controlled M. tuberculosis growth and produced mainly nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin (IL)-12p70, whereas TBP macrophages did not kill M. tuberculosis. Additionally, TBP macrophages produced low levels of NO and IL-12p70 and high levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-10. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta levels were similar among all three groups. M. tuberculosis infection had little effect on the cytokine response after IFN-gamma stimulus, but infection alone induced more IL-10 and TGF-beta in TBP macrophages. There were no differences in Stat1 nuclear translocation and DNA binding between the groups. However, the phosphorylated Stat1 and c-Jun (AP-1) in nuclear protein extracts was diminished in TBP macrophages compared to macrophages of healthy individuals. These results indicate an impairment of Stat1-dependent and Stat1-independent IFN-gamma signalling in macrophages of people with active tuberculosis, suggesting a different molecular regulation that could impact macrophage functionality and disease outcome. PMID:19737230

  3. Evaluation of heat shock proteins for discriminating between latent tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Seema D; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is of the utmost concern. The available tests, the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the Quantiferon-TB Gold test (QFT-G) cannot discriminate between active TB and LTBI. Therefore, the aim of the study is to identify new biomarkers that can discriminate between active TB and LTBI and can also assess the risk of the individual developing active TB. In total, 55 blood samples were collected, of which 10 samples were from the active TB infection group, 10 were from the high-risk exposure group, 23 were from the low-risk exposure group, and 12 were from healthy controls living in a non-TB endemic area. A panel of heat shock proteins (Hsps), including host Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Hsp16, were evaluated in all of the collected samples using ELISA. The levels of the host Hsp(s) (Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90) and MTB Hsp16 were significantly (p<0.05) elevated in the active TB group compared to the high-risk exposure group, the low-risk exposure group and the control group. Notably, the levels of the same panel of Hsp(s) were elevated in the high-risk exposure group compared to the low-risk exposure group. On follow-up, out of the 10 high-risk exposure participants, 3 converted into active TB, indicating that this group has the highest risk of developing TB. Thus, the evaluated panel of Hsp(s) can discriminate between LTBI and active TB. They can also identify individuals who are at the highest risk of developing active TB. Because they can be rapidly detected, Hsp(s) have an edge over the existing diagnostic tools for LTBI. The evaluation of these proteins will be useful in designing better diagnostic methods for LTBI. PMID:26300163

  4. Rapid, Semiquantitative Assay To Discriminate among Compounds with Activity against Replicating or Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Quezada, Landys Lopez; Glasheen, Jou; Ballinger, Elaine; Somersan-Karakaya, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Warren, J. David; Nathan, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The search for drugs that can kill replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces practical bottlenecks. Measurement of CFU and discrimination of bacteriostatic from bactericidal activity are costly in compounds, supplies, labor, and time. Testing compounds against M. tuberculosis under conditions that prevent the replication of M. tuberculosis often involves a second phase of the test in which conditions are altered to permit the replication of bacteria that survived the first phase. False-positive determinations of activity against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis may arise from carryover of compounds from the nonreplicating stage of the assay that act in the replicating stage. We mitigate these problems by carrying out a 96-well microplate liquid MIC assay and then transferring an aliquot of each well to a second set of plates in which each well contains agar supplemented with activated charcoal. After 7 to 10 days—about 2 weeks sooner than required to count CFU—fluorometry reveals whether M. tuberculosis bacilli in each well have replicated extensively enough to reduce a resazurin dye added for the final hour. This charcoal agar resazurin assay (CARA) distinguishes between bacterial biomasses in any two wells that differ by 2 to 3 log10 CFU. The CARA thus serves as a pretest and semiquantitative surrogate for longer, more laborious, and expensive CFU-based assays, helps distinguish bactericidal from bacteriostatic activity, and identifies compounds that are active under replicating conditions, nonreplicating conditions, or both. Results for 14 antimycobacterial compounds, including tuberculosis (TB) drugs, revealed that PA-824 (pretomanid) and TMC207 (bedaquiline) are largely bacteriostatic. PMID:26239979

  5. Rapid, Semiquantitative Assay To Discriminate among Compounds with Activity against Replicating or Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ben; Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Quezada, Landys Lopez; Glasheen, Jou; Ballinger, Elaine; Somersan-Karakaya, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Warren, J David; Nathan, Carl

    2015-10-01

    The search for drugs that can kill replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces practical bottlenecks. Measurement of CFU and discrimination of bacteriostatic from bactericidal activity are costly in compounds, supplies, labor, and time. Testing compounds against M. tuberculosis under conditions that prevent the replication of M. tuberculosis often involves a second phase of the test in which conditions are altered to permit the replication of bacteria that survived the first phase. False-positive determinations of activity against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis may arise from carryover of compounds from the nonreplicating stage of the assay that act in the replicating stage. We mitigate these problems by carrying out a 96-well microplate liquid MIC assay and then transferring an aliquot of each well to a second set of plates in which each well contains agar supplemented with activated charcoal. After 7 to 10 days-about 2 weeks sooner than required to count CFU-fluorometry reveals whether M. tuberculosis bacilli in each well have replicated extensively enough to reduce a resazurin dye added for the final hour. This charcoal agar resazurin assay (CARA) distinguishes between bacterial biomasses in any two wells that differ by 2 to 3 log10 CFU. The CARA thus serves as a pretest and semiquantitative surrogate for longer, more laborious, and expensive CFU-based assays, helps distinguish bactericidal from bacteriostatic activity, and identifies compounds that are active under replicating conditions, nonreplicating conditions, or both. Results for 14 antimycobacterial compounds, including tuberculosis (TB) drugs, revealed that PA-824 (pretomanid) and TMC207 (bedaquiline) are largely bacteriostatic. PMID:26239979

  6. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity and cytotoxicity of Calophyllum brasiliense Cambess (Clusiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Claudia Terencio Agostinho; Brenzan, Mislaine Adriana; Scodro, Regiane Bertin de Lima; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Lopes, Luciana Dias Ghiraldi; Siqueira, Vera Lucia Dias; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the in vitro anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity and the cytotoxicity of dichloromethane extract and pure compounds from the leaves of Calophyllum brasiliense. Purification of the dichloromethane extract yielded the pure compounds (-) mammea A/BB (1), (-) mammea B/BB (2) and amentoflavone (3). The compound structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and spectrometric data. The contents of bioactive compounds in the extracts were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet detector. The anti-M. tuberculosis activity of the extracts and the pure compounds was evaluated using a resazurin microtitre assay plate. The cytotoxicity assay was performed in J774G.8 macrophages using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide colourimetric method. The quantification of the dichloromethane extract showed (1) and (2) at concentrations of 31.86 ± 2.6 and 8.24 ± 1.1 µg/mg of extract, respectively. The dichloromethane and aqueous extracts showed anti-M. tuberculosis H37Rv activity of 62.5 and 125 µg/mL, respectively. Coumarins (1) and (2) showed minimal inhibitory concentration ranges of 31.2 and 62.5 µg/mL against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and clinical isolates. Compound (3) showed no activity against M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The selectivity index ranged from 0.59-1.06. We report the activity of the extracts and coumarins from the leaves of C. brasiliense against M. tuberculosis. PMID:24676652

  7. Latent Tuberculosis in Health Care Workers Exposed to Active Tuberculosis in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Khamis, Faryal; Al-Lawati, Adil; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al-Abri, Seif; Al-Naamani, Jaleelah; Al-Harthi, Harith; Al-Jardani, Amina; Al-Harthi, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Data on the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in healthcare workers (HCW) in Oman and the Arabian Gulf is scarce. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis (LTB) among HCW exposed to active TB in one of the tertiary care hospitals in Muscat. Methods Exposed HCW were screened for LTB from January to June 2012 using skin tuberculin and serum interferon tests. Candidates were followed-up for a total of nine months. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Results A total of 371 exposed HCW were involved in the study. The incidence of LTB in exposed HCW was 33.2% (n = 123). Almost 54% (66/123) of the HCW started treatment and only 42.4% (28/66) completed the full nine-month treatment course. Conclusions The high prevalence of LTBI in exposed HCW merits further evaluation of the screening and treatment programs in the country. Future countrywide studies are warranted to provide more precise statistics on the prevalence and management of this public health issue. PMID:27403243

  8. Microfold Cells Actively Translocate Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Initiate Infection.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vidhya R; Franco, Luis H; Zacharia, Vineetha M; Khan, Haaris S; Stamm, Chelsea E; You, Wu; Marciano, Denise K; Yagita, Hideo; Levine, Beth; Shiloh, Michael U

    2016-08-01

    The prevailing paradigm is that tuberculosis infection is initiated when patrolling alveolar macrophages and dendritic cells within the terminal alveolus ingest inhaled Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, definitive data for this model are lacking. Among the epithelial cells of the upper airway, a specialized epithelial cell known as a microfold cell (M cell) overlies various components of mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue. Here, using multiple mouse models, we show that Mtb invades via M cells to initiate infection. Intranasal Mtb infection in mice lacking M cells either genetically or by antibody depletion resulted in reduced invasion and dissemination to draining lymph nodes. M cell-depleted mice infected via aerosol also had delayed dissemination to lymph nodes and reduced mortality. Translocation of Mtb across two M cell transwell models was rapid and transcellular. Thus, M cell translocation is a vital entry mechanism that contributes to the pathogenesis of Mtb. PMID:27452467

  9. Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator in suspected acute myocardial infarction. The ASSET Study.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, R G

    1989-05-01

    Intravenous rtPA (total dose, 100 mg over 3 h) was compared with placebo in a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial in 5,011 patients with suspected AMI of less than 5 h duration. No ECG or enzymatic confirmation of the diagnosis was required for study entry. At 1 month 9.8% of patients given placebo had died compared with 7.2% of those who received rtPA (2.6% actual reduction, 26% relative reduction, with 95% confidence intervals of 11-39%). The majority of deaths occurred in patients who had an in-hospital diagnosis of MI (72% in both groups), with a 1-month infarct mortality of 13.1% in the placebo limb and 9.4% in the rtPA limb (relative reduction 28%, 95% CI, 14-41%). Approximately 18% of patients in both groups had a normal ECG on entry to the trial, and at 1 month the fatality was 1.6% in the rtPA group and 3.0% in the placebo group. Treatment with rtPA did not reduce the number of patients with normal ECGs from developing MI (28% rtPA vs 24% placebo). Treatment with rtPA was associated with significantly more bleeding episodes, the vast majority of which were clinically minor. The risk of all strokes in the rtPA group was similar to that in the placebo group (1.1% vs 1.0%). Treatment with rtPA was unaccompanied by either allergic or hypotensive episodes, and, among rtPA treated patients, there was no increase in clinically important ventricular dysrhythmias. Neither age nor time from onset of symptoms reduced the benefit from rtPA. PMID:2495910

  10. ‘Black bronchoscopy’: a case of active mycobacterial tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Inaty, Hanine; Arora, Ayush; Diacovo, Julia M.; Mehta, Atul

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old male presents with chronic cough and hemoptysis. Computed tomography of the chest revealed a left lower lobe (LLL) area of consolidation with prominent ipsilateral hilar lymphadenopathy. Bronchoscopic airway examination revealed black mucosal discoloration and airway narrowing at the superior segment of the LLL. Bronchoalveolar lavage from the corresponding site grew mycobacterial tuberculosis. The patient's symptoms subsided with anti-tuberculous therapy with a significant decrease in the size of the LLL mass. PMID:27471594

  11. 'Black bronchoscopy': a case of active mycobacterial tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Inaty, Hanine; Arora, Ayush; Diacovo, Julia M; Mehta, Atul

    2016-07-01

    A 63-year-old male presents with chronic cough and hemoptysis. Computed tomography of the chest revealed a left lower lobe (LLL) area of consolidation with prominent ipsilateral hilar lymphadenopathy. Bronchoscopic airway examination revealed black mucosal discoloration and airway narrowing at the superior segment of the LLL. Bronchoalveolar lavage from the corresponding site grew mycobacterial tuberculosis. The patient's symptoms subsided with anti-tuberculous therapy with a significant decrease in the size of the LLL mass. PMID:27471594

  12. A prospective cohort study of latent tuberculosis in adult close contacts of active pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Hyo; Lee, Seung Jun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kim, Ho Cheol; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Hee Jin; Menzies, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in adult close contacts of active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients in Korea. Methods: Adult close contacts of active pulmonary TB patients were recruited at a regional tertiary hospital in Korea. The participants were tested for LTBI using the tuberculin skin test (TST) and/or QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) test. LTBI patients, who consented to treatment, were randomly assigned to receive isoniazid for 9 months (9INH) or rifampin for 4 months (4RIF). Results: We examined 189 adult close contacts (> 18 years) of 107 active pulmonary TB patients. The TST and QFT-G were positive (≥ 10 mm) in 75/183 (39.7%) and 45/118 (38.1%) tested participants, respectively. Among 88 TST or QFT-G positive LTBI participants, 45 participants were randomly assigned to receive 4RIF (n = 21) or 9INH (n = 24), respectively. The average treatment duration for the 4RIF and 9INH groups was 3.3 ± 1.3 and 6.1 ± 2.7 months, respectively. Treatment was completed in 25 participants (4RIF, n = 16; 9INH, n = 9). LTBI participants who accepted treatment were more likely to be women and have more cavitary lesions on the chest radiographs of index cases and positive TST and QFT-G results compared to those who refused treatment. Conclusions: About 40% of adult close contacts of active pulmonary TB patients had LTBI; about 50% of these LTBI participants agreed to treatment. PMID:27052266

  13. Radioiodinated DPA-713 Imaging Correlates with Bactericidal Activity of Tuberculosis Treatments in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Alvaro A.; Pokkali, Supriya; DeMarco, Vincent P.; Klunk, Mariah; Mease, Ronnie C.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Current tools for monitoring response to tuberculosis treatments have several limitations. Noninvasive biomarkers could accelerate tuberculosis drug development and clinical studies, but to date little progress has been made in developing new imaging technologies for this application. In this study, we developed pulmonary single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using radioiodinated DPA-713 to serially monitor the activity of tuberculosis treatments in live mice, which develop necrotic granulomas and cavitary lesions. C3HeB/FeJ mice were aerosol infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and administered either a standard or a highly active bedaquiline-containing drug regimen. Serial 125I-DPA-713 SPECT imaging was compared with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and standard microbiology. Ex vivo studies were performed to characterize and correlate DPA-713 imaging with cellular and cytokine responses. Pulmonary 125I-DPA-713 SPECT, but not 18F-FDG PET, was able to correctly identify the bactericidal activities of the two tuberculosis treatments as early as 4 weeks after the start of treatment (P < 0.03). DPA-713 readily penetrated the fibrotic rims of necrotic and cavitary lesions. A time-dependent decrease in both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels was observed with treatments, with 125I-DPA-713 SPECT correlating best with tissue TNF-α levels (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.01). 124I-DPA-713 was also evaluated as a PET probe and demonstrated a 4.0-fold-higher signal intensity in the infected tuberculous lesions than uninfected controls (P = 0.03). These studies provide proof of concept for application of a novel noninvasive imaging biomarker to monitor tuberculosis treatments, with the potential for application for humans. PMID:25403669

  14. Radioiodinated DPA-713 imaging correlates with bactericidal activity of tuberculosis treatments in mice.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Alvaro A; Pokkali, Supriya; DeMarco, Vincent P; Klunk, Mariah; Mease, Ronnie C; Foss, Catherine A; Pomper, Martin G; Jain, Sanjay K

    2015-01-01

    Current tools for monitoring response to tuberculosis treatments have several limitations. Noninvasive biomarkers could accelerate tuberculosis drug development and clinical studies, but to date little progress has been made in developing new imaging technologies for this application. In this study, we developed pulmonary single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using radioiodinated DPA-713 to serially monitor the activity of tuberculosis treatments in live mice, which develop necrotic granulomas and cavitary lesions. C3HeB/FeJ mice were aerosol infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and administered either a standard or a highly active bedaquiline-containing drug regimen. Serial (125)I-DPA-713 SPECT imaging was compared with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and standard microbiology. Ex vivo studies were performed to characterize and correlate DPA-713 imaging with cellular and cytokine responses. Pulmonary (125)I-DPA-713 SPECT, but not (18)F-FDG PET, was able to correctly identify the bactericidal activities of the two tuberculosis treatments as early as 4 weeks after the start of treatment (P < 0.03). DPA-713 readily penetrated the fibrotic rims of necrotic and cavitary lesions. A time-dependent decrease in both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels was observed with treatments, with (125)I-DPA-713 SPECT correlating best with tissue TNF-α levels (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.01). (124)I-DPA-713 was also evaluated as a PET probe and demonstrated a 4.0-fold-higher signal intensity in the infected tuberculous lesions than uninfected controls (P = 0.03). These studies provide proof of concept for application of a novel noninvasive imaging biomarker to monitor tuberculosis treatments, with the potential for application for humans. PMID:25403669

  15. The in vitro activity of beta-lactamase inhibitors in combination with cephalosporins against M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, C H; Yang, M H; Lin, J S; Lee, Y C; Perng, R P

    1995-04-01

    Although there are reports that the addition of a beta-lactamase inhibitor to ampicillin or amoxicillin greatly improves their in vitro activity against M. tuberculosis, there are no written reports about the antituberculosis effects of beta-lactamase inhibitors in combination with cephalosporins against M. tuberculosis. In this report, we have determined the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 5 cephalosporins with or without combination with beta-lactamase inhibitor against M. tuberculosis strains isolated from patients before antituberculosis treatment and checked the production of beta-lactamase by bacteria before this procedure. Four strains of M. tuberculosis were contaminated during the experiment, and all the other 16 strains hydrolyzed the nitrocefin disc, thus indicating a beta-lactamase producer. The MICs of cephalosporins alone against M. tuberculosis were 200-400 micrograms/ml for ceforanide, 100-400 micrograms/ml for cephapirin, 400-1600 micrograms/ml for cefamandole, 200-1600 micrograms/ml for cefotaxime, and 800-1600 micrograms/ml for ceftriaxone. After adding the equimolar concentrations of sulbactam, the MICs were reduced to 100-200 micrograms/ml for ceforanide, 12.5-100 micrograms/ml for cephapirin, 100-400 micrograms/ml for cefamandole, 25-200 micrograms/ml for cefotaxime, and 100-800 micrograms/ml for ceftriaxone. We concluded that sulbactam enhanced the antituberculosis effect of cephalosporins. PMID:7624446

  16. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; et al

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and proteinmore » degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.« less

  17. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.

  18. Functional analysis of TPM domain containing Rv2345 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies its phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Avni; Eniyan, Kandasamy; Sinha, Swati; Lynn, Andrew Michael; Bajpai, Urmi

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the causal agent of tuberculosis, the second largest infectious disease. With the rise of multi-drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis, serious challenge lies ahead of us in treating the disease. The availability of complete genome sequence of Mtb has improved the scope for identifying new proteins that would not only further our understanding of biology of the organism but could also serve to discover new drug targets. In this study, Rv2345, a hypothetical membrane protein of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, which is reported to be a putative ortholog of ZipA cell division protein has been assigned function through functional annotation using bioinformatics tools followed by experimental validation. Sequence analysis showed Rv2345 to have a TPM domain at its N-terminal region and predicted it to have phosphatase activity. The TPM domain containing region of Rv2345 was cloned and expressed using pET28a vector in Escherichia coli and purified by Nickel affinity chromatography. The purified TPM domain was tested in vitro and our results confirmed it to have phosphatase activity. The enzyme activity was first checked and optimized with pNPP as substrate, followed by using ATP, which was also found to be used as substrate by the purified protein. Hence sequence analysis followed by in vitro studies characterizes TPM domain of Rv2345 to contain phosphatase activity. PMID:25782739

  19. Characterization of the helicase activity and substrate specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis UvrD.

    PubMed

    Curti, Elena; Smerdon, Stephen J; Davis, Elaine O

    2007-03-01

    UvrD is a helicase that is widely conserved in gram-negative bacteria. A uvrD homologue was identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the basis of the homology of its encoded protein with Escherichia coli UvrD, with which it shares 39% amino acid identity, distributed throughout the protein. The gene was cloned, and a histidine-tagged form of the protein was expressed and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein had in vitro ATPase activity that was dependent upon the presence of DNA. Oligonucleotides as short as four nucleotides were sufficient to promote the ATPase activity. The DNA helicase activity of the enzyme was only fueled by ATP and dATP. UvrD preferentially unwound 3'-single-stranded tailed duplex substrates over 5'-single-stranded ones, indicating that the protein had a duplex-unwinding activity with 3'-to-5' polarity. A 3' single-stranded DNA tail of 18 nucleotides was required for effective unwinding. By using a series of synthetic oligonucleotide substrates, we demonstrated that M. tuberculosis UvrD has an unwinding preference towards nicked DNA duplexes and stalled replication forks, representing the likely sites of action in vivo. The potential role of M. tuberculosis UvrD in maintenance of bacterial genomic integrity makes it a promising target for drug design against M. tuberculosis. PMID:17158674

  20. Micrococcin P1 - A bactericidal thiopeptide active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Degiacomi, Giulia; Personne, Yoann; Mondésert, Guillaume; Ge, Xueliang; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Boldrin, Francesca; Goel, Pavitra; Peisker, Kristin; Benjak, Andrej; Barrio, Maria Belén; Ventura, Marcello; Brown, Amanda C; Leblanc, Véronique; Bauer, Armin; Sanyal, Suparna; Cole, Stewart T; Lagrange, Sophie; Parish, Tanya; Manganelli, Riccardo

    2016-09-01

    The lack of proper treatment for serious infectious diseases due to the emergence of multidrug resistance reinforces the need for the discovery of novel antibiotics. This is particularly true for tuberculosis (TB) for which 3.7% of new cases and 20% of previously treated cases are estimated to be caused by multi-drug resistant strains. In addition, in the case of TB, which claimed 1.5 million lives in 2014, the treatment of the least complicated, drug sensitive cases is lengthy and disagreeable. Therefore, new drugs with novel targets are urgently needed to control resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. In this manuscript we report the characterization of the thiopeptide micrococcin P1 as an anti-tubercular agent. Our biochemical experiments show that this antibiotic inhibits the elongation step of protein synthesis in mycobacteria. We have further identified micrococcin resistant mutations in the ribosomal protein L11 (RplK); the mutations were located in the proline loop at the N-terminus. Reintroduction of the mutations into a clean genetic background, confirmed that they conferred resistance, while introduction of the wild type RplK allele into resistant strains re-established sensitivity. We also identified a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. These data, in good agreement with previous structural studies suggest that also in M. tuberculosis micrococcin P1 functions by binding to the cleft between the 23S rRNA and the L11 protein loop, thus interfering with the binding of elongation factors Tu and G (EF-Tu and EF-G) and inhibiting protein translocation. PMID:27553416

  1. All-trans retinoic acid triggered antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is dependent on NPC2

    PubMed Central

    Inkeles, Megan S.; De Leon, Avelino; Pellegrini, Matteo; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Liu, Philip T.

    2014-01-01

    A role for vitamin A in host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been suggested through epidemiological and in vitro studies; however, the mechanism is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that vitamin A-triggered antimicrobial activity against M. tuberculosis requires expression of Niemann-Pick disease type C2 (NPC2). Comparison of monocytes stimulated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3), the biologically active forms of vitamin A and vitamin D, respectively, indicates that ATRA and 1,25D3 induce mechanistically distinct antimicrobial activities. Stimulation of primary human monocytes with ATRA did not result in expression of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin, which is required for 1,25D3 antimicrobial activity. In contrast, ATRA triggers a reduction in the total cellular cholesterol concentration, whereas 1,25D3 did not. Blocking ATRA-induced cellular cholesterol reduction inhibits antimicrobial activity as well. Bioinformatic analysis of ATRA and 1,25D3 induced gene profiles suggests Niemann-Pick disease type C2 (NPC2) is a key gene in ATRA-induced cholesterol regulation. Knockdown experiments demonstrate that ATRA-mediated decrease of total cellular cholesterol content and increase in lysosomal acidification are both dependent upon expression of NPC2. Expression of NPC2 was lower in caseous tuberculosis granulomas and M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes compared to normal lung and uninfected cells, respectively. Loss of NPC2 expression ablated ATRA-induced antimicrobial activity. Taken together, these results suggest that the vitamin A-mediated antimicrobial mechanism against M. tuberculosis requires NPC2-dependent expression and function, indicating a key role for cellular cholesterol regulation in the innate immune response. PMID:24501203

  2. [Imaging and Laboratory Diagnostics for Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Bauer, C M; Schmähl, A; Kreuter, M

    2016-05-01

    Diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is difficult, since symptoms are often very unspecific or lacking. However active, prompt and accurate diagnosis is the key element in the public health response to tuberculosis and the cornerstone of tuberculosis control. Different diagnostic methods for an assured diagnosis of TB are necessary. Chest radiography is a useful keystone to identify tuberculosis, but diagnosis of tuberculosis cannot be established by radiography alone. CT scanning is used in patients without pathological chest radiography but clinically suspected active TB and to differentiate TB from other diseases. Radiological appearance is primarily determined by the immune status of patients and caverns and disseminated disease foci are often observed. Laboratory diagnostic methods include microscopic identification of acid-fast mycobacteria from any body fluid (especially sputum), as well as isolation and characterisation of mycobacteria in culture. It is then possible to type the pathogens by the shape of their colony, their growth behavior and their biochemical characteristics. These methods are regarded as the gold standard in diagnosis of active TB. In patients who are highly suspected of having TB, but whose sputum specimens tested negative for mycobacteria, a nucleic acid amplification test is additionally performed. Moreover, sensitivity testing with first and second line antitubercular drugs is applied as standard. Laboratory diagnostic testing of cellular immunity against pathogenic mycobacteria employs the tuberculin skin test (TST, Mantoux tuberculin test) or the more specific interferon γ test to determine γ interferon released by T lymphocytes stimulated in vitro. The new ELISA and ELISPOT procedures exhibit higher test specificity and less cross reactivity to NTM (non-tuberculosis mycobacteria), are independent of BCG-vaccination status and correlate better with the degree of exposure than does the TST. PMID:27187878

  3. Enhancement of antibiotic activity by efflux inhibitors against multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Tatiane; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Maschmann, Raquel; Ramos, Daniela; von Groll, Andrea; Rossetti, Maria L.; Silva, Pedro A.; Viveiros, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis continues to increase and new approaches for its treatment are necessary. The identification of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates presenting efflux as part of their resistant phenotype has a major impact in tuberculosis treatment. In this work, we used a checkerboard procedure combined with the tetrazolium microplate-based assay (TEMA) to study single combinations between antituberculosis drugs and efflux inhibitors (EIs) against multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates using the fully susceptible strain H37Rv as reference. Efflux activity was studied on a real-time basis by a fluorometric method that uses ethidium bromide as efflux substrate. Quantification of efflux pump genes mRNA transcriptional levels were performed by RT-qPCR. The fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC) indicated synergistic activity for the interactions between isoniazid, rifampicin, amikacin, ofloxacin, and ethidium bromide plus the EIs verapamil, thioridazine and chlorpromazine. The FICs ranged from 0.25, indicating a four-fold reduction on the MICs, to 0.015, 64-fold reduction. The detection of active efflux by real-time fluorometry showed that all strains presented intrinsic efflux activity that contributes to the overall resistance which can be inhibited in the presence of the EIs. The quantification of the mRNA levels of the most important efflux pump genes on these strains shows that they are intrinsically predisposed to expel toxic compounds as the exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics were not necessary to increase the pump mRNA levels when compared with the non-exposed counterpart. The results obtained in this study confirm that the intrinsic efflux activity contributes to the overall resistance in multidrug resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and that the inhibition of efflux pumps by the EIs can enhance the clinical effect of antibiotics that are their substrates. PMID:25972842

  4. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  5. Transcriptional suppression of IL-27 production by Mycobacterium tuberculosis-activated p38 MAPK via inhibition of AP-1 binding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jidong; Qian, Xuesong; Ning, Huan; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Hoft, Daniel F; Liu, Jianguo

    2011-05-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a major global challenge to human health care, and the mechanisms of how M. tuberculosis evades host immune surveillance to favor its survival are still largely unknown. In this study, we found that bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and viable M. tuberculosis as well as M. tuberculosis lysates could activate IL-27 expression in human and mouse macrophages by induction of p28 subunit transcription. However, in parallel with these effects, BCG and M. tuberculosis lysate stimulation of macrophages induced activation of p38 MAPK signaling molecules MLK3/MKK3/MK2 to prevent maximal IL-27 production. M. tuberculosis lysate-induced p28 transcription was dependent on MyD88 signaling pathway. AP-1/c-Fos was shown to bind directly to the p28 promoter and induce p28 expression after M. tuberculosis lysate stimulation. Overexpression of p38α inhibited the binding of c-Fos to the p28 promoter but had no effect on c-Fos protein expression or phosphorylation in response to M. tuberculosis lysate stimulation. Furthermore, blockade of p38 by SB203580 enhanced M. tuberculosis-induced AP-1 binding to the p28 promoter. Importantly, we show that adding exogenous IL-27 to increase the levels produced by PBMCs stimulated with live mycobacteria enhanced the ability of BCG-expanded T cells to inhibit intracellular mycobacterial growth in human macrophages. Taken together, our data demonstrate that mycobacterial stimulation induces both IL-27 production and p38 MAPK activation. Strategies designed to tip the balance toward positive regulation of p28 induction by mycobacteria could lead to enhanced protective tuberculosis immunity. PMID:21482740

  6. Coincident Helminth Infection Modulates Systemic Inflammation and Immune Activation in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Sridhar, Rathinam; Hanna, Luke E.; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background Helminth infections are known to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating responses associated with inflammation and immune activation (reflecting disease activity and/or severity) in TB is not known. Methodology We measured markers of inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary TB individuals (ATB) with co-incidental Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection. These included systemic levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors and immune activation markers. As a control, we measured the systemic levels of the same molecules in TB-uninfected individuals (NTB) with or without Ss infection. Principal Findings Our data confirm that ATB is associated with elevated levels of the various measured molecules when compared to those seen in NTB. Our data also reveal that co-incident Ss infection in ATB individuals is associated with significantly decreased circulating levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the systemic immune activation markers, sCD14 and sCD163. These changes are specific to ATB since they are absent in NTB individuals with Ss infection. Conclusions Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the markers associated with TB disease activity and severity and indicate that co-incidental helminth infections might dampen the severity of TB disease. PMID:25375117

  7. Antitubercular activity of disulfiram, an antialcoholism drug, against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Horita, Yasuhiro; Takii, Takemasa; Yagi, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Kenji; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Inagaki, Emi; Kremer, Laurent; Sato, Yasuo; Kuroishi, Ryuji; Lee, Yoosa; Makino, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Hajime; Hasegawa, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2012-08-01

    The antimycobacterial activities of disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) clinical isolates were evaluated in vitro. Both DSF and DDC exhibited potent antitubercular activities against 42 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, including MDR/XDR-TB strains. Moreover, DSF showed remarkable bactericidal activity ex vivo and in vivo. Therefore, DSF might be a drug repurposed for the treatment of MDR/XDR-TB. PMID:22615274

  8. Antitubercular Activity of Disulfiram, an Antialcoholism Drug, against Multidrug- and Extensively Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Kenji; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Inagaki, Emi; Kremer, Laurent; Sato, Yasuo; Kuroishi, Ryuji; Lee, YooSa; Makino, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Hajime; Hasegawa, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2012-01-01

    The antimycobacterial activities of disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) clinical isolates were evaluated in vitro. Both DSF and DDC exhibited potent antitubercular activities against 42 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, including MDR/XDR-TB strains. Moreover, DSF showed remarkable bactericidal activity ex vivo and in vivo. Therefore, DSF might be a drug repurposed for the treatment of MDR/XDR-TB. PMID:22615274

  9. [Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2006-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology (SPR) and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology (SPP) have developed guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (AT) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD), namely rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonists. Due to the high risk of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with IJD, LTBI and AT screening should be performed as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis. Even if TB screening was performed at the beginning of the disease, the evaluation should be repeated before starting anti-TNF-alpha therapy. When TB (LTBI orAT) treatment is indicated, it should be performed before the beginning of anti-TNF-alpha therapy. If the IJD activity requires urgent anti-TNF-alpha therapy, these drugs can be started after two months of antituberculosis therapy in AT cases, or after one month in LTBI cases. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If abnormal, e.g. Gohn complex, the patient should be treated as LTBI; residual lesions require the exclusion of AT and patients with history of untreated or incomplete TB treatment should be treated as LTBI. In cases of suspected active lesions, AT diagnosis should be confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test (TST), with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If induration is less than 5 mm, the test should be repeated after 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and should be considered negative if the result is again inferior to 5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment. IfTST is performed in immunosupressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test. PMID:17094335

  10. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors: March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFalpha therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn s complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk/benefit assessment. PMID:18344925

  11. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors - March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFα therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFα therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFα therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn's complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions, ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-α therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk / benefit assessment. Rev Port Pneumol 2007; XIV (2): 271-283. PMID:25966834

  12. Target prediction for an open access set of compounds active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Papadatos, George; Yang, Lun; Wallace, Iain M; Kumar, Vinod; Pieper, Ursula; Sali, Andrej; Brown, James R; Overington, John P; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects an estimated two billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. The development of new anti-TB therapeutics is required, because of the emergence of multi-drug resistance strains as well as co-infection with other pathogens, especially HIV. Recently, the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline published the results of a high-throughput screen (HTS) of their two million compound library for anti-mycobacterial phenotypes. The screen revealed 776 compounds with significant activity against the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain, including a subset of 177 prioritized compounds with high potency and low in vitro cytotoxicity. The next major challenge is the identification of the target proteins. Here, we use a computational approach that integrates historical bioassay data, chemical properties and structural comparisons of selected compounds to propose their potential targets in M. tuberculosis. We predicted 139 target--compound links, providing a necessary basis for further studies to characterize the mode of action of these compounds. The results from our analysis, including the predicted structural models, are available to the wider scientific community in the open source mode, to encourage further development of novel TB therapeutics. PMID:24098102

  13. Target Prediction for an Open Access Set of Compounds Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Papadatos, George; Yang, Lun; Wallace, Iain M.; Kumar, Vinod; Pieper, Ursula; Sali, Andrej; Brown, James R.; Overington, John P.; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects an estimated two billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. The development of new anti-TB therapeutics is required, because of the emergence of multi-drug resistance strains as well as co-infection with other pathogens, especially HIV. Recently, the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline published the results of a high-throughput screen (HTS) of their two million compound library for anti-mycobacterial phenotypes. The screen revealed 776 compounds with significant activity against the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain, including a subset of 177 prioritized compounds with high potency and low in vitro cytotoxicity. The next major challenge is the identification of the target proteins. Here, we use a computational approach that integrates historical bioassay data, chemical properties and structural comparisons of selected compounds to propose their potential targets in M. tuberculosis. We predicted 139 target - compound links, providing a necessary basis for further studies to characterize the mode of action of these compounds. The results from our analysis, including the predicted structural models, are available to the wider scientific community in the open source mode, to encourage further development of novel TB therapeutics. PMID:24098102

  14. Pancreas-specific lipase concentrations and amylase and lipase activities in the peritoneal fluid of dogs with suspected pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Marie A; Hill, Steve L; Sunico, Sarena; Suchodolski, Jan S; Robertson, Jane E; Steiner, Joerg M

    2014-09-01

    Diagnosing acute pancreatitis in the dog can be challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of pancreas-specific lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI), and the activities of amylase and lipase, in the peritoneal fluid from a population of dogs diagnosed with acute pancreatitis based on clinical signs, ultrasonographic findings and serum cPLI concentrations. In a prospective study, cPLI concentrations, and amylase and lipase activities, were measured in the peritoneal fluid of 14 dogs with pancreatitis and 19 dogs with non-pancreatic disease. The sensitivity and specificity of peritoneal fluid cPLI concentration (cut-off value 500 µg/L) were 100.0% (95% confidence interval, CI, 80.7-100.0%) and 94.7% (95% CI 76.7-99.7%), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of peritoneal fluid amylase (cut-off value 1050 U/L) and lipase activities (cut-off value 500 U/L) were 71.4% (95% CI 44.5-90.2%) and 84.2% (95% CI 62.8-95.8%) for amylase activity, and 92.9% (95% CI 69.5-99.6%) and 94.7% (95% CI 76.7-99.7%) for lipase activity, respectively. In conclusion, peritoneal fluid cPLI concentration was highly sensitive as a complementary diagnostic tool in a group of dogs with suspected acute pancreatitis. Peritoneal fluid lipase activity was not as sensitive as cPLI concentration, but may also support a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs. PMID:25106805

  15. Cathepsin L maturation and activity is impaired in macrophages harboring M. avium and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Rajeev M; Mampe, Stephanie; Shaffer, Brian; Erickson, Ann H; Bryant, Paula

    2006-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages demonstrate diminished capacity to present antigens via class II MHC molecules. Since successful class II MHC-restricted antigen presentation relies on the actions of endocytic proteases, we asked whether the activities of cathepsins (Cat) B, S and L-three major lysosomal cysteine proteases-are modulated in macrophages infected with pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. Infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with either Mycobacterium avium or M. tuberculosis had no obvious effect on Cat B or Cat S activity. In contrast, the activity of Cat L was altered in infected cells. Specifically, whereas the 24-kDa two-chain mature form of active Cat L predominated in uninfected cells, we observed an increase in the steady-state activity of the precursor single-chain (30 kDa) and 25-kDa two-chain forms of the enzyme in cells infected with either M. avium or M. tuberculosis. Pulse-chase analyses revealed that maturation of nascent, single-chain Cat L into the 25-kDa two-chain form was impaired in infected macrophages, and that maturation into the 24-kDa two-chain form did not occur. Consistent with these data, M. avium infection inhibited the IFNgamma-induced secretion of active two-chain Cat L by macrophages. Viable bacilli were not required to disrupt Cat L maturation, suggesting that a constitutively expressed mycobacterial component was responsible. The absence of the major active form of lysosomal Cat L in M. avium- and M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages may influence the types of T cell epitopes generated in these antigen-presenting cells, and/or the rate of class II MHC peptide loading. PMID:16636015

  16. Detection of Tuberculosis Infection Hotspots Using Activity Spaces Based Spatial Approach in an Urban Tokyo, from 2003 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Kiyohiko; Ohkado, Akihiro; Uchimura, Kazuhiro; Murase, Yoshiro; Tatsumi, Yuriko; Kayebeta, Aya; Watanabe, Yu; Ishikawa, Nobukatsu

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying ongoing tuberculosis infection sites is crucial for breaking chains of transmission in tuberculosis-prevalent urban areas. Previous studies have pointed out that detection of local accumulation of tuberculosis patients based on their residential addresses may be limited by a lack of matching between residences and tuberculosis infection sites. This study aimed to identify possible tuberculosis hotspots using TB genotype clustering statuses and a concept of “activity space”, a place where patients spend most of their waking hours. We further compared the spatial distribution by different residential statuses and describe urban environmental features of the detected hotspots. Methods Culture-positive tuberculosis patients notified to Shinjuku city from 2003 to 2011 were enrolled in this case-based cross-sectional study, and their demographic and clinical information, TB genotype clustering statuses, and activity space were collected. Spatial statistics (Global Moran’s I and Getis-Ord Gi* statistics) identified significant hotspots in 152 census tracts, and urban environmental features and tuberculosis patients’ characteristics in these hotspots were assessed. Results Of the enrolled 643 culture-positive tuberculosis patients, 416 (64.2%) were general inhabitants, 42 (6.5%) were foreign-born people, and 184 were homeless people (28.6%). The percentage of overall genotype clustering was 43.7%. Genotype-clustered general inhabitants and homeless people formed significant hotspots around a major railway station, whereas the non-clustered general inhabitants formed no hotspots. This suggested the detected hotspots of activity spaces may reflect ongoing tuberculosis transmission sites and were characterized by smaller residential floor size and a higher proportion of non-working households. Conclusions Activity space-based spatial analysis suggested possible TB transmission sites around the major railway station and it can assist in further

  17. [Smoking and tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Underner, Michel; Perriot, Jean

    2012-12-01

    Smoking and tuberculosis represent two major world health issues particularly in developing countries. Tobacco smoke increases risk of Mycobaterium tuberculosis infection by several means: alteration of muco-ciliary clearance, reduced alveolar macrophage activity; immune-depression of pulmonary lymphocytes, reduction of cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells, alteration of the activity of the pulmonary dendritic cells. Both active and passive smoking increases the risk of latent tubercular infection and of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. Active smoking increases the severity of pulmonary tuberculosis (gravity of radiological lesions). The diagnostic delay and recovery details are more important for smokers. Active smoking increases relapses of both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis after treatment with or without the Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) with poor observance of treatment. The mortality risk from tuberculosis is heightened among smokers. Smoking cessation represents an essential means of controlling tuberculosis epidemics in developing countries. PMID:22465718

  18. In vitro-in vivo activity relationship of substituted benzimidazole cell division inhibitors with activity against Mycobacteria tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Knudson, Susan E.; Kumar, Kunal; Awasthi, Divya; Ojima, Iwao; Slayden, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Structure based drug design was used to develop a compound library of novel 2,5,6- and 2,5,7-trisubstituted benzimidazoles. Three structural analogs, SB-P1G10, SB-P8B2 and SB-P3G2 were selected from this library based on previous studies for advanced study. In vitro studies revealed that SB-P8B2 and SB-P3G2 had sigmoidal kill-curves while in contrast SB-P1G10 showed a narrow zonal susceptibility. The in vitro studies also demonstrated that exposure to SB-P8B2 or SB-P3G2 was bactericidal, while SB-P1G10 treatment never resulted in complete killing. The dose curves for the three compounds against clinical isolates were comparable to their respective dose curves in the laboratory strain of M. tuberculosis. SB-P8B2 and SB-P3G2 exhibited antibacterial activity against non-replicating bacilli under low oxygen conditions. SB-P3G2 and SB-P1G10 were assessed in acute short-term animal models of tuberculosis, which showed that SB-P3G2 treatment demonstrated activity against M. tuberculosis. Together, these studies reveal an in vitro- in vivo relationship of the 2,5,6-trisubstituted benzimidazoles that serves as a criterion for advancing this class of cell division inhibitors into more resource intensive in vivo efficacy models such as the long-term murine model of tuberculosis and Pre-IND PK/PD studies. Specifically, these studies are the first demonstration of efficacy and an in vitro–in vivo activity relationship for 2,5,6-trisubstituted benzimidazoles. The in vivo activity presented in this manuscript substantiates this class of cell division inhibitors as having potency and efficacy against M. tuberculosis. PMID:24746463

  19. The role of Ca²⁺ in the activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Karkare, Shantanu; Yousafzai, Faridoon; Mitchenall, Lesley A; Maxwell, Anthony

    2012-10-01

    DNA gyrase is the only type II topoisomerase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and needs to catalyse DNA supercoiling, relaxation and decatenation reactions in order to fulfil the functions normally carried out by gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV in other bacteria. We have obtained evidence for the existence of a Ca(2+)-binding site in the GyrA subunit of M. tuberculosis gyrase. Ca(2+) cannot support topoisomerase reactions in the absence of Mg(2+), but partial removal of Ca(2+) from GyrA by dialysis against EGTA leads to a modest loss in relaxation activity that can be restored by adding back Ca(2+). More extensive removal of Ca(2+) by denaturation of GyrA and dialysis against EGTA results in an enzyme with greatly reduced enzyme activities. Mutation of the proposed Ca(2+)-binding residues also leads to loss of activity. We propose that Ca(2+) has a regulatory role in M. tuberculosis gyrase and suggest a model for the modulation of gyrase activity by Ca(2+) binding. PMID:22844097

  20. Comparative cytotoxic and anti-tuberculosis activity of Aplysina caissara marine sponge crude extracts.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Luciana G; Muccillo-Baisch, Ana L; Filgueira, Daza de M V B; Boyle, Robert T; Ramos, Daniela F; Soares, Andrea D; Lerner, Clea; Silva, Pedro A; Trindade, Gilma S

    2008-01-01

    Three crude extracts of Aplysina caissara, a marine sponge endemic to Brazil, were tested against a hepatoma cell line and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The results demonstrate that all extracts are toxic and capable of inhibiting cellular growth. Additionally, the extracts produced morphological aberrations and inhibited cell attachment to culture substrates. These effects were dose/time dependent. Our results also suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is not involved in the cytotoxic processes levied by the extracts employed in this study and that active metabolites are likely to be present in the polar fractions of the crude extracts. Finally, our results indicate that all three extracts exhibit a moderate anti-tuberculosis capacity, and that the removal of an extract's lipid fraction appears to diminish this activity. PMID:17826358

  1. Novel aryloxy azolyl chalcones with potent activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Marrapu, Vijay K; Chaturvedi, Vinita; Singh, Shubhra; Singh, Shyam; Sinha, Sudhir; Bhandari, Kalpana

    2011-09-01

    A series of twenty seven novel aryloxy azolyl chalcones were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for the growth inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Ten compounds from this series exhibited good activity with MIC in the range of 3.12-0.78 μg/mL and six of them were found non-toxic against VERO cells and MBMDMøs (mouse bone-marrow derived macrophages), were further evaluated ex-vivo for their potential to kill intracellular bacilli. Two compounds 4 and 19 showed 99% and 71% killing respectively, of intracellular bacilli in MBMDMøs infection model. Further, compound 19, an imidazolyl chalcone with a 2,4-difluorobenzyloxy moiety also exhibited moderate in vivo activity in mice against virulent M. tuberculosis, thus providing a new structural lead towards TB drug development. PMID:21764184

  2. Control measures to trace ≤ 15-year-old contacts of index cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Cláudia Di Lorenzo; de Melo, Angelita Cristine; de Oliveira, Lílian Ruth Silva; Froede, Emerson Lopes; Camargos, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This was descriptive study carried out in a medium-sized Brazilian city. In ≤ 15-year-old contacts of index cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis, we assessed compliance with the Brazilian national guidelines for tuberculosis control. We interviewed 43 contacts and their legal guardians. Approximately 80% of the contacts were not assessed by the municipal public health care system, and only 21% underwent tuberculin skin testing. The results obtained with the Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detector method suggest that health care teams have a biased attitude toward assessing such contacts and underscore the need for training health professionals regarding tuberculosis control programs. PMID:26578137

  3. FOXO3 rs12212067: T > G Association with Active Tuberculosis in Han Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjun; Zhu, Yaowu; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Feng; Peng, Jing; Hou, Hongyan; Sun, Ziyong

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that the human innate immune and adaptive immune response play important role in tuberculosis (TB) infection and progress. Emerging evidence shows that FOXO3 plays an important role in the human immune system. Recent research has shown that the FOXO3 genetic variants are associated malaria infection. In this study, 268 confirmed TB patients, 321 patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and 475 TB-free controls were recruited; the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs12212067: T > G in FOXO3 was genotyped using predesigned TaqMan® allelic discrimination assays. The results showed that the G allele of rs12212067 in FOXO3 was more common in health control and the latent TB group compared with the active TB group (p = 0.048, odds ratio (OR) 95 % confidence intervals (CI) = 1.37 (1.00-1.89); p = 0.042, OR 95 % CI = 1.42 (1.01-1.99), respectively); furthermore, within active TB patients, the G allele of rs12212067 in FOXO3 was more frequent in extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) group compared to pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) group (p = 0.035, OR 95 % CI = 0.57 (0.33-0.97). In conclusion, this study found that rs12212067 in FOXO3 was associated with increased risk of active TB. The minor G allele might be a protection factor which was found more common in latent TB patients and healthy controls than active TB patients. PMID:26223437

  4. Nitric oxide generated from isoniazid activation by KatG: source of nitric oxide and activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Graham S; Master, Sharon; Rusnak, Frank; Deretic, Vojo

    2004-08-01

    Isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) is a frontline antituberculosis agent. Once taken up by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, INH requires activation by the catalase-peroxidase KatG, converting INH from its prodrug form into a range of bactericidal reactive species. Here we used 15N-labeled INH together with electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping techniques to demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO*) is generated from oxidation at the hydrazide nitrogens during the activation of INH by M. tuberculosis KatG. We also observed that a specific scavenger of NO* provided protection against the antimycobacterial activity of INH in bacterial culture. No significant increases in mycobacterial protein nitration were detected, suggesting that NOdot; and not peroxynitrite, a nitrating metabolite of NO*, is involved in antimycobacterial action. In conclusion, INH-derived NO* has biological activity, which directly contributes to the antimycobacterial action of INH. PMID:15273113

  5. Gamma interferon release assay for monitoring of treatment response for active tuberculosis: an explosion in the spaghetti factory.

    PubMed

    Denkinger, Claudia M; Pai, Madhukar; Patel, Meena; Menzies, Dick

    2013-02-01

    Few studies have correlated the results of interferon (gamma interferon) release assays (IGRAs) with known markers of tuberculosis (TB) treatment response. We report the results of serial QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube assay (QFT) testing on 149 patients with active tuberculosis and correlate the results with smear and culture conversion. We show that QFT results do not offer much value for treatment monitoring of TB disease. PMID:23175268

  6. Impact of awareness drives and community-based active tuberculosis case finding in Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Parija, D; Patra, T K; Kumar, A M V; Swain, B K; Satyanarayana, S; Sreenivas, A; Chadha, V K; Moonan, P K; Oeltmann, J E

    2014-09-01

    India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control programme employs passive case detection. The new sputum smear-positive case detection rate is less than 70% in Odisha State. During April-June 2012, active case finding (ACF) was conducted through awareness drives and field-based tuberculosis (TB) screening in select communities with the lowest case detection rates. During the campaign, 240 sputum smear-positive TB cases were detected. The number of smear-positive cases detected increased by 11% relative to April-June 2011 in intervention communities compared to an 0.8% increase in non-intervention communities. ACF brought TB services closer to the community and increased TB case detection. PMID:25189560

  7. [Tuberculosis of ankle].

    PubMed

    Rubio Barbón, S; Rodríguez Cocina, B; Suárez del Villar Acebal, R; Calvo Rodríguez, C E; Villar López, A; Escalada Rodríguez, P; Torreblanca Gil, A

    2004-09-01

    The authors present a case of tuberculous arthritis of ankle with sinovial fluid and sputum aspirate Lowenstein positive (M. tuberculosis) in a patient non inmunocomprometid and review the clinical, diagnosis and treatment aspects of this entity, and show the difficult diagnosis in cases of radiology normal or low suspect. PMID:15476422

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1096 protein: gene cloning, protein expression, and peptidoglycan deacetylase activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many bacteria modulate and evade the immune defenses of their hosts through peptidoglycan (PG) deacetylation. The PG deacetylases from Streptococcus pneumonia, Listeria monocytogenes and Lactococcus lactis have been characterized. However, thus far, the PG deacetylase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been identified. Results In this study, we cloned the Rv1096 gene from the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain and expressed Rv1096 protein in both Escherichia coli and M. smegmatis. The results showed that the purified Rv1096 protein possessed metallo-dependent PG deacetylase activity, which increased in the presence of Co2+. The kinetic parameters of the PG deacetylase towards M. smegmatis PG as a substrate were as follows: Km, 0.910 ± 0.007 mM; Vmax, 0.514 ± 0.038 μMmin-1; and Kcat = 0.099 ± 0.007 (S-1). Additionally, the viability of M. smegmatis in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein was 109-fold higher than that of wild-type M. smegmatis after lysozyme treatment. Additionally, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein, M. smegmatis kept its regular shape, with an undamaged cell wall and smooth surface. These results indicate that Rv1096 caused deacetylation of cell wall PG, leading to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Conclusion We have determined that M. tuberculosis Rv1096 is a PG deacetylase. The PG deacetylase activity of Rv1096 contributed to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Our findings suggest that deacetylation of cell wall PG may be involved in evasion of host immune defenses by M. tuberculosis. PMID:24975018

  9. Measurement of phenotype and absolute number of circulating heparin-binding hemagglutinin, ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and purified protein derivative antigen-specific CD4 T cells can discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Paul; Barkham, Timothy M S; Tang, Wenying; Kemeny, David M; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee T

    2015-02-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used as adjunctive tests for the evaluation of suspected cases of active tuberculosis (TB). However, a positive test does not differentiate latent from active TB. We investigated whether flow cytometric measurement of novel combinations of intracellular cytokines and surface makers on CD4 T cells could differentiate between active and latent TB after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific proteins. Blood samples from 60 patients referred to the Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit for evaluation for active TB or as TB contacts were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6 and CFP-10, or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA). The CD4 T cell cytokine response (IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], interleukin-17A [IL-17A], interleukin-22 [IL-22], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and surface marker expression (CD27, CXCR3, and CD154) were then measured. We found that the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T cells, defined as CD154(+) TNF-α(+) cells that were negative for CD27 and positive for GM-CSF, gave the strongest discrimination between subjects with latent and those with active TB (area under the receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curve of 0.9277; P < 0.0001). Also, the proportions and absolute numbers of HBHA-specific CD4 T cells were significantly higher in those with latent TB infection, particularly CD154(+) TNF-α(+) IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+) and CD154(+) TNF-α(+) CXCR3(+). Finally, we found that the ratio of ESAT-6- and CFP-10-responding to HBHA-responding CD4 T cells was significantly different between the two study populations. In conclusion, we found novel markers of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 cells which differentiate between active and latent TB. PMID:25520147

  10. Role of Metal Ions on the Activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pyrazinamidase

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Patricia; Ferrer, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; Christiansen, Gina; Moreno-Román, Paola; Gutiérrez, Andrés H.; Sotelo, Jun; Evangelista, Wilfredo; Fuentes, Patricia; Rueda, Daniel; Flores, Myra; Olivera, Paula; Solis, José; Pesaresi, Alessandro; Lamba, Doriano; Zimic, Mirko

    2012-01-01

    Pyrazinamidase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyzes the conversion of pyrazinamide to the active molecule pyrazinoic acid. Reduction of pyrazinamidase activity results in a level of pyrazinamide resistance. Previous studies have suggested that pyrazinamidase has a metal-binding site and that a divalent metal cofactor is required for activity. To determine the effect of divalent metals on the pyrazinamidase, the recombinant wild-type pyrazinamidase corresponding to the H37Rv pyrazinamide-susceptible reference strain was expressed in Escherichia coli with and without a carboxy terminal. His-tagged pyrazinamidase was inactivated by metal depletion and reactivated by titration with divalent metals. Although Co2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+ restored pyrazinamidase activity, only Co2+ enhanced the enzymatic activity to levels higher than the wild-type pyrazinamidase. Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Mg2+ did not restore the activity under the conditions tested. Various recombinant mutated pyrazinamidases with appropriate folding but different enzymatic activities showed a differential pattern of recovered activity. X-ray fluorescence and atomic absorbance spectroscopy showed that recombinant wild-type pyrazinamidase expressed in E. coli most likely contained Zn. In conclusion, this study suggests that M. tuberculosis pyrazinamidase is a metalloenzyme that is able to coordinate several ions, but in vivo, it is more likely to coordinate Zn2+. However, in vitro, the metal-depleted enzyme could be reactivated by several divalent metals with higher efficiency than Zn. PMID:22764307

  11. Effect of serial subculturing on the genetic composition and cytotoxic activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Torres, C A; Castro-Garza, J; Ocampo-Candiani, J; Monot, M; Cole, S T; Vera-Cabrera, L

    2010-04-01

    Continuous subculture has been observed to produce changes in the virulence of micro-organisms, e.g. rabies virus, poliovirus and Mycobacterium bovis BCG. The latter has been used as a vaccine for tuberculosis for the last 100 years; however, in some instances its efficacy has been observed to be very low. In order to determine whether similar changes can be produced in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we selected four isolates, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, a Beijing strain (DR-689), and two more isolates with deletion of the phospholipase C locus (plcA-plcB-plcC ), and subjected them to serial culturing on Middlebrook 7H9 medium, with or without ox bile. After 100 passages, we performed RFLP-IS6110 analysis to determine whether genomic changes were produced. We also checked their genomic composition by microarray analysis. Changes in virulence were studied by measuring the cytotoxic effect of parental and subcultured isolates on a THP-1 macrophage monolayer. The most visible change was the change of position of an IS6110 band of approximately 1400 bp to approximately 1600 bp in the Beijing isolate subcultured in the ox bile medium. Analysis by microarray and PCR confirmation did not reveal any genomic changes. Cytotoxic activity was decreased in the isolates at levels close to that of BCG, and more consistently in those subcultured in the presence of ox bile. PMID:20056774

  12. Systematic Survey of Serine Hydrolase Activity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Defines Changes Associated with Persistence.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Corrie; Anderson, Lindsey N; Frando, Andrew; Sadler, Natalie C; Brown, Robert W; Smith, Richard D; Wright, Aaron T; Grundner, Christoph

    2016-02-18

    The transition from replication to non-replication underlies much of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) pathogenesis, as non- or slowly replicating Mtb are responsible for persistence and poor treatment outcomes. Therapeutic targeting of non-replicating populations is a priority for tuberculosis treatment, but few drug targets in non-replicating Mtb are currently known. Here, we directly measured the activity of the highly diverse and druggable serine hydrolases (SHs) during active replication and non-replication using activity-based proteomics. We predict SH activity for 78 proteins, including 27 proteins with unknown function, and identify 37 SHs that remain active in the absence of replication, providing a set of candidate persistence targets. Non-replication was associated with major shifts in SH activity. These activity changes were largely independent of SH abundance, indicating extensive post-translational regulation of SHs. By probing a large cross-section of druggable Mtb enzyme space during replication and non-replication, we identify new SHs and suggest new persistence targets. PMID:26853625

  13. Tuberculosis screening in patients with HIV: use of audit and feedback to improve quality of care in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Bjerrum, Stephanie; Bonsu, Frank; Hanson-Nortey, Nii Nortey; Kenu, Ernest; Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Andersen, Aase Bengaard; Bjerrum, Lars; Jarbøl, Dorte; Munck, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis screening of people living with HIV (PLHIV) can contribute to early tuberculosis diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. Evidence-based guidelines for tuberculosis screening are available, but literature assessing their implementation and the quality of clinical practice is scarce. Objectives To assess tuberculosis screening practices and the effectiveness of audit and performance feedback to improve quality of tuberculosis screening at HIV care clinics in Ghana. Design Healthcare providers at 10 large HIV care clinics prospectively registered patient consultations during May and October 2014, before and after a performance feedback intervention in August 2014. The outcomes of interest were overall tuberculosis suspicion rate during consultations and provider adherence to the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care and the World Health Organizations’ guidelines for symptom-based tuberculosis screening among PLHIV. Results Twenty-one healthcare providers registered a total of 2,666 consultations; 1,368 consultations before and 1,298 consultations after the feedback intervention. Tuberculosis suspicion rate during consultation increased from 12.6 to 20.9% after feedback (odds ratio, OR 1.83; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.09–3.09). Before feedback, sputum smear microscopy was requested for 58.7% of patients with suspected tuberculosis, for 47.2% of patients with cough ≥2 weeks, and for 27.5% of patients with a positive World Health Organization (WHO) symptom screen (any of current cough, fever, weight loss or night sweats). After feedback, patients with a positive WHO symptom screen were more likely to be suspected of tuberculosis (OR 2.21; 95% CI: 1.19–4.09) and referred for microscopy (OR 2.71; 95% CI: 1.25–5.86). Conclusions A simple prospective audit tool identified flaws in clinical practices for tuberculosis screening of PLHIV. There was no systematic identification of people with suspected active tuberculosis. We found

  14. The vital activity of organisms in infralow frequency magnetic field. 4. Mycobacteria tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Khizhenkov, P.K.; Noreiko, B.V.; Lepshina, S.M.

    1995-07-01

    It is shown that a periodic (0.5 or 7 h/day) application of an alternating magnetic field H (f = 8 Hz, amplitude 60-80 Oe) enhances the vital activity of tuberculosis mycobacteria (TMB), which leads to a doubling of the biocycles and a 48-h reduction in the lag-phase. The increase in the functional activity of the TMB is accompanied by a lowering of the their resistance to medication. In the experiment, the TMB exposed to the magnetic field effect completely lost their resistance to three of the four tested medicines.

  15. A Method for Extracting Suspected Parotid Lesions in CT Images using Feature-based Segmentation and Active Contours based on Stationary Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. Y.; Lin, S. F.

    2013-10-01

    Automatic suspected lesion extraction is an important application in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). In this paper, we propose a method to automatically extract the suspected parotid regions for clinical evaluation in head and neck CT images. The suspected lesion tissues in low contrast tissue regions can be localized with feature-based segmentation (FBS) based on local texture features, and can be delineated with accuracy by modified active contour models (ACM). At first, stationary wavelet transform (SWT) is introduced. The derived wavelet coefficients are applied to derive the local features for FBS, and to generate enhanced energy maps for ACM computation. Geometric shape features (GSFs) are proposed to analyze each soft tissue region segmented by FBS; the regions with higher similarity GSFs with the lesions are extracted and the information is also applied as the initial conditions for fine delineation computation. Consequently, the suspected lesions can be automatically localized and accurately delineated for aiding clinical diagnosis. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing with the results outlined by clinical experts. The experiments on 20 pathological CT data sets show that the true-positive (TP) rate on recognizing parotid lesions is about 94%, and the dimension accuracy of delineation results can also approach over 93%.

  16. Study of Genetic Evolution in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the Iran and Belarus

    PubMed Central

    Bostanabad, Saeed Zaker; Shekarabei, Mehdi; Nojoumi, Seyed Ali; Jabbarzadeh, Esmaeil; Ghalami, Mostafa; Kazemi, Vahid Molla; Beigdeli, Mostafa Gholi; Karim Rahimi, Mohammad; Bossak, Mohammad; Sagalchyk, Evgeni Romanovich; Konstantina Surkova, Larisa; Mikhaelovna Zalutska, Aksana; Slizen, Veronika; Petrovich Titov, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This is the new comparative geogenetic molecular evolution research of M. tuberculosis in Iran and Belarus. Thus, we researched the genetic patterns of samples collected in the first survey of anti-tuberculosis drug-resistance by gene coding of RNA polymerase as part of the international project of on tuberculosis. Method: DNA extraction and amplification of rpoB gene was performed. All PCR products of gene were sequenced using the Amersham auto sequencer. For analysing phenogram has been demonstrated by method UPGMA and Neighbour-Joining. Clinical isolates (70/473) were analyzed by using sequencing gene rpoB and genotyped by program DNAMAN and MEGA. Results: The all data were compared with the international database of national center for biotechnology information website. Multi drug resistant of tuberculosis patient (MDR-TB) was 92% in never treated and 8% in previously treated. Mutations in rpoB gene and katG genes were showed in 95% and 84% of the MDR isolates, respectively. Two clusters were found to be identical by the four different analysis methods, presumably representing cases of recent transmission of MDR tuberculosis. The other isolates are divided in Iran into 2 groups: group A – similar to the Eastern strains (China, Taiwan) and group B – strains of another genotype. And 3 groups in Belarus: group A - Strains of the first group are more similar to the standard European and Eastern ones China and Taiwan) which diverged in the last 10 years (Genetic evolution rate), i.e. they are relatively new ones, and that is confirmed by the mutations, group B - Strains of the second group diverged earlier; they are older than the strains of the first group (16 years old- time and rate of evolution) and group C - Strains of the third group are similar to European strains and only circulate in Brest region. They are grouped separately on the phenogram and became prevalent in Iran (they are called Iranian residential strains and also is genetic analogy

  17. Mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and in a murine model of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês S; Villela, Anne D; Gonçalves, Raoni S B; Abbadi, Bruno Lopes; Trindade, Rogério Valim; López-Gavín, Alexandre; Tudó, Griselda; González-Martín, Julian; Basso, Luiz Augusto; de Souza, Marcus V N; Campos, Maria Martha; Santos, Diógenes Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Repurposing of drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB) has been considered an alternative to overcome the global TB epidemic, especially to combat drug-resistant forms of the disease. Mefloquine has been reported as a potent drug to kill drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, mefloquine-derived molecules have been synthesised and their effectiveness against mycobacteria has been assessed. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the activities of mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound 1E in a murine model of TB infection following administration of both drugs by the oral route. The effects of associations between mefloquine or 1E with the clinically used antituberculosis drugs isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, moxifloxacin and streptomycin were also investigated. Importantly, combination of mefloquine with isoniazid and of 1E with streptomycin showed a two-fold decrease in their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Moreover, no tested combinations demonstrated antagonist interactions. Here we describe novel evidence on the activity of mefloquine and 1E against a series of quinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. These data show MICs against quinolone-resistant strains (0.5-8 µg/mL) similar to or lower than those previously reported for multidrug-resistant strains. Taking these results together, we can suggest the use of mefloquine or 1E in combination with clinically available drugs, especially in the case of resistant forms of TB. PMID:27364701

  18. Identification and Characterization of Lipase Activity and Immunogenicity of LipL from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jun; Dang, Guanghui; Li, Huafang; Li, Tiantian; Yue, Zhiguo; Li, Na; Liu, Yajun; Liu, Siguo; Chen, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Lipids and lipid-metabolizing esterases/lipases are highly important for the mycobacterial life cycle and, possibly, for mycobacterial virulence. In this study, we expressed 10 members of the Lip family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Among the 10 proteins, LipL displayed a significantly high enzymatic activity for the hydrolysis of long-chain lipids. The optimal temperature for the lipase activity of LipL was demonstrated to be 37°C, and the optimal pH was 8.0. The lipase active center was not the conserved motif G-x-S-x-G, but rather the S-x-x-K and GGG motifs, and the key catalytic amino acid residues were identified as G50, S88, and K91, as demonstrated through site-directed mutagenesis experiments. A three-dimensional modeling structure of LipL was constructed, which showed that the GGG motif was located in the surface of a pocket structure. Furthermore, the subcellular localization of LipL was demonstrated to be on the mycobacterial surface by Western blot analysis. Our results revealed that the LipL protein could induce a strong humoral immune response in humans and activate a CD8+ T cell-mediated response in mice. Overall, our study identified and characterized a novel lipase denoted LipL from M. tuberculosis, and demonstrated that LipL functions as an immunogen that activates both humoral and cell-mediated responses. PMID:26398213

  19. NLRP3 Activation Was Regulated by DNA Methylation Modification during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Meili; Wang, Lu; Wu, Tao; Xi, Jun; Han, Yuze; Yang, Xingxiang; Zhang, Ding; Fang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages and dendritic cells. Much attention has been paid to the mechanisms for regulation of NLRP3 against Mtb. However, whether epigenetic mechanisms participated in NLRP3 activation is still little known. Here we showed that NLRP3 activation was regulated by DNA methylation modification. Mtb infection promoted NLRP3 activation and inflammatory cytokines expression. NLRP3 promoter was cloned and subsequently identified by Dual-Luciferase Reporter System. The results showed that NLRP3 promoter activity was decreased after methylation by DNA methylase Sss I in vitro. Meanwhile, DNA methyltransferases inhibitor DAC could upregulate the expression of NLRP3. Furthermore, promoter region of NLRP3 gene was demethylated after Mtb H37Rv strain infection. These data revealed that DNA methylation was involved in NLRP3 inflammasome activation during Mtb infection and provided a new insight into the relationship between host and pathogens. PMID:27366746

  20. Activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis by extract of South African medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Mativandlela, Sannah Patience Nkami; Meyer, Jacob Jacobus Marion; Hussein, Ahmed A; Houghton, Peter J; Hamilton, Chris J; Lall, Namrita

    2008-06-01

    Seven ethnobotanically selected medicinal plants were screened for their antimycobacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of four plants namely Artemisia afra, Dodonea angustifolia, Drosera capensis and Galenia africana ranged from 0.781 to 6.25 mg/mL against Mycobacterium smegmatis. G. africana showed the best activity exhibiting an MIC of 0.78 mg/mL and a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 1.56 mg/mL. The MICs of ethanol extracts of D. angustifolia and G. africana against M. tuberculosis were found to be 5.0 and 1.2 mg/mL respectively. The mammalian cytotoxicity IC(50) value of the most active antimycobacterial extract, from G. africana, was found to be 101.3 microg/mL against monkey kidney Vero cells. Since the ethanol G. africana displayed the best antimycobacterial activity, it was subjected to fractionation which led to the isolation of a flavone, 5,7,2'-trihydroxyflavone. The MIC of this compound was found to be 0.031 mg/mL against M. smegmatis and 0.10 mg/mL against M. tuberculosis. This study gives some scientific basis to the traditional use of these plants for TB-related symptoms. PMID:18412151

  1. The active site architecture in peroxiredoxins: a case study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis AhpE.

    PubMed

    Pedre, Brandán; van Bergen, Laura A H; Palló, Anna; Rosado, Leonardo A; Dufe, Veronica Tamu; Molle, Inge Van; Wahni, Khadija; Erdogan, Huriye; Alonso, Mercedes; Proft, Frank De; Messens, Joris

    2016-08-11

    Peroxiredoxins catalyze the reduction of peroxides, a process of vital importance to survive oxidative stress. A nucleophilic cysteine, also known as the peroxidatic cysteine, is responsible for this catalytic process. We used the Mycobacterium tuberculosis alkyl hydroperoxide reductase E (MtAhpE) as a model to investigate the effect of the chemical environment on the specificity of the reaction. Using an integrative structural (R116A - PDB ; F37H - PDB ), kinetic and computational approach, we explain the mutational effects of key residues in its environment. This study shows that the active site residues are specifically oriented to create an environment which selectively favours a reaction with peroxides. PMID:27471753

  2. Meropenem-Clavulanic Acid Shows Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    England, Kathleen; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Arora, Kriti; Weiner, Danielle; Dayao, Emmanuel; Schimel, Daniel; Via, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    The carbapenems imipenem and meropenem in combination with clavulanic acid reduced the bacterial burden in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages by 2 logs over 6 days. Despite poor stability in solution and a short half-life in rodents, treatment of chronically infected mice revealed significant reductions of bacterial burden in the lungs and spleens. Our results show that meropenem has activity in two in vivo systems, but stability and pharmacokinetics of long-term administration will offer significant challenges to clinical evaluation. PMID:22450968

  3. Synthesis and Anti-Tuberculosis Activity of the Marine Natural Product Caulerpin and Its Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Canché Chay, Cristina I.; Gómez Cansino, Rocío; Espitia Pinzón, Clara I.; Torres-Ochoa, Rubén O.; Martínez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Caulerpin (1a), a bis-indole alkaloid from the marine algal Caulerpa sp., was synthesized in three reaction steps with an overall yield of 11%. The caulerpin analogues (1b–1g) were prepared using the same synthetic pathway with overall yields between 3% and 8%. The key reaction involved a radical oxidative aromatic substitution involving xanthate (3) and 3-formylindole compounds (4a–4g). All bis-indole compounds synthesized were evaluated against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv, and 1a was found to display excellent activity (IC50 0.24 µM). PMID:24681629

  4. Humoral immunity in tuberculin skin test anergy and its role in high-risk persons exposed to active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Encinales, Liliana; Zuñiga, Joaquin; Yunis, Maria; Granados-Montiel, Julio; Granados, Julio; Almeciga, Ingrid; Clavijo, Olga; Awad, Carlos; Collazos, Vilma; Vargas-Rojas, María Inés; Bañales-Mendez, José Luis; Vazquez-Castañeda, Lilia; Stern, Joel N.; Romero, Viviana; Frindkis-Hareli, Masha; Terreros, Daniel; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Yunis, Edmond J.

    2009-01-01

    The most common test to identify latent tuberculosis is the Tuberculin skin test that detects T cell responses of delayed type hypersensitivity type IV. Since it produces false negative reactions in active tuberculosis or in high-risk persons exposed to tuberculosis patients as shown in this report, we studied antibody profiles to explain the anergy of such responses in high-risk individuals without active infection. Our results showed that humoral immunity against Tuberculin, regardless of the result of the Tuberculin skin test is important for protection from active tuberculosis and that the presence of high antibody titers is a more reliable indicator of infection latency suggesting that latency can be based on the levels of antibodies together with in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of the purified protein derivative. Importantly, anti-Tuberculin IgG antibody levels mediate the anergy described herein, which could also prevent reactivation of disease in high-risk individuals with high antibody titers. Such IgG Tuberculin antibodies were also found associated with blocking and/or stimulation of in vitro cultures of PBMC with Tuberculin. In this regard, future studies need to establish if immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can generate a broad spectrum of reactions either toward Th1 responses favoring stimulation by cytokines or by antibodies and those toward diminished responses by Th2 cytokines or blocking by antibodies; possibly involving mechanisms of antibody dependent protection from Mtb by different subclasses of IgG. PMID:20004475

  5. The cytosolic sensor cGAS detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA to induce type I interferons and activate autophagy

    PubMed Central

    MacDuff, Donna A.; Kimmey, Jacqueline M.; Diner, Elie J.; Olivas, Joanna; Vance, Russell E.; Stallings, Christina L.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Cox, Jeffery S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Type I interferons (IFNs) are critical mediators of antiviral defense, but their elicitation by bacterial pathogens can be detrimental to hosts. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, induce type I IFNs following phagosomal membrane perturbations. Cytosolic M. tuberculosis DNA has been implicated as a trigger for IFN production, but the mechanisms remain obscure. We report that the cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), is required for activating IFN production via the STING/TBK1/IRF3 pathway during M. tuberculosis and L. pneumophila infection of macrophages, whereas L. monocytogenes short-circuits this pathway by producing the STING agonist, c-di-AMP. Upon sensing cytosolicDNA, cGAS also activates cell-intrinsic antibacterial defenses, promoting autophagic targeting of M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we show that cGAS binds M. tuberculosis DNA during infection, providing direct evidence that this unique host-pathogen interaction occurs in vivo. These data uncover a mechanism by which IFN is likely elicited during active human infections. PMID:26048136

  6. Humoral immunity in tuberculin skin test anergy and its role in high-risk persons exposed to active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Encinales, Liliana; Zuñiga, Joaquin; Granados-Montiel, Julio; Yunis, Maria; Granados, Julio; Almeciga, Ingrid; Clavijo, Olga; Awad, Carlos; Collazos, Vilma; Vargas-Rojas, María Inés; Bañales-Mendez, José Luis; Vazquez-Castañeda, Lilia; Stern, Joel N; Romero, Viviana; Fridkis-Hareli, Masha; Frindkis-Hareli, Masha; Terreros, Daniel; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Yunis, Edmond J

    2010-02-01

    The most common test to identify latent tuberculosis is the tuberculin skin test that detects T cell responses of delayed type hypersensitivity type IV. Since it produces false negative reactions in active tuberculosis or in high-risk persons exposed to tuberculosis patients as shown in this report, we studied antibody profiles to explain the anergy of such responses in high-risk individuals without active infection. Our results showed that humoral immunity against tuberculin, regardless of the result of the tuberculin skin test is important for protection from active tuberculosis and that the presence of high antibody titers is a more reliable indicator of infection latency suggesting that latency can be based on the levels of antibodies together with in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of the purified protein derivative. Importantly, anti-tuberculin IgG antibody levels mediate the anergy described herein, which could also prevent reactivation of disease in high-risk individuals with high antibody titers. Such anti-tuberculin IgG antibodies were also found associated with blocking and/or stimulation of in vitro cultures of PBMC with tuberculin. In this regard, future studies need to establish if immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can generate a broad spectrum of reactions either toward Th1 responses favoring stimulation by cytokines or by antibodies and those toward diminished responses by Th2 cytokines or blocking by antibodies; possibly involving mechanisms of antibody dependent protection from Mtb by different subclasses of IgG. PMID:20004475

  7. The Cytosolic Sensor cGAS Detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA to Induce Type I Interferons and Activate Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert O; Bell, Samantha L; MacDuff, Donna A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Diner, Elie J; Olivas, Joanna; Vance, Russell E; Stallings, Christina L; Virgin, Herbert W; Cox, Jeffery S

    2015-06-10

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are critical mediators of antiviral defense, but their elicitation by bacterial pathogens can be detrimental to hosts. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, induce type I IFNs following phagosomal membrane perturbations. Cytosolic M. tuberculosis DNA has been implicated as a trigger for IFN production, but the mechanisms remain obscure. We report that the cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), is required for activating IFN production via the STING/TBK1/IRF3 pathway during M. tuberculosis and L. pneumophila infection of macrophages, whereas L. monocytogenes short-circuits this pathway by producing the STING agonist, c-di-AMP. Upon sensing cytosolic DNA, cGAS also activates cell-intrinsic antibacterial defenses, promoting autophagic targeting of M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we show that cGAS binds M. tuberculosis DNA during infection, providing direct evidence that this unique host-pathogen interaction occurs in vivo. These data uncover a mechanism by which IFN is likely elicited during active human infections. PMID:26048136

  8. Tuberculosis and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Krishna Bihari; Gupta, Rajesh; Atreja, Atulya; Verma, Manish; Vishvkarma, Suman

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition and tuberculosis are both problems of considerable magnitude in most of the underdeveloped regions of the world. These two problems tend to interact with each other. Tuberculosis mortality rates in different economic groups in a community tend to vary inversely with their economic levels. Similarly, nutritional status is significantly lower in patients with active tuberculosis compared with healthy controls. Malnutrition can lead to secondary immunodeficiency that increases the host's susceptibility to infection. In patients with tuberculosis, it leads to reduction in appetite, nutrient malabsorption, micronutrient malabsorption, and altered metabolism leading to wasting. Both, protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrients deficiencies increase the risk of tuberculosis. It has been found that malnourished tuberculosis patients have delayed recovery and higher mortality rates than well-nourished patients. Nutritional status of patients improves during tuberculosis chemotherapy. High prevalence of human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection in the underdeveloped countries further aggravates the problem of malnutrition and tuberculosis. Effect of malnutrition on childhood tuberculosis and tuberculin skin test are other important considerations. Nutritional supplementation may represent a novel approach for fast recovery in tuberculosis patients. In addition, raising nutritional status of population may prove to be an effective measure to control tuberculosis in underdeveloped areas of world. PMID:20165588

  9. The MprB Extracytoplasmic Domain Negatively Regulates Activation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis MprAB Two-Component System

    PubMed Central

    Bretl, Daniel J.; Bigley, Tarin M.; Terhune, Scott S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an acid-fast pathogen of humans and the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB). It is estimated that one-third of the world's population is latently (persistently) infected with M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis persistence is regulated, in part, by the MprAB two-component signal transduction system, which is activated by and mediates resistance to cell envelope stress. Here we identify MprAB as part of an evolutionarily conserved cell envelope stress response network and demonstrate that MprAB-mediated signal transduction is negatively regulated by the MprB extracytoplasmic domain (ECD). In particular, we report that deregulated production of the MprB sensor kinase, or of derivatives of this protein, negatively impacts M. tuberculosis growth. The observed growth attenuation is dependent on MprAB-mediated signal transduction and is exacerbated in strains of M. tuberculosis producing an MprB variant lacking its ECD. Interestingly, full-length MprB, and the ECD of MprB specifically, immunoprecipitates the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK in vivo, while overexpression of dnaK inhibits MprAB-mediated signal transduction in M. tuberculosis grown in the absence or presence of cell envelope stress. We propose that under nonstress conditions, or under conditions in which proteins present in the extracytoplasmic space are properly folded, signaling through the MprAB system is inhibited by the MprB ECD. Following exposure to cell envelope stress, proteins present in the extracytoplasmic space become unfolded or misfolded, leading to removal of the ECD-mediated negative regulation of MprB and subsequent activation of MprAB. PMID:24187094

  10. Lung surfactant dysfunction in tuberculosis: effect of mycobacterial tubercular lipids on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine surface activity.

    PubMed

    Chimote, G; Banerjee, R

    2005-11-10

    In pulmonary tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria reside in the alveoli and are in close proximity with the alveolar surfactant. Mycolic acid in its free form and as cord factor, constitute the major lipids of the mycobacterial cell wall. They can detach from the bacteria easily and are known to be moderately surface active. We hypothesize that these surface-active mycobacterial cell wall lipids could interact with the pulmonary surfactant and result in lung surfactant dysfunction. In this study, the major phospholipid of the lung surfactant, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and binary mixtures of DPPC:phosphatidylglycerol (PG) in 9:1 and 7:3 ratios were modelled as lung surfactant monolayers and the inhibitory potential of mycolic acid and cord factor on the surface activity of DPPC and DPPC:PG mixtures was evaluated using Langmuir monolayers. The mycobacterial lipids caused common profile changes in all the isotherms: increase in minimum surface tension, compressibility and percentage area change required for change in surface tension from 30 to 10 mN/m. Higher minimum surface tension values were achieved in the presence of mycolic acid (18.2+/-0.7 mN/m) and cord factor (13.28+/-1.2 mN/m) as compared to 0 mN/m, achieved by pure DPPC film. Similarly higher values of compressibility (0.375+/-0.005 m/mN for mycolic acid:DPPC and 0.197+/-0.003 m/mN for cord factor:DPPC monolayers) were obtained in presence of mycolic acid and cord factor. Thus, mycolic acid and cord factor were said to be inhibitory towards lung surfactant phospholipids. Higher surface tension and compressibility values in presence of tubercular lipids are suggestive of an unstable and fluid surfactant film, which will fail to achieve low surface tensions and can contribute to alveolar collapse in patients suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis. In conclusion a biophysical inhibition of lung surfactant may play a role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis and may serve as a target for

  11. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  12. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Diana; Pires, David; Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  13. High Affinity Inha Inhibitors with Activity Against Drug-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan,T.; Truglio, J.; Boyne, M.; Novichenok, P.; Zhang, X.; Stratton, C.; Li, H.; Kaur, T.; Amin, A.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Novel chemotherapeutics for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are required to combat the spread of tuberculosis, a disease that kills more than 2 million people annually. Using structure-based drug design, we have developed a series of alkyl diphenyl ethers that are uncompetitive inhibitors of InhA, the enoyl reductase enzyme in the MTB fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. The most potent compound has a Ki{prime} value of 1 nM for InhA and MIC{sub 99} values of 2-3 {micro}g mL{sup -1} (6-10 {micro}M) for both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of MTB. Overexpression of InhA in MTB results in a 9-12-fold increase in MIC{sub 99}, consistent with the belief that these compounds target InhA within the cell. In addition, transcriptional response studies reveal that the alkyl diphenyl ethers fail to upregulate a putative efflux pump and aromatic dioxygenase, detoxification mechanisms that are triggered by the lead compound triclosan. These diphenyl ether-based InhA inhibitors do not require activation by the mycobacterial KatG enzyme, thereby circumventing the normal mechanism of resistance to the front line drug isoniazid (INH) and thus accounting for their activity against INH-resistant strains of MTB.

  14. A Note on Derivatives of Isoniazid, Rifampicin, and Pyrazinamide Showing Activity Against Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nusrath Unissa, Ameeruddin; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2016-04-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a serious problem that impedes the success of the TB control program. Of note, multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB and extensively drug-resistant (XDR)-TB have certainly complicated the scenario. One of the possible strategies to overcome drug resistance in an economic and simple manner would involve modification of existing anti-TB drugs to obtain derivatives that can work on resistant TB bacilli. These may have improved half-life and increased bioavailability, be more efficacious, and serve as cost-effective alternatives, as compared to new drugs identified through conventional methods of drug discovery and development. Although extensive literature is available on the activity of various derivatives of first-line drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide) on drug-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), reports on the activity of derivatives on resistant MTB are very limited, to our knowledge. In light of this, the present review aims to provide a concise report on the derivatives of first-line drugs that have the potential to overcome the resistance to the parental drug and could thus serve as effective alternatives. PMID:26613382

  15. Post-treatment change in Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in patients with active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Ho; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lee, Shin Yup; Cha, Seung Ick; Park, Jae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Monitoring tuberculosis (TB) treatment response remains challenging due to lack of reliable laboratory markers. In recent years, increased efforts have been exerted toward development of new biomarkers reflecting treatment response appropriately. While performance of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) to monitor anti-TB treatment has been extensively evaluated, there is no data about post-treatment changes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) antigen-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) release in active TB patients. Herein, we explored whether the MTB antigen-stimulated TNF-α release would be useful for monitoring responses to anti-TB treatment. Methods We compared unstimulated (TNF-αNil), MTB antigen-stimulated (TNF-αAg), and MTB antigen-stimulated minus unstimulated TNF-α levels (TNF-αAg-Nil) in supernatants from QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube tests before and after treatment in 16 active TB patients, 25 latent TB infection (LTBI) subjects, and 10 healthy controls (HC). Results TNF-αAg and TNF-αAg-Nil levels decreased significantly after treatment in patients with active TB. In addition, TNF-αNil, TNF-αAg, and TNF-αAg-Nil levels were significantly higher in untreated active TB patients compared to LTBI subjects and HC. Conclusions This finding cautiously suggests that MTB Ag-stimulated TNF-α response may be a potential adjunctive marker for monitoring treatment response in active TB patients. PMID:26101647

  16. Inflammasome genetics contributes to the development and control of active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Souza de Lima, D; Ogusku, M M; Sadahiro, A; Pontillo, A

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major public health problem. An estimated one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) but remains asymptomatic (latent TB) and only 5% to 10% of these latent individuals will develop active pulmonary TB. Factors affecting the balance between latent and active TB are mostly unknown, even if host genome has been shown to contribute to the outcome of Mtb response. Acute inflammation and Th1 response are important in the early clearance of the bacteria as it was emphasized by the association between immune genes (i.e.: HLA, IFNG, TNF, NRPAM1, IL10) variants and the development of active pulmonary TB. Recently, the role of the inflammasome in experimental TB has been demonstrated, however, to our knowledge, no data still exist about the contribution of inflammasome genetics to Mtb susceptibility and/or to the development of active TB. For this reason, selected polymorphisms in inflammasome genes were analysed in a case/control cohort of individuals with active pulmonary TB from an endemic area of Brazil Amazon. Our data evidence the novel association between polymorphisms in NLRP3-inflammasome encoding genes and active pulmonary TB, and replicated the association between P2X7 and TB observed in other populations. These results emphasize the role of NLRP3-inflammasome also in human TB, and contribute to our knowledge about pathways involved in the development of active TB, even if deeper investigation are needed to fully elucidate the role of the complex in Mtb infection. PMID:27101784

  17. Baseline assessment of collaborative tuberculosis/HIV activities in Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Martinot, Amanda; Van Rie, Annelies; Mulangu, Sabue; Mbulula, Marie; Jarrett, Nikki; Behets, Frieda; Bola, Valentin; Bahati, Etienne

    2008-07-01

    Ninety-two clinics were surveyed in 2005 as part of a baseline assessment of HIV activities in Tuberculosis (TB) clinics in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Some HIV activities were implemented in 58% of TB clinics. The majority of health had > or = 1 health care worker (HCW) trained in either HIV counseling or testing (71%). Fifty-three clinics offered counseling and testing to TB patients; twenty-two (42%) routinely offered HIV CT to all patients, while others used selective criteria. While most offered on-site counseling (92%) and testing (77%), not all 53 clinics had a HCW trained in counseling and only 31 had access to a counseling room. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was offered in 51% of clinics; antiretroviral treatment in 17%. Shortcomings in human resources, infrastructure and quality of services were revealed. Strengthening those clinics already implementing HIV activities could be prioritized to achieve the goals set forward by the Global Plan to Stop TB. PMID:18628533

  18. Epidemiological and clinical study of tuberculosis in the district of Kolín, Czechoslovakia*

    PubMed Central

    Stýblo, K.; Dan̆ková, D.; Drápela, J.; Galliová, J.; Ježek, Z.; Křivánek, J.; Kubík, A.; Langerová, M.; Radkovský, J.

    1967-01-01

    Many developed countries are faced with the problem of reorganizing their tuberculosis-control programme to bring it into line with modern conditions. The study reported was undertaken to provide guidelines for this reorganization. It was begun in the district of Kolín, Czechoslovakia, with a population of some 100 000, in 1961 and is still in progress. The paper covers the first 4 years of the study. In 1961 a thorough check-up was made on all persons registered as having active or inactive tuberculosis, or fibrotic lung lesions. In 1961 and 1963 a mass X-ray and tuberculin-testing campaign, with 95% coverage, was carried out for all persons over 14 years of age. All persons with active tuberculosis received adequate treatment. Persons registered as having tuberculosis or suspected tuberculosis were subjected to regular photofluorographic and bacteriological investigations. Newborn infants were given BCG vaccination, and persons aged 14 years and 19 years with negative tuberculin reactions were vaccinated. The prevalence of bacillary tuberculosis fell from 150 cases in 1960 to 91 in 1964, mainly owing to a decrease in the number of chronic cases. The incidence of bacillary tuberculosis detectable by direct smear microscopy, however, remained at about 25 cases throughout the period 1961-64. The risk of developing tuberculosis was found to be highest in persons with fibrotic lung lesions or inactive tuberculosis, and in men above 45 years of age and women above 65 with previously normal photofluorograms. It is concluded from the study that in developed countries priority should be given to adequate treatment of all persons with active tuberculosis, and to early diagnosis in persons consulting physicians and in the high-risk population groups. PMID:5301821

  19. Genitourinary tuberculosis masquerading as a ureteral calculus

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Nathan; Hoag, Nathan A.; Jones, Edward C.; Rowley, Allen; McLoughlin, Martin G.; Paterson, Ryan F.

    2013-01-01

    The genitourinary tract is a common extrapulmonary site of tuberculosis infection, yet remains a rare clinical entity in North America. We report the case of a 37-year-old man who presented for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for a suspected ureteral stone on imaging. Further workup confirmed a diagnosis of genitourinary tuberculosis. Medical management was undertaken and, ultimately, nephrectomy performed. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of clinical suspicion for genitourinary tuberculosis. PMID:23766841

  20. Evaluation of the anti-mycobacterium tuberculosis activity and in vivo acute toxicity of Annona sylvatic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent emergence of extensively multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains has further complicated the control of tuberculosis. There is an urgent need for the development of new molecular candidates antitubercular drugs. Medicinal plants have been an excellent source of leads for the development of drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of 28 alcoholic extracts and essential oils of native and exotic Brazilian plants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to further study these extracts through chemical fractionation, the isolation of their constituents, and an evaluation of the in vivo acute toxicity of the active extracts. To the best of our knowledge this is the first chemical characterization, antituberculosis activity and acute toxicity evaluation of Annona sylvatica. Methods The anti-mycobacterial activity of these extracts and their constituent compounds was evaluated using the resazurin reduction microtiter assay (REMA). To investigate the acute toxicity of these extracts in vivo, female Swiss mice were treated with the extracts at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg · kg-1 of body weight. The extracts were characterized by LC-MS, and the constituents were isolated and identified by chromatographic analysis of spectroscopic data. Results Of the 28 extracts, the methanol extract obtained from the leaves of Annona sylvatica showed anti-mycobacterial activity with an minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 184.33 μg/mL, and the ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) resulting from liquid-liquid partitioning of the A. sylvatica extract showed an MIC of 115.2 μg/mL. The characterization of this extract by LC-MS identified flavonoids and acetogenins as its main constituents. The phytochemical study of the A. sylvatica EAF resulted in the isolation of quercetin, luteolin, and almunequin. Conclusions Among the compounds isolated from the EAF, luteolin and almunequin were the most promising, with MICs of 236.8

  1. [Experience in joint activities of the Central Research Institute of Tuberculosis, USSR Ministry of Health, with therapeutic-preventive institutions of a Kazakhstan rural area].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, E S; Fisher, Iu Ia; Fedorov, L P; Utepkaliev, M M; Akpanov, Z A; Temresheva, G T; Polosukhin, S M

    1991-01-01

    The joint activity of the Institute staff together with local health institutions has favoured qualified tuberculosis care to become more accessible to the rural population. Favourable changes in the epidemiological situation have been registered in a high tuberculosis incidence area. PMID:1837927

  2. Access channel residues Ser315 and Asp137 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG) control peroxidatic activation of the pro-drug isoniazid

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiangbo; Hersleth, Hans-Petter; Zhu, Janan; Andersson, K. Kristoffer; Magliozzo, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidatic activation of the anti-tuberculosis pro-drug isoniazid by Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG) is regulated by gating residues of a heme access channel. The steric restriction at the bottleneck of this channel is alleviated by replacement of residue Asp137 with Ser, according to crystallographic and kinetic studies. PMID:24185282

  3. A mathematical representation of the development of Mycobacterium tuberculosis active, latent and dormant stages.

    PubMed

    Magombedze, Gesham; Mulder, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The majority of individuals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacilli develop latent infection. Mtb becomes dormant and phenotypically drug resistant when it encounters multiple stresses within the host, and expresses a set of genes, known as the dormancy regulon, in vivo. These genes are expressed in vitro in response to nitric oxide (NO), hypoxia (oxygen deprivation), and nutrient starvation. The occurrence and reactivation of latent tuberculosis (TB) is not clearly understood. The ability of the pathogen to enter and exit from different states is associated with its ability to cause persistent infection. During infection it is not known whether the organism is in a persistent slow replicating state or a dormant non-replicating state, with the latter ultimately causing a latent infection with the potential to reactivate to active disease. We collected gene expression data for Mtb bacilli under different stress conditions that simulate latency or dormancy. Time course experiments were selected and differentially expressed gene profiles were determined at each time point. A mathematical model was then developed to show the dynamics of Mtb latency based on the profile of differentially expressed genes. Analysis of the time course data show the dynamics of latency occurrence in vitro and the mathematical model reveals all possible scenarios of Mtb latency development with respect to the different conditions that may be produced by the immune response in vivo. The mathematical model provides a biological explanation of how Mtb latency occurs based on observed gene expression changes in in vitro latency models. PMID:21968442

  4. Potential novel markers to discriminate between active and latent tuberculosis infection in Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-juan; Liang, Yan; Yang, You-rong; Feng, Jin-dong; Luo, Zhan-peng; Zhang, Jun-Xian; Wu, Xue-qiong

    2016-02-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) constitutes the main reservoir for reactivation tuberculosis. The finding of potential biomarkers for differentiating between TB and LTBI is very necessary. In this study, the immunological characteristics and potential diagnostic utility of Rv2029c, Rv2628 and Rv1813c proteins were assessed. These three proteins stimulated PBMCs from ELISPOT-positive LTBI subjects produced higher levels of IFN-γ in comparison with TB patients and ELISPOT-negative healthy subjects (p<0.05). BCG vaccination and non-TB respiratory disease had little influence on the immunological responses of Rv2029c and Rv2628 proteins (p>0.05). The LTBI diagnostic performance of Rv2029c was higher than Rv2628 and Rv1813c by ROC evaluation. But Rv2628 had much higher specificity than Rv2029c in active TB patients and uninfected healthy subjects. The IgG level against Rv1813c was higher in the TB group than in LTBI and uninfected healthy subjects (p<0.05). These results suggest that T cell response to Rv2628 and antibody against Rv1813c might be applicable as biomarkers to distinguish TB from LTBI and uninfected individuals. PMID:26851588

  5. Association of Strong Immune Responses to PPE Protein Rv1168c with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nooruddin; Alam, Kaiser; Nair, Shiny; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Murthy, Kolluri J. R.; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2008-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) infection is critical for the treatment, prevention, and control of TB. Conventional diagnostic tests based on purified protein derivative (PPD) do not achieve the required diagnostic sensitivity. Therefore, in this study, we have evaluated the immunogenic properties of Rv1168c, a member of the PPE family, in comparison with PPD, which is routinely used in the tuberculin test, and Hsp60 and ESAT-6, well-known immunodominant antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In a conventional enzyme immunoassay, the recombinant Rv1168c protein displayed stronger immunoreactivity against the sera obtained from patients with clinically active TB than did PPD, Hsp60, or ESAT-6 and could distinguish TB patients from Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated controls. Interestingly, Rv1168c antigen permits diagnosis of smear-negative pulmonary TB as well as extrapulmonary TB cases, which are often difficult to diagnose by conventional tests. The immunodominant nature of Rv1168c makes it a promising candidate to use in serodiagnosis of TB. In addition, our studies also show that Rv1168c is a potent T-cell antigen which elicits a strong gamma interferon response in sensitized peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from TB patients. PMID:18400969

  6. Host Protein Biomarkers Identify Active Tuberculosis in HIV Uninfected and Co-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Cortes, Laetitia; Croteau, Pascal; Yanofsky, Corey; Mentinova, Marija; Rajotte, Isabelle; Schirm, Michael; Zhou, Yiyong; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Larsen, Michelle; Allard, René; Hunter, Joanna; Paramithiotis, Eustache

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for active tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed to improve rapid TB diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify serum protein expression changes associated with TB but not latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI), uninfected states, or respiratory diseases other than TB (ORD). Serum samples from 209 HIV uninfected (HIV−) and co-infected (HIV+) individuals were studied. In the discovery phase samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, and in the verification phase biologically independent samples were analyzed via a multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay. Compared to LTBI and ORD, host proteins were significantly differentially expressed in TB, and involved in the immune response, tissue repair, and lipid metabolism. Biomarker panels whose composition differed according to HIV status, and consisted of 8 host proteins in HIV− individuals (CD14, SEPP1, SELL, TNXB, LUM, PEPD, QSOX1, COMP, APOC1), or 10 host proteins in HIV+ individuals (CD14, SEPP1, PGLYRP2, PFN1, VASN, CPN2, TAGLN2, IGFBP6), respectively, distinguished TB from ORD with excellent accuracy (AUC = 0.96 for HIV− TB, 0.95 for HIV+ TB). These results warrant validation in larger studies but provide promise that host protein biomarkers could be the basis for a rapid, blood-based test for TB. PMID:26501113

  7. Host Protein Biomarkers Identify Active Tuberculosis in HIV Uninfected and Co-infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Achkar, Jacqueline M; Cortes, Laetitia; Croteau, Pascal; Yanofsky, Corey; Mentinova, Marija; Rajotte, Isabelle; Schirm, Michael; Zhou, Yiyong; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Larsen, Michelle; Allard, René; Hunter, Joanna; Paramithiotis, Eustache

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers for active tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed to improve rapid TB diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify serum protein expression changes associated with TB but not latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI), uninfected states, or respiratory diseases other than TB (ORD). Serum samples from 209 HIV uninfected (HIV(-)) and co-infected (HIV(+)) individuals were studied. In the discovery phase samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, and in the verification phase biologically independent samples were analyzed via a multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay. Compared to LTBI and ORD, host proteins were significantly differentially expressed in TB, and involved in the immune response, tissue repair, and lipid metabolism. Biomarker panels whose composition differed according to HIV status, and consisted of 8 host proteins in HIV(-) individuals (CD14, SEPP1, SELL, TNXB, LUM, PEPD, QSOX1, COMP, APOC1), or 10 host proteins in HIV(+) individuals (CD14, SEPP1, PGLYRP2, PFN1, VASN, CPN2, TAGLN2, IGFBP6), respectively, distinguished TB from ORD with excellent accuracy (AUC = 0.96 for HIV(-) TB, 0.95 for HIV(+) TB). These results warrant validation in larger studies but provide promise that host protein biomarkers could be the basis for a rapid, blood-based test for TB. PMID:26501113

  8. Adverse neuro-immune-endocrine interactions in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bottasso, Oscar; Bay, María Luisa; Besedovsky, Hugo; Del Rey, Adriana

    2013-03-01

    The nervous, endocrine and immune systems play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis and interact with each other for a successful defensive strategy against injurious agents. However, the situation is different in long-term diseases with marked inflammation, in which defensive mechanisms become altered. In the case of tuberculosis (TB), this is highlighted by several facts: an imbalance of plasma immune and endocrine mediators, that results in an adverse environment for mounting an adequate response against mycobacteria and controlling inflammation; the demonstration that dehidroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion by a human adrenal cell line can be inhibited by culture supernatants from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells - PBMC - of TB patients, with this effect being partly reverted when neutralizing transforming growth factor-β in such supernantants; the in vitro effects of adrenal steroids on the specific immune response of PBMC from TB patients, that is a cortisol inhibition of mycobacterial antigen-driven lymphoproliferation and interferon-γ production as well as a suppression of TGF-β production in DHEA-treated PBMC; and lastly the demonstration that immune and endocrine compounds participating in the regulation of energy sources and immune activity correlated with the consumption state of TB patients. Collectively, immune-endocrine disturbances of TB patients are involved in critical components of disease pathology with implications in the impaired clinical status and unfavorable disease outcome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neuroinflammation in neurodegeneration and neurodysfunction'. PMID:23147110

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE9 protein has high activity binding peptides which inhibit target cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Diana P; Ocampo, Marisol; Pabón, Laura; Herrera, Chonny; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Munoz, Marina; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2016-05-01

    PE/PPE proteins are involved in several processes during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection of target cells; studying them is extremely interesting as they are the only ones from the Mycobacterium genus, they abound in pathogenic species such as Mtb and their function remains yet unknown. The PE9 protein (Rv1088) was characterised, the rv1088 gene was identified by PCR in Mtb complex strains and its expression and localisation on mycobacterial surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunoelectron microscopy. Bioinformatics tools were used for predicting PE9 protein structural aspects and experimental study involved the circular dichroism of synthetic peptides. The peptides were tested in binding assays involving U937 and A549 cells; two high activity binding peptides (HABPs) were found for both cell lines (39226-(1)MSYMIATPAALTAAATDIDGI(21) and 39232-(125)YQRHFGTGGQPEFRQHSEHRR(144)), one for U937 (39231-(104)YAGAGRRQRRRRSGDGQWRLRQ(124)) and one for A549 (39230-(83)YGTGVFRRRRGRQTVTAAEHRA(103)). HABP 39232 inhibited mycobacterial entry to A549 cells (∼70%) and U937 cells (∼50%), peptides 39226 and 39231 inhibited entry to U937 cells (∼60% and 80%, respectively) and peptide 39230 inhibited entry to A549 cells (∼60%). This emphasised HABPs' functional importance in recognition between Mtb H37Rv and target cell receptors. These peptide sequences could be involved in invasion and were recognised by the host's immune system, thereby highlighting their use when designing an efficient anti-tuberculosis multiantigenic vaccine. PMID:26851205

  10. The association between sterilizing activity and drug distribution into tuberculosis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Prideaux, Brendan; Via, Laura E.; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Eum, Seokyong; Sarathy, Jansy; O’Brien, Paul; Chen, Chao; Kaya, Firat; Weiner, Danielle M.; Chen, Pei-Yu; Song, Taeksun; Lee, Myungsun; Shim, TaeSun; Cho, Jeong Su; Kim, Wooshik; Cho, Sang Nae; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Barry, Clifton E.; Dartois, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Finding new treatment-shortening antibiotics to improve cure rates and curb the alarming emergence of drug resistance is the major objective of tuberculosis (TB) drug development. Using a MALDI mass spectrometry imaging suite in a biosafety containment facility, we show that the key sterilizing drugs rifampicin and pyrazinamide efficiently penetrate the sites of TB infection in lung lesions. Rifampicin even accumulates in necrotic caseum, a critical lesion site where persisting tubercle bacilli reside1. In contrast, moxifloxacin which is active in vitro against persisters, a sub-population of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that persists in specific niches under drug pressure, and achieved treatment shortening in mice2, does not diffuse well in caseum, concordant with its failure to shorten therapy in recent clinical trials. We also suggest that such differential spatial distribution and kinetics of accumulation in lesions may create temporal and spatial windows of monotherapy in specific niches, allowing the gradual development of multidrug resistant TB. We propose an alternative working model to prioritize new antibiotic regimens based on quantitative and spatial distribution of TB drugs in the major lesion types found in human lungs. The finding that lesion penetration contributes to treatment outcome has wide implications for TB. PMID:26343800

  11. Rifapentine Is Not More Active than Rifampin against Chronic Tuberculosis in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.; Illei, Peter B.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Pinn, Michael L.; Mdluli, Khisimuzi E.; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2012-01-01

    Rifamycins are key sterilizing drugs in the current treatment of active tuberculosis (TB). Daily dosing of rifapentine (P), a potent rifamycin with high intracellular accumulation, in place of rifampin (R) in the standard antitubercular regimen significantly shortens the duration of treatment needed to prevent relapse in a murine model of active TB. We undertook the current study to compare directly the activities of human-equivalent doses of P and R in a guinea pig model of chronic TB, in which bacilli are predominantly extracellular within human-like necrotic granulomas. Hartley strain guinea pigs were aerosol infected with ∼200 bacilli of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and treatment given 5 days/week was initiated 6 weeks later. R at 100 mg/kg of body weight and P at 100 mg/kg were given orally alone or in combination with isoniazid (H) at 60 mg/kg and pyrazinamide (Z) at 300 mg/kg. Culture-positive relapse was assessed in subgroups of guinea pigs after completion of 1 and 2 months of treatment. Human-equivalent doses of R and P showed equivalent bactericidal activity when used alone and in combination therapy. In guinea pigs treated with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide (RHZ) or PHZ, microbiological relapse occurred in the lungs of 8/10 animals treated for 1 month and in 0/10 animals treated for 2 months. Substitution of P for R in the standard antitubercular regimen did not shorten the time to cure in this guinea pig model of chronic TB. Data from ongoing clinical trials comparing the activity of these two drugs are awaited to determine the relevance of the guinea pig TB model in preclinical drug screening. PMID:22547623

  12. Phytoconstituents from Alpinia purpurata and their in vitro inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Villaflores, Oliver B.; Macabeo, Allan Patrick G.; Gehle, Dietmar; Krohn, Karsten; Franzblau, Scott G.; Aguinaldo, Alicia M.

    2010-01-01

    Alpinia purpurata or red ginger was studied for its phytochemical constituents as part of our growing interest on Philippine Zingiberaceae plants that may exhibit antimycobacterial activity. The hexane and dichloromethane subextracts of the leaves were fractionated and purified using silica gel chromatography to afford a mixture of C28–C32 fatty alcohols, a 3-methoxyflavone and two steroidal glycosides. The two latter metabolites were spectroscopically identified as kumatakenin (1), sitosteryl-3-O-6-palmitoyl-β-D-glucoside (2) and b-sitosteryl galactoside (3) using ultraviolet (UV), infrared (IR), electron impact mass spectrometer (EIMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments, and by comparison with literature data. This study demonstrates for the first time the isolation of these constituents from A. purpurata. In addition to the purported anti-inflammatory activity, its phytomedicinal potential to treat tuberculosis is also described. PMID:21120040

  13. Biomarkers on patient T cells diagnose active tuberculosis and monitor treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Adekambi, Toidi; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Cagle, Stephanie; Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Wang, Yun F.; Hu, Yijuan; Day, Cheryl L.; Ray, Susan M.; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The identification and treatment of individuals with tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health priority. Accurate diagnosis of pulmonary active TB (ATB) disease remains challenging and relies on extensive medical evaluation and detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in the patient’s sputum. Further, the response to treatment is monitored by sputum culture conversion, which takes several weeks for results. Here, we sought to identify blood-based host biomarkers associated with ATB and hypothesized that immune activation markers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells would be associated with Mtb load in vivo and could thus provide a gauge of Mtb infection. METHODS. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we evaluated the expression of immune activation markers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells from individuals with asymptomatic latent Mtb infection (LTBI) and ATB as well as from ATB patients undergoing anti-TB treatment. RESULTS. Frequencies of Mtb-specific IFN-γ+CD4+ T cells that expressed immune activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR as well as intracellular proliferation marker Ki-67 were substantially higher in subjects with ATB compared with those with LTBI. These markers accurately classified ATB and LTBI status, with cutoff values of 18%, 60%, and 5% for CD38+IFN-γ+, HLA-DR+IFN-γ+, and Ki-67+IFN-γ+, respectively, with 100% specificity and greater than 96% sensitivity. These markers also distinguished individuals with untreated ATB from those who had successfully completed anti-TB treatment and correlated with decreasing mycobacterial loads during treatment. CONCLUSION. We have identified host blood-based biomarkers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells that discriminate between ATB and LTBI and provide a set of tools for monitoring treatment response and cure. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Registration is not required for observational studies. FUNDING. This study was funded by Emory University, the NIH, and the Yerkes National Primate Center. PMID:25822019

  14. All-trans retinoic acid-triggered antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is dependent on NPC2.

    PubMed

    Wheelwright, Matthew; Kim, Elliot W; Inkeles, Megan S; De Leon, Avelino; Pellegrini, Matteo; Krutzik, Stephan R; Liu, Philip T

    2014-03-01

    A role for vitamin A in host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been suggested through epidemiological and in vitro studies; however, the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that vitamin A-triggered antimicrobial activity against M. tuberculosis requires expression of NPC2. Comparison of monocytes stimulated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3), the biologically active forms of vitamin A and vitamin D, respectively, indicates that ATRA and 1,25D3 induce mechanistically distinct antimicrobial activities. Stimulation of primary human monocytes with ATRA did not result in expression of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin, which is required for 1,25D3 antimicrobial activity. In contrast, ATRA triggered a reduction in the total cellular cholesterol concentration, whereas 1,25D3 did not. Blocking ATRA-induced cellular cholesterol reduction inhibits antimicrobial activity as well. Bioinformatic analysis of ATRA- and 1,25D3-induced gene profiles suggests that NPC2 is a key gene in ATRA-induced cholesterol regulation. Knockdown experiments demonstrate that ATRA-mediated decrease in total cellular cholesterol content and increase in lysosomal acidification are both dependent upon expression of NPC2. Expression of NPC2 was lower in caseous tuberculosis granulomas and M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes compared with normal lung and uninfected cells, respectively. Loss of NPC2 expression ablated ATRA-induced antimicrobial activity. Taken together, these results suggest that the vitamin A-mediated antimicrobial mechanism against M. tuberculosis requires NPC2-dependent expression and function, indicating a key role for cellular cholesterol regulation in the innate immune response. PMID:24501203

  15. Characterization of Antibacterial and Hemolytic Activity of Synthetic Pandinin 2 Variants and Their Inhibition against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Alexis; Villegas, Elba; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The contention and treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacteria that cause infectious diseases require the use of new type of antibiotics. Pandinin 2 (Pin2) is a scorpion venom antimicrobial peptide highly hemolytic that has a central proline residue. This residue forms a structural “kink” linked to its pore-forming activity towards human erythrocytes. In this work, the residue Pro14 of Pin2 was both substituted and flanked using glycine residues (P14G and P14GPG) based on the low hemolytic activities of antimicrobial peptides with structural motifs Gly and GlyProGly such as magainin 2 and ponericin G1, respectively. The two Pin2 variants showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli, S. aureus, and M. tuberculosis. However, Pin2 [GPG] was less hemolytic (30%) than that of Pin2 [G] variant. In addition, based on the primary structure of Pin2 [G] and Pin2 [GPG], two short peptide variants were designed and chemically synthesized keeping attention to their physicochemical properties such as hydrophobicity and propensity to adopt alpha-helical conformations. The aim to design these two short antimicrobial peptides was to avoid the drawback cost associated to the synthesis of peptides with large sequences. The short Pin2 variants named Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] showed antibiotic activity against E. coli and M. tuberculosis. Besides, Pin2 [14] presented only 25% of hemolysis toward human erythrocytes at concentrations as high as 100 µM, while the peptide Pin2 [17] did not show any hemolytic effect at the same concentration. Furthermore, these short antimicrobial peptides had better activity at molar concentrations against multidrug resistance M. tuberculosis than that of the conventional antibiotics ethambutol, isoniazid and rifampicin. Therefore, Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] have the potential to be used as an alternative antibiotics and anti-tuberculosis agents with reduced hemolytic effects. PMID:25019413

  16. In Vivo Molecular Dissection of the Effects of HIV-1 in Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Lucy C. K.; Pollara, Gabriele; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tomlinson, Gillian S.; Lehloenya, Rannakoe J.; Roe, Jennifer; Meldau, Richard; Miller, Robert F.; Ramsay, Alan; Chain, Benjamin M.; Dheda, Keertan; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-01-01

    Increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) associated with HIV-1 infection is primarily attributed to deficient T helper (Th)1 immune responses, but most people with active TB have robust Th1 responses, indicating that these are not sufficient to protect against disease. Recent findings suggest that favourable outcomes following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection arise from finely balanced inflammatory and regulatory pathways, achieving pathogen control without immunopathology. We hypothesised that HIV-1 and antiretroviral therapy (ART) exert widespread changes to cell mediated immunity, which may compromise the optimal host protective response to TB and provide novel insights into the correlates of immune protection and pathogenesis. We sought to define these effects in patients with active TB by transcriptional profiling of tuberculin skin tests (TST) to make comprehensive molecular level assessments of in vivo human immune responses at the site of a standardised mycobacterial challenge. We showed that the TST transcriptome accurately reflects the molecular pathology at the site of human pulmonary TB, and used this approach to investigate immune dysregulation in HIV-1/TB co-infected patients with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with TST reactivity or anergy and unmasking TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after initiation of ART. HIV-1 infected patients with positive TSTs exhibited preserved Th1 responses but deficient immunoregulatory IL10-inducible responses. Those with clinically negative TSTs revealed profound anergy of innate as well as adaptive immune responses, except for preservation of type 1 interferon activity, implicated in impaired anti-mycobacterial immunity. Patients with unmasking TB IRIS showed recovery of Th1 immunity to normal levels, but exaggerated Th2-associated responses specifically. These mechanisms of immune dysregulation were localised to the tissue microenvironment and not evident in peripheral blood. TST

  17. Highly active antiretroviral therapy and tuberculosis control in Africa: synergies and potential.

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Hargreaves, Nicola J.; Chimzizi, Rehab; Salaniponi, Felix M.

    2002-01-01

    HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) and TB (tuberculosis) are two of the world's major pandemics, the brunt of which falls on sub-Saharan Africa. Efforts aimed at controlling HIV/AIDS have largely focused on prevention, little attention having been paid to care. Work on TB control has concentrated on case detection and treatment. HIV infection has complicated the control of tuberculosis. There is unlikely to be a decline in the number of cases of TB unless additional strategies are developed to control both this disease and HIV simultaneously. Such strategies would include active case-finding in situations where TB transmission is high, the provision of a package of care for HIV-related illness, and the application of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The latter is likely to have the greatest impact, but for this therapy to become more accessible in Africa the drugs would have to be made available through international support and a programme structure would have to be developed for its administration. It could be delivered by means of a structure based on the five-point strategy called DOTS, which has been adopted for TB control. However, it may be unrealistic to give TB control programmes the responsibility for running such a programme. A better approach might be to deliver highly active antiretroviral therapy within a comprehensive HIV/AIDS management strategy complementing the preventive work already being undertaken by AIDS control programmes. TB programmes could contribute towards the development and implementation of this strategy. PMID:12132003

  18. In Vivo Molecular Dissection of the Effects of HIV-1 in Active Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Lucy C K; Pollara, Gabriele; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tomlinson, Gillian S; Lehloenya, Rannakoe J; Roe, Jennifer; Meldau, Richard; Miller, Robert F; Ramsay, Alan; Chain, Benjamin M; Dheda, Keertan; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-03-01

    Increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) associated with HIV-1 infection is primarily attributed to deficient T helper (Th)1 immune responses, but most people with active TB have robust Th1 responses, indicating that these are not sufficient to protect against disease. Recent findings suggest that favourable outcomes following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection arise from finely balanced inflammatory and regulatory pathways, achieving pathogen control without immunopathology. We hypothesised that HIV-1 and antiretroviral therapy (ART) exert widespread changes to cell mediated immunity, which may compromise the optimal host protective response to TB and provide novel insights into the correlates of immune protection and pathogenesis. We sought to define these effects in patients with active TB by transcriptional profiling of tuberculin skin tests (TST) to make comprehensive molecular level assessments of in vivo human immune responses at the site of a standardised mycobacterial challenge. We showed that the TST transcriptome accurately reflects the molecular pathology at the site of human pulmonary TB, and used this approach to investigate immune dysregulation in HIV-1/TB co-infected patients with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with TST reactivity or anergy and unmasking TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after initiation of ART. HIV-1 infected patients with positive TSTs exhibited preserved Th1 responses but deficient immunoregulatory IL10-inducible responses. Those with clinically negative TSTs revealed profound anergy of innate as well as adaptive immune responses, except for preservation of type 1 interferon activity, implicated in impaired anti-mycobacterial immunity. Patients with unmasking TB IRIS showed recovery of Th1 immunity to normal levels, but exaggerated Th2-associated responses specifically. These mechanisms of immune dysregulation were localised to the tissue microenvironment and not evident in peripheral blood. TST

  19. Crystal Structures of the Kinase Domain of the Sulfate-Activating Complex in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Poyraz, Ömer; Brunner, Katharina; Lohkamp, Bernhard; Axelsson, Hanna; Hammarström, Lars G. J.; Schnell, Robert; Schneider, Gunter

    2015-01-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis the sulfate activating complex provides a key branching point in sulfate assimilation. The complex consists of two polypeptide chains, CysD and CysN. CysD is an ATP sulfurylase that, with the energy provided by the GTPase activity of CysN, forms adenosine-5’-phosphosulfate (APS) which can then enter the reductive branch of sulfate assimilation leading to the biosynthesis of cysteine. The CysN polypeptide chain also contains an APS kinase domain (CysC) that phosphorylates APS leading to 3’-phosphoadenosine-5’-phosphosulfate, the sulfate donor in the synthesis of sulfolipids. We have determined the crystal structures of CysC from M. tuberculosis as a binary complex with ADP, and as ternary complexes with ADP and APS and the ATP mimic AMP-PNP and APS, respectively, to resolutions of 1.5 Å, 2.1 Å and 1.7 Å, respectively. CysC shows the typical APS kinase fold, and the structures provide comprehensive views of the catalytic machinery, conserved in this enzyme family. Comparison to the structure of the human homolog show highly conserved APS and ATP binding sites, questioning the feasibility of the design of specific inhibitors of mycobacterial CysC. Residue Cys556 is part of the flexible lid region that closes off the active site upon substrate binding. Mutational analysis revealed this residue as one of the determinants controlling lid closure and hence binding of the nucleotide substrate. PMID:25807013

  20. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  1. Mechanistic insights on immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Esaki M; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Larsson, Marie

    2015-02-12

    Immunosenescence is marked by accelerated degradation of host immune responses leading to the onset of opportunistic infections, where senescent T cells show remarkably higher ontogenic defects as compared to healthy T cells. The mechanistic association between T-cell immunosenescence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, and functional T-cell responses in HIV-tuberculosis (HIV-TB) co-infection remains to be elaborately discussed. Here, we discussed the association of immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-TB co-infection and reviewed the role played by mediators of immune deterioration in HIV-TB co-infection necessitating the importance of designing therapeutic strategies against HIV disease progression and pathogenesis. PMID:25674514

  2. Two enzymes with redundant fructose bisphosphatase activity sustain gluconeogenesis and virulence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Uday; Marrero, Joeli; Calhoun, Susannah; Eoh, Hyungjin; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro Sorio; Rhee, Kyu; Ehrt, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) likely utilizes host fatty acids as a carbon source during infection. Gluconeogenesis is essential for the conversion of fatty acids into biomass. A rate-limiting step in gluconeogenesis is the conversion of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate to fructose 6-phosphate by a fructose bisphosphatase (FBPase). The Mtb genome contains only one annotated FBPase gene, glpX. Here we show that, unexpectedly, an Mtb mutant lacking GLPX grows on gluconeogenic carbon sources and has detectable FBPase activity. We demonstrate that the Mtb genome encodes an alternative FBPase (GPM2, Rv3214) that can maintain gluconeogenesis in the absence of GLPX. Consequently, deletion of both GLPX and GPM2 is required for disruption of gluconeogenesis and attenuation of Mtb in a mouse model of infection. Our work affirms a role for gluconeogenesis in Mtb virulence and reveals previously unidentified metabolic redundancy at the FBPase-catalysed reaction step of the pathway. PMID:26258286

  3. Predictive value of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-tuberculosis Gold In-Tube test for development of active tuberculosis in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, Ekrem Cengiz; Gunluoglu, Gulşah; Gunluoglu, Mehmet Zeki; Tural, Seda; Sökücü, Sinem

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemodialysis (HD) patients are at increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) compared with the general population. QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) for LTBI detection is more promising than tuberculin skin test (TST) in HD patients. AIM: In our study, we evaluated the value of the TST and QFT-G In-Tube (QFG-IT) test in the development of active tuberculosis (TB), in the HD patients, and in healthy controls. METHODS: The study enrolled 95 HD patients and ninety age-matched, healthy controls. The TST and QFG-IT were performed. All the subjects were followed up 5 years for active TB disease. RESULTS: Compared to the healthy controls, a high prevalence of LTBI was found in the HD patients by QFG-IT (41% vs. 25%). However, no significant difference was detected by TST (32% vs. 31%). Four HD patients and one healthy control progressed to active TB disease within the 5-year follow-up. For active TB discovered subjects, QFG-IT was positive in all, but TST was positive in two (one patient and one healthy control). In HD patients; sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of QFG-IT, and TST for active TB was 100% and 25%, 62% and 67%, 10%, and 3%, and 100% and 95%, respectively. Receiver operating curve analysis revealed that the results are significantly different (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: QFG-IT test is a more useful diagnostic method than TST for detecting those who will progress to active TB in HD patients. PMID:27168859

  4. Noninvasive Test for Tuberculosis Detection among Primates

    PubMed Central

    Mugisha, Lawrence; Shoyama, Fernanda Miyagaki; O’Malley, Melanie J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Asiimwe, Benon; Travis, Dominic A.; Singer, Randall S.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2015-01-01

    Traditional testing methods have limited epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis among free-living primates. PCR amplification of insertion element IS6110 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fecal samples was evaluated as a noninvasive screening test for tuberculosis in primates. Active tuberculosis was detected among inoculated macaques and naturally exposed chimpanzees, demonstrating the utility of this test. PMID:25695329

  5. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasome Active Site Threonine Is Essential for Persistence Yet Dispensable for Replication and Resistance to Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Gandotra, Sheetal; Lebron, Maria B.; Ehrt, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Previous work revealed that conditional depletion of the core proteasome subunits PrcB and PrcA impaired growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro and in mouse lungs, caused hypersusceptibility to nitric oxide (NO) and impaired persistence of the bacilli during chronic mouse infections. Here, we show that genetic deletion of prcBA led to similar phenotypes. Surprisingly, however, an active site mutant proteasome complemented the in vitro and in vivo growth defects of the prcBA knockout (ΔprcBA) as well as its NO hypersensitivity. In contrast, long-term survival of M. tuberculosis in stationary phase and during starvation in vitro and in the chronic phase of mouse infection required a proteolytically active proteasome. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase did not rescue survival of ΔprcBA, revealing a function beyond NO defense, by which the proteasome contributes to M. tuberculosis fitness during chronic mouse infections. These findings suggest that proteasomal proteolysis facilitates mycobacterial persistence, that M. tuberculosis faces starvation during chronic mouse infections and that the proteasome serves a proteolysis-independent function. PMID:20711362

  6. Structural analysis of the dodecameric proteasome activator PafE in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Wang, Tong; Jastrab, Jordan B; Darwin, K Heran; Li, Huilin

    2016-04-01

    The human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires a proteasome system to cause lethal infections in mice. We recently found that proteasome accessory factor E (PafE, Rv3780) activates proteolysis by the Mtb proteasome independently of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Moreover, PafE contributes to the heat-shock response and virulence of Mtb Here, we show that PafE subunits formed four-helix bundles similar to those of the eukaryotic ATP-independent proteasome activator subunits of PA26 and PA28. However, unlike any other known proteasome activator, PafE formed dodecamers with 12-fold symmetry, which required a glycine-XXX-glycine-XXX-glycine motif that is not found in previously described activators. Intriguingly, the truncation of the PafE carboxyl-terminus resulted in the robust binding of PafE rings to native proteasome core particles and substantially increased proteasomal activity, suggesting that the extended carboxyl-terminus of this cofactor confers suboptimal binding to the proteasome core particle. Collectively, our data show that proteasomal activation is not limited to hexameric ATPases in bacteria. PMID:27001842

  7. Structural analysis of the dodecameric proteasome activator PafE in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Wang, Tong; Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran; Li, Huilin

    2016-03-21

    Here, the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires a proteasome system to cause lethal infections in mice. We recently found that proteasome accessory factor E (PafE, Rv3780) activates proteolysis by the Mtb proteasome independently of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Moreover, PafE contributes to the heat-shock response and virulence of Mtb. Here, we show that PafE subunits formed four-helix bundles similar to those of the eukaryotic ATP-independent proteasome activator subunits of PA26 and PA28. However, unlike any other known proteasome activator, PafE formed dodecamers with 12-fold symmetry, which required a glycine-XXX-glycine-XXX-glycine motif that is not found in previously described activators. Intriguingly, themore » truncation of the PafE carboxyl-terminus resulted in the robust binding of PafE rings to native proteasome core particles and substantially increased proteasomal activity, suggesting that the extended carboxyl-terminus of this cofactor confers suboptimal binding to the proteasome core particle. Collectively, our data show that proteasomal activation is not limited to hexameric ATPases in bacteria.« less

  8. Hypoxia and classical activation limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival by Akt-dependent glycolytic shift in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Matta, S K; Kumar, D

    2016-01-01

    Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major antibacterial defense mechanism used by macrophages upon activation. Exposure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected macrophages to hypoxia is known to compromise the survival of the pathogen. Here we report that the hypoxia-induced control of intracellular Mtb load in RAW 264.7 macrophages was mediated by regulating the cellular ROS levels. We show that similar to classical activation, hypoxia incubation of macrophages resulted in decreased mitochondrial outer membrane potential (MOMP) and a concomitant increase in the cellular ROS levels. Mitochondrial depolarization and consequently higher ROS could be blocked by knocking down Akt using siRNAs, which acted by inhibiting the switch to glycolytic mode of metabolism, an essential adaptive response upon classical activation or hypoxic incubation of macrophages. Moreover, in the classically activated macrophages or in the macrophages under hypoxia incubation, supplementation with additional glucose had similar effects as Akt knockdown. Interestingly, in both the cases, the reversal of phenotype was linked with the ability of the mitochondrial F0–F1 ATP synthase activity to maintain the MOMP in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. Both Akt knockdown and glucose supplementation were also able to rescue Mtb survival in these macrophages upon classical activation or hypoxia incubation. These results provide a framework for better understanding of how the interplay between oxygen supply, which is limiting in the human tubercular granulomas, and nutrient availability could together direct the outcome of infections in vivo. PMID:27551515

  9. Cytokine and chemokine expression profiles in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulation are altered in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected subjects with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Waruk, Jillian L M; Machuki, Zipporah; Mesa, Christine; Juno, Jennifer A; Anzala, Omu; Sharma, Meenu; Ball, T Blake; Oyugi, Julius; Kiazyk, Sandra

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects nearly 2 million people annually and is the most common cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. Tuberculosis (TB) diagnostics cater to HIV-uninfected individuals in non-endemic countries, are expensive, slow, and lack sensitivity for those most affected. Patterns of soluble immune markers from Mtb-stimulated immune cells are not well defined in HIV co-infection. We assessed immune differences between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals with active TB utilizing IFNγ-based QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) testing in Nairobi, Kenya. Excess QFT supernatants were used to measure cytokine and chemokine responses by a 17-plex bead array. Mtb/HIV co-infected participants were significantly less likely to be QFT+ (47.2% versus 84.2% in the HIV-uninfected group), and demonstrated lower expression of all cytokines except for IFNα2. Receiver operator characteristic analyses identified IL-1α as a potential marker of co-infection. Among HIV-infected individuals, CD4+ T cell count correlated weakly with the expression of several analytes. Co-expression analysis highlighted differences in immune profiles between the groups. These data suggest that there is a unique and detectable Mtb-specific immune response in co-infection. A better understanding of Mtb immunology can translate into much needed immunodiagnostics with enhanced sensitivity in HIV-infected individuals, facilitating their opportunity to obtain live-saving treatment. PMID:26073895

  10. Prevalence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Prison Inmates in Ethiopia, a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Solomon; Haileamlak, Abraham; Wieser, Andreas; Pritsch, Michael; Heinrich, Norbert; Loscher, Thomas; Hoelscher, Michael; Rachow, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Setting Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major health problems in prisons. Objective This study was done to assess the prevalence and determinants of active tuberculosis in Ethiopian prisons. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2013 in 13 zonal prisons. All incarcerated inmates underwent TB symptom screening according to WHO criteria. From identified TB-suspects two sputum samples were analyzed using smear microscopy and solid culture. A standardized questionnaire assessing TB risk factors was completed for each TB suspect. Results 765 (4.9%) TB suspects were identified among 15,495 inmates. 51 suspects were already on anti-TB treatment (6.67%) and 20 (2.8%) new culture-confirmed TB cases were identified in the study, resulting in an overall TB prevalence of 458.1/100,000 (95%CI: 350-560/100,000). Risk factors for active TB were alcohol consumption, contact with a TB case before incarceration and no window in prison cell. HIV prevalence was not different between TB suspects and active TB cases. Further, the TB burden in prisons increased with advancing distance from the capital Addis Ababa. Conclusions The overall TB prevalence in Ethiopian prisons was high and extremely variable among different prisons. TB risk factors related to conditions of prison facilities and the impact of implemented TB control measures need to be further studied in order to improve TB control among inmates. PMID:26641654

  11. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bhatter, Purva D.; Gupta, Pooja D.; Birdi, Tannaz J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome), Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf), Piper nigrum L. (seed), and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber) were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549) infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone) was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous) showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous) and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol) extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity. PMID:26941797

  12. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays.

    PubMed

    Bhatter, Purva D; Gupta, Pooja D; Birdi, Tannaz J

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome), Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf), Piper nigrum L. (seed), and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber) were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549) infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone) was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous) showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous) and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol) extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity. PMID:26941797

  13. Characteristics of Active Tuberculosis Patients Requiring Intensive Care Monitoring and Factors Affecting Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Levent, Dalar; Emel, Eryüksel; Pelin, Uysal; Turkay, Akbaş; Aybüke, Kekeçoğlu

    2016-01-01

    Background One to three percent of cases of acute tuberculosis (TB) require monitoring in the intensive care unit (ICU). The purpose of this study is to establish and determine the mortality rate and discuss the causes of high mortality in these cases, and to evaluate the clinical and laboratory findings of TB patients admitted to the pulmonary ICU. Methods The data of patients admitted to the ICU of Yedikule Chest Diseases and Chest Surgery Education and Research Hospital due to active TB were retrospectively evaluated. Demographic characteristics, medical history, and clinical and laboratory findings were evaluated. Results Thirty-five TB patients (27 males) with a median age of 47 years were included, of whom 20 died within 30 days (57%). The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were significantly higher, and albumin and PaO2/FIO2 levels were significantly lower, and shock, multiple organ failure, the need for invasive mechanical ventilation and drug resistance were more common in the patients who died. The mortality risk was 7.58 times higher in the patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. The SOFA score alone was a significant risk factor affecting survival. Conclusion The survival rate is low in cases of tuberculosis treated in an ICU. The predictors of mortality include the requirement of invasive mechanical ventilation and multiple organ failure. Another factor specific to TB patients is the presence of drug resistance, which should be taken seriously in countries where there is a high incidence of the disease. Finding new variables that can be established with new prospective studies may help to decrease the high mortality rate. PMID:27433176

  14. Interleukin 17-Producing γδ T Cells Increased in Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Meiyu; Wang, Zhaohua; Yao, Chunyan; Jiang, Lina; Jin, Qili; Wang, Jing; Li, Baiqing

    2008-01-01

    Although it has been known that γδ T cells may play an important role in the immune response to infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), the mechanisms by which the γδ T cells participate in the innate and/or acquired immunity to tuberculosis (TB) have not been full elucidated. In the present study, 27 patients with active pulmonary TB and 16 healthy donors (HD) were performed. We found that proportion of IL-17-producing cells among lymphocyte was similar between TB patients and HD, whereas the proportions of γδ T cells in IL-17-producing cells (59.2%) and IL-17-producing cells in γδ T cells (19.4%) in peripheral blood were markedly increased in TB patients when compared to those in HD (43.9% and 7.7%, respectively). In addition, the proportions of IFN-γ-producing γδ T cells in TB patients were obviously lower than that in HD. Upon re-stimulated with M. tb heat-treated antigen (M. tb-HAg) in vitro, fewer IL-17-producing γδ T cells were generated from HD and TB patients, whereas IFN-γ-producing γδ T cells were increased in TB patients compared to that in HD. Our findings in TB patients and healthy human were consistent with other murine investigation that the IL-17-producing γδ T cells were main source of IL-17 in mouse model of BCG infection, suggesting that γδ T cells might be involved in the formation of tubercular granuloma in pulmonary TB patients, but need further identification. PMID:18582402

  15. Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with concomitant induction of cellular immune responses by a tetraaza-macrocycle with acetate pendant arms.

    PubMed

    David, S; Ordway, D; Arroz, M J; Costa, J; Delgado, R

    2001-01-01

    The novel tetraaza-macrocyclic compound 3,7,11-tris(carboxymethyl)-3,7,11,17-tetraaza-bicyclo[11.3.1]heptadeca-1(17),13,15-triene, abbreviated as ac3py14, was investigated for its activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for induction of protective cellular immune responses. Perspective results show that ac3py14 and its Fe3+ 1:1 complex, [Fe(ac3py14)], inhibited radiometric growth of several strains of M. tuberculosis. Inhibition with 25 microg/mL varied from 99% for H37Rv to 80% and above for multiple drug-resistant clinical isolates. The capacity of ac3py14 to elicit a beneficial immune response without cellular apoptosis was assessed and compared to the effects of virulent M. tuberculosis. The present study produces evidence that after stimulation with ac3py14 there was significant production of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), whereas the production of interleukin-5 (IL-5) remained low, and there was development of a memory population (CD45RO). The level of binding of Annexin V, a marker of apoptosis, was not sufficient to result in toxic effects toward alphabeta and gammadelta T cells and CD14+ macrophages. This preliminary study is the first report of a compound that simultaneously exerts an inhibitory effect against M. tuberculosis and induces factors associated with protective immune responses. PMID:11501675

  16. Vitamin D Status in Botswana Children Under 2 Years Old With and Without Active Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ludmir, Jonathan; Mazhani, Loeto; Cary, Mark S; Chakalisa, Unoda A; Pettifor, John M; Molefi, Mooketsi; Redwood, Abiona; Stallings, Virginia A; Gross, Robert; Steenhoff, Andrew P

    2016-05-01

    Additional strategies are needed to prevent and treat tuberculosis (TB). Although vitamin D may have antimycobacterial effects, it is unknown whether low vitamin D status confers a risk for active TB in African children. This case-control study assessed serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration in children with and without active TB in Gaborone, Botswana. A total of 80 children under 2 years old with and without active TB, seen at hospitals and clinics in the greater Gaborone area between September 2010 and November 2012, were enrolled. Of these, 39 cases did not differ from the 41 controls in median 25(OH)D levels (P = 0.84). The 25(OH)D was < 20 ng/mL in 8/39 (21%) cases and 7/41 (17%) controls (P = 0.69, χ(2)). Univariate analyses of subject clinical characteristics (other than 25(OH)D levels) showed that any degree of weight loss was associated with a diagnosis of TB (P = 0.047). Other clinical characteristics, including age (P = 0.08) or weight below third percentile (P = 0.58), showed no association with TB. There was no significant difference in vitamin D status between children under 2 years old with and without active TB. Lower vitamin D status did not appear to be a risk factor for TB in this small Gaborone cohort. PMID:26976889

  17. Predominance of modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and active transmission of Beijing sublineage in Jayapura, Indonesia Papua.

    PubMed

    Chaidir, Lidya; Sengstake, Sarah; de Beer, Jessica; Oktavian, Antonius; Krismawati, Hana; Muhapril, Erfin; Kusumadewi, Inri; Annisa, Jessi; Anthony, Richard; van Soolingen, Dick; Achmad, Tri Hanggono; Marzuki, Sangkot; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotype distribution is different between West and Central Indonesia, but there are no data on the most Eastern part, Papua. We aimed to identify the predominant genotypes of M. tuberculosis responsible for tuberculosis in coastal Papua, their transmission, and the association with patient characteristics. A total of 199 M. tuberculosis isolates were collected. Spoligotyping was applied to describe the population structure of M. tuberculosis, lineage identification was performed using a combination of lineage-specific markers, and genotypic clusters were identified using a combination of 24-locus-MIRU-VNTR and spoligotyping. A high degree of genetic diversity was observed among isolates based on their spoligopatterns. Strains from modern lineage 4 made up almost half of strains (46.9%), being more abundant than the ancient lineage 1 (33.7%), and modern lineage 2 (19.4%). Thirty-five percent of strains belonged to genotypic clusters, especially strains in the Beijing genotype. Previous TB treatment and mutations associated with drug resistance were more common in patients infected with strains of the Beijing genotype. Papua shows a different distribution of M. tuberculosis genotypes compared to other parts of Indonesia. Clustering and drug resistance of modern strains recently introduced to Papua may contribute to the high tuberculosis burden in this region. PMID:26825253

  18. Untreated Active Tuberculosis in Pregnancy with Intraocular Dissemination: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    LoBue, Stephen; Adams, Daniel; Oladipo, Yewande; Posso, Ramses; Mapp, Tiffany; Santiago, Crystal; Jain, Manisha; Marino, William D.; Henderson, Cassandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease that affects hundreds of millions of people across the world. However, the incidence in developed countries has decreased over the past decades causing physicians to become unfamiliar with its unspecific symptoms. Pregnant individuals are especially difficult because many symptoms of active TB can mimic normal physiological changes of pregnancy. We present a case report of a 26-year-old multiparous woman, G4P3003, at 38-week gestation with a history of positive PPD who emigrated from Ghana 6 years ago. She came to the hospital with an initial complaint of suprapubic pain, pressure, and possible leakage of amniotic fluid for the past week. Patient also complained of a productive cough for the past 3 to 4 months with a decrease in vision occurring with the start of pregnancy. Visual acuity was worse than 20/200 in both eyes. Definitive diagnosis of active TB was delayed due to patient refusal of chest X-ray. Fortunately, delay in diagnosis was minimized since patient delivered within 24 hours of admission. Active TB was confirmed with intraocular dissemination. Patient had optic atrophy OS (left eye) and papillitis, choroiditis, and uveitis OD (right eye) due to TB infiltration. Fetus was asymptomatic and anti-TB therapy was started for both patients. PMID:26693374

  19. Identification of a small molecule with activity against drug-resistant and persistent tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Sambandan, Dhinakaran; Halder, Rajkumar; Wang, Jianing; Batt, Sarah M.; Weinrick, Brian; Ahmad, Insha; Yang, Pengyu; Zhang, Yong; Kim, John; Hassani, Morad; Huszar, Stanislav; Trefzer, Claudia; Ma, Zhenkun; Kaneko, Takushi; Mdluli, Khisi E.; Franzblau, Scott; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; Johnsson, Kai; Mikusova, Katarina; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Fütterer, Klaus; Robbins, Scott H.; Barnes, S. Whitney; Walker, John R.; Jacobs, William R.; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    A cell-based phenotypic screen for inhibitors of biofilm formation in mycobacteria identified the small molecule TCA1, which has bactericidal activity against both drug-susceptible and -resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and sterilizes Mtb in vitro combined with rifampicin or isoniazid. In addition, TCA1 has bactericidal activity against nonreplicating Mtb in vitro and is efficacious in acute and chronic Mtb infection mouse models both alone and combined with rifampicin or isoniazid. Transcriptional analysis revealed that TCA1 down-regulates genes known to be involved in Mtb persistence. Genetic and affinity-based methods identified decaprenyl-phosphoryl-β-D-ribofuranose oxidoreductase DprE1 and MoeW, enzymes involved in cell wall and molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis, respectively, as targets responsible for the activity of TCA1. These in vitro and in vivo results indicate that this compound functions by a unique mechanism and suggest that TCA1 may lead to the development of a class of antituberculosis agents. PMID:23776209

  20. Biochemical characterization of quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and inhibition of its activity by pyrazinamide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Shibayama, Keigo; Rimbara, Emiko; Mori, Shigetarou

    2014-01-01

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a key enzyme in the de novo pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis and a target for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. QAPRTase catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid mononucleotide from quinolinic acid (QA) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) through a phosphoribosyl transfer reaction followed by decarboxylation. The crystal structure of QAPRTase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (MtQAPRTase) has been determined; however, a detailed functional analysis of MtQAPRTase has not been published. Here, we analyzed the enzymatic activities of MtQAPRTase and determined the effect on catalysis of the anti-tuberculosis drug pyrazinamide (PZA). The optimum temperature and pH for MtQAPRTase activity were 60°C and pH 9.2. MtQAPRTase required bivalent metal ions and its activity was highest in the presence of Mg2+. Kinetic analyses revealed that the Km values for QA and PRPP were 0.08 and 0.39 mM, respectively, and the kcat values for QA and PRPP were 0.12 and 0.14 [s-1], respectively. When the amino acid residues of MtQAPRTase, which may interact with QA, were substituted with alanine residues, catalytic activity was undetectable. Further, PZA, which is an anti-tuberculosis drug and a structural analog of QA, markedly inhibited the catalytic activity of MtQAPRTase. The structure of PZA may provide the basis for the design of new inhibitors of MtQAPRTase. These findings provide new insights into the catalytic properties of MtQAPRTase. PMID:24949952

  1. Aberrant Inflammasome Activation Characterizes Tuberculosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hong Yien; Yong, Yean Kong; Shankar, Esaki M; Paukovics, Geza; Ellegård, Rada; Larsson, Marie; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; French, Martyn A; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2016-05-15

    Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) complicates combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in up to 25% of patients with HIV/TB coinfection. Monocytes and IL-18, a signature cytokine of inflammasome activation, are implicated in TB-IRIS pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated inflammasome activation both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients. HIV/TB patients exhibited higher proportions of monocytes expressing activated caspase-1 (casp1) pre-cART, compared with HIV patients without TB, and patients who developed TB-IRIS exhibited the greatest increase in casp1 expression. CD64(+) monocytes were a marker of increased casp1 expression. Furthermore, IL-1β, another marker of inflammasome activation, was also elevated during TB-IRIS. TB-IRIS patients also exhibited greater upregulation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome mRNA, compared with controls. Analysis of plasma mitochondrial DNA levels showed that TB-IRIS patients experienced greater cell death, especially pre-cART. Plasma NO levels were lower both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence of inadequate inflammasome regulation. Plasma IL-18 levels pre-cART correlated inversely with NO levels but positively with monocyte casp1 expression and mitochondrial DNA levels, and expression of IL-18Rα on CD4(+) T cells and NK cells was higher in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence that IL-18 is a marker of inflammasome activation. We propose that inflammasome activation in monocytes/macrophages of HIV/TB patients increases with ineffective T cell-dependent activation of monocytes/macrophages, priming them for an excessive inflammatory response after cART is commenced, which is greatest in patients with TB-IRIS. PMID:27076678

  2. 2-(Quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides Are Active against Drug-Susceptible and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains.

    PubMed

    Pissinate, Kenia; Villela, Anne Drumond; Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês; Giacobbo, Bruno Couto; Grams, Estêvão Silveira; Abbadi, Bruno Lopes; Trindade, Rogério Valim; Roesler Nery, Laura; Bonan, Carla Denise; Back, Davi Fernando; Campos, Maria Martha; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Machado, Pablo

    2016-03-10

    2-(Quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides have been described as potent in vitro inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. Herein, additional chemical modifications of lead compounds were carried out, yielding highly potent antitubercular agents with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values as low as 0.05 μM. Further, the synthesized compounds were active against drug-resistant strains and were devoid of apparent toxicity to Vero and HaCat cells (IC50s ≥ 20 μM). In addition, the 2-(quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides showed intracellular activity against the bacilli in infected macrophages with action similar to rifampin, low risk of drug-drug interactions, and no sign of cardiac toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) at 1 and 5 μM. Therefore, these data indicate that this class of compounds may furnish candidates for future development to, hopefully, provide drug alternatives for tuberculosis treatment. PMID:26985307

  3. Granulocytic Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells Expansion during Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis Is Associated with High Nitric Oxide Plasma Level

    PubMed Central

    El Daker, Sary; Sacchi, Alessandra; Tempestilli, Massimo; Carducci, Claudia; Goletti, Delia; Vanini, Valentina; Colizzi, Vittorio; Lauria, Francesco Nicola; Martini, Federico; Martino, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still the principal cause of death caused by a single infectious agent, and the balance between the bacillus and host defense mechanisms reflects the different manifestations of the pathology. The aim of this work was to study the role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) during active pulmonary tuberculosis at the site of infection. We observed an expansion of MDSCs in the lung and blood of patients with active TB, which are correlated with an enhanced amount of nitric oxide in the plasma. We also found that these cells have the remarkable ability to suppress T-cell response, suggesting an important role in the modulation of the immune response against TB. Interestingly, a trend in the diminution of MDSCs was found after an efficacious anti-TB therapy, suggesting that these cells may be used as a potential biomarker for monitoring anti-TB therapy efficacy. PMID:25879532

  4. The Three Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen 85 Isoforms Have Unique Substrates and Activities Determined by Non-active Site Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Keriann M.; Dolan, Michael A.; Barry, Conor S.; Joe, Maju; McPhie, Peter; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Lowary, Todd L.; Davis, Benjamin G.; Barry, Clifton E.

    2014-01-01

    The three isoforms of antigen 85 (A, B, and C) are the most abundant secreted mycobacterial proteins and catalyze transesterification reactions that synthesize mycolated arabinogalactan, trehalose monomycolate (TMM), and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), important constituents of the outermost layer of the cellular envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These three enzymes are nearly identical at the active site and have therefore been postulated to exist to evade host immunity. Distal to the active site is a second putative carbohydrate-binding site of lower homology. Mutagenesis of the three isoforms at this second site affected both substrate selectivity and overall catalytic activity in vitro. Using synthetic and natural substrates, we show that these three enzymes exhibit unique selectivity; antigen 85A more efficiently mycolates TMM to form TDM, whereas C (and to a lesser extent B) has a higher rate of activity using free trehalose to form TMM. This difference in substrate selectivity extends to the hexasaccharide fragment of cell wall arabinan. Mutation of secondary site residues from the most active isoform (C) into those present in A or B partially interconverts this substrate selectivity. These experiments in combination with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that differences in the N-terminal helix α9, the adjacent Pro216–Phe228 loop, and helix α5 are the likely cause of changes in activity and substrate selectivity. These differences explain the existence of three isoforms and will allow for future work in developing inhibitors. PMID:25028517

  5. Target-Based Identification of Whole-Cell Active Inhibitors of Biotin Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sae Woong; Casalena, Dominick; Wilson, Daniel; Dai, Ran; Nag, Partha; Liu, Feng; Boyce, Jim P.; Bittker, Joshua; Schreiber, Stuart; Finzel, Barry C.; Schnappinger, Dirk; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Biotin biosynthesis is essential for survival and persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in vivo. The aminotransferase BioA, which catalyzes the antepenultimate step in the biotin pathway, has been established as a promising target due to its vulnerability to chemical inhibition. We performed high-throughput screening (HTS) employing a fluorescence displacement assay and identified a diverse set of potent inhibitors including many diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) scaffolds. To efficiently select only hits targeting biotin biosynthesis, we then deployed a whole-cell counter-screen in either biotin-free and biotin-containing medium against wild-type Mtb and in parallel with isogenic bioA Mtb strains that possess differential levels of BioA expression. This counter-screen proved crucial to filter out compounds whose whole-cell activity was off-target as well as identify hits with weak, but measurable whole-cell activity in BioA-depleted strains. Several of the most promising hits were co-crystallized with BioA to provide a framework for future structure-based drug design efforts. PMID:25556942

  6. A novel molecule with notable activity against multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice O; Mangu, Naveen K; Seo, Byung I; Gund, Machhindra G

    2015-03-15

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is emerging as a serious global health problem, which has been elevated through co-infection involving HIV and MDR-Mtb. The discovery of new compounds with anti-MDR TB efficacy and favorable metabolism profiles is an important scientific challenge. Using computational biology and ligand docking data, we have conceived a multifunctional molecule, 2, as a potential anti-MDR TB agent. This compound was produced through a multi-step synthesis. It exhibited significant in vitro activity against MDR-TB (MIC 1.56μg/mL) and its half-life (t1/2) in human liver microsomes was 14.4h. The metabolic profiles of compound 2 with respect to human cytochrome P450 (CYP) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isozymes were favorable. Compound 2 also had relatively low in vitro cytotoxicity in uninfected macrophages. It displayed synergistic behavior against MDR-TB in combination with PA-824. Interestingly, compound 2 also displayed in vitro anti-HIV activity. PMID:25677656

  7. UvrD2 is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but its helicase activity is not required.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alan; Güthlein, Carolin; Beresford, Nicola; Böttger, Erik C; Springer, Burkhard; Davis, Elaine O

    2011-09-01

    UvrD is an SF1 family helicase involved in DNA repair that is widely conserved in bacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has two annotated UvrD homologues; here we investigate the role of UvrD2. The uvrD2 gene at its native locus could be knocked out only in the presence of a second copy of the gene, demonstrating that uvrD2 is essential. Analysis of the putative protein domain structure of UvrD2 shows a distinctive domain architecture, with an extended C terminus containing an HRDC domain normally found in SF2 family helicases and a linking domain carrying a tetracysteine motif. Truncated constructs lacking the C-terminal domains of UvrD2 were able to compensate for the loss of the chromosomal copy, showing that these C-terminal domains are not essential. Although UvrD2 is a functional helicase, a mutant form of the protein lacking helicase activity was able to permit deletion of uvrD2 at its native locus. However, a mutant protein unable to hydrolyze ATP or translocate along DNA was not able to compensate for lack of the wild-type protein. Therefore, we concluded that the essential role played by UvrD2 is unlikely to involve its DNA unwinding activity and is more likely to involve DNA translocation and, possibly, protein displacement. PMID:21725019

  8. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activation Decreases Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T.; Strand, Matthew J.; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R.; Kinney, William H.; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ordway, Diane J.; Chan, Edward D.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  9. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Feldman, Nicole E; Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T; Strand, Matthew J; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R; Kinney, William H; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Voelker, Dennis R; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  10. Serological markers of hepatitis B and C in patients with HIV/AIDS and active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Mariz, Carolline; Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa; Ximenes, Ricardo A A; Lacerda, Heloísa R; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito B; Montarroyos, Ulisses R; Barreto, Silvana; Salustiano, Daniela Medeiros; Albuquerque, Maria Fátima Pessoa Militão

    2016-06-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and C virus (HCV) are common in patients with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis (TB). This is a cross-sectional study with patients infected with HIV/AIDS and active TB in Recife, Brazil, aiming to verify the prevalence of markers for HBV: antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc); and HCV: antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) by chemiluminescence, and to identify the frequency of associated factors. Data were collected through questionnaires, and blood was drawn from patients for analysis. We used the chi-square test and the Fisher exact test when necessary. We conducted a bivariate logistic regression analysis and the magnitude of the associations was expressed as odds ratio (OR) with a confidence interval of 95%. Among 166 patients studied with HIV/AIDS and active TB, anti-HBc was positive in 61 patients [36.7%; 95%CI (29.4-44.6%)] and anti-HCV in 11[6.6%; 95%CI (3.4-11.5%)]. In the logistic regression analysis, male sex, and age ≥40 years were independent factors associated with the occurrence of anti-HBc. In conclusion, we verified a high frequency of HBV contact marker and a low frequency of HCV markers in patients with HIV/AIDS and TB in Recife. J. Med. Virol. 88:996-1002, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26580855

  11. Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Interventions Among Immigrants, Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Schepisi, Monica Sañé; Gualano, Gina; Piselli, Pierluca; Mazza, Marta; D’Angelo, Donatella; Fasciani, Francesca; Barbieri, Alberto; Rocca, Giorgia; Gnolfo, Filippo; Olivani, Piefranco; Ferrarese, Maurizio; Codecasa, Luigi Ruffo; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Girardi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    In Italy tuberculosis (TB) is largely concentrated in vulnerable groups such as migrants and in urban settings. We analyzed three TB case finding interventions conducted at primary centers and mobile clinics for regular/irregular immigrants and refugees/asylum seekers performed over a four-year period (November 2009-March 2014) at five different sites in Rome and one site in Milan, Italy. TB history and presence of symptoms suggestive of active TB were investigated by verbal screening through a structured questionnaire in migrants presenting for any medical condition to out-patient and mobile clinics. Individuals reporting TB history or symptoms were referred to a TB clinic for diagnostic workup. Among 6347 migrants enrolled, 891 (14.0%) reported TB history or symptoms suggestive of active TB and 546 (61.3%) were referred to the TB clinic. Of them, 254 (46.5%) did not present for diagnostic evaluation. TB was diagnosed in 11 individuals representing 0.17% of those screened and 3.76% of those evaluated. The overall yield of this intervention was in the range reported for other TB screening programs for migrants, although we recorded an unsatisfactory adherence to diagnostic workup. Possible advantages of this intervention include low cost and reduced burden of medical procedures for the screened population. PMID:27403270

  12. Increased mortality associated with treated active tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kabali, Conrad; Mtei, Lillian; Brooks, Daniel R; Waddell, Richard; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky; Arbeit, Robert D; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C Fordham; Horsburgh, C Robert

    2013-07-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected patients, even when successfully treated, may be associated with excess mortality. We conducted a prospective cohort study nested in a randomized TB vaccine trial to compare mortality between HIV-infected patients diagnosed and treated for TB (TB, n = 77) and HIV-infected patients within the same CD4 range, who were not diagnosed with or treated for active TB (non-TB, n = 308) in the period 2001-2008. Only twenty four subjects (6%) were on antiretroviral therapy at the beginning of this study. After accounting for covariate effects including use of antiretroviral therapy, isoniazid preventive therapy, and receipt of vaccine, we found a four-fold increase in mortality in TB patients compared with non-TB patients (adjusted Hazard Ratio 4.61; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.63, 13.05). These findings suggest that treatment for TB alone is not sufficient to avert the excess mortality associated with HIV-related TB and that prevention of TB may provide a mortality benefit. PMID:23523641

  13. Increased mortality associated with treated active tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kabali, Conrad; Mtei, Lillian; Brooks, Daniel R.; Waddell, Richard; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky; Arbeit, Robert D.; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C. Fordham; Horsburgh, C. Robert

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Active tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected patients, even when successfully treated, may be associated with excess mortality. We conducted a prospective cohort study nested in a randomized TB vaccine trial to compare mortality between HIV-infected patients diagnosed and treated for TB (TB, n=77) and HIV-infected patients within the same CD4 range, who were not diagnosed with or treated for active TB (non-TB, n=308) in the period 2001–2008. Only twenty four subjects (6%) were on antiretroviral therapy at the beginning of this study. After accounting for covariate effects including use of antiretroviral therapy, isoniazid preventive therapy, and receipt of vaccine, we found a four-fold increase in mortality in TB patients compared with non-TB patients (adjusted Hazard Ratio 4.61; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.63, 13.05). These findings suggest that treatment for TB alone is not sufficient to avert the excess mortality associated with HIV-related TB and that prevention of TB may provide a mortality benefit. PMID:23523641

  14. Potential Role of M. tuberculosis Specific IFN-γ and IL-2 ELISPOT Assays in Discriminating Children with Active or Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Elena; Della Bella, Chiara; Bonsignori, Francesca; Sollai, Sara; Amedei, Amedeo; Galli, Luisa; Niccolai, Elena; Singh, Mahavir; D'Elios, Mario M.; de Martino, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Background Although currently available IGRA have been reported to be promising markers for TB infection, they cannot distinguish active tuberculosis (TB) from latent infection (LTBI). Objective Children with LTBI, active TB disease or uninfected were prospectively evaluated by an in-house ELISPOT assay in order to investigate possible immunological markers for a differential diagnosis between LTBI and active TB. Methods Children at risk for TB infection prospectively enrolled in our infectious disease unit were evaluated by in-house IFN-γ and IL-2 based ELISPOT assays using a panel of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. Results Twenty-nine children were classified as uninfected, 21 as LTBI and 25 as active TB cases (including 5 definite and 20 probable cases). Significantly higher IFN-γ ELISPOT responses were observed in infected vs. uninfected children for ESAT-6 (p<0.0001), CFP-10 (p<0.0001), TB 10.3 (p = 0.003), and AlaDH (p = 0.001), while differences were not significant considering Ag85B (p = 0.063), PstS1 (p = 0.512), and HspX (16 kDa) (p = 0.139). IL-2 ELISPOT assay responses were different for ESAT-6 (p<0.0001), CFP-10 (p<0.0001), TB 10.3 (p<0.0001), HspX (16 kDa) (p<0.0001), PstS1 (p<0.0001) and AlaDH (p = 0.001); but not for Ag85B (p = 0.063). Comparing results between children with LTBI and those with TB disease differences were significant for IFN-γ ELISPOT only for AlaDH antigen (p = 0.021) and for IL-2 ELISPOT assay for AlaDH (p<0.0001) and TB 10.3 antigen (p = 0.043). ROC analyses demonstrated sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 81% of AlaDH-IL-2 ELISPOT assay in discriminating between latent and active TB using a cut off of 12.5 SCF per million PBMCs. Conclusion Our data suggest that IL-2 based ELISPOT with AlaDH antigen may be of help in discriminating children with active from those with latent TB. PMID:23029377

  15. A Broad Profile of Co-Dominant Epitopes Shapes the Peripheral Mycobacterium tuberculosis Specific CD8+ T-Cell Immune Response in South African Patients with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson-Robertson, Rebecca; Loxton, André G.; Walzl, Gerhard; Ehlers, Marthie M.; Kock, Marleen M.; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    We studied major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptide-presentation and nature of the antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell response from South African tuberculosis (TB) patients with active TB. 361 MHC class I binding epitopes were identified from three immunogenic TB proteins (ESAT-6 [Rv3875], Ag85B [Rv1886c], and TB10.4 [Rv0288], including amino acid variations for Rv0288, i.e., A10T, G13D, S27N, and A71S for MHC allotypes common in a South African population (e.g., human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A*30, B*58, and C*07). Inter-allelic differences were identified regarding the broadness of the peptide-binding capacity. Mapping of frequencies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells using 48 different multimers, including the newly constructed recombinant MHC class I alleles HLA-B*58:01 and C*0701, revealed a low frequency of CD8+ T-cell responses directed against a broad panel of co-dominant M. tb epitopes in the peripheral circulation of most patients. The antigen-specific responses were dominated by CD8+ T-cells with a precursor-like phenotype (CD45RA+CCR7+). The data show that the CD8+ T-cell response from patients with pulmonary TB (prior to treatment) is directed against subdominant epitopes derived from secreted and non-secreted M. tb antigens and that variant, natural occurring M. tb Rv0288 ligands, have a profound impact on T-cell recognition. PMID:23555576

  16. Feasibility, Yield, and Cost of Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Linked to a Mobile HIV Service in Cape Town, South Africa: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kranzer, Katharina; Lawn, Stephen D.; Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Vassall, Anna; Raditlhalo, Eudoxia; Govindasamy, Darshini; van Schaik, Nienke; Wood, Robin; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2012-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization is currently developing guidelines on screening for tuberculosis disease to inform national screening strategies. This process is complicated by significant gaps in knowledge regarding mass screening. This study aimed to assess feasibility, uptake, yield, treatment outcomes, and costs of adding an active tuberculosis case-finding program to an existing mobile HIV testing service. Methods and Findings The study was conducted at a mobile HIV testing service operating in deprived communities in Cape Town, South Africa. All HIV-negative individuals with symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis, and all HIV-positive individuals regardless of symptoms were eligible for participation and referred for sputum induction. Samples were examined by microscopy and culture. Active tuberculosis case finding was conducted on 181 days at 58 different sites. Of the 6,309 adults who accessed the mobile clinic, 1,385 were eligible and 1,130 (81.6%) were enrolled. The prevalence of smear-positive tuberculosis was 2.2% (95% CI 1.1–4.0), 3.3% (95% CI 1.4–6.4), and 0.4% (95% CI 1.4 015–6.4) in HIV-negative individuals, individuals newly diagnosed with HIV, and known HIV, respectively. The corresponding prevalence of culture-positive tuberculosis was 5.3% (95% CI 3.5–7.7), 7.4% (95% CI 4.5–11.5), 4.3% (95% CI 2.3–7.4), respectively. Of the 56 new tuberculosis cases detected, 42 started tuberculosis treatment and 34 (81.0%) completed treatment. The cost of the intervention was US$1,117 per tuberculosis case detected and US$2,458 per tuberculosis case cured. The generalisability of the study is limited to similar settings with comparable levels of deprivation and TB and HIV prevalence. Conclusions Mobile active tuberculosis case finding in deprived populations with a high burden of HIV and tuberculosis is feasible, has a high uptake, yield, and treatment success. Further work is now required to examine cost-effectiveness and affordability and

  17. Low-Income Parents' Warmth and Parent-Child Activities for Children with Disabilities, Suspected Delays and Biological Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.; Peterson, Carla A.; Wall, Shavaun; Carta, Judith J.; Luze, Gayle; Swanson, Mark; Jeon, Hyun-Joo

    2011-01-01

    Warm and responsive parenting is optimal for child development, but this style of parenting may be difficult for some parents to achieve. This study examines how parents' observed warmth and their reported frequency of parent-child activities were related to children's classifications as having biological risks or a range of disability indicators.…

  18. Suspected Pesticide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sellar, Christine; Ferguson, Joyce A.

    1991-01-01

    Of 1125 calls to a regional poison control center about suspected pesticide poisonings, more than half concerned children younger than 6 years, most of whom had ingested small amounts and required no treatment other than drinking fluids. Adults represented a small proportion of victims, but were more likely to have consumed moderate or large quantities, to have symptoms, and to need referral. PMID:21228985

  19. Mycobacterial Bacilli Are Metabolically Active during Chronic Tuberculosis in Murine Lungs: Insights from Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic tuberculosis represents a major health problem for one third of the world’s population today. A key question relevant to chronic tuberculosis is the physiological status of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during this important stage of infection. Previous work on chronic tuberculosis revealed t...

  20. Enzymatic Activities and DNA Substrate Specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA Helicase XPB

    PubMed Central

    Balasingham, Seetha V.; Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Homberset, Håvard; Rossi, Marie L.; Laerdahl, Jon K.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-01-01

    XPB, also known as ERCC3 and RAD25, is a 3′→5′ DNA repair helicase belonging to the superfamily 2 of helicases. XPB is an essential core subunit of the eukaryotic basal transcription factor complex TFIIH. It has two well-established functions: in the context of damaged DNA, XPB facilitates nucleotide excision repair by unwinding double stranded DNA (dsDNA) surrounding a DNA lesion; while in the context of actively transcribing genes, XPB facilitates initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription at gene promoters. Human and other eukaryotic XPB homologs are relatively well characterized compared to conserved homologs found in mycobacteria and archaea. However, more insight into the function of bacterial helicases is central to understanding the mechanism of DNA metabolism and pathogenesis in general. Here, we characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis XPB (Mtb XPB), a 3′→5′ DNA helicase with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed DNA unwinding in the presence of significant excess of enzyme. The unwinding activity was fueled by ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg2+/Mn2+. Consistent with the 3′→5′ polarity of this bacterial XPB helicase, the enzyme required a DNA substrate with a 3′ overhang of 15 nucleotides or more. Although Mtb XPB efficiently unwound DNA model substrates with a 3′ DNA tail, it was not active on substrates containing a 3′ RNA tail. We also found that Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed ATP-independent annealing of complementary DNA strands. These observations significantly enhance our understanding of the biological roles of Mtb XPB. PMID:22615856

  1. Using Commercial Activity Monitors to Measure Gait in Patients with Suspected iNPH: Implications for Ambulatory Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Gaglani, Shiv; Haynes, M Ryan; Hoffberger, Jamie B; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study seeks to validate the use of activity monitors to detect and record gait abnormalities, potentially identifying patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) prior to the onset of cognitive or urinary symptoms. Methods: This study compared the step counts of four common activity monitors (Omron Step Counter HJ-113, New Lifestyles 2000, Nike Fuelband, and Fitbit Ultra) to an observed step count in 17 patients with confirmed iNPH. Results: Of the four devices, the Fitbit Ultra (Fitbit, Inc., San Francisco, CA) provided the most accurate step count. The correlation with the observed step count was significantly higher (p<0.009) for the Fitbit Ultra than for any of the other three devices. Conclusions: These preliminary findings suggest that existing activity monitors have variable efficacy in the iNPH patient population and that the MEMS tri-axial accelerometer and algorithm of the Fitbit Ultra provides the most accurate gait measurements of the four devices tested. PMID:26719825

  2. Structure-activity relationships of 2-aminothiazoles effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Anja; Boshoff, Helena I.; Vasan, Mahalakshmi; Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Barry, Clifton E.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    A series of 2-aminothiazoles was synthesized based on a HTS scaffold from a whole-cell screen against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The SAR shows the central thiazole moiety and the 2-pyridyl moiety at C-4 of the thiazole are intolerant to modification. However, the N-2 position of the aminothiazole exhibits high flexibility and we successfully improved the antitubercular activity of the initial hit by more than 128-fold through introduction of substituted benzoyl groups at this position. N-(3-Chlorobenzoyl)-4-(2-pyridinyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-amine (55) emerged as one of the most promising analogues with a MIC of 0.024 μM or 0.008 μg/mL in 7H9 media and therapeutic index of nearly ~300. However, 55 is rapidly metabolized by human liver microsomes (t1/2 = 28 min) with metabolism occurring at the invariant aminothiazole moiety and Mtb develops spontaneous resistance with a high frequency of ~10−5. PMID:24075144

  3. Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Kelly E.; Tang, Tania; Golub, Jonathan E.; Dorman, Susan E.; Cronin, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an emerging chronic health condition of developed and developing countries. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with active, culture-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) in Maryland to determine the impact of DM on TB treatment outcomes. Of 297 TB patients, 42 (14%) had DM. Patients with diabetes had 2.0 times higher odds of death than patients without diabetes (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74–5.2, P = 0.18). Adjusting for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), age, weight, and foreign birth, the odds of death were 6.5 times higher in patients with diabetes than patients without diabetes (95% CI 1.1–38.0, P = 0.039). In pulmonary TB patients, time to sputum culture conversion was longer in patients with diabetes than patients without diabetes (median 49 versus 39 days, P = 0.09). Two-month culture conversion proportions were similar (70% and 69%). Treatment failure occurred in 4.1% of patients without diabetes and 6.7% of patients with diabetes (P = 0.51). In conclusion, DM was a risk factor for death in Maryland TB patients. There was a trend toward increased time to culture conversion; two-month culture conversion proportions, however, were similar. PMID:19346391

  4. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis Research The New Challenge for TB Research NIAID ... HIV/AIDS Multidrug-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Research Agenda (PDF) TB Research at NIAID Research ...

  5. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis (TB) Overview In developed countries, such as the ... thought to be infected with TB bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ). TB is a chronic bacterial infection. It ...

  6. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB.We conducted a nested case-control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates.From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78-0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66-0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine.In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  7. Differential gene expression of activating Fcγ receptor classifies active tuberculosis regardless of human immunodeficiency virus status or ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J S; Loxton, A G; Haks, M C; Kassa, D; Ambrose, L; Lee, J-S; Ran, L; van Baarle, D; Maertzdorf, J; Howe, R; Mayanja-Kizza, H; Boom, W H; Thiel, B A; Crampin, A C; Hanekom, W; Ota, M O C; Dockrell, H; Walzl, G; Kaufmann, S H E; Ottenhoff, T H M

    2014-04-01

    New diagnostics and vaccines for tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed, but require an understanding of the requirements for protection from/susceptibility to TB. Previous studies have used unbiased approaches to determine gene signatures in single-site populations. The present study utilized a targeted approach, reverse transcriptase multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (RT-MLPA), to validate these genes in a multisite study. We analysed ex vivo whole blood RNA from a total of 523 participants across four sub-Saharan countries (Ethiopia, Malawi, South Africa, and The Gambia) with differences in TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status. We found a number of genes that were expressed at significantly lower levels in participants with active disease than in those with latent TB infection (LTBI), with restoration following successful TB treatment. The most consistent classifier of active disease was FCGR1A (high-affinity IgG Fc receptor 1 (CD64)), which was the only marker expressed at significantly higher levels in participants with active TB than in those with LTBI before treatment regardless of HIV status or genetic background. This is the first study to identify a biomarker for TB that is not affected by HIV status or geo-genetic differences. These data provide valuable clues for understanding TB pathogenesis, and also provide a proof-of-concept for the use of RT-MLPA in rapid and inexpensive validation of unbiased gene expression findings. PMID:24205913

  8. Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti). Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous catt...

  9. Increased Risk of Active Tuberculosis following Acute Kidney Injury: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hsui; Huang, Hui-Yu; Huang, Tao-Min; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Meng-Chun; Ko, Wen-Je; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Yu, Chong-Jen; Shu, Chin-Chung; Lee, Chih-Hsin; Wang, Jann-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Profound alterations in immune responses associated with uremia and exacerbated by dialysis increase the risk of active tuberculosis (TB). Evidence of the long-term risk and outcome of active TB after acute kidney injury (AKI) is limited. Methods This population-based-cohort study used claim records retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database. We retrieved records of all hospitalized patients, more than 18 years, who underwent dialysis for acute kidney injury (AKI) during 1999–2008 and validated using the NSARF data. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model to adjust for the ongoing effect of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was conducted to predict long-term de novo active TB after discharge from index hospitalization. Results Out of 2,909 AKI dialysis patients surviving 90 days after index discharge, 686 did not require dialysis after hospital discharge. The control group included 11,636 hospital patients without AKI, dialysis, or history of TB. The relative risk of active TB in AKI dialysis patients, relative to the general population, after a mean follow-up period of 3.6 years was 7.71. Patients who did (hazard ratio [HR], 3.84; p<0.001) and did not (HR, 6.39; p<0.001) recover from AKI requiring dialysis had significantly higher incidence of TB than patients without AKI. The external validated data also showed nonrecovery subgroup (HR = 4.37; p = 0.049) had high risk of developing active TB compared with non-AKI. Additionally, active TB was associated with long-term all-cause mortality after AKI requiring dialysis (HR, 1.34; p = 0.032). Conclusions AKI requiring dialysis seems to independently increase the long-term risk of active TB, even among those who weaned from dialysis at discharge. These results raise concerns that the increasing global burden of AKI will in turn increase the incidence of active TB. PMID:23936044

  10. Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenases EthA and MymA Are Required for Activation of Replicating and Non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Grant, Sarah Schmidt; Wellington, Samantha; Kawate, Tomohiko; Desjardins, Christopher A; Silvis, Melanie R; Wivagg, Carl; Thompson, Matthew; Gordon, Katherine; Kazyanskaya, Edward; Nietupski, Raymond; Haseley, Nathan; Iwase, Noriaki; Earl, Ashlee M; Fitzgerald, Michael; Hung, Deborah T

    2016-06-23

    Successful treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection typically requires a complex regimen administered over at least 6 months. Interestingly, many of the antibiotics used to treat M. tuberculosis are prodrugs that require intracellular activation. Here, we describe three small molecules, active against both replicating and non-replicating M. tuberculosis, that require activation by Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs). Two molecules require BVMO EthA (Rv3854c) for activation and the third molecule requires the BVMO MymA (Rv3083). While EthA is known to activate the antitubercular drug ethionamide, this is the first description of MymA as an activating enzyme of a prodrug. Furthermore, we found that MymA also plays a role in activating ethionamide, with loss of MymA function resulting in ethionamide-resistant M. tuberculosis. These findings suggest overlap in function and specificity of the BVMOs in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27321573